Science.gov

Sample records for facial seborrheic dermatitis

  1. Seborrheic dermatitis: an update.

    PubMed

    Bukvić Mokos, Zrinka; Kralj, Martina; Basta-Juzbašić, Aleksandra; Lakoš Jukić, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder clinically characterized by scaling and poorly defined erythematous patches. The prevalence of adult seborrheic dermatitis is estimated at 5%. Although the exact cause of seborrheic dermatitis has yet to be understood, Malassezia yeasts, hormones (androgens), sebum levels and immune response are known to play important roles in its development. Additional factors including drugs, winter temperatures and stress may exacerbate seborrheic dermatitis. A variety of treatment modalities are available, including antifungal agents, topical low-potency steroids and calcineurin inhibitors (immunomodulators). This review summarizes current knowledge on the etiopathogenesis and therapy of adult seborrheic dermatitis.

  2. Seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Ana Luisa Sobral Bittencourt; Mameri, Angela Cristina Akel; Vargas, Thiago Jeunon de Sousa; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia; Nunes, Amanda Pedreira; Carneiro, Sueli Coelho da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing erythematous scaly skin disease, the prevalence of which is around 1 to 3% of the general population in the United States. It has two incidence peaks, the first in the first three months of life and the second beginning at puberty and reaching its apex at 40 to 60 years of age. The prevalence of seborrheic dermatitis is higher in HIV-positive individuals and the condition tends to be more intense and refractory to treatment in these patients. Neurological disorders and other chronic diseases are also associated with the onset of seborrheic dermatitis. The currently accepted theory on the pathogenesis of this disease advocates that yeast of Malassezia spp., present on the skin surface of susceptible individuals, leads to a non-immunogenic irritation due to the production of unsaturated fatty acids deposited on the skin surface. This article provides a review of the literature on seborrheic dermatitis, focusing on immunogenetics, the clinical forms of the disease and its treatment.

  3. Adult Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic-recurrent inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects adults; however, a more transient infantile form also occurs. The definitive cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown. However, proliferation of Malassezia species has been described as a contributing factor. The adult form of seborrheic dermatitis affects up to approximately five percent of the general population. The disorder commonly affects the scalp, face, and periauricular region, with the central chest, axillae, and genital region also involved in some cases. Pruritus is not always present and is relatively common, especially with scalp disease. A variety of treatments are available including topical corticosteroids, topical antifungal agents, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and more recently, a nonsteroidal “device ”cream. This article reviews the practical topical management of seborrheic dermatitis in the United States, focusing on the adult population. PMID:21607192

  4. Seborrheic dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Dandruff; Seborrheic eczema; Cradle cap ... The exact cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown. It may be due to a combination of factors: Oil gland activity Yeasts, called malassezia, which live on the ...

  5. Topical Treatment of Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Versteeg, Sarah G

    2017-04-01

    Facial seborrheic dermatitis (SD), a chronic inflammatory skin condition, can impact quality of life, and relapses can be frequent. Three broad categories of agents are used to treat SD: antifungal agents, keratolytics, and corticosteroids. Topical therapies are the first line of defense in treating this condition. Our objective was to critically review the published literature on topical treatments for facial SD. We searched PubMed, Scopus, Clinicaltrials.gov, MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane library databases for original clinical studies evaluating topical treatments for SD. We then conducted both a critical analysis of the selected studies by grading the evidence and a qualitative comparison of results among and within studies. A total of 32 studies were eligible for inclusion, encompassing 18 topical treatments for facial SD. Pimecrolimus, the focus of seven of the 32 eligible studies, was the most commonly studied topical treatment. Promiseb ® , desonide, mometasone furoate, and pimecrolimus were found to be effective topical treatments for facial SD, as they had the lowest recurrence rate, highest clearance rate, and the lowest severity scores (e.g., erythema, scaling, and pruritus), respectively. Ciclopirox olamine, ketoconazole, lithium (gluconate and succinate), and tacrolimus are also strongly recommended (level A recommendations) topical treatments for facial SD, as they are consistently effective across high-quality trials (randomized controlled trials).

  6. Malassezia species and seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Zisova, Lilia G

    2009-01-01

    Malassezia spp. are medically important dimorphic, lipophilic yeasts that form part of the normal cutaneous microflora of human. Seborrheic dermatitis is a multifactor disease that needs endogenous and exogenous predisposing factors for its development. Presence of these factors leads to reproduction of the saprophytic opportunistic pathogen Malassezia spp. and development of a disease. The inflammatory reaction against the yeast Malassezia is considered basic in the etiology of the seborrheic dermatitis. The pathogenesis and exact mechanisms via which these yeasts cause inflammation are still not fully elucidated. They are rather complex and subject of controversy in literature. Most probably Malassezia spp. cause seborrheic dermatitis by involving and combining both nonummune and immune mechanisms (nonspecific and specific). Which of these mechanisms will dominate in any single case depends on the number and virulence of the yeasts as well as on the microorganism reactivity. In the recent years a great interest have been aroused by the epidemiological investigations. Depending on the geographical place of the countries different Malassezia species in seborrheic dermatitis dominate in the different countries. In view of the etiology and pathogenesis of the seborrheic dermatitis comprehensive antifungal preparations have been recently introduced and are nowadays the basic therapeutic resource in the treatment of this disease.

  7. Ciclopirox 1% shampoo for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Nicol, Karyn A

    2006-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic superficial fungal infection of the skin, particularly affecting sites rich in sebaceous glands. Although the precise etiology of seborrheic dermatitis is uncertain, yeasts of the genus Malassezia are known to play a causative role. Ciclopirox is a broad-spectrum, hydroxypyridone-derived, synthetic antifungal agent, which also has anti-inflammatory properties. Ciclopirox is effective both in vitro and in vivo against Malassezia yeasts, making it a valuable option for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. Varying frequencies and concentrations of ciclopirox shampoo have been shown to be effective and safe in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp.

  8. Randomized, open-labeled, non-inferiority study between ciclopiroxolamine 1% cream and ketoconazole 2% foaming gel in mild to moderate facial seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Chosidow, O; Maurette, C; Dupuy, P

    2003-01-01

    Topical ketoconazole (KC) is considered a standard treatment for seborrheic dermatitis. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical study, we demonstrated that antifungal ciclopiroxolamine (CIC) 1% cream was effective in mild to moderate facial seborrheic dermatitis. We report here the results of a randomized, open-labeled clinical study comparing CIC 1% cream and KC 2% foaming gel in patients with mild to moderate facial seborrheic dermatitis, using a non-inferiority trial design. Three hundred and three patients were enrolled, 154 patients in the CIC group and 149 patients in the KC group, and comprised the study population for intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis. The per protocol (PP) population comprised a total of 282 patients, 147 in the CIC group and 135 in the KC group. Patients were randomly allocated to apply either the CIC 1% cream twice a day for 28 days maximum (initial phase), followed by once a day for another 28 days (maintenance phase); or the KC 2% foaming gel twice a week at the initial phase, followed by once a week during the maintenance phase. Test lesions were defined as lesions localized to the nasolabial folds, alae nasi, and/or the eyebrows. The main efficacy parameter (endpoint) was the proportion of patients who presented a complete disappearance of both erythema and scaling on test lesions and pruritus on all lesions at the end of the initial phase (28 days or less). At baseline, both treatment groups were comparable in terms of demographic data and lesional status. At the end of the initial phase, responders were found to be non-inferior with CIC treatment compared with KC treatment in both study populations (ITT population: 37% CIC responders and 34% KC responders; in the PP population: 39 and 36% responders, respectively). The 95% confidence interval limit for differences were -7.99-13.56 in the ITT population, and -8.06-14.5 in the PP population. At the end of the maintenance phase, treatment response to CIC was greater than to KC in

  9. Ciclopirox shampoo for treating seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Bluhm, R

    2004-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease, affecting between 1% and 3% of immunocompetent adults. While its cause is unknown, a number of predisposing factors have been reported, including the implications of Malassezia yeasts. Various treatment options are available, such as ciclopirox shampoo, which combines anti-Malassezia activity with an anti-inflammatory action. This agent has been shown to be an effective and safe treatment for seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp.

  10. Evaluation of a Topical Anti-inflammatory/Antifungal Combination Cream in Mild-to-moderate Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis: An Intra-subject Controlled Trial Examining Treated vs. Untreated Skin Utilizing Clinical Features and Erythema-directed Digital Photography.

    PubMed

    Dall'Oglio, Federica; Tedeschi, Aurora; Guardabasso, Vincenzo; Micali, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate if nonprescription topical agents may provide positive outcomes in the management of mild-to-moderate facial seborrheic dermatitis by reducing inflammation and scale production through clinical evaluation and erythema-directed digital photography. Open-label, prospective, not-blinded, intra-patient, controlled, clinical trial (target area). Twenty adult subjects affected by mild-to-moderate facial seborrheic dermatitis were enrolled and instructed to apply the study cream two times daily, initially on a selected target area only for seven days. If the subject developed visible improvement, it was advised to extend the application to all facial affected area for 21 additional days. Efficacy was evaluated by measuring the grade of erythema (by clinical examination and by erythema-directed digital photography), desquamation (by clinical examination), and pruritus (by subject-completed visual analog scale). Additionally, at the end of the protocol, a Physician Global Assessment was carried out. Eighteen subjects completed the study, whereas two subjects were lost to follow-up for nonadherence and personal reasons, respectively. Day 7 data from target areas showed a significant reduction in erythema. At the end of study, a significant improvement was recorded for erythema, desquamation, and pruritus compared to baseline. Physician Global Assessment showed improvement in 89 percent of patients, with a complete response in 56 percent of cases. These preliminary results indicate that the study cream may be a viable nonprescription therapeutic option for patients affected by facial seborrheic dermatitis able to determine early and significant improvement. This study also emphasizes the advantages of using an erythema-directed digital photography system for assisting in a simple, more accurate erythema severity grading and therapeutic monitoring in patients affected by seborrheic dermatitis.

  11. Distribution of malassezia species on the scalp in korean seborrheic dermatitis patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Won; Byun, Hee Jin; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Dong Ha; Lim, Yun Young; Lee, Jin Woong; Kim, Myeung Nam; Kim, Donghak; Chun, Young-Jin; Mun, Seog Kyun; Kim, Chan Woong; Kim, Sung Eun; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2011-05-01

    Malassezia species play an important role in the pathogenesis of seborrheic dermatitis. In particular, M. restricta and M. globosa are considered to be the predominant organisms in seborrheic dermatitis of Western countries. However, species distribution of Malassezia in seborrheic dermatitis has not been clearly determined yet in Asia. To identify the distribution of Malassezia species on the scalp of seborrheic dermatitis patients in Korea using 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP analysis. A total of 40 seborrheic dermatitis patients and 100 normal healthy volunteers were included in this study. For the identification of Malassezia species, the scalp scales of the subjects were analyzed by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP analysis. The most commonly identified Malassezia species were M. restricta in the seborrheic dermatitis patients, and M. globosa in the normal controls. In the seborrheic dermatitis group, M. restricta was identified in 47.5%, M. globosa in 27.5%, M. furfur in 7.5%, and M. sympodialis in 2.5% of patients. In the healthy control group, M. globosa was identified in 32.0%, M. restricta in 25.0%, M. furfur in 8.0%, M. obtusa in 6.0%, M. slooffiae in 6.0%, and M. sympodialis in 4.0% of subjects. M. restricta is considered to be the most important Malassezia species in Korean seborrheic dermatitis patients.

  12. Distribution of Malassezia Species on the Scalp in Korean Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang Won; Byun, Hee Jin; Kim, Dong Ha; Lim, Yun Young; Lee, Jin Woong; Kim, Myeung Nam; Kim, Donghak; Chun, Young-Jin; Mun, Seog Kyun; Kim, Chan Woong; Kim, Sung Eun; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2011-01-01

    Background Malassezia species play an important role in the pathogenesis of seborrheic dermatitis. In particular, M. restricta and M. globosa are considered to be the predominant organisms in seborrheic dermatitis of Western countries. However, species distribution of Malassezia in seborrheic dermatitis has not been clearly determined yet in Asia. Objective To identify the distribution of Malassezia species on the scalp of seborrheic dermatitis patients in Korea using 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP analysis. Methods A total of 40 seborrheic dermatitis patients and 100 normal healthy volunteers were included in this study. For the identification of Malassezia species, the scalp scales of the subjects were analyzed by 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP analysis. Results The most commonly identified Malassezia species were M. restricta in the seborrheic dermatitis patients, and M. globosa in the normal controls. In the seborrheic dermatitis group, M. restricta was identified in 47.5%, M. globosa in 27.5%, M. furfur in 7.5%, and M. sympodialis in 2.5% of patients. In the healthy control group, M. globosa was identified in 32.0%, M. restricta in 25.0%, M. furfur in 8.0%, M. obtusa in 6.0%, M. slooffiae in 6.0%, and M. sympodialis in 4.0% of subjects. Conclusion M. restricta is considered to be the most important Malassezia species in Korean seborrheic dermatitis patients. PMID:21747613

  13. Investigations of seborrheic dermatitis. Part I. The role of selected cytokines in the pathogenesis of seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Trznadel-Grodzka, Ewa; Błaszkowski, Marcin; Rotsztejn, Helena

    2012-11-14

    The etiology of seborrheic dermatitis is not fully understood. It has been observed that a number of anascogenic yeasts of Malassezia spp. is related to the intensity of the symptoms. The aim of the study is to measure the concentration of selected inflammatory factors IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and TNF-α in the serum by an immunoenzymatic method, as well as to confirm the relationship between the studied factors and the clinical condition of the patients (sex, the intensity of skin lesions according to the Scaparro scale) and, finally, to compare the results with the control group. The total number of subjects who participated in the study was 66. The control group (C) consisted of 30 volunteers (23 females and 7 males), with no clinical disorders, aged 24-65 (37.41±6.08 years). Thirty-six patients with seborrheic dermatitis (16 females and 20 males), aged 19-76 (38.61±13.77), made up the study group. The determination of IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and TNF-α was performed by ELISA using a Human High Sensitivity kit (Diaclone, France). Clinically, the intensity of the disease process was evaluated on the Scaparro et al. scale, as modified by Kaszuba. We observed statistically significantly higher levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in patients with seborrheic dermatitis compared to the control group. We conclude that seborrheic dermatitis is a dermatosis characterized by a cell type immune response with an important role of IFN-γ and IL-2.

  14. Investigations of seborrheic dermatitis. Part II. Influence of itraconazole on the clinical condition and the level of selected cytokines in seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Trznadel-Grodzka, Ewa; Błaszkowski, Marcin; Rotsztejn, Helena

    2012-11-14

    The pathogenesis of seborrheic dermatitis has not been fully elucidated. A number of anascogenic yeasts of Malassezia spp. appear to be involved in the intensity of the symptoms. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the levels of selected inflammatory cytokines, IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and TNF-α, in the serum after treatment with itraconazole. Sixty-six subjects were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 30 participants (23 females and 7 males) without any clinical disorders, aged 24-65 (37.41±6.08 years). Thirty-six patients with seborrheic dermatitis (16 females and 20 males), aged 19-76 (38.61±13.77), constituted the study group. The measurement of IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and TNF-α levels was performed by ELISA using a Human High Sensitivity kit (Diaclone, France). After six-week treatment with itraconazole administered daily at a dose of 200 mg using pulse therapy, there was remission of the disease or at least substantial clinical improvement in the patients with seborrheic dermatitis. The levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ cytokines in the study group were higher than in the control group. After the treatment the level of IFN-γ secretion in the male patients with seborrheic dermatitis significantly increased. The levels of the other studied cytokines did not significantly differ. The treatment with itraconazole had a beneficial effect on the clinical condition of the skin of the patients. IFN-γ is a cytokine whose secretion might affect the condition of the skin in seborrheic dermatitis.

  15. Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Thomas; Scheinfeld, Noah

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin condition, characterized by scaling and poorly defined erythematous patches. It may be associated with pruritus, and it primarily affects sebum-rich areas, such as the scalp, face, upper chest, and back. Although its pathogenesis is not completely understood, some postulate that the condition results from colonization of the skin of affected individuals with species of the genus Malassezia (formerly, Pityrosporum). A variety of treatment modalities are available, including eradication of the fungus, reducing or treating the inflammatory process, and decreasing sebum production. PMID:20592880

  16. Scalp Psoriasis vs. Seborrheic Dermatitis: What's the Difference?

    MedlinePlus

    ... dermatitis of the scalp? Answers from Lawrence E. Gibson, M.D. Your doctor can usually tell whether ... bring psoriasis under better control. With Lawrence E. Gibson, M.D. Sasseville D. Seborrheic dermatitis in adolescents ...

  17. High Staphylococcus epidermidis Colonization and Impaired Permeability Barrier in Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    An, Qian; Sun, Meng; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhang, Li; Zhai, Jin-Long; Hong, Yu-Xiao; Song, Bing; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background: Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a common inflammatory skin condition. The etiology is unclear, although overgrowth of Malassezia on the skin has been suggested to cause SD. This study investigated whether colonization with Staphylococcus plays a role in facial SD, which was not well addressed previously. Methods: The study was conducted from September 1, 2011 to February 20, 2012 in the First Hospital of China Medical University. In the first phase, the study evaluated the level of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and the number of colony-forming units (CFU) of Staphylococcus in defined skin areas of SD patients who were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive (HIV [+] SD [+] group, n = 13), classical SD (HIV [−] SD [+] group, n = 24) patients, HIV seropositive-non-SD (HIV [+] SD [−] group, n = 16) patients, and healthy volunteers (HIV [−] SD [−] group, n = 16). In the second phase, we enrolled another cohort of HIV (−) SD (+) patients who applied topical fusidic acid (n = 15), tacrolimus (n = 16), or moisturizer (n = 12). Changes in the Seborrheic Dermatitis Area Severity Index (SDASI), TEWL, and Staphylococcus density were evaluated 2 weeks later. Comparisons of each index were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and least significant difference method. Results: The level of TEWL was greater through lesional sites in the HIV (+) SD (+) group than that in HIV (+) SD (−) and HIV (−) SD (−) groups (95% confidence interval [CI]: 18.873–47.071, P < 0.001 and 95% CI: 28.755–55.936, P < 0.001, respectively). The number of CFU of Staphylococcus was greater in the HIV (+) SD (+) group than that in HIV (+) SD (−) and HIV (−) SD (−) groups (95% CI: 37.487–142.744, P = 0.001 and 95% CI: 54.936–156.400, P < 0.001, respectively). TEWL was significantly more improved in patients treated with tacrolimus and fusidic acid than that in those treated with moisturizers (95% CI: 7.560–38.987, P = 0.004 and 95% CI: 4.659–37

  18. A novel cosmetic antifungal/anti-inflammatory topical gel for the treatment of mild to moderate seborrheic dermatitis of the face: an open-label trial utilizing clinical evaluation and erythema-directed digital photography.

    PubMed

    Dall' Oglio, Federica; Tedeschi, Aurora; Fusto, Carmelinda M; Lacarrubba, Francesco; Dinotta, Franco; Micali, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    Topical cosmetic agents may play a role in the management of facial seborrheic dermatitis by reducing inflammation and scale production. Advanced digital photography, equipped with technology able to provide a detailed evaluation of red skin components corresponding to vascular flare (erythema-directed digital photography), is a useful tool for evaluation of erythema in patients affected by inflammatory dermatoses. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a new cosmetic topical gel containing piroctone olamine, lactoferrin, glycero-phospho-inositol, and Aloe vera for the treatment of facial seborrheic dermatitis by clinical and advanced digital photography evaluation. An open-label, prospective, clinical trial was conducted on 25 patients with mild to moderate facial seborrheic dermatitis. Subjects were instructed to apply the gel twice daily for 45 days. The clinical efficacy was evaluated by measuring at baseline, at day 15 and 45 the degree of desquamation (by clinical examination) and erythema (by digital photography technology via VISIA-CR™ system equipped with RBX™), using a 5-point severity scale, and pruritus (by subject-completed Visual Analogue Scale; scale from 0 to 100 mm). Finally, at baseline and at the end of the study, IGA (Investigator Global Assessment) was performed using a 5-point severity scale (from 0 = worsening to 4 = excellent response). At the end of treatment, a significant reduction (P<0.001) of all considered parameters was observed. Moreover, an excellent response (>80% improvement) was recorded in 47.9% of patients, with no case of worsening. No signs of local intolerance were documented. The tested cosmetic topical gel was effective in treating mild to moderate seborrheic dermatitis of the face. Erythema-directed digital photography may represent a noteworthy tool for the therapeutic monitoring of facial seborrheic dermatitis and an important adjunct aid in the dermatologic clinical practice.

  19. Seborrheic dermatitis: a clinical practice snapshot.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer A

    2011-08-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic, recurring skin disorder that has no cure.Current clinical research has implicated Malassezia yeast in the etiology. Using a clear, concise clinical picture and a thorough patient history, even the novice NP can formulate an effective treatment plan.

  20. Follicular variant of seborrheic dermatitis: is it identical to Malassezia folliculitis?

    PubMed

    Valentine, Mark C

    2011-01-01

    Follicular accentuation in some patients with seborrheic dermatitis of the back and chest has been recognized for more than a century. The recognition of Malassezia folliculitis in recent decades has led to some confusion regarding categorization of these cases. The author proposes that there is sufficient clinical variation between the typical case of Malassezia folliculitis and patients with follicular seborrheic dermatitis to justify continued separation of these entities until further study provides more clarification.

  1. Multispectral imaging based on a Smartphone with an external C-MOS camera for detection of seborrheic dermatitis on the scalp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Manjae; Kim, Sewoong; Hwang, Minjoo; Kim, Jihun; Je, Minkyu; Jang, Jae Eun; Lee, Dong Hun; Hwang, Jae Youn

    2017-02-01

    To date, the incident rates of various skin diseases have increased due to hereditary and environmental factors including stress, irregular diet, pollution, etc. Among these skin diseases, seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis are a chronic/relapsing dermatitis involving infection and temporary alopecia. However, they typically exhibit similar symptoms, thus resulting in difficulty in discrimination between them. To prevent their associated complications and appropriate treatments for them, it is crucial to discriminate between seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis with high specificity and sensitivity and further continuously/quantitatively to monitor the skin lesions during their treatment at other locations besides a hospital. Thus, we here demonstrate a mobile multispectral imaging system connected to a smartphone for selfdiagnosis of seborrheic dermatitis and further discrimination between seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis on the scalp, which is the more challenging case. Using the system developed, multispectral imaging and analysis of seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis on the scalp was carried out. It was here found that the spectral signatures of seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis were discernable and thus seborrheic dermatitis on the scalp could be distinguished from psoriasis by using the system. In particular, the smartphone-based multispectral imaging and analysis moreover offered better discrimination between seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis than the RGB imaging and analysis. These results suggested that the multispectral imaging system based on a smartphone has the potential for self-diagnosis of seborrheic dermatitis with high portability and specificity.

  2. Seborrheic Dermatitis and Dandruff: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Borda, Luis J.; Wikramanayake, Tongyu C.

    2016-01-01

    Seborrheic Dermatitis (SD) and dandruff are of a continuous spectrum of the same disease that affects the seborrheic areas of the body. Dandruff is restricted to the scalp, and involves itchy, flaking skin without visible inflammation. SD can affect the scalp as well as other seborrheic areas, and involves itchy and flaking or scaling skin, inflammation and pruritus. Various intrinsic and environmental factors, such as sebaceous secretions, skin surface fungal colonization, individual susceptibility, and interactions between these factors, all contribute to the pathogenesis of SD and dandruff. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on SD and dandruff, including epidemiology, burden of disease, clinical presentations and diagnosis, treatment, genetic studies in humans and animal models, and predisposing factors. Genetic and biochemical studies and investigations in animal models provide further insight on the pathophysiology and strategies for better treatment. PMID:27148560

  3. 21 CFR 358.750 - Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis. 358.750 Section 358.750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Dermatitis, and Psoriasis § 358.750 Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains the established...

  4. 21 CFR 358.750 - Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis. 358.750 Section 358.750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Dermatitis, and Psoriasis § 358.750 Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains the established...

  5. Seborrheic dermatitis: etiology, risk factors, and treatments: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Dessinioti, Clio; Katsambas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a common skin condition seen frequently in clinical practice. The use of varying terms such as sebopsoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, seborrheic eczema, dandruff, and pityriasis capitis reflects the complex nature of this condition. Despite its frequency, much controversy remains regarding the pathogenesis of SD. This controversy extends to its classification in the spectrum of cutaneous diseases, having being classified as a form of dermatitis, a fungal disease, or an inflammatory disease, closely related with psoriasis. Some have postulated that SD is caused by Malassezia yeasts, based on the observation of their presence in affected skin and the therapeutic response to antifungal agents. Others have proposed that Malassezia is incidental to a primary inflammatory dermatosis that resulted in increased cell turnover, scaling, and inflammation in the epidermis, similar to psoriasis. The presence of host susceptibility factors, permitting the transition of M furfur to its pathogenic form, may be associated with immune response and inflammation. Metabolites produced by Malassezia species, including oleic acid, malssezin, and indole-3-carbaldehyde, have been implicated. SD also has been traditionally considered to be a form of dermatitis based on the presence of Malassezia in healthy skin, the absence the pathogenic mycelial form of Malassezia yeasts in SD, and its chronic course. As a result, proposed treatments vary, ranging from topical corticosteroids to topical antifungals and antimicrobial peptides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cutaneous fungal microbiome: Malassezia yeasts in seborrheic dermatitis scalp in a randomized, comparative and therapeutic trial.

    PubMed

    Kamamoto, C S L; Nishikaku, A S; Gompertz, O F; Melo, A S; Hassun, K M; Bagatin, E

    2017-01-01

    Malassezia spp in skin microbiome scalp has been implicated in seborrheic dermatitis pathogenesis. Thus, treatment based in antifungal combined to topical keratolitic agents have been indicated as well as oral isotretinoin as it reduces the sebum production, glandular's size and possesses anti-inflammatory properties. This randomized, comparative and therapeutic trial aimed toper form the genotypic identification of Malassezia species before and after low-dose oral isotretinoin or topical antifungal treatments for moderate to severe seborrhea and/or seborrheic dermatitis on scalp. Scales and sebum of the scalp were seeded in the middle of modified Dixon and incubated at 32°C. For genotypic identification polymerase chain reaction primers for the ITS and D1/D2 ribossomal DNA were used and followed by samples sequencing. The procedure was conducted before and after therapeutic and randomized intervention for moderate to severe seborrhea/seborrheic dermatitis on the scalp, including oral isotretinoin, 10 mg, every other day and anti-seborrheic shampoo (piroctone olamine), over six months. The M. globosa and M. restricta were the most frequent species isolated on the scalp before and after both treatments. Other non- Malassezia species were also identified. The Malassezia spp. were maintained in the scalp after both treatments that were equally effective for the control of seborrhea/seborrheic dermatitis clinical signs.

  7. Cutaneous fungal microbiome: Malassezia yeasts in seborrheic dermatitis scalp in a randomized, comparative and therapeutic trial

    PubMed Central

    Kamamoto, C. S. L.; Nishikaku, A. S.; Gompertz, O. F.; Melo, A. S.; Hassun, K. M.; Bagatin, E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malassezia spp in skin microbiome scalp has been implicated in seborrheic dermatitis pathogenesis. Thus, treatment based in antifungal combined to topical keratolitic agents have been indicated as well as oral isotretinoin as it reduces the sebum production, glandular's size and possesses anti-inflammatory properties. This randomized, comparative and therapeutic trial aimed toper form the genotypic identification of Malassezia species before and after low-dose oral isotretinoin or topical antifungal treatments for moderate to severe seborrhea and/or seborrheic dermatitis on scalp. Scales and sebum of the scalp were seeded in the middle of modified Dixon and incubated at 32°C. For genotypic identification polymerase chain reaction primers for the ITS and D1/D2 ribossomal DNA were used and followed by samples sequencing. The procedure was conducted before and after therapeutic and randomized intervention for moderate to severe seborrhea/seborrheic dermatitis on the scalp, including oral isotretinoin, 10 mg, every other day and anti-seborrheic shampoo (piroctone olamine), over six months. The M. globosa and M. restricta were the most frequent species isolated on the scalp before and after both treatments. Other non-Malassezia species were also identified. The Malassezia spp. were maintained in the scalp after both treatments that were equally effective for the control of seborrhea/seborrheic dermatitis clinical signs. PMID:29484095

  8. Clinical study of sertaconazole 2% cream vs. hydrocortisone 1% cream in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Goldust, Mohamad; Rezaee, Elham; Masoudnia, Sima; Raghifar, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is an inflammatory skin disorder affecting the scalp, face, and trunk, however, there are controversies surrounding its treatment. The aim of the study is to compare the efficacy of sertaconazole 2% cream with hydrocortisone 1% cream in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. In total, 138 patients suffering from seborrheic dermatitis were studied. Sixty-nine patients received local sertoconazole 2% cream and they were recommended to use the cream twice a day and for 4 weeks. To create a control group, 69 patients received hydrocortisone 1% cream twice a day for four weeks. At the time of referral, and at 2 and 4 weeks after their first visit, the patients were examined by a dermatologist to check the improvement of clinical symptoms. The mean age of patients was 36.45 +/- 13.23. The highest level of satisfaction (85.1%) was observed 28 days after sertaconazole consumption: 76.9% was recorded for the hydrocortisone group. No relapse of the disease one month after stopping treatment was observed in either the sertaconazole 2% group or the hydrocortisone 1% group. Sertaconazole 2% cream may be an excellent alternative therapeutic modality for treating seborrheic dermatitis.

  9. A pilot study on seborrheic dermatitis using pramiconazole as a potent oral anti-Malassezia agent.

    PubMed

    Piérard, Gérald E; Ausma, Jannie; Henry, Frédérique; Vroome, Valérie; Wouters, Luc; Borgers, Marcel; Cauwenbergh, Geert; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine

    2007-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is considered to be a Malassezia-driven disease. Little objective information is available so far from biometrological quantitative assessments of this skin condition. Pramiconazole is a novel triazole with potent in vitro antifungal activity, especially against Malassezia spp. To study the sequential effects of pramiconazole on Malassezia, inflammation and epidermal changes. This study was performed in 2 groups of subjects suffering from seborrheic dermatitis. The first group (n = 17) remained untreated and was used as control. Clinical, mycological and biometrological assessments were performed at inclusion and during the following 2 weeks. The second group of subjects (n = 10) received a single 200-mg oral dose of pramiconazole at inclusion. Clinical, mycological and biometrological evaluations were performed before and during 1 month following the single antifungal intake. For both parts of the study, several parameters were assessed including yeast density, desquamation, erythema, itching and sebum excretion. In the control group, no significant changes were observed in any of the parameters during the observation period. The findings were markedly different in the pramiconazole-treated subjects. The yeast density was significantly improved on days 3, 7 and 28. Desquamation, erythema, itching, and the global clinical evaluation as assessed by the patients and investigators became significantly improved on days 7 and 28. A trend in decrease of scaliness was noted. No effect on sebum excretion was evidenced. In conclusion, a single 200-mg dose of pramiconazole exhibitsin vivo efficacy in controlling some important clinical aspects of seborrheic dermatitis. Following a reduction in the number of yeasts on day 3, a decrease in the severity of clinical signs and symptoms occurred from day 7 onwards. Sebum excretion appeared uninvolved in the clearing process of seborrheic dermatitis. A single 200-mg dose of pramiconazole appears to abate

  10. Seborrheic dermatitis: predisposing factors and ITS2 secondary structure for Malassezia phylogenic analysis.

    PubMed

    Amado, Yulien; Patiño-Uzcátegui, Anelvi; Cepero de García, Maria C; Tabima, Javier; Motta, Adriana; Cárdenas, Martha; Bernal, Adriana; Restrepo, Silvia; Celis, Adriana

    2013-11-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a chronic, widespread skin condition, which is considered a multifactorial disease influenced, in part, by Malassezia spp. opportunistic activities, as well as various endogenous and exogenous factors. Malassezia species are lipophilic, lipid-dependent yeasts that are members of the normal mycobiota of the human skin. Their isolation from SD lesions varies around the world and the study of the relationship among factors such as gender, age, immunosuppressive condition of the patient and SD development, can lead to a better understanding of this disease. To elucidate the association of age and gender with the development of SD and to precisely determine the Malassezia species involved in the disease, samples were obtained from 134 individuals, including individuals without lesions, human immunodeficiency virus positive patients, individuals with seborrheic dermatitis, and HIV patients with seborrheic dermatitis. Malassezia spp. were identified by phenotypic and genotypic methods and a phylogenetic analysis was performed using Bayesian inference. This study revealed that age and gender are not predisposing factors for SD development, and that the most frequent species of Malassezia related to SD development among the Colombian population is M. restricta. We also report the isolation of M. yamatoensis for the first time in Colombia, and propose an ITS2 secondary structure from Malassezia taxa that can be used for precise identification and to establish more robust phylogenetic relationships.

  11. 21 CFR 358.750 - Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of drug products for the control of... DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Drug Products for the Control of Dandruff, Seborrheic Dermatitis, and Psoriasis § 358.750 Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic...

  12. 21 CFR 358.750 - Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of drug products for the control of... DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Drug Products for the Control of Dandruff, Seborrheic Dermatitis, and Psoriasis § 358.750 Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic...

  13. 21 CFR 358.750 - Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of drug products for the control of... DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Drug Products for the Control of Dandruff, Seborrheic Dermatitis, and Psoriasis § 358.750 Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic...

  14. Evaluation of Expression of Lipases and Phospholipases of Malassezia restricta in Patients with Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang Won; Lee, Shin Yung; Lee, Younghoon

    2013-01-01

    Background Malassezia species (spp.) are cutaneous opportunistic pathogens and associated with various dermatological diseases including seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff and atopic dermatitis. Almost all Malassezia spp. are obligatorily lipid-dependent, which might be caused by lack of the myristic acid synthesis. Recent genome analysis of M. restricta and M. globosa suggested that the absence of a gene encoding fatty acid synthesis might be compensated by abundant genes encoding hydrolases, which produce fatty acids, and that lipases and phospholipases may play a role in virulence of the fungus. Objective The current study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipases and phospholipases in virulence of the M. restricta as being the most frequently isolated Malassezia spp. from the human skin. Methods Swap samples of two different body sites of at least 18 patients with seborrheic dermatitis were obtained and in vivo expression of lipases and phospholipases of M. restricta was analyzed by the gene specific two-step nested RT-PCR. Results The results of the current study suggest that majority of the patients display expression of lipase RES_0242. Conclusion These data imply a possible role of lipase in the host environment to produce free fatty acids for the fungus. PMID:24003273

  15. Evaluation of Expression of Lipases and Phospholipases of Malassezia restricta in Patients with Seborrheic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Won; Lee, Shin Yung; Lee, Younghoon; Jung, Won Hee

    2013-08-01

    Malassezia species (spp.) are cutaneous opportunistic pathogens and associated with various dermatological diseases including seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff and atopic dermatitis. Almost all Malassezia spp. are obligatorily lipid-dependent, which might be caused by lack of the myristic acid synthesis. Recent genome analysis of M. restricta and M. globosa suggested that the absence of a gene encoding fatty acid synthesis might be compensated by abundant genes encoding hydrolases, which produce fatty acids, and that lipases and phospholipases may play a role in virulence of the fungus. The current study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipases and phospholipases in virulence of the M. restricta as being the most frequently isolated Malassezia spp. from the human skin. Swap samples of two different body sites of at least 18 patients with seborrheic dermatitis were obtained and in vivo expression of lipases and phospholipases of M. restricta was analyzed by the gene specific two-step nested RT-PCR. The results of the current study suggest that majority of the patients display expression of lipase RES_0242. These data imply a possible role of lipase in the host environment to produce free fatty acids for the fungus.

  16. Identification of Malassezia species in patients with seborrheic dermatitis in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Ran, Yuping; Xie, Zhen; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2013-02-01

    The causes of seborrheic dermatitis (SD) are complex and incompletely understood. Among the factors, Malassezia yeasts have been reported to play a major etiological role in SD. Many previous studies adopted conventional culture methods that were disadvantaged to detect Malassezia microflora in SD patients, resulting in a low detection rate for each species and high variance in types of microflora observed. This study analyzed Malassezia microflora in SD patients by applying a transparent dressing to the lesional skin and using direct detection of fungal DNA using nested PCR. We collected samples from the lesional skin of 146 SD patients in China and extracted fungal DNA directly from the lesional samples without culture. Specific primers for each Malassezia species were designed to amplify existing yeasts in each sample. Some samples were randomly selected to culture and identified by morphological and physiologic criteria. M. globosa and M. restricta were found in 87.0 and 81.5% of seborrheic dermatitis patients, respectively, which together accounted for more than 50% of Malassezia spp. recovered in these Chinese patients. The majority of SD patients (82.9%) showed co-colonization of two or more Malassezia species. M. globosa and M. restricta predominated in Malassezia colonization in Chinese SD patients. Compared with conventional culture, non-culture-based methods may more accurately reflect Malassezia microflora constitution.

  17. Scalp Seborrheic Dermatitis and Dandruff Therapy Using a Herbal and Zinc Pyrithione-based Therapy of Shampoo and Scalp Lotion.

    PubMed

    Barak-Shinar, Deganit; Green, Lawrence J

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of an herbal and zinc pyrithione shampoo and a scalp lotion (Kamedis Derma-Scalp Dandruff Therapy, Kamedis Ltd., Tel Aviv, Israel) for the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff. Design: This was an interventional, open-label, safety and efficacy study. Setting: This open-label study was conducted at Consumer Product Testing Company Inc. in Fairfield, New Jersey. At the baseline visit (Day 0), an examination of the scalp was conducted by a board-certified dermatologist. The entire scalp was evaluated for evidence of seborrheic dermatitis using the Adherent Scalp Flaking Score with a 10-point scale. Only subjects with evidence of moderate-to-greater seborrheic dermatitis or moderate-to-greater dandruff were deemed qualified for inclusion in the study. Participants: Fifty subjects were recruited and included in the study. Measurements: Study subjects were evaluated by the same dermatologist for erythema and flaking at Days 0, 14, 28, and 42 using a five-point scale for each parameter. At each time point, a total severity score was calculated based on the findings of the evaluations. Following the scalp evaluation, each subject had a standardized digital photograph taken of his or her scalp. Each subject was also asked to answer a satisfaction questionnaire regarding the product treatment enhancement and characteristics. Results: A reduction in both parameters evaluated was seen at all time points. Statistical significance was achieved at each time point when compared with the baseline visit. In addition, the subjects expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the treatment. No adverse events were reported during this study. Conclusion: The study showed that the herbal zinc pyrithione shampoo and scalp lotion provided improvement in the main symptoms of seborrheic dermatitis.

  18. Scalp Seborrheic Dermatitis and Dandruff Therapy Using a Herbal and Zinc Pyrithione-based Therapy of Shampoo and Scalp Lotion

    PubMed Central

    Green, Lawrence J.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of an herbal and zinc pyrithione shampoo and a scalp lotion (Kamedis Derma-Scalp Dandruff Therapy, Kamedis Ltd., Tel Aviv, Israel) for the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff. Design: This was an interventional, open-label, safety and efficacy study. Setting: This open-label study was conducted at Consumer Product Testing Company Inc. in Fairfield, New Jersey. At the baseline visit (Day 0), an examination of the scalp was conducted by a board-certified dermatologist. The entire scalp was evaluated for evidence of seborrheic dermatitis using the Adherent Scalp Flaking Score with a 10-point scale. Only subjects with evidence of moderate-to-greater seborrheic dermatitis or moderate-to-greater dandruff were deemed qualified for inclusion in the study. Participants: Fifty subjects were recruited and included in the study. Measurements: Study subjects were evaluated by the same dermatologist for erythema and flaking at Days 0, 14, 28, and 42 using a five-point scale for each parameter. At each time point, a total severity score was calculated based on the findings of the evaluations. Following the scalp evaluation, each subject had a standardized digital photograph taken of his or her scalp. Each subject was also asked to answer a satisfaction questionnaire regarding the product treatment enhancement and characteristics. Results: A reduction in both parameters evaluated was seen at all time points. Statistical significance was achieved at each time point when compared with the baseline visit. In addition, the subjects expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the treatment. No adverse events were reported during this study. Conclusion: The study showed that the herbal zinc pyrithione shampoo and scalp lotion provided improvement in the main symptoms of seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:29410727

  19. New perspectives on dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis: lessons we learned from bacterial and fungal skin microbiota.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Luciana Campos

    2017-06-01

    The human body is inhabited by complex microbial communities, which positively impact different aspects of our health, and might also be related to the development of diseases. Progress in technologies, particularly sequencing methods and bioinformatics tools, has been crucial for the advances in this field. Microbial communities from skin can modulate immune response and protect the host against pathogens, and there are also data supporting their association with several skin conditions; including dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis. For decades, they have been thought to be related to Malassezia yeasts; however, the microbial role has not been elucidated, and their etiology remains poorly understood. This review discusses the recent findings in dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis and their relation to the skin microbiota. Data provided new perceptions to aid in the understanding of these skin disorders, broadening our view of their etiology and the possible roles of microbial communities in symptom development.

  20. Comparative analysis of the frequency, distribution and population sizes of yeasts associated with canine seborrheic dermatitis and healthy skin.

    PubMed

    Yurayart, Chompoonek; Chindamporn, Ariya; Suradhat, Sanipa; Tummaruk, Padet; Kajiwara, Susumu; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2011-03-24

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity of yeast associated with the degree of canine seborrheic dermatitis (SD) by anatomical sites. Fifty-seven samples were divided as 17 healthy skin, 20 with primary seborrheic dermatitis (PSD), and 20 with secondary seborrheic dermatitis (SSD). Yeast isolation and characterization were carried out based on microscopical features and biochemical properties. DNA analysis at the internal transcribed spacer I of 26S rDNA region was utilized for species confirmation. Four species of yeast consisting Malassezia pachydermatis, Malassezia furfur, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis recovered from examined dogs. M. pachydermatis and C. parapsilosis were isolated from all dogs, but C. tropicalis and M. furfur were recovered from 3 healthy dogs and one diseased dog, respectively. The number of M. pachydermatis and C. parapsilosis in diseased dogs was higher than that of healthy specimens (P<0.01). High frequency and population size of C. parapsilosis were closely associated to PSD, while those of M. pachydermatis were associated with both PSD and SSD (P<0.01). C. parapsilosis were predominant at the perianal area. This study demonstrated the co-colonization of M. pachydermatis and C. parapsilosis in large amounts and frequency associated with stage of disease and anatomical site. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Malassezia species in patients with seborrheic dermatitis and atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Tajima, Mami

    2005-01-01

    Malassezia species, organisms normally colonizing the skin surface, are thought to play a role as either the cause or an exacerbating factor in a number of skin conditions, including pityriasis versicolor, Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis (SD) and atopic dermatitis (AD). Using a non-cultural PCR method, we analyzed Malassezia spp. extracted from the skin surface of SD and AD patients. The species most commonly detected in both patient groups were M. globosa and M. restricta, and the number of Malassezia spp. In these patients was higher than in healthy subjects. After a topical application of 2% ketoconazole cream, changes in the population of Malassezia spp. in 20 intractable cases of AD were recorded. The addition of the 2% ketoconazole cream to the standard topical treatments was found to have reduced the Malassezia spp. population by 90%, and showed a clinical efficacy rate of 70%. Furthermore, a combination of azole agents and tacrolimus produced a synergistic anti-fungal effect against Malassezia spp. in vitro. A clinical trial using this drug combination conducted on the face and neck of patients with intractable AD showed a 66.6% efficacy rate in both the reduction of the flora and in clinical improvement. From these results it was evident that Malassezia is one of the factors exacerbating AD, and that removal of the organism results in an improvement in the clinical condition of the patient.

  2. Double blind clinical trial in a series of 115 patients with seborrheic dermatitis: prevention of relapses using a topical modulator of Toll like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, M A; Baroni, A; Brambilla, L; Cannavò, S P; Cristaudo, A; Vedove, C Dalle; Frasca, M; Girolomoni, G; Gnecchi, L; Peris, K; Trifirò, C; Matta, A M; Robert, G

    2011-06-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory disease aggravated by Malassezia species. Toll-like receptors (TLR) are part of innate immune system that can be activated by yeasts. Previous studies showed that an association of Umbelliferae extract with a lipid (TLR2-Regul™) decreases the IL-8 expression in human skin in contact with M. furfur. The aim of this study was to assess the activity of a topical formulated with TLR2-Regul™ in the prevention of seborrheic dermatitis (SD) relapses. Immune-competent SD adult patients were treated for SD (topical imidazoles or steroids). Cleared patients were randomized and received a topical containing TLR2-Regul™ (A) or its vehicle (B). Erythema, scales and pruritus were assessed during two months. The study included 115 patients, mean age 43.4, sex ratio m/f 1.5. At week 4 the relapse rate was 26% (N.=15) in group A and 43% (N.=25) in group B. At W8 the relapse rate was 21% (N.=12) in group A and 40% (N.=23) (P=0.0309). In this series of 115 adults with seborrheic dermatitis, patients treated with a topical containing TLR-Regul™ showed a significantly less relapse rate compared with the excipient group (P<0.05). TLR modulation could represent a new therapeutic approach in the prevention of seborrheic dermatitis relapses.

  3. Malassezia furfur in infantile seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Wananukul, Siriwan; Chindamporn, Ariya; Yumyourn, Poomjit; Payungporn, Sunchai; Samathi, Chanchuree; Poovorawan, Yong

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to study both incidence and various strains of Malassezia in infantile seborrheic dermatitis (ISD). Sixty infants between 2 weeks and 2 years old with clinical diagnosis of ISD at the Department of Pediatrics, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital from May 2002 to April 2003 were recruited. Malassezia spp. were isolated from cultured skin samples of the patients, genomic DNA was extracted and the ITS1 rDNA region was amplified. The PCR product was examined by agarose gel electrophoresis and DNA sequences were determined. The ITS1 sequences were also subjected to phylogenetic analysis and species identification. ISD is most commonly found in infants below the age of 2 months (64%), followed by those between 2 and 4 months (28%) old. Cultures yielded yeast-like colonies in 15 specimens. PCR yielded 200-bp products (Candida) in 3 patients and 300-bp products (Malassezia furfur) in 12 patients (18%). Sugar fermentation using API 20C aux performed on the three 200-bp PCR products yielded Candida species. M. furfur was the only Malassezia recovered from skin scrapings of children with ISD.

  4. Three etiologic facets of dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis: Malassezia fungi, sebaceous lipids, and individual sensitivity.

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, Yvonne M; Gemmer, Christina M; Kaczvinsky, Joseph R; Kenneally, Dianna C; Schwartz, James R; Dawson, Thomas L

    2005-12-01

    Application of new molecular and biochemical tools has greatly increased our understanding of the organisms, mechanisms, and treatments of dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis. Dandruff results from at least three etiologic factors: Malassezia fungi, sebaceous secretions, and individual sensitivity. While Malassezia (formerly P. ovale) has long been a suspected cause, implicated by its presence on skin and lipophylic nature, lack of correlation between Malassezia number and the presence and severity of dandruff has remained perplexing. We have previously identified the Malassezia species correlating to dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis. In this report, we show that dandruff is mediated by Malassezia metabolites, specifically irritating free fatty acids released from sebaceous triglycerides. Investigation of the toxic Malassezia free fatty acid metabolites (represented by oleic acid) reveals the component of individual susceptibility. Malassezia metabolism results in increased levels of scalp free fatty acids. Of the three etiologic factors implicated in dandruff, Malassezia, sebaceous triglycerides, and individual susceptibility, Malassezia are the easiest to control. Pyrithione zinc kills Malassezia and all other fungi, and is highly effective against the Malassezia species actually found on scalp. Reduction in fungi reduces free fatty acids, thereby reducing scalp flaking and itch.

  5. Seborrheic dermatitis due to Malassezia species in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Zarei-Mahmoudabadi, Ali; Zarrin, Majid; Mehdinezhad, Forough

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a frequent disorder of the skin that is distinguished by the development of erythematous patches and yellow-gray scales. It is a multifactor disease that requires predisposing factors for its progress. Presence of these factors leads to reproduction of opportunistic yeast Malassezia spp. The aim of the present study was to isolate and identify distribution of Malassezia species on the scalp of SD patients in Ahvaz using modified Dixons agar. Materials and Methods A total of 110 patients diagnosed with SD were sampled. The sampling was carried out by brushing the hair and collecting the dandruff in paper pockets. For identification of Malassezia species, the scalp scales were cultured in Dixons agar. A combination of different characteristics including yeast cell morphology, ability to grow on Sabouraud dextrose agar, catalase test and ability to utilize individual Tweens (20, 40, 60 & 80) were used for identification of species. Results Twenty-seven of 110 (24.5%) SD patients had positive cultures for Malassezia species of which 17 (63%) were male and 10 (37%) were female. The most commonly identified Malassezia species was M. globosa (40.7%) followed by M. pachydermatis (22.2%), M. furfur (11.1%) and M. restricta(7.4%) and Malassezia species (18.5%). Conclusion Malassezia globosa was considered to be the most important orgaism involved in cases with Seborrheic dermatitisin this study. PMID:24475335

  6. Seborrheic dermatitis due to Malassezia species in Ahvaz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Zarei-Mahmoudabadi, Ali; Zarrin, Majid; Mehdinezhad, Forough

    2013-09-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a frequent disorder of the skin that is distinguished by the development of erythematous patches and yellow-gray scales. It is a multifactor disease that requires predisposing factors for its progress. Presence of these factors leads to reproduction of opportunistic yeast Malassezia spp. The aim of the present study was to isolate and identify distribution of Malassezia species on the scalp of SD patients in Ahvaz using modified Dixons agar. A total of 110 patients diagnosed with SD were sampled. The sampling was carried out by brushing the hair and collecting the dandruff in paper pockets. For identification of Malassezia species, the scalp scales were cultured in Dixons agar. A combination of different characteristics including yeast cell morphology, ability to grow on Sabouraud dextrose agar, catalase test and ability to utilize individual Tweens (20, 40, 60 & 80) were used for identification of species. Twenty-seven of 110 (24.5%) SD patients had positive cultures for Malassezia species of which 17 (63%) were male and 10 (37%) were female. The most commonly identified Malassezia species was M. globosa (40.7%) followed by M. pachydermatis (22.2%), M. furfur (11.1%) and M. restricta(7.4%) and Malassezia species (18.5%). Malassezia globosa was considered to be the most important orgaism involved in cases with Seborrheic dermatitisin this study.

  7. Clinical efficacy of a new ciclopiroxolamine/zinc pyrithione shampoo in scalp seborrheic dermatitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Lorette, Gérard; Ermosilla, Valérie

    2006-01-01

    Ciclopiroxolamine (CPO) and Zinc Pirythione (ZP) antifungals are efficient at treating scalp seborrheic dermatitis. This multicentre, single-blind, clinical study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a shampoo containing the 1.5% CPO/1% ZP association compared to the vehicle shampoo and to 2% ketoconazole foaming gel in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. In 189 patients randomised to apply 1 of the 3 products twice a week for 28 days, the global lesional score, erythema, pruritus, global efficacy, quality of life (SF12 and DLQI questionnaires) and tolerance were measured at 0, 7, 14 and 28 days. The 3 products reduced lesional score, erythema and pruritus from day 7 (p < 0.0001). The 2 antifungal treatments were significantly more efficient than the vehicle in reducing lesional score, erythema and pruritus at day 14 (p < 0.0001). At day 7, the CPO/ZP shampoo was more efficient in reducing pruritus than ketoconazole gel and vehicle (p = 0.032 and p < 0.001, respectively). The global efficacy of the 2 antifungal treatments assessed at day 28 by both investigator and patient was significantly better than that of the vehicle. Only the CPO/ZP shampoo improved all DLQI questionnaire dimensions. The CPO/ZP shampoo was as rapid and efficient as ketoconazole gel in SD treatment.

  8. Clinical Evaluation of a New-Formula Shampoo for Scalp Seborrheic Dermatitis Containing Extract of Rosa centifolia Petals and Epigallocatechin Gallate: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Shin, Hong-Ju; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong; Lee, Yang Won

    2014-12-01

    Scalp seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic type of inflammatory dermatosis that is associated with sebum secretion and proliferation of Malassezia species. Ketoconazole or zinc-pyrithione shampoos are common treatments for scalp seborrheic dermatitis. However, shampoos comprising different compounds are required to provide patients with a wider range of treatment options. This study was designed to evaluate a new-formula shampoo that contains natural ingredients-including extract of Rosa centifolia petals and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)-that exert antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and sebum secretion inhibitory effects, and antifungal agents for the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis. Seventy-five patients were randomized into three treatment groups; new-formula shampoo, 2% ketoconazole shampoo, and 1% zinc- pyrithione shampoo. The clinical severity scores and sebum levels were assessed by the same dermatologists at baseline (week 0), and at 2 and 4 weeks after using the shampoo. User satisfaction and irritation were also assessed with the aid of a questionnaire. The efficacy of the new-formula shampoo was comparable to that of both the 1% zinc-pyrithione shampoo and the 2% ketoconazole shampoo. Furthermore, it was found to provide a more rapid response than the 1% zinc-pyrithione shampoo for mild erythema lesions and was associated with greater user satisfaction compared with the 2% ketoconazole shampoo. However, the new-formula shampoo did not exhibit the previously reported sebum inhibitory effect. Extract of R. centifolia petals or EGCG could be useful ingredients in the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis.

  9. Clinical Evaluation of a New-Formula Shampoo for Scalp Seborrheic Dermatitis Containing Extract of Rosa centifolia Petals and Epigallocatechin Gallate: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Shin, Hong-Ju; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2014-01-01

    Background Scalp seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic type of inflammatory dermatosis that is associated with sebum secretion and proliferation of Malassezia species. Ketoconazole or zinc-pyrithione shampoos are common treatments for scalp seborrheic dermatitis. However, shampoos comprising different compounds are required to provide patients with a wider range of treatment options. Objective This study was designed to evaluate a new-formula shampoo that contains natural ingredients-including extract of Rosa centifolia petals and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)-that exert antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and sebum secretion inhibitory effects, and antifungal agents for the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis. Methods Seventy-five patients were randomized into three treatment groups; new-formula shampoo, 2% ketoconazole shampoo, and 1% zinc- pyrithione shampoo. The clinical severity scores and sebum levels were assessed by the same dermatologists at baseline (week 0), and at 2 and 4 weeks after using the shampoo. User satisfaction and irritation were also assessed with the aid of a questionnaire. Results The efficacy of the new-formula shampoo was comparable to that of both the 1% zinc-pyrithione shampoo and the 2% ketoconazole shampoo. Furthermore, it was found to provide a more rapid response than the 1% zinc-pyrithione shampoo for mild erythema lesions and was associated with greater user satisfaction compared with the 2% ketoconazole shampoo. However, the new-formula shampoo did not exhibit the previously reported sebum inhibitory effect. Conclusion Extract of R. centifolia petals or EGCG could be useful ingredients in the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:25473226

  10. Risk factors and common contact allergens in facial allergic contact dermatitis patients.

    PubMed

    Kasemsarn, Pranee; Iamphonrat, Thanawan; Boonchai, Waranya

    2016-04-01

    Facial dermatitis is commonly encountered in dermatologic practice. It is sometimes difficult to manage because its causative factors may be multiple and difficult to diagnose. This study was designed to identify the characteristics, patch test results, and final diagnoses of facial dermatitis patients who were referred to a contact dermatitis clinic and to identify factors associated with facial allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). We retrospectively reviewed case records of facial dermatitis patients who underwent patch testing at the clinic during the period from July 2006 to June 2011. Of the 891 patients patch-tested, 244 (27.4%) had facial dermatitis. Female patients were 9.1 times more predominant than male patients. The mean ± standard deviation age of patients was 37.3 ± 14.8 years. A total of 199 (81.6%) patients demonstrated at least one positive reaction to a patch test, 66.7% of which were clinically relevant. Allergic contact dermatitis was diagnosed in 45.5% of patients. Independent factors predisposing towards facial dermatitis were female sex, having a previous history of cosmetic allergy, a positive patch test reaction to hairdressing product-related allergens, and a positive allergic reaction to preservative allergens. The prevalence of facial dermatitis was 27.4%. Almost half of all patients with facial dermatitis demonstrated ACD. Factors associated with facial ACD were female gender, a history of cosmetic allergy, and positive patch test reactions to hairdressing product-related allergens and preservatives. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  11. Treatment of Malassezia species associated seborrheic blepharitis with fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Zisova, Lilia G

    2009-01-01

    The AIM of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of fluconazole (FungoIon) in patients with seborrheic blepharitis. Four seborrheic blepharitis patients with Malassezia spp. positive cultures on Dixon's agar were treated with fluconazole (Fungolon) (0.200) weekly for 4 weeks. The therapeutic effect of the treatment was positive in all patients--the clinical symptoms withdrew and cultures became mycologically negative. The results indicate that antifungal agents are efficient in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

  12. Herbal liposome for the topical delivery of ketoconazole for the effective treatment of seborrheic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Vivek; Sharma, Swati; Yadav, Renu Bala; Agarwal, Udita

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop liposomal gel containing ketoconazole and neem extract for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis in an effectual means. Azoles derivatives that are commonly used to prevent superficial fungal infections include triazole category like itraconazole. These drugs are available in the form of oral dosage that required a long period of time for treatment. Ketoconazole is available in the form of gel but is not used with any herbal extract. Neem ( Azadirachta indica) leaves show a good anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activity and have great potential as a bioactive compound. The thin film hydration method was used to design an herbal liposomal preparation. The formulation was further subjected to their characterization as particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, % cumulative drug release, and anti-fungal activity and it was also characterized by the mean of their physicochemical properties such as FTIR, SEM, DSC, TGA, and AFM. The results show that the formulation of liposomes with neem extract F12 were found to be optimum on the basis of entrapment efficiency in the range 88.9 ± 0.7%, with a desired mean particle size distribution of 141.6 nm and zeta potential - 45 mV. The anti-fungal activity of liposomal formulation F12 was carried out against Aspergillus niger and Candida tropicalis by measuring the inhibition zone 8.9 and 10.2 mm, respectively. Stability of optimized formulation was best seen at refrigerated condition. Overall, these results indicated that developed liposomal gel of ketoconazole with neem extract could have great potential for seborrheic dermatitis and showed synergetic effect for the treatment.

  13. Scalp seborrheic dermatitis: prevalence and associated factors in male adolescents.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Juliano de Avelar; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Duquia, Rodrigo Pereira; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Staub, Henrique Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of seborrheic dermatitis (SD) in the general population is variable in the literature. Factors associated with SD are not well understood. To verify the prevalence of scalp SD in a selected survey of male adolescents on mandatory military service and to find possible associated factors (skin color, socioeconomic level, triceps skin fold, acne, and tobacco consumption). This cross-sectional study included 18-year-old male adolescents on compulsory military service in a southern Brazilian city. Scalp SD was considered as erythema and scaling in any part of the scalp. Skin color, socioeconomic level, triceps skin fold, acne, and tabagism comprised the independent variables studied in our population. A total of 2201 adolescents entered the study. The global prevalence of scalp SD was 11%. White skin [adjusted prevalence ratio (PR) 1.42; 95% CI 1.06-1.92; P = 0.02] and triceps skin fold >19.5 mm (adjusted PR 1.56; 95% CI 1.12-2.18; P = 0.009) were significantly associated with scalp SD. The other variables were not associated with the outcome. Prevalence of scalp SD in our survey of male adolescents was 11%. The occurrence of scalp SD was associated with white skin and a higher body fat content. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  14. A new yeast, Malassezia yamatoensis, isolated from a patient with seborrheic dermatitis, and its distribution in patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Takashi; Tajima, Mami; Takashima, Masako; Amaya, Misato; Saito, Masuyoshi; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Nishikawa, Akemi

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years, new Malassezia species have been found regularly in Japanese subjects. We isolated another new Malassezia species from a Japanese patient with seborrheic dermatitis (SD), and named it M. yamatoensis. In its physiological characteristics and the utilization of Tween by M. yamatoensis is similar to that of M. furfur and M. dermatis. It is distinguished by its growth temperature. To examine the distribution of the microorganism in the skin of patients with SD and atopic dermatitis (AD), and healthy subjects, we applied transparent dressings to the skin, and detected M. yamatoensis DNA using a non-culture-based method that consisted of nested PCR with specific primers. M. yamatoensis DNA was detected from 3 of 31 SD patients (9.7%), 5 of 36 AD patients (13.9%), and 1 of 22 healthy subjects (4.6%). Therefore, M. yamatoensis is a rare member of the cutaneous microflora.

  15. A comprehensive pathophysiology of dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis - towards a more precise definition of scalp health.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, James R; Messenger, Andrew G; Tosti, Antonella; Todd, Gail; Hordinsky, Maria; Hay, Roderick J; Wang, Xuemin; Zachariae, Claus; Kerr, Kathy M; Henry, James P; Rust, Rene C; Robinson, Michael K

    2013-03-27

    Despite an increasing knowledge of dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis (D/SD), the pathophysiological understanding is still incomplete but suggests a role of Malassezia yeasts in triggering inflammatory and hyper-proliferative epidermal responses. The objective of this report is to review published literature from in vivo studies of D/SD populations to provide a more complete description of overall scalp health. New biomolecular capabilities establish a depth of pathophysiological understanding not previously achievable with traditional means of investigation. Biomarkers representing inflammation, hyper-proliferation and barrier function are all perturbed by the D/SD condition and robustly respond to therapeutic resolution. These biomarkers can be sampled noninvasively, enabling their use in routine clinical evaluations as either surrogate endpoints or complementary ones to classical signs/symptoms to broaden the etiological learning.

  16. Seborrheic dermatitis flare in a Dutch male due to commensal Malassezia furfur overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yuping; He, Xiaodan; Zhang, Hao; Dai, Yaling; Li, Lina; Bulmer, G S

    2008-09-01

    This is a case of seborrheic dermatitis (SD) barbae from which Malassezia furfur (M. furfur) was isolated. The patient was a 57-year-old Dutch male, who was hospitalized for fever and weakness of extremities. He presented with symmetrical erythema with an abundance of greasy chaffy scales on his beard area. No reasons were detected for his fever following a routine search. M. furfur was identified through mycological examination, including direct microscopic examination, culture, Tween test, esculine splitting test and DNA sequencing, of samples from the skin lesions. The patient was treated with oral itraconazole capsules (200 mg, b.i.d. for 8 days, then 200 mg o.d. for 13 days), washing his scalp and face with 2% ketoconazole shampoo (once a day) and topical application of a cream containing 1% naftifine hydrochloride and 0.25% ketoconazole (b.i.d.). After treatment the fever subsided and the SD lesion gradually healed. M. furfur was not isolated again from skin scrapings and 7 days later therapy was terminated and no recurrence was noted after one week follow-up since the cessation of treatment.

  17. Dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products containing coal tar and menthol for over-the-counter human use; amendment to the monograph. Final rule

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    2006-03-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule amending the final monograph (FM) for over-the-counter (OTC) dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products to include the combination of 1.8 percent coal tar solution and 1.5 percent menthol in a shampoo drug product to control dandruff. FDA did not receive any comments or data in response to its previously proposed rule to include this combination. This final rule is part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products.

  18. Identification of Malassezia species from immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients with seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Prohic, A; Kasumagic-Halilovic, E

    2010-12-01

    Differences in prevalence, clinical and histological manifestations between seborrheic dermatitis (SD) in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients suggest that these two populations might also differ in a spectrum of isolated Malassezia species. The purpose of our study was to analyse the prevalence of Malassezia species in immunocompromised and non-immunocompromised patients with SD and to examine if the range of isolated yeasts varies between these two study groups. Specimens were taken from 50 patients with SD: 30 without any underlying disease and 20 with confirmed immunosuppression. The samples were obtained by scraping the skin surface of the scalp and trunk lesions of all subjects and then incubated on modified Dixon agar. The yeasts isolated were identified by their morphological and physiological properties according to Guillot et al method. In both groups, the most commonly isolated species from the scalp lesions were Malassenzia restricta and Malassenzia globosa, the later being the most common species isolated from lesional trunk skin. No significant differences were found between immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients from both sampled sites. There is no difference in the distribution of Malassezia species isolated from SD lesions between immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. However, the much higher percentage of positive cultures in immunocompromised patients confirms that impaired cellular immunity may facilitate fungal survival on the skin.

  19. Malassezia species retrieved from skin with pityriasis versicolor, seborrheic dermatitis and skin free of lesions: a comparison of two sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, A F; Lisboa, C; Faria-Ramos, I; Silva, R M; Miranda, I M; Rodrigues, A G

    2018-03-05

    Malassezia are involved in the pathogenesis of different skin diseases including pityriasis versicolor (PV) and seborrheic dermatitis (SD), but these yeasts are also important inhabitants of the skin microbiome. Culture is not performed routinely, although it may be of value in doubtful cases to support the diagnosis; culture is crucial for identification tools such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Culture is also critical to assess the number of organisms and viability and, eventually, to perform antifungal susceptibility tests. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. [Facial allergic contact dermatitis. Data from the IVDK and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Schnuch, A; Szliska, C; Uter, W

    2009-01-01

    The face is exposed to many foreign substances and may thus be a site of allergic contact dermatitis. Our aim is to elucidate the spectrum of factors associated with facial dermatitis by analyzing data of patients patch tested in the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) between 1995 and 2007. In 18,572 patients the main anatomical site of dermatitis was the face. Among these, the proportion of females and of patients with past or present atopic eczema was increased, while probable occupational causation was less common than in the overall group. Cosmetic allergens, as well as nickel, were significantly more common in women than men, including fragrance mix (10.8% vs. 8.3%), p-phenylenediamine (4.0% vs. 2.8%), lanolin alcohols (3.0% vs. 2.2%), Lyral(TM) (3.1% vs. 2.0%) and bufexamac (1.8% vs. 1.1%). In comparison, only epoxy resin contact allergy was diagnosed significantly more often in men than women: In patients with airborne contact dermatitis, over-represented allergens included sesquiterpene lactone mix, compositae mix, epoxy resin, (chloro-) methylisothiazolinone and oil of turpentine. In the clinical approach to patients with facial dermatitis, occupational airborne causation should be considered in addition to non-occupational (e.g., cosmetic) allergen exposure.

  1. Randomized study comparing the efficacy and tolerance of a lipohydroxy acid shampoo to a ciclopiroxolamine shampoo in the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Seite, Sophie; Rougier, André; Talarico, Sergio

    2009-12-01

    The success of a dandruff treatment depends not only on the ability of a shampoo to control dandruff, but also on patient compliance, which is closely linked to the cosmetic attributes of the product. The aim of this study was to compare efficacy, tolerance, and cosmetic properties of a LHA Shampoo [containing 0.1% lipohydroxy acid (LHA) and 1.3% salicylic acid] to a CPO shampoo [containing 1.5% ciclopiroxolamine (CPO), 3% salicylic acid, and 0.5% menthol] in subjects with seborrheic dermatitis (SD) of the scalp. One hundred subjects with mild to moderate scalp SD were randomized to receive either the LHA shampoo or the CPO shampoo every 2 days for 4 weeks. Efficacy and tolerance were evaluated at days 0, 14, and 28. The LHA and the CPO shampoo both decreased symptoms of scale, erythema, itching, cutaneous discomfort, and dryness from baseline to day 28. A higher percentage of patients showed improvement in the group treated with the LHA formulation than in the group treated with the CPO formulation, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. At day 28, the tolerance and the global efficacy of the LHA shampoo were significantly better (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01, respectively) than those of the CPO shampoo. Furthermore, the cosmetic acceptability was better or significantly better for all the endpoints evaluated for the LHA shampoo (P = 0.02 for cleaning, P = 0.04 for lathering). In conclusion, these results demonstrated that the lipohydroxy acid shampoo evaluated in this study is a more convenient, efficient, safe, and well-tolerated cosmetic treatment for mild-to-moderate seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp than a ciclopiroxolamine shampoo.

  2. Contact allergy to rubber accelerators remains prevalent: retrospective results from a tertiary clinic suggesting an association with facial dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Schwensen, J F; Menné, T; Johansen, J D; Thyssen, J P

    2016-10-01

    Chemicals used for the manufacturing of rubber are known causes of allergic contact dermatitis on the hands. Recent European studies have suggested a decrease in thiuram contact allergy. Moreover, while an association with hand dermatitis is well established, we have recently observed several clinical cases with allergic facial dermatitis to rubber. To evaluate temporal trends of contact allergy to rubber accelerators from the European baseline series in a tertiary patch test clinic in Denmark, and examine associations with anatomical locations of dermatitis. Patch test and clinical data collected in a Danish tertiary dermatology clinic in Gentofte, Herlev, Copenhagen between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2014 were analysed. The following rubber accelerators or mixtures in petrolatum from the European baseline patch test series were included: thiuram mix 1.0%, mercaptobenzothiazole 2.0% and mercapto mix 1.0%. The overall prevalence of contact allergy to rubber accelerators was 3.1% with no significant change during the study period (P trend = 0.667). Contact allergy to thiuram mix was the most prevalent and was significantly associated with occupational contact dermatitis, hand dermatitis, age >40 years and facial dermatitis in adjusted binary logistic regression analysis. Current clinical relevance of contact allergy to thiuram mix was 59.3%. Patients with contact allergy to mercapto mix and mercaptobenzothiazole had a concomitant reaction to thiuram mix in 35.2% (19/54) and 35.4% (17/48) of the cases respectively. Contact allergy to rubber accelerators remains prevalent. Clinicians should be aware of the hitherto unexplored clinical association with facial dermatitis. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  3. Utilization of matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for identification of infantile seborrheic dermatitis-causing Malassezia and incidence of culture-based cutaneous Malassezia microbiota of 1-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mikachi; Umeda, Yoshiko; Yo, Ayaka; Yamaura, Mariko; Makimura, Koichi

    2014-02-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has been utilized for identification of various microorganisms. Malassezia species, including Malassezia restricta, which is associated with seborrheic dermatitis, has been difficult to identify by traditional means. This study was performed to develop a system for identification of Malassezia species with MALDI-TOF-MS and to investigate the incidence and variety of cutaneous Malassezia microbiota of 1-month-old infants using this technique. A Malassezia species-specific MALDI-TOF-MS database was developed from eight standard strains, and the availability of this system was assessed using 54 clinical strains isolated from the skin of 1-month-old infants. Clinical isolates were cultured initially on CHROMagar Malassezia growth medium, and the 28S ribosomal DNA (D1/D2) sequence was analyzed for confirmatory identification. Using this database, we detected and analyzed Malassezia species in 68% and 44% of infants with and without infantile seborrheic dermatitis, respectively. The results of MALDI-TOF-MS analysis were consistent with those of rDNA sequencing identification (100% accuracy rate). To our knowledge, this is the first report of a MALDI-TOF-MS database for major skin pathogenic Malassezia species. This system is an easy, rapid and reliable method for identification of Malassezia. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  4. Malassezia arunalokei sp. nov., a Novel Yeast Species Isolated from Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients and Healthy Individuals from India

    PubMed Central

    Honnavar, Prasanna; Prasad, Gandham S.; Ghosh, Anup; Dogra, Sunil; Handa, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    The majority of species within the genus Malassezia are lipophilic yeasts that colonize the skin of warm-blooded animals. Two species, Malassezia globosa and Malassezia restricta, are implicated in the causation of seborrheic dermatitis/dandruff (SD/D). During our survey of SD/D cases, we isolated several species of Malassezia and noticed vast variations within a few lipid-dependent species. Variations observed in the phenotypic characteristics (colony morphology, absence of catalase activity, growth at 37°C, and precipitation surrounding wells containing Tween 20 or Cremophor EL) suggested the possible presence of a novel species. Sequence divergence observed in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, the D1/D2 domain, and the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA and the TEF1 gene, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the ITS2 region, and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis support the existence of a novel species. Based on phenotypic and molecular characterization of these strains, we propose a new species, namely, M. arunalokei sp. nov., and we designate NCCPF 127130 (= MTCC 12054 = CBS 13387) as the type strain. PMID:27147721

  5. Malassezia arunalokei sp. nov., a Novel Yeast Species Isolated from Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients and Healthy Individuals from India.

    PubMed

    Honnavar, Prasanna; Prasad, Gandham S; Ghosh, Anup; Dogra, Sunil; Handa, Sanjeev; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M

    2016-07-01

    The majority of species within the genus Malassezia are lipophilic yeasts that colonize the skin of warm-blooded animals. Two species, Malassezia globosa and Malassezia restricta, are implicated in the causation of seborrheic dermatitis/dandruff (SD/D). During our survey of SD/D cases, we isolated several species of Malassezia and noticed vast variations within a few lipid-dependent species. Variations observed in the phenotypic characteristics (colony morphology, absence of catalase activity, growth at 37°C, and precipitation surrounding wells containing Tween 20 or Cremophor EL) suggested the possible presence of a novel species. Sequence divergence observed in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, the D1/D2 domain, and the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA and the TEF1 gene, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the ITS2 region, and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis support the existence of a novel species. Based on phenotypic and molecular characterization of these strains, we propose a new species, namely, M. arunalokei sp. nov., and we designate NCCPF 127130 (= MTCC 12054 = CBS 13387) as the type strain. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. [Prevalence of Malassezia species associated with seborrheic dermatitis lesions in patients in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Sosa, María de los Angeles; Rojas, Florencia; Mangiaterra, Magdalena; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is considered the second most frequently dermatosis associated with the genus Malassezia but little is the knowledge about the epidemiology of this association. To determinate the prevalence of Malassezia species associated with SD and to analyse their distribution according to the location of the lesion on the body. This study was performed in Resistencia city, located in a subtropical area in northeast Argentina. In this study, 226 skin samples from patients with lesions compatible with SD were studied. Age, gender and body sites lesion were recorded. Strains were identified by PCR-RFLP. One hundred and thirty-one positive cultures were obtained. Association of 2 species was detected in 10 cases; therefore, 141 strains were isolated. Malasezzia globosa (43.3%) was the most frequent species isolated, followed by Malasezzia furfur (20.6%), Malasezzia sympodialis (17%) and Malasezzia restricta (16.3%). Three isolates of Malasezzia slooffiae (2.1%) and one of Malasezzia pachydermatis (0.7%) were obtained. Statistical significance (P<0.05) was found between M. globosa and scalp. Malasezzia restricta was isolated only in head areas. This study suggests M. globosa is the most related species to SD. The prevalence of other species is different from that reported by other authors. Only M. globosa and M. restricta presented a pattern of relationship with the body sites of the lesions. It is noteworthy is the isolation of the zoophylic species M. pachydermatis. The Malassezia genus ecology and the pathogenic role of its species are still under study. This work is a contribution to this knowledge. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. [Characterization of species of the gender Malassezia in patients with seborrheic dermatitis and subjects without skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Rendic, Elizabeth; Díaz, Cristina; Fich, Félix

    2003-11-01

    The yeast Malassezia spp has an established etiological role in pityriasis versicolor, folliculitis, systemic infections and onychomycosis. To assess the presence of Malassezia spp in patients with seborrheic dermatitis (SD), to find a correlation between Malassezia spp count and the severity of the disease and to compare the prevalence of the different Malassezia species in SD patients and subjects without skin lesions. Scrapings of the face from 81 patients with SD (69 males) and 79 subjects (54 males) without skin lesions were obtained for a direct microscope examination and yeast culture. The yeast Malassezia was found in 76% of SD patients and in 82% of subjects without skin lesions. There was a positive correlation between the number of yeasts found on direct examination and the clinical severity of lesions in SD patients. Although this correlation was statistically significant (P = 0.046), the degree of association (rho = 0.22) was weak. Fifty Malassezia species were identified. M globosa was found in 67% of SD patients, followed by M furfur and M sympodialis, each present in 16.5% of the SD patients. In subjects without skin lesions, the most prevalent species were M globosa (77%), followed by M sympodialis (12%), M slooffiae (7%) and M furfur (4%). The presence of the yeast Malassezia is not associated with the presence of skin lesions.

  8. Antifungal agent susceptibilities and interpretation of Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida parapsilosis isolated from dogs with and without seborrheic dermatitis skin.

    PubMed

    Yurayart, Chompoonek; Nuchnoul, Noppawan; Moolkum, Pornsawan; Jirasuksiri, Supitcha; Niyomtham, Waree; Chindamporn, Ariya; Kajiwara, Susumu; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2013-10-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida parapsilosis are recognized as commensal yeasts on the skin of healthy dogs but also causative agents of eborrheic dermatitis, especially in atopic dogs. We determined and compared the susceptibility levels of yeasts isolated from dogs with and without seborrheic dermatitis (SD) using the disk diffusion method (DD) for itraconazole (ITZ), ketoconazole (KTZ), nystatin (NYS), terbinafine (TERB) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and the broth microdilution method (BMD) for ITZ and KTZ. The reliability between the methods was assessed using an agreement analysis and linear regression. Forty-five M. pachydermatis and 28 C. parapsilosis isolates were identified based on physiological characteristics and an approved molecular analysis. By DD, all tested M. pachydermatis isolates were susceptible to ITZ, KTZ, NYS and TERB but resistant to 5-FC. Only 46 - 60% of the tested C. parapsilosis isolates were susceptible to KTZ, TERB and 5-FC, but ITZ and NYS were effective against all. By BMD, over 95% of M. pachydermatis isolates were susceptible to KTZ and ITZ with an MIC90 < 0.03 and 0.12 μg/ml, respectively. The frequency of KTZ- and ITZ-resistant C. parapsilosis was 29% and 7%, and the MIC90 values were 1 μg/ml and 0.5-1 μg/ml, respectively. Regarding the agreement analysis, 2.2% of minor errors were observed in M. pachydermatis and 0.2-1% of very major errors occurred among C. parapsilosis. There were no significant differences in the yeast resistance rates between dogs with and without SD. KTZ and ITZ were still efficacious for M. pachydermatis but a high rate of KTZ resistant was reported in C. parapsilosis.

  9. Dysplastic nevus associated with seborrheic keratosis*

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Luciane Francisca Fernandes; Michalany, Nilceo Schwery; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Hirata, Sergio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis is a common skin lesion which may coincidentally be associated melanocytic nevi. The authors describe a case of dysplastic nevus associated with seborrheic keratosis and discuss the clinical, dermoscopic, and histological findings of this association. They also discuss the association between seborrheic keratosis and other benign and malignant tumours. PMID:24626665

  10. Does tachyphylaxis occur in long-term management of scalp seborrheic dermatitis with pyrithione zinc-based treatments?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, James R; Rocchetta, Heather; Asawanonda, Pravit; Luo, Fangyi; Thomas, Jennifer H

    2009-01-01

    Scalp seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff (SD/D) are chronic conditions requiring long-term treatment. There is a common belief that patients frequently experience decreasing benefits over time when using a single product. This physiologic accommodation is termed tachyphylaxis. To systematically investigate the anecdotal belief that tachyphylaxis occurs in long-term treatment of SD/D using quantitative clinical assessments. An international questionnaire completed by 722 dermatologists assessed the belief of tachyphylaxis incidence with pyrithione zinc (PTZ)-based shampoos, time course, occurrence relative to active ingredients, and effect of switching products. Two double-blind, randomized, clinical evaluations were conducted, 24- and 48-week studies, whereby a 1% PTZ shampoo, a 2% PTZ shampoo, or a matched placebo control shampoo was used by each subject for the duration of the study. Dermatologists assessed the adherent scalp flaking (scale of 0-10) at baseline and at specified intervals. Sixty-four per cent of responding dermatologists believed tachyphylaxis occurred with PTZ products, and most felt that tachyphylaxis occurred within 3 months of use. Evaluation of mean treatment responses vs. placebo and individual responses as a function of study duration showed a consistent benefit for all products at all time points; therefore, no evidence for tachyphylaxis was found (within 48 weeks of treatment). No evidence for tachyphylaxis in SD/D treatment by PTZ-based shampoos was found. Compliance could explain the decreasing response rate seen over time; the solution is to choose an affordable therapeutic product that is effective long term without cosmetic trade-offs.

  11. AhR ligands, malassezin, and indolo[3,2-b]carbazole are selectively produced by Malassezia furfur strains isolated from seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gaitanis, George; Magiatis, Prokopios; Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Bassukas, Ioannis D; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Velegraki, Aristea; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2008-07-01

    Malassezia yeasts are connected with seborrheic dermatitis (SD) whereas M. furfur pathogenicity is associated with the production of bioactive indoles. In this study, the production of indoles by M. furfur isolates from healthy and diseased skin was compared, the respective HPLC patterns were analyzed, and substances that are preferentially synthesized by strains isolated from SD lesions were isolated and characterized. Malassezin, pityriacitrin, indole-3-carbaldehyde, and indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ) were isolated by HPLC from extracts of M. furfur grown in L-tryptophan agar, and identified by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Of these, ICZ, a potent ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), is described for the first time to our knowledge as a M. furfur metabolite. HPLC-photodiode array detection analysis of strain extracts from 7 healthy subjects and 10 SD patients showed that M. furfur isolates from only SD patients consistently produce malassezin and ICZ. This discriminatory production of AhR agonists provides initial evidence for a previously unreported mechanism triggering development of SD and indicates that the variable pathogenicity patterns recorded for M. furfur-associated SD conditions may be attributed to selective production (P<0.001) of measurable bioactive indoles.

  12. Malassezia globosa and restricta: breakthrough understanding of the etiology and treatment of dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis through whole-genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Thomas L

    2007-12-01

    Dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis (D/SD) share an etiology dependent upon three factors: sebum, microbial metabolism (specifically, Malassezia yeasts), and individual susceptibility. Advances in microbiological and analytical techniques permit a more detailed understanding of these etiologic factors, especially the role of Malassezia. Malassezia are lipid-dependent and demonstrate adaptation allowing them to exploit a narrow niche on sebum-rich skin. Work in our and our collaborators' laboratories has focused on understanding these adaptations by detailed analysis of biochemistry and gene expression. We have shown that Malassezia globosa and M. restricta predominate on dandruff scalp, that oleic acid alone can initiate dandruff-like desquamation, that M. globosa is the most likely initiating organism by virtue of its high lipase activity, and that an M. globosa lipase is expressed on human scalp. Considering the importance of M. globosa in D/SD (and the overall importance of commensal fungi), we have sequenced the M. globosa and M. restricta genomes. Genomic analysis indicates key adaptations to the skin environment, several of which yield important clues to the role Malassezia play in human disease. This work offers the promise of defining new treatments to D/SD that are targeted at changing the level or activities of Malassezia genes.

  13. Multicenter, double-blind, parallel group study investigating the non-inferiority of efficacy and safety of a 2% miconazole nitrate shampoo in comparison with a 2% ketoconazole shampoo in the treatment of seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Stanislaw A

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the non-inferiority of efficacy and tolerance of 2% miconazole nitrate shampoo in comparison with 2% ketoconazole shampoo in the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis. A randomized, double-blind, comparative, parallel group, multicenter study was done. A total of 274 patients (145 miconazole, 129 ketoconazole) were enrolled. Treatment was twice-weekly for 4 weeks. Safety and efficacy assessments were made at baseline and at weeks 2 and 4. Assessments included symptoms of erythema, itching, scaling ['Symptom Scale of Seborrhoeic Dermatitis' (SSSD)], disease severity and global change [Clinical Global Impressions (CGIs) and Patient Global Impressions (PGIs)]. Miconazole shampoo is at least as effective and safe as ketoconazole shampoo in treating scalp seborrheic dermatitis scalp.

  14. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients by the Analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Oh, Byung Ho; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2010-05-01

    This case-control study concerns a molecular biological method based on the data gathered from a group of Korean subjects to examine the distribution of Malassezia yeasts in seborrheic dermatitis (SD) patients. Cultures for Malassezia yeasts were taken from the foreheads, cheeks and chests of 60 patients with SD and in 60 healthy controls of equivalent age. The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between certain species of Malassezia and SD. This was done by analyzing the differences in the distribution of Malassezia species in terms of age and body parts of the host with healthy controls. 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP, a fast and accurate molecular biological method, was used to overcome the limits of morphological and biochemical methods. The positive Malassezia culture rate was 51.7% in patients with SD, which was lower than that of healthy adults (63.9%). M. restricta was dominant in patients with SD (19.5%). Likewise, M. restricta was identified as a common species (20.5%) in healthy controls. In the ages 31~40, M. restricta was found to be the most common species (31.6%) among SD patients. According to the results of the study, the most frequently isolated species was M. restricta (19.5%) in patients with SD. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of Malassezia species between the SD patients and healthy control groups.

  15. Seborrheic Keratosis of the Conjunctiva: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Bae, Hyoung Won; Lee, Kwang Kil; Kim, Tae Im

    2009-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis is a benign epithelial neoplasia that occurs mainly in the skin of the eyelids and face. We describe a case of seborrheic keratosis of the conjunctiva confirmed by histopathology. A 72-year-old man presented with a recurrent conjunctival mass involving the nasal side of his right eye. Clinically, a diagnosis of conjunctival papilloma was made, and a mass excision was performed. The histopathological analysis evidenced a conjunctival-covering epithelium with papillomatous changes and irregular acanthosis, at the expense of a proliferation of basaloid cells. In addition, the lesion exhibited multiple pseudohorn cysts containing keratin. With the above findings, a diagnosis of conjunctival seborrheic keratosis was established. The occurrence of seborrheic keratosis on the conjunctiva is rare. In this case, seborrheic keratosis was confirmed by pathologic report despite its similar appearance with papilloma. Seborrheic keratosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of conjunctival lesions. PMID:20046694

  16. Identification of Malassezia species in the facial lesions of Chinese seborrhoeic dermatitis patients based on DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lian, C-h; Shen, L-l; Gao, Q-y; Jiang, M; Zhao, Z-j; Zhao, J-j

    2014-12-01

    The genus Malassezia is important in the aetiology of facial seborrhoeic dermatitis (FSD), which is the most common clinical type. The purpose of this study was to analyse the distribution of Malassezia species in the facial lesions of Chinese seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD) patients and healthy individuals. Sixty-four isolates of Malassezia were isolated from FSD patients and 60 isolates from healthy individuals. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was used to identify the isolates. The most frequently identified Malassezia species associated with FSD was M. furfur (76.56%), followed by M. sympodialis (12.50%) and M. japonica (9.38%). The most frequently isolated species in healthy individuals were M. furfur (61.67%), followed by M. sympodialis (25.00%), M. japonica (6.67%), M. globosa (3.33%), and M. obtusa (3.33%). Overall, our study revealed that while M. furfur is the predominant Malassezia species in Chinese SD patients, there is no significant difference in the distribution of Malassezia species between Chinese SD patients and healthy individuals. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. A lipohydroxyacid-containing shampoo improves scalp condition and quality of life in patients with seborrheic dermatitis and light-to-moderate scalp psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Seité, S; Paries, J; Reygagne, P; Hamidou, Z; Jouanique, C; Perez-Pala, G; Rougier, A

    2009-06-01

    Dandruff is a common scalp disorder affecting almost half of the post-pubertal population of any ethnicity and both genders. It is one of the major reasons for patients to consult a dermatologist and it is the cause of significant psychological and social distress. The aim of this open study was to evaluate the benefit of a 4-week treatment with a shampoo containing 0.1% lipohydroxyacid (LHA) and 1.3% salicylic acid on the scalp condition and on the quality of life of 275 volunteers with seborrheic dermatitis (SD) (n = 226) or light-to-moderate scalp psoriasis (SP) (n = 49). The clinical benefit of the treatment was assessed by scoring the following parameters, i.e., severity of the dermatosis, scaling, itching, excoriations, and superficial burning sensation. The impact on the quality of life was assessed using the Scalpdex, a questionnaire specially developed by Chen et al. for patients with scalp dermatitis, which includes 23 questions regarding the symptoms, functioning and emotions affected by scalp dermatosis. The shampoo used in this study was well tolerated. After a 4-week treatment, dermatologists noticed a significant clinical improvement of all the scalp parameters evaluated (i.e., the composite lesional score was improved in 91% and 77% of the patients with SD or SP respectively). The symptoms, functioning and emotions scores of quality of life were also significantly improved in relation to the improvement of scalp condition. This study not only allowed a better understanding of the SD and SP patient's profile but also demonstrated that the shampoo evaluated is a convenient, efficient, safe, and well-tolerated cosmetic treatment of SD and light-to-moderate SP improving greatly the quality of life of the treated patients.

  18. Malassezia Intra-Specific Diversity and Potentially New Species in the Skin Microbiota from Brazilian Healthy Subjects and Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Renan Cardoso; Zani, Marcelo Bergamin; Arruda, Ana Carolina Belini Bazán; de Arruda, Lucia Helena Fávaro; Paulino, Luciana Campos

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts are part of the resident cutaneous microbiota, and are also associated with skin diseases such as seborrheic dermatitis (SD). The role these fungi play in skin diseases and why they are pathogenic for only some individuals remain unclear. This study aimed to characterize Malassezia microbiota from different body sites in healthy and SD subjects from Brazil. Scalp and forehead samples from healthy, mild SD and severe SD subjects were collected. Non-scalp lesions from severe SD patients were also sampled. 5.8S rDNA/ITS2 amplicons from Malassezia sp. were analyzed by RFLP and sequencing. Results indicate that Malassezia microbiota did not group according to health condition or body area. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that three groups of sequences did not cluster together with any formally described species, suggesting that they might belong to potential new species. One of them was found in high proportions in scalp samples. A large variety of Malassezia subtypes were detected, indicating intra-specific diversity. Higher M. globosa proportions were found in non-scalp lesions from severe SD subjects compared with other areas, suggesting closer association of this species with SD lesions from areas other than scalp. Our results show the first panorama of Malassezia microbiota in Brazilian subjects using molecular techniques and provide new perspectives for further studies to elucidate the association between Malassezia microbiota and skin diseases. PMID:25695430

  19. Malassezia intra-specific diversity and potentially new species in the skin microbiota from Brazilian healthy subjects and seborrheic dermatitis patients.

    PubMed

    Soares, Renan Cardoso; Zani, Marcelo Bergamin; Arruda, Ana Carolina Belini Bazán; Arruda, Lucia Helena Fávaro de; Paulino, Luciana Campos

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts are part of the resident cutaneous microbiota, and are also associated with skin diseases such as seborrheic dermatitis (SD). The role these fungi play in skin diseases and why they are pathogenic for only some individuals remain unclear. This study aimed to characterize Malassezia microbiota from different body sites in healthy and SD subjects from Brazil. Scalp and forehead samples from healthy, mild SD and severe SD subjects were collected. Non-scalp lesions from severe SD patients were also sampled. 5.8S rDNA/ITS2 amplicons from Malassezia sp. were analyzed by RFLP and sequencing. Results indicate that Malassezia microbiota did not group according to health condition or body area. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that three groups of sequences did not cluster together with any formally described species, suggesting that they might belong to potential new species. One of them was found in high proportions in scalp samples. A large variety of Malassezia subtypes were detected, indicating intra-specific diversity. Higher M. globosa proportions were found in non-scalp lesions from severe SD subjects compared with other areas, suggesting closer association of this species with SD lesions from areas other than scalp. Our results show the first panorama of Malassezia microbiota in Brazilian subjects using molecular techniques and provide new perspectives for further studies to elucidate the association between Malassezia microbiota and skin diseases.

  20. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients by the Analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Byung Ho; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2010-01-01

    Background This case-control study concerns a molecular biological method based on the data gathered from a group of Korean subjects to examine the distribution of Malassezia yeasts in seborrheic dermatitis (SD) patients. Cultures for Malassezia yeasts were taken from the foreheads, cheeks and chests of 60 patients with SD and in 60 healthy controls of equivalent age. Objective The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between certain species of Malassezia and SD. This was done by analyzing the differences in the distribution of Malassezia species in terms of age and body parts of the host with healthy controls. Methods 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP, a fast and accurate molecular biological method, was used to overcome the limits of morphological and biochemical methods. Results The positive Malassezia culture rate was 51.7% in patients with SD, which was lower than that of healthy adults (63.9%). M. restricta was dominant in patients with SD (19.5%). Likewise, M. restricta was identified as a common species (20.5%) in healthy controls. In the ages 31~40, M. restricta was found to be the most common species (31.6%) among SD patients. Conclusion According to the results of the study, the most frequently isolated species was M. restricta (19.5%) in patients with SD. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of Malassezia species between the SD patients and healthy control groups. PMID:20548904

  1. Clobetasol propionate shampoo 0.05% in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Reygagne, Pascal; Poncet, Michel; Sidou, Farzaneh; Soto, Pascale

    2007-05-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD), a common dermatosis associating hyperseborrhea, erythema, itching, and dandruff, has frequent scalp involvement. Malassezia furfur infection seems to play an important role in the condition's etiopathology. Treatment of SD usually consists of corticosteroids or antifungals, such as ketoconazole. The aim of this multicenter, randomized, investigator-blinded, parallel-group pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clobetasol propionate shampoo 0.05% after different short-contact application times compared with its vehicle and ketoconazole foaming gel 2% in the treatment of SD of the scalp. For 4 weeks, 55 subjects received one of the following treatments twice weekly: clobetasol propionate shampoo for 2.5, 5, or 10 minutes; clobetasol propionate vehicle for 10 minutes; or ketoconazole foaming gel for 5 minutes before rinsing off. Efficacy criteria included total severity score (TSS) and individual scores of signs such as itching and global improvement. Safety included reporting of burning, overall tolerance, and adverse events. Results showed that an application of clobetasol propionate for 5 and 10 minutes provided a similar mean percentage decrease of TSS, and the mean percentage decrease of TSS for all active groups was significantly superior to that of the vehicle (P < .01). Overall and local safety were good for all treatment groups. The present pilot study demonstrated that a short-contact application of clobetasol propionate shampoo is effective and safe in the treatment of SD of the scalp.

  2. Isolation and identification of Malassezia species from Chinese and Korean patients with seborrheic dermatitis and in vitro studies on their bioactivity on sebaceous lipids and IL-8 production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Su Na; Kim, Ah-Reum; Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Won-Seok; Lee, John Hwan; Jung, Won Hee; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the distribution of Malassezia yeast in 120 Chinese (20 patients from each of six cities) and 20 Korean patients with scalp seborrheic dermatitis (SD) and dandruff (SD/D) using ITS1 and ITS2 polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Bioactivity was studied by quantifying sebum lipid production by human primary sebocytes and inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-8 (IL-8) production was studied by exposing HaCaT keratinocytes with extracts of five standard Malassezia strains; M. globosa, M. restricta, M. sympodialis, M. dermatis and M. slooffiae. M. restricta and M. globosa were the most frequently encountered species from both Chinese and Korean patients. These two Malassezia species also promoted neutral lipid synthesis although the result was not statistically significant and induced significant increase in IL-8 production among the five Malassezia species studied. The study suggests a possible role of these organisms in the pathogenesis of SD/D. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Dermatoscopic Findings of Seborrheic Keratosis in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Maria Luiza; Oliveira Lima, Cíntia Maria; Moura, Heloísa Helena; Ishida, Cleide; Campos-do-Carmo, Gabriella; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous melanoma may in some instances be confused with seborrheic keratosis, which is a very common neoplasia, more often mistaken for actinic keratosis and verruca vulgaris. Melanoma may clinically resemble seborrheic keratosis and should be considered as its possible clinical simulator. We report a case of melanoma with dermatoscopic characteristics of seborrheic keratosis and emphasize the importance of the dermatoscopy algorithm in differentiating between a melanocytic and a non-melanocytic lesion, of the excisional biopsy for the establishment of the diagnosis of cutaneous tumors, and of the histopathologic examination in all surgically removed samples.

  4. Seborrheic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seborrheic kertosis. In: Lebwohl MG, Heymann WR, Berth-Jones J, Coulson I, eds. Treatment of Skin Disease: Comprehensive Therapeutic Strategies . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 220. Review Date 10/24/2016 Updated by: David L. Swanson, MD, Vice Chair ...

  5. GIANT PEDUNCULATED SEBORRHEIC KERATOSIS OF PENIS

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Jagdeep S; Thakur, Anamika; Chauhan, C G S; Diwana, Vijay K; Chauhan, D C

    2008-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis of the penis is a rare entity. It has been mistaken as genital warts and differentiation is only made on histopathology. We are reporting a case presenting as multiple giant polypoidal lesions on the penile skin for the last 20 years. Seborrheic keratosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pedunculated lesions of the penis. The histopathology after shave excision will be diagnostic. PMID:19967020

  6. Melanoma in-situ arising in seborrheic keratosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Repertinger, Susan; Wang, Jeff; Adickes, Edward; Sarma, Deba P

    2008-01-01

    Background Seborrheic keratosis is a very common benign skin tumor in man. Melanoma is rare but is the most dreaded of all malignant skin tumors. A melanoma arising in a seborrheic keratosis is distinctly rare. We are reporting such a case occurring in an 86-year-old man. Case presentation An-86-year-old male with a history of multiple actinic keratoses and seborrheic keratoses of the head and trunk presented with a mid-back skin lesion. The lesion was poorly circumscribed, flat, and gray, with a pink-tan, well-circumscribed scaly nodule within it. The biopsied lesion was composed of the usual features of hyperkeratotic seborrheic keratosis, but with focal atypical melanocytic proliferation with nesting along the dermal-epidermal junction. We interpreted this lesion as a melanoma in-situ arising within a seborrheic keratosis. Conclusion It is not uncommon for many physicians to remove a typical seborrheic keratosis without a confirmatory microscopic confirmation. We urge that all such lesions be examined by the pathologist to avoid missing another concomitant malignant lesion such as melanoma which needs adequate resection and close follow-up. PMID:18947402

  7. Two cases of seborrheic keratosis with basal clear cells.

    PubMed

    Anan, Takashi; Fukumoto, Takaya; Kimura, Tetsunori

    2017-03-01

    Seborrheic keratosis with basal clear cells (SKBCC) is an extremely rare histopathological variant of seborrheic keratosis that has histological similarities to melanoma in situ. We herein report two cases of SKBCC and provide the first description of the dermoscopic features of this condition, in addition to the histopathological findings. Both of the two lesions showed typical histological architectures of seborrheic keratosis with rows or focal clusters of monomorphic clear cells with abundant pale cytoplasm and small round nucleus in the basal layer. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that most clear cells were positive for high molecular weight cytokeratin (34βE12) in a peripheral pattern but were negative tor Melan-A. Dermoscopy revealed typical features of ordinary seborrheic keratosis, while unfortunately did not reflect the presence of basal clear cells. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Acneiform facial eruptions

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Melody J.; Taher, Muba; Lauzon, Gilles J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To summarize clinical recognition and current management strategies for four types of acneiform facial eruptions common in young women: acne vulgaris, rosacea, folliculitis, and perioral dermatitis. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE Many randomized controlled trials (level I evidence) have studied treatments for acne vulgaris over the years. Treatment recommendations for rosacea, folliculitis, and perioral dermatitis are based predominantly on comparison and open-label studies (level II evidence) as well as expert opinion and consensus statements (level III evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Young women with acneiform facial eruptions often present in primary care. Differentiating between morphologically similar conditions is often difficult. Accurate diagnosis is important because treatment approaches are different for each disease. CONCLUSION Careful visual assessment with an appreciation for subtle morphologic differences and associated clinical factors will help with diagnosis of these common acneiform facial eruptions and lead to appropriate management. PMID:15856972

  9. The treatment of facial atopic dermatitis in children who are intolerant of, or dependent on, topical corticosteroids: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hoeger, P H; Lee, K-H; Jautova, J; Wohlrab, J; Guettner, A; Mizutani, G; Hultsch, T

    2009-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is most prevalent in areas of reduced skin barrier reserve, like face and neck, especially in children. Treatment with topical corticosteroids (TCS) is limited due to heightened risk of treatment-associated side-effects, thus necessitating alternative AD therapies. The primary study objective was to determine the efficacy of pimecrolimus cream 1% in children with mild-moderate facial AD dependent on/intolerant of TCS. Secondary objectives included effects on overall Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI), head/neck EASI, pruritus severity and time to clearance of facial AD. A multicentre, double-blind (DB) study of < or = 6 weeks, followed by a 6-week, open-label (OL) phase was conducted. Two hundred patients (aged 2-11 years) were randomized 1:1 to pimecrolimus cream 1% (n = 99) or vehicle (n = 101) twice daily until clearance of facial AD or for a maximum of 6 weeks (DB phase). Sixteen patients receiving vehicle were allowed to switch to the OL phase at day 22. Significantly more pimecrolimus-treated vs. vehicle-treated patients were cleared/almost cleared of facial AD (Investigators' Global Assessment 0/1): 74.5% vs. 51.0%, P < 0.001 (day 43) [57.1% vs. 36.0%, P = 0.004 (day 22)]. Median time to clearance was 22.0 vs. 43.0 days (pimecrolimus vs. vehicle, respectively). Statistically significant differences for pimecrolimus vs. vehicle were also seen on head/neck EASI, overall EASI, and head/neck pruritus scores. Adverse events were mainly mild-moderate, occurring with similar frequency in both treatment groups. In children with facial dermatitis intolerant of/dependent on TCS, pimecrolimus cream 1% effectively controls eczema and pruritus and is well tolerated.

  10. 21 CFR 358.701 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Seborrheic Dermatitis, and Psoriasis § 358.701 Scope. (a) An over-the-counter dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis drug product in a form suitable for topical application is generally recognized as safe...

  11. The multifunctionality of 10% sodium sulfacetamide, 5% sulfur emollient foam in the treatment of inflammatory facial dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2010-03-01

    Prior to 1962, some of the most versatile drugs in dermatology were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) solely on the basis of safety. One of these is the combination 10% sodium sulfacetamide and 5% sulfur. Sodium sulfacetamide possesses anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties while sulfur is a nonspecific antibacterial and antifungal. A new emollient foam formulation of 10% sodium sulfacetamide and 5% sulfur allows a thinner application film and leaves behind no residue on hair bearing or non-hair bearing skin. The sulfur smell is also more quickly dissipated with reduced irritation. This uncontrolled, observational, prospective, open-label, single site, eight-week study enrolled 24 subjects (eight with rosacea, eight with seborrheic dermatitis, eight with acne vulgaris) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this novel foam formulation. At eight weeks, statistically significant improvement was seen in inflammatory rosacea lesion counts and the signs of seborrheic dermatitis. A 50% reduction was noted in the total acne lesion counts. These findings confirm the versatility of an emollient 10% sodium sulfacetamide and 5% sulfur foam.

  12. Association between melanocytic neoplasms and seborrheic keratosis: more than a coincidental collision?

    PubMed Central

    DeFazio, Jennifer; Zalaudek, Iris; Busam, Klaus J.; Cota, Carlo; Marghoob, Ashfaq

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations and an expanding knowledge of cell-to-cell communication have led us to speculate that the finding of a melanocytic nevus in conjunction with a seborrheic keratosis is more than a coincidental collision of two lesions. Here we present five cases demonstrating dermoscopic features of both melanocytic lesions and seborrheic keratoses with corresponding histology. Four cases demonstrate dermoscopic features of a melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratosis, and the final case a melanoma arising in association with a seborrheic keratosis. PMID:23785597

  13. Dandruff, Cradle Cap, and Other Scalp Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... men. Dandruff is usually a symptom of seborrheic dermatitis, or seborrhea. It is a skin condition that ... care provider. There is a type of seborrheic dermatitis that babies can get. It is called cradle ...

  14. Causes and Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seborrheic Dermatitis in Children Treatment For Children Eczema & Child Development Tools for School Living Well Resources Eczema and ... Seborrheic Dermatitis in Children Treatment For Children Eczema & Child Development Tools for School Living Well Resources Eczema and ...

  15. Bowenoid transformation in seborrheic keratosis: A retrospective analysis of 429 patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Parvin; Adibi, Neda; Nematollahi, Pardis; Heidarpour, Mitra; Eftekhari, Mehdi; Siadat, Amir Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Background: Seborrheic keratosis is a common, benign skin tumor. Numerous reports have shown its possibility of malignant transformation. This study was designed to demonstrate the occurrence of concomitant seborrheic keratosis and skin cancers. Materials and Methods: Data was retrospectively reviewed from all patients with a diagnosis of seborrheic keratosis in pathology department of Alzahra Hospital and a private pathology laboratory in Isfahan, Iran over a 4-year period. We classified all demographic data and associated dysplasia or Bowen's disease and analyzed them by student-t or chi-square tests. Results: From all 429 specimens, 5 (1.2%) were found to be associated with Bowen's disease and one (0.2%) with mild dysplasia in squamous epithelium. All cases arose within the clinically, atypical seborrheic keratosis. More men were affected with lesions alone and with malignancy (230/423 (54.4%) and 5/6 (83.3%), respectively) compared to women. The average age of patients suffering from lesions with and without associated malignancy was 57 and 54 years, respectively. The common site of lesion alone was head and neck but lesions with malignancy involved lower extremities. The two lesions were significantly different in site of occurrence (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Generally, although the association between seborrheic keratosis and skin malignancy appears to be accidental, it must always be in mind. Therefore, histopathologic examination of all seborrheic keratosis should be considered, especially when seborrheic keratosis has atypical clinical manifestations. PMID:23267371

  16. In vitro activity of kombucha tea ethyl acetate fraction against Malassezia species isolated from seborrhoeic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, E; Saeidi, M; Marashi, M A; Moafi, A; Mahmoodi, V; Zeinolabedini Zamani, M

    2016-12-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic and recurrent superficial dermatitis in which Malassezia species play an important role. There are different Malassezia species, which have been recently reported to be resistant to common antifungals. Natural sources can be useful alternatives to reduce the emergence of this resistance. Kombucha tea is believed to have potential antimicrobial properties. Regarding this, the present study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of Kombucha tea ethyl acetate fraction (KEAF) against Malassezia species obtained from the patients with seborrheic dermatitis. A total of 23 clinical isolates were identified by direct microscopic examination and Tween assimilation, and then confirmed by DNA sequencing of ITS regions for Malassezia species. Kombucha tea was fractionated using ethyl acetate (1:2 v/v). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) microdilution assay was used to evaluate the anti- Malssezia activity of KEAF at three concentrations of 10, 40, and 80 mg/mL. The results of the DNA sequence analysis indicated that M. furfur (39.13%) was the predominant species, followed by M. globosa (30.43%), M. sloofie (13.04%), M. sympodialis (13.04%), and M. restricta (4.34%), respectively. Furthermore, KEAF showed inhibitory activity against Malassezia species. Accordingly, KEAF had the lowest and highest MIC value against M. sloofie and M. restricta , respectively. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of the extract was equivalent to that of ketoconazole at 4.8 µg/mL. The findings of the current study highlighted the antifungal properties of KEAF. Therefore, this extract can be promoted as complementary medicine for the treatment of the infections caused by Malassezia .

  17. In vitro activity of kombucha tea ethyl acetate fraction against Malassezia species isolated from seborrhoeic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, E; Saeidi, M; Marashi, MA; Moafi, A; Mahmoodi, V; Zeinolabedini Zamani, M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic and recurrent superficial dermatitis in which Malassezia species play an important role. There are different Malassezia species, which have been recently reported to be resistant to common antifungals. Natural sources can be useful alternatives to reduce the emergence of this resistance. Kombucha tea is believed to have potential antimicrobial properties. Regarding this, the present study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of Kombucha tea ethyl acetate fraction (KEAF) against Malassezia species obtained from the patients with seborrheic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 23 clinical isolates were identified by direct microscopic examination and Tween assimilation, and then confirmed by DNA sequencing of ITS regions for Malassezia species. Kombucha tea was fractionated using ethyl acetate (1:2 v/v). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) microdilution assay was used to evaluate the anti-Malssezia activity of KEAF at three concentrations of 10, 40, and 80 mg/mL. Results: The results of the DNA sequence analysis indicated that M. furfur (39.13%) was the predominant species, followed by M. globosa (30.43%), M. sloofie (13.04%), M. sympodialis (13.04%), and M. restricta (4.34%), respectively. Furthermore, KEAF showed inhibitory activity against Malassezia species. Accordingly, KEAF had the lowest and highest MIC value against M. sloofie and M. restricta, respectively. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of the extract was equivalent to that of ketoconazole at 4.8 µg/mL. Conclusion: The findings of the current study highlighted the antifungal properties of KEAF. Therefore, this extract can be promoted as complementary medicine for the treatment of the infections caused by Malassezia. PMID:28959793

  18. In Vitro Anti-Malassezia Activity of Castanea crenata Shell and Oil-Soluble Glycyrrhiza Extracts.

    PubMed

    Han, Song Hee; Hur, Min Seok; Kim, Min Jung; Jung, Won Hee; Park, Minji; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Shin, Hong Ju; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong; Lee, Yang Won

    2017-06-01

    A new shampoo with anti- Malassezia properties obtained from various plants is required to provide seborrheic dermatitis patients with a wider range of treatment options. The aim of this study was to obtain in vitro susceptibility profiles of Malassezia restricta and M. globosa , the most important pathogenic organisms in the development of seborrheic dermatitis, to the plant extracts used in commercial anti-dandruff shampoos. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for eight candidate plant extracts and two plant-derived natural products diluted with Leeming and Notman medium to final concentrations of 0.016 to 1 mg/ml. Castanea crenata shell, Camellia sinensis leaf, and oil-soluble Glycyrrhiza extracts presented relatively low MIC values (≤0.5 mg/ml) against both strains. The C. crenata shell and oil-soluble Glycyrrhiza extracts demonstrated especially high anti-Malassezia activity, suggesting their potential use in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. The extracts also showed fungistatic activity against other common facultative pathogenic yeasts, Cryptococcus and Candida . C. crenata shell and oil-soluble Glycyrrhiza extracts could potentially be used as active ingredients in anti-seborrheic and anti-dandruff shampoo formulations. They could be helpful for repeated treatments and regular prophylaxis of scalp seborrheic dermatitis.

  19. Parthenium dermatitis manifesting clinically as polymorphic light eruption and prurigo nodularis- like lesions with vasculitis-like picture on histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Chembolli; Srinivas, C. R.; Pillai, Suma B.; Shanthakumari, S.

    2011-01-01

    Parthenium dermatitis is a widespread and distressing dermatoses in rural and urban India caused by the air borne allergen of the Compositae weed Parthenium hysterophorus. Parthenium dermatitis has been thought to be mediated solely by type IV hypersensitivity, but recently a combined immediate (type I) and delayed (type IV) hypersensitivity mechanism has been postulated in the initiation and perpetuation of parthenium dermatitis, especially in sensitized subjects with an atopic diathesis. Initially, the exposed sites of the body are involved. Later in the course of the disease, unexposed sites may get involved. Various clinical presentations have been described in parthenium dermatitis. Typically, it presents as an air borne contact dermatitis (ABCD) involving the eyelids and nasolabial folds Other presentations include a photodermatitis (essentially a pseudo photodermatitis), atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, exfoliative dermatitis, hand dermatitis. Photosensitive lichenoid dermatitis and prurigo nodularis are rarer presentations. Uncommon presentations have been described in parthenium dermatitis. They include prurigo nodularis-like lesions and photosensitive lichenoid eruption. Three cases are presented, two of whom presented as polymorphic-like lesions and one as prurigo nodularis. All three patch tested positive to parthenium on Day 2. Prick testing was positive in two of the three patients. Parthenium dermatitis mimicking polymorphic light eruption has not been reported. Histopathology revealed vasculitis in the lesional skin in two of the patients. Although leukocytoclastic vasculitis has been reported earlier from the prick-tested site, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of vasculitis in lesional skin of parthenium dermatitis. PMID:23130236

  20. In Vitro Anti-Malassezia Activity of Castanea crenata Shell and Oil-Soluble Glycyrrhiza Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Han, Song Hee; Hur, Min Seok; Kim, Min Jung; Jung, Won Hee; Park, Minji; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Shin, Hong Ju; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2017-01-01

    Background A new shampoo with anti-Malassezia properties obtained from various plants is required to provide seborrheic dermatitis patients with a wider range of treatment options. Objective The aim of this study was to obtain in vitro susceptibility profiles of Malassezia restricta and M. globosa, the most important pathogenic organisms in the development of seborrheic dermatitis, to the plant extracts used in commercial anti-dandruff shampoos. Methods Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for eight candidate plant extracts and two plant-derived natural products diluted with Leeming and Notman medium to final concentrations of 0.016 to 1 mg/ml. Results Castanea crenata shell, Camellia sinensis leaf, and oil-soluble Glycyrrhiza extracts presented relatively low MIC values (≤0.5 mg/ml) against both strains. The C. crenata shell and oil-soluble Glycyrrhiza extracts demonstrated especially high anti-Malassezia activity, suggesting their potential use in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. The extracts also showed fungistatic activity against other common facultative pathogenic yeasts, Cryptococcus and Candida. Conclusion C. crenata shell and oil-soluble Glycyrrhiza extracts could potentially be used as active ingredients in anti-seborrheic and anti-dandruff shampoo formulations. They could be helpful for repeated treatments and regular prophylaxis of scalp seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:28566909

  1. Effects of scalp dermatitis on chemical property of hair keratin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Shin, Min Kyung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-05-01

    The effects of scalp dermatitis (seborrheic dermatitis (SD), psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis (AD)) on chemical properties of hair keratin were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Hairs were collected from lesional regions affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD and non-lesional regions separately. The hairs with SD were taken from patients with ages of 16-80 years. The ages of patients with psoriasis ranged from 8 to 67 years, and all patients exhibited moderate disease. Hairs with AD were taken from the patients with ages of 24-45 years and the average SCORing atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) was 48.75. Hairs from 20 normal adults were collected as a control. The FT-IR absorbance bands were analyzed by the Gaussian model to obtain the center frequency, half width, height, and area of each band. The height and area of all bands in the spectra were normalized to the amide I centered at 1652 cm-1 to quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of keratin. The spectra of hair with scalp dermatitis were different with that of control, the amide A components centered at 3278 cm-1 were smaller than those of the control. The psoriasis hair showed a large difference in the IR absorbance band between lesional and non-lesional hairs indicating good agreement with the morphological changes. The hairs with diseases did not show differences in the content of cystine, which was centered at 1054 cm-1, from the control. The chemical properties of keratin were not significantly different between the hairs affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD. However, the changes induced by scalp dermatitis were different with weathering. Therefore, FT-IR analysis could be used to screen differences between the physiological and pathological conditions of scalp hair.

  2. Genetic alterations in seborrheic keratoses

    PubMed Central

    Heidenreich, Barbara; Denisova, Evygenia; Rachakonda, Sivaramakrishna; Sanmartin, Onofre; Dereani, Timo; Hosen, Ismail; Nagore, Eduardo; Kumar, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    Seborrheic keratoses are common benign epidermal lesions that are associated with increased age and sun-exposure. Those lesions despite harboring multiple somatic alterations in contrast to malignant tumors appear to be genetically stable. In order to investigate and characterize the presence of recurrent mutations, we performed exome sequencing on DNA from one seborrheic keratosis lesion and corresponding blood cells from the same patients with follow up investigation of alterations identified by exome sequencing in 24 additional lesions from as many patients. In addition we investigated alterations in all lesions at specific genes loci that included FGFR3, PIK3CA, HRAS, BRAF, CDKN2A and TERT and DHPH3 promoters. The exome sequencing data indicated three mutations per Mb of the targeted sequence. The mutational pattern depicted typical UV signature with majority of alterations being C>T and CC>TT base changes at dipyrimidinic sites. The FGFR3 mutations were the most frequent, detected in 12 of 25 (48%) lesions, followed by the PIK3CA (32%), TERT promoter (24%) and DPH3 promoter mutations (24%). TERT promoter mutations associated with increased age and were present mainly in the lesions excised from head and neck. Three lesions also carried alterations in CDKN2A. FGFR3, TERT and DPH3 expression did not correlate with mutations in the respective genes and promoters; however, increased FGFR3 transcript levels were associated with increased FOXN1 levels, a suggested positive feedback loop that stalls malignant progression. Thus, in this study we report overall mutation rate through exome sequencing and show the most frequent mutations seborrheic keratosis. PMID:28410231

  3. Anogenital giant seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Chokoeva, Anastasiya; Tchernev, Georgi; Heinig, Birgit; Schönlebe, Jacqueline

    2017-08-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) are very common benign epidermal tumors. Giant seborrheic keratosis (GSK) is a rare variant with clinical characteristics, which leads very often to misdiagnosis. A genital site of SK is very unusual clinical manifestation and although the cause is still unknown, current literature data point to a possible pathogenetic role of chronic friction and HPV infection. The rare genital localization makes Buschke-Löwenstein tumor and verrucous carcinoma important differential diagnoses. GSK may also show some clinical features of a melanoacanthoma, which makes cutaneous melanoma as another possible differential diagnosis. The clinical diagnosis of genital GSK is often a very difficult one, because the typical clinical features of GSK disappear and the most common dermoscopic features of GSK are usually not seen in the genital region lesions. The diagnosis of GSK of the anogenital area should be made only and always after the exact histological verification and variety of differential diagnosis should be carefully considered. The treatment of GSK is primary surgically. We present a rare case of GSK with concomitant HPV infection in the anogenital region of 72-year-old patient. Surgical approach was performed with excellent outcome.

  4. Gallate Contact Dermatitis: Product Update and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, Zachary E; Van Noord, Megan G; Atwater, Amber Reck

    Allergic contact dermatitis related to cosmetic use can result from allergens not routinely evaluated by standard patch test protocols. Propyl, octyl, and dodecyl gallates are commonly used antioxidant preservatives with reports of associated allergic contact dermatitis in the literature. The objectives of this review were to investigate the role of gallates in allergic contact dermatitis and to explore products containing these preservatives. A systematic review of the literature through April 2016 was performed to explore cases of reported gallate allergy. Food and cosmetic product databases were searched for products containing gallates. Seventy-four cases of gallate contact allergy have been reported. In addition, a variety of commercially available cosmetic products and foods contain gallate chemicals. Propyl gallate is the most commonly reported gallate contact allergen and often causes facial and/or hand dermatitis.

  5. The challenge of diagnosing seborrheic keratosis by reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, A; Chen, J; Yang, C; Ding, Y; Zeng, Q; Tan, L

    2018-05-24

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is one of the most common skin tumors seen by dermatologists. It should be differentiated with many diseases, especially skin tumors. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been applied for evaluation of SK. There are a few studies that describe the RCM of SK. The aim of the study was to find the challenge of diagnosing seborrheic keratosis by reflectance confocal microscopy. A total of 390 patients with a clinical suspicious diagnosis of seborrheic keratosis were enrolled in this study, and lesions from each patient were imaged with RCM. Thirty-seven of these patients performed a biopsy in order to be given a histological diagnosis. We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of RCM diagnosis and histological diagnosis, and then found the RCM characteristics of biopsy-proven lesions. According to RCM images, 258 of 390 (66.2%) patients were diagnosed with SK, 97 of 390 (24.9%) patients could not be diagnosed by the dermatologist according to RCM. Of all 37 biopsied lesions, 23 were SK, 6 were actinic keratosis, 2 were basal cell carcinoma, and 2 were squamous cell carcinoma. It is challenge to diagnose seborrheic keratosis by reflectance confocal microscopy. It may due to the variable clinical and RCM appearances of SK, and limited depth of RCM. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Cloudy and starry milia-like cysts: how well do they distinguish seborrheic keratoses from malignant melanomas?

    PubMed

    Stricklin, S M; Stoecker, W V; Oliviero, M C; Rabinovitz, H S; Mahajan, S K

    2011-10-01

    Seborrheic keratoses are the most common skin lesions known to contain small white or yellow structures called milia-like cysts (MLCs). Varied appearances can sometimes make it difficult to differentiate benign lesions from malignant lesions such as melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer found in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine the statistical occurrence of MLCs in benign vs. malignant lesions. A medical student with 10 months experience in examining approximately 1000 dermoscopy images and a dermoscopy-naïve observer analysed contact non-polarized dermoscopy images of 221 malignant melanomas and 175 seborrheic keratoses for presence of MLCs. The observers found two different types of MLCs present: large ones described as cloudy and smaller ones described as starry. Starry MLCs were found to be prevalent in both seborrheic keratoses and melanomas. Cloudy MLCs, however, were found to have 99.1% specificity for seborrheic keratoses among this group of seborrheic keratoses and melanomas. Cloudy MLCs can be a useful tool for differentiating between seborrheic keratoses and melanomas. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  7. Cloudy and starry milia-like cysts: how well do they distinguish seborrheic keratoses from malignant melanomas?

    PubMed Central

    Stricklin, S.M.; Stoecker, W.V.; Oliviero, M.C.; Rabinovitz, H.S.; Mahajan, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Seborrheic keratoses are the most common skin lesions known to contain small white or yellow structures called milia-like cysts (MLCs). Varied appearances can sometimes make it difficult to differentiate benign lesions from malignant lesions such as melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer found in humans. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the statistical occurrence of MLCs in benign vs. malignant lesions. Methods A medical student with 10 months experience in examining approximately 1000 dermoscopy images and a dermoscopy-naïve observer analysed contact non-polarized dermoscopy images of 221 malignant melanomas and 175 seborrheic keratoses for presence of MLCs. Results The observers found two different types of MLCs present: large ones described as cloudy and smaller ones described as starry. Starry MLCs were found to be prevalent in both seborrheic keratoses and melanomas. Cloudy MLCs, however, were found to have 99.1% specificity for seborrheic keratoses among this group of seborrheic keratoses and melanomas. Conclusion Cloudy MLCs can be a useful tool for differentiating between seborrheic keratoses and melanomas. Received: 18 June 2010; Accepted: 27 October 2010 PMID:21923811

  8. Noncorticosteroid Combination Shampoo versus 1% Ketoconazole Shampoo for the Management of Mild-to-Moderate Seborrheic Dermatitis of the Scalp: Results from a Randomized, Investigator-Single-Blind Trial Using Clinical and Trichoscopic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Oglio, Federica; Lacarrubba, Francesco; Verzì, Anna Elisa; Micali, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a combination noncorticosteroid, antiinflammatory/antifungal shampoo versus 1% ketoconazole shampoo in the treatment of mild-to-moderate scalp seborrheic dermatitis (SD). Procedures Twenty patients were randomized to using the combination shampoo (group A, 10 patients) or the 1% ketoconazole shampoo (group B, 10 patients) 3 times a week every other day for 8 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated by measuring the degree of scaling and pruritus by clinical and trichoscopic examination using a 4-point scale. Additionally, a physician global assessment (PGA) was assessed at the end of the study. Results At 4 weeks, there was a significant reduction of scaling from baseline for both groups, while pruritus showed a significant reduction only for group A. After 8 weeks, there was a significant reduction of scaling and pruritus for both groups. PGA showed a complete response in 90% of the cases in both groups. Conclusions The results of our study demonstrate that the combination noncorticosteroid, antiinflammatory/antifungal shampoo represents an alternative approach to standard topical treatment for scalp SD. A noncorticosteroid shampoo may be equally safe and effective as ketoconazole shampoo for scalp SD, and trichoscopy provides accurate and reliable quantifiable data to assist in therapeutic monitoring. PMID:27171495

  9. Noncorticosteroid Combination Shampoo versus 1% Ketoconazole Shampoo for the Management of Mild-to-Moderate Seborrheic Dermatitis of the Scalp: Results from a Randomized, Investigator-Single-Blind Trial Using Clinical and Trichoscopic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dall'Oglio, Federica; Lacarrubba, Francesco; Verzì, Anna Elisa; Micali, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a combination noncorticosteroid, antiinflammatory/antifungal shampoo versus 1% ketoconazole shampoo in the treatment of mild-to-moderate scalp seborrheic dermatitis (SD). Twenty patients were randomized to using the combination shampoo (group A, 10 patients) or the 1% ketoconazole shampoo (group B, 10 patients) 3 times a week every other day for 8 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated by measuring the degree of scaling and pruritus by clinical and trichoscopic examination using a 4-point scale. Additionally, a physician global assessment (PGA) was assessed at the end of the study. At 4 weeks, there was a significant reduction of scaling from baseline for both groups, while pruritus showed a significant reduction only for group A. After 8 weeks, there was a significant reduction of scaling and pruritus for both groups. PGA showed a complete response in 90% of the cases in both groups. The results of our study demonstrate that the combination noncorticosteroid, antiinflammatory/antifungal shampoo represents an alternative approach to standard topical treatment for scalp SD. A noncorticosteroid shampoo may be equally safe and effective as ketoconazole shampoo for scalp SD, and trichoscopy provides accurate and reliable quantifiable data to assist in therapeutic monitoring.

  10. Severe facial dermatitis as a late complication of aesthetic rhinoplasty; a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rajabian, Mohammad Hossain; Sodaify, Manoochehr; Aghaei, Shahin

    2004-01-01

    Background Contact dermatitis, as a cutaneous complication after rhinoplasty, is of early onset, limited and transient. The cause of this dermatitis is irritant or allergic. Late onset skin complications are rare and non-inflammatory. Case presentation We are reporting an unexpected, severe allergic contact dermatitis of the face, in a young female, appearing one month following aesthetic rhinoplasty. She failed to respond to ordinary treatments for dermatitis. We did standard battery – including nitrofurazone, tincture of benzoin and hydrocortisone – patch test for the patient that showed sensitivity to benzoin and corticosteroid. Conclusions In summary we report a case of a severe allergic contact dermatitis of the face, in a 21-year-old girl who underwent corrective aesthetic rhinoplasty, appearing one month following surgical operation. We were unable to find a similar report in the medical literature. PMID:15056395

  11. Cradle Cap (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cradle Cap (Infantile Seborrheic Dermatitis) KidsHealth / For Parents / Cradle Cap ( ... many babies develop called cradle cap. About Cradle Cap Cradle cap is the common term for seborrheic ...

  12. Expression of lumican in hidroacanthoma simplex and clonal-type seborrheic keratosis as a potent differential diagnostic marker.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ryoko; Ansai, Shin-Ichi; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Matsuda, Yoko; Naito, Zenya; Kawana, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    Lumican, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family, regulates the assembly and diameter of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix of various tissues. The lumican expression correlates with pathological conditions and the growth and metastasis of various malignancies. In cutaneous neoplasms, the lumican expression is lower in advanced-stage malignant melanomas that invade the dermis than in early-stage melanomas. Furthermore, we have recently reported that the expression pattern of lumican is different from that of actinic keratosis and the Bowen disease. Lumican is positive in the poroid cells of intraepidermal sweat ducts; therefore, we examined the expression patterns of lumican in acanthotic-type seborrheic keratosis and Pinkus-type poroma followed by clonal-type seborrheic keratosis and hidroacanthoma simplex. The neoplastic cells of acanthotic-type seborrheic keratosis exhibited positive immunostaining in only 1 of 31 cases (3.23%), whereas the poroid cells of Pinkus-type poroma exhibited positive immunoreactivity in 26 of 28 patients (92.8%). In the hidroacanthoma simplex cases, lumican was expressed in poroid cells forming intraepidermal nests in 22 of 28 patients (78.6%), whereas the neoplastic cells in most cases of clonal-type seborrheic keratosis were negative for lumican. In some seborrheic keratosis cases that were positive for lumican in neoplastic cells, lumican was observed in squamoid cells but not in basaloid cells. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the immunoreactivity of lumican in seborrheic keratosis and in basaloid cells. These findings suggest that lumican is a potent differential diagnostic marker that distinguishes hidroacanthoma simplex from clonal-type seborrheic keratosis.

  13. Occupational carprofen photoallergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, A C; Muller, F; Ferguson, J; Dawe, R S

    2008-12-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug carprofen was used in humans in the 1980s, before its withdrawal due to adverse effects. It re-emerged for veterinary uses, for which it is still widely prescribed, in the 1990s. There has been one previous report published of photoallergic contact dermatitis (PACD) in a pharmaceutical factory worker exposed to carprofen. Investigation of carprofen as a cause of PACD in pharmaceutical factory workers presenting with facial dermatitis. Photopatch testing to carprofen dilutions in two pharmaceutical factory workers and three healthy volunteer controls using the European consensus methodology. This was followed by testing of eight further employees, referred by occupational health services, in the same factory. The index patient suspected a problem with carprofen and was found to have PACD to carprofen. The second patient presented with a widespread, although especially photoexposed site, dermatitis and was initially labelled as having an 'unclassified dermatitis'. Only subsequently was her exposure (indirect; she did not work in the packaging section of the factory like the first patient) to carprofen recognized and testing confirmed both contact allergy and PACD to carprofen. One of three healthy volunteer controls had an active photoallergy sensitization event to carprofen starting 10 days after photopatch testing. Three of eight factory employees subsequently referred because of skin problems had carprofen PACD. Carprofen is a potent photoallergen. These cases emphasize the importance of photopatch testing, and considering agents not included in standard series, when investigating patients presenting with a photoexposed site dermatitis.

  14. Lumps, Bumps, and Things that Go Itch in Your Office!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Renee P.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a short dermatological case presentation involving a 9-year-old black female student who suffered from a severe case of atopic dermatitis (AD). Health history, physical findings on the subject, and differential diagnosis, such as impetigo, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, scabies, and seborrheic dermatitis, are given.…

  15. Seborrheic Dermatitis Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Media contacts Advertising contacts AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal notice Copyright © 2018 American Academy ... prohibited without prior written permission. AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal notice Copyright © 2017 American Academy ...

  16. Positive lymphocyte transformation test in a patient with allergic contact dermatitis of the scalp after short-term use of topical minoxidil solution.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Tobias; Schlütter-Böhmer, Brigitte; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Bieber, Thomas; Novak, Natalija

    2005-07-01

    Topical 2,4-diamino-6-piperidinopyrimidine-3-oxide (minoxidil) solution has been widely used for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia for over 15 years now and the substance is currently approved for this indication in 2% and 5% formulation. Typical side effects of this topical treatment include irritative dermatitis going along with pruritus, erythema, scaling and dryness, which occur especially at the onset of the therapy. In some cases, allergic contact dermatitis or exacerbation of seborrheic dermatitis has been reported. While most of the patients with allergic contact dermatitis described in the literature showed a positive sensitization to the vehicle substance propylene glycol evaluated by patch testing, reactions to the active ingredient minoxidil are rare. Here, we report a case of allergic sensitization to minoxidil, which we evaluated and differentiated from an irritative reaction by a combination of patch testing and lymphocyte transformation test. The differentiation of allergic and irritative adverse effects and the identification of the causative allergen are of major relevance for the proceeding and adjustment of the therapy. Patients with sensitizations against propylene glycol are candidates for preparations with alternative solvents but can proceed treatment with minoxidil. In contrast, patients with allergies to the active ingredient itself are no longer candidates for treatment with minoxidil and should undergo alternative therapeutic options.

  17. [Compositae dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Marina; Poljacki, Mirjana

    2003-01-01

    Compositae dermatitis is an allergic contact dermatitis caused by plant species of the Compositae family. The first report of a cutaneous reaction to the Chrysanthemum genus was made by Howe JS in 1887. In 1895 Maiden JH reported about skin lesions among men working with Tagetes minuta. Case reports of contact allergic-ragweed dermatitis appeared in the American literature as early as 1919. The North American feverfew--Parthenium Hysterophorus was brought to India from America in 1956 and it caused thousands of cases of so-called parthenium dermatitis. Ragweed and parthenium dermatitis became prototypes for the classic, so-called "airborne" Compositae dermatitis, that affects primarily exposed skin surfaces, and produces a universal erythroderma. The frequency of contact allergy to Compositae in Europe is higher than previously believed. It occurs most frequently in middle-aged and elderly persons, but also in all age groups. During the two past decades a more equal sex ratio has been established. The prevalence varies from 0.7-1.4% in the general population, up to 4.5% among occupationally exposed persons. Compositae allergy is among the top ten contact sensitivities in Europe. In North Europe plants were the cause of 4.4% cases of occupational allergic contact dermatitis. ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS: Among cultivated Compositae plants, Chrysanthemum is considered to be a major sensitizer in Europe (60%). Among the edible types, it is lettuce--Lactuca sativa and endive Cichorium endivia (20-30%), and wild-growing feverfew--Tanace--tum parthenium (70-90%), tansy--Tanacetum vulgare (54%), and dandelion--Taraxacum officinale (65%). Sesquiterpene lactones are the main sensitizers of the Compositae family. Other components, thiophenes and acetylenes are said to elicit only phytophotodermatitis, but recent studies have demonstrated that some thiophenes and benzofuran derivates possess not only phototoxic activity, but also sensitizing properties. Photosensitivity is

  18. Clinical comparison of human and canine atopic dermatitis using human diagnostic criteria (Japanese Dermatological Association, 2009): proposal of provisional diagnostic criteria for canine atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuri; Nagata, Masahiko; Murayama, Nobuo; Nanko, Hiroko; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease encountered in both humans and dogs. Canine AD can be used in the analysis of naturally occurring AD; however, details of clinical comparison have been lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare those clinical features using the human diagnostic criteria (Japanese Dermatological Association, 2009). Fifty-one dogs with canine AD were evaluated by the human criteria. Prior to this study, canine AD was basically diagnosed by the fulfillment of two authentic canine AD criteria and a positive reaction against Dermatophagoides farinae in serum immunoglobulin E levels and/or in intradermal tests. Among the human AD criteria items, behavior corresponding to pruritus was observed in all 51 dogs. Skin lesions corresponding to eczematous dermatitis were seen in 50 dogs, and symmetrical distribution of skin lesions was noted in all 51 dogs. A chronic or chronically relapsing course was observed in 50 dogs. Based on these results, the concordance rate for the criteria was 96% (49/51). Differential diagnoses of AD were also investigated in the same manner. The concordance rate for the criteria was 0% (0/69) in scabies, 2% (1/50) in pyoderma, 0% (0/50) in demodicosis, 0% (0/9) in cutaneous lymphoma, 0% (0/2) in ichthyosis, 25% (2/7) in flea allergy, 48% (24/50) in seborrheic dermatitis and 75% (3/4) in food allergy. Canine AD is thus indicated as a valuable counterpart to human AD in clinical aspects. In addition, the human AD criteria could be applicable, with some modification, as provisional diagnostic criteria for canine AD. © 2011 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  19. Eyelid Dermatitis: Contact Allergy to 3-(Dimethylamino)propylamine

    PubMed Central

    Knopp, Eleanor; Watsky, Kalman

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with intractable eyelid dermatitis. Patch testing revealed sensitization to 3-(dimethylamino)propylamine (DMAPA). DMAPA is an important etiology of allergic contact dermatitis of the eyelids and face but is easily missed even with expanded-series patch testing. We also review the most common causative allergens in eyelid dermatitis cited in the literature over the past decade. DMAPA is a reagent used in the formation of cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB), a common additive to liquid soaps, shampoos, and other cleansing products because of its utility as a surfactant. Beginning in the 1980s, reports of allergy to CAPB surfaced in the literature. Ultimately, a majority of patch testing studies have shown that clinical allergy to CAPB-containing products actually reflects allergy to contaminant DMAPA in most cases. Amidoamine, another intermediate in the formation of CAPB, may also be implicated through a proposed mechanism of conversion to DMAPA in the skin. When patch-testing for eyelid and facial dermatitis, it is crucial to test with DMAPA directly, not just with CAPB; unlike commercial-grade CAPB, the CAPB in patch test kits is ultrapure and does not contain contaminant DMAPA. PMID:19134437

  20. Molecular analysis of Malassezia microflora in seborrheic dermatitis patients: comparison with other diseases and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Mami; Sugita, Takashi; Nishikawa, Akemi; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2008-02-01

    Malassezia species colonize the skin of normal and various pathological conditions including pityriasis versicolor (PV), seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD) and atopic dermatitis (AD). To elucidate the pathogenic role of Malassezia species in SD, Malassezia microflora of 31 Japanese SD patients was analyzed using a PCR-based, culture-independent method. Nested PCR assay using the primers in the rRNA gene indicated that the major Malassezia species in SD were M. globosa and M. restricta, found in 93 and 74% of the patients, respectively. The detection rate and number of each species varied similarly in SD, PV and healthy subjects (HSs), whereas AD showed higher values. Real-time PCR assay showed that the lesional skin harbored approximately three times the population of genus Malassezia found in nonlesional skin (P<0.05), and that M. restricta is a significantly more common species than M. globosa in SD (P<0.005). Genotypic analysis of the rRNA gene showed that the M. globosa and M. restricta from SD patients fell into specific clusters, and could be distinguished from those collected from HSs, but not from those colleted from AD patients. Our results indicate that certain strains of M. restricta occur in the lesional skin of SD patients.

  1. A retrospective review of streptococcal infections in pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeffrey L; Hersh, Adam L; Okamura, Tessie; Howard, Renee; Frieden, Ilona J

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess the clinical characteristics and impact of group A streptococcal infection in children with atopic dermatitis, a retrospective review was performed in children diagnosed with atopic dermatitis who had a skin culture. Culture results and clinical characteristics of those with group A streptococcus were compared with those with Staphlococcus aureus. Infection with group A streptococcus was present in 16%; infection with Staphlococcus aureus was present in 72%, and 14% had mixed cultures. Patients infected with group A streptococcus were more likely to be febrile, to have facial and periorbital involvement, and to be hospitalized compared with those infected with Staphlococcus aureus alone (p ≤ 0.01 for all comparisons). Bacteremia and cellulitis were significantly more common in those infected with group A streptococcus than in those infected with Staphlococcus aureus. Retrospective design and review of only those patients receiving bacterial cultures may select for greater severity than in the general atopic dermatitis population. Group A streptococcus appears to be a significant skin pathogen infecting children with atopic dermatitis. Children with atopic dermatitis and group A streptococcal infection are more likely to have invasive disease and complications than those infected with Staphlococcus aureus alone. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The role of immunosuppression in squamous cell carcinomas arising in seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Conic, Ruzica Z; Napekoski, Karl; Schuetz, Heidi; Piliang, Melissa; Bergfeld, Wilma; Atanaskova Mesinkovska, Natasha

    2017-06-01

    Seborrheic keratoses (SK) are common skin neoplasms considered to be benign. Reports of associated squamous cell carcinoma arising within seborrheic keratosis (SCC-SK) have been described. To describe the histopathologic characteristics of SCC-SK and identify predisposing factors in formation of these rare lesions. There were 162 cases of SCC-SK in a span of a decade (2003-2014). All of the histopathologic specimens and medical records were reviewed. Data from these patients were compared to a control group with seborrheic keratosis who were matched by age, sex, and location of lesion from the same time period (n = 162). SCC-SK has the classic histopathologic features of SK, such as hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, papillomatosis, and pseudohorn cysts. The areas of squamous cell carcinoma were characterized by areas of squamous dysplasia (100%), hypogranulosis (79.6%), squamous eddies (79.6%), solar elastosis (80.9%), and brown pigmentation (59.9%). Patients with a history of immunosuppression had an increased risk for developing SCC-SK (19% vs 3%; P < .01), particularly when inhibition was transplant-associated (10% vs 0%; P < .01). This was a single center, retrospective study. SCC-SK occurs more often in elderly men with a history of immunosuppression associated with organ transplants. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent Advances in Pharmacotherapeutic Paradigm of Mild to Recalcitrant Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zahid; Sahudin, Shariza; Thu, Hnin Ei; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Kumolosasi, Endang

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic skin inflammatory disorder characterized by perivascular infiltration of immunoglobulin E (IgE), T lymphocytes, and mast cells. The key factors responsible for the pathophysiology of this disease are immunological disorders and defects in epidermal barrier properties. Pruritus, intense itching, psychological stress, deprived physical and mental performance, and sleep disturbance are the hallmark features of this dermatological disorder. Preventive interventions such as educational programs, avoidance of allergens, and exclusive care toward the skin could play a partial role in suppressing the symptoms. Based on the available clinical evidence, topical corticosteroids (TCs) are among the most commonly prescribed agents; however, these should be selected with care. In cases of steroid phobia, persistent adverse effects or chronic use, topical calcineurin inhibitors can be considered as a promising adjunct to TCs. Recent advances in the pharmacotherapeutic paradigm of atopic diseases exploring the therapeutic dominance of nanocarrier-mediated delivery is also discussed in this evidence-based review with regard to the treatment of AD. The present review summarizes the available clinical evidence, highlighting the current and emerging trends in the treatment of AD and providing evidence-based recommendations for the clinicians and health care professionals. Available evidence for the management of pediatric and adult atopic dermatitis (AD; atopic eczema) of all severities is explored. The management of other types of dermatitis, such as irritant contact dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, neurodermatitis, perioral dermatitis, stasis dermatitis, and allergic contact dermatitis are outside the scope of current review article. The presented studies were appraised using a unified system called the "Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT)", which was developed by the editors of several US family medicine and primary care journals

  4. Allergenic Ingredients in Facial Wet Wipes.

    PubMed

    Aschenbeck, Kelly A; Warshaw, Erin M

    Allergic contact dermatitis commonly occurs on the face. Facial cleansing wipes may be an underrecognized source of allergens. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of potentially allergenic ingredients in facial wet wipes. Ingredient lists from name brand and generic facial wipes from 4 large retailers were analyzed. In the 178 facial wipes examined, a total of 485 ingredients were identified (average, 16.7 ingredients per wipe). Excluding botanicals, the top 15 potentially allergenic ingredients were glycerin (64.0%), fragrance (63.5%), phenoxyethanol (53.9%), citric acid (51.1%), disodium EDTA (44.4%), sorbic acid derivatives (39.3%), tocopherol derivatives (38.8%), polyethylene glycol derivatives (32.6%), glyceryl stearate (31.5%), sodium citrate (29.8%), glucosides (27.5%), cetearyl alcohol (25.8%), propylene glycol (25.3%), sodium benzoate (24.2%), and ceteareth-20 (23.6%)/parabens (23.6%). Of note, methylisothiazolinone (2.2%) and methylchloroisothiazolinone (1.1%) were uncommon. The top potential allergens of botanical origin included Aloe barbadensis (41.0%), chamomile extracts (27.0%), tea extracts (21.3%), Cucumis sativus (20.2%), and Hamamelis virginiana (10.7%). Many potential allergens are present in facial wet wipes, including fragrances, preservatives, botanicals, glucosides, and propylene glycol.

  5. A laboratory-based study on patients with Parkinson's disease and seborrheic dermatitis: the presence and density of Malassezia yeasts, their different species and enzymes production.

    PubMed

    Arsic Arsenijevic, Valentina S; Milobratovic, Danica; Barac, Aleksandra M; Vekic, Berislav; Marinkovic, Jelena; Kostic, Vladimir S

    2014-03-14

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are frequently associated conditions. Aims of this study were: to determine severity of SD, presence of different species and density of Malassezia yeasts; to assess yeast lipases and phosphatases production in vitro and to compare these results between SD patients with and without PD. This case-control prospective study was conducted at the Dermatology and Neurology Units, Clinical Centre of Serbia and at the National Medical Mycology Reference Laboratory, University of Belgrade Medical School, Serbia. A total of 90 patients and 70 healthy controls (HC) were investigated: 60 patients with SD (SDN) and 30 patients with SD and PD (SDP). Culture-based mycological examination was carried out on lesional skin (LS) and non-lesional skin (NLS). A yeasts density was determined by counting the Malassezia colony forming units per tape (CFU/tape). Enzymes production by isolated Malassezia was investigated. The most patients with SD were male (76.7%; SDP and 63.3%; SDN) and the intensity of SD was dominantly severe or moderate (76.7%; SDP and 75%; SDN). The presence of Malasseziа was high on LS in both groups (87.3%; SDP and 86.7%; SDN) (p=0.667).The highest yeasts density (mean CFU/tape=67.8) was detected on LS in 53% of SDP group and in 21.7% of SDN group (mean CFU/tape=31.9) (p < 0.01). The presence of negative cultures was lower in SDP group (13.3%) in comparison to HC and SDN groups (37% and 31.7%, respectively). Malassezia density on NLS in SDP group (mean CFU/tape=44.3) was significantly higher in comparison to SDN and HC (p=0.018). M. globosa was the most abundant species identified amongst isolates from the SDP group (42.3%) and exhibited high production of phosphatase and lipase in vitro. From this laboratory-based study a positive correlation between SD, PD, M. globosa incidence, high yeast density and high phosphatase and lipase activity was established. Our data lead to conclusion that local skin

  6. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from epoxy resin in a golf club repairman.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Marléne; Möller, Halvor; Pontén, Ann

    2008-01-01

    A golfer presented with facial and hand eczema. He had exacerbations of his hand eczema prior to golf tournaments. Being an authorized golf club repairman, he had been working with a two-part glue containing an epoxy resin (ER) based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and the hardener diethylenetriamine (DETA) for approximately 4 years before he developed any skin problems. He was patch-tested with the standard, which contains an ER based on DGEBA (DGEBA-R), epoxy (containing DETA), and rubber glove series and had positive reactions to DGEBA-R only. Other work materials (a latex glove, a golf glove made of leather, and part of the handle of his own golf club "as is" and in a methyl tert-butyl ether extract) were tested, with negative results. Allergic contact dermatitis from ER affects the skin by direct contact; the dermatitis is usually localized to the hands and forearms. If the face and eyelids are involved, the dermatitis may be due to exposure to airborne hardeners or reactive diluents, exposure to airborne dust from residual monomers, or ectopic allergic reactions. Our repairman had sandpapered an old glued surface, which may have led to possible airborne dust formation, thus explaining the facial eczema. Therefore, a worker with contact allergy to ER may continue working provided the skin is protected from contamination.

  7. Seborrheic Dermatitis and Rosacea

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the scalp may include medicated anti-dandruff shampoos. Rosacea patients who suspect they may have this ... to Donate Make Your Opinion Count Take our survey about doctor-patient communication. arrow Donate Now Your ...

  8. Skin complaints in buildings with indoor climate problems

    SciTech Connect

    Stenberg, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Sick Building Syndrome (SBS), as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), is a combination of both common and unspecific symptoms. Few studies have been published with detailed descriptions of clinical findings. One of the few dermatological references with a close relation to sick buildings is the so-called low humidity occupational dermatoses. Since 1982, an increasing number of outpatients from building with indoor climate problems have been investigated at the Department of Dermatology in Umea, Sweden. The most common findings regarding work-related diseases have been seborrheic dermatitis, facial erythema, periorbital eczema, rosacea, urticaria, and itching folliculitis. It is suggestedmore » that physical, chemical, and psychological factors are of importance in producing these symptoms.« less

  9. A laboratory-based study on patients with Parkinson’s disease and seborrheic dermatitis: the presence and density of Malassezia yeasts, their different species and enzymes production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are frequently associated conditions. Aims of this study were: to determine severity of SD, presence of different species and density of Malassezia yeasts; to assess yeast lipases and phosphatases production in vitro and to compare these results between SD patients with and without PD. Methods This case–control prospective study was conducted at the Dermatology and Neurology Units, Clinical Centre of Serbia and at the National Medical Mycology Reference Laboratory, University of Belgrade Medical School, Serbia. A total of 90 patients and 70 healthy controls (HC) were investigated: 60 patients with SD (SDN) and 30 patients with SD and PD (SDP). Culture-based mycological examination was carried out on lesional skin (LS) and non-lesional skin (NLS). A yeasts density was determined by counting the Malassezia colony forming units per tape (CFU/tape). Enzymes production by isolated Malassezia was investigated. Results The most patients with SD were male (76.7%; SDP and 63.3%; SDN) and the intensity of SD was dominantly severe or moderate (76.7%; SDP and 75%; SDN). The presence of Malasseziа was high on LS in both groups (87.3%; SDP and 86.7%; SDN) (p=0.667). The highest yeasts density (mean CFU/tape=67.8) was detected on LS in 53% of SDP group and in 21.7% of SDN group (mean CFU/tape=31.9) (p < 0.01). The presence of negative cultures was lower in SDP group (13.3%) in comparison to HC and SDN groups (37% and 31.7%, respectively). Malassezia density on NLS in SDP group (mean CFU/tape=44.3) was significantly higher in comparison to SDN and HC (p=0.018). M. globosa was the most abundant species identified amongst isolates from the SDP group (42.3%) and exhibited high production of phosphatase and lipase in vitro. Conclusion From this laboratory-based study a positive correlation between SD, PD, M. globosa incidence, high yeast density and high phosphatase and lipase activity was established. Our data

  10. Study on Chinese common allergens of contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fan, W X; Zhao, B

    1990-01-01

    Patch tests were performed according to the European Standard Allergens (ESA) in 204 cases suspected of contact dermatitis. The reaction was positive in 58.33% of the cases. The common allergens were nickel (15.7%), fragrance mix (11.8%) p-phenylenediamine (8.8%), colophony (6.9%), benzocaine (6.4%), formaldehyde (5.9%), black rubber mix (4.9%), cobalt (4.4%), balsam of Peru (3.9%), potassium dichromate (3.4%), thiuram mix (2.9%) and mercapto mix (2.9%). In 85 cases of negative reaction to the European Standard Allergens, 36 were patch tested to suspected agents based on the individual case histories, of which 21 positively reacted. The common sensitizing agents were ampicillin and thiomersal. Of 204 cases, 107 were cases of facial contact dermatitis. Patch tests showed that the most common allergens were p-phenylenediamine (15.9%), nickel (13.1%) and fragrance mix (14.95%).

  11. Infantile eczema at one month of age is associated with cord blood eosinophilia and subsequent development of atopic dermatitis and wheezing illness until two years of age.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Shimanouchi, Yasuhiro; Kawakubo, Keiichi; Oishi, Naobumi; Wakiguchi, Hiroshi; Futamura, Kyoko; Saito, Hirohisa

    2005-01-01

    Physiological and pathological skin eruptions are commonly encountered in neonates in our clinical practice. However, the types of skin eruptions that are associated with the subsequent development of atopic dermatitis and the mechanisms of these associations remain uncertain. A total of 105 newborn babies with normal delivery were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. The cord blood eosinophil count was measured and the neonates were examined at 1 month of age and followed until 8 years of age. At 1 month of age, infantile eczema, seborrheic dermatitis, intertrigo and diaper dermatitis were diagnosed in a total of 29, 7, 14 and 24 neonates, respectively. No association was found among the prevalences of these eruptions. Neonates with infantile eczema had a significantly higher number and ratio of eosinophils in the cord blood (eosinophil count: 670.8 +/- 67.8 vs. 349.0 +/- 30.3/microl, p < 0.0001; eosinophil ratio: 5.12 +/- 0.53 vs. 2.61 +/- 0.22%, p < 0.0001, for the presence and the absence of infantile eczema, respectively). In contrast, no such tendency was found for any other skin eruptions. In neonates with infantile eczema at 1 month of age, the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis had been made significantly earlier and the prevalence of wheezing illness was significantly higher than in those without infantile eczema until 2 years of age. Infantile eczema, but not other skin eruptions, precedes the development of atopic dermatitis and wheezing illness during early infancy, presumably because of the activation of eosinophils before birth. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Molecular identification of Malassezia species isolated from dermatitis affections.

    PubMed

    Affes, M; Ben Salah, S; Makni, F; Sellami, H; Ayadi, A

    2009-05-01

    The lipophilic yeast of the genus Malassezia are opportunistic microorganisms of the skin microflora but they can be agents of various dermatomycoses. The aim of this study was to perform molecular identification of the commonly isolated Malassezia species from various dermatomycoses in our region. Thirty strains of Malassezia were isolated from different dermatologic affections: pityriasis versicolor (17), dandruff (5), seborrheic dermatitis (4), onyxis (2), folliculitis (1) and blepharitis (1). These species were identified by their morphological features and biochemical characterisation. The molecular identification was achieved by amplification of the internal transcribed spacer region by simple PCR. PCR technique was used for molecular characterisation of four Malassezia species: Malassezia globosa (270 bp), Malassezia furfur (230 bp), Malassezia sympodialis (190 bp) and Malassezia restricta (320 bp). We have detected the association between M. furfur and M. sympodialis in 16% and confirmed presumptive identification in 70% of the cases. The phenotypic identification based on microscopic and physiological method is difficult and time consuming. The application of a simple PCR method provides a sensitive and rapid identification system for Malassezia species, which may be applied in epidemiological surveys and routine practice.

  13. Prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jung Min; Ha, Beomman; Lee, Hongsun; Park, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyun Joon; Park, Young Min

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea. Four dermatologists visited adjacent military units and examined soldiers. A structured questionnaire that included questions about known skin diseases, demographic information, and questions for the Perceived Stress Index was completed for each participant. The soldiers that had been diagnosed with a skin disease answered one additional questionnaire (Skindex-29) which assess the influence of an individual's skin disease on daily life. Of 1,321 soldiers examined, 798 (60.4%) had one or more skin diseases. The three most common skin problems were acne (35.6%), tinea pedis (15.2%) and atopic dermatitis (5.1%). The diseases closely related to the period of military service were acne, tinea pedis, viral warts and corns. The diseases related to the amount of stress were atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and acne. The most troublesome skin diseases were atopic dermatitis, tinea cruris, and seborrheic dermatitis. These results demonstrated that the prevalence of skin disease among military personnel in Korea is very high, and that some of the skin disorders may have a significant influence on their daily lives.

  14. Prevalence of Common Skin Diseases and Their Associated Factors among Military Personnel in Korea: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Min; Ha, Beomman; Lee, Hongsun; Park, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyun Joon

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea. Four dermatologists visited adjacent military units and examined soldiers. A structured questionnaire that included questions about known skin diseases, demographic information, and questions for the Perceived Stress Index was completed for each participant. The soldiers that had been diagnosed with a skin disease answered one additional questionnaire (Skindex-29) which assess the influence of an individual's skin disease on daily life. Of 1,321 soldiers examined, 798 (60.4%) had one or more skin diseases. The three most common skin problems were acne (35.6%), tinea pedis (15.2%) and atopic dermatitis (5.1%). The diseases closely related to the period of military service were acne, tinea pedis, viral warts and corns. The diseases related to the amount of stress were atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and acne. The most troublesome skin diseases were atopic dermatitis, tinea cruris, and seborrheic dermatitis. These results demonstrated that the prevalence of skin disease among military personnel in Korea is very high, and that some of the skin disorders may have a significant influence on their daily lives. PMID:23091325

  15. Dermatology for the Allergist

    PubMed Central

    Lockey, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Allergists/immunologists see patients with a variety of skin disorders. Some, such as atopic and allergic contact dermatitis, are caused by abnormal immunologic reactions, whereas others, such as seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea, lack an immunologic basis. This review summarizes a select group of dermatologic problems commonly encountered by an allergist/immunologist. PMID:23268431

  16. Clinical study of a retinoic acid-loaded microneedle patch for seborrheic keratosis or senile lentigo.

    PubMed

    Hirobe, Sachiko; Otsuka, Risa; Iioka, Hiroshi; Quan, Ying-Shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Asada, Hideo; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2017-01-01

    Pigmented lesions such as of seborrheic keratosis and senile lentigo, which are commonly seen on skin of people>50years of age, are considered unattractive and disfiguring because of their negative psychological impact. Drug therapy using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is an attractive option for self-treatment at home. We have developed an ATRA-loaded microneedle patch (ATRA-MN) and confirmed the pharmacological effects of ATRA-MN application in mice. Here, we describe a clinical study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ATRA-MN in subjects with seborrheic keratosis or senile lentigo. ATRA-MN was applied to the lesion site of each subject for 6h once per week for 4weeks. The skin irritation reaction was scored to assess adverse reactions and blood tests were performed to evaluate the presence of systemic adverse reactions. To assess the treatment effect using ATRA-MN, the desquamation and whitening ability of the investigational skin was observed. Desquamation of the stratum corneum was observed following four ATRA-MN applications at 1-week intervals, but ATRA-MN applications did not induce severe local or systemic adverse effects. These results showed that ATRA-MN treatment is promising as a safe and effective therapy for seborrheic keratosis and senile lentigo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis from ethyl chloride and benzocaine.

    PubMed

    Carazo, Juan Luis Anguita; Morera, Blanca Sáenz de San Pedro; Colom, Luis Palacios; Gálvez Lozano, José Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Ethyl chloride (EC) or chloroethane (C2H5Cl) is a volatile halogenated hydrocarbon. Reports of contact sensitivity to this gas are infrequent considering its widespread use as a local anesthetic, and it may have a relatively low sensitization potential. Benzocaine is another local anesthetic derivative of the ethyl ester of para-aminobenzoic acid, previously reported as a causative agent of delayed hypersensitivity reactions. We present a patient who developed a generalized itching dermatitis after the application of a medical aerosol containing EC, as well as facial angioedema and tongue swelling after the local application of benzocaine. Patch-test results were positive for EC "as is" (++), benzocaine 5% in petrolatum (++), and caine mix (+++) at 96 hours (day 4). The possibility of cross-sensitization between both drugs would not have been chemically plausible. We report the first published clinical case of contact allergic dermatitis from two chemically unrelated local anesthetics (EC and benzocaine) in the same patient.

  18. "Dermatitis" defined.

    PubMed

    Smith, Suzanne M; Nedorost, Susan T

    2010-01-01

    The term "dermatitis" can be defined narrowly or broadly, clinically or histologically. A common and costly condition, dermatitis is underresourced compared to other chronic skin conditions. The lack of a collectively understood definition of dermatitis and its subcategories could be the primary barrier. To investigate how dermatologists define the term "dermatitis" and determine if a consensus on the definition of this term and other related terms exists. A seven-question survey of dermatologists nationwide was conducted. Of respondents (n  =  122), half consider dermatitis to be any inflammation of the skin. Nearly half (47.5%) use the term interchangeably with "eczema." Virtually all (> 96%) endorse the subcategory "atopic" under the terms "dermatitis" and "eczema," but the subcategories "contact," "drug hypersensitivity," and "occupational" are more highly endorsed under the term "dermatitis" than under the term "eczema." Over half (55.7%) personally consider "dermatitis" to have a broad meaning, and even more (62.3%) believe that dermatologists as a whole define the term broadly. There is a lack of consensus among experts in defining dermatitis, eczema, and their related subcategories.

  19. Differentiation of seborrheic keratosis from basal cell carcinoma, nevi and melanoma by RGB autofluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lihachev, Alexey; Lihacova, Ilze; Plorina, Emilija V.; Lange, Marta; Derjabo, Alexander; Spigulis, Janis

    2018-01-01

    A clinical trial on the autofluorescence imaging of skin lesions comprising 16 dermatologically confirmed pigmented nevi, 15 seborrheic keratosis, 2 dysplastic nevi, histologically confirmed 17 basal cell carcinomas and 1 melanoma was performed. The autofluorescence spatial properties of the skin lesions were acquired by smartphone RGB camera under 405 nm LED excitation. The diagnostic criterion is based on the calculation of the mean autofluorescence intensity of the examined lesion in the spectral range of 515 nm–700 nm. The proposed methodology is able to differentiate seborrheic keratosis from basal cell carcinoma, pigmented nevi and melanoma. The sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method was estimated as being close to 100%. The proposed methodology and potential clinical applications are discussed in this article. PMID:29675324

  20. Differentiation of seborrheic keratosis from basal cell carcinoma, nevi and melanoma by RGB autofluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Lihachev, Alexey; Lihacova, Ilze; Plorina, Emilija V; Lange, Marta; Derjabo, Alexander; Spigulis, Janis

    2018-04-01

    A clinical trial on the autofluorescence imaging of skin lesions comprising 16 dermatologically confirmed pigmented nevi, 15 seborrheic keratosis, 2 dysplastic nevi, histologically confirmed 17 basal cell carcinomas and 1 melanoma was performed. The autofluorescence spatial properties of the skin lesions were acquired by smartphone RGB camera under 405 nm LED excitation. The diagnostic criterion is based on the calculation of the mean autofluorescence intensity of the examined lesion in the spectral range of 515 nm-700 nm. The proposed methodology is able to differentiate seborrheic keratosis from basal cell carcinoma, pigmented nevi and melanoma. The sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method was estimated as being close to 100%. The proposed methodology and potential clinical applications are discussed in this article.

  1. Six children with allergic contact dermatitis to methylisothiazolinone in wet wipes (baby wipes).

    PubMed

    Chang, Mary Wu; Nakrani, Radhika

    2014-02-01

    Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI) is a combination preservative used in personal care and household products and is a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Recently, MI alone, without MCI, has been increasingly used in consumer products in attempts to minimize allergic reactions. Wet wipes are extensively tested and traditionally believed to be innocuous. MI in wet wipes ("baby wipes") has not been previously reported to cause ACD in children in the United States. Only 1 previous report of ACD in a child in Belgium has been recently reported. We report 6 children with chronic, perianal/buttock, and facial eczematous dermatitis, refractory to multiple topical and oral antibiotics and corticosteroids. All tested positive to MCI/MI on patch testing. None wore diapers. All patients had been using wet wipes containing MI (without MCI) to affected areas. Discontinuation of wipes resulted in rapid and complete resolution. This is the first report of pediatric ACD to MI in wet wipes in the United States, and the largest series to date. ACD to MI in wet wipes is frequently misdiagnosed as eczema, impetigo, or psoriasis. Wet wipes are increasingly marketed in personal care products for all ages, and MI exposure and sensitization will likely increase. Dermatitis of the perianal, buttock, facial, and hand areas with a history of wet wipe use should raise suspicion of ACD to MI and prompt appropriate patch testing. Rapid resolution occurs after the allergen exposure is eliminated. All isothiozolinones should be avoided in personal care and household products for these patients.

  2. Seborrheic Dermatitis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Media contacts Advertising contacts AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal notice Copyright © 2018 American Academy ... prohibited without prior written permission. AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal notice Copyright © 2017 American Academy ...

  3. Perioral dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... dermatitis URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001455.htm Perioral dermatitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Perioral dermatitis is a skin disorder resembling acne ...

  4. Rash - child under 2 years

    MedlinePlus

    ... can last for 12 to 18 months. Cradle cap (seborrheic dermatitis) causes greasy, scaling, crusty patches on ... acne medicines used by adolescents and adults. CRADLE CAP For cradle cap, wash the hair or scalp ...

  5. [Malassezia related diseases].

    PubMed

    Sei, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Genusmalassezia are now divided to fourteen species. Different species will start or aggravate different skin diseases. In the seborrheic dermatitis, M.restricta will play an important role, in the atopic dermatitis, M.globosa and/or M.restricta are major cutaneous microflora. The availability of new tools such as genomic and proteomic analyses has begun to provide a new insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms involved.

  6. Lack of antinuclear antibody in children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Dhar, S; Kanwar, A J; Deodhar, S D

    1997-01-01

    Antinuclear antibody (ANA) was assayed in 76 children with atopic dermatitis (AD) of which 46 were males and 30 females. Their ages ranged from 6 months to 12 years (mean 3.4 years). Age at onset of AD ranged from 2 months to 5.5 years (mean 1.9 years) and its duration ranged from 4 months to 4 years (mean 1.2 years). While facial lesions were present in 56 (73.3%) patients, 49 (64.5%) patients had predominant involvement of extensors. As per severity score designed by Rajka and Langerland, 31 (40.8%), 42 (55.3%) and 3 (3.9%) patients had mild, moderate and severe diseases respectively. History of photosensitivity was present in 6 (7.9%) patients. Serum samples were positive for ANA in a very low titre (1:20) in 2/6 patients with facial lesions. However LE cell, rheumatoid factor and C-reactive proteins were negative and serum complement levels were within normal limits.

  7. Allergic contact dermatitis from cocamidopropyl betaine, cocamidoamine, 3-(dimethylamino)propylamine, and oleamidopropyl dimethylamine: co-reactions or cross-reactions?

    PubMed

    Moreau, Linda; Sasseville, Denis

    2004-09-01

    We present the case of a patient with facial dermatitis caused by sensitization to cocamidopropyl betaine. The patient also had positive patch-test reactions to cocamidoamine, 3-(dimethylamino)propylamine, and oleamidopropyl dimethylamine. The presence of 3-(dimethylamino)propylamine as an impurity in all of these substances can be hypothesized to explain these simultaneous reactions.

  8. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising within Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Yurdakul, Cüneyt; Güçer, Hasan; Sehitoglu, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumour development within a seborrheic keratosis (SK) is extremely rare. Though the most commonly developed malignant tumour is the basal cell carcinoma (BCC), other tumour types have also been reported in literature. Herein, we will report a superficial type BCC case developed within SK localized in hairy skin of a 78-year-old female patient. In immunohistochemical evaluation, diffuse positive staining with CK19 and over-expression in p53 compared with non-neoplastic areas were determined in neoplastic basaloid islands. It is always not easy to differentiate especially superficial type BCC cases from non-neoplastic epithelium of SK with histopathological evaluation. As far as this reason we believe that in difficult differentiation of these 2 lesions, in order to show the differentiation in basal epithelium, immunohistochemical evaluation may be helpful. PMID:25177624

  9. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan; Thyssen, Jacob P; Fonacier, Luz; Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis cannot be assumed as atopic without further testing. Patch testing should at least be considered in cases of chronic or recurrent eczema regardless of the working diagnosis.

  10. Staphylococcal dermatitis in quail with a parakeratotic hyperkeratotic dermatosis suggestive of pantothenic acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Raidal, S R

    1995-09-01

    This report describes an outbreak of Staphylococcal dermatitis which occurred in commercial Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) with a history and clinico-pathological evidence suggestive of pantothenic acid deficiency. The flock had a low hatchability rate (40 to 43%) and a high percentage (50%) of dead-in-shell embryos. Approximately 5 to 15% of the grower flock developed crusty facial scabs and conjunctivitis from 4 days of age. Culture of eyelid skin yielded pure growths of non-haemolytic, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. Histological examination revealed a generalised hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis of feathers, feather follicles and non-follicular skin. There was invasion of feather follicles by cocci and focal areas of suppurative exudative dermatitis and subcutaneous abscesses particularly in the eyelids and commissures of the beak. Clinical signs were alleviated by treatment with amoxycillin and a change in ration formulation.

  11. 76 FR 45801 - Perrigo Company and Paddock Laboratories, Inc.; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Orders...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ...), 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20580. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christine Palumbo... individuals' home contact information from comments before placing them on the Commission Web site. Because... shampoo is a prescription shampoo used to treat seborrheic dermatitis, an inflammatory condition that...

  12. [A study of culture-based easy identification system for Malassezia].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takamasa

    2011-01-01

    Most species of this genus are lipid-dependent yeasts, which colonize the seborrheic part of the skin, and they have been reported to be associated with pityriasis versicolor, Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis. Malassezia have been re-classified into 7 species based on molecular biological analysis of nuclear ribosomal DNA/RNA and new Malassezia species were reported. As members of the genus Malassezia share similar morphological and biochemical characteristics, it was thought to be difficult to differentiate between them based on phenotypic features. While molecular biological techniques are the most reliable methods for identification of Malassezia, they are not available in most clinical laboratories. We studied ( i ) development of an efficient isolation media and culture based easy identification system, ( ii ) the incidence of atypical biochemical features in Malassezia species and propose a culture-based easy identification system for clinically important Malassezia species, M. globosa, M. restricta, and M. furfur.

  13. [Shiitake dermatitis: flagellate dermatitis after eating mushrooms].

    PubMed

    Haas, N; Vogt, R; Sterry, W

    2001-02-01

    The name of flagellate dermatitis originates from self-flagellating medieval people. This dermatitis is not rare as a drug eruption following bleomycin therapy. An identical skin eruption caused by the mushroom shiitake Lentinus edodes is more common but reported mostly from Japan. We saw a 67-year-old patient who presented with the typical linear scratch marks after a dinner in a Chinese restaurant. The basic mechanism is a toxic epidermal damage. Since it is not clear why the dermatitis does not occur frequently since Shiitake is the second most popular mushroom in the world, we discuss possible cofactors that may trigger the toxic reaction.

  14. Dermatitis herpetiformis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001480.htm Dermatitis herpetiformis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is a very itchy rash consisting ...

  15. Follicular contact dermatitis revisited: A review emphasizing neomycin-associated follicular contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    Follicular contact dermatitis clinically presents as individual papules that include a central hair follicle. Pathologic features involve the follicle and the surrounding dermis: spongiosis and vesicle formation of the follicular epithelium associated with perifollicular and perivascular lymphocytic inflammation. Using the PubMed database, an extensive literature search was performed on follicular contact dermatitis and neomycin. Relevant papers were reviewed and the clinical and pathologic features, the associated chemicals (including a more detailed description of neomycin), the hypothesized pathogenesis, and the management of follicular contact dermatitis were described. Several agents-either as allergens or irritants-have been reported to elicit follicular contact dermatitis. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the selective involvement of the follicles in follicular contact dermatitis: patient allergenicity, characteristics of the agent, vehicle containing the agent, application of the agent, and external factors. The differential diagnosis of follicular contact dermatitis includes not only recurrent infundibulofolliculitis, but also drug eruption, mite infestation, viral infection, and dermatoses that affect hair follicles. The primary therapeutic intervention for follicular contact dermatitis is withdrawal of the causative agent; treatment with a topical corticosteroid preparation may also promote resolution of the dermatitis. In conclusion, follicular contact dermatitis may be secondary to allergens or irritants; topical antibiotics, including neomycin, may cause this condition. Several factors may account for the selective involvement of the hair follicle in this condition. Treatment of the dermatitis requires withdrawal of the associated topical agent; in addition, topical corticosteroids may be helpful to promote resolution of lesions. PMID:25516854

  16. Perianal Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Agulló-Pérez, Alfredo-Daniel; Hervella-Garcés, Marcos; Oscoz-Jaime, Saioa; Azcona-Rodríguez, Maialen; Larrea-García, Mónica; Yanguas-Bayona, Juan-Ignacio

    Perianal complaints are often consulted in dermatology clinics, and in many cases, a conclusive diagnosis is not easily made. The aim of this study was to study and identify the epidemiological, clinical, and contact allergy features of patients with perianal dermatitis who attended at a contact dermatitis unit in a tertiary hospital in Spain. Adult patients with long-lasting (>4 weeks) perianal dermatitis were recruited during the past 10 years for investigation and follow-up. Every patient underwent a diagnostic workup consisting of dermatological exploration and patch tests with the standard and specific series, as well as the patients' own products. General surgical exploration was also performed in some patients. One hundred twenty-four patients were included. The MOAHLFA index was as follows: 43.5, 0, 4.8, 11.3, 1.6, 8.1, and 75. The main final diagnoses were allergic contact dermatitis (32.3%), psoriasis (24.2%), irritant contact dermatitis (17.7%), and lichen simplex (neurodermatitis) (10%). Eighty-one patients (66.1%) showed 1 or more positive reactions, and in 52 patients (43%), positive reactions relevant to the present disease were found. Contact allergy in patients with long-lasting perianal complaints is frequent. It is mandatory for these patients to be referred to a dermatologist for an adequate evaluation and patch testing. Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone seems as the most common allergen implicated in perianal contact dermatitis.

  17. Occupations at risk of developing contact allergy to isothiazolinones in Danish contact dermatitis patients: results from a Danish multicentre study (2009-2012).

    PubMed

    Schwensen, Jakob F; Menné, Torkil; Andersen, Klaus E; Sommerlund, Mette; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, the prevalence of contact allergy to isothiazolinones has reached epidemic levels. Few studies have presented data on occupations at risk of developing contact allergy to isothiazolinones. To present demographics and examine risk factors for sensitization to methylisothiazolinone (MI), methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI) in combination with MI and benzisothiazolinone (BIT) in Danish dermatitis patients. A retrospective epidemiological analysis of data from three Danish hospitals departments was conducted. All patients consecutively patch tested with MI, MCI/MI and BIT between 2009 and 2013 were included. MI contact allergy showed a significantly increased trend in prevalence from 1.8% in 2009 to 4.2% in 2012 (p < 0.001). Females with facial dermatitis mainly drove the increase in 2012. Adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that MI sensitization was significantly associated with occupational exposures, hand and facial dermatitis, age > 40 years, and the occupational groups of tile setters/terrazzo workers, machine operators, and painters. MCI/MI contact allergy was significantly associated with the following high-risk occupations: painting, welding (blacksmiths), machine operating, and cosmetology. The occupational group of painting was frequent in the group of patients with BIT contact allergy. Several high-risk occupations for sensitization to isothiazolinones exist. Regulation on the allowed concentration of isothiazolinones, and especially MI, in both consumer products and industrial products is needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Autofluorescence of seborrheic keratosis (warts) and of tissue surrounding malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Wolfgang; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard; Bohle, Rainer M.; Dreyer, Thomas

    1997-12-01

    Autofluorescence measurements on human tissue have revealed a decrease in intensity in malignant tumors and an increase in the healthy region adjacent to the tumor. This latter event might serve as a protective wall against the invasive tumor cells. The composition of this wall is still unknown. Antioxidants such as NADH might be involved. In the case of seborrheic keratosis (wart), the intensity is increased in the pigmented spots. Care must be taken, therefore, when warts are attached to malignant tumors. The resulting value is, then, not indicative for the condition of the system.

  19. Stasis dermatitis and ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcers; Ulcers - venous; Venous ulcer; Venous insufficiency - stasis dermatitis; Vein - stasis dermatitis ... veins. Some people with venous insufficiency develop stasis dermatitis. Blood pools in the veins of the lower ...

  20. Seborrheic inclusion cyst of the skin positive for cytoplasmic inclusion bodies and HPV antigen.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Seborrheic inclusion cyst (SIC) is a very rare variant of epidermal cyst of the skin. SIC shows seborrheic keratosis (SK)-like lesion in epidermal cyst. SIC is extremely rare; only 6 case reports have been published in the English literature. However, no immunohistochemical study of SIC has been reported. A 41-year-old Japanese man noticed a subcutaneous tumor in the neck. Physical examination showed slightly mobile tumor in the subcutaneous tissue, and total excision was performed. Grossly, the tumor (1 x 1 x 0.8 cm) was cyst containing atheromatous keratin. Microscopically, the lesion is a cyst containing keratins. About one half of the cyst showed features of epidermal cyst consisting of mature squamous epithelium with granular layers. The other one half showed SK-like epidermal proliferation. The SK-like area showed basaloid cell proliferation with pseudohorn cysts. No significant atypia was noted. Many eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were noted in the SK-like area. Immunohistochemically, the SK-like area was positive for pancytokeratin AE1/3, pancytokeratin CAM5.2, p63, and Ki-67 (labeling=8%) and HPV, but negative for p53. The pathological diagnosis was SIC.

  1. [Recent advances in research on Malassezia microbiota in humans].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Takashi; Zhang, Enshi; Tanaka, Takafumi; Nishikawa, Akemi; Tajima, Mami; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2013-01-01

    Malassezia species of lipophilic yeasts account for most fungal microbiota. Although they colonize healthy skin, they are also associated with several skin diseases, including pityriasis versicolor, seborrheic dermatitis, Malassezia folliculitis, and atopic dermatitis. To date, 14 members of the Malassezia genus have been identified. Of these, both M. globosa and M. restricta predominate, regardless of skin-disease type. Comprehensive analysis of fungal microbiota in the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis using an rRNA clone library method revealed that fungal microbiota cluster according to disease severity. The external ear canal and sole of the foot are colonized by specific Malassezia microbiota.

  2. Dermoscopy-pathology relationship in seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Akane

    2017-05-01

    Making a definitive diagnosis of seborrheic keratosis (SK) can be challenging for the naked eye due to its wide variation in clinical features. Fortunately, however, most cases of SK exhibit the typical dermoscopic findings of fissures and ridges, hairpin vessels with white halo, comedo-like openings, and milia-like cysts, all of which are helpful to distinguish SK from melanoma, melanocytic nevus, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and other skin tumors. Histopathologically, these dermoscopic characteristics correspond to papillomatous surface of the epidermis, enlarged capillaries of the dermal papillae, pseudohorn cysts in the epidermis opened to the surface of the lesion and intraepidermal cysts, respectively. Clinicians should bear in mind that the clonal type of SK dermoscopically mimics melanoma and BCC by the presence of globule-like structures, while regressing SK exhibits a granular pattern that is similar to the peppering found in melanoma. Furthermore, milia-like cysts alone are insufficient for a conclusive diagnosis of SK because melanoma in rare cases displays cysts along with other SK-like dermoscopic findings. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. Diet and Dermatitis: Food Triggers

    PubMed Central

    Schlichte, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Given increasing awareness of the link between diet and health, many patients are concerned that dietary factors may trigger dermatitis. Research has found that dietary factors can indeed exacerbate atopic dermatitis or cause dermatitis due to systemic contact dermatitis. In atopic dermatitis, dietary factors are more likely to cause an exacerbation among infants or children with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis relative to other populations. Foods may trigger rapid, immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reactions or may lead to late eczematous reactions. While immediate reactions occur within minutes to hours of food exposure, late eczematous reactions may occur anywhere from hours to two days later. Screening methods, such as food allergen-specific serum immunoglobulin E tests or skin prick tests, can identify sensitization to specific foods, but a diagnosis of food allergy requires specific signs and symptoms that occur reproducibly upon food exposure. Many patients who are sensitized will not develop clinical findings upon food exposure; therefore, these tests may result in false-positive tests for food allergy. This is why the gold standard for diagnosis remains the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge. In another condition, systemic contact dermatitis, ingestion of a specific food can actually cause dermatitis. Systemic contact dermatitis is a distinct T-cell mediated immunological reaction in which dietary exposure to specific allergens results in dermatitis. Balsam of Peru and nickel are well-known causes of systemic contact dermatitis, and reports have implicated multiple other allergens. This review seeks to increase awareness of important food allergens, elucidate their relationship with atopic dermatitis and systemic contact dermatitis, and review available diagnostic and treatment strategies. PMID:24688624

  4. Paederus dermatitis featuring chronic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Stanimirović, Andrija; Skerlev, Mihael; Culav-Košćak, Ivana; Kovačević, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Paederus dermatitis is a distinct variant of acute irritant contact dermatitis caused by mucocutaneous contact with the specific toxin of an insect belonging to the genus Paederus. It is characterized by the sudden onset of erythema and vesiculobullous lesions on exposed skin, with special predilection for the periorbital region. Paederus species have been mostly identified in Africa, Asia, Australia, and Central/South America. We report a 51-year-old woman who experienced 4 recurrences of periorbital erythema and edema in the previous year. No consistent etiology could be established at the beginning. Only after taking a detailed medical history was it discovered that 1 year before our examination, the patient had traveled to Kenya, where she had experienced contact with the insect. This fact led us to the diagnosis of Paederus dermatitis. After appropriate treatment, a complete regression was observed over a 3-week period.

  5. Contact Dermatitis in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Janice L; Perez, Caroline; Jacob, Sharon E

    2016-08-01

    Contact dermatitis is an umbrella term that describes the skin's reaction to contacted noxious or allergenic substances. The two main categories of contact dermatitis are irritant type and allergic type. This review discusses the signs, symptoms, causes, and complications of contact dermatitis. It addresses the testing, treatment, and prevention of contact dermatitis. Proper management of contact dermatitis includes avoidance measures for susceptible children. Implementation of a nickel directive (regulating the use of nickel in jewelry and other products that come into contact with the skin) could further reduce exposure to the most common allergens in the pediatric population. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e287-e292.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Patch Test Negative Generalized Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Alison; Mowad, Christen

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common condition in dermatology. Patch testing is the criterion standard for diagnosis. However, dermatitis is not always caused by an allergen, and patch testing does not identify a culprit in every patient. Generalized dermatitis, defined as eczematous dermatitis affecting greater than 3 body sites, is often encountered in dermatology practice, especially patch test referral centers. Management for patients with generalized dermatitis who are patch test negative is challenging. The purpose of this article is to outline an approach to this challenging scenario and summarize the paucity of existing literature on patch test negative generalized dermatitis.

  7. Merkel cell carcinoma with seborrheic keratosis: A unique association.

    PubMed

    Anand, Murthy S; Krishnamurthy, Shantha; Ravindranath, Suvarna; Ranganathan, Jyothi

    2018-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, clinically aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin; MCC is 40 times less common as compared to melanoma. The most frequently reported sites have been the head and neck, extremities, and trunk. Potential mimics include malignant melanoma, lymphoma, or metastatic small cell (neuroendocrine) carcinomas. Histopathology of MCC resembles small cell carcinoma both morphologically and on IHC. The possible cell of origin was proposed as the Merkel cell, which functions as a mechanoreceptor. It has a high chance of local recurrence, regional and distant spread. In recent times, Merkel cell polyomavirus has been implicated as the causative agent for this tumor. The same agent has a reported etiologic association with other skin lesions, including seborrheic keratosis.

  8. Pediatric "pet consort dermatitis"-Allergic contact dermatitis from transfer of bronopol from a pet cat.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Dathan; Ridpath, Alyson; Fernandez Faith, Esteban

    2018-06-26

    Consort dermatitis refers to an allergic contact dermatitis caused by transfer from an intimate contact to a sensitized patient. Although close contact with other humans most commonly provokes consort dermatitis, pets have been the source in a minority of cases. We present a unique case of transfer dermatitis from a patient's cat litter to her forearms. Pediatric dermatologists should be aware of the possibility of consort or "transfer" allergic contact dermatitis from pets. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Current status of atopic dermatitis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Takahito; Takeuchi, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic or chronically relapsing, severely pruritic, eczematous skin disease. AD is the second most frequently observed skin disease in dermatology clinics in Japan. Prevalence of childhood AD is 12-13% in mainland Japan; however, it is only half that (about 6%) in children from Ishigaki Island, Okinawa. Topical steroids and tacrolimus are the mainstay of treatment. However, the adverse effects and emotional fear of long-term use of topical steroids have induced a "topical steroid phobia" in patients throughout the world. Undertreatment can exacerbate facial/periocular lesions and lead to the development of atopic cataract and retinal detachment due to repeated scratching/rubbing/patting. Overcoming topical steroid phobia is a key issue for the successful treatment of AD through education, understanding and cooperation of patients and their guardians. PMID:22053299

  10. Noneczematous Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Caterina; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Irritant or allergic contact dermatitis usually presents as an eczematous process, clinically characterized by erythematoedematovesicous lesions with intense itching in the acute phase. Such manifestations become erythematous-scaly as the condition progresses to the subacute phase and papular-hyperkeratotic in the chronic phase. Not infrequently, however, contact dermatitis presents with noneczematous features. The reasons underlying this clinical polymorphism lie in the different noxae and contact modalities, as well as in the individual susceptibility and the various targeted cutaneous structures. The most represented forms of non-eczematous contact dermatitis include the erythema multiforme-like, the purpuric, the lichenoid, and the pigmented kinds. These clinical entities must obviously be discerned from the corresponding “pure” dermatitis, which are not associated with contact with exogenous agents. PMID:24109520

  11. Dermatitis, contact (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture shows a skin inflammation (dermatitis) caused by contact with a material that causes an allergic reaction in this person. Contact dermatitis is a relatively common condition, and can be caused ...

  12. Stressors in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Barilla, Steven; Felix, Kayla; Jorizzo, Joseph L

    2017-01-01

    As with other inflammatory skin disorders, atopic dermatitis has a tendency to cause stress and also be exacerbated by it. Patients with atopic dermatitis have several disease-associated stressors, some of which include physical discomfort due to itching and altered appearance due to flare-ups. These stressors have been shown to effect patients psychosocially by altering sleep patterns, decreasing self-esteem and interfering with interpersonal relationships. In combination with its direct effect on patients, atopic dermatitis also causes stress for parents and caregivers. Studies suggest that atopic dermatitis is strongly correlated with co-sleeping habits, which can negatively impact the health and mood of parents or caregivers. It has also been reported to interfere with the formation of a strong mother-child relationship. In order to optimize treatment for patients with atopic dermatitis, it is important to note the impact that it has on quality of life. By implementing patient counseling, sleep-targeted therapies, and the use of quality of life (QoL) indices, atopic dermatitis patients and caregivers have the potential to experience greater satisfaction with treatment.

  13. Perfume dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, W G

    1985-01-01

    The most common reaction to fragrance materials seen by practicing dermatologists is allergic contact dermatitis. Photodermatitis is occasionally seen, as is contact urticaria, irritation, and depigmentation. Fragrances are the leading cause of allergic contact dermatitis due to cosmetics. The fragrance mixture can cause false-positive reactions; therefore, it is more desirable to test with a separate series of fragrance materials.

  14. [News on occupational contact dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Crépy, Marie-Noëlle; Bensefa-Colas, Lynda

    2014-03-01

    Contact dermatitis--irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis and protein contact dermatitis--are the most common occupational skin diseases, most often localized to the hands. Contact urticaria is rarer The main occupational irritants are wet work, detergents and disinfectants, cutting oils, and solvents. The main occupational allergens are rubber additives, metals (chromium, nickel, cobalt), plastics (epoxy resins, acrylic), biocides and plants. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination, medical history and allergy testing. For a number of irritating or sensitizing agents, irritant or allergic dermatitis can be notified as occupational diseases. The two main prevention measures are reducing skin contact with irritants and complete avoidance of skin contact with offending allergens.

  15. Contact dermatitis to training toilet seat (potty seat dermatitis).

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Claire O; Barros, Mark A; Zaenglein, Andrea L

    2018-05-29

    Allergic contact dermatitis from various components of toilet seats has been well described. We report a case of a young boy presenting with an atypical pattern of dermatitis who was found to be allergic to his training toilet seat. This case highlights the importance of recognizing this diagnosis and the role of potty seats as the causative factor. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [Malassezia and its presumed association with skin diseases in dogs].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is the major species in Malassezia isolated from dogs, and there is a presumably Malassezia-associated skin disease,"Malassezia dermatitis" in the dog. The skin lesion is characterized by relatively demarcated erythema with some scaling at the sebum-rich areas, in which lichenification and hyperpigmentation could be involved in the chronic stage. The clinical features suggest that it corresponds to seborrheic dermatitis in humans. Hence, it might be possible to identify essential pathogenesis of the disease by clarifying its differences in humans and animals as a shared disease.

  17. Stoma dermatitis: prevalent but often overlooked.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shilpa; Ehrlich, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Peristomal dermatoses commonly afflict the area around stoma openings in ostomy patients. These complications, however, are often unreported by patients and remain untreated for years, thus affecting maintenance and recovery from the surgery. These dermatoses can have chemical, mechanical, irritant, bacterial, immunologic, or disease-related etiologies. Examples of common forms of dermatitis that occur peristomally include fecal or urine irritant contact dermatitis, chronic papillomatous dermatitis, mechanical dermatitis, and allergic contact dermatitis. This article summarizes various skin irritations that can occur after an ostomy and also reviews previously published reports of peristomal allergic contact dermatitis. In addition, the clinical importance of identifying these dermatoses (most important, their effects on the patient's quality of life), risk factors for the skin irritations, the importance of patch testing, treatment of stoma dermatitis, and the importance of patient education and patient-doctor communication are also discussed.

  18. Occupational contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lushniak, Boris D

    2004-01-01

    The dermatologist should be aware of the many facets of occupational skin diseases, which can be caused by physical, chemical, and biological insults. The most common manifestation of occupational skin diseases is contact dermatitis (both irritant and allergic). Three factors point out the importance of occupational skin diseases as diseases that have a public health impact: 1) occupational skin diseases are common; 2) they often have a poor prognosis; and 3) they result in a noteworthy economic impact for society and for an individual. They are also diseases amenable to public health interventions. Specific industries and exposures may put a worker at risk of occupational contact dermatitis. The accuracy of the diagnosis of occupational contact dermatitis is related to the skill level, experience, and knowledge of the medical professional who makes the diagnosis and confirms the relationship with a workplace exposure. Prevention of occupational contact dermatitis is important, and a variety of prevention strategies are available.

  19. Black-spot poison ivy dermatitis. An acute irritant contact dermatitis superimposed upon an allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, R M; Rivera, H P; Guin, J D

    1984-08-01

    A black spot in the epidermis over a blister of poison ivy dermatitis is an uncommon finding. Four patients with the phenomenon are described. Histologic and histochemical studies were made on biopsy material and the blackish deposit on the skin surface was compared with black deposits in and on leaves of the species of poison ivy. This examination revealed a yellow, amorphous substance on the stratum corneum of the lesions and a similar substance in and on leaves of the poison ivy plant, Toxicodendron radicans ssp. negundo. Associated with the pigmentary deposits there were distinct changes of acute irritant contact dermatitis superimposed upon allergic contact dermatitis. Our findings support the view that the black material is the oleoresin of the plant, and that this substance behaves both as an irritant and an allergen.

  20. Seborrhoeic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Naldi, Luigi

    2010-12-07

    Seborrhoeic dermatitis affects at least 10% of the population. Malassezia (Pityrosporum) ovale is thought to be the causative organism, and causes inflammation by still poorly defined mechanisms. Seborrhoeic dermatitis tends to relapse after treatment. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of topical treatments for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp in adults? What are the effects of topical treatments for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face and body in adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 12 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: bifonazole, emollients, ketoconazole, lithium succinate, selenium sulphide, tar shampoo, terbinafine, and topical corticosteroids (betamethasone valerate, clobetasol propionate, clobetasone butyrate, hydrocortisone, mometasone furoate).

  1. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy chemicals: occupations, sensitizing products, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Pesonen, Maria; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-12-01

    Epoxy products are among the most common causes of occupational allergic contact dermatitis. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A resin (DGEBA-R) is the most important sensitizer in epoxy systems. To describe patients with occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy products. Patients with allergic reactions to epoxy chemicals were chosen from test files (January 1991 to June 2014). Only patients with occupational contact allergy to some component of epoxy resin systems were included. We analysed patch test results, occupation, symptoms, and exposure data. We found a total of 209 cases with occupational contact allergy to epoxy chemicals. The largest occupational groups were painters (n = 41), floor layers (n = 19), electrical industry workers (n = 19), tile setters (n = 16), and aircraft industry workers (n = 15). A total of 82% of the patients reacted to DGEBA-R. Diagnosis of the DGEBA-R-negative patients required testing with m-xylylenediamine, N,N'-tetraglycidyl-4,4'-methylenedianiline, 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether, 2,4,6-tris-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin, N,N'-diglycidyl-4-glycidyloxyaniline, isophoronediamine, 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane, diethylenetriamine, and cresyl glycidyl ether. The hands/upper extremities were most commonly affected (69%), but facial symptoms were also frequent (60%). Allergic contact dermatitis caused by to epoxy products cannot always be diagnosed by the use of commercial test substances. Workplace products need to be tested. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Chromate Dermatitis from Paint

    PubMed Central

    Engel, H. O.; Calnan, C. D.

    1963-01-01

    Among 250 workers engaged on wet sandpapering of primer paint on car bodies 65 developed a contact dermatitis. The average latent period before dermatitis developed was 4·6 months: only 60% of the patients made a completely satisfactory recovery. The average duration of dermatitis was 5·3 months. Two thirds of the men used one of two barrier creams supplied, while one third used none. Routine patch testing showed that the majority was allergic to chromate. It was found that a primer paint contained zinc chromate, which had been introduced into the paint by the manufacturers shortly before the first cases occurred. Removal of chromate from the paint resulted in a prompt cessation of new cases of dermatitis. Images PMID:14046155

  3. Is dermatitis palmaris sicca an irritant contact dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Juan; Liu, Zhen; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Yong-Hua; Fan, Yi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Dermatitis palmaris sicca (DPS) is a common dry-fissured palmar dermatitis in Asian women. It may be an irritant contact dermatitis, but the immunophenotype of the cells in its infiltrate is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of inflammatory cells in the pathogenesis of DPS. Patch testing was done in 68 patients with DPS, 87 subjects with hand eczema, and 31 healthy subjects. Immunophenotyping of cutaneous inflammatory cells was performed in 8 patients with DPS, 10 subjects with hand eczema, and 8 healthy individuals. Positive patch rates were higher in patients with DPS and those with hand eczema compared with healthy controls, but strong positive (++ or +++) reactions in DPS were fewer compared with hand eczema. Density of CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD68 cells in skin lesions of DPS and hand eczema was significantly higher than that in normal skin. Sparse CD20 cells were present only in hand eczema. Compared with hand eczema, the number of CD3, CD8, CD68, and dermal CD1a cells decreased, but epidermal CD1a cells and CD4/CD8 ratio increased in DPS. The absolute lack of CD20 cells and relative scarcity of dermal CD8 and CD1a cells in skin lesions might be insufficient to induce contact hypersensitivity, so DPS may be an irritant but not allergic contact dermatitis.

  4. A Rare Case of Oestrogen Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bourgeault, Emilie; Bujold, Janie; Doucet, Marie-Eve

    Oestrogen dermatitis is a rare disorder characterised by cyclical eruptions in association with a woman's menstrual cycle. A 43-year-old woman with an 8-year history of cyclical inguinal dermatitis, with a negative patch test, was tested with intradermal progesterone and oestrogen. Intradermal testing was positive for oestrogen only. In a female patient with cyclical dermatitis, it is important to consider oestrogen or progesterone dermatitis in the differential diagnosis.

  5. Biofilm production and antifungal susceptibility of co-cultured Malassezia pachydermatis and Candida parapsilosis isolated from canine seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bumroongthai, K; Chetanachan, P; Niyomtham, W; Yurayart, C; Prapasarakul, N

    2016-07-01

    The yeasts Malassezia (M.) pachydermatis and Candida (C.) parapsilosis are often co-isolated in case of canine seborrhea dermatitis (SD) and also are emerging as opportunistic pathogens of immunocompromised human beings. Increased information about how their relationship results in biofilm production and an antifungal response would be useful to inform treatment and control. This study was designed to investigate biofilm production derived from co-culture of M. pachydermatis and C. parapsilosis from dog skin and to determine their in vitro antifungal susceptibility. We demonstrated that regardless of yeast strain or origin all single and dual cultures produced biofilms within 24 hours, and the greatest amount was present after 72 hours. Biofilm production from mixed cultures was greater than for single strains (P < .05). All sessile forms of the single and dual cultures were resistant to the tested antifungals itraconazole and ketoconazole, whereas planktonic forms were susceptible. The study suggests that dual cultures produce stronger biofilms that are likely to enhance persistence in skin lesions in dogs and result in greater resistance to antifungal treatment. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. [Canine atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Bensignor, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by typical clinical signs and affecting up to 10 % of dogs aged from 1 to 3 years. The diagnosis is mainly clinical and the treatment is complex. This canine form may offer a good model of human atopic dermatitis, as the two diseases show many pathogenetic, clinical and therapeutic similarities.

  7. Contact allergy to preservatives in patients with occupational contact dermatitis and exposure analysis of preservatives in registered chemical products for occupational use.

    PubMed

    Schwensen, Jakob Ferløv; Friis, Ulrik Fischer; Menné, Torkil; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate risk factors for sensitization to preservatives and to examine to which extent different preservatives are registered in chemical products for occupational use in Denmark. A retrospective epidemiological observational analysis of data from a university hospital was conducted. All patients had occupational contact dermatitis and were consecutively patch tested with 11 preservatives from the European baseline series and extended patch test series during a 5-year period: 2009-2013. Information regarding the same preservatives in chemical products for occupational use ('substances and materials') registered in the Danish Product Register Database (PROBAS) was obtained. The frequency of preservative contact allergy was 14.2% (n = 141) in 995 patients with occupational contact dermatitis. Patients with preservative contact allergy had significantly more frequently facial dermatitis (19.9 versus 13.1%) and age > 40 years (71.6 versus 45.8%) than patients without preservative contact allergy, whereas atopic dermatitis was less frequently observed (12.1 versus 19.8%). Preservative contact allergy was more frequent in painters with occupational contact dermatitis as compared to non-painters with occupational contact dermatitis (p < 0.001). This was mainly caused by contact allergy to methylisothiazolinone and contact allergy to formaldehyde. Analysis of the registered substances and materials in PROBAS revealed that preservatives occurred in several product categories, e.g., 'paints and varnishes', 'cleaning agents', 'cooling agents', and 'polishing agents'. Formaldehyde and isothiazolinones were extensively registered in PROBAS. The extensive use of formaldehyde and isothiazolinones in chemical products for occupational use may be problematic for the worker. Appropriate legislation, substitution, and employee education should be prioritized.

  8. Shoe allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Matthys, Erin; Zahir, Amir; Ehrlich, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Foot dermatitis is a widespread condition, affecting men and women of all ages. Because of the location, this condition may present as a debilitating problem to those who have it. Allergic contact dermatitis involving the feet is frequently due to shoes or socks. The allergens that cause shoe dermatitis can be found in any constituent of footwear, including rubber, adhesives, leather, dyes, metals, and medicaments. The goal of treatment is to identify and minimize contact with the offending allergen(s). The lack of product information released from shoe manufacturers and the continually changing trends in footwear present a challenge in treating this condition. The aim of this study is to review the current literature on allergic contact shoe dermatitis; clinical presentation, allergens, patch testing, and management will be discussed. PubMed and MEDLINE databases were used for the search, with a focus on literature updates from the last 15 years.

  9. PLANT DERMATITIS: ASIAN PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Goon, Anthony Teik Jin; Goh, Chee Leok

    2011-01-01

    Occupational and recreational plant exposure on the skin is fairly common. Plant products and extracts are commonly used and found extensively in the environment. Adverse reactions to plants and their products are also fairly common. However, making the diagnosis of contact dermatitis from plants and plant extracts is not always simple and straightforward. Phytodermatitis refers to inflammation of the skin caused by a plant. The clinical patterns may be allergic phytodermatitis, photophytodermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, pharmacological injury, and mechanical injury. In this article, we will focus mainly on allergy contact dermatitis from plants or allergic phytodermatitis occurring in Asia. PMID:22345775

  10. Hand dermatitis/eczema: current management strategy.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Sharma, Alpna D

    2010-07-01

    Ever since its inception a couple of centuries ago, hand dermatitis/eczema has been in the reckoning. Idiosyncrasies continued to loom large thereafter, till it acquired its appropriate position. Dermatitis/eczema are synonymous, often used to indicate a polymorphic pattern of the inflammation of the skin, characterized by pruritus, erythema and vesiculation. A spectrum delineated into acute sub-acute and chronic dermatitis of the hands. Pompholyx, recurrent focal palmer peeling, ring, wear and tear and fingertip eczema, apron, discoid eczema, chronic acral dermatitis, gut and patchy papulosquamous eczema are its clinical variants. Occupational dermatitis/eczema may be contributory. Etiological definitions are clinched by detailed history of exogenous and endogenous factors. However, scientific confirmation of the entity is through patch testing by using available antigens.

  11. Acrylate Systemic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Maxwell B; Pratt, Melanie D

    2015-01-01

    Acrylates, the 2012 American Contact Dermatitis Society allergen of the year, are found in a range of products including the absorbent materials within feminine hygiene pads. When fully polymerized, acrylates are nonimmunogenic; however, if not completely cured, the monomers can be potent allergens.A 28-year-old woman is presented, who had her teeth varnished with Isodan (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France) containing HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with no initial reaction. Approximately 1 month later, the patient developed a genital dermatitis secondary to her feminine hygiene pads. The initial reaction resolved, but 5 months later, the patient developed a systemic contact dermatitis after receiving a second varnishing.The patient was dramatically patch test positive to many acrylates. This case demonstrates a reaction to likely unpolymerized acrylates within a feminine hygiene pad, as well as broad cross-reactivity or cosensitivity to acrylates, and possibly a systemic contact dermatitis with systemic re-exposure to unpolymerized acrylates.

  12. Reactive Granulomatous Dermatitis: A Review of Palisaded Neutrophilic and Granulomatous Dermatitis, Interstitial Granulomatous Dermatitis, Interstitial Granulomatous Drug Reaction, and a Proposed Reclassification.

    PubMed

    Rosenbach, Misha; English, Joseph C

    2015-07-01

    The terms "palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis," "interstitial granulomatous dermatitis," and the subset "interstitial granulomatous drug reaction" are a source of confusion. There exists substantial overlap among the entities with few strict distinguishing features. We review the literature and highlight areas of distinction and overlap, and propose a streamlined diagnostic workup for patients presenting with this cutaneous reaction pattern. Because the systemic disease associations and requisite workup are similar, and the etiopathogenesis is poorly understood but likely similar among these entities, we propose the simplified unifying term "reactive granulomatous dermatitis" to encompass these entities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Easter egg hunt dermatitis: systemic allergic contact dermatitis associated with chocolate ingestion.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; Hamann, Dathan; Goldenberg, Alina; Connelly, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric systemic allergic contact dermatitis to nickel has previously been reported in association with cocoa. We present four clinical cases of hypersensitivity temporally associated with chocolate consumption at Easter. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for foods high in nickel to provoke patients with known nickel sensitivity and systemic dermatitis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A prospective study on canine atopic dermatitis and food-induced allergic dermatitis in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Picco, F; Zini, E; Nett, C; Naegeli, C; Bigler, B; Rüfenacht, S; Roosje, P; Gutzwiller, M E Ricklin; Wilhelm, S; Pfister, J; Meng, E; Favrot, C

    2008-06-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis sensu stricto and food-induced allergic dermatitis are common canine skin conditions, which are often considered clinically undistinguishable. Several attempts have been made to describe populations of atopic dogs and determine breed predisposition but the results were often biased by the use of hospital populations as control group. The present study aims to describe a population of Swiss atopic and food-allergic dogs and to compare it with a data set representing more than 85% of all Swiss dogs. The study, which was carried out during 1 year in several practices and teaching hospital in Switzerland, describes a group of 259 allergic dogs, determines breed predisposition for atopic dermatitis and food-induced allergic dermatitis, compares the clinical signs and features of both conditions, and outlines the clinical picture of five frequently affected breeds.

  15. Conctact dermatitis: some important topics.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, P D

    2015-11-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a type IV delayed hypersensitivity reaction. The gold standard for diagnosis is patch testing. The prevalence of positive patch tests in referred patients with suspected ACD ranges from 27 to 95.6%. The relationship between ACD and atopic dermatitis (AD) is complicated with conflicting reports of prevalence in the literature; however, in a patient with dermatitis not responding to traditional therapies, or with new areas of involvement, ACD should be considered as part of the work-up.

  16. Wound-Related Allergic/Irritant Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Ladizinski, Barry; Saraiya, Ami; Lee, Kachiu C; Skotnicki-Grant, Sandy; Maibach, Howard

    2016-06-01

    To provide information from a literature review about the prevention, recognition, and treatment for contact dermatitis. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Identify signs and symptoms of and diagnostic measures for contact dermatitis.2. Identify causes and risks for contact dermatitis.3. Select appropriate treatment for contact dermatitis and its prevention. Contact dermatitis to wound care products is a common, often neglected problem. A review was conducted to identify articles relevant to contact dermatitis.A PubMed English-language literature review was conducted for appropriate articles published between January 2000 and December 2015.Contact dermatitis is both irritant (80% of cases) or allergic (20% of cases). Frequent use of potential contact allergens and impaired barrier function of the skin can lead to rising sensitization in patients with chronic wounds. Common known allergens to avoid in wound care patients include fragrances, colophony, lanolin, and topical antibiotics.Clinicians should be cognizant of the allergens in wound care products and the potential for sensitization. All medical devices, including wound dressings, adhesives, and bandages, should be labeled with their complete ingredients, and manufacturers should be encouraged to remove common allergens from wound care products, including topical creams, ointments, and dressings.

  17. Prevention of occupational dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sartorelli, P; Kezic, S; Larese Filon, F; John, S M

    2011-01-01

    Occupational dermatitis is among the most frequent occupational diseases. Dermal exposure risk affects many professional categories such as healthcare workers, hairdressers, bakers, cleaning and kitchen employees. The economical burden of occupational dermatitis (OD) is huge (greater than 5 billion Euro per year in Europe), comprising direct costs (treatment, compensation), as well as indirect costs due to sick leave and lack of productivity. A scientifically based preventive program consisting of skin protection during work, cleaning and skin care after work has generally been recommended to prevent occupational contact dermatitis. However the rate of reported occupational skin diseases seems unchanged in the recent years. In cases of impaired skin condition the secondary prevention (i.e. therapeutic treatment by dermatologists and health-educational intervention seminars) is fundamental. For cases of occupational dermatoses in which these outpatient prevention measures are not successful, interdisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation measures have been developed (tertiary individual prevention). In the past years, various pilot-concepts to improve occupational dermatitis prevention have been successfully put into practice focussing on interdisciplinary (dermatological and educational) skin protection training programmes for high-risk professions. Currently a multi-step intervention approach is implemented which is aiming at offering quick preventive help at all levels of severity of occupational contact dermatitis. Recent data reveals that there are reliable evidence-based options for multidisciplinary prevention and patient management of occupational dermatitis using a combined approach by a network of clinics, practices and statutory social insurance bodies. At this stage, it seemed reasonable to form a European joint initiative for skin prevention. Recently a European network of preventive dermatology (European Initiative for the Prevention of Occupational Skin

  18. Effect of Benralizumab in Atopic Dermatitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-22

    Dermatitis, Atopic; Dermatitis; Eczema; Skin Diseases; Skin Diseases, Genetic; Genetic Diseases, Inborn; Skin Diseases, Eczematous; Hypersensitivity; Hypersensitivity, Immediate; Immune System Diseases

  19. Jet Fuel-Associated Occupational Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Contestable, James J

    2017-03-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is a ubiquitous problem. Sailors onboard U.S. Navy vessels are at high risk given the multitude of potential workplace exposures. Solvents, petrochemicals, and fuels are abundant and can cause irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. Symptoms of contact dermatitis can cause inability to work and, if chronic, may require a change in rating or job. Prevention of this issue requires patient education about the risks and correct personnel protective equipment. Even with preventative strategies in place, exposures and cases of contact dermatitis will occur. Treatment consists of topical steroids and immunomodulators, as well as barrier creams and emollients. The goal of treatment is to fully restore the skin's natural barrier and prevent further exposure. A classic case of jet fuel-associated contact dermatitis is reviewed. A literature review utilizing PubMed, Google Scholar, and Google Search was conducted to elucidate our understanding of this issue, current occupational health guidelines, preventative approaches, and treatments. This case report provides guidance and recommendations for providers who encounter contact dermatitis related to petrochemicals, such as jet fuel. The literature review revealed limited knowledge surrounding in vivo human skin effects of jet fuel, specifically JP-5. Even larger gaps were found in our understanding of, and guidelines for, protective modalities against jet fuel exposure and dermatitis. A case is presented to facilitate recognition of jet fuel contact dermatitis and guidance for treatment and prevention. Given our current limited knowledge and guidelines concerning protective equipment and skin protectants, multiple proposals for future studies are suggested. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Stinging nettle dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bryan E; Miller, Christopher J; Adams, David R

    2003-03-01

    The stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a common weed that can cause a wide range of cutaneous reactions. Contact with the hairs or spines on the stems and leaves of the stinging nettle causes the release of several biologically active substances. The released chemicals act to cause itching, dermatitis, and urticaria within moments of contact. Extracts from the stinging nettle may provide therapeutic value for some inflammatory medical conditions. There is no standard treatment for stinging nettle dermatitis.

  1. Atopic dermatitis phenotypes and the need for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Beatriz; Brehler, Ann-Christin; Novak, Natalija

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent developments in therapies which target the molecular mechanisms in atopic dermatitis. Recent findings Current advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of atopic dermatitis are leading to the stratification of different atopic dermatitis phenotypes. New therapies offer the option to target-specific molecules involved in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis. Current new therapies under investigation aim to modulate specific inflammatory pathways associated with distinctive atopic dermatitis phenotypes, which would potentially translate into the development of personalized, targeted-specific treatments of atopic dermatitis. Summary Despite the unmet need for well tolerated, effective, and personalized treatment of atopic dermatitis, the current standard treatments of atopic dermatitis do not focus on the individual pathogenesis of the disease. The development of targeted, phenotype-specific therapies has the potential to open a new promising era of individualized treatment of atopic dermatitis. PMID:28582322

  2. Efficacy of the combined use of a facial cleanser and moisturizers for the care of mild acne patients with sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Kenichi; Seki, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Yosuke; Umeda, Koji; Nishizaka, Takahiro; Tanabe, Hisateru; Takagi, Yutaka; Ishida, Koichi; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2015-02-01

    Acne is a common skin disease that involves the seborrheic area of the face and results from the obstruction of hair follicles followed by inflammation. Careful face washing helps to improve and prevent acne; however, intensive washing has a risk of inducing skin barrier impairment and dry skin, especially in sensitive skin. We hypothesized that skin care combining mild skin cleansing and intensive moisturizing ("combination skin care") may be effective in the care of acne in subjects with dry skin and/or sensitive skin. We developed a combination skin care with a weakly acidic foaming facial skin cleanser based on a mild detergent, an aqueous lotion with eucalyptus extract and a moisturizing gel containing pseudo-ceramide and eucalyptus extract. To optimize an ideal facial skin care system for mild acne on sensitive skin, we performed a 4-week clinical trial with 29 post-adolescent Japanese women with mild acne with dry and sensitive skin. The acne significantly decreased after this trial accompanied by the improvement of dry skin, a significantly increased endogenous ceramide level in the stratum corneum and an elongated alkyl chain length of the non-hydroxy acyl sphingosine type ceramide. No adverse events due to the test samples were observed. Based on diagnosis by a dermatologist, 97% of the subjects found the combination skin care to be "useful" or "slightly useful". Based on these findings, the combined use of a facial skin cleanser and moisturizers is safe and effective for the care of acne in post-adolescent Japanese women with sensitive skin. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. Shiitake Mushroom Dermatitis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Stephany, Mathew Paul; Chung, Stella; Handler, Marc Zachary; Handler, Nancy Stefanie; Handler, Glenn A; Schwartz, Robert A

    2016-10-01

    Shiitake mushroom dermatitis is a cutaneous reaction caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked shiitake mushrooms. Symptoms include linear erythematous eruptions with papules, papulovesicles or plaques, and severe pruritus. It is likely caused by lentinan, a heat-inactivated beta-glucan polysaccharide. Cases were initially reported in Japan but have now been documented in other Asian countries, North America, South America, and Europe, as this mushroom is now cultivated and consumed worldwide. Shiitake mushroom dermatitis may result from mushroom ingestion or from handling, which can result in an allergic contact dermatitis.

  4. Contact Dermatitis for the Practicing Allergist.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of important practice recommendations from the recently updated Contact Dermatitis Practice Parameter. This updated parameter provides essential recommendations pertaining to clinical history, physical examination, and patch testing evaluation of patients suspected of allergic contact dermatitis. In addition to providing guidance for performing and interpreting closed patch testing, the updated parameter provides concrete recommendations for assessing metal hypersensitivity in patients receiving prosthetic devices, for evaluating workers with occupational contact dermatitis, and also for addressing allergic contact dermatitis in children. Finally, the document provides practical recommendations useful for educating patients regarding avoidance of exposure to known contact sensitizers in the home and at work. The Contact Dermatitis Parameter is designed as a practical, evidence-based clinical tool to be used by allergists and dermatologists who routinely are called upon to evaluate patients with skin disorders. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  6. Dermatitis, contact on the cheek (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin inflammation (dermatitis) on the cheek caused by contact with a substance that produced an allergic reaction (allergen). Contact dermatitis causes redness, itching, and small blisters (vesicles).

  7. Occupational contact dermatitis in blue-collar workers: results from a multicentre study from the Danish Contact Dermatitis Group (2003-2012).

    PubMed

    Schwensen, Jakob F; Menné, Torkil; Veien, Niels K; Funding, Anne T; Avnstorp, Christian; Østerballe, Morten; Andersen, Klaus E; Paulsen, Evy; Mørtz, Charlotte G; Sommerlund, Mette; Danielsen, Anne; Andersen, Bo L; Thormann, Jens; Kristensen, Ove; Kristensen, Berit; Vissing, Susanne; Nielsen, Niels H; Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2014-12-01

    Blue-collar workers have a high risk of occupational contact dermatitis, but epidemiological studies are scarce. To investigate allergic contact dermatitis in blue-collar workers with dermatitis registered by the Danish Contact Dermatitis Group. A retrospective analysis of patch test data from 1471 blue-collar workers and 1471 matched controls tested between 2003 and 2012 was performed. A logistic regression was used to test for associations. The blue-collar workers often had occupational hand dermatitis (p < 0.001). Atopic dermatitis was less commonly observed among blue-collar workers (19.6%) than among controls (23.9%) (p = 0.005). Allergens with a statistically significant association with the occupational group of blue-collar workers were epoxy resins, methyldibromo glutaronitrile, 2-bromo-2-nitro-1,3-propanediol, potassium dichromate, and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI)/methylisothiazolinone (MI). The following occupations were additionally identified as risk factors for contact sensitization to MCI/MI and MI, epoxy resins, and potassium dichromate, respectively: painting, construction work, and tile setting/terrazzo work. Contact allergy is a major problem among blue-collar workers. The data indicate a healthy worker effect among blue-collar workers diagnosed with dermatitis, as blue-collar workers were diagnosed significantly less often with atopic dermatitis than were controls. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [Allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Laguna, C; de la Cuadra, J; Martín-González, B; Zaragoza, V; Martínez-Casimiro, L; Alegre, V

    2009-01-01

    Contact dermatitis to cosmetics is a common problem in the general population, although its prevalence appears to be underestimated. We reviewed cases of allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics diagnosed in our dermatology department over a 7-year period with a view to identifying the allergens responsible, the frequency of occurrence of these allergens, and the cosmetic products implicated. Using the database of the skin allergy department, we undertook a search of all cases of allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics diagnosed in our department from January 2000 through October 2007. In this period, patch tests were carried out on 2,485 patients, of whom 740 were diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis and the cause was cosmetics in 202 of these patients (170 women and 32 men), who accounted for 27.3 % of all cases. A total of 315 positive results were found for 46 different allergens. Allergens most often responsible for contact dermatitis in a cosmetics user were methylisothiazolinone (19 %), paraphenylenediamine (15.2 %), and fragrance mixtures (7.8 %). Acrylates were the most common allergens in cases of occupational disease. Half of the positive results were obtained with the standard battery of the Spanish Group for Research Into Dermatitis and Skin Allergies (GEIDAC). The cosmetic products most often implicated among cosmetics users were hair dyes (18.5 %), gels/soaps (15.7 %), and moisturizers (12.7 %). Most patients affected were women. Preservatives, paraphenylenediamine, and fragrances were the most frequently detected cosmetic allergens, in line with previous reports in the literature. Finally, in order to detect new cosmetic allergens, cooperation between physicians and cosmetics producers is needed.

  9. Hand dermatitis--differential diagnoses, diagnostics, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hand dermatitis is multifactorial, and includes factors such as genetic predisposition and exposure. A high incidence rate is associated with female gender, contact allergy, atopic dermatitis, and wet work. The most important risk factors for the persistence of hand dermatitis include its extent, contact allergic or atopic etiology, childhood dermatitis, and early onset (before the age of 20). The cost of illness of hand dermatitis corresponds to this seen in moderate to severe psoriasis. The diagnostic workup of hand dermatitis and its differential diagnoses requires a detailed assessment of occupational and recreational exposure. In case of possible work-related triggers, early notification of the accident insurer should be sought (via the dermatologist's report). Exposure to a contact allergen is a contributing factor in one-half of all cases of hand dermatitis. It is therefore imperative that all patients with hand dermatitis persisting for more than three months undergo patch testing. Successful and sustainable treatment of hand dermatitis starts with the proper identification and elimination of individual triggers, including the substitution of identified contact allergens and irritants, as well as optimizing preventive measures. Graded therapy taking the clinical severity into account is essential. Validated instruments may be used to monitor therapeutic efficacy. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Economic Impact of Atopic Dermatitis in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulmin; Park, Kui Young; Ahn, Seohee; Kim, Dong Ha; Li, Kapsok; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Moon-Beom; Jo, Sun-Jin; Yim, Hyeon Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis is a global public health concern owing to its increasing prevalence and socioeconomic burden. However, few studies have assessed the economic impact of atopic dermatitis in Korea. Objective We conducted a cost analysis of atopic dermatitis and evaluated its economic impacts on individual annual disease burden, quality of life, and changes in medical expenses with respect to changes in health related-quality of life. Methods The cost analysis of atopic dermatitis was performed by reviewing the home accounting records of 32 patients. The economic impact of the disease was evaluated by analyzing questionnaires. To handle uncertainties, we compared the results with the data released by the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Board on medical costs claimed by healthcare facilities. Results The direct cost of atopic dermatitis per patient during the 3-month study period was 541,280 Korean won (KRW), and expenditures on other atopic dermatitis-related products were 120,313 KRW. The extrapolated annual direct cost (including expenditures on other atopic dermatitis-related products) per patient was 2,646,372 KRW. The estimated annual indirect cost was 1,507,068 KRW. Thus, the annual cost of illness of atopic dermatitis (i.e., direct+indirect costs) was estimated to be 4,153,440 KRW. Conclusion The annual total social cost of atopic dermatitis on a national level is estimated to be 5.8 trillion KRW. PMID:26082587

  11. [Atopic dermatitis physiopathology].

    PubMed

    Waton, J

    2017-12-01

    Our understanding of the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis has much improved over the recent years. Epidermal barrier alterations are integrated into 2 theories called inside out and outside in. They are related to complex immune abnormalities. Understanding their mechanism makes it possible to foresee new therapeutics. Moreover, environmental biodiversity, the diversity of cutaneous microbiota and genetic predispositions in atopic dermatitis lead to a new, more comprehensive theory, « the biodiversity theory », integrating epigenetics. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  12. Molecular basis of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonness, Sonja; Bieber, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease and there are numerous publications on this topic. This review will focus on developments in understanding the molecular basis of atopic dermatitis while considering the genetic background, skin barrier impairment, immune system deviation and microbial superinfections. Atopic dermatitis is a complex genetic disease in which gene-gene and gene-environment interactions play a key role. Surprisingly some genetic regions of interest were found to be overlapping with loci identified to play a role in another very common inflammatory skin disease, psoriasis, while no overlap has so far been observed with asthma. Impairment of the skin barrier followed by antigens trespassing seems to play an important role, favouring sensitization via transepidermal penetration which is the focus of current investigations. Superinfections by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus due to a weak innate defence seem to be significant in atopic dermatitis as they elicit a strong inflammatory response. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a high incidence in school children and adults. Disease pathogenesis is complex and the background is multifactorial, making the underlying predispositions elusive. Understanding new pathogenic pathways may lead to the development of new drugs with enhanced benefit for the patient.

  13. Molecular aspects of allergens in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Raffaela; Dzoro, Sheron; Mittermann, Irene; Fedenko, Elena; Elisyutina, Olga; Khaitov, Musa; Karaulov, Alexander; Valenta, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Molecular allergology uses pure, mainly recombinant and structurally defined allergen molecules and allergen-derived epitopes to study mechanisms of IgE-associated allergy, to diagnose, and even predict the development of allergic manifestations and to treat and prevent IgE-associated allergies. Atopic dermatitis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease is almost always associated with IgE sensitization to allergens. However, also non-IgE-mediated pathomechanisms seem to be operative in atopic dermatitis and it is often difficult to identify the disease-causing allergens. Here we review recent work showing the usefulness of molecular allergology to study mechanisms of atopic dermatitis, for diagnosis and eventually for treatment and prevention of atopic dermatitis. Recent findings IgE sensitization to airborne, food-derived, microbial allergens, and autoallergens has been found to be associated with atopic dermatitis. Using defined allergen molecules and non-IgE-reactive allergen derivatives, evidence could be provided for the existence of IgE- and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms of inflammation in atopic dermatitis. Furthermore, effects of epicutaneous allergen administration on systemic allergen-specific immune responses have been studied. Multi-allergen tests containing micro-arrayed allergen molecules have been shown to be useful for the identification of culprit allergens in atopic dermatitis and may improve the management of atopic dermatitis by allergen-specific immunotherapy, allergen avoidance, and IgE-targeting therapies in a personalized medicine approach. Summary Molecular allergology allows for dissection of the pathomechanisms of atopic dermatitis, provides new forms of allergy diagnosis for identification of disease-causing allergens, and opens the door to new forms of management by allergen-specific and T cells-targeting or IgE-targeting interventions in a personalized medicine approach. PMID:28622169

  14. Influences of Environmental Chemicals on Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangmi

    2015-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition including severe pruritus, xerosis, visible eczematous skin lesions that mainly begin early in life. Atopic dermatitis exerts a profound impact on the quality of life of patients and their families. The estimated lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis has increased 2~3 fold during over the past 30 years, especially in urban areas in industrialized countries, emphasizing the importance of life-style and environment in the pathogenesis of atopic diseases. While the interplay of individual genetic predisposition and environmental factors contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis, the recent increase in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis might be attributed to increased exposure to various environmental factors rather than alterations in human genome. In recent decades, there has been an increasing exposure to chemicals from a variety of sources. In this study, the effects of various environmental chemicals we face in everyday life - air pollutants, contact allergens and skin irritants, ingredients in cosmetics and personal care products, and food additives - on the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis are reviewed.

  15. Influences of Environmental Chemicals on Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition including severe pruritus, xerosis, visible eczematous skin lesions that mainly begin early in life. Atopic dermatitis exerts a profound impact on the quality of life of patients and their families. The estimated lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis has increased 2~3 fold during over the past 30 years, especially in urban areas in industrialized countries, emphasizing the importance of life-style and environment in the pathogenesis of atopic diseases. While the interplay of individual genetic predisposition and environmental factors contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis, the recent increase in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis might be attributed to increased exposure to various environmental factors rather than alterations in human genome. In recent decades, there has been an increasing exposure to chemicals from a variety of sources. In this study, the effects of various environmental chemicals we face in everyday life - air pollutants, contact allergens and skin irritants, ingredients in cosmetics and personal care products, and food additives - on the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis are reviewed. PMID:26191377

  16. A localized flare of dermatitis may render patch tests uninterpretable in some patients with recently controlled widespread dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Magembe, Anna J; Davis, Mark D P; Richardson, Donna M

    2009-01-01

    Patch testing rarely is confounded by localized dermatitis induced in the area being tested (usually the back). Its occurrence renders the interpretation of patch tests impossible. To review our experience of the circumstances in which this phenomenon occurs during patch testing. We retrospectively reviewed patients with this phenomenon who underwent patch testing from January 1, 2002, through June 30, 2006. Of the 3,569 patients tested, 12 (0.34% [9 men and 3 women]) had development of this phenomenon. All patients previously had recent widespread dermatitis that was suppressed temporarily with topical corticosteroids and wet dressings at the time of patch testing. The period between control of the dermatitis and the initiation of patch testing was less than 1 week for all patients. Three patients (25%) had recently discontinued therapy with systemic corticosteroids (less than 1 week earlier). In patients with irritable skin either immediately after widespread dermatitis is controlled or after the cessation of systemic corticosteroid treatment, a flare of dermatitis induced by patch testing may render patch tests unreadable and therefore uninterpretable. To avoid this confounding occurrence, a waiting period between control of widespread dermatitis and initiation of patch testing is advised.

  17. Rosmarinus officinalis L. as cause of contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Miroddi, M; Calapai, G; Isola, S; Minciullo, P L; Gangemi, S

    2014-01-01

    Because of the widespread use of botanicals, it has become crucial for health professionals to improve their knowledge about safety problems. Several herbal medicines contain chemicals with allergenic properties responsible for contact dermatitis. Among these, one is Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), a plant used since ancient times in folk medicine; at the present time it is used worldwide as a spice and flavouring agent, as a preservative and for medicinal and cosmetic purposes. The present article aims to revise and summarise scientific literature reporting cases of contact dermatitis caused by the use of R. officinalis as a raw material or as herbal preparations. Published case reports were researched on the following databases and search engines: PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Scopus. The used keywords were: R. officinalis and rosemary each alone or combined with the words allergy, contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, sensitisation and occupational dermatitis. The published case reports show that both rosemary extracts and raw material can be responsible for allergic contact dermatitis. Two cases related to contact dermatitis caused by cross-reactivity between rosemary and thyme were also commented. The diterpene carnosol, a chemical constituent of this plant, has been imputed as a common cause for this reaction. The incidence of contact dermatitis caused by rosemary is not common, but it could be more frequent with respect to the supposed occurrence. It seems plausible that cases of contact dermatitis caused by rosemary are more frequent with respect to the supposed occurrence, because they could be misdiagnosed. For this reason, this possibility should be carefully considered in dermatitis differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification and treatment of poison ivy dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Briant, D; Brouder, G

    1983-01-01

    Poison ivy dermatitis is an acute self-limiting problem of two or three weeks' duration that can cause significant discomfort. Poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac cause more cases of allergic contact dermatitis than all the other contact allergens combined. Treatment of poison ivy dermatitis depends on the severity of the reaction. The nurse practitioner can manage the majority of poison ivy cases. However, if there is systemic involvement, a physician consultation is necessary. The patient can best be assisted by assessing the severity of the dermatitis, prescribing an appropriate supportive therapy and teaching preventive measures.

  19. Apoptosis in the areas of squamous differentiation of irritated seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Pesce, C; Scalora, S

    2000-03-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) consists of a localized proliferation of basaloid keratinocytes, often accompanied by hyperkeratosis and hyperpigmentation. In irritated SK, these features are associated with areas of squamous differentiation with larger keratinocytes and squamous cell eddies. This work is concerned with the evaluation of apoptosis, as demonstrated by the TUNEL method, in the different varieties of SK. Apoptosis was highly expressed in the areas of squamous differentiation of irritated SK, but only mildly increased in the other varieties of SK. These data support the hypothesis that apoptosis has a role in the squamous differentiation of irritated SK. In consideration also of previous data showing that irritated SK is associated with downregulation of EGF-R expression and 125I-EGF binding, we postulate that the morphologic features of irritated SK could correspond to an involution phase of the disease, characterized by altered cell balance with inadequate cell renewal and increased cell loss.

  20. Atopic dermatitis results in intrinsic barrier and immune abnormalities: Implications for contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gittler, Julia K.; Krueger, James G.; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), as well as irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), are common skin diseases. These diseases are characterized by skin inflammation mediated by activated innate immunity or acquired immune mechanisms. Although AD, ICD, and ACD can be encountered in pure forms by allergists and dermatologists, patients with AD often present with increased frequency of ICD and ACD. Although a disturbed barrier alone could potentiate immune reactivity in patients with AD through increased antigen penetration, additional immune mechanisms might explain the increased susceptibility of atopic patients to ICD and ACD. This review discusses cellular pathways associated with increased skin inflammation in all 3 conditions and presents mechanisms that might contribute to the increased rate of ICD and ACD in patients with AD. PMID:22939651

  1. Atypical clinical appearance of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis of seborrheic areas of the face.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yumi; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis is a pruritic eruption that preferentially involves the face. It is characterized by well-demarcated erythema, extending peripherally with a central clearing and pigmentation, together with sterile pustules lining the periphery. We describe five cases of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis with pruritic papules and erythema on seborrheic areas of the face, which lacked the typical features of classic eosinophilic pustular folliculitis--pustules and peripheral extension--but showed eosinophilic infiltration of the hair follicles, histologically. The eruption quickly responded to oral indomethacin except for one case that responded to tranilast and one case that was associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, with recurrences in defined areas of the face. Our findings in these cases suggest that eosinophilic pustular folliculitis may vary in clinical appearance.

  2. [Effects of a Facial Muscle Exercise Program including Facial Massage for Patients with Facial Palsy].

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyoung Ju; Shin, Sung Hee

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a facial muscle exercise program including facial massage on the facial muscle function, subjective symptoms related to paralysis and depression in patients with facial palsy. This study was a quasi-experimental research with a non-equivalent control group non-synchronized design. Participants were 70 patients with facial palsy (experimental group 35, control group 35). For the experimental group, the facial muscular exercise program including facial massage was performed 20 minutes a day, 3 times a week for two weeks. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, χ²-test, Fisher's exact test and independent sample t-test with the SPSS 18.0 program. Facial muscular function of the experimental group improved significantly compared to the control group. There was no significant difference in symptoms related to paralysis between the experimental group and control group. The level of depression in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Results suggest that a facial muscle exercise program including facial massage is an effective nursing intervention to improve facial muscle function and decrease depression in patients with facial palsy.

  3. The combined diagnosis of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis in a retrospective cohort of 1000 consecutive patients with occupational contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Schwensen, Jakob F; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2014-12-01

    The diagnosis of combined allergic and irritant contact dermatitis is an accepted subdiagnosis for hand dermatitis, and it is often considered in a patient with contact dermatitis, a positive and relevant patch test result, and wet work exposure. We therefore hypothesize that it is arbitrary for wet work exposure to be taken into consideration in a patient with newly diagnosed relevant contact allergy. Furthermore, an overestimation of the diagnosis will probably occur if the criteria for wet work exposure are applied correctly, as many occupations have an element of wet work. To find the statistically expected number of combined allergic and irritant contact dermatitis cases in 1000 patients, and to evaluate the diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis. One thousand consecutive patients with occupational contact dermatitis from a hospital unit in Denmark were assessed. The expected number of cases with the diagnosis of combined allergic and irritant contact dermatitis was 0.33%, as compared with the observed number of 6.4%. Females occupied in wet occupations were often diagnosed with combined allergic and irritant contact dermatitis (p < 0.005). The diagnosis of combined allergic and irritant contact dermatitis should be used critically to avoid misclassification, and possible criteria for the diagnosis are proposed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cytopathology of parasitic dermatitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sood, N K; Mekkib, Berhanu; Singla, L D; Gupta, K

    2012-04-01

    Out of 44 cases of dermatitis in dogs, 11 cases of parasitic origin were analyzed by cytopathology. Histopathologic examination of punch biopsies was also done for correlation with cytologic findings. Sarcoptic dermatitis was recorded in six cases, wherein, besides sarcoptic mites, neutrophils, macrophages, and plasma cells and keratinizing epithelial cells were also seen. Hematology revealed a relative neutrophilia and mild eosinophilia. Four cases of severe and generalized demodicosis complicated with bacteria and/or Malassezia sp. infection were also recorded. Histopathologically numerous Demodex sp. mites in varying stage of maturation were found damaging the hair follicles along with associated pathological changes and foreign body granulomas in one case. In addition, flea allergy dermatitis was also observed in one dog. In nutshell, cytology was found to be unequivocally effective in diagnosing parasitic dermatitis.

  5. Beyond spaghetti and meatballs: skin diseases associated with the Malassezia yeasts.

    PubMed

    Levin, Nikki A

    2009-01-01

    Malassezia are common lipid-dependent fungi that grow on the sebaceous areas of human skin, including the face, scalp, and upper trunk. Although Malassezia are a part of the normal human skin flora, they may also cause or exacerbate several skin diseases, including tinea versicolor, Pityrosporum folliculitis, and seborrheic dermatitis. Topical antifungals are the mainstay of treating Malassezia-related diseases. Chronic prophylaxis is often required to prevent recurrences.

  6. Dermatitis and aircrew.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Peter A; Smith, Derek R

    2006-01-01

    Dermatitis is a common problem both in the workplace and in the general community. Airline personnel represent a novel occupational group as they are also exposed to a wide range of potential chemical irritants and other aggravating factors, such as low relative humidity and airborne pollutants. Common skin irritants include dielectric fluids from electrodischarge machining, 'prepreg' materials and sealants in aircraft manufacture, kerosene and various jet-fuel components. Commercial jet fuel is a complex mixture of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, and there is potential for dermal exposure among refueling and maintenance crew. Low relative humidity appears to exacerbate dermatitis amongst aircrew, especially on longer flight durations. Pilots may also be exposed to additional skin irritants outside of the cabin environment, such as ethylene glycol, hydraulic fluid or jet fuel, all of which may be encountered during routine inspections of aircraft before and after flight. Given these factors, preventive measures must carefully consider the undoubted potential for contact with irritants and allergens, which may lead to dermatitis in airline personnel.

  7. Workplace screening for hand dermatitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nichol, K; Copes, R; Spielmann, S; Kersey, K; Eriksson, J; Holness, D L

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) are at increased risk for developing occupational skin disease (OSD) such as dermatitis primarily due to exposure to wet work. Identification of risk factors and workplace screening can help early detection of OSD to avoid the condition becoming chronic. To determine risk factors and clinical findings for hand dermatitis using a workplace screening tool. Employees at a large teaching hospital in Toronto, Canada, were invited to complete a two-part hand dermatitis screening tool. Part 1 inquired about hand hygiene practices and Part 2 comprised a visual assessment of participants' hands by a health professional and classification as (i) normal, (ii) mild dermatitis or (iii) moderate/severe dermatitis. Risk factors were determined using chi-square and Cochran-Armitage analysis on a dichotomous variable, where Yes represented either a mild or moderate/severe disease classification. There were 183 participants out of 643 eligible employees; response rate 28%. Mild or moderate/severe dermatitis was present in 72% of participants. These employees were more likely to work directly with patients, have worked longer in a health care setting, wash hands and change gloves more frequently, wear gloves for more hours per day, have a history of eczema or dermatitis and report a current rash on the hands or rash in the past 12 months. There was a high percentage of HCWs with dermatitis and risk factors for dermatitis. These findings argue for increased attention to prevention and early identification of hand dermatitis and support further testing of the workplace screening tool. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. An update on airborne contact dermatitis: 2001-2006.

    PubMed

    Santos, Raquel; Goossens, An

    2007-12-01

    Reports on airborne dermatoses are mainly published in the context of occupational settings. Hence, in recent years, dermatologists and also occupational physicians have become increasingly aware of the airborne source of contact dermatitis, resulting mainly from exposure to irritants or allergens. However, their occurrence is still underestimated, because reports often omit the term 'airborne' in relation to dust or volatile allergens. For the present update, we screened the journals 'Contact Dermatitis' (July 2000 to December 2006); 'Dermatitis', formerly named 'American Journal of Contact Dermatitis'; 'La Lettre du Gerda' (January 2000 to December 2006); and also included relevant articles from other journals published during the same period. This resulted in an updated list of airborne dermatitis causes.

  9. An update on airborne contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Huygens, S; Goossens, A

    2001-01-01

    This review is an update of 2 previously published articles on airborne contact dermatoses. Because reports in the literature often omit the term 'airborne', 18 volumes of Contact Dermatitis (April 1991-June 2000), 8 volumes of the American Journal of Contact Dermatitis (1992 1999) and 4 volumes of La Lettre du Gerda (1996-1999) were screened, and the cases cited were classified as to history, lesion locations, sensitization sources, and other factors. Reports on airborne dermatitis are increasingly being published, sometimes in relation to specific occupational areas.

  10. Allergic contact dermatitis: Patient management and education.

    PubMed

    Mowad, Christen M; Anderson, Bryan; Scheinman, Pamela; Pootongkam, Suwimon; Nedorost, Susan; Brod, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common diagnosis resulting from exposure to a chemical or chemicals in a patient's personal care products, home, or work environment. Once patch testing has been performed, the education and management process begins. After the causative allergens have been identified, patient education is critical to the proper treatment and management of the patient. This must occur if the dermatitis is to resolve. Detailed education is imperative, and several resources are highlighted. Photoallergic contact dermatitis and occupational contact dermatitis are other considerations a clinician must keep in mind. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Contact urticaria, allergic contact dermatitis, and photoallergic contact dermatitis from oxybenzone.

    PubMed

    Landers, Maeran; Law, Sandra; Storrs, Frances J

    2003-03-01

    There is little literature regarding conventional patch tests and photopatch tests to oxybenzone resulting in both immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. A patient was patch-tested and photopatch-tested to various sunscreen chemicals. Both immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions were observed with oxybenzone. The positive patch tests were also photoaccentuated. Oxybenzone, a common sunscreen allergen, can result in both contact urticaria and delayed-type hypersensitivity on both conventional patch testing and photopatch testing. Allergic contact dermatitis to sunscreen chemicals has traditionally included contact urticaria, allergic contact dermatitis, and photoallergic contact dermatitis. Due to the recognition of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and its esters as sensitizers, the presence of benzophenones in "PABA-free" sunscreens has become more prevalent, especially in sunscreens with a sun protection factor (SPF) greater than 8. In our patient, immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions were seen to oxybenzone (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2-benzoyl-5-methoxyphenol, benzophenone-3, Eusolex 4360, Escalol 567, EUSORB 228, Spectra-Sorb UV-9, Uvinul M-40) upon conventional patch testing and photopatch testing.

  12. Allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Park, Michelle E; Zippin, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis caused by cosmetic products is an increasing concern given the continual creation and introduction of new cosmetics to the public. This article presents an overview of how to evaluate a patient for patch testing, including common areas for cosmetic-induced dermatitis, common cosmetic allergens, and proper management. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Mental Health Comorbidity in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yaghmaie, Pouya; Koudelka, Caroline W.; Simpson, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent data, primarily from Europe, suggest children with atopic dermatitis may be at increased risk of developing mental health disorders. Objective We aimed to quantify the mental health burden associated with pediatric atopic dermatitis in the United States. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used analyzing data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health – a survey reporting on the health status of 92,642 non-institutionalized children ages 0-17. The lifetime prevalence of various provider-diagnosed mental health conditions was calculated for those with and without a history of atopic dermatitis. Results The odds of having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was significantly increased in children with atopic dermatitis compared to non-atopic dermatitis controls, OR 1.87 (95% CI 1.54, 2.27) even after controlling for known confounders. The adjusted odds ratios for depression, anxiety, conduct disorder, and autism were 1.81 (95% CI 1.33,2.46) , 1.77 (95% CI 1.36, 2.29), 1.87 (1.46, 2.39), and 3.04 (95% CI 2.13, 4.34), respectively, and these estimates were all statistically significant. A clear dose-dependent relationship was observed between the prevalence of a mental health disorder and the reported severity of the skin disease. Conclusions Our data reveal a striking association between mental health disorders and atopic dermatitis in the U.S. pediatric population. The severity of the skin disease alters the strength of the association. Prospective cohort studies are needed to verify these associations and to explore underlying mechanisms. Strategies to prevent atopic dermatitis or to aggressively treat early skin inflammation may modify the risk of developing mental health disorders in at-risk children. PMID:23245818

  14. Fiberglass dermatitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, B J; Lee, J Y; Wang, R C

    1993-08-01

    Fiberglass is widely used for insulation and as a reinforcement filling material. Handling fiberglass products may induce contact dermatitis. We report on the first two cases of fiberglass dermatitis reported in Taiwan. The first patient suffered from a severe pruritic eruption two hours after repairing a roof with wave-form ceiling boards. Erythematous maculopapules were present on both hands and finger webs. The second patient was a quality controller of printed circuit boards (PRCBs). She presented with erythematous maculopapules on the face and excoriated papules and lichenified plaques on the trunk and forearms, which had been present for two years. Scrapings of the skin lesions from both patients showed fiberglass spicules of 7.5 to 8 microns in diameter. Similar fibers were detected in scrapings from the wave-form ceiling board and PRCB. Histopathology of the second case revealed spongiotic psoriasiform dermatitis. Patch tests in case 2 with the plastics and glues series, epoxy resin and scrapings from the PRCBs were all negative. Fiberglass dermatitis may be easily misdiagnosed. Clinically, it may resemble scabies, eczematous dermatitis, folliculitis, petechiae and urticaria. A high index of suspicion is essential for a correct diagnosis.

  15. Impact of regulation on contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Daniel; Ledet, Johnathan J

    2009-07-01

    Contact dermatitis is a serious public health and dermatologic concern. The prevalence of contact dermatitis in the United States was estimated to be 13.6 per 1000 population according to the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey using physical examinations by dermatologists of a selected sample of Americans. The American Medical Care Survey estimated that for all American physicians dermatitis is the second most common dermatologic diagnosis proffered. It is essential that government, industry, and dermatologists work together to enhance regulatory methods to control and prevent contact allergy epidemics. Increased knowledge and awareness of occupational skin diseases by dermatologists and other health care professionals will assist in achieving national public health goals. This article reviews governmental regulations-some helpful for patients and workers and some not helpful for dermatologists in their quest to assist patients with contact dermatitis.

  16. Allergic contact dermatitis to fragrances: part 2.

    PubMed

    Arribas, M P; Soro, P; Silvestre, J F

    2013-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis due to fragrances usually manifests as subacute or chronic dermatitis because fragrances are found in a wide range of products to which patients are repeatedly exposed. The typical patient is a middle-aged woman with dermatitis on her hands and face, although other sites may be affected depending on the allergen and the product in which it is found. The standard patch test series of the Spanish Contact Dermatitis and Skin Allergy Research Group (GEIDAC) contains 4 fragrance markers: balsam of Peru, fragrance mix i, fragrance mix ii, and lyral. Testing with a specific fragrance series is recommended in patients with a positive result to any of these 4 markers. The use of a specific fragrance series and new legislation obliging manufacturers to specify the fragrances used in their products, will help to improve the management of allergic contact dermatitis due to fragrances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  17. The pH of water from various sources: an overview for recommendation for patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Nuchkull, Piyavadee; Varothai, Supenya

    2013-07-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have increased susceptibility to irritants. Some patients have questions about types of water for bathing or skin cleansing. We studied the pH of water from various sources to give an overview for physicians to recommend patients with AD. Water from various sources was collected for measurement of the pH using a pH meter and pH-indicator strips. Bottled drinking still water had pH between 6.9 and 7.5 while the sparkling type had pH between 4.9 and 5.5. Water derived from home water filters had an approximate pH of 7.5 as same as tap water. Swimming pool water had had pH between 7.2 and 7.5 while seawater had a pH of 8. Normal saline and distilled water had pH of 5.4 and 5.7, respectively. Facial mineral water had pH between 7.5 and 8, while facial makeup removing water had an acidic pH. Normal saline, distilled water, bottled sparkling water and facial makeup removing water had similar pH to that of normal skin of normal people. However, other factors including benefits of mineral substances in the water in terms of bacteriostatic and anti-inflammation should be considered in the selection of cleansing water.

  18. The pH of water from various sources: an overview for recommendation for patients with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Varothai, Supenya

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have increased susceptibility to irritants. Some patients have questions about types of water for bathing or skin cleansing. Objective We studied the pH of water from various sources to give an overview for physicians to recommend patients with AD. Methods Water from various sources was collected for measurement of the pH using a pH meter and pH-indicator strips. Results Bottled drinking still water had pH between 6.9 and 7.5 while the sparkling type had pH between 4.9 and 5.5. Water derived from home water filters had an approximate pH of 7.5 as same as tap water. Swimming pool water had had pH between 7.2 and 7.5 while seawater had a pH of 8. Normal saline and distilled water had pH of 5.4 and 5.7, respectively. Facial mineral water had pH between 7.5 and 8, while facial makeup removing water had an acidic pH. Conclusion Normal saline, distilled water, bottled sparkling water and facial makeup removing water had similar pH to that of normal skin of normal people. However, other factors including benefits of mineral substances in the water in terms of bacteriostatic and anti-inflammation should be considered in the selection of cleansing water. PMID:23956962

  19. Keratosis lichenoides chronica: Case-based review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pistoni, Federica; Peroni, Anna; Colato, Chiara; Schena, Donatella; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2016-08-01

    Keratosis lichenoides chronica (KLC) is a rare dermatological condition characterized by keratotic papules arranged in a parallel linear or reticular pattern and facial lesions resembling seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea. The clinical, histological and therapeutic information on 71 patients with KLC retrieved through a PubMed search plus one our new case were analyzed. KLC affects patients of all ages, with a modest male predominance. Pediatric cases represent about one quarter of patients. Diagnosis is usually delayed and histologically confirmed. All patients have thick, rough and scaly papules and plaques arranged in a linear or reticular pattern, on limbs (>80%) and trunk (about 60%). Face involvement is described in two-thirds of patients. Lesions are usually asymptomatic or mildly pruritic. Other manifestations, such as palmoplantar keratoderma, mucosal involvement, ocular manifestations, nail dystrophy, are reported in 20-30% of patients. Children present more frequently alopecia. No controlled trials are available. Results from small case series or single case reports show that the best treatment options are phototherapy and systemic retinoids, alone or in combination, with nearly half of patients reaching complete remission. Systemic corticosteroids as well as antibiotics and antimalarials are not effective.

  20. [Facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  1. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Meek, Marcel F

    2009-08-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two cases of sound-induced facial synkinesis (SFS) after facial nerve injury. As far as we know, this phenomenon has not been described in the English literature before. Patient A presented with right hemifacial palsy after lesion of the facial nerve due to skull base fracture. He reported involuntary muscle activity at the right corner of the mouth, specifically on hearing ringing keys. Patient B suffered from left hemifacial palsy following otitis media and developed involuntary muscle contraction in the facial musculature specifically on hearing clapping hands or a trumpet sound. Both patients were evaluated by means of video, audio and EMG analysis. Possible mechanisms in the pathophysiology of SFS are postulated and therapeutic options are discussed.

  2. Atopic dermatitis in the domestic dog.

    PubMed

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M

    2016-01-01

    Dogs may develop a syndrome of spontaneous, inflammatory, pruritic dermatitis that shares many features with human atopic dermatitis, including a young age of onset, characteristic lesion distribution, immunoglobulin E sensitization to common environmental allergen sources, and evidence of epidermal barrier dysfunction. There are also several important differences between canine and human atopic dermatitis. Although dogs may suffer from multiple-organ hypersensitivity syndromes, there is no evidence that this species experiences the progressive evolution from cutaneous to respiratory allergy characteristic of the human atopic march. Despite the presence of epidermal barrier derangement, there is no significant association between canine atopic dermatitis and mutations in filaggrin. Finally, treatment of canine disease relies much less heavily on topical therapy than does its human counterpart, while allergy testing and allergen-specific immunotherapy provide an often essential component of effective clinical management of affected dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Taxonomy of Malassezia furfur: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Aspíroz, M C; Moreno, L A; Rubio, M C

    1997-12-01

    Malassezia furfur is a lipophilic yeast considered as a normal component of the human skin flora. Apart from pityriasis versicolor, M. furfur has been linked to several skin diseases such as seborrheic dermatitis, folliculitis or atopic dermatitis. Moreover, these yeasts have been reported as agent of invasive human diseases including pneumonia, catheter-associated sepsis and peritonitis. The existence of morphological, serological, metabolical, biochemical and karyotipical differences has been described among isolates of these yeasts. These observations gave arguments for a possible intraspecific division, and this hypothesis has been confirmed by the existence of six species within the formerly called M. furfur (lipid-dependent Malassezia strains): M. furfur, Malassezia sympodialis, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia obtusa, Malassezia restricta and Malassezia slooffiae.

  4. Facial dynamics and emotional expressions in facial aging treatments.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Thierry; Gassia, Véronique; Belhaouari, Lakhdar

    2015-03-01

    Facial expressions convey emotions that form the foundation of interpersonal relationships, and many of these emotions promote and regulate our social linkages. Hence, the facial aging symptomatological analysis and the treatment plan must of necessity include knowledge of the facial dynamics and the emotional expressions of the face. This approach aims to more closely meet patients' expectations of natural-looking results, by correcting age-related negative expressions while observing the emotional language of the face. This article will successively describe patients' expectations, the role of facial expressions in relational dynamics, the relationship between facial structures and facial expressions, and the way facial aging mimics negative expressions. Eventually, therapeutic implications for facial aging treatment will be addressed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Contact dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 35. Usatine RP, Riojas M. Diagnosis and management of contact dermatitis. Am Fam Physician . 2010;82( ...

  6. Dermoscopic Clues for Diagnosing Melanomas That Resemble Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Sonia; Aguilera, Paula; Scalvenzi, Massimiliano; Longo, Caterina; Barreiro, Alicia; Broganelli, Paolo; Cavicchini, Stefano; Llambrich, Alex; Zaballos, Pedro; Thomas, Luc; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana; Zalaudek, Iris

    2017-01-01

    Importance Melanomas that clinically mimic seborrheic keratosis (SK) can delay diagnosis and adequate treatment. However, little is known about the value of dermoscopy in recognizing these difficult-to-diagnose melanomas. Objective To describe the dermoscopic features of SK-like melanomas to understand their clinical morphology. Design, Setting, and Participants This observational retrospective study used 134 clinical and dermoscopic images of histopathologically proven melanomas in 134 patients treated in 9 skin cancer centers in Spain, France, Italy, and Austria. Without knowledge that the definite diagnosis for all the lesions was melanoma, 2 dermoscopy-trained observers evaluated the clinical descriptions and 48 dermoscopic features (including all melanocytic and nonmelanocytic criteria) of all 134 images and classified each dermoscopically as SK or not SK. The total dermoscopy score and the 7-point checklist score were assessed. Images of the lesions and patient data were collected from July 15, 2013, through July 31, 2014. Main Outcomes and Measures Frequencies of specific morphologic patterns of (clinically and dermoscopically) SK-like melanomas, patient demographics, and interobserver agreement of criteria were evaluated. Results Of the 134 cases collected from 72 men and 61 women, all of whom were white and who had a mean (SD) age of 55.6 (17.5) years, 110 (82.1%) revealed dermoscopic features suggestive of melanoma, including pigment network (74 [55.2%]), blue-white veil (72 [53.7%]), globules and dots (68 [50.7%]), pseudopods or streaks (47 [35.1%]), and blue-black sign (43 [32.3%]). The remaining 24 cases (17.9%) were considered likely SKs, even by dermoscopy. Overall, lesions showed a scaly and hyperkeratotic surface (45 [33.6%]), yellowish keratin (42 [31.3%]), comedo-like openings (41 [30.5%]), and milia-like cysts (30 [22.4%]). The entire sample achieved a mean (SD) total dermoscopy score of 4.7 (1.6) and a 7-point checklist score of 4.4 (2

  7. [Contact dermatitis: an approach used by a medical officer].

    PubMed

    Vologzhanin, D A; Bozhchenko, A A; Bala, A M

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with contact dermatitis issues, that are of interest not only for dermatologists and specialists in professional pathology, but as well as for general practitioners. Issues of contact dermatitis classification, pathogenic peculiarities of the disease main forms and their basic causes are discussed. Clinical manifestations of irritative and allergic contact dermatitis are described in detail, aspects of differential diagnostics analysed. A detailed consideration is given to allergic diagnostics of contact dermatitis using application test-systems with the most common contact allergens. Main principles of contact dermatitis treatment are outlined in the article. The necessity of a complex approach to this disease therapy that requires not only external therapy, but the compliance with an appropriate treatment regimen, diet as well as application of a particular system therapy is shown. Recommendations for contact dermatitis prophylaxis are given.

  8. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Mohd Noor, Nor Farid; Basri, Rehana; Yew, Tan Fo; Wen, Tay Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05) but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1%) were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5%) short and 81 (28.3%) long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  9. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18–25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects’ evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05) but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1%) were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5%) short and 81 (28.3%) long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. In conclusion: 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population. PMID:26562655

  10. Stasis Dermatitis: Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Management.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Swaminathan; Migden, Michael R; Silapunt, Sirunya

    2017-06-01

    Stasis dermatitis commonly occurs in older age. It is caused by venous hypertension resulting from retrograde flow due to incompetent venous valves, valve destruction, or obstruction of the venous system. Further tissue changes arise from an inflammatory process mediated by metalloproteinases, which are up-regulated by ferric ion from extravasated red blood cells. Stasis dermatitis presents initially as poorly demarcated erythematous plaques of the lower legs bilaterally, classically involving the medial malleolus. It is one of the spectrum of cutaneous findings that may result from chronic venous insufficiency. Its mimics include cellulitis, contact dermatitis, and pigmented purpuric dermatoses. Duplex ultrasound is useful in demonstrating venous reflux when the clinical diagnosis of stasis dermatitis is inadequate. Conservative treatment involves the use of compression therapy directed at improving ambulatory venous pressure. Interventional therapy currently includes minimally invasive techniques such as endovenous thermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy, which have supplanted the use of open surgical techniques.

  11. Granulomatous dermatitis due to Malassezia sympodialis.

    PubMed

    Desai, Harsha B; Perkins, Philip L; Procop, Gary W

    2011-09-01

    A 67-year-old man, with multiple skin lesions that appeared over 2 years, had biopsies that disclosed granulomatous dermatitis with associated small yeasts. The urinary antigen test results were negative for Histoplasma infection; cultures from the biopsies did not grow any fungi or other potential pathogens. The chest roentgenogram results were normal. Morphologic examination revealed features of a Malassezia species. Broad-range fungal polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing disclosed that the infecting fungus was Malassezia sympodialis , a lipid-dependent yeast. This report supports one other case report that Malassezia species may cause granulomatous dermatitis; in the previous case, the etiologic agent was Malassezia pachydermatis , a nonlipid-dependent species. We recommend the use of lipid-supplemented culture media for specimens from patients with granulomatous dermatitis because several Malassezia species are dependent on lipid; the absence of lipid supplementation in routine cultures likely explains the negative culture results for this patient. This, to our knowledge, is the first report of granulomatous dermatitis caused by M sympodialis.

  12. Management of Itch in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Judith; Buddenkotte, Joerg; Berger, Timothy G.; Steinhoff, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common, pruritic, inflammatory skin disorder. Chronic, localized, or even generalized pruritus is the diagnostic hallmark of atopic dermatitis, and its management remains a challenge for physicians. The threshold for itch and alloknesis is markedly reduced in these patients, and infections can promote exacerbation and thereby increase the itch. Modern management consists of anti-inflammatory, occasionally antiseptic, as well as antipruritic therapies to address the epidermal barrier as well as immunomodulation or infection. Mild forms of atopic dermatitis may be controlled with topical therapies, but moderate-to-severe forms often require a combination of systemic treatments consisting of antipruritic and immunosuppressive drugs, phototherapy, and topical compounds. In addition, patient education and a therapeutic regimen to help the patient cope with the itch and eczema are important adjuvant strategies for optimized long-term management. This review highlights various topical, systemic, and complementary and alternative therapies, as well as provide a therapeutic ladder for optimized long-term control of itch in atopic dermatitis. PMID:21767767

  13. Occupational poison ivy and oak dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Epstein, W L

    1994-07-01

    Among the growing and diverse groups of outdoor and environmental workers, poison ivy and poison oak continue to be the major cause of occupational contact dermatitis. This article reviews the practical and theoretic means to prevent poison ivy and poison oak dermatitis in workers occupationally exposed to these weeds.

  14. Making contact for contact dermatitis: a survey of the membership of the American Contact Dermatitis Society.

    PubMed

    Nezafati, Kaveh A; Carroll, Bryan; Storrs, Frances J; Cruz, Ponciano D

    2013-01-01

    The American Contact Dermatitis Society (ACDS) is the principal organization representing the subspecialty of contact dermatitis in the United States. The aim of this study was to characterize ACDS members with respect to demographic characteristics, patch-test practices, and sentiments regarding the Society and its journal Dermatitis. We conducted cross-sectional postal and online surveys of ACDS members. More than a third of ACDS members responded to the survey, 92% of whom practice dermatology, and most of whom are community practitioners. Responders manage patients with allergic and irritant dermatitis at a similar frequency. On average, they patch test 4 patients per week using 66 allergens per patient, which often include customized trays. Almost half of these practitioners learned patch testing from their residency programs. Most of the responders read and value the Society journal, value the Contact Allergen Management Program database, and attend society meetings. The ACDS is comprised overwhelmingly of dermatologists who are primarily community-based, young relative to the start of their practices, and use the Society's resources for continuing education.

  15. [Clinical symptomps, diagnosis and therapy of feline allergic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Favrot, C; Rostaher, A; Fischer, N

    2014-07-01

    Allergies are often suspected in cats and they are mainly hypersensitivity reactions against insect bites, food- or environmental allergens. Cats, with non flea induced atopic dermatitis, normally present with one oft he following reaction patterns: miliary dermatitis, eosinophilic dermatitis, selfinduced alopecia or head and neck excoriations. None of these reaction patterns is nevertheless pathognomonic for allergic dermatitis, therefore the diagnosis is based on the one hand on the exclusion of similar diseases on the other hand on the successful response on a certain therapy. Recently a study on the clinical presentation of cats with non flea induced atopic dermatitis was published. In this study certain criteria for diagnosing atopy in cats were proposed. For therapy of allergic cats cyclosporin, glucocorticoids, antihistamines, hypoallergenic diets and allergen specific immunotherapy are used. This article should provide a recent overview on the clinical symptoms, diagnosis and therapy of feline allergic dermatitis.

  16. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis 2014.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ichiro; Kohno, Yoichi; Akiyama, Kazuo; Aihara, Michiko; Kondo, Naomi; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shoji, Shunsuke; Yamada, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and coun- termeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is a inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level. The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2012 (ADGL2012)" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2013" together with those for other allergic diseases. © 2014 Japanese Society of Allergology.

  17. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis 2014.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ichiro; Kohno, Yoichi; Akiyama, Kazuo; Aihara, Michiko; Kondo, Naomi; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shoji, Shunsuke; Yamada, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Koichiro

    2014-09-01

    Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and countermeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is a inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level. The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2012 (ADGL2012)" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2013" together with those for other allergic diseases.

  18. Atopic dermatitis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Berke, Rebecca; Singh, Arshdeep; Guralnick, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis, also known as atopic eczema, is a chronic pruritic skin condition affecting approximately 17.8 million persons in the United States. It can lead to significant morbidity. A simplified version of the U.K. Working Party's Diagnostic Criteria can help make the diagnosis. Asking about the presence and frequency of symptoms can allow physicians to grade the severity of the disease and response to treatment. Management consists of relieving symptoms and lengthening time between flare-ups. Regular, liberal use of emollients is recommended. The primary pharmacologic treatment is topical corticosteroids. Twice-daily or more frequent application has not been shown to be more effective than once-daily application. A maintenance regimen of topical corticosteroids may reduce relapse rates in patients who have recurrent moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Pimecrolimus and tacrolimus are calcineurin inhibitors that are recommended as second-line treatment for persons with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis and who are at risk of atrophy from topical corticosteroids. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a boxed warning about a possible link between these medications and skin malignancies and lymphoma, studies have not demonstrated a clear link. Topical and oral antibiotics may be used to treat secondary bacterial infections, but are not effective in preventing atopic dermatitis flare-ups. The effectiveness of alternative therapies, such as Chinese herbal preparations, homeopathy, hypnotherapy/biofeedback, and massage therapy, has not been established.

  19. Protein contact dermatitis: allergens, pathogenesis, and management.

    PubMed

    Levin, Cheryl; Warshaw, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Protein contact dermatitis is an allergic skin reaction induced principally by proteins of either animal or plant origin. The clinical presentation is that of a chronic dermatitis, and it is often difficult to differentiate between allergic contact dermatitis and other eczematous dermatoses. One distinguishing clinical feature is that acute flares of pruritus, urticaria, edema, or vesiculation are noted minutes after contact with the causative substances. Additionally, the patch-test result is typically negative, and the scratch- or prick-test result is positive. The pathogenesis of protein contact dermatitis is unclear but may involve a type I (immunoglobulin E [IgE], immediate) hypersensitivity reaction, type IV (cell-mediated delayed) hypersensitivity reaction, and/or a delayed reaction due to IgE-bearing Langerhans' cells. Management involves avoidance of the allergen.

  20. Dermatitis Herpetiformis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Authors Information for Reviewers Human & Animal Rights Job Postings Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive ... Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is an intensely itchy skin eruption. It usually shows up in young adults, and is more common in men and people ...

  1. Traumatic facial nerve neuroma with facial palsy presenting in infancy.

    PubMed

    Clark, James H; Burger, Peter C; Boahene, Derek Kofi; Niparko, John K

    2010-07-01

    To describe the management of traumatic neuroma of the facial nerve in a child and literature review. Sixteen-month-old male subject. Radiological imaging and surgery. Facial nerve function. The patient presented at 16 months with a right facial palsy and was found to have a right facial nerve traumatic neuroma. A transmastoid, middle fossa resection of the right facial nerve lesion was undertaken with a successful facial nerve-to-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis. The facial palsy improved postoperatively. A traumatic neuroma should be considered in an infant who presents with facial palsy, even in the absence of an obvious history of trauma. The treatment of such lesion is complex in any age group but especially in young children. Symptoms, age, lesion size, growth rate, and facial nerve function determine the appropriate management.

  2. Complete prevention of radiation-induced dermatitis using topical adrenergic vasoconstrictors.

    PubMed

    Fahl, William E

    2016-12-01

    Radiation dermatitis is a commonly occurring, painful, side effect of cancer radiotherapy that causes some patients to withdraw from the radiotherapy course. Our goal was to test and optimize topical application of an adrenergic vasoconstrictor to rat skin in a preclinical test to prevent radiation-induced dermatitis. A radiation dermatitis assay was developed in which 17.2 Gy to a 1.5 × 3.0 cm rectangle on the clipped dorsal back of rats yielded Grade 3 radiation dermatitis over the irradiated area 13 days later. Single, topical applications of each of three adrenergic vasoconstrictors, epinephrine, norepinephrine, or phenylephrine, in various vehicle formulations, doses, and application schedules, were tested to determine their efficacy in preventing radiation dermatitis. Each of the three adrenergic agonists conferred 100 % prevention of radiation dermatitis in linear, dose-dependent manners and their EC 50 potencies in preventing radiation dermatitis correlated well with their individual K d association constants for binding to mammalian α-adrenergic receptors. Topical vasoconstrictor application as little as 3-12 min before irradiation gave 80-100 % prevention, respectively, of radiation dermatitis. There was a strong correlation between the extent (0-100 %) of skin blanch present in skin immediately before irradiation and prevention of radiation dermatitis scored 13 days after irradiation. The data presented here demonstrate that topical application of adrenergic vasoconstrictors to rat skin before a large, 17.2 Gy, radiation insult confers 100 % protection against radiation dermatitis and support ongoing clinical trials and commercial development of a vasoconstrictor-based product to prevent radiotherapy-induced dermatitis.

  3. Acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Adam J; Kole, Lauren; Moran, Meena S

    2017-01-01

    Nearly all women who receive radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer experience some degree of radiation dermatitis. However, evidence describing the appropriate management of radiation dermatitis is often lacking or contradictory. Here, we summarize the available literature regarding radiation dermatitis causes, the presentation and timing of symptoms, methods for dermatitis assessment and prevention, and review evidence-based management strategies. PMID:28503074

  4. Classification and possible bacterial infection in outpatients with eczema and dermatitis in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Shi, Xiao-Dong; Li, Lin-Feng; Zhou, Ping; Shen, Yi-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the classification and bacterial infection in outpatients with eczema and dermatitis in China. To investigate the prevalence of eczema and dermatitis in outpatients of dermatology clinics in China, examine classification and proportion of common types of dermatitis and the possible bacterial infection, and analyze the possible related factors. Outpatients with eczema or dermatitis from 39 tertiary hospitals of 15 provinces in mainland China from July 1 to September 30, 2014, were enrolled in this cross-sectional and multicenter study. Among 9393 enrolled outpatients, 636 patients (6.7%) were excluded because of incomplete information. The leading subtypes of dermatitis were unclassified eczema (35.5%), atopic dermatitis (13.4%), irritant dermatitis (9.2%), and widespread eczema (8.7%). Total bacterial infection rate was 52.3%, with widespread eczema, stasis dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis being the leading three (65.7%, 61.8%, and 61.4%, respectively). Clinically very likely bacterial infection has a significant positive correlation with disease duration, history of allergic disease, history of flexion dermatitis, and severe itching. Atopic dermatitis has become a common subtype of dermatitis in China. Secondary bacterial infection is common in all patients with dermatitis, and more attentions should be paid on this issue in other type of dermatitis apart from atopic dermatitis. PMID:28858126

  5. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  6. Clinical and Histopathological Investigation of Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Nam Kyung; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is one of the most common epidermal tumors of the skin. However, only a few large-scale clinicohistopathological investigations have been conducted on SK or on the possible correlation between histopathological SK subtype and location. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and histopathological features of a relatively large number of cases of diagnosed SK. Methods Two hundred and seventy-one pathology slides of skin tissue from patients with clinically diagnosed SK and 206 cases of biopsy-proven SK were analyzed. The biopsy-proven cases of SK were assessed for histopathological subclassification. The demographic, clinical, and histopathological data of the patients were collected for analysis of associated factors. Results The most frequent histopathological subtype was the acanthotic type, followed by mixed, hyperkeratotic, melanoacanthoma, clonal, irritated, and adenoid types; an unexpectedly high percentage (9.2%) of the melanoacanthoma variant was observed. The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites than in sun-protected sites (p=0.028). Premalignant and malignant entities together represented almost one-quarter (24.2%) of the clinicopathological mismatch cases (i.e., mismatch between the clinical and histopathological diagnoses). Regarding the location of SK development, the frequency of mismatch for the sun-exposed areas was significantly higher than that for sun-protected areas (p=0.043). Conclusion The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites. Biopsy sampling should be performed for lesions situated in sun-exposed areas to exclude other premalignant or malignant diseases. PMID:27081260

  7. Occupational protein contact dermatitis in food handlers.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, N; Roed-Petersen, J

    1976-02-01

    The preparation of food in restaurant kitchens carries a high risk of occupational dermatoses. Analysis of 33 cases revealed four different etiological types. Simple irritant dermatitis was rare (2 cases), plain contact dermatitis was more common (6 cases). Fifteen patients had relevant patch tests and scratch tests; ten had positive scratch tests only to explain the cause of their dermatitis. The last type was termed protein contact dermatitis. The major type IV allergens incriminated were metals, onion and garlic. The major proteinaceous allergens indicated by history and test results were fish and shell-fish. Open patch tests with the incriminated foods may cause erythema or oedema on normal skin after 20 minutes. Previously eczematous, now normal looking, skin often responds with a crop of dyshidrotic vesicles preceded by erythema and itching 30 minutes after the application of an open test. Examination for specific IgE is not always positive in such cases. Inhalant allergy was rare. The results indicate that food handlers are sensitized by the protein they touch, and then react to later contact with the proteins. Protein contact dermatitis is similarly common among veterinary surgeons, while the importance in other occupational groups remains to be studied.

  8. Japanese guidelines for atopic dermatitis 2017.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ichiro; Aihara, Michiko; Ohya, Yukihiro; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shimojo, Naoki; Shoji, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Masami; Yamada, Hidekazu

    2017-04-01

    Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and countermeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level. The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2015 (ADGL2015)" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2016" together with those for other allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Role of Malassezia spp. in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Glatz, Martin; Bosshard, Philipp P.; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia spp. is a genus of lipophilic yeasts and comprises the most common fungi on healthy human skin. Despite its role as a commensal on healthy human skin, Malassezia spp. is attributed a pathogenic role in atopic dermatitis. The mechanisms by which Malassezia spp. may contribute to the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis are not fully understood. Here, we review the latest findings on the pathogenetic role of Malassezia spp. in atopic dermatitis (AD). For example, Malassezia spp. produces a variety of immunogenic proteins that elicit the production of specific IgE antibodies and may induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, Malassezia spp. induces auto-reactive T cells that cross-react between fungal proteins and their human counterparts. These mechanisms contribute to skin inflammation in atopic dermatitis and therefore influence the course of this disorder. Finally, we discuss the possible benefit of an anti-Malassezia spp. treatment in patients with atopic dermatitis. PMID:26239555

  10. Methotrexate use in allergic contact dermatitis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashaki; Burns, Erin; Burkemper, Nicole M

    2018-03-01

    Methotrexate, a folate antimetabolite, is used to treat atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although methotrexate's therapeutic efficacy has been noted in the literature, there are few data on the efficacy of methotrexate treatment for allergic contact dermatitis. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of methotrexate in treating allergic contact dermatitis at a single institution, and also to assess methotrexate efficacy in patients with chronic, unavoidable allergen exposure. We performed a retrospective chart review of 32 patients diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis by positive patch test reactions, and who received treatment with methotrexate from November 2010 to November 2014. Demographic and treatment-associated data were collected from electronic medical records. Ten patients were identified as allergen non-avoiders secondary to their occupation, and were subgrouped as such. Seventy-eight per cent (25/32) of patients showed either a partial or a complete response. Methotrexate had a comparable efficacy rate in the allergen non-avoiders subset, at 10 of 10. Of the 32 patients, 23% (5/22) had complete clearance of their dermatitis, and 1/10 of allergen non-avoiders had complete clearance of their dermatitis. Methotrexate is a well-tolerated and effective treatment for allergic contact dermatitis, and shows comparable efficacy to immunomodulatory agents such as cyclosporine and azathioprine, with robust efficacy despite persistent allergen exposure in patients with allergic contact dermatitis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Three cases of pigmented cosmetic dermatitis-like eruptions associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome or anti-SSA antibody.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Naoko; Sakai, Takashi; Saito-Shono, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Kazushi; Hatano, Yutaka; Katagiri, Kazumoto; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Kawano, Kenji; Kimoto, Kenichi; Kubota, Toshiaki; Eshima, Nobuoki; Kojima, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Sakuhei

    2016-08-01

    Pigmented cosmetic dermatitis-like (Riehl's melanosis-like) pigmentation was reported in three of 27 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. But case reports of such eruptions are rare. We describe three cases of such eruptions associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome or anti-SSA antibody and possible associations with specific types of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and infiltrating lymphocytes. These middle-aged Japanese women had reticular facial pigmentation and histopathological examination revealed interface dermatitis, melanophages, and dense lymphocytic infiltration around hair follicles and sweat ducts. HLA typing revealed common antigenic equivalents or genetic typing of HLA-A2, DR52, DPA1(02:02) and DPB1(05:01). Immunohistochemical staining revealed major subsets of T cells to be CD8 and CD45RO. Some Foxp3- and few IL17-positive cells were found in strong contrast to the major CD4 subset of infiltrated T cells in annular erythema associated with Sjögren's syndrome. Apparently, our patients' pigmentation represented a specific etiology associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome or anti-SSA antibody. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  12. Occupational dermatitis in hairdressers - influence of individual and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Carøe, Tanja K; Ebbehøj, Niels E; Agner, Tove

    2017-03-01

    Hairdressers are at risk of developing occupational contact dermatitis because of their intense contact with wet work in combination with chemicals. To perform an analysis of a cohort study of hairdressers with occupational contact dermatitis recognized in the period 2006-2011, focusing on individual and environmental factors associated with the disease. The study was a descriptive, register-based survey including all hairdressers with recognized occupational contact dermatitis in Denmark in the period January 2006 to September 2011. Data were obtained from the Danish National Board of Industrial Injuries. The study comprised 381 patients (373 women and 8 men). The median age was 25 years, 64.8% were apprentices, and 35.2% were fully trained hairdressers. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 36.0%, and was significantly higher among apprentices than among fully trained hairdressers (44.9% and 19.4%, respectively) (p < 0.001). Of the patients, 48.3% had their dermatitis recognized as occupational irritant contact dermatitis, 46.7% had their dermatitis recognized as as occupational allergic contact dermatitis or combined allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, and 5.0% were recognized as having occupational contact urticaria. The low median age, the high percentages of atopic dermatitis in apprentices and the fact that more apprentices than fully trained hairdressers had recognized occupational contact dermatitis underlines the importance of early prevention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Crystal deodorant dermatitis: irritant dermatitis to alum-containing deodorant.

    PubMed

    Gallego, H; Lewis, E J; Crutchfield, C E

    1999-07-01

    Two patients developed an irritant dermatitis of the axillae shortly after using an over-the-counter "natural deodorant crystal" product containing alum. We discuss this previously unreported, untoward reaction to alum, an ancient agent with newfound popularity as an alternative health product.

  14. Atopic Dermatitis and Comorbidities: Added Value of Comprehensive Dermatoepidemiology.

    PubMed

    Nijsten, Tamar

    2017-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is common and in its severe form is devastating. This chronic inflammatory dermatosis is part of the atopic syndrome, which includes asthma, food allergies, and hay fever and is known to be associated with mental health disorders. In line with psoriasis, several recent observational studies using national survey and linkage data have suggested a link between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease. The atopic dermatitis field can benefit from the past experiences in psoriasis research and should not follow the same path, but, rather, aim for a more comprehensive approach from the beginning. A recent German consortium studying links between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease first screened a large claims database, followed by analyses of more deeply phenotyped (birth) cohorts with longitudinal data. In addition, genetic and metabolic analyses assessing the predisposition of patients with atopic dermatitis for cardiovascular disease were performed. Overall, the association between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease was at most modest, but in more refined cohorts the cardiovascular risk profile and genetic architecture was comparable. A more integrated approach could create clarity about the clinical relevance of cardiovascular disease in individuals with atopic dermatitis sooner, avoid speculation that affects patient care, and save scientific resources. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Occupational protein contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Barbaud, Annick; Poreaux, Claire; Penven, Emmanuelle; Waton, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is generally caused by haptens but can also be induced by proteins causing mainly immunological contact urticaria (ICU); chronic hand eczema in the context of protein contact dermatitis (PCD). In a monocentric retrospective study, from our database, only 31 (0.41%) of patients with contact dermatitis had positive skin tests with proteins: 22 had occupational PCD, 3 had non-occupational PCD, 5 occupational ICU and 1 cook had a neutrophilic fixed food eruption (NFFE) due to fish. From these results and analysis of literature, the characteristics of PCD can be summarized as follows. It is a chronic eczematous dermatitis, possibly exacerbated by work, suggestive if associated with inflammatory perionyxix and immediate erythema with pruritis, to be investigated when the patient resumes work after a period of interruption. Prick tests with the suspected protein-containing material are essential, as patch tests have negative results. In case of multisensitisation revealed by prick tests, it is advisable to analyse IgE against recombinant allergens. A history of atopy, found in 56 to 68% of the patients, has to be checked for. Most of the cases are observed among food-handlers but PCD can also be due to non-edible plants, latex, hydrolysed proteins or animal proteins. Occupational exposure to proteins can thus lead to the development of ICU. Reflecting hypersensitivity to very low concentrations of allergens, investigating ICU therefore requires caution and prick tests should be performed with a diluted form of the causative protein-containing product. Causes are food, especially fruit peel, non-edible plants, cosmetic products, latex, animals.

  16. Pattern of occupational allergic dermatitis in the Dermatology Clinic, Hospital Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Rohna, R; Ganesapillai, T; Salbiah, D; Zaiton, I

    1999-03-01

    A two years retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed as contact allergic dermatitis with positive patch test attending the Dermatology clinic was performed. Of the 346 patients with a positive patch test, 14% had occupational dermatitis. This condition affected mainly young and inexperienced workers. An inverse relationship was seen between age and prevalence of occupational allergic dermatitis. Allergic hand dermatitis was the commonest presentation in occupational allergic dermatitis. This was followed by dermatitis of the exposed skin (face, neck, hands and forearms). The common sensitising agents identified were rubber chemicals and nickel. The two main groups at risk were factory workers and medical personnel. The common allergens found in factory workers were epoxy resin, pewter, nickel and rubber chemicals. Exposure dermatitis occurred in patients working in the pewter industry. Two thirds of medical personnel with hand dermatitis were allergic to rubber gloves. One year follow up after patch testing showed that 19% of patients still suffered from chronic dermatitis. Dermatitis improved in 34% of patients. Forty-seven percent were cured and stopped attending the clinic after patch testing and adequate counselling.

  17. Polysensitization and individual susceptibility to allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gosnell, Amy L; Schmotzer, Brian; Nedorost, Susan T

    2015-01-01

    Patients with allergic contact dermatitis to 1 antigen have been shown to be at increased risk of developing delayed type hypersensitivity reactions to additional antigens. Both environmental and genetic factors likely influence the risk of sensitization. The aim of this study was to determine whether polysensitization occurs at a higher frequency than would be expected based on chance and whether polysensitization occurs more often in subsets of patients with hand involvement and atopic dermatitis. From a database of patch test results from a single practitioner, the probability of having positive reactions to 3 or more unrelated allergens was calculated under the assumption that positive reactions are independent and compared with the observed proportion having positive reactions to 3 or more unrelated allergens. The analysis was repeated excluding patients with leg involvement as a proxy for venous insufficiency dermatitis. The proportion of patients from the polysensitized and nonpolysensitized cohorts with either hand involvement or a history of atopic dermatitis was also calculated. Polysensitization occurs more often than expected based on chance. Polysensitized patients were more likely to have hand dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis was not significantly associated with polysensitization in this analysis. Polysensitized individuals may represent a phenotype with increased genetic susceptibility to sensitization.

  18. Colors and contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Foti, Caterina; Romita, Paolo; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of skin diseases relies on several clinical signs, among which color is of paramount importance. In this review, we consider certain clinical presentations of both eczematous and noneczematous contact dermatitis in which color plays a peculiar role orientating toward the right diagnosis. The conditions that will be discussed include specific clinical-morphologic subtypes of eczematous contact dermatitis, primary melanocytic, and nonmelanocytic contact hyperchromia, black dermographism, contact chemical leukoderma, and others. Based on the physical, chemical, and biologic factors underlying a healthy skin color, the various skin shades drawing a disease picture are thoroughly debated, stressing their etiopathogenic origins and histopathologic aspects.

  19. Advances in understanding and managing atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Michael; Sidbury, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, pruritic skin disease characterized by an improperly functioning skin barrier and immune dysregulation. We review proposed atopic dermatitis pathomechanisms, emphasizing how these impact current perspectives on natural history, role of allergic sensitization, and future therapeutic targets. PMID:26918129

  20. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh.

  1. Facial approximation-from facial reconstruction synonym to face prediction paradigm.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N

    2015-05-01

    Facial approximation was first proposed as a synonym for facial reconstruction in 1987 due to dissatisfaction with the connotations the latter label held. Since its debut, facial approximation's identity has morphed as anomalies in face prediction have accumulated. Now underpinned by differences in what problems are thought to count as legitimate, facial approximation can no longer be considered a synonym for, or subclass of, facial reconstruction. Instead, two competing paradigms of face prediction have emerged, namely: facial approximation and facial reconstruction. This paper shines a Kuhnian lens across the discipline of face prediction to comprehensively review these developments and outlines the distinguishing features between the two paradigms. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Milia after allergic contact dermatitis from poison ivy: two cases.

    PubMed

    Berk, David R; Hurt, Mark A; Reese, Lester T; Wagner, Laura; Bayliss, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    Milia have rarely been reported as a complication of severe allergic contact dermatitis. To our knowledge, milia have not previously been associated with poison ivy dermatitis. We present two cases of milia after allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy.

  3. Human Facial Expressions as Adaptations:Evolutionary Questions in Facial Expression Research

    PubMed Central

    SCHMIDT, KAREN L.; COHN, JEFFREY F.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of the face in social interaction and social intelligence is widely recognized in anthropology. Yet the adaptive functions of human facial expression remain largely unknown. An evolutionary model of human facial expression as behavioral adaptation can be constructed, given the current knowledge of the phenotypic variation, ecological contexts, and fitness consequences of facial behavior. Studies of facial expression are available, but results are not typically framed in an evolutionary perspective. This review identifies the relevant physical phenomena of facial expression and integrates the study of this behavior with the anthropological study of communication and sociality in general. Anthropological issues with relevance to the evolutionary study of facial expression include: facial expressions as coordinated, stereotyped behavioral phenotypes, the unique contexts and functions of different facial expressions, the relationship of facial expression to speech, the value of facial expressions as signals, and the relationship of facial expression to social intelligence in humans and in nonhuman primates. Human smiling is used as an example of adaptation, and testable hypotheses concerning the human smile, as well as other expressions, are proposed. PMID:11786989

  4. Realistic facial animation generation based on facial expression mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Garrod, Oliver; Jack, Rachael; Schyns, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Facial expressions reflect internal emotional states of a character or in response to social communications. Though much effort has been taken to generate realistic facial expressions, it still remains a challenging topic due to human being's sensitivity to subtle facial movements. In this paper, we present a method for facial animation generation, which reflects true facial muscle movements with high fidelity. An intermediate model space is introduced to transfer captured static AU peak frames based on FACS to the conformed target face. And then dynamic parameters derived using a psychophysics method is integrated to generate facial animation, which is assumed to represent natural correlation of multiple AUs. Finally, the animation sequence in the intermediate model space is mapped to the target face to produce final animation.

  5. Collembola are Unlikely to Cause Human Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, CSH; Lim, SL; Chew, FT; Ong, TC; Deharveng, L

    2009-01-01

    There have been several unconfirmed case reports of dermatitis caused by Collembola (springtails). We recently investigated two nurses with dermatitis suspected to be caused by Drepanura Schött (Collembola: Entomobryidae). IgE antibodies to Collembola proteins were not detected in sera from the nurses and skin tests with the Collembola extract and crushed whole Collembola were negative in both the nurses and volunteers. This study suggests that the springtail Drepanura may not cause human dermatitis and that other organisms and organic matter that are also found in the moist environment inhabited by Collembola might instead be responsible. PMID:19611235

  6. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. Results: In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. Conclusions: The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh. PMID:26550216

  7. Diagnosing Allergic Contact Dermatitis Through Elimination, Perception, Detection and Deduction.

    PubMed

    Pongpairoj, Korbkarn; Puangpet, Pailin; Thaiwat, Supitchaya; McFadden, John P

    2017-10-01

    Several authors have commented upon the skills of detection required in making a diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. Here, we emphasise the search for clues in a systematic manner. We describe four stages as part of a systematic method for diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis. Firstly, elimination (or inclusion) of non-allergic diagnoses. Secondly, perception: the pre-patch test diagnosis and the 'three scenarios' principle. Thirdly, detection: optimising the sensitivity of the patch test process. Fourthly, deduction: diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis by associating the dermatitis with the allergen exposure. We further compare and contrast the pre-patch test history and examination with the markedly different one ('microhistory' and 'microexamination') used after patch testing. The importance of knowledge of contact dermatitis literature is emphasised with a review of recent publications. Finally, we also highlight the use of contact allergy profiling as an investigative tool in the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis.

  8. Occupational Contact Dermatitis in the Canadian Aircraft Industry.

    PubMed

    Loranger, Camille; Moreau, Linda; Sasseville, Denis

    Aircraft building exposes workers to irritant and sensitizing products. The aim of this article was to study occupational dermatoses among aircraft workers over 25 years. The files of aerospace workers referred between 1990 and 2015 were extracted from the database of the McGill University Health Centre contact dermatitis clinic. These were subdivided according to demographics, type of work, patch testing results, and final diagnosis. Of 305 workers, 58% were 40 years or younger; one third were women. Onset of dermatitis varied from 2 months to 25 years, but 120 cases (39%) occurred during the first 3 years. Fifty-one percent of the cases involved assemblers, and 27% were composite material technicians, which were overrepresented as they constitute 10% of the workforce. Of the 305 workers, 152 suffered from allergic contact dermatitis, and 96 had irritant contact dermatitis. Of those with allergic contact dermatitis, 124 reacted to epoxy-based workplace products, but only 48 had positive patch tests to commercially available epoxy allergens. More than 60% of the cases of epoxy allergy would have been missed without testing with workplace products.

  9. The histopathologic features of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis.

    PubMed

    James, Travis; Ghaferi, Jessica; LaFond, Ann

    2017-01-01

    The histologic features of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) are generally non-specific and have been described only in brief case reports. We present a case of APD and review the literature with a focus on the histologic findings described. A review of the English literature on APD was performed using PubMed and MEDLINE. A total of 39 patients, including our patient are included in this review. The most consistent histologic finding reported was a perivascular inflammatory infiltrate, being seen in 72% of cases. A non-specific or interstitial inflammatory infiltrate was described in 31% of the cases, with 41% having an eosinophilic component and 21% having a neutrophilic component mixed with the predominant lymphocytic infiltrate. Interface dermatitis was the second most common finding with 36% showing a mild to exaggerated interface dermatitis. Although histopathologic changes are non-specific, perivascular dermatitis with eosinophils and interface changes are common in APD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Allergic contact hobby dermatitis from turpentine.

    PubMed

    Barchino-Ortiz, L; Cabeza-Martínez, R; Leis-Dosil, V M; Suárez-Fernández, R M; Lázaro-Ochaita, P

    2008-01-01

    Turpentine is an oleoresin obtained from various species of pine. It contains a volatile oil (oil of turpentine) which is responsible for its properties and this is the form generally used. Opportunity for contact with turpentine is widespread. It is universally used as a solvent to dissolve and thin lacquers, varnishes and paints. It is also an ingredient in many liniments and cold remedies. Turpentine is regarded as both a local irritant and a sensitizer. Cases of allergic contact dermatitis in painters, mechanics, shoe repairers and home decorators have been reported. We report a case of a non-professional painter who developed a contact allergic dermatitis due to his exposure to turpentine while doing oil-painting as a hobby. Dermatitis is one of the biggest dangers of working with art materials and occupational contact dermatitis is often detected on the hands of the painters. Solvents are indispensable and turpentine is the most important and the traditional one used in oil-painting. Contact allergy to oil of turpentine was reported to have become rare in Europe but over the last few years, increased rates of turpentine sensitization have been reported.

  11. Cost-of-illness of patients with contact dermatitis in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Saetterstrøm, Bjørn; Olsen, Jens; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2014-09-01

    Contact dermatitis is a frequent occupational and non-occupational skin disease. To investigate the effects of contact dermatitis on labour market affiliation and societal costs in terms of healthcare costs and production loss. A total of 21 441 patients patch tested either in hospital departments or at dermatological clinics in the period 2004-2009 were included in the study. The analyses were stratified by children (age 0-15 years), occupational contact dermatitis (age 16-65 years), and non-occupational dermatitis (age ≥ 16 years). Controls were selected from a 30% random sample of the population. Individual encrypted data were retrieved on healthcare utilization, socio-demographics, education, labour market affiliation and transfer payments from public registers in Denmark for cases and controls. Attributable healthcare costs for 4 years prior to patch testing (1 year for children) and the year after patch testing were €959 for children, €724 for occupational contact dermatitis, and €1794 for non-occupational dermatitis. Productivity costs for the same period were €10 722 for occupational contact dermatitis and €3074 for non-occupational contact dermatitis. The main findings of this study were that there were statistically significant attributable healthcare costs for both children and adults, and statistically significant productivity loss for adults. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Results of patch testing in 10 patients with peristomal dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Landis, Megan N; Keeling, James H; Yiannias, James A; Richardson, Donna M; Nordberg Linehan, Diane L; Davis, Mark D P

    2012-09-01

    Peristomal dermatitis is a common problem in patients with ostomies that is a source of considerable morbidity. Irritant contact dermatitis is most common, but allergic contact dermatitis can also occur. Because of the lack of published reports on patch testing for this indication, we undertook a retrospective study of patch testing results in patients with suspected peristomal allergic contact dermatitis. We sought to describe our patch testing experience with patients referred with peristomal dermatitis. This was a retrospective review of medical records of patients with ostomies and peristomal dermatitis who underwent patch testing in the Mayo Clinic Departments of Dermatology in Jacksonville, FL; Rochester, MN; and Scottsdale, AZ, during a 10-year period (2000-2010). Ten patients with peristomal dermatitis were referred for patch testing (6 in Minnesota, 2 in Florida, and 2 in Arizona). Patients were patch tested to the materials used in their stoma devices, to the standard series, and in some cases to supplemental series. All 10 had at least one allergic patch test reaction, most commonly to stoma paste (3 of 10 patients). Retrospective nature of study via chart review is a limitation. Patch testing is a useful tool for identification of allergens in patients with peristomal dermatitis. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Poison Ivy Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Poison Ivy Dermatitis Share | "Leaves of three - let it ... has a longer stem than the other two. Poison ivy clings to tree trunks and other vertical ...

  14. Easy facial analysis using the facial golden mask.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha

    2007-05-01

    For over 2000 years, many artists and scientists have tried to understand or quantify the form of the perfect, ideal, or most beautiful face both in art and in vivo (life). A mathematical relationship has been consistently and repeatedly reported to be present in beautiful things. This particular relationship is the golden ratio. It is a mathematical ratio of 1.618:1 that seems to appear recurrently in beautiful things in nature as well as in other things that are seen as beautiful. Dr. Marquardt made the facial golden mask that contains and includes all of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional geometric golden elements formed from the golden ratio. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of the golden facial mask. In 40 cases, the authors applied the facial golden mask to preoperative and postoperative photographs and scored each photograph on a 1 to 5 scale from the perspective of their personal aesthetic views. The score was lower when the facial deformity was severe, whereas it was higher when the face was attractive. Compared with the average scores of facial mask applied photographs and nonapplied photographs using a nonparametric test, statistical significance was not reached (P > 0.05). This implies that the facial golden mask may be used as an analytical tool. The facial golden mask is easy to apply, inexpensive, and relatively objective. Therefore, the authors introduce it as a useful facial analysis.

  15. Can atopic dermatitis be prevented?

    PubMed

    Gómez-de la Fuente, E

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis has become a health problem in our setting due to its rising prevalence, impact on quality of life, associated costs, and role in the progression to other atopic diseases. Furthermore, atopic dermatitis has no definitive cure and therefore preventive measures are important. In this article, we review the latest advances in both primary prevention (reduction of the incidence of atopic dermatitis) and secondary prevention (reduction of associated morbidity and reduction of the atopic march). We analyze the different preventive strategies available, including modification of the immune system through microbial exposure, induction of immune tolerance through antigen exposure, and restoration of skin barrier function to halt the atopic march. Dermatologists need to be familiar with these strategies in order to apply them where necessary and to accurately inform patients and their relatives to prevent misguided or inappropriate actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  16. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Long, D; Thiboutot, D M; Majeski, J T; Vasily, D B; Helm, K F

    1996-06-01

    Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is an uncommon systemic disorder involving the cutaneous and musculoskeletal systems. The eruption may mimic other dermatoses including granuloma annulare, erythema chronicum migrans, and the inflammatory stage of morphea. Key histopathologic characteristics, along with clinical correlation, allow accurate diagnosis. We describe the clinical, serologic, and histologic features in three patients with interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis. Skin biopsy specimens were examined and correlated with the clinical and laboratory findings. Erythematous, annular, indurated plaques on the extremities were present in two women. An erythematous, papular eruption on the head and neck was present in a third patient. All patients had myalgia and migratory polyarthralgias of the extremities along with various serologic abnormalities. Histologic examination revealed a dense lymphohistiocytic interstitial infiltrate involving primarily the reticular dermis. Foci of necrobiotic collagen were present. Vasculitis was absent. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is unique multisystem disease with variable cutaneous expression. Abnormal serologic findings indicate a possible connection to collagen vascular disease.

  17. Pizza makers' contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lembo, Serena; Lembo, Claudio; Patruno, Cataldo; Balato, Anna; Balato, Nicola; Ayala, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Contact eczema to foods, spices, and food additives can occur in occupational and nonoccupational settings in those who grow, handle, prepare, or cook food. Pizza is one of the most eaten foods in every continent, and pizza making is a common work in many countries. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence and the causes of contact dermatitis in pizza makers in Naples. We performed an observational study in 45 pizza makers: all the enrolled subjects had to answer a questionnaire designed to detect personal history of respiratory or cutaneous allergy, atopy; work characteristics and timing were also investigated. Every subject attended the dermatology clinic for a complete skin examination, and when needed, patients were patch tested using the Italian baseline series of haptens integrated with an arbitrary pizza makers series. Our results reported that 13.3% of the enrolled pizza makers (6/45) presented hand eczema, and that 8.9% (4/45) were affected by occupational allergic contact dermatitis. Diallyl disulfide and ammonium persulfate were the responsible substances. Performing patch tests in pizza makers and food handlers affected by hand contact dermatitis is useful. We propose a specific series of haptens for this wide working category.

  18. [Atopic dermatitis in children: general principles of management].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yusuke Leo; Christen-Zaech, Stéphanie

    2013-04-03

    Atopic dermatitis is the most frequent dermatosis in childhood. Numerous studies underscored the central role of skin barrier alterations in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory skin lesions. The management of atopic dermatitis has to be multidimensional. It combines among others some daily local care and a sporadic topical anti-inflammatory treatment during the acute flare-ups. The objective of this article is to summarize, in light of the recent European guidelines, the general principles of management of atopic dermatitis, for the general practitioner.

  19. Transgenic rat model of childhood-onset dermatitis by overexpressing telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT).

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Sato, Atsuko; Hamada, Shun; Yagi, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Murakami, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Childhood-onset dermatitis is one of the most common skin disorders in children. Although various mouse models that mirror aspects of dermatitis have become available, there is still a need for an animal model that develops dermatitis in childhood and is more suitable for performing tissue transplantation experiments. There is emerging evidence that peripheral blood T lymphocytes from patients with dermatitis have significantly increased telomerase activity. Here, we developed telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)-expressing transgenic (Tg) rats that spontaneously developed eczematous skin inflammation in childhood. Newborn TERT-Tg rats developed visible dermatitis in 56 % of cases, and the skin lesions microscopically showed spongiosis and acanthosis with infiltration of lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis exhibited increased CD4 (2.5-fold) and CD8 (fivefold) T cell numbers compared with dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. Stronger TERT activity was observed in the peripheral lymphocytes of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats than those of dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed that IL-4 was markedly elevated in the spleen of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats, and that interferon-gamma was increased in the dermatitis lesions. Moreover, skin grafting of TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis onto T cell-deficient nude rats demonstrated that the inflamed skin lesions could not be maintained. Taken together, the results suggest that TERT activation in T lymphocytes is one of the potential predisposing factors for dermatitis. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the TERT-Tg rats mirror aspects of human childhood-onset dermatitis and that these animals represent a potential animal model system for studying childhood-onset dermatitis.

  20. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis to nitromethane.

    PubMed

    Webb, Kelli G; Fowler, Joseph F

    2002-12-01

    Nitromethane has wide industrial and commercial application as a polar solvent for adhesives and acrylics as well as explosive fuel. Allergic contact dermatitis to this chemical has not been described previously. The authors documented allergic contact hand dermatitis in 4 coworkers who similarly handled an adhesive solvent containing nitromethane. All 4 cases were confirmed by patch testing and resolved after allergen avoidance. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA)

  1. Chromate dermatitis from a boiler lining.

    PubMed

    Rycroft, R J; Calnan, C D

    1977-08-01

    Chromate dermatitis is described in a mechanical fitter working inside boiler combustion chambers. A source of hexavalent chromate is traced to the action of the heat and alkaline fuel ash on trivalent chrome ore in parts of the refractory lining. Removal of the patient from this contact has resulted in almost complete clearing of his dermatitis, without any relapse, during a 9-month follow-up period.

  2. Cheyletiella dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Powell, R F; Palmer, S M; Palmer, C H; Smith, E B

    1977-10-01

    A mild dermatitis probably due to Cheyletiella yasguri was observed in 2 persons whose pet dog was infested with this parasite. Cheyletiella mites differ morphologically from sarcoptic mites, which cause canine and human scabies. Treatment of man and dog with 1% gamma benzene hexachloride is usually successful in clearing this condition.

  3. [Risks and health problems caused by the use of video terminals].

    PubMed

    Tamez González, Silvia; Ortiz-Hernández, Luis; Martínez-Alcántara, Susana; Méndez-Ramírez, Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the association between video display terminal (VDT) use and health hazards, occupational risks, and psychosocial factors, in newspaper workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1998 in a representative sample (n = 68) drawn from a population of 218 VDT operators in Mexico City. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Data were confirmed by performing physical examinations. The research hypothesis was that both the current and cumulative use of VDT are associated with visual, musculoskeletal system, and skin illnesses, as well as with fatigue and mental or psychosomatic disorders. Occupational health hazards were assessed (visual problems, postural risks, sedentary work, computer mouse use, excessive heat, and overcrowding), as well as psychosocial factors related to work organization (psychological demands, work control, and social support). Prevalence ratios were adjusted for confounding variables like age, sex and schooling. Women were more likely than men to have upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), dermatitis, and seborrheic eczema. VDT use was associated with neuro-visual fatigue, upper extremity MSD, dermatitis, and seborrheic eczema. Computer mouse use and postural risks were significantly associated with health problems. Psychosocial factors were mainly associated with mental problems, psychosomatic disorders, and fatigue. Intense use of video screens has been found to cause musculoskeletal disorders of the hand. The diversification of tasks and control of labor processes itself had a protective effect against psychosomatic disorders and pathological fatigue.

  4. Reproducibility of the dynamics of facial expressions in unilateral facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Alagha, M A; Ju, X; Morley, S; Ayoub, A

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of non-verbal facial expressions in unilateral facial paralysis using dynamic four-dimensional (4D) imaging. The Di4D system was used to record five facial expressions of 20 adult patients. The system captured 60 three-dimensional (3D) images per second; each facial expression took 3-4seconds which was recorded in real time. Thus a set of 180 3D facial images was generated for each expression. The procedure was repeated after 30min to assess the reproducibility of the expressions. A mathematical facial mesh consisting of thousands of quasi-point 'vertices' was conformed to the face in order to determine the morphological characteristics in a comprehensive manner. The vertices were tracked throughout the sequence of the 180 images. Five key 3D facial frames from each sequence of images were analyzed. Comparisons were made between the first and second capture of each facial expression to assess the reproducibility of facial movements. Corresponding images were aligned using partial Procrustes analysis, and the root mean square distance between them was calculated and analyzed statistically (paired Student t-test, P<0.05). Facial expressions of lip purse, cheek puff, and raising of eyebrows were reproducible. Facial expressions of maximum smile and forceful eye closure were not reproducible. The limited coordination of various groups of facial muscles contributed to the lack of reproducibility of these facial expressions. 4D imaging is a useful clinical tool for the assessment of facial expressions. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Occupational dermatitis in health care workers evaluated for suspected allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Salmon; Belsito, Donald V

    2015-01-01

    Contact dermatitides occur commonly among health care workers (HCWs). To contrast the atopic status and incidence, location, and final diagnosis of skin diseases afflicting HCWs versus non-HCWs (NHCWs) evaluated for suspicion of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD); and among the population diagnosed with ACD, to compare the incidence and occupational relatedness of allergens found in HCWs with the rates observed in NHCWs. Between July 1, 1994, and May 30, 2014, 2611 patients underwent patch testing by the senior author. Of these, 165 were classified as HCWs based on their primary occupation. Statistical analysis was done using a χ test. Health care workers were more likely than NHCWs to be women and to have hand dermatitis. Women, but not men, HCWs suffered more irritant contact dermatitis. Health care workers had significantly more work-related ACD, especially to formaldehyde, quaternium-15, 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol, cocamide diethanolamine (DEA), thiuram mix, carba mix, thimerosal, benzalkonium chloride, glutaraldehyde, and bacitracin. Only patients suspected of having ACD were tested. Our population was geographically limited to metropolitan Kansas City, MO and metropolitan New York, NY. Health care workers suffer more from occupational ACD, especially of the hands, than do NHCWs, including to allergens not present on available standard allergen series.

  6. Atopic and Contact Dermatitis of the Vulva.

    PubMed

    Pichardo-Geisinger, Rita

    2017-09-01

    Pruritus, or itch, is a common vulvar complaint that is often treated empirically as a yeast infection; however, yeast infections are just one of the many conditions that can cause vulvar itch. Ignoring other conditions can prolong pruritus unnecessarily. Atopic dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, and allergic contact dermatitis are extremely common noninfectious causes of vulvar itch that are often underdiagnosed by nondermatologists. Identifying these conditions and treating them appropriately can significantly improve a patient's quality of life and appropriately decrease health care expenditures by preventing unnecessary additional referrals or follow-up visits and decreasing pharmaceutical costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxicodendron dermatitis: poison ivy, oak, and sumac.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Aaron C

    2006-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis caused by the Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus) species-poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac-affects millions of North Americans every year. In certain outdoor occupations, for example, agriculture and forestry, as well as among many outdoor enthusiasts, Toxicodendron dermatitis presents a significant hazard. This review considers the epidemiology, identification, immunochemistry, pathophysiology, clinical features, treatment, and prevention of this common dermatologic problem. Recent research in prevention is emphasized, and resources to help in the identification of plants are provided in the bibliography. The literature was searched using a MEDLINE query for "Toxicodendron dermatitis", and the identified article bibliographies were searched as well.

  8. Flagellate dermatitis after consumption of Shiitake mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Burkhard; Marsch, Wolfgang Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellate dermatitis occurs in patients who have eaten Shiitake mushrooms. We are reporting on a 55-year-old man, who developed whiplash-striped, severely itching efflorescences on the trunk 3 days after eating Lentinula edodes. Flagellate dermatitis is also known as a cutaneous side effect of bleomycin therapy. PMID:25097492

  9. Leprosy in the Bible.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    For many years, the biblical term tzaraat has referred to leprosy. In fact, the disease or diseases described under this name have no relationship to leprosy, as it was known in the Middle Ages or today; moreover, the term referred not only to skin disease, but also to the state of the ritual impurity and punishment for the sins. Although the real nature of tzaraat remains unknown, the differential diagnosis might include the following: Psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, favus, dermatophyte infections, nummular dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, crusted scabies, syphilis, impetigo, sycosis barbae, alopecia areata, furuncles, scabies, neurodermatitis, scarlet fever, lupus erythematosus, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, folliculitis decalvans, morphea, sarcoidosis, and lichen planopilaris. Leprosy became interchangeable with the biblical leprosy due to two inaccurate translations: The Hebrew tzaraat was first translated into Greek as leprosy in the sixth century, and later, the word leprosy was translated into Arabic as lepra in the ninth century. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Digital Dermatitis in Cattle: Current Bacterial and Immunological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Welder, Jennifer H.; Alt, David P.; Nally, Jarlath E.

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Digital dermatitis causes lameness in cattle. Numerous studies have identified multiple bacteria associated with these painful lesions. Several types of a spiral shaped bacteria, Treponema species, are thought to play a role in disease development. Little is known about the immune response to bacteria involved in digital dermatitis. Local inflammatory cells can contribute to the non-healing nature of the disease. Animal models of infection are required to develop effective vaccines and treatments. Abstract Globally; digital dermatitis is a leading form of lameness observed in production dairy cattle. While the precise etiology remains to be determined; the disease is clearly associated with infection by numerous species of treponemes; in addition to other anaerobic bacteria. The goal of this review article is to provide an overview of the current literature; focusing on discussion of the polybacterial nature of the digital dermatitis disease complex and host immune response. Several phylotypes of treponemes have been identified; some of which correlate with location in the lesion and some with stages of lesion development. Local innate immune responses may contribute to the proliferative, inflammatory conditions that perpetuate digital dermatitis lesions. While serum antibody is produced to bacterial antigens in the lesions, little is known about cellular-based immunity. Studies are still required to delineate the pathogenic traits of treponemes associated with digital dermatitis; and other host factors that mediate pathology and protection of digital dermatitis lesions. PMID:26569318

  11. Childhood atopic dermatitis: a cross-sectional study of relationships between child and parent factors, atopic dermatitis management, and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Amy E; Fraser, Jennifer A; Ramsbotham, Joanne; Morawska, Alina; Yates, Patsy

    2015-01-01

    Successful management of atopic dermatitis poses a significant and ongoing challenge to parents of affected children. Despite frequent reports of child behaviour problems and parenting difficulties, there is a paucity of literature examining relationships between child behaviour and parents' confidence and competence with treatment. To examine relationships between child, parent, and family variables, parents' self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis, self-reported performance of management tasks, observed competence with providing treatment, and atopic dermatitis severity. Cross-sectional study design. Participants A sample of 64 parent-child dyads was recruited from the dermatology clinic of a paediatric tertiary referral hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Parents completed self-report questionnaires examining child behaviour, parents' adjustment, parenting conflict, parents' relationship satisfaction, and parents' self-efficacy and self-reported performance of key management tasks. Severity of atopic dermatitis was assessed using the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index. A routine home treatment session was observed, and parents' competence in carrying out the child's treatment assessed. Pearson's and Spearman's correlations identified significant relationships (p<.05) between parents' self-efficacy and disease severity, child behaviour difficulties, parent depression and stress, parenting conflict, and relationship satisfaction. There were also significant relationships between each of these variables and parents' self-reported performance of management tasks. More profound child behaviour difficulties were associated with more severe atopic dermatitis and greater parent stress. Using multiple linear regressions, significant proportions of variation in parents' self-efficacy and self-reported task performance were explained by child behaviour difficulties and parents' formal education. Self-efficacy emerged as a likely mediator for relationships between both child

  12. The Prevalence of Cosmetic Facial Plastic Procedures among Facial Plastic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Moayer, Roxana; Sand, Jordan P; Han, Albert; Nabili, Vishad; Keller, Gregory S

    2018-04-01

    This is the first study to report on the prevalence of cosmetic facial plastic surgery use among facial plastic surgeons. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency with which facial plastic surgeons have cosmetic procedures themselves. A secondary aim is to determine whether trends in usage of cosmetic facial procedures among facial plastic surgeons are similar to that of nonsurgeons. The study design was an anonymous, five-question, Internet survey distributed via email set in a single academic institution. Board-certified members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) were included in this study. Self-reported history of cosmetic facial plastic surgery or minimally invasive procedures were recorded. The survey also queried participants for demographic data. A total of 216 members of the AAFPRS responded to the questionnaire. Ninety percent of respondents were male ( n  = 192) and 10.3% were female ( n  = 22). Thirty-three percent of respondents were aged 31 to 40 years ( n  = 70), 25% were aged 41 to 50 years ( n  = 53), 21.4% were aged 51 to 60 years ( n  = 46), and 20.5% were older than 60 years ( n  = 44). Thirty-six percent of respondents had a surgical cosmetic facial procedure and 75% has at least one minimally invasive cosmetic facial procedure. Facial plastic surgeons are frequent users of cosmetic facial plastic surgery. This finding may be due to access, knowledge base, values, or attitudes. By better understanding surgeon attitudes toward facial plastic surgery, we can improve communication with patients and delivery of care. This study is a first step in understanding use of facial plastic procedures among facial plastic surgeons. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Contact Dermatitis to Personal Sporting Equipment in Youth.

    PubMed

    Marzario, Barbara; Burrows, Dianne; Skotnicki, Sandy

    2016-07-01

    Contact dermatitis to personal sporting equipment in youth is poorly studied. To review the results of patch testing 6 youth to their sporting equipment in a dermatology general private practice from 2006 to 2011. A retrospective analysis of 6 youth aged 11 to 14 who were evaluated for chronic and persistent dermatitis occurring in relation to sports equipment was conducted. All patients were subjected to epicutaneous (patch) testing, which included some or all of the following: North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACGD) series, textile series, rubber series, corticosteroid series, and raw material from the patients' own personal equipment. All cases had 1 or more positive patch test reactions to an allergen within the aforementioned series, and 3 subjects tested positive to their personal equipment in raw form. Allergic contact dermatitis, not irritant, was deemed the relevant cause of chronic dermatitis in 4 of the 6 patients due to positive reactions to epicutaneous tests and/or personal equipment. The utility of testing to patients' own sporting equipment was shown to be of additional value and should be considered when patch testing for contact allergy to sporting equipment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Systemic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Marcella; Rosner, Greg

    2018-05-15

    Systemic contact dermatitis (SCD) traditionally refers to a skin condition where an individual who is cutaneously sensitized to an allergen will subsequently react to that same allergen or a cross reacting allergen via a different route. It occurs to allergens including metals, medications, and foods. The exact pathophysiology underlying this disease remains unknown, although it appears to be mediated by type 4 hypersensitivity reactions and possibly type 3 hypersensitivity reactions. The p-I concept (pharmacologic interaction with immunoreceptors) hypothesized that drugs are able to bind directly to a T cell receptor without first being presented by MHC (major histocompatibility complex) molecules and without prior metabolism, which would help explain why SCD can be seen on first exposure to medications. Nomenclature remains a challenge as SCD can be subcategorized using terms such as ACDS (allergic contact dermatitis syndrome) and its four clinical stages, Baboon syndrome, and SDRIFE (symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema), which share many overlapping features. Food allergens may be responsible for uncontrolled or persistent symptoms in patients with contact dermatitis who do not respond to topical avoidance. With medications, symptoms may be induced by topical application versus systemic administration. Patch testing (PT) may be beneficial in diagnosing SCD caused by metals and many topical medications including corticosteroids, antimicrobials (ampicillin, bacitracin, erythromycin, neomycin, nystatin), NSAIDs (diclofenac, ibuprofen), anesthetics, and antihistamines (chlorphenamine, piperazine). Current treatment options include topical steroids and oral antihistamines for symptom relief and dietary avoidance to causative foods or metals.

  15. Case for diagnosis. Infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1: differential diagnosis of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lorena Maria Lima de; Souza, Marcos Vilela de; Guedes, Antonio Carlos Martins; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi

    2017-01-01

    Infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH) is the main cutaneous marker of HTLV-1 infection. This disease occurs primarily in children and should be differentiated from other eczemas, especially from atopic dermatitis. The largest series of IDH are from Jamaica and Brazil. There are an estimated 15 to 20 million infected people in the world, and Brazil is one of the endemic regions. Studies suggest that IDH in children may be a marker for the development of T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) or myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM / TSP) in adulthood.

  16. Chronic radiation-induced dermatitis: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Spałek, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic radiation dermatitis is a late side effect of skin irradiation, which may deteriorate patients' quality of life. There is a lack of precise data about its incidence; however, several risk factors may predispose to the development of this condition. It includes radiotherapy dose, fractionation, technique, concurrent systemic therapy, comorbidities, and personal and genetic factors. Chronic radiation dermatitis is mostly caused by the imbalance of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. Clinical manifestation includes changes in skin appearance, wounds, ulcerations, necrosis, fibrosis, and secondary cancers. The most severe complication of irradiation is extensive radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). RIF can manifest in many ways, such as skin induration and retraction, lymphedema or restriction of joint motion. Diagnosis of chronic radiation dermatitis is usually made by clinical examination. In case of unclear clinical manifestation, a biopsy and histopathological examination are recommended to exclude secondary malignancy. The most effective prophylaxis of chronic radiation dermatitis is the use of proper radiation therapy techniques to avoid unnecessary irradiation of healthy skin. Treatment of chronic radiation dermatitis is demanding. The majority of the interventions are based only on clinical practice. Telangiectasia may be treated with pulse dye laser therapy. Chronic postirradiation wounds need special dressings. In case of necrosis or severe ulceration, surgical intervention may be considered. Management of RIF should be complex. Available methods are rehabilitative care, pharmacotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and laser therapy. Future challenges include the assessment of late skin toxicity in modern irradiation techniques. Special attention should be paid on genomics and radiomics that allow scientists and clinicians to select patients who are at risk of the development of chronic radiation dermatitis. Novel treatment methods and clinical

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis from color film developers: clinical and histologic features.

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, R R; Cockerell, C J; Belsito, D; Ostreicher, R

    1993-05-01

    We evaluated two patients with allergic contact dermatitis that resulted from exposure to color film developers. A lichenoid eruption developed in one patient, whereas an eruption more characteristic of an acute spongiotic dermatitis developed in the second patient. Histologic findings in the first case were those of a "lichenoid dermatitis" but with features distinct from classic lichen planus. The biopsy specimens from the second patient showed a subacute spongiotic process with a bandlike infiltrate suggestive of an evolving lichenoid process. Contact allergy to color developers may result in eruptions similar to lichen planus. This process appears to evolve from an acute spongiotic dermatitis in its early phase to a lichenoid dermatitis in fully developed and more chronic forms. Although the histologic features are those of a "lichenoid" dermatitis, some features, such as the presence of spongiosis, eosinophils, and a less intense inflammatory infiltrate, may enable distinction between lichenoid allergic contact dermatitis and true lichen planus. In addition, clinicopathologic correlation with patch test results should permit accurate diagnosis in most cases.

  18. Current knowledge on biomarkers for contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Sjors A; Engebretsen, Kristiane A; Agner, Tove; Angelova-Fischer, Irena; Berents, Teresa; Brandner, Johanna; Brans, Richard; Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Hummler, Edith; Jakasa, Ivone; Jurakić-Tončic, Ružica; John, Swen M; Khnykin, Denis; Molin, Sonja; Holm, Jan O; Suomela, Sari; Thierse, Hermann-Josef; Kezic, Sanja; Martin, Stefan F; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-07-01

    Contact sensitization is common and affects up to 20% of the general population. The clinical manifestation of contact sensitization is allergic contact dermatitis. This is a clinical expression that is sometimes difficult to distinguish from other types of dermatitis, for example irritant and atopic dermatitis. Several studies have examined the pathogenesis and severity of allergic contact dermatitis by measuring the absence or presence of various biomarkers. In this review, we provide a non-systematic overview of biomarkers that have been studied in allergic contact dermatitis. These include genetic variations and mutations, inflammatory mediators, alarmins, proteases, immunoproteomics, lipids, natural moisturizing factors, tight junctions, and antimicrobial peptides. We conclude that, despite the enormous amount of data, convincing specific biomarkers for allergic contact dermatitis are yet to be described. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Management of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: The Role of Emollient Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Catherine Mack Correa, M.; Nebus, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disorder that afflicts a growing number of young children. Genetic, immune, and environmental factors interact in a complex fashion to contribute to disease expression. The compromised stratum corneum found in atopic dermatitis leads to skin barrier dysfunction, which results in aggravation of symptoms by aeroallergens, microbes, and other insults. Infants—whose immune system and epidermal barrier are still developing—display a higher frequency of atopic dermatitis. Management of patients with atopic dermatitis includes maintaining optimal skin care, avoiding allergic triggers, and routinely using emollients to maintain a hydrated stratum corneum and to improve barrier function. Flares of atopic dermatitis are often managed with courses of topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. This paper discusses the role of emollients in the management of atopic dermatitis, with particular emphasis on infants and young children. PMID:23008699

  20. Epidermal multinucleated keratinocytes: a histopathologic clue to dermatitis artefacta.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Schowalter, Michael K; Piliang, Melissa P; Fernandez, Anthony P

    2016-10-01

    Dermatitis artefacta is a psycho-cutaneous disorder characterized by self-inflicted cutaneous injuries, often in association with an underlying psychiatric disorder or as a response to external stressors. Cutaneous lesions suggestive of dermatitis artefacta are dependent on the means of injury and thus may be morphologically variable, but typically have geometric shapes, spare hard-to-reach anatomic areas, and are present in variable stages of evolution at any specific time. Although a dermatologist may be suspicious of dermatitis artefacta in a given patient, making a definitive diagnosis is extremely challenging. Patients often clinically evade questioning and deny creating skin lesions, and histopathologic evaluation of lesional biopsies usually reveals non-specific epidermal and dermal changes and inflammation. Thus, identification of clues that lend support to a diagnosis of dermatitis artefacta would be welcomed by both clinicians and pathologists. Here we present a case of dermatitis artefacta with a unique, yet previously reported, histopathological finding of multinucleated keratinocytes within the epidermis. Although probably uncommon and dependent on the etiology of cutaneous injury, we believe this finding is important for dermatopathologists to be aware of as a potential diagnostic clue when evaluating biopsies in patients suspected to have dermatitis artefacta. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Epidemiology of occupational contact dermatitis in a North Italian population.

    PubMed

    Lodi, A; Mancini, L L; Ambonati, M; Coassini, A; Ravanelli, G; Crosti, C

    2000-03-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is a very important skin disease both for its high frequency and for its social and economic implications. The aim of our work is to evaluate the epidemiology of occupational contact dermatitis in a north-Italian population and the possibility of a correct etiological diagnosis using the patch test standard series of GIRDCA (Italian Group of Resarch on Contact Dermatitis). We patch tested 1,565 out-patients affected by dermatitis with standard series GIRDCA and with other specific professional haptens. The manifestations were suspected of being of occupational origin by a dermatologist on the basis of clinical and anamnestic data. Of all the recorded professions we have considered only the more numerically significant: food industry, building industry, textile industry, employees, cleaners, hospital personnel, hairdressers, housewives, mechanics and metallurgists. Sixty-nine percent of contact dermatitis was found in women, the hairdressers had the greatest number of patients in the younger group (68.7% in the 11-20 years age group) and the textile industry workers in older group (100% in the 41-50 years age group). A positive allergological anamnesis emerged in 32.3% of allergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis (10.6%) was more frequent than allergic contact dermatitis (8.4%). The hands are the most common localization (94. 4%). The allergen with the highest frequency of positive reactions is p-phenylenediamine (25.3%). We discuss the frequency of positives to various groups of allergens in each profession and the principal means of contact. Because of the frequency of this type of occupational skin disease, we stress the importance of prevention. The standard series GIRDCA was found to be adequate for recognizing occupational contact dermatitis in most of our patients (74%).

  2. Contact dermatitis in students practicing sports: incidence of rubber sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Ventura, M T; Dagnello, M; Matino, M G; Di Corato, R; Giuliano, G; Tursi, A

    2001-04-01

    Over the last few years, changes in cutaneous homoeostasis resulting from sports activities have been reported. In particular, alterations in sweating mechanisms, the hydrolipid barrier, and surface bacterial flora, together with exposure to atmospheric conditions and the need to use medicaments, detergents, and other topical substances, predispose subjects to allergic contact dermatitis. To evaluate the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis in a group of young people practising sports activities. Patch tests were performed to confirm the diagnosis of irritant or allergic dermatitis; in addition, the radioallergoabsorbent test (RAST) to latex was evaluated in the group studied. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by thiourams (23.3%) and mercaptobenzothiazole (20.9%) was prevalent. Other haptens, such as benzocaine and nickel, which are contained in clothing, equipment, topical medicaments, and creams used for massage, were also allergenic. In two cases, RAST positivity to latex was registered. -The results suggest that close contact with sports equipment may increase the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis. Students practising certain sports may have "professional" allergic contact dermatitis to additives used in the production of rubber.

  3. Facial neuropathy with imaging enhancement of the facial nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Sehreen; Jensen, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    A young women developed unilateral facial neuropathy 2 weeks after a motor vehicle collision involving fractures of the skull and mandible. MRI showed contrast enhancement of the facial nerve. We review the literature describing facial neuropathy after trauma and facial nerve enhancement patterns with different causes of facial neuropathy. PMID:25574155

  4. London-born black Caribbean children are at increased risk of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Williams, H C; Pembroke, A C; Forsdyke, H; Boodoo, G; Hay, R J; Burney, P G

    1995-02-01

    Previous reports suggest that atopic dermatitis is more common in black Caribbean children born in the United Kingdom than in white children. It is unclear whether these differences are caused by selection bias or variations in the use of the word "eczema" in the groups studied. Our objective was to explore ethnic group differences in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis in London schoolchildren. A cross-sectional prevalence survey of 693 junior school children in three schools was performed. Atopic dermatitis was defined in three ways: (1) by a dermatologist, (2) by visible flexural dermatitis as recorded by an independent observer, and (3) by a history of flexural dermatitis according to the child's parents. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis according to examination by a dermatologist was 16.3% in black Caribbean children and 8.7% in white children. This increased risk was present for different methods of defining of a atopic dermatitis and persisted after adjustment for potential confounders. London-born black Caribbean children appear to be at an increased risk of having atopic dermatitis.

  5. Measuring Facial Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  6. Effect of a Facial Muscle Exercise Device on Facial Rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ui-jae; Kwon, Oh-yun; Jung, Sung-hoon; Ahn, Sun-hee; Gwak, Gyeong-tae

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background The efficacy of facial muscle exercises (FMEs) for facial rejuvenation is controversial. In the majority of previous studies, nonquantitative assessment tools were used to assess the benefits of FMEs. Objectives This study examined the effectiveness of FMEs using a Pao (MTG, Nagoya, Japan) device to quantify facial rejuvenation. Methods Fifty females were asked to perform FMEs using a Pao device for 30 seconds twice a day for 8 weeks. Facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area were measured sonographically. Facial surface distance, surface area, and volumes were determined using a laser scanning system before and after FME. Facial muscle thickness, cross-sectional area, midfacial surface distances, jawline surface distance, and lower facial surface area and volume were compared bilaterally before and after FME using a paired Student t test. Results The cross-sectional areas of the zygomaticus major and digastric muscles increased significantly (right: P < 0.001, left: P = 0.015), while the midfacial surface distances in the middle (right: P = 0.005, left: P = 0.047) and lower (right: P = 0.028, left: P = 0.019) planes as well as the jawline surface distances (right: P = 0.004, left: P = 0.003) decreased significantly after FME using the Pao device. The lower facial surface areas (right: P = 0.005, left: P = 0.006) and volumes (right: P = 0.001, left: P = 0.002) were also significantly reduced after FME using the Pao device. Conclusions FME using the Pao device can increase facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area, thus contributing to facial rejuvenation. Level of Evidence: 4 PMID:29365050

  7. Pigmented and hyperkeratotic napkin dermatitis: a liquid detergent irritant dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, A; Neri, I; Marzaduri, S; Fiorillo, L

    1996-01-01

    Napkin or diaper dermatitis (DD) is an inflammatory cutaneous eruption limited to the diaper area and common in the first 2 years of life. A number of clinical variants of DD have been identified. We report a new variant of DD characterized by papyraceous skin, brownish discoloration and predilection for the depth of folds. 15 infants and toddlers affected by this peculiar type of DD were evaluated regarding duration, localization, morphology and evolution of their dermatosis. This variant of DD was mainly confined to the depth of inguinal and gluteal folds and invariably associated with severe xerosis with papyraceous and glazed skin. The patients were healthy and asymptomatic and all laboratory investigations performed were normal. All patients were frequently changed and thoroughly washed with synthetic detergents with acid pH. DD improved rapidly with reduced frequency of washing and discontinuation of liquid detergents. We conclude that this condition is a type of irritant contact dermatitis from excessive use of lipid acid detergents.

  8. Use of aromatherapy products and increased risk of hand dermatitis in massage therapists.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Glen H; Katz, Kenneth A; Ellis, Elliot; James, William D

    2004-08-01

    To determine the 12-month prevalence of hand dermatitis among massage therapists, to investigate a potential association between hand dermatitis and the use of aromatherapy products, and to study potential associations with other known risk factors for hand dermatitis. Mailed survey. Philadelphia, Pa. Members of a national massage therapy organization who live in the greater Philadelphia region. Self-reported and symptom-based prevalences of hand dermatitis. The number of respondents was 350 (57%). The 12-month prevalence of hand dermatitis in subjects was 15% by self-reported criteria and 23% by a symptom-based method. In multivariate analysis, statistically significant independent risk factors for self-reported hand dermatitis included use of aromatherapy products in massage oils, lotions, or creams (odds ratio, 3.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.53-7.02; P =.002) and history of atopic dermatitis (odds ratio, 8.06; 95% confidence interval, 3.39-19.17; P<.001). The prevalence of hand dermatitis in massage therapists is high. Significant independent risk factors include use of aromatherapy products in massage oils, creams, or lotions and history of atopic dermatitis.

  9. Severe facial swelling in a pregnant woman after using hair dye.

    PubMed

    van Genderen, Michel E; Carels, Ginette; Lonnee, Edward R; Dees, Adriaan

    2014-03-31

    A 33-year-old Caucasian pregnant woman (26 weeks' gestation) presented to the emergency department. She had a 2-day history of severe itching of the scalp and steadily worsening swelling of the face over the previous 12 h, which had extended to the neck. She had no difficulty breathing. The itching and swelling had developed 3 days after she had used hair dye. The patient had no history of allergic responses to hair dye or black henna tattoos. A diagnosis of type IV delayed hypersensitivity reaction was made. Permanent hair dyes are the most frequently used professional hair dyes and are most commonly based on paraphenylenediamine (PPD) or related chemicals. PPD is known to be one of the most potent allergens which cause allergic contact dermatitis. After treatment with intravenous antihistamines and steroids, the facial swelling reduced and the patient had completely recovered by the following day.

  10. Hair dye dermatitis and p-phenylenediamine contact sensitivity: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The contact allergic reactions from p-phenylenediamine (PPD) in hair dyes vary from mild contact dermatitis to severe life- threatening events (angioedema, bronchospasm, asthma, renal impairment). Objectives: To study the clinical patterns and PPD contact sensitivity in patients with hair-dye dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Eighty (M:F 47:33) consecutive patients aged between 18 and 74 years suspected to have contact allergy from hair dye were studied by patch testing with Indian Standard Series including p-phenylenediamine (PPD, 1.0% pet). Results: 54 Fifty-four (M:F 21:33) patients showed positive patch tests from PPD. Eight of these patients also showed positive patch test reaction from fragrance mix, thiuram mix, paraben mix, or colophony. Fifty-seven (71%) patients affected were aged older than 40 years. The duration of dermatitis varied from < 1 month to > 1 year with exacerbation following hair coloring. Forty-nine patients had dermatitis of scalp and/or scalp margins and 23 patients had face and neck dermatitis. Periorbital dermatitis, chronic actinic dermatitis, and erythema multiforme-like lesions were seen in 4, 2, and 1 patients, respectively. Conclusions: Hair dyes and PPD constitute a significant cause of contact dermatitis. There is an urgent need for creating consumer awareness regarding hair-dyes contact sensitivity and the significance of performing sensitivity testing prior to actual use. PMID:26225326

  11. Facial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Gopalkrishnan, Kulandaswamy

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the incidence of facial fractures along with age, gender predilection, etiology, commonest site, associated dental injuries, and any complications of patients operated in Craniofacial Unit of SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of OMFS, SDM College of Dental Sciences, Dharwad from January 2003 to December 2013. Data were recorded for the cause of injury, age and gender distribution, frequency and type of injury, localization and frequency of soft tissue injuries, dentoalveolar trauma, facial bone fractures, complications, concomitant injuries, and different treatment protocols.All the data were analyzed using statistical analysis that is chi-squared test. A total of 1146 patients reported at our unit with facial fractures during these 10 years. Males accounted for a higher frequency of facial fractures (88.8%). Mandible was the commonest bone to be fractured among all the facial bones (71.2%). Maxillary central incisors were the most common teeth to be injured (33.8%) and avulsion was the most common type of injury (44.6%). Commonest postoperative complication was plate infection (11%) leading to plate removal. Other injuries associated with facial fractures were rib fractures, head injuries, upper and lower limb fractures, etc., among these rib fractures were seen most frequently (21.6%). This study was performed to compare the different etiologic factors leading to diverse facial fracture patterns. By statistical analysis of this record the authors come to know about the relationship of facial fractures with gender, age, associated comorbidities, etc.

  12. Occupational Airborne Contact Dermatitis From Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    DeKoven, Joel G; Yu, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Few published reports have described occupational contact dermatitis from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) exposure in the literature. We present an additional case of a 58-year-old male pharmaceutical worker with an occupational airborne allergic contact dermatitis to PPIs confirmed by patch testing. This is a novel report of workplace exposure to dexlansoprazole and esomeprazole PPIs with resultant clinical contact allergy and relevant positive patch test results to these 2 agents. A literature review of all previously reported cases of occupational contact dermatitis to PPI is summarized. The case also emphasizes the importance of even minute exposures when considering workplace accommodation.

  13. Cheyletiella dermatitis: a report of fourteen cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, B W

    1991-02-01

    Cheyletiella dermatitis is an infrequently reported eruption caused by an ectoparasite whose normal hosts are household pets. Fourteen cases, documented over an eight-year period, are reported. All cases were found in one practice in a small community. Typical patients are female, aged forty years or younger, who experience pruritic papules in the winter months. Cheyletiella dermatitis is not a rare problem.

  14. Parents' reported preference scores for childhood atopic dermatitis disease states

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joëlle Y; Reed, Shelby D; Weinfurt, Kevin P; Kahler, Kristijan H; Walter, Emmanuel B; Schulman, Kevin A

    2004-01-01

    Background We sought to elicit preference weights from parents for health states corresponding to children with various levels of severity of atopic dermatitis. We also evaluated the hypothesis that parents with children who had been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis would assign different preferences to the health state scenarios compared with parents who did not have a child with atopic dermatitis. Methods Subjects were parents of children aged 3 months to 18 years. The sample was derived from the General Panel, Mommies Sub-Panel, and Chronic Illness Sub-Panel of Harris Interactive. Participants rated health scenarios for atopic dermatitis, asthma, and eyeglasses on a visual analog scale, imagining a child was experiencing the described state. Results A total of 3539 parents completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent had a child with a history of atopic dermatitis. Mean preference scores for atopic dermatitis were as follows: mild, 91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.7 to 91.5); mild/moderate, 84 (95%CI, 83.5 to 84.4); moderate, 73 (95%CI, 72.5 to 73.6); moderate/severe, 61 (95%CI, 60.6 to 61.8); severe, 49 (95% CI, 48.7 to 50.1); asthma, 58 (95%CI, 57.4 to 58.8); and eyeglasses, 87(95%CI, 86.3 to 87.4). Conclusions Parents perceive that atopic dermatitis has a negative effect on quality of life that increases with disease severity. Estimates of parents' preferences can provide physicians with insight into the value that parents place on their children's treatment and can be used to evaluate new medical therapies for atopic dermatitis. PMID:15491500

  15. Fragrance allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Judy; Zug, Kathryn A

    2014-01-01

    Fragrances are a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis in Europe and in North America. They can affect individuals at any age and elicit a spectrum of reactions from contact urticaria to systemic contact dermatitis. Growing recognition of the widespread use of fragrances in modern society has fueled attempts to prevent sensitization through improved allergen identification, labeling, and consumer education. This review provides an overview and update on fragrance allergy. Part 1 discusses the epidemiology and evaluation of suspected fragrance allergy. Part 2 reviews screening methods, emerging fragrance allergens, and management of patients with fragrance contact allergy. This review concludes by examining recent legislation on fragrances and suggesting potential additions to screening series to help prevent and detect fragrance allergy.

  16. Automatic Contour Extraction of Facial Organs for Frontal Facial Images with Various Facial Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Seiji; Takahashi, Hisanori; Tange, Akira; Kikuchi, Kohki

    This study deals with a method to realize automatic contour extraction of facial features such as eyebrows, eyes and mouth for the time-wise frontal face with various facial expressions. Because Snakes which is one of the most famous methods used to extract contours, has several disadvantages, we propose a new method to overcome these issues. We define the elastic contour model in order to hold the contour shape and then determine the elastic energy acquired by the amount of modification of the elastic contour model. Also we utilize the image energy obtained by brightness differences of the control points on the elastic contour model. Applying the dynamic programming method, we determine the contour position where the total value of the elastic energy and the image energy becomes minimum. Employing 1/30s time-wise facial frontal images changing from neutral to one of six typical facial expressions obtained from 20 subjects, we have estimated our method and find it enables high accuracy automatic contour extraction of facial features.

  17. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Xiong, Yu-Xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial "line-laser" scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a "stereophotography" (3dMD) and a "structured light" facial scanner (FaceScan) separately. Registration based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm was executed to overlap the test models to reference models, and "3D error" as a new measurement indicator calculated by reverse engineering software (Geomagic Studio) was used to evaluate the 3D global and partial (upper, middle, and lower parts of face) PA of each facial scanner. The respective 3D accuracy of stereophotography and structured light facial scanners obtained for facial deformities was 0.58±0.11 mm and 0.57±0.07 mm. The 3D accuracy of different facial partitions was inconsistent; the middle face had the best performance. Although the PA of two facial scanners was lower than their nominal accuracy (NA), they all met the requirement for oral clinic use.

  18. Hand dermatitis in auto mechanics and machinists.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Jeffrey C H; Kudla, Irena; Holness, D Linn

    2007-09-01

    Auto mechanics and machinists presenting with suspected allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) have traditionally been patch-tested with a standard screening tray and a specialty tray such as the Oil and Cooling Fluid Series. While this has proven useful for patch-testing the machinist, there is a need for the development of a more specific allergen testing tray for the auto mechanic. The objective of the study was to compare clinical features and patch-test results of auto mechanics and machinists with hand dermatitis to evaluate differences in allergen profiles. We performed a chart review of 33 auto mechanics and 24 machinists referred to our Occupational Contact Dermatitis Clinic from 2002 to 2005 for evaluation of hand dermatitis. With a panel of 84 allergens, 52 positive reactions were detected in 17 cases of ACD in mechanics. The profiles were different from the cases of ACD diagnosed in 10 of 24 machinists. Mechanics and machinists differ in the spectrum of occupational exposures. Patch testing with greater numbers of allergens likely identifies a larger proportion of mechanics with occupationally relevant ACD. Further study is needed to determine the most appropriate allergens to include in a clinically useful "mechanic's tray."

  19. Occupational contact allergic dermatitis in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Mikov, Ivan; Turkalj, Ivan; Jovanović, Marina

    2011-06-01

    Dental professionals may be at increased risk of developing occupational allergic diseases specially to methacrylates that can permeate protective disposable gloves. We presented a case of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in a 28-year-old dental technician. The patient had complained of itching and cracking of fingers for 6 months. The dermatitis improved over weekends. Skin erythema and scaling were present with primarily involvement of the fingertips. Patch testing with dental series gave positive vesicular reaction to methyl methacrylate. Follow-up after 6 months of allergen avoidance showed a complete regression of dermatitis. Methacrylates serve as bases for acrylic resins which are used in prosthetics. Methyl methacrylate as a small molecular acrylate can permeate thin protective disposable gloves. Using adequate personal protective equipment, like nitrile rubber gloves, is the most important preventive measure in this occupation. Health practitioners should recognize possible occupational hazards in dentistry and implement appropriate preventive measures to protect health of workers.

  20. Dysbiosis and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Drives Inflammation in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Glatz, Martin; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kaplan, Daniel H; Kong, Heidi H; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-04-21

    Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17(fl/fl)Sox9-(Cre) mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotics specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dysbiosis and Staphylococcus aureus colonization drives inflammation in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Glatz, Martin; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kaplan, Daniel H.; Kong, Heidi H.; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Summary Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17fl/flSox9-Cre mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotic specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis. PMID:25902485

  2. Evaluation and Management of Patch Test-Negative Patients With Generalized Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Alison; Mowad, Christen M

    Patients with generalized dermatitis are common in dermatology practices. Allergic contact dermatitis is often suspected, and patients frequently undergo patch testing. When the patch testing result is negative, further evaluation and management of these patients are challenging. The purpose of this study was to survey members of the American Contact Dermatitis Society regarding the evaluation and management of patch test-negative patients with generalized dermatitis. Generalized dermatitis was the most common term identified for patch test-negative patients with diffuse dermatitis. After having negative expanded patch testing results, most physicians proceeded with additional testing including skin biopsy, complete blood cell count with differential, and liver and renal function tests. The most commonly used systemic treatment is prednisone, followed by methotrexate. Narrow-band ultraviolet B (UVB) is the most commonly used light source. Antihistamines are frequently prescribed. Food allergy is not felt to be causative. This cohort of patients experiences significant impairment in quality of life, stress on personal relationships, and time off work. The management of patch test-negative patients with generalized dermatitis is challenging. This study provides insight into management of these complex patients. It also demonstrates practice gaps in the management of these patients, indicating a need for further studies to direct the evaluation and management of this patient population.

  3. Emotional facial activation induced by unconsciously perceived dynamic facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Jakob; Davey, Graham C L; Parkhouse, Thomas; Meeres, Jennifer; Scott, Ryan B

    2016-12-01

    Do facial expressions of emotion influence us when not consciously perceived? Methods to investigate this question have typically relied on brief presentation of static images. In contrast, real facial expressions are dynamic and unfold over several seconds. Recent studies demonstrate that gaze contingent crowding (GCC) can block awareness of dynamic expressions while still inducing behavioural priming effects. The current experiment tested for the first time whether dynamic facial expressions presented using this method can induce unconscious facial activation. Videos of dynamic happy and angry expressions were presented outside participants' conscious awareness while EMG measurements captured activation of the zygomaticus major (active when smiling) and the corrugator supercilii (active when frowning). Forced-choice classification of expressions confirmed they were not consciously perceived, while EMG revealed significant differential activation of facial muscles consistent with the expressions presented. This successful demonstration opens new avenues for research examining the unconscious emotional influences of facial expressions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic Factors That Increase Male Facial Masculinity Decrease Facial Attractiveness of Female Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony J.; Mitchem, Dorian G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework. PMID:24379153

  5. Genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity decrease facial attractiveness of female relatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony J; Mitchem, Dorian G; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Keller, Matthew C; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2014-02-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework.

  6. [Role of IgE-dependent reactions in atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Dynowski, Jarosław; Wasowska-Królikowska, Krystyna; Modzelewska-Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Tomaszewska, Monika; Funkowicz, Marzena

    2007-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a disease of multifactorial pathogenesis. of the study was to establish the most common allergens responsible for development of atopic symptoms in children with atopic dermatitis. the study complied 36 children aged 4 months - 3 years treated in the Department of Children Allergology, Gastroenterology and Nutrition because of atopic dermatitis. With each case the patient and family history of atopy was collected and basic laboratory tests were conducted (including total IgE and specific IgE using Polly Check system). eosinophilia was found in 11/36 children, elevated total IgE level in 16/36 and specific IgE were present in 14/36 patients. 6 patients proved to have sIgE for more then one allergen. The most commonly found allergens were animal hair, and food allergens. In 22 cases in spite of obvious clinical symptoms requiring therapy at hospital, all sIgE were negative for all tested allergens. although estimating sIgE is commonly used in diagnosing atopic dermatitis, it may not be sufficient to establish complete diagnosis. It seems that animal hair and food allergens are mainly responsible for development of atopic dermatitis.

  7. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    PubMed

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Contralateral botulinum toxin injection to improve facial asymmetry after acute facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin

    2013-02-01

    The application of botulinum toxin to the healthy side of the face in patients with long-standing facial paralysis has been shown to be a minimally invasive technique that improves facial symmetry at rest and during facial motion, but our experience using botulinum toxin therapy for facial sequelae prompted the idea that botulinum toxin might be useful in acute cases of facial paralysis, leading to improve facial asymmetry. In cases in which medical or surgical treatment options are limited because of existing medical problems or advanced age, most patients with acute facial palsy are advised to await spontaneous recovery or are informed that no effective intervention exists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin treatment for facial asymmetry in 18 patients after acute facial palsy who could not be optimally treated by medical or surgical management because of severe medical or other problems. From 2009 to 2011, nine patients with Bell's palsy, 5 with herpes zoster oticus and 4 with traumatic facial palsy (10 men and 8 women; age range, 22-82 yr; mean, 50.8 yr) participated in this study. Botulinum toxin A (Botox; Allergan Incorporated, Irvine, CA, USA) was injected using a tuberculin syringe with a 27-gauge needle. The amount injected per site varied from 2.5 to 3 U, and the total dose used per patient was 32 to 68 U (mean, 47.5 +/- 8.4 U). After administration of a single dose of botulinum toxin A on the nonparalyzed side of 18 patients with acute facial paralysis, marked relief of facial asymmetry was observed in 8 patients within 1 month of injection. Decreased facial asymmetry and strengthened facial function on the paralyzed side led to an increased HB and SB grade within 6 months after injection. Use of botulinum toxin after acute facial palsy cases is of great value. Such therapy decreases the relative hyperkinesis contralateral to the paralysis, leading to greater symmetric function. Especially in patients with medical

  9. Prospective multicenter survey on the clinical management of pediatric contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Claudia; Diociaiuti, Andrea; Arcangeli, Fabio; El Hachem, May

    2016-12-01

    Contact dermatitis can be defined as an inflammatory process affecting the skin surface and induced by contact with chemical, physical and/or biotic agents in the environment. It causes lesions to skin, mucosae and semi-mucosae by means of allergic and irritant pathogenic mechanisms. Among the main triggers of contact dermatitis in the pediatric age are chemical or physical agents, which cause irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), and sensitizers, which cause a tissue damage through an allergic mechanism (allergic contact dermatitis [ACD]). A prospective, multicenter, observational study was carried out in 204 children affected by contact dermatitis, aged up to 14 years, and enrolled by pediatricians from 7 different Italian provinces. The diagnosis of contact dermatitis was based on the pediatrician's clinical evaluation. The data were collected through a series of simple and multiple choice questions, anonymously filled out by pediatricians. In 90% of cases (184 of 204 patients), there was complete remission of contact dermatitis, with no cases of worsening. No adverse events were observed, either. The effectiveness of the therapy was rated as "very effective" by 84.4% of the parents and 86.8% of the pediatricians. In only 10 patients a new therapy had to be prescribed. Contact dermatitis is a heterogeneous inflammatory skin disease induced by contact with different kinds of environmental agents. Cutaneous manifestations are highly variable and depend on the modality of contact, on the causative agent and on the pathogenesis. This Italian experience of a clinical approach to contact dermatitis stresses the need of daily skin care through different therapeutic strategies, based on the diagnosis, the clinical severity and the parents and children compliance. The first therapeutic measure to be implemented is prevention, through the removal of the causative agent and the use of protective devices. Indeed, preserving the skin's barrier function is an important goal and

  10. [Atopic dermatitis and domestic animals].

    PubMed

    Song, M

    2000-09-01

    Several arguments are raised attributing to aeroallergens an important role in atopic dermatitis. The aeroallergens that penetrate the epidermis could be fixed by IgE on the Langerhans cells and then induce a cellular mediator reaction comparable to that of allergic contact eczema. Patch tests have been developed to evaluate the role of aeroallergens (dust mites, animal dander, etc.). Preventive anti-dust mites measures in the home of atopic patients are recommended. Eviction of domestic animals (cat, dog, etc.) or avoidance measures for animal dander in the home can produce improvement in atopic dermatitis. Oral specific immunotherapy is being validated as a treatment for this disease.

  11. Quantitative facial asymmetry: using three-dimensional photogrammetry to measure baseline facial surface symmetry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Helena O; Morrison, Clinton S; Linden, Olivia; Phillips, Benjamin; Chang, Johnny; Byrne, Margaret E; Sullivan, Stephen R; Forrest, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Although symmetry is hailed as a fundamental goal of aesthetic and reconstructive surgery, our tools for measuring this outcome have been limited and subjective. With the advent of three-dimensional photogrammetry, surface geometry can be captured, manipulated, and measured quantitatively. Until now, few normative data existed with regard to facial surface symmetry. Here, we present a method for reproducibly calculating overall facial symmetry and present normative data on 100 subjects. We enrolled 100 volunteers who underwent three-dimensional photogrammetry of their faces in repose. We collected demographic data on age, sex, and race and subjectively scored facial symmetry. We calculated the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between the native and reflected faces, reflecting about a plane of maximum symmetry. We analyzed the interobserver reliability of the subjective assessment of facial asymmetry and the quantitative measurements and compared the subjective and objective values. We also classified areas of greatest asymmetry as localized to the upper, middle, or lower facial thirds. This cluster of normative data was compared with a group of patients with subtle but increasing amounts of facial asymmetry. We imaged 100 subjects by three-dimensional photogrammetry. There was a poor interobserver correlation between subjective assessments of asymmetry (r = 0.56). There was a high interobserver reliability for quantitative measurements of facial symmetry RMSD calculations (r = 0.91-0.95). The mean RMSD for this normative population was found to be 0.80 ± 0.24 mm. Areas of greatest asymmetry were distributed as follows: 10% upper facial third, 49% central facial third, and 41% lower facial third. Precise measurement permitted discrimination of subtle facial asymmetry within this normative group and distinguished norms from patients with subtle facial asymmetry, with placement of RMSDs along an asymmetry ruler. Facial surface symmetry, which is poorly assessed

  12. [Inpatient rehabilitation of chronic dermatoses illustrated by atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Nürnberg, W

    2005-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is defined as a chronically relapsing skin disease resulting from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. It usually occurs during early childhood and shows typical clinical manifestations, depending on the patient's age. In cases of chronic atopic dermatitis, negative effects on professional and social activities and participation have to be expected. To counteract or overcome these threatening impairments in the different facets of life, prescribing inpatient rehabilitative measures should be considered early. Dermatological rehabilitation according to guidelines guarantees an interdisciplinary and multimodal treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  13. Skin-specific training experience of workers assessed for contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Zack, B; Arrandale, V; Holness, D L

    2018-05-17

    Contact dermatitis is a common and preventable work-related disease. Skin-specific training may be effective for preventing occupational contact dermatitis, but little information is available regarding actual workplace training and its effectiveness. To describe workplace skin-specific training among workers with suspected contact dermatitis. Patch test patients being assessed for suspected contact dermatitis at an occupational health clinic in Toronto, Canada, completed a questionnaire on training experiences, workplace characteristics, exposures and skin protection practices. Of 175 patients approached, 122 (71%) workers completed questionnaires. Many (80%) had received general occupational health and safety and hazardous materials training (76%). Fewer (39%) received skin-specific training. Of those with work-related contact dermatitis, 52% did not receive skin-specific training. Skin-specific training was commonly provided by health and safety professionals or supervisors using video, classroom and online techniques. Content included glove use, exposure avoidance and hand washing information. Workers that received skin-specific training found it memorable (87%), useful (85%) and common sense in nature (100%). This study indicates gaps in workplace training on skin disease prevention for workers with contact dermatitis. Workers perceived skin-specific training to be useful. Understanding worker training experiences is important to prevention programme development and reducing work-related skin disease.

  14. Poison Ivy Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ivy is caused by an allergic reaction ( allergic contact dermatitis ) to the oily coating that covers of these ... person doesn't have to come in direct contact with the leaves, roots, or branches of Rhus plants to get the rash. One can get it from contaminated clothing. Even ...

  15. Vitamin D in Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria and Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, Shannon K; Rainwater, Ellecia; Shure, Anna K; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vitamin D influences allergen-induced pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, and its potential immunomodulatory role in allergic skin disorders has been explored. This comprehensive review article provides an overview of the role of vitamin D in three common dermatologic conditions: atopic dermatitis (AD), chronic urticaria, and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Whereas the literature regarding vitamin D and AD has resulted in mixed findings, several studies have described an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and AD severity, and improvement in AD with vitamin D supplementation. Similarly, several studies report an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and severity of chronic urticaria. Although current research in humans remains limited, an increased likelihood of ACD has been demonstrated in vitamin D-deficient mice. Additional well-designed clinical trials will be necessary to determine whether vitamin D supplementation should be recommended for prevention or adjuvant treatment of these common dermatologic conditions. PMID:27014952

  16. Increased risk of stroke in contact dermatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Lun; Hsu, Min-Hsien; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chan, Po-Chi; Chang, Ko-Shih; Lee, Ching-Hsiao; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Tsai, Min-Tein; Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Dermatologic diseases are not traditional risk factors of stroke, but recent studies show atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and bullous skin disease may increase the risk of stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. No previous studies have focused on the association between contact dermatitis and stroke. We established a cohort comprised of 48,169 contact dermatitis patients newly diagnosed in 2000–2003 and 96,338 randomly selected subjects without the disorder, frequency matched by sex, age, and diagnosis year, as the comparison cohort. None of them had a history of stroke. Stroke incidence was assessed by the end of 2011 for both cohorts. The incidence stroke was 1.1-fold higher in the contact dermatitis cohort than in the comparison cohort (5.93 vs 5.37 per 1000 person-years, P < 0.01). The multivariable Cox method analyzed adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) were 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.19) for all stroke types and 1.12 (95% CI, 1.05–1.20) for ischemic stroke and 1.11 (95% CI, 0.94–1.30) for hemorrhagic stroke. The age-specific aHR of stroke for contact dermatitis cohort increased with age, from 1.14 (95% CI, 1.03–1.27) for 65 to 74 years; to 1.27 (95% CI, 1.15–1.42) for 75 years and older. The aHR of stroke were 1.16 (95% CI, 1.07–1.27) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.00–1.18) for men and women, respectively. This study suggests that patients with contact dermatitis were at a modestly increased risk of stroke, significant for ischemic stroke but not for hemorrhagic stroke. Comorbidity, particularly hypertension, increased the hazard of stroke further. PMID:28272195

  17. [A guide for education programs in atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Barbarot, S; Gagnayre, R; Bernier, C; Chavigny, J-M; Chiaverini, C; Lacour, J-P; Dupre-Goetghebeur, D; Misery, L; Piram, M; Cuny, J-F; Dega, H; Stalder, J-F

    2007-02-01

    Education about therapy applies to many chronic diseases. The aim is to improve patient management through the development of certain skills by patients themselves. Atopic dermatitis is an area amenable to the development of therapeutic education. The purpose of this study was to define the skills required for management of atopic dermatitis suitable for therapeutic education and to bring together these skills in a handbook suitable for use. Thirty caregivers were involved in the drafting of the handbook (dermatologists, a doctor specialising in therapeutic education, a psychologist and nurses), each of whom has experience of therapeutic education in atopic dermatitis. Four age groups were selected (under 5 years, 6 to 10 years, pre-teens/adults, parents of children aged under 5 years). For each age group, different levels of skill were identified for patients or parents of children and suitable learning methods were selected. Skills were classed according to 3 levels: (i) knowledge about the disease, treatments, triggering factors, (ii) knowledge about provision of care by patients or their parents, (iii) knowledge in terms of explaining the disease and treatment methods to family, and knowing who to contact and when. Finally, a 10-question evaluation guide was drawn up. In this paper we report the method of production and content of the handbook of skills for atopic dermatitis patients. The aim is not to impose all skills listed in this work on patients but rather to provide caregivers with a complete handbook covering therapeutic education. The book is intended for patients with moderate to severe forms of atopic dermatitis currently in therapeutic failure. It may be used by anyone treating such patients, whether doctors, nurses or psychologists, depending on the items chosen. It is intended for use as a support for the elaboration, diffusion and evaluation of a therapeutic education programme for atopic dermatitis.

  18. Outcome of facial physiotherapy in patients with prolonged idiopathic facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Watson, G J; Glover, S; Allen, S; Irving, R M

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated whether patients who remain symptomatic more than a year following idiopathic facial paralysis gain benefit from tailored facial physiotherapy. A two-year retrospective review was conducted of all symptomatic patients. Data collected included: age, gender, duration of symptoms, Sunnybrook facial grading system scores pre-treatment and at last visit, and duration of treatment. The study comprised 22 patients (with a mean age of 50.5 years (range, 22-75 years)) who had been symptomatic for more than a year following idiopathic facial paralysis. The mean duration of symptoms was 45 months (range, 12-240 months). The mean duration of follow up was 10.4 months (range, 2-36 months). Prior to treatment, the mean Sunnybrook facial grading system score was 59 (standard deviation = 3.5); this had increased to 83 (standard deviation = 2.7) at the last visit, with an average improvement in score of 23 (standard deviation = 2.9). This increase was significant (p < 0.001). Tailored facial therapy can improve facial grading scores in patients who remain symptomatic for prolonged periods.

  19. Systemic treatment of papular dermatitis: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Farah A; Sandoval, Laura F; Jorizzo, Joseph L; Huang, William W

    2015-10-01

    Papular dermatitis is an intensely pruritic eruption that is often refractory to conventional therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different non-steroidal systemic therapies for long-term control of disease in patients with papular dermatitis. This was a single center, retrospective study involving a chart review of patients with a diagnosis of papular dermatitis who were prescribed systemic therapy between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2012. Fourteen patients were identified that were treated with a systemic agent. Median duration of treatment was 25 months. Methotrexate was used first line in 12 patients, with control of disease achieved in eight patients with a dose between 2.5 and 10 mg weekly. Azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil also provided control of disease when used as first-line therapy in the remaining two patients. While azathiopurine was effective in patients who failed methotrexate, gastrointestinal side effects limited its use long term. Low dose weekly methotrexate, as well as, azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil are long-term treatment options for patients with papular dermatitis refractory to other therapies.

  20. In vitro antifungal efficacy of ciclopirox olamine alone and associated with zinc pyrithione compared to ketoconazole against Malassezia globosa and Malassezia restricta reference strains.

    PubMed

    Roques, Christine; Brousse, Sabine; Panizzutti, Cédric

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro fungicidal and growth inhibitory activity of ciclopirox olamine alone (1% and 1.5%) or in association with 1% zinc pyrithione compared to 2% ketoconazole, against Malassezia species particularly involved in the pathogenesis of seborrheic dermatitis. Experiments were performed on Malassezia globosa IP 2387.96 and M. restricta IP 2392.96 strains. Growth inhibitory activity of the active compounds in solution was evaluated by measuring minimal inhibitory concentrations using a broth micro-method and their fungicidal activity by a filtration method after contact times between solutions and yeasts ranging from 3-5 to 30 min. Concerning the determination of minimal inhibitory concentration of ciclopirox olamine/zinc pyrithione, it revealed the marked synergistic inhibitory effect of the association, leading to a higher efficacy compared to ketoconazole. As to the fungicidal activity of ciclopirox olamine, it significantly increased with the contact time. After 15-30 min of contact between 1.5% ciclopirox olamine and Malassezia strains, a 2-log reduction of Malassezia counts was observed. The 1.5% ciclopirox olamine/1% zinc pyrithione association was characterized by a steady fungicidal efficacy whereas the 2% ketoconazole solution did not express any fungicidal effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the in vitro inhibitory and fungicidal efficacy of the ciclopirox olamine/zinc pyrithione association against Malassezia species and underscores its potential interest in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

  1. Avian Schistosomes and Outbreaks of Cercarial Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mikeš, Libor; Lichtenbergová, Lucie; Skála, Vladimír; Soldánová, Miroslava; Brant, Sara Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer's itch) is a condition caused by infective larvae (cercariae) of a species-rich group of mammalian and avian schistosomes. Over the last decade, it has been reported in areas that previously had few or no cases of dermatitis and is thus considered an emerging disease. It is obvious that avian schistosomes are responsible for the majority of reported dermatitis outbreaks around the world, and thus they are the primary focus of this review. Although they infect humans, they do not mature and usually die in the skin. Experimental infections of avian schistosomes in mice show that in previously exposed hosts, there is a strong skin immune reaction that kills the schistosome. However, penetration of larvae into naive mice can result in temporary migration from the skin. This is of particular interest because the worms are able to migrate to different organs, for example, the lungs in the case of visceral schistosomes and the central nervous system in the case of nasal schistosomes. The risk of such migration and accompanying disorders needs to be clarified for humans and animals of interest (e.g., dogs). Herein we compiled the most comprehensive review of the diversity, immunology, and epidemiology of avian schistosomes causing cercarial dermatitis. PMID:25567226

  2. Avian schistosomes and outbreaks of cercarial dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Horák, Petr; Mikeš, Libor; Lichtenbergová, Lucie; Skála, Vladimír; Soldánová, Miroslava; Brant, Sara Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer's itch) is a condition caused by infective larvae (cercariae) of a species-rich group of mammalian and avian schistosomes. Over the last decade, it has been reported in areas that previously had few or no cases of dermatitis and is thus considered an emerging disease. It is obvious that avian schistosomes are responsible for the majority of reported dermatitis outbreaks around the world, and thus they are the primary focus of this review. Although they infect humans, they do not mature and usually die in the skin. Experimental infections of avian schistosomes in mice show that in previously exposed hosts, there is a strong skin immune reaction that kills the schistosome. However, penetration of larvae into naive mice can result in temporary migration from the skin. This is of particular interest because the worms are able to migrate to different organs, for example, the lungs in the case of visceral schistosomes and the central nervous system in the case of nasal schistosomes. The risk of such migration and accompanying disorders needs to be clarified for humans and animals of interest (e.g., dogs). Herein we compiled the most comprehensive review of the diversity, immunology, and epidemiology of avian schistosomes causing cercarial dermatitis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Poison ivy dermatitis. Nuances in treatment.

    PubMed

    Williford, P M; Sheretz, E F

    1994-02-01

    Acute allergic contact dermatitis due to poison ivy or poison oak is a common presenting complaint in the practices of many primary care physicians. While the clinical features are well described, reported treatment regimens vary in both topical and systemic therapies. We review herein the variability of presenting morphologic features of the disease and common treatment regimens, with attention given to complications of therapy. We also comment on the correct botanical designation, incidence, and immune mechanisms of the disease state and review measures to avoid allergic contact dermatitis due to poison ivy and poison oak.

  4. Appropriate glove use in dermatitis prevention.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Rose; Sunley, Kim

    Work-related skin problems in nursing staff have risen in recent years, and inspections by the Health and Safety Executive in 2011 found a number of NHS trusts failing in their duties to prevent and manage the risks of work-related dermatitis. In response, the Royal College of Nursing issued guidelines on glove use and the prevention of contact dermatitis in nursing (RCN, 2012). These involved close collaboration between the professional and trade union parts of the RCN because failure to prevent and manage skin problems affects the safety of both staff and patients.

  5. [Peripheral blood cells luminol-dependent chemiluminescence at the different stages of atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Elistratova, I V; Morozov, S G; Zakharova, I A; Tarasova, M V

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this work was to record the luminol-dependent spontaneous and induced chemiluminescence at the different stages of atopic dermatitis. Peripheral blood cells were obtained from adult patient with atopic dermatitis followed by the registration of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence on luminograph. Opsonized zymosan as well as yeasts Candida tropicalis have been used to induce the chemiluminescence. Spontaneous and induced chemiluminescence were slightly elevated at the mild atopic dermatitis but were decreased at the severe stage of disease. Statistically significant difference has been found between group with mild and severe atopic dermatitis, Skin contamination by yeasts Candida tropicalis causes the increased level of blood cells chemiluminescence at the first week of atopic relapse when the disease was mild. Severe stage of atopic dermatitis was coupled with statistically significant inhibition of both, spontaneous and induced chemiluminescence. Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of peripheral blood cells from adult atopic dermatitis patients may be stimulated at the mild stage and suppressed at severe stage of atopic dermatitis.

  6. [A clinical analysis of 50 cases of medicament-like dermatitis due to trichloroethylene].

    PubMed

    Xia, Li-hua; Huang, Han-lin; Kuang, Shou-ren; Liu, Hui-fang; Kong, Ling-zhen

    2004-06-01

    To investigate the clinical manifestations, complications and treatment of medicament-like dermatitis due to trichloroethylene (TCE), so as to provide basis for studying its etiology and mechanism. Fifty patients with dermatitis due to TCE from 1997 to 2000 were analysed retrospectively. The occurrence of the dermatitis was not parallel to TCE exposure levels, without significant dose-effect relationship. This disease could be caused by both inhalation and skin exposure. The latency period of TCE dermatitis ranged from 5 to 66 days, and the average was 31.5 d (Medium). The major clinical manifestations included skin lesions, fever, superficial lymph node swelling and liver dysfunction. Infection was the major complication. Glucocorticoid was effective for treatment of this disease. The clinical manifestations due to TCE exposure were similar to dermatitis medicamentosa. The major clinical types of TCE dermatitis included exfoliative dermatitis and erythema multiforme. The dermatitis is considered to be mediated by delayed-type (IV) hypersensitivity. The key factors to treat this disease successfully included the use of glucocorticoid in time with sufficient dose and full course, professional skin care, active treatment to protect the liver and to avoid infection.

  7. Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Ophthalmic Medications: Relevant Allergens and Alternative Testing Methods.

    PubMed

    Grey, Katherine R; Warshaw, Erin M

    Allergic contact dermatitis is an important cause of periorbital dermatitis. Topical ophthalmic agents are relevant sensitizers. Contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications can be challenging to diagnose and manage given the numerous possible offending agents, including both active and inactive ingredients. Furthermore, a substantial body of literature reports false-negative patch test results to ophthalmic agents. Subsequently, numerous alternative testing methods have been described. This review outlines the periorbital manifestations, causative agents, and alternative testing methods of allergic contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications.

  8. Pustular irritant contact dermatitis caused by dexpanthenol in a child.

    PubMed

    Gulec, Ali Ihsan; Albayrak, Hulya; Uslu, Esma; Başkan, Elife; Aliagaoglu, Cihangir

    2015-03-01

    Pustular irritant contact dermatitis is rare and unusual clinic form of contact dermatitis. Dexpanthenol is the stable alcoholic analogue of pantothenic acid. It is widely used in cosmetics and topical medical products for several purposes. We present the case of 8-year-old girl with pustules over erythematous and eczematous areas on the face and neck. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported that is diagnosed as pustular irritant contact dermatitis caused by dexpanthenol.

  9. T cell lymphomatoid contact dermatitis: a challenging case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Knackstedt, Thomas J; Zug, Kathryn A

    2015-02-01

    Lymphomatoid contact dermatitis is a pseudolymphoma with clinical and histological features of allergic contact dermatitis and cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Incorrect diagnosis may lead to unnecessary testing, unnecessary treatment, or patient harm. The objective of this study is to present a case to demonstrate the diagnostic challenge and overlap between allergic contact dermatitis and cutaneous T cell lymphoma in a patient with lymphomatoid contact dermatitis caused by methylchoroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and paraben mix, and to review the existing literature in order to summarize the demographics, clinical features, allergens and treatments reported for lymphomatoid contact dermatitis. A search of major scientific databases was conducted for English-language articles reporting cases of lymphomatoid contact dermatitis or additional synonymous search headings. Nineteen articles with a total of 23 patients were analysed. Lymphomatoid contact dermatitis was more common in men, with an average age of 58.5 years. Fourteen unique allergens were identified and confirmed by patch testing. However, no single test or study was diagnostic of lymphomatoid contact dermatitis. Allergen avoidance was the most useful management tool, but selected patients required topical or systemic immunosuppression. In conclusion, without specific diagnostic features, evaluation for lymphomatoid contact dermatitis should include a thorough history and examination, patch testing, and biopsy with immunohistochemistry and clonality studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The Association Between Bathing Habits and Severity of Atopic Dermatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Koutroulis, Ioannis; Pyle, Tia; Kopylov, David; Little, Anthony; Gaughan, John; Kratimenos, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that frequently affects children. The current recommendations on management using lifestyle modification are highly variable, leading to confusion and uncertainty among patients. To determine current bathing behaviors and the subsequent impact on disease severity. This was an observational cross-sectional study conducted at an urban pediatric emergency department. Parents were asked to fill out a questionnaire concerning the patient's bathing habits. The results were correlated with the atopic dermatitis severity determined by the SCORAD (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis) tool. No difference between variables was found to be significant for bathing frequency, time spent bathing, or use of moisturizers. Multivariate analysis showed that atopic dermatitis severity increased with age greater than 2 years (P = .0004) and with greater bathing duration (P = .001). Atopic dermatitis severity may be associated with a longer duration of bathing. The frequency of bathing does not appear to affect atopic dermatitis severity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Peeters, N; Lemkens, P; Leach, R; Gemels B; Schepers, S; Lemmens, W

    Facial trauma. Patients with facial trauma must be assessed in a systematic way so as to avoid missing any injury. Severe and disfiguring facial injuries can be distracting. However, clinicians must first focus on the basics of trauma care, following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) system of care. Maxillofacial trauma occurs in a significant number of severely injured patients. Life- and sight-threatening injuries must be excluded during the primary and secondary surveys. Special attention must be paid to sight-threatening injuries in stabilized patients through early referral to an appropriate specialist or the early initiation of emergency care treatment. The gold standard for the radiographic evaluation of facial injuries is computed tomography (CT) imaging. Nasal fractures are the most frequent isolated facial fractures. Isolated nasal fractures are principally diagnosed through history and clinical examination. Closed reduction is the most frequently performed treatment for isolated nasal fractures, with a fractured nasal septum as a predictor of failure. Ear, nose and throat surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons and ophthalmologists must all develop an adequate treatment plan for patients with complex maxillofacial trauma.

  12. Less common clinical manifestations of atopic dermatitis: prevalence by age.

    PubMed

    Julián-Gónzalez, Rolando Elias; Orozco-Covarrubias, Luz; Durán-McKinster, Carola; Palacios-Lopez, Carolina; Ruiz-Maldonado, Ramon; Sáez-de-Ocariz, Marimar

    2012-01-01

    The common manifestations of atopic dermatitis (AD) appear sequentially with involvement of the cheeks in infancy, flexural extremities in childhood, and hands in adulthood. Although less common clinical manifestations are well described, they have not been the subject of epidemiologic studies to describe their prevalence in specific age groups. This observational, cross-sectional, comparative study included 131 children younger than 18 of both sexes with AD who attended the clinics of the Dermatology Department of the National Institute of Pediatrics in Mexico City. Patients were examined to determine the presence of infrequent clinical manifestations of AD during infancy, preschool and school age, and adolescence and stratified according to sex, age, and number of clinical signs. A chi-square test was used to detect differences according to age and sex. Logistic regression analysis was also performed. The main findings according to age were genital dermatitis and papular-lichenoid dermatitis variant in infants; atopic feet, prurigo-like, nummular pattern, and erythroderma in preschool and school-aged children; and eyelid eczema and nipple dermatitis in adolescents. The risk of development of nipple dermatitis and eyelid eczema increased with age, and the development of genital dermatitis decreased with age. The knowledge of the prevalence of less common clinical manifestations of AD according to age in different populations might be helpful in diagnosing incipient cases of AD. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Identification of metallic items that caused nickel dermatitis in Danish patients.

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2010-09-01

    Nickel allergy is prevalent as assessed by epidemiological studies. In an attempt to further identify and characterize sources that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis, we analysed items identified by nickel-allergic dermatitis patients as causative of nickel dermatitis by using the dimethylglyoxime (DMG) test. Dermatitis patients with nickel allergy of current relevance were identified over a 2-year period in a tertiary referral patch test centre. When possible, their work tools and personal items were examined with the DMG test. Among 95 nickel-allergic dermatitis patients, 70 (73.7%) had metallic items investigated for nickel release. A total of 151 items were investigated, and 66 (43.7%) gave positive DMG test reactions. Objects were nearly all purchased or acquired after the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive. Only one object had been inherited, and only two objects had been purchased outside of Denmark. DMG testing is valuable as a screening test for nickel release and should be used to identify relevant exposures in nickel-allergic patients. Mainly consumer items, but also work tools used in an occupational setting, released nickel in dermatitis patients. This study confirmed 'risk items' from previous studies, including mobile phones.

  14. Investigation of the correlation of serum IL-31 with severity of dermatitis in an experimental model of canine atopic dermatitis using beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Marsella, Rosanna; Ahrens, Kim; Sanford, Rachel

    2018-02-01

    IL-31 is a cytokine that is believed to play an important role in atopic dermatitis (AD). IL-31 levels positively correlate with disease severity in children with AD. Currently, there is no study that has investigated such a correlation in atopic dogs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between IL-31 serum levels and severity of dermatitis. It was hypothesized that a positive correlation exists between severity of AD and circulating levels of IL-31. Sixteen atopic beagles experimentally sensitized to house dust mites. Atopic beagles were exposed to dust mites epicutaneously twice weekly for four weeks. Severity of dermatitis was scored by the Canine Atopic Dermatitis and Extent Severity Index, 3 rd iteration (CADESI-03) on days 0 and 28. Blood samples were taken on days 0 and 28 to measure serum IL-31 using a commercially available ELISA. Correlation between CADESI-03 scores and serum IL-31 levels was not detected on day 0 (Pearson, r = -0.2609, P = 0.3291). After flare-up of dermatitis was induced with allergen exposure, a significant positive correlation was detected between serum IL-31 and CADESI-03 on Day 28 (r = 0.6738, P = 0.004). Positive correlation was detected in active disease between severity of dermatitis and circulating levels of IL-31. Additional studies are needed to investigate this correlation in other breeds of dogs and to test whether circulating levels of IL-31 may predict clinical response to biological agents aimed at IL-31. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  15. The history of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Owen N; Strom, Mark A; Ladizinski, Barry; Lio, Peter A

    Fred Wise (1881-1950) and Marion Sulzberger (1895-1983) are often credited with introducing the term atopic dermatitis to dermatology in 1933. This definition was based on atopy, a term first created by Arthur Coca (1875-1959) and Robert Cooke (1880-1960) in 1923, when they recognized an association between allergic rhinitis and asthma. Despite its recent introduction into our medical lexicon, historical precursors of atopic dermatitis date back to at least as early as 69-140 ce. In this contribution, we highlight both the prominent individuals credited with shaping the disorder into our current interpretation and the suspected historical precursors of this disease and reported treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis From the Perspective of Traditional Persian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Choopani, Rasool; Mehrbani, Mehrzad; Fekri, Alireza; Mehrabani, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong current trend for using complementary and alternative medications to treat atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis is a common, chronic, pruritic, and inflammatory skin disease. It can have a profound, negative effect on patients’ quality of life. Mild cases of atopic dermatitis can be controlled by the application of moisturizers and topical corticosteroids. However, in severe cases, application of immunosuppressive medication is unavoidable but it can have adverse effects. In traditional Persian medicine, diseases similar to resistant atopic dermatitis are treated with whey in combination with decoction of field dodder. Both whey and field dodder have anti-inflammatory properties. Consumption of whey can also aid skin repair, mitigate pruritus, and help combat the high level of stress experienced by patients. Therefore, it is hypothesized that consumption of traditional medicinal treatment of whey with decoction of field dodder can be applied as a complementary treatment for atopic dermatitis. PMID:26260045

  17. Stoma care products represent a common and previously underreported source of peristomal contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Cressey, Brienne D; Belum, Viswanath R; Scheinman, Pamela; Silvestri, Dianne; McEntee, Nancy; Livingston, Vashti; Lacouture, Mario E; Zippin, Jonathan H

    2017-01-01

    Peristomal dermatitis is a common complication for the >700 000 patients in the United States with an ostomy. The role of stoma skin care products in peristomal dermatitis is poorly understood. To evaluate stoma skin care products as a cause of peristomal dermatitis. A retrospective chart review of patients with peristomal dermatitis at four academic hospitals from January 2010 to March 2014 was performed. Patient demographics, clinical information and use test and patch test results were documented. Eighteen patients identified as having peristomal dermatitis were tested. Twelve of these had peristomal contact dermatitis. We identified numerous stoma skin care products as triggers of irritant and/or allergic contact dermatitis. The most common stoma skin care product used and/or involved in dermatitis was Cavilon™ No Sting Barrier Film. Our data support a paradigm shift whereby healthcare workers treating patients with peristomal dermatitis, which is currently considered to be a reaction mainly to bodily fluids, must consider those products used to protect the skin as potential triggers for this disease. Therefore, patients with peristomal dermatitis should be tested with their stoma skin care agents to determine the need for removal or change of these products. Additionally, full ingredient labelling by manufacturers would help identify new allergens and irritants. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Atopic dermatitis: professional orientation.

    PubMed

    Frimat, Paul; Boughattas, Wided; Even, Dorothée

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is often exacerbated by the working environment. In order to reduce the risk of allergy, young people must receive better medical guidance when they choose a career. This is all the more relevant for young atopic patients.

  19. Immunotherapy of allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2011-08-01

    The term 'immunotherapy' refers to treating diseases by inducing, enhancing or suppressing immune responses. As allergy is an excessive, detrimental immune reaction to otherwise harmless environmental substances, immunotherapy of allergic disease is aimed at the induction of tolerance toward sensitizing antigens. This article focuses on the historical developments, present state and future outlook for immunotherapy with haptens as a therapeutic modality for allergic contact dermatitis. Inspired by the effectiveness of immunotherapy in respiratory allergies, attempts were undertaken at curing allergic contact dermatitis by means of controlled administration of the sensitizing haptens. Animal and human experiments confirmed that tolerance to haptens can be induced most effectively when the induction of tolerance precedes attempted sensitization. In real life, however, therapy is sought by people who are already sensitized and an effective reversal of hypersensitivity seems more difficult to achieve. Decades of research on Rhus hypersensitivity led to a conclusion that immunotherapy can suppress Rhus dermatitis, however, only to a limited degree, for a short period of time, and at a high risk of side effects, which makes this method therapeutically unprofitable. Methodological problems with most available studies of immunotherapy of contact allergy to nickel make any definite conclusions impossible at this stage.

  20. Allergic Contact Dermatitis From Methylisothiazolinone in Residential Wall Paint.

    PubMed

    Goodier, Molly C; Ljungberg, Linda; Persson, Christina; Engfeldt, Malin; Bruze, Magnus; Warshaw, Erin M

    A 33-year-old woman presented to our clinic for suspected photoallergic contact dermatitis with a recent episode of severe, vesicular dermatitis involving exposed skin and correlating with relocation to a new home. Biopsy results showed spongiotic and lichenoid dermatitis with eosinophils. Patch test results showed a very strong (+++) reaction to methylisothiazolinone (MI), mild (+) reaction to MI/methylchloroisothiazolinone, and no reaction to benzisothiazolinone. These allergens were found in several personal products. However, the patient was suspicious of 4 wall paints recently used in her home. Semiopen patch tests to 3 Behr interior paints showed positive results. Nine controls showed negative results. High-performance liquid chromatography demonstrated MI and benzisothiazolinone in all 4 paints at concentrations ranging from 50 to 100 ppm and 290 to 340 ppm, respectively. Although MI has been reported to cause occupational airborne contact dermatitis in European household painters, to our knowledge, this is the first documented case of paint-related MI allergy in the United States.

  1. [Occupational contact dermatitis in metal workers and gender effect].

    PubMed

    Filon, F Larese; Marzioti, G; Fortina, A Belloni; Peserico, A; De Toni, A; Corradini, M T; Carrabba, E; Fiorito, A

    2007-01-01

    Contact dermatitis is more frequent among women for anatomical reasons and for extraprofessional exposure to irritants and detergents during homeworks. In addition sensitisation to contact haptens is different in sexes. The aim of our work was to evaluate the association between patch test skin sensitizations and professional exposure to metals analyzing data for gender. Of the 15.217 patients patch tested for dermatitis, 678 were metalworkers. The statistical analysis revealed a significant association between dermatitis and sensitisation to nickel in professional exposed women (OR = 1.68; LC50% 1.11-6.50) while metal sensitisation (Cr.Ni and Co) was not relevant in men: for them a significant association between dermatitis and sensitisation was found to quaternium (OR = 3.91; LC95% 1.18-12.9), to mercaptobenzothiazole (OR = 2.69; LC50% 1.11-6.50) and to ethylendiamine dichloride (OR = 2.53; LC95% 1-6.41). The authors stress the need to evaluate patch test sensitisation considering gender effects.

  2. Autoimmune Progesterone Dermatitis Presenting as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Drayer, Sara M; Laufer, Larry R; Farrell, Maureen E

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is an uncommon disease presenting with cyclical skin eruptions corresponding with the menstrual cycle luteal phase. Because symptoms are precipitated by rising progesterone levels, treatment relies on hormone suppression. A 22-year-old nulligravid woman presented with symptoms mistaken for Stevens-Johnson syndrome. A cyclic recurrence of her symptoms was noted, and the diagnosis of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis was made by an intradermal progesterone challenge. After 48 months, she remained refractory to medical management and definitive surgical treatment with bilateral oophorectomy was performed. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is a challenging diagnosis owing to its rarity and variety of clinical presentations. Treatment centers on suppression of endogenous progesterone and avoidance of exogenous triggers. When these modalities fail, surgical management must be undertaken.

  3. Slowing down presentation of facial movements and vocal sounds enhances facial expression recognition and induces facial-vocal imitation in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Carole; Lainé, France; Rodriguez, Mélissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-09-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on CD-Rom, under audio or silent conditions, and under dynamic visual conditions (slowly, very slowly, at normal speed) plus a static control. Overall, children with autism showed lower performance in expression recognition and more induced facial-vocal imitation than controls. In the autistic group, facial expression recognition and induced facial-vocal imitation were significantly enhanced in slow conditions. Findings may give new perspectives for understanding and intervention for verbal and emotional perceptive and communicative impairments in autistic populations.

  4. Association Among Facial Paralysis, Depression, and Quality of Life in Facial Plastic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nellis, Jason C.; Ishii, Masaru; Byrne, Patrick J.; Boahene, Kofi D. O.; Dey, Jacob K.; Ishii, Lisa E.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Though anecdotally linked, few studies have investigated the impact of facial paralysis on depression and quality of life (QOL). OBJECTIVE To measure the association between depression, QOL, and facial paralysis in patients seeking treatment at a facial plastic surgery clinic. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS Data were prospectively collected for patients with all-cause facial paralysis and control patients initially presenting to a facial plastic surgery clinic from 2013 to 2015. The control group included a heterogeneous patient population presenting to facial plastic surgery clinic for evaluation. Patients who had prior facial reanimation surgery or missing demographic and psychometric data were excluded from analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Demographics, facial paralysis etiology, facial paralysis severity (graded on the House-Brackmann scale), Beck depression inventory, and QOL scores in both groups were examined. Potential confounders, including self-reported attractiveness and mood, were collected and analyzed. Self-reported scores were measured using a 0 to 100 visual analog scale. RESULTS There was a total of 263 patients (mean age, 48.8 years; 66.9% were female) were analyzed. There were 175 control patients and 88 patients with facial paralysis. Sex distributions were not significantly different between the facial paralysis and control groups. Patients with facial paralysis had significantly higher depression, lower self-reported attractiveness, lower mood, and lower QOL scores. Overall, 37 patients with facial paralysis (42.1%) screened positive for depression, with the greatest likelihood in patients with House-Brackmann grade 3 or greater (odds ratio, 10.8; 95% CI, 5.13–22.75) compared with 13 control patients (8.1%) (P < .001). In multivariate regression, facial paralysis and female sex were significantly associated with higher depression scores (constant, 2.08 [95% CI, 0.77–3.39]; facial paralysis effect, 5.98 [95% CI, 4.38–7

  5. Patch test reactions to metal salts in patients with different types of dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Turčić, Petra; Marinović Kulišić, Sandra; Lipozenčić, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Metal allergies can be a clinical problem, especially in atopic individuals. This study is unique and contributes with new knowledge in everyday life skin care of irritant and atopic dermatitis patients. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of positive patch test reactions to metal contact allergens (potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, white mercury precipitate) in patients diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis. Between 2007 and 2011, patch testing was performed in 2185 patients according to the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group technique. Study results showed statistically significant differences in patch test responses to 2 allergens, nickel sulfate (χ(2)=24.22; p<0.001) and cobalt chloride (χ(2)=22.72; p<0.001). Nickel sulfate was the most common allergen in allergic contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis, while for irritant contact dermatitis the most common allergen was cobalt chloride. Among the 4 tested metal allergens, the most common and relevant was nickel sulfate (χ(2)=17.25; p<0.004), found in almost all study subjects. In conclusion, the increased awareness of allergens and their potential sources may help limit the use of these chemicals in consumer product manufacturing.

  6. Facial fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Boyette, Jennings R

    2014-10-01

    Facial trauma in children differs from adults. The growing facial skeleton presents several challenges to the reconstructive surgeon. A thorough understanding of the patterns of facial growth and development is needed to form an individualized treatment strategy. A proper diagnosis must be made and treatment options weighed against the risk of causing further harm to facial development. This article focuses on the management of facial fractures in children. Discussed are common fracture patterns based on the development of the facial structure, initial management, diagnostic strategies, new concepts and old controversies regarding radiologic examinations, conservative versus operative intervention, risks of growth impairment, and resorbable fixation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Malassezia yeasts and their significance in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Hort, W; Nilles, M; Mayser, P

    2006-07-01

    Yeasts of the genus Malassezia belong to the normal microflora of the human skin. In addition they are known to cause a variety of skin diseases; the most frequent of which is pityriasis versicolor. Malassezia yeasts are also thought to be associated with seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff and Malassezia folliculitis. Recently the significance of Malassezia yeasts as a trigger factor for atopic dermatitis of the head and neck region has been pointed out. The role of the Malassezia yeasts in these different diseases has been controversial in the past and remains an issue because of difficulties in isolation, culture and differentiation of the organism. Thanks to molecular techniques, 10 species can actually be differentiated. The article presents the different Malassezia-associated diseases, their clinical picture, diagnosis and appropriate therapy. In addition the speciation of Malassezia is reviewed.

  8. Slowing down Presentation of Facial Movements and Vocal Sounds Enhances Facial Expression Recognition and Induces Facial-Vocal Imitation in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tardif, Carole; Laine, France; Rodriguez, Melissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on…

  9. Current Quality-of-Life Tools Available for Use in Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Swietlik, Jacquelyn; Reeder, Margo

    2016-01-01

    Contact dermatitis is a common dermatologic condition that can cause significant impairment in patients' overall quality of life (QoL). This impact is separate and potentially more clinically relevant than one's disease "severity" in contact dermatitis and should be consistently addressed by dermatologists. Despite this, QoL tools specific to contact dermatitis are lacking, and there is little consistency in the literature regarding the tool used to evaluate clinical response to therapies. Measurements currently available to evaluate disease-related QoL in contact dermatitis fit into 1 of the following 3 general types: generic health-related QoL measures, dermatology-related QoL measures, or specific dermatologic disease-related QoL measures. This article reviews the strengths and weaknesses of existing QoL tools used in contact dermatitis including: Short Form Survey 36, Dermatology Life Quality Index, Skindex-29, Skindex-16, Dermatology-Specific Quality of Life, and Fragrance Quality of Life Index.

  10. Classifying Facial Actions

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  11. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by cocamide diethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Sarien; Gilissen, Liesbeth; Goossens, An

    2016-07-01

    Cocamide DEA (CAS no. 68603-42-9) is a non-ionic surfactant frequently used in industrial, household and cosmetic products for its foam-producing and stabilizing properties. Contact allergy has been reported quite rarely in the past, but recently several cases were published, raising the question of an increase in the frequency of allergic dermatitis caused by this substance. To describe cocamide DEA-allergic patients and their characteristics observed in our department. Medical charts of patients, investigated between 1990 and December 2015, were retrospectively reviewed for cocamide DEA-allergy. Demographic characteristics and patch test results were analyzed. Out of 1767 patients tested, 18 (1%) presented with an allergic reaction to cocamide DEA, all of them at least with hand dermatitis. Twelve patients had (past) occupational exposure to cocamide DEA. Out of the 18 patients, 15 showed (most often) multiple positive reactions and 7 also suffered from atopic dermatitis. Cocamide DEA allergy is relatively rare, despite frequent use, and an increasing trend was not observed. Reactions to cocamidopropyl betaine and cocamide MEA only occurred in some of the subjects tested. Shampoos and liquid hand soaps/cleansers dominated as sources of exposure. All patients presented with an impaired skin barrier due to atopic and/or previous contact dermatitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Chronic, burning facial pain following cosmetic facial surgery.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, E; Yaari, A; Har-Shai, Y

    1996-01-01

    Chronic, burning facial pain as a result of cosmetic facial surgery has rarely been reported. During the year of 1994, two female patients presented themselves at our Pain Relief Clinic with chronic facial pain that developed following aesthetic facial surgery. One patient underwent bilateral transpalpebral surgery for removal of intraorbital fat for the correction of the exophthalmus, and the other had classical face and anterior hairline forehead lifts. Pain in both patients was similar in that it was bilateral, symmetric, burning in quality, and aggravated by external stimuli, mainly light touch. It was resistant to multiple analgesic medications, and was associated with significant depression and disability. Diagnostic local (lidocaine) and systemic (lidocaine and phentolamine) nerve blocks failed to provide relief. Psychological evaluation revealed that the two patients had clear psychosocial factors that seemed to have further compounded their pain complaints. Tricyclic antidepressants (and biofeedback training in one patient) were modestly effective and produced only partial pain relief.

  13. Facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Little, Anthony C

    2014-11-01

    Facial attractiveness has important social consequences. Despite a widespread belief that beauty cannot be defined, in fact, there is considerable agreement across individuals and cultures on what is found attractive. By considering that attraction and mate choice are critical components of evolutionary selection, we can better understand the importance of beauty. There are many traits that are linked to facial attractiveness in humans and each may in some way impart benefits to individuals who act on their preferences. If a trait is reliably associated with some benefit to the perceiver, then we would expect individuals in a population to find that trait attractive. Such an approach has highlighted face traits such as age, health, symmetry, and averageness, which are proposed to be associated with benefits and so associated with facial attractiveness. This view may postulate that some traits will be universally attractive; however, this does not preclude variation. Indeed, it would be surprising if there existed a template of a perfect face that was not affected by experience, environment, context, or the specific needs of an individual. Research on facial attractiveness has documented how various face traits are associated with attractiveness and various factors that impact on an individual's judgments of facial attractiveness. Overall, facial attractiveness is complex, both in the number of traits that determine attraction and in the large number of factors that can alter attraction to particular faces. A fuller understanding of facial beauty will come with an understanding of how these various factors interact with each other. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:621-634. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1316 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Relationships among plasma granzyme B level, pruritus and dermatitis in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Yayoi; Kimura, Utako; Matsuda, Hironori; Tengara, Suhandy; Kamo, Atsuko; Umehara, Yoshie; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Suga, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hideoki; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Takamori, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by skin barrier dysfunction, allergic inflammation and intractable pruritus resistant to conventional antipruritic treatments, including H 1 -antihistamines. Granzymes (Gzms) are a family of serine proteases expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells that have been shown to modulate inflammation. However, the relationship between Gzms and pathology in AD remains unclear. This study assessed the correlation between plasma GzmB levels and severity of pruritus and dermatitis, in AD patients. Plasma was collected from 46 patients with AD, 24 patients with psoriasis, and 30 healthy controls. AD severity was assessed with the scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) index, psoriasis severity with the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI), and degree of pruritus by visual analogue scale (VAS) score. GzmA, GzmB and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Plasma GzmB concentrations were significantly higher in patients with AD and psoriasis than in healthy controls. Correlation analyses showed that plasma GzmB concentrations positively correlated with SCORAD and serum levels of severity markers such as thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, and lactate dehydrogenase in AD patients. Moreover, plasma levels of GRP, an itch-related peptide, were higher in patients with AD, positively correlating with VAS score and plasma GzmB level. In addition, plasma GzmB concentration was significantly lower in the treatment group than the untreated group with AD. Meanwhile, there were no correlations among GzmB levels, VAS score and PASI score in patients with psoriasis. In contrast to the results of plasma GzmB, plasma GzmA levels were unchanged among AD, psoriasis and healthy groups, and showed no correlations with VAS score and SCORAD index in patients with AD. Plasma GzmB levels may reflect the degree of pruritus and dermatitis in

  15. Effect of environmental tobacco smoke on atopic dermatitis among children in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yi, Okhee; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Kim, Ho; Ha, Mina; Hong, Soo-Jong; Hong, Yun-Chul; Leem, Jong-Han; Sakong, Joon; Lee, Chul Gab; Kim, Su-Young; Kang, Dongmug

    2012-02-01

    The prevalence of atopic dermatitis is increasing in many countries. Several factors are known to be associated with childhood atopic dermatitis. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is one of the most common indoor pollutants, and children are more vulnerable to ETS exposure than adults are. In this study, the possible association of ETS with atopic dermatitis was evaluated in 7030 individuals aged 6-13 years who participated in the Children's Health and Environment Research study. In addition, predictive factors, such as the allergic history of the parents, children's immunoglobulin E levels and children's history of rhinitis and its association with dermatitis, were assessed. After adjustment for possible confounding variables, atopic dermatitis was found to be highly correlated with ETS, especially among children whose mothers had smoked during pregnancy and/or in the first year after birth (OR=2.06, 95% CI: 1.01-4.22). In conclusion, our results show that childhood exposure to ETS is a major risk factor for atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Facial anatomy.

    PubMed

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Children's Facial Trustworthiness Judgments: Agreement and Relationship with Facial Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fengling; Xu, Fen; Luo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined developmental changes in children's abilities to make trustworthiness judgments based on faces and the relationship between a child's perception of trustworthiness and facial attractiveness. One hundred and one 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds, along with 37 undergraduates, were asked to judge the trustworthiness of 200 faces. Next, they issued facial attractiveness judgments. The results indicated that children made consistent trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments based on facial appearance, but with-adult and within-age agreement levels of facial judgments increased with age. Additionally, the agreement levels of judgments made by girls were higher than those by boys. Furthermore, the relationship between trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments increased with age, and the relationship between two judgments made by girls was closer than those by boys. These findings suggest that face-based trait judgment ability develops throughout childhood and that, like adults, children may use facial attractiveness as a heuristic cue that signals a stranger's trustworthiness.

  18. Children's Facial Trustworthiness Judgments: Agreement and Relationship with Facial Attractiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fengling; Xu, Fen; Luo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined developmental changes in children's abilities to make trustworthiness judgments based on faces and the relationship between a child's perception of trustworthiness and facial attractiveness. One hundred and one 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds, along with 37 undergraduates, were asked to judge the trustworthiness of 200 faces. Next, they issued facial attractiveness judgments. The results indicated that children made consistent trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments based on facial appearance, but with-adult and within-age agreement levels of facial judgments increased with age. Additionally, the agreement levels of judgments made by girls were higher than those by boys. Furthermore, the relationship between trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments increased with age, and the relationship between two judgments made by girls was closer than those by boys. These findings suggest that face-based trait judgment ability develops throughout childhood and that, like adults, children may use facial attractiveness as a heuristic cue that signals a stranger's trustworthiness. PMID:27148111

  19. Occupational contact dermatitis in hairdressers/cosmetologists: retrospective analysis of north american contact dermatitis group data, 1994 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Erin M; Wang, Michael Z; Mathias, C G Toby; Maibach, Howard I; Belsito, Donald V; Zug, Kathryn A; Taylor, James S; Zirwas, Matthew J; Fransway, Anthony F; Deleo, Vincent A; Marks, James G; Pratt, Melanie D; Storrs, Frances J; Rietschel, Robert L; Fowler, Joseph F; Sasseville, Denis

    2012-01-01

    European studies document that occupational contact dermatitis (CD) is common in hairdressers, but studies from North America are lacking. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of occupational CD among North American hairdressers/cosmetologists (HD/CS) and to characterize responsible allergens and irritants as well as their sources. A cross-sectional analysis of patients patch tested by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group between 1994 and 2010 was conducted. Of 35,842 patients, 432 (1.2%) were HD/CS. Significantly, most of the HD/CS were female (89.8%) and younger than 40 years (55.6%) as compared with non-hairdressers (P < 0.0001). The rates for allergic and irritant CD in HD/CS were 72.7% and 37.0%, respectively. The most common body site of involvement was the hand, and this was significantly more common than in non-HD/CS (P < 0.0001). The most frequent currently relevant and occupationally related allergens were glyceryl thioglycolate, p-phenylenediamine, nickel sulfate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and quaternium-15. Hair dyes, permanent wave solutions, and other hair products were common sources of allergens. The North American Contact Dermatitis Group allergen series missed at least 1 occupationally-related allergen in 26.2% of patients. Contact dermatitis in North American HD/CS is common, and occupationally related allergens are those found in HD/CS products. Supplemental hairdressing/cosmetology antigen series are important in detecting all occupationally related allergens in this population.

  20. An outbreak of mud-wrestling-induced pustular dermatitis in college students. Dermatitis palaestrae limosae.

    PubMed

    Adler, A I; Altman, J

    1993-01-27

    To investigate an outbreak of gram-negative folliculitis in relation to a common exposure, mud wrestling, and identify risk factors for dermatitis among those who mud wrestled. Case-control study. University of Washington, Seattle. Two college-residence groups of students. Cultures from affected students and from mud similar to that used for wrestling yielded Enterobacteriaceae. The odds ratio associated with mud wrestling was 79.5 (95% confidence interval, 13.9 to 895.4). Increased time spent wrestling was associated with increased risk. Skin trauma during wrestling or immersion in the mud increased the risk of infection (odds ratio, 23.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 1440.4). Mud wrestling is one cause of pustular follicular dermatitis. Trauma to the skin may be a necessary cofactor for the development of infection.

  1. Signs of atopic dermatitis and contact dermatitis affected by distinct H2-haplotype in the NC/Nga genetic background.

    PubMed

    Ohkusu-Tsukada, Kozo; Ito, Daiki; Okuno, Yuki; Tsukada, Teruyo; Takahashi, Kimimasa

    2018-02-07

    We recently advocated in favour of naming a novel H2-haplotype consisting of K d , D/L dm7 , I-A k and I-E k in the atopic dermatitis (AD) mouse model NC/Nga as "H-2 nc ." The role of the H2-haplotype in AD development was investigated in H2 b -congenic NC/Nga mice (NC.h2 b/b and NC.h2 b/nc ) established by backcrossing. A severe 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced dermatitis in NC/Nga was alleviated partially in NC.h2 b/nc and significantly in NC.h2 b/b . The AD phenotype was correlated with thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP)-epidermal expression levels and serum levels of total IgE and IL-18/IL-33. Histologically, allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) was accompanied by lymphocytes and plasma cells-infiltrating perivasculitis in NC.h2 b/nc and NC.h2 b/b and clearly differed from AD accompanied by neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages-infiltrating diffuse suppurative dermatitis in NC/Nga. Interestingly, IFN-γ/IL-17 production from autoreactive CD4 + T-cells remarkably increased in DNFB-sensitised NC.h2 b/b but not in NC/Nga. Our findings suggest that AD or ACD may depend on haplotype H-2 nc or H-2 b , respectively, in addition to the NC/Nga genetic background.

  2. Bullous cryothermic dermatitis artefacta induced by deodorant spray abuse.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, A; Bender, A; Hertl, M; König, A

    2011-08-01

    Dermatitis artefacta belongs to a broad spectrum of factitious diseases of lesions usually self-induced by patients. Here we report a surprisingly effective induction of blisters and thermic dermatitis by excessive abuse of common deodorant sprays. We evaluated the clinical course and outcome in three patients with dermatitis artefacta induced by deodorant spray. A 12-year-old boy only admitted the abuse of deodorant spray after psychiatric intervention. Two adults (21-year-old and 37-year-old women) had borderline personality disorder and frankly reported the urge to induce pain by spraying for at least 100 s at a short distance. Bullous dermatitis was the acute presenting sign in all patients. The bullae were found on the extensor surfaces of the extremities, with a distribution of older lesions showing erosions and scarring and fresh lesions with intact bullae with a diameter of 3-15 cm. After searching for the causative agent and removal of the deodorant spray, clinical outcome showed a healing without and with scars. Cryo-damage by abuse of common deodorant sprays seems to become a popular mechanism by which an impressive bullous dermatitis can be artificially induced. Dermatologists and psychiatrist should be aware of this method of injury. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  3. Devriesea agamarum causes dermatitis in bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Martel, An; Chiers, Koen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2009-03-02

    Devriesea agamarum is frequently isolated from dermatitis in lizards, notably from cheilitis in spiny tailed lizards (genus Uromastyx). It was the aim of the present study to assess the role of this bacterium as a causative agent of dermatitis by fulfilling Koch's postulates. First, its association with diseased lizards was demonstrated. The bacterium was isolated from several, mainly desert dwelling squamate species showing symptoms of dermatitis and/or septicaemia. The affected lizards mainly belonged to the family of the Agamidae (genera Pogona, Uromastyx, Agama) and in one case to the Iguanidae (genus Crotaphytus). Secondly, the occurrence of D. agamarum in 66 clinically healthy bearded dragons, 21 clinically healthy Uromastyx species and 40 squamate eggshells was studied. The bacterium was isolated from the oral cavity of 10 bearded dragons but from none of the healthy Uromastyx species. Hence D. agamarum was found to be part of the oral microbiota in Pogona vitticeps. Finally, bearded dragons (P. vitticeps) were experimentally inoculated with D. agamarum by direct application of a bacterial suspension on intact and abraded skin. At the scarified skin of all inoculated lizards, dermatitis was induced from which D. agamarum was re-isolated. In conclusion, D. agamarum is a facultative pathogenic bacterium, able to cause dermatitis in agamid lizards when the integrity of the skin is breached.

  4. AIRBORNE CONTACT DERMATITIS – CURRENT PERSPECTIVES IN ETIOPATHOGENESIS AND MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Sanjeev; De, Dipankar; Mahajan, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    The increasing recognition of occupational origin of airborne contact dermatitis has brought the focus on the variety of irritants, which can present with this typical morphological picture. At the same time, airborne allergic contact dermatitis secondary to plant antigens, especially to Compositae family, continues to be rampant in many parts of the world, especially in the Indian subcontinent. The recognition of the contactant may be difficult to ascertain and the treatment may be even more difficult. The present review focuses on the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic issues in airborne contact dermatitis. PMID:22345774

  5. Brain responses to facial attractiveness induced by facial proportions: evidence from an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Chau, Desmond K. P.; Su, Jianpo; Zeng, Ling-Li; Jiang, Weixiong; He, Jufang; Fan, Jintu; Hu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    Brain responses to facial attractiveness induced by facial proportions are investigated by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in 41 young adults (22 males and 19 females). The subjects underwent fMRI while they were presented with computer-generated, yet realistic face images, which had varying facial proportions, but the same neutral facial expression, baldhead and skin tone, as stimuli. Statistical parametric mapping with parametric modulation was used to explore the brain regions with the response modulated by facial attractiveness ratings (ARs). The results showed significant linear effects of the ARs in the caudate nucleus and the orbitofrontal cortex for all of the subjects, and a non-linear response profile in the right amygdala for only the male subjects. Furthermore, canonical correlation analysis was used to learn the most relevant facial ratios that were best correlated with facial attractiveness. A regression model on the fMRI-derived facial ratio components demonstrated a strong linear relationship between the visually assessed mean ARs and the predictive ARs. Overall, this study provided, for the first time, direct neurophysiologic evidence of the effects of facial ratios on facial attractiveness and suggested that there are notable gender differences in perceiving facial attractiveness as induced by facial proportions. PMID:27779211

  6. Brain responses to facial attractiveness induced by facial proportions: evidence from an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Chau, Desmond K P; Su, Jianpo; Zeng, Ling-Li; Jiang, Weixiong; He, Jufang; Fan, Jintu; Hu, Dewen

    2016-10-25

    Brain responses to facial attractiveness induced by facial proportions are investigated by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in 41 young adults (22 males and 19 females). The subjects underwent fMRI while they were presented with computer-generated, yet realistic face images, which had varying facial proportions, but the same neutral facial expression, baldhead and skin tone, as stimuli. Statistical parametric mapping with parametric modulation was used to explore the brain regions with the response modulated by facial attractiveness ratings (ARs). The results showed significant linear effects of the ARs in the caudate nucleus and the orbitofrontal cortex for all of the subjects, and a non-linear response profile in the right amygdala for only the male subjects. Furthermore, canonical correlation analysis was used to learn the most relevant facial ratios that were best correlated with facial attractiveness. A regression model on the fMRI-derived facial ratio components demonstrated a strong linear relationship between the visually assessed mean ARs and the predictive ARs. Overall, this study provided, for the first time, direct neurophysiologic evidence of the effects of facial ratios on facial attractiveness and suggested that there are notable gender differences in perceiving facial attractiveness as induced by facial proportions.

  7. Early-life risk factors for occurrence of atopic dermatitis during the first year.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Mikio; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Mizuno, Takahisa; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Tokuyama, Kenichi; Morikawa, Akihiro

    2007-03-01

    In a prospective birth cohort study, we sought to identify perinatal predictors of the occurrence of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. Associations of family history, infection during pregnancy, cord blood cytokine concentrations, and skin function parameters with atopic dermatitis were analyzed. Stratum corneum hydration was measured with an impedance meter until 5 days after delivery and again at 1 month. Complete data were obtained for 213 infants, including 27 diagnosed by a physician as having atopic dermatitis during their first year and 26 diagnosed as having infantile eczema during their first month. The risk of atopic dermatitis during the first year of life was related to maternal atopic dermatitis, lower concentrations of macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta in cord blood, and greater skin moisture in the surface and stratum corneum of the forehead and cheek at 1 month of age but not to viral or bacterial infection during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Paternal hay fever was associated negatively with the development of atopic dermatitis. High concentrations of interleukin-5, interleukin-17, and macrophage chemotactic protein-1 and only surface moisture in the cheek were associated with greater risk of infantile eczema in the first month. The association of atopic dermatitis in infancy with reduced neonatal macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta levels suggests a link with immature immune responses at birth. Stratum corneum barrier disruption in atopic dermatitis may involve impairment of cutaneous adaptation to extrauterine life. The majority of risk factors had different effects on infant eczema and atopic dermatitis, indicating different causes.

  8. Eyelid Dermatitis Caused by Allergic Contact to Acrylates in Artificial Nails.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Jorge; Gonçalves, Rita; Coelho, Pedro; Maio, Tiago

    2017-03-13

    Over the past few years, there has been an increase in cases of allergic contact dermatitis caused by acrylates, because of the growing popularity of artificial nails. Pathological reactions to artificial nails typically occur on or around the nail area. Eyelid contact dermatitis due to artificial nails is rarely seen, especially in a nonoccupational setting. The authors report the case of a 45-year-old female accountant who developed eyelid dermatitis due to artificial nails.

  9. Autoimmune estrogen dermatitis in an infertile female.

    PubMed

    Elcin, Gonca; Gülseren, Duygu; Bayraktar, Miyase; Gunalp, Serdar; Gurgan, Timur

    2017-06-01

    Autoimmune estrogen dermatitis is a cyclical cutaneous eruption that occurs premenstrually and goes to the rapid resolution within a few days of menstrual cycles. The disorder has variable clinical manifestations consisting of macules, papules, vesicles, urticarial lesions, bullae, eczematous plaques, and erythema multiforme-like lesions. Herein, we present a case of a 30-year-old woman with attacks of edema and erosions involving the oral and genital mucosal sites on every first day of her menstruation period. She had also multiple endocrinological problems such as hypotroidism and infertility. To determine the sex hormon sensitivity, intradermal skin tests were performed. Based on her personal history and skin test findings, a diagnosis of autoimmune estrogen dermatitis was made. After the oophorectomy, she was free from the skin and mucosal symptoms. We propose that it is important to suspect the diagnosis of autoimmune estrogen dermatitis in patients who present with recurrent cylic eruptions and it must be kept in mind that these patients might have a concomitant infertility.

  10. Palisaded Neutrophilic and Granulomatous Dermatitis/Interstitial Granulomatous Dermatitis Overlap: A Striking Clinical and Histologic Presentation With "Burning Rope Sign" and Subsequent Mirror-Image Contralateral Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kern, Malan; Shiver, Mallory B; Addis, Kristen M; Gardner, Jerad M

    2017-09-01

    Palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis and interstitial granulomatous dermatitis are uncommon granulomatous dermatoses that often arise in association with rheumatoid arthritis. These 2 entities have overlapping features and may exist on a spectrum. We report an intriguing case of a 53-year-old man with advanced rheumatoid arthritis who presented with a large indurated painful truncal plaque with a palpable cord in addition to a papulonodular eruption on his dorsal hands. Furthermore, our patient had a recurrence in a near-identical mirror-image pattern on the contralateral trunk. The constellation of clinical and histopathological findings in our patient further suggests that palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis and interstitial granulomatous dermatitis exist as overlapping disease entities on a continuum. In addition, we propose that recurrence of skin findings may be indicative of the severity of the underlying systemic disease process.

  11. Children with atopic dermatitis may have unacknowledged contact allergies contributing to their skin symptoms.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, A B; Johansen, J D; Deleuran, M; Mortz, C G; Skov, L; Sommerlund, M

    2018-03-01

    Whether children with atopic dermatitis have an altered risk of contact allergy than children without atopic dermatitis is frequently debated and studies have been conflicting. Theoretically, the impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis (AD) facilitates the penetration of potential allergens and several authors have highlighted the risk of underestimating and overlooking contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis. To determine the prevalence of contact allergy in Danish children with atopic dermatitis and explore the problem of unacknowledged allergies maintaining or aggravating the skin symptoms. In a cross-sectional study, 100 children and adolescents aged 5-17 years with a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis were patch tested with a paediatric series of 31 allergens. Thirty per cent of the children had at least one positive patch test reaction, and 17% had at least one contact allergy that was relevant to the current skin symptoms. The risk of contact allergy was significantly correlated to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Metals and components of topical skincare products were the most frequent sensitizers. Patch testing is relevant as a screening tool in the management of children with atopic dermatitis as they may have unacknowledged contact allergies contributing to or maintaining their skin symptoms. Children with atopic dermatitis seem to be at greater risk of sensitization to certain allergens including metals and components of skincare products. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. [Peripheral facial nerve lesion induced long-term dendritic retraction in pyramidal cortico-facial neurons].

    PubMed

    Urrego, Diana; Múnera, Alejandro; Troncoso, Julieta

    2011-01-01

    Little evidence is available concerning the morphological modifications of motor cortex neurons associated with peripheral nerve injuries, and the consequences of those injuries on post lesion functional recovery. Dendritic branching of cortico-facial neurons was characterized with respect to the effects of irreversible facial nerve injury. Twenty-four adult male rats were distributed into four groups: sham (no lesion surgery), and dendritic assessment at 1, 3 and 5 weeks post surgery. Eighteen lesion animals underwent surgical transection of the mandibular and buccal branches of the facial nerve. Dendritic branching was examined by contralateral primary motor cortex slices stained with the Golgi-Cox technique. Layer V pyramidal (cortico-facial) neurons from sham and injured animals were reconstructed and their dendritic branching was compared using Sholl analysis. Animals with facial nerve lesions displayed persistent vibrissal paralysis throughout the five week observation period. Compared with control animal neurons, cortico-facial pyramidal neurons of surgically injured animals displayed shrinkage of their dendritic branches at statistically significant levels. This shrinkage persisted for at least five weeks after facial nerve injury. Irreversible facial motoneuron axonal damage induced persistent dendritic arborization shrinkage in contralateral cortico-facial neurons. This morphological reorganization may be the physiological basis of functional sequelae observed in peripheral facial palsy patients.

  13. Repeated short presentations of morphed facial expressions change recognition and evaluation of facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Jun; Tanno, Yoshihiko; Sugiura, Yoshinori

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated whether sensitivity to and evaluation of facial expressions varied with repeated exposure to non-prototypical facial expressions for a short presentation time. A morphed facial expression was presented for 500 ms repeatedly, and participants were required to indicate whether each facial expression was happy or angry. We manipulated the distribution of presentations of the morphed facial expressions for each facial stimulus. Some of the individuals depicted in the facial stimuli expressed anger frequently (i.e., anger-prone individuals), while the others expressed happiness frequently (i.e., happiness-prone individuals). After being exposed to the faces of anger-prone individuals, the participants became less sensitive to those individuals' angry faces. Further, after being exposed to the faces of happiness-prone individuals, the participants became less sensitive to those individuals' happy faces. We also found a relative increase in the social desirability of happiness-prone individuals after exposure to the facial stimuli.

  14. Plant dermatitis. Possible culprits go far beyond poison ivy.

    PubMed

    Juckett, G

    1996-09-01

    Given the variety of existing plant species in the environment, it is remarkable that people have adjusted as well as they have to the many plants that can cause uncomfortable skin reactions. With a basic understanding of the types of reaction and the common plants that cause each type, physicians can help patients discover the source of the dermatitis and thus prevent reexposure. In immediate contact dermatitis, welts form rapidly after patients brush against an offending plant, but the urticarial rash is short-lived. In irritant contact dermatitis, the skin is traumatized mechanically (eg, with cactus spines) or chemically (eg, with capsaicin from hot peppers), producing a more persistent skin reaction. Phytophotodermatitis occurs when the skin is exposed to sunlight after contact with an offending plant; reactions are erythema, pruritus, vesiculation, and subsequent hyperpigmentation. Allergic contact dermatitis, typified by the rash of poison ivy, is a cell-mediated immune response that occurs in previously sensitized persons. Erythema, vesiculation, and pruritus, which usually heal without causing pigmentary changes, may last for several weeks.

  15. Atopic Dermatitis According to GARP: New Mechanistic Insights in Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nousbeck, Janna; Irvine, Alan D

    2016-12-01

    In complex disease such as atopic dermatitis, the journey from identification of strong risk loci to profound functional and mechanistic insights can take several years. Here, Manz et al. have elegantly deciphered the mechanistic pathways in the well-established 11q13.5 atopic dermatitis risk locus. Their genetic and functional insights emphasize a role for T regulatory cells in atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Eyelid Dermatitis Caused by Allergic Contact to Acrylates in Artificial Nails

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Jorge; Gonçalves, Rita; Coelho, Pedro; Maio, Tiago

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has been an increase in cases of allergic contact dermatitis caused by acrylates, because of the growing popularity of artificial nails. Pathological reactions to artificial nails typically occur on or around the nail area. Eyelid contact dermatitis due to artificial nails is rarely seen, especially in a nonoccupational setting. The authors report the case of a 45-year-old female accountant who developed eyelid dermatitis due to artificial nails. PMID:28603598

  17. Follicular contact dermatitis due to coloured permanent-pressed sheets

    PubMed Central

    Panaccio, François; Montgomery, D. C.; Adam, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A delayed hypersensitivity type of allergic contact dermatitis was observed following exposure to certain brands of 50% cotton, 50% polyester coloured permanent-pressed sheets produced by a particular manufacturer. The dermatitis presented as an extremely pruritic follicular eczema of the body and vesicular edema of the ears and face. Patch testing excluded formalin as the allergen but suggested permanent-pressing chemicals as a possibility. Several washings of the sheets did not prevent the development of the dermatitis. The removal of sheets did not immediately result in improvement: the condition could persist for up to eight weeks after their discontinuance. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4268628

  18. [Nickel contact dermatitis. A ring signal in actual pathology].

    PubMed

    Cherciu, Mirela; Zbranca, Anca

    2004-01-01

    Contact dermatitis produced by nickel is extremely common in women by earrings or other items of jewelry which contain nickel. Areas of involvement are under rings, bracelets, watches, spectacle frames, coins in pockets, jeans studs and other sites of direct contact with the metal. The frequency of nickel dermatitis is increasing in the male population and this may be due of body-piercing or professional contact in the field of metallic constructions. The treatment is difficult because of the presence of nickel in so many substances, things or even food. The management of contact dermatitis include the reduction or elimination of the allergen, the use of topical or systemic steroids, oral desensitisation and use of nickel in selected cases.

  19. Resin Dermatitis in a Car Factory

    PubMed Central

    Engel, H. O.; Calnan, C. D.

    1966-01-01

    An outbreak of dermatitis in a car assembly factory is described; it affected 50 workers who handled rubber weatherstrips coated with an adhesive. The adhesive was found to contain para-tertiary butyl phenol (P.T.B.P.) formaldehyde resin. Of those patch tested 70% gave positive reactions to the adhesive and 65% to the resin. Improved methods of handling and personal protection succeeded in arresting the occurrence of dermatitis. Barrier creams gave no protection in these circumstances. The episode illustrates the different preventive control methods which have to be tried when dealing with a simple skin hazard which cannot be abolished. Images PMID:5904100

  20. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the mastoid facial nerve canal mimicking a facial nerve schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew L; Bharatha, Aditya; Aviv, Richard I; Nedzelski, Julian; Chen, Joseph; Bilbao, Juan M; Wong, John; Saad, Reda; Symons, Sean P

    2009-07-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma of the skull base is a rare entity. Involvement of the temporal bone is particularly rare. We present an unusual case of progressive facial nerve paralysis with imaging and clinical findings most suggestive of a facial nerve schwannoma. The lesion was tubular in appearance, expanded the mastoid facial nerve canal, protruded out of the stylomastoid foramen, and enhanced homogeneously. The only unusual imaging feature was minor calcification within the tumor. Surgery revealed an irregular, cystic lesion. Pathology diagnosed a chondromyxoid fibroma involving the mastoid portion of the facial nerve canal, destroying the facial nerve.

  1. Dermatitis herpetiformis--a skin manifestation of a generalized disturbance in immunity.

    PubMed

    Davies, M G; Marks, R; Nuki, G

    1978-04-01

    Detailed investigations on 42 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) are presented, emphasis being placed on the presence of other disorders having a prominent immunopathogenic basis. These patients and 42 age and sex matched controls were submitted to an extensive clinical and investigative search for the presence of disorders with an immunological basis including the atopic disorders. The findings provided further evidence supporting the association of dermatitis herpetiformis with thyroid disease and pernicious anaemia. A statistically increased incidence of Raynaud's phenomenon and atopy was found in the patients with dermatitis herpetiformis compared to the control group. In addition, of the patients with dermatitis herpetiformis, two had rheumatoid arthritis, two had ulcerative colitis, one had systemic lupus erythematosus and four had splenomegaly. The possible basis for these associations is discussed and it is suggested that dermatitis herpetiformis may be part of a wider spectrum of disease. Genetic linkage and the formation of immune complexes following exposure to a dietary antigen may both be responsible for the disorders associated with DH.

  2. Prevalence of Suicidal Ideation in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimata, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of suicidal ideation in patients with mild, moderate, and severe atopic dermatitis between the age of 15 to 49 years were 0.21%, 6%, and 19.6%, respectively. In addition, the prevalence of homicide-suicidal ideation in mothers or fathers of patients (aged 0-14 years) with mild, moderate, and severe atopic dermatitis were 0.11%,…

  3. Tacrolimus treatment of atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thestrup-Pedersen, Kristian

    2003-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is today the most common chronic disease of children in Europe, the US and Japan. The 'golden standard' of therapy is topical glucocorticosteroids and emollients. The steroids have been on the market for four decades, are efficacious, but only advised for short-term treatment due to their risks of side effects. More than 16,000 persons suffering from atopic dermatitis have been enrolled in clinical studies of tacrolimus. One third of patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis experience over 90% improvement in their disease over a 12-week treatment period and up to 70% of patients have over 50% improvement. A 1-year treatment leads to more than 90% improvement in 75% of patients. The most pronounced side effect is a burning sensation occurring in up to 60% of patients. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic skin disease leading to a demand for long-term treatment control. Such treatment options have not previously been available--except for emollients which are not efficacious for controlling skin inflammation. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are new treatment options, free from the potential side effects of topical steroids, which are known for their efficacy in short-term treatment. The new treatment modalities prevent the eczema from relapsing and at the same time they control active eczema. The future will see a shift towards the long-term use of tacrolimus which is able to control the skin inflammation and, hopefully, shorten the course of the eczema.

  4. Contact Dermatitis Associated With Skin Cleansers: Retrospective Analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group Data 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Erin M; Goodier, Molly C; DeKoven, Joel G; Maibach, Howard I; Taylor, James S; Sasseville, Denis; Belsito, Donald V; Fowler, Joseph F; Fransway, Anthony F; DeLeo, Vincent A; Marks, James G; Pratt, Melanie D; Mathias, Toby; Zirwas, Matthew J; Zug, Kathryn A

    There is limited information regarding contact dermatitis (CD) associated with skin cleansers (SCs). The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of allergic patch test (APT) reactions and irritant CD (ICD) associated with SCs. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was performed using North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2000-2014. Of 32,945 tested patients, 1069 (3.24%) had either APT reaction or ICD associated with SCs. Of these, 692 (64.7%) had APT reaction only, 350 (32.7%) had ICD only, and 27 (2.5%) had both. Individuals with APT reaction and/or ICD were more likely to have occupationally related skin disease (relative risk [RR] = 3.8 [95% confidence interval {CI} = 3.3-4.5] for APT reaction and 10.0 [95% CI = 8.2-12.2] for ICD, respectively, P < 0.0001). As compared with those without APT reaction to SC, individuals with APT reaction had significantly higher frequencies of hand (RR = 2.4 [95% CI = 2.1-2.7]) and arm dermatitis (RR = 1.3 [95% CI = 1.1-1.6], P ≤ 0.001). Irritant CD was strongly associated with hand dermatitis (RR = 6.2 [95% CI = 5.2-7.3], P < 0.0001). More than 50 allergens were associated with SCs including quaternium-15 (11.2%), cocamidopropyl betaine (9.5%), methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (8.4%), coconut diethanolamide (7.9%), fragrance mix I (7.7%), Myroxylon pereirae (5.9%), 4-chloro-3,5-xylenol (5.8%), amidoamine (5.5%), and formaldehyde (4.4%). Many allergens, especially preservatives and surfactants, were associated with SCs. Most cases involved the hands and were occupationally related.

  5. Contact dermatitis and patch testing for the allergist.

    PubMed

    Fonacier, Luz; Noor, Irum

    2018-06-01

    To review of contact dermatitis (CD) and its key allergens and provide updates and recommendations for the practicing allergist. Through the use of various scientific search engines (eg, PubMed and MEDLINE), we reviewed literature on CD, patch tests (PTs), key allergens, occupational dermatitis, and treatment. Studies on CD, important allergens, and PTs were considered. Contact-induced dermatitis may be due to allergic CD, irritant CD, systemic CD, contact urticaria, and protein CD. Key allergens include metals (nickel, gold), topical medicaments (topical corticosteroids), and cosmetics and personal care products (fragrances and preservatives such as methyl- and methylchloro-isothiazolinone). Present relevance of a positive PT result is the combination of definite, probable, and possible relevance and should be correlated with the patient's history and physical examination. Treatment of allergic CD includes identification of relevant allergens, patient education, avoidance, and provision of alternative products the patient can use. CD is a common inflammatory skin disease and should be suspected in patients presenting with acute, subacute, or chronic dermatitis. The gold standard for diagnosing allergic CD is a PT. This article provides practical recommendations for the diagnosis and management of CD commonly seen by the allergist in their practice. Copyright © 2018 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Literature review of the causes, treatment, and prevention of dermatitis linearis.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Brooke A; Irish, Seth R

    2016-04-01

    Dermatitis linearis is a skin condition that affects both local populations and travelers alike. Dermatitis linearis is caused by some beetles within the subtribe Paederina and manifests as painful lesions, blisters and intense itching. Though outbreaks are widespread, the condition as a whole still remains relatively unknown. An extensive search of the existing Paederus literature was conducting in order to elucidate relevant information regarding the occurrence of outbreaks, seasonality, exposure and symptom onset, and management of dermatitis linearis. Special consideration was given to behavioral and environmental factors. Epidemics of dermatitis linearis are most commonly observed during the rainy season or after particularly hot and humid weather patterns. Symptom onset is typically delayed 6-48 h after exposure. The most common symptoms are stinging, burning and itching, with later development of erythematous plaques and blisters. Though symptoms of dermatitis linearis resolve spontaneously, wet compresses, antihistamines and topical steroid ointments and lotions are recommended to alleviate symptoms. Dermatitis linearis in travelers and local populations can be prevented through minimizing or modifying sources of artificial light, using pesticide-treated nets near beds and lights, general housekeeping and vegetation maintenance, and by raising awareness regarding the conditions caused by Paederus. Published by Oxford University Press International Society of Travel Medicine 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Cost of illness of atopic dermatitis in children: a societal perspective.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Andrew S

    2003-01-01

    Childhood atopic dermatitis is a disorder with considerable social and financial costs. Consideration of these costs is increasingly important in view of the growing prevalence of atopic dermatitis, particularly in developed countries over recent decades. The family stress related to the care of children with moderate or severe atopic dermatitis is significantly greater than that of the care of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The factors contributing to family stress include sleep deprivation, loss of employment, time taken for care of atopic dermatitis and financial costs. The financial costs for the family and community include medical and hospital direct costs of treatments and indirect costs from loss of employment. There are many interventions utilised in the treatment of childhood atopic dermatitis which involve not only medical practitioners but nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, psychologists and purveyors of so-called alternative therapies such as naturopathy, aromatherapy and bioresonance, all of which contribute to the financial burdens on the parents and the community. It is possible that appropriate interventions directed to reducing trigger factors might produce worthwhile savings, although the cost benefit of these measures has not been demonstrated. In conclusion, atopic dermatitis should not be regarded as a minor skin disorder but as a condition which has the potential to be a major handicap with considerable personal, social and financial consequences both to the family and the community.

  8. Health-related quality of life in adult dermatitis patients stratified by filaggrin genotype.

    PubMed

    Heede, Nina G; Thyssen, Jacob P; Thuesen, Betina H; Linneberg, Allan; Szecsi, Pal B; Stender, Steen; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-03-01

    Information concerning health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and comorbidities of adult dermatitis patients stratified by loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) is limited. To investigate HRQoL, skin symptoms and comorbidities in adult FLG mutation carriers. This cross-sectional study included patients diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema (n = 520). Patients completed questionnaires about dermatitis, skin symptoms, HRQoL, and comorbidities, including actinic keratosis, and atopic and mental disorders. FLG mutations (R501X, 2282del4, and R2447X) were identified in 16.9% of patients, and were significantly associated not only with atopic dermatitis, but also independently with skin fissures on the fingers and heels, and self-reported actinic keratosis. Although FLG mutations were significantly associated with reduced HRQoL, as measured by use of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), no association with self-reported anxiety or depression was identified. Notably, the highest median DLQI score, reflecting greater impairment, was reported by patients with both FLG mutations and atopic dermatitis. Overall, 19.7% of patients with both atopic dermatitis and FLG mutations reported a 'large or extremely large' impact on their lives; this represents twice the prevalence seen in patients with atopic dermatitis and wild-type FLG (9.6%). Patients with both atopic dermatitis and common FLG mutations are more frequently affected by reduced HRQoL. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Epidemiological analysis of occupational dermatitis notified in Brazil in the period 2007 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Plombom, Gabriela Yumi; Oliveira, Mariana Santos de; Tabushi, Fernanda Lika; Kassem, Amanda Joekel; Purim, Kátia Sheylla Malta; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    Occupational dermatitis affects the quality of life and productivity of workers. Studies on the subject are scarce in Brazil. It is estimated that the disease is underreported and that many affected patients do not seek health care. To conduct an epidemiological analysis of occupational dermatitis notified via SINAN in Brazil from January 2007 to December 2012; evaluate the profile of patients assisted; and check the main etiological agents involved. We analyzed the compulsory notification forms of cases of occupational dermatitis filled nationwide during January 2007 to December 2012. During the study period 3027 cases of occupational dermatitis were notified in Brazil. In 61.4% of cases patients were men aged between 35-49 years (39.6%). The most described etiological agent was chromium (13.9%). The location of the body most affected was the hands, with 28.4% of cases. The construction sector is implicated in 28.7% of cases and domestic services by 18%. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most prevalent occupational dermatitis (20.6%) and the region with the highest number of notifications was the Midwest, with 376.4 cases per million inhabitants. The profile of patients most affected by occupational dermatitis in Brazil during the study period was: men with elementary school, aged between 20 and 49 years old and working in the construction industry. The most common occupational dermatitis were allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium after years of exposure, being the hands and head the parts of the body most affected.

  10. Facial Dermatitis and Rosacea.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joseph F

    2016-06-01

    Rosacea is a chronic skin disorder associated with flushing, erythema, dryness, burning and stinging, and inflammatory papules and pustules. New treatments available or in development target the inflammatory and erythematous components of the disease. These agents include the selective α2 receptor agonist brimonidine, the topical agents ivermectin cream 1% and azelaic acid foam 15%, and use of tetracyclinetype antibiotics, which affect the cathelicidin pathway. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S107-S109. 2016 published by Frontline Medical Communications.

  11. Patch test results of the dental personnel with contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Oguzhan; Gul, Ulker

    2014-12-01

    Dental personnel have high risk of occupational contact dermatitis. The aim of this study is to detect the materials which cause contact sensitization and the frequency of contact dermatitis by using patch tests with European standard series and dental screening series in dental personnel. Between August 2008 and July 2009, 461 dental personnel working in Ankara (Turkey) were examined and age, gender, previous history of dermatitis, area of the skin affected and clinical diagnosis were noted. About 198 (43%) of the dental personnel were diagnosed contact dermatitis. Sixty-five of the dental personnel accepted to be patch tested. Dental technicians, dentists and dental nurses constitute 69.2%, 24.6% and 6.2% of patch tested 65 patients, respectively. Positive reactions to at least one allergen were detected with European standard series at 20% and with dental series at 10.8% among the dental personnel. The most common allergens were nickel sulfate (12.3%), acrylates (6.1%) and para-tertiary-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin (4.6%). The most common acrylate was ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (3.1%). We believe our study will be helpful to dermatologists about frequency of contact dermatitis among dental personnel and allergens that cause contact sensitivity for developing new methods to protect the personnel in dentistry against sensitization.

  12. Tinea atypica: report of nine cases.

    PubMed

    Zisova, Liliya Georgieva; Dobrev, Hristo Petrov; Tchernev, Georgi; Semkova, Kristina; Aliman, Anastasia Atanasova; Chorleva, Kristina Ivanova; Chapanova, Antonina Teneva; Vutova, Nina Ivanova; Wollina, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    Fungal infections of the skin are a common condition, usually easy to diagnose and treat. When the infection is clinically mimicking another cutaneous disorder or when the clinical presentation is modified by the use of inappropriate treatment, it is referred to as tinea atypica or tinea incognito.We report a series of nine cases of patients with tinea atypica, imitating and diagnosed initially as different skin diseases. Two patients were defined as pyoderma in the facial and pubic regions (caused respectively by Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes and Microsporum canis) and one as herpes zoster ophthalmicus (caused by Trichophyton rubrum). Six additional patients were initially misdiagnosed: (1) Plaque-like formation of the skin misdiagnosed as an impetiginized eczema (with isolated agent Trichophyton verrucosum). (2) A rare form of skin infection of the hand caused by T. rubrum, imitating clinically cutaneous infection with tuberculum mulgentium. (3) Rosacea-like dermatitis with an isolated agent Fusarium. (4) A patient with the typical clinical symptoms of seborrheic dermatitis of the face (and with isolated T. rubrum as a causative agent). (5) Another patient presented with a widespread folliculitis by Trichophyton mentagrophytes. (6) In a patient with bullous pemphigoid and immunosuppression pemphigoid-like eruptions were caused by Malassezia pachydermatis and T. rubrum. The diagnosis in the presented cases was based on direct microscopic examination with KOH and a culture on Sabouraud agar.After the diagnosis of tinea, treatment with topical and systemic antifungal agents was administrated, followed by complete clinical remissions in all cases.The clinical manifestations of tinea atypica can mimic a large number of other dermatoses, which often leads to misdiagnosing, and as a consequence--to serious difficulties in the management of clinical symptoms and in offering appropriate therapy.

  13. Caricaturing facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Calder, A J; Rowland, D; Young, A W; Nimmo-Smith, I; Keane, J; Perrett, D I

    2000-08-14

    The physical differences between facial expressions (e.g. fear) and a reference norm (e.g. a neutral expression) were altered to produce photographic-quality caricatures. In Experiment 1, participants rated caricatures of fear, happiness and sadness for their intensity of these three emotions; a second group of participants rated how 'face-like' the caricatures appeared. With increasing levels of exaggeration the caricatures were rated as more emotionally intense, but less 'face-like'. Experiment 2 demonstrated a similar relationship between emotional intensity and level of caricature for six different facial expressions. Experiments 3 and 4 compared intensity ratings of facial expression caricatures prepared relative to a selection of reference norms - a neutral expression, an average expression, or a different facial expression (e.g. anger caricatured relative to fear). Each norm produced a linear relationship between caricature and rated intensity of emotion; this finding is inconsistent with two-dimensional models of the perceptual representation of facial expression. An exemplar-based multidimensional model is proposed as an alternative account.

  14. Enhancing facial features by using clear facial features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rofoo, Fanar Fareed Hanna

    2017-09-01

    The similarity of features between individuals of same ethnicity motivated the idea of this project. The idea of this project is to extract features of clear facial image and impose them on blurred facial image of same ethnic origin as an approach to enhance a blurred facial image. A database of clear images containing 30 individuals equally divided to five different ethnicities which were Arab, African, Chines, European and Indian. Software was built to perform pre-processing on images in order to align the features of clear and blurred images. And the idea was to extract features of clear facial image or template built from clear facial images using wavelet transformation to impose them on blurred image by using reverse wavelet. The results of this approach did not come well as all the features did not align together as in most cases the eyes were aligned but the nose or mouth were not aligned. Then we decided in the next approach to deal with features separately but in the result in some cases a blocky effect was present on features due to not having close matching features. In general the available small database did not help to achieve the goal results, because of the number of available individuals. The color information and features similarity could be more investigated to achieve better results by having larger database as well as improving the process of enhancement by the availability of closer matches in each ethnicity.

  15. Association between cobalt allergy and dermatitis caused by leather articles--a questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2015-02-01

    Cobalt is a strong skin sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen. Recent studies have recognized exposure to leather articles as a potential cause of cobalt allergy. To examine the association between contact allergy to cobalt and a history of dermatitis resulting from exposure to leather. A questionnaire case-control study was performed: the case group consisted of 183 dermatitis patients with a positive patch test reaction to cobalt chloride and a negative patch test reaction to potassium dichromate; the control group consisted of 621 dermatitis patients who did not react to either cobalt or chromium in patch testing. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test, Fisher's exact, and the Mann-Whitney test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations while taking confounding factors into consideration. Leather was observed as the most frequent exposure source causing dermatitis in the case group. Although the case group significantly more often reported non-occupational dermatitis caused by leather exposure (p < 0.001), no association was found between cobalt allergy and dermatitis caused by work-related exposure to leather. Our study suggests a positive association between cobalt allergy and a history of dermatitis caused by non-occupational exposure to leather articles. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Surgery-Related Contact Dermatitis: A Review of Potential Irritants and Allergens.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kevin A; Kelso, John M

    Surgical procedures utilize an increasing number of medical products including antiseptics, anesthetics, gloves, suture materials, tissue adhesives, topical antibiotics, and bandages. Many of these products have irritant potential. Allergic contact dermatitis has also been reported. This review covers preoperative, operative, and postoperative exposures that may result in contact dermatitis. Testing with standard patch panels such as T.R.U.E. Test and the North American Contact Dermatitis Group 65 allergen series does not evaluate for all relevant contactants. A thorough understanding of potential exposures is vital to effectively evaluate a patient with surgery-related contact dermatitis. A systematic approach is needed to ensure that standard patch panels and supplementary patches adequately address each encountered contactant. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Coral Dermatitis or Infectious Dermatitis: Report of a Case of Staphylococcus Aureus Infection of Skin After Scuba Diving

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Skin lesion which develops after deep sea diving is termed as coral dermatitis. The corals are known to produce a toxic substance which when comes in to contact with human skin may elicit hypersensitive reactions. Most previous reports highlight the allergic reactions caused by deep sea diving. This is a rare case of staphylococcal skin infection in a second-year medical student caused by Staphylococcus aureus; he reported a history of deep sea diving before being presented to the hospital with skin rashes. This case highlights the importance of considering infectious aetiology in cases of coral dermatitis. PMID:29666774

  18. Facial reanimation by muscle-nerve neurotization after facial nerve sacrifice. Case report.

    PubMed

    Taupin, A; Labbé, D; Babin, E; Fromager, G

    2016-12-01

    Recovering a certain degree of mimicry after sacrifice of the facial nerve is a clinically recognized finding. The authors report a case of hemifacial reanimation suggesting a phenomenon of neurotization from muscle-to-nerve. A woman benefited from a parotidectomy with sacrifice of the left facial nerve indicated for recurrent tumor in the gland. The distal branches of the facial nerve, isolated at the time of resection, were buried in the masseter muscle underneath. The patient recovered a voluntary hémifacial motricity. The electromyographic analysis of the motor activity of the zygomaticus major before and after block of the masseter nerve showed a dependence between mimic muscles and the masseter muscle. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the spontaneous reanimation of facial paralysis. The clinical case makes it possible to argue in favor of muscle-to-nerve neurotization from masseter muscle to distal branches of the facial nerve. It illustrates the quality of motricity that can be obtained thanks to this procedure. The authors describe a simple implantation technique of distal branches of the facial nerve in the masseter muscle during a radical parotidectomy with facial nerve sacrifice and recovery of resting tone but also a quality voluntary mimicry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Occupational Contact Dermatitis in North American Production Workers Referred for Patch Testing: Retrospective Analysis of Cross-Sectional Data From the North American Contact Dermatitis Group 1998 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Erin M; Hagen, Solveig L; DeKoven, Joel G; Zug, Kathryn A; Sasseville, Denis; Belsito, Donald V; Zirwas, Matthew J; Fowler, Joseph F; Taylor, James S; Fransway, Anthony F; DeLeo, Vincent A; Marks, James G; Pratt, Melanie D; Maibach, Howard I; Mathias, C G Toby

    Little is known about the epidemiology of contact dermatitis in production workers (PWs). The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of contact dermatitis and characterize clinically relevant and occupationally related allergens among North American PWs undergoing patch testing. This was a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data from 1998 to 2014. Of 39,332 patch-tested patients, 2732 (7.0%) were PWs. Among PWs, most were men (62.4%) and white (83.9%). A history of childhood eczema was uncommon (11.3%). Prevalent occupations included machine operators (27.3%); fabricators, assemblers, and hand-working occupations (16.8%); and precision metalworking occupations (16.1%). The most frequent sites of dermatitis were the hands (53.8%) and arms (29.4%), which were significantly more commonly affected compared with non-PWs (P < 0.0001). Occupationally related skin disease, allergic contact dermatitis, and irritant contact dermatitis were also significantly more common in PWs (49.9% vs 10.6%, 58.9% vs 53.7%, and 32.7% vs 25.7%, respectively; all Ps < 0.0001). Epoxy (15.3%), thiuram mix (8.3%), carba mix (8.1%), formaldehyde (6.3%), and cobalt (5.9%) were the most frequent occupationally related allergens. The top allergen sources included adhesives/glues (16.0%), metalworking fluids/cutting oils (6.8%), and coatings (6.3%). Production workers had a high rate of occupationally related skin disease, as well as irritant and allergic contact dermatitis. Involvement of exposed body areas was common. Frequently identified allergens included adhesives/glues, rubber accelerators, metals, and preservatives.

  20. Classification and possible bacterial infection in outpatients with eczema and dermatitis in China: A cross-sectional and multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Shi, Xiao-Dong; Li, Lin-Feng; Zhou, Ping; Shen, Yi-Wei

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about the classification and bacterial infection in outpatients with eczema and dermatitis in China.To investigate the prevalence of eczema and dermatitis in outpatients of dermatology clinics in China, examine classification and proportion of common types of dermatitis and the possible bacterial infection, and analyze the possible related factors.Outpatients with eczema or dermatitis from 39 tertiary hospitals of 15 provinces in mainland China from July 1 to September 30, 2014, were enrolled in this cross-sectional and multicenter study. Among 9393 enrolled outpatients, 636 patients (6.7%) were excluded because of incomplete information.The leading subtypes of dermatitis were unclassified eczema (35.5%), atopic dermatitis (13.4%), irritant dermatitis (9.2%), and widespread eczema (8.7%). Total bacterial infection rate was 52.3%, with widespread eczema, stasis dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis being the leading three (65.7%, 61.8%, and 61.4%, respectively). Clinically very likely bacterial infection has a significant positive correlation with disease duration, history of allergic disease, history of flexion dermatitis, and severe itching.Atopic dermatitis has become a common subtype of dermatitis in China. Secondary bacterial infection is common in all patients with dermatitis, and more attentions should be paid on this issue in other type of dermatitis apart from atopic dermatitis.

  1. Antioxidant Therapies for Ulcerative Dermatitis: A Potential Model for Skin Picking Disorder

    PubMed Central

    George, Nneka M.; Whitaker, Julia; Vieira, Giovana; Geronimo, Jerome T.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Fletcher, Craig A.; Garner, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Skin Picking Disorder affects 4% of the general population, with serious quality of life impacts, and potentially life threatening complications. Standard psychoactive medications do not help most patients. Similarly, Mouse Ulcerative Dermatitis (skin lesions caused by excessive abnormal grooming behavior) is very common in widely used inbred strains of mice, and represents a serious animal welfare issue and cause of mortality. Treatment options for Ulcerative Dermatitis are largely palliative and ineffective. We have proposed mouse Ulcerative Dermatitis as a model for human Skin Picking Disorder based on similar epidemiology, behavior, and its comorbidity and mechanistic overlap with hair pulling (trichotillomania). We predicted that mouse Ulcerative Dermatitis would be treated by N-Acetylcysteine, as this compound is highly effective in treating both Skin Picking Disorder and Trichotillomania. Furthermore, we hypothesized that N-Acetylcysteine’s mode of action is as a precursor to the production of the endogenous antioxidant glutathione in the brain, and therefore intranasal glutathione would also treat Ulcerative Dermatitis. Accordingly, we show in a heterogenous prospective trial, the significant reduction in Ulcerative Dermatitis lesion severity in mice receiving either N-acetylcysteine (oral administration) or glutathione (intranasal). The majority of mice treated with N-acetylcysteine improved slowly throughout the course of the study. Roughly half of the mice treated with glutathione showed complete resolution of lesion within 2-4 weeks, while the remainder did not respond. These findings are the first to show that the use of N-acetylcysteine and Glutathione can be curative for mouse Ulcerative Dermatitis. These findings lend additional support for mouse Ulcerative Dermatitis as a model of Skin Picking Disorder and also support oxidative stress and glutathione synthesis as the mechanism of action for these compounds. As N-Acetylcysteine is poorly

  2. Antioxidant Therapies for Ulcerative Dermatitis: A Potential Model for Skin Picking Disorder.

    PubMed

    George, Nneka M; Whitaker, Julia; Vieira, Giovana; Geronimo, Jerome T; Bellinger, Dwight A; Fletcher, Craig A; Garner, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Skin Picking Disorder affects 4% of the general population, with serious quality of life impacts, and potentially life threatening complications. Standard psychoactive medications do not help most patients. Similarly, Mouse Ulcerative Dermatitis (skin lesions caused by excessive abnormal grooming behavior) is very common in widely used inbred strains of mice, and represents a serious animal welfare issue and cause of mortality. Treatment options for Ulcerative Dermatitis are largely palliative and ineffective. We have proposed mouse Ulcerative Dermatitis as a model for human Skin Picking Disorder based on similar epidemiology, behavior, and its comorbidity and mechanistic overlap with hair pulling (trichotillomania). We predicted that mouse Ulcerative Dermatitis would be treated by N-Acetylcysteine, as this compound is highly effective in treating both Skin Picking Disorder and Trichotillomania. Furthermore, we hypothesized that N-Acetylcysteine's mode of action is as a precursor to the production of the endogenous antioxidant glutathione in the brain, and therefore intranasal glutathione would also treat Ulcerative Dermatitis. Accordingly, we show in a heterogenous prospective trial, the significant reduction in Ulcerative Dermatitis lesion severity in mice receiving either N-acetylcysteine (oral administration) or glutathione (intranasal). The majority of mice treated with N-acetylcysteine improved slowly throughout the course of the study. Roughly half of the mice treated with glutathione showed complete resolution of lesion within 2-4 weeks, while the remainder did not respond. These findings are the first to show that the use of N-acetylcysteine and Glutathione can be curative for mouse Ulcerative Dermatitis. These findings lend additional support for mouse Ulcerative Dermatitis as a model of Skin Picking Disorder and also support oxidative stress and glutathione synthesis as the mechanism of action for these compounds. As N-Acetylcysteine is poorly tolerated

  3. Changing perception: facial reanimation surgery improves attractiveness and decreases negative facial perception.

    PubMed

    Dey, Jacob K; Ishii, Masaru; Boahene, Kofi D O; Byrne, Patrick J; Ishii, Lisa E

    2014-01-01

    Determine the effect of facial reanimation surgery on observer-graded attractiveness and negative facial perception of patients with facial paralysis. Randomized controlled experiment. Ninety observers viewed images of paralyzed faces, smiling and in repose, before and after reanimation surgery, as well as normal comparison faces. Observers rated the attractiveness of each face and characterized the paralyzed faces by rating severity, disfigured/bothersome, and importance to repair. Iterated factor analysis indicated these highly correlated variables measure a common domain, so they were combined to create the disfigured, important to repair, bothersome, severity (DIBS) factor score. Mixed effects linear regression determined the effect of facial reanimation surgery on attractiveness and DIBS score. Facial paralysis induces an attractiveness penalty of 2.51 on a 10-point scale for faces in repose and 3.38 for smiling faces. Mixed effects linear regression showed that reanimation surgery improved attractiveness for faces both in repose and smiling by 0.84 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.67, 1.01) and 1.24 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.42) respectively. Planned hypothesis tests confirmed statistically significant differences in attractiveness ratings between postoperative and normal faces, indicating attractiveness was not completely normalized. Regression analysis also showed that reanimation surgery decreased DIBS by 0.807 (95% CI: 0.704, 0.911) for faces in repose and 0.989 (95% CI: 0.886, 1.093), an entire standard deviation, for smiling faces. Facial reanimation surgery increases attractiveness and decreases negative facial perception of patients with facial paralysis. These data emphasize the need to optimize reanimation surgery to restore not only function, but also symmetry and cosmesis to improve facial perception and patient quality of life. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Detection of feline herpes virus 1 via polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in cats with ulcerative facial dermatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex reaction patterns and mosquito bite hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Persico, Paola; Roccabianca, Paola; Corona, Antonio; Vercelli, Antonella; Cornegliani, Luisa

    2011-12-01

    Ulcerative dermatitis caused by feline herpes virus 1 (FHV-1) is an uncommon disease characterized by cutaneous ulcers secondary to epidermal, adnexal and dermal necrosis. Differential diagnoses for FHV-1 lesions include, but are not limited to, mosquito bite hypersensitivity and eosinophilic granuloma complex. Histopathological diagnosis of FHV-1 dermatitis is based on the detection of the intranuclear inclusion bodies. In cases where intranuclear inclusions are missing but clinical and histological findings are compatible with FHV-1 dermatitis, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and PCRs have been used. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the presence of FHV-1 by IHC and PCR in skin biopsies and compared the results of the two tests. Sixty-four skin biopsy specimens from cats with compatible lesions were reviewed and tested via PCR and IHC for evidence of FHV-1. Polymerase chain reaction was positive in 12 of 64 biopsies; PCR and IHC were positive only in two of 64 biopsies, and these cases were considered true positive cases. The higher number of PCR-positive cases was possibly attributed to amplification of viral DNA from a live attenuated vaccination, but a previous FHV-1 infection with subsequent amplification of latently inserted FHV-1 could not be excluded. If clinical signs and histopathology suggest FHV-1 infection in the absence of typical inclusion bodies, IHC is the preferred diagnostic test; PCR may be useful for initial screening, but due to false positives is not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology. © 2011 ESVD and ACVD.

  5. Epidemiological analysis of occupational dermatitis notified in Brazil in the period 2007 to 2012*

    PubMed Central

    Plombom, Gabriela Yumi; de Oliveira, Mariana Santos; Tabushi, Fernanda Lika; Kassem, Amanda Joekel; Purim, Kátia Sheylla Malta; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Occupational dermatitis affects the quality of life and productivity of workers. Studies on the subject are scarce in Brazil. It is estimated that the disease is underreported and that many affected patients do not seek health care. OBJECTIVES To conduct an epidemiological analysis of occupational dermatitis notified via SINAN in Brazil from January 2007 to December 2012; evaluate the profile of patients assisted; and check the main etiological agents involved. METHODS We analyzed the compulsory notification forms of cases of occupational dermatitis filled nationwide during January 2007 to December 2012. RESULTS During the study period 3027 cases of occupational dermatitis were notified in Brazil. In 61.4% of cases patients were men aged between 35-49 years (39.6%). The most described etiological agent was chromium (13.9%). The location of the body most affected was the hands, with 28.4% of cases. The construction sector is implicated in 28.7% of cases and domestic services by 18%. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most prevalent occupational dermatitis (20.6%) and the region with the highest number of notifications was the Midwest, with 376.4 cases per million inhabitants. CONCLUSIONS The profile of patients most affected by occupational dermatitis in Brazil during the study period was: men with elementary school, aged between 20 and 49 years old and working in the construction industry. The most common occupational dermatitis were allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium after years of exposure, being the hands and head the parts of the body most affected. PMID:28099592

  6. Automated Facial Recognition of Computed Tomography-Derived Facial Images: Patient Privacy Implications.

    PubMed

    Parks, Connie L; Monson, Keith L

    2017-04-01

    The recognizability of facial images extracted from publically available medical scans raises patient privacy concerns. This study examined how accurately facial images extracted from computed tomography (CT) scans are objectively matched with corresponding photographs of the scanned individuals. The test subjects were 128 adult Americans ranging in age from 18 to 60 years, representing both sexes and three self-identified population (ancestral descent) groups (African, European, and Hispanic). Using facial recognition software, the 2D images of the extracted facial models were compared for matches against five differently sized photo galleries. Depending on the scanning protocol and gallery size, in 6-61 % of the cases, a correct life photo match for a CT-derived facial image was the top ranked image in the generated candidate lists, even when blind searching in excess of 100,000 images. In 31-91 % of the cases, a correct match was located within the top 50 images. Few significant differences (p > 0.05) in match rates were observed between the sexes or across the three age cohorts. Highly significant differences (p < 0.01) were, however, observed across the three ancestral cohorts and between the two CT scanning protocols. Results suggest that the probability of a match between a facial image extracted from a medical scan and a photograph of the individual is moderately high. The facial image data inherent in commonly employed medical imaging modalities may need to consider a potentially identifiable form of "comparable" facial imagery and protected as such under patient privacy legislation.

  7. [Food hypersensitivity dermatitis in the dog: diagnostic possibilities].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, S; Favrot, C

    2005-04-01

    Dogs with food hypersensitivity usually develop chronic pruritic dermatoses virtually indistinguishable from atopic dermatitis. These reactions are often called food allergy but the pathogenesis is poorly characterized. Several studies have addressed the incidence of canine adverse reactions to food but the outcomes were conflicting. The gold standard for the diagnosis of such a condition is the restricted dietary trial and the subsequent provocation challenge. Some attempts have been made to develop serological tests but none of these tests accurately predicted canine food sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of food hypersensitivity dermatitis and to evaluate a newly developed serological test for the diagnosis of food allergy in dogs. Only 9% of 55 dogs with dermatological signs compatible with food hypersensitivity or atopic dermatitis have been diagnosed as food hypersensitive dogs. The repeatability of the serological test has shown to be insufficient.

  8. External facial features modify the representation of internal facial features in the fusiform face area.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Vadim; Yovel, Galit

    2010-08-15

    Most studies of face identity have excluded external facial features by either removing them or covering them with a hat. However, external facial features may modify the representation of internal facial features. Here we assessed whether the representation of face identity in the fusiform face area (FFA), which has been primarily studied for internal facial features, is modified by differences in external facial features. We presented faces in which external and internal facial features were manipulated independently. Our findings show that the FFA was sensitive to differences in external facial features, but this effect was significantly larger when the external and internal features were aligned than misaligned. We conclude that the FFA generates a holistic representation in which the internal and the external facial features are integrated. These results indicate that to better understand real-life face recognition both external and internal features should be included. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prebiotics and probiotics: the prevention and reduction in severity of atopic dermatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Foolad, N; Armstrong, A W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to identify whether supplementation with prebiotics and/or probiotics help prevent the development or reduce the severity of atopic dermatitis in children less than three years of age. Since 1997, immunostimulatory supplements, such as prebiotics and probiotics, have been investigated. Various supplementations include probiotics (single strain or mix), probiotics with formula, probiotics mix with prebiotics, and prebiotics. In this narrative review, we examined 13 key articles on prebiotics and/or probiotics, and their effects on infant atopic dermatitis. Among the selected studies, a total of 3,023 participants received supplements or placebo. Eight out of the 13 (61.5%) studies reported a significant effect on the prevention of atopic dermatitis after supplementation with probiotics and/or prebiotics. Five out of the 13 (38.5%) studies indicated significant reduction in the severity of atopic dermatitis after supplementation. Based on the available studies, supplementation with certain probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) appears to be an effective approach for the prevention and reduction in severity of atopic dermatitis. A mix of specific probiotic strains prevented atopic dermatitis among infants. Based on studies with prebiotics, there was a long-term reduction in the incidence of atopic dermatitis. Supplementation with prebiotics and probiotics appears useful for the reduction in the severity of atopic dermatitis. Additional interventional studies exploring prebiotics and probiotics are imperative before recommendations can be made.

  10. Prevalence of dermatitis in the working population, United States, 2010 National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Luckhaupt, Sara E; Dahlhamer, James M; Ward, Brian W; Sussell, Aaron L; Sweeney, Marie H; Sestito, John P; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2013-06-01

    Prevalence patterns of dermatitis among workers offer clues about risk factors and targets for prevention, but population-based estimates of the burden of dermatitis among US workers are lacking. Data from an occupational health supplement to the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS-OHS) were used to estimate the prevalence of dermatitis overall and by demographic characteristics and industry and occupation (I&O) of current/recent employment. Data were available for 27,157 adults, including 17,524 current/recent workers. The overall prevalence rate of dermatitis among current/recent workers was 9.8% (range among I&O groups: 5.5-15.4%), representing approximately 15.2 million workers with dermatitis. The highest prevalence rates were among I&O groups related to health care. Overall, 5.6% of dermatitis cases among workers (9.2% among healthcare workers) were attributed to work by health professionals. Dermatitis affected over 15 million US workers in 2010, and its prevalence varied by demographic characteristics and industry and occupation of employment. The prevalence rate of work-related dermatitis based on the NHIS-OHS was approximately 100-fold higher than incidence rates based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Survey of Occupational Illness and Injury. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Age and sex prevalence of infectious dermatoses among primary school children in a rural South-Eastern Nigerian community

    PubMed Central

    Kalu, Eziyi Iche; Wagbatsoma, Victoria; Ogbaini-Emovon, Ephraim; Nwadike, Victor Ugochukwu; Ojide, Chiedozie Kingsley

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Various dermatoses, due to their morbidity characteristics, have been shown to negatively impact on learning. The most epidemiologically important seem to be the infectious types because of their transmissibility and amenability to simple school-health measures. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and sex/age correlates of infectious dermatoses in a rural South-eastern Nigerian community. Methods The pupils were proportionately recruited from the three primary schools based on school population. Stratified simple random sampling method was adopted and a table of random numbers was used to select required pupils from each arm. Clinical and laboratory examination was done to establish diagnoses of infectious skin disease. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results The 400 pupils consisted of 153 males and 247 females. Age range was between 6 and 12 years. The prevalence of infectious dermatoses was 72.3%. The five most prevalent clinical forms of infectious dermatoses, in order of decreasing prevalence, were tinea capitis (35.2%), scabies (10.5%), tinea corporis (5.8%), tinea pedis (5.5%), and impetigo (5.0%). More cases, generally, occurred among males than females (80.4% vs 67.2%)); while some specific clinical types, pediculosis and seborrheic dermatitis, exhibited predilection for females. Pyodermas and scabies were significantly more prevalent in the 7-9 age-group; while tinea capitis, tinea corporis, seborrheic dermatitis and pediculosis were more associated with ≥10 age-group. Conclusion Infectious dermatoses were highly prevalent in the surveyed population. Many of the clinical types exhibited sex- and age-specificity. PMID:26430479

  12. Low DNA Sequence Diversity of the Intergenic Spacer 1 Region in the Human Skin Commensal Fungi Malassezia sympodialis and M. dermatis Isolated from Patients with Malassezia-Associated Skin Diseases and Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Cho, Otomi; Sugita, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    As DNA sequences of the intergenic spacer (IGS) region in the rRNA gene show remarkable intraspecies diversity compared with the small subunit, large subunit, and internal transcribed spacer region, the IGS region has been used as an epidemiological tool in studies on Malassezia globosa and M. restricta, which are responsible for the exacerbation of atopic dermatitis (AD) and seborrheic dermatitis (SD). However, the IGS regions of M. sympodialis and M. dermatis obtained from the skin of patients with AD and SD, as well as healthy subjects, lacked sequence diversity. Of the 105 M. sympodialis strains and the 40 M. dermatis strains, the sequences of 103 (98.1 %) and 39 (97.5 %), respectively, were identical. Thus, given the lack of intraspecies diversity in the IGS regions of M. sympodialis and M. dermatis, studies of the diversity of these species should be performed using appropriate genes and not the IGS.

  13. Alkyl Glucosides in Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Loranger, Camille; Alfalah, Maisa; Ferrier Le Bouedec, Marie-Christine; Sasseville, Denis

    Ecologically sound because they are synthesized from natural and renewable sources, the mild surfactants alkyl glucosides are being rediscovered by the cosmetic industry. They are currently found in rinse-off products such as shampoos, liquid cleansers, and shower gels, but also in leave-on products that include moisturizers, deodorants, and sunscreens. During the past 15 years, numerous cases of allergic contact dermatitis have been published, mostly to lauryl and decyl glucosides, and these compounds are considered emergent allergens. Interestingly, the sunscreen Tinosorb M contains decyl glucoside as a hidden allergen, and most cases of allergic contact dermatitis reported to this sunscreen ingredient are probably due to sensitization to decyl glucoside. This article will review the chemistry of alkyl glucosides, their sources of exposure, as well as their cutaneous adverse effects reported in the literature and encountered in various patch testing centers.

  14. Kaposi's sarcoma concealed by stasis dermatitis in a patient with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Hilal Kaya; Bulur, Işıl; Saraçoğlu, Zeynep Nurhan; Karapınar, Tekden; Arık, Deniz

    2017-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multifocal and angioproliferative neoplasm. KS may be accompanied by psoriasis; however, in most of these cases the main mechanism involves iatrogenic KS associated with the immunosuppressive drugs that are used in psoriasis treatment. In angioproliferative lesions as a result of venous insufficiency and stasis dermatitis, acroangiodermatitis (pseudo-KS) is initially considered. However, the concurrent occurrence of psoriasis, stasis dermatitis, and KS has not been previously reported. We report a case of classic-type KS in an 83-year-old man that was concealed by stasis dermatitis and accompanied by psoriasis.

  15. Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry Data on Contact Allergy in Children With Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; McGowan, Maria; Silverberg, Nanette B; Pelletier, Janice L; Fonacier, Luz; Mousdicas, Nico; Powell, Doug; Scheman, Andrew; Goldenberg, Alina

    2017-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) have a dynamic relationship not yet fully understood. Investigation has been limited thus far by a paucity of data on the overlap of these disorders in pediatric patients. To use data from the Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry to elucidate the associations and sensitizations among patients with concomitant AD and ACD. This retrospective case review examined 1142 patch test cases of children younger than 18 years, who were registered between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2015, by 84 health care providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) from across the United States. Data were gathered electronically from multidisciplinary providers within outpatient clinics throughout the United States on pediatric patients (ages 0-18 years). All participants were patch-tested to assess sensitizations to various allergens; history of AD was noted by the patch-testing providers. Primary outcomes were sensitization rates to various patch-tested allergens. A total of 1142 patients were evaluated: 189 boys (34.2%) and 363 girls (65.8%) in the AD group and 198 boys (36.1%) and 350 girls (63.9%) in the non-AD group (data on gender identification were missing for 17 patients). Compared with those without AD, patch-tested patients with AD were 1.3 years younger (10.5 vs 11.8 years; P < .001) and had longer history of dermatitis (3.5 vs 1.8 years; P < .001). Patch-tested patients designated as Asian or African American were more likely to have concurrent AD (odds ratio [OR], 1.92; 95% CI, 1.20-3.10; P = .008; and OR, 4.09; 95% CI, 2.70-6.20; P <.001, respectively). Patients with AD with generalized distribution were the most likely to be patch tested (OR, 4.68; 95% CI, 3.50-6.30; P < .001). Patients with AD had different reaction profiles than those without AD, with increased frequency of reactions to cocamidopropyl betaine, wool alcohol, lanolin, tixocortol pivalate, and

  16. Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Argaud, Soizic; Delplanque, Sylvain; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Auffret, Manon; Duprez, Joan; Vérin, Marc; Grandjean, Didier; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    According to embodied simulation theory, understanding other people’s emotions is fostered by facial mimicry. However, studies assessing the effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion are still controversial. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), one of the most distinctive clinical features is facial amimia, a reduction in facial expressiveness, but patients also show emotional disturbances. The present study used the pathological model of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral). Our results evidenced a significant decrease in facial mimicry for joy in PD, essentially linked to the absence of reaction of the zygomaticus major and the orbicularis oculi muscles in response to happy avatars, whereas facial mimicry for expressions of anger was relatively preserved. We also confirmed that PD patients were less accurate in recognizing positive and neutral facial expressions and highlighted a beneficial effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion. We thus provide additional arguments for embodied simulation theory suggesting that facial mimicry is a potential lever for therapeutic actions in PD even if it seems not to be necessarily required in recognizing emotion as such. PMID:27467393

  17. Demographics of US pediatric contact dermatitis registry providers.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Alina; Jacob, Sharon E

    2015-01-01

    Children are as likely as adults to be sensitized and reactive to contact allergens. However, the prevailing data on pediatric allergic contact dermatitis are quantitatively and qualitatively limited because of a narrow geographic localization of data-reporting providers. The aim of the study was to present the first quarter results from the Loma Linda Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry focused on registered providers who self-identified as providing care for pediatric allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) within the United States. The US providers were invited to join the registry via completion of an online, secure, 11-question registration survey addressing demographics and clinical practice essentials. The presented results reflect data gathered within the first quarter of registry recruitment; registration is ongoing. Of 169 responders from 48 states, the majority of providers were female (60.4%), academic (55.6%), and dermatologists (76.3%). Based on individual provider averages, the minimum cumulative number of pediatric patch-test evaluations performed each year ranged between 1372 and 3468 children. The Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry provides a description of the current leaders in the realm of pediatric ACD and gaps, which are in need of attention. The registry allows for a collaborative effort to exchange information, educate providers, and foster investigative research with the hope of legislation that can reduce the disease burden of ACD in US children.

  18. Acute irritant threshold correlates with barrier function, skin hydration and contact hypersensitivity in atopic dermatitis and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Kazandjieva, Jana; Tsankov, Nikolai; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to disclose interactions between epidermal barrier, skin irritation and sensitization in healthy and diseased skin. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration (SCH) were assessed in adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), rosacea and healthy controls. A 4-h patch test with seven concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate was performed to determine the irritant threshold (IT). Contact sensitization pattern was revealed by patch testing with European baseline series. Subjects with a lower IT had higher TEWL values and lower SCH. Subjects with positive allergic reactions had significantly lower IT. In AD, epidermal barrier deterioration was detected on both volar forearm and nasolabial fold, while in rosacea, impeded skin physiology parameters were observed on the facial skin only, suggesting that barrier impediment is restricted to the face in rosacea, in contrast with AD where the abnormal skin physiology is generalized. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Incongruence Between Observers’ and Observed Facial Muscle Activation Reduces Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions From Video Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Wingenbach, Tanja S. H.; Brosnan, Mark; Pfaltz, Monique C.; Plichta, Michael M.; Ashwin, Chris

    2018-01-01

    According to embodied cognition accounts, viewing others’ facial emotion can elicit the respective emotion representation in observers which entails simulations of sensory, motor, and contextual experiences. In line with that, published research found viewing others’ facial emotion to elicit automatic matched facial muscle activation, which was further found to facilitate emotion recognition. Perhaps making congruent facial muscle activity explicit produces an even greater recognition advantage. If there is conflicting sensory information, i.e., incongruent facial muscle activity, this might impede recognition. The effects of actively manipulating facial muscle activity on facial emotion recognition from videos were investigated across three experimental conditions: (a) explicit imitation of viewed facial emotional expressions (stimulus-congruent condition), (b) pen-holding with the lips (stimulus-incongruent condition), and (c) passive viewing (control condition). It was hypothesised that (1) experimental condition (a) and (b) result in greater facial muscle activity than (c), (2) experimental condition (a) increases emotion recognition accuracy from others’ faces compared to (c), (3) experimental condition (b) lowers recognition accuracy for expressions with a salient facial feature in the lower, but not the upper face area, compared to (c). Participants (42 males, 42 females) underwent a facial emotion recognition experiment (ADFES-BIV) while electromyography (EMG) was recorded from five facial muscle sites. The experimental conditions’ order was counter-balanced. Pen-holding caused stimulus-incongruent facial muscle activity for expressions with facial feature saliency in the lower face region, which reduced recognition of lower face region emotions. Explicit imitation caused stimulus-congruent facial muscle activity without modulating recognition. Methodological implications are discussed. PMID:29928240

  20. Incongruence Between Observers' and Observed Facial Muscle Activation Reduces Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions From Video Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wingenbach, Tanja S H; Brosnan, Mark; Pfaltz, Monique C; Plichta, Michael M; Ashwin, Chris

    2018-01-01

    According to embodied cognition accounts, viewing others' facial emotion can elicit the respective emotion representation in observers which entails simulations of sensory, motor, and contextual experiences. In line with that, published research found viewing others' facial emotion to elicit automatic matched facial muscle activation, which was further found to facilitate emotion recognition. Perhaps making congruent facial muscle activity explicit produces an even greater recognition advantage. If there is conflicting sensory information, i.e., incongruent facial muscle activity, this might impede recognition. The effects of actively manipulating facial muscle activity on facial emotion recognition from videos were investigated across three experimental conditions: (a) explicit imitation of viewed facial emotional expressions (stimulus-congruent condition), (b) pen-holding with the lips (stimulus-incongruent condition), and (c) passive viewing (control condition). It was hypothesised that (1) experimental condition (a) and (b) result in greater facial muscle activity than (c), (2) experimental condition (a) increases emotion recognition accuracy from others' faces compared to (c), (3) experimental condition (b) lowers recognition accuracy for expressions with a salient facial feature in the lower, but not the upper face area, compared to (c). Participants (42 males, 42 females) underwent a facial emotion recognition experiment (ADFES-BIV) while electromyography (EMG) was recorded from five facial muscle sites. The experimental conditions' order was counter-balanced. Pen-holding caused stimulus-incongruent facial muscle activity for expressions with facial feature saliency in the lower face region, which reduced recognition of lower face region emotions. Explicit imitation caused stimulus-congruent facial muscle activity without modulating recognition. Methodological implications are discussed.

  1. [The application of facial liposuction and fat grafting in the remodeling of facial contour].

    PubMed

    Wen, Huicai; Ma, Li; Sui, Ynnpeng; Jian, Xueping

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the application of facial liposuction and fat grafting in the remodeling of facial contour. From Nov. 2008 to Mar. 2014, 49 cases received facial liposuction and fat grafting to improve facial contours. Subcutaneous facial liposuction with tumescent technique and chin fat grafting were performed in all the cases, buccal fat pad excision of fat in 7 cases, the masseter injection of botulinum toxin type A in 9 cases, temporal fat grafting in 25 cases, forehead fat grafting in 15 cases. Marked improvement was achieved in all the patients with stable results during the follow-up period of 6 - 24 months. Complications, such as asymmetric, unsmooth and sagging were retreated with acceptance results. Combination application of liposuction and fat grafting can effectively and easily improve the facial contour with low risk.

  2. Facial Orientation and Facial Shape in Extant Great Apes: A Geometric Morphometric Analysis of Covariation

    PubMed Central

    Neaux, Dimitri; Guy, Franck; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Coudyzer, Walter; Vignaud, Patrick; Ducrocq, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The organization of the bony face is complex, its morphology being influenced in part by the rest of the cranium. Characterizing the facial morphological variation and craniofacial covariation patterns in extant hominids is fundamental to the understanding of their evolutionary history. Numerous studies on hominid facial shape have proposed hypotheses concerning the relationship between the anterior facial shape, facial block orientation and basicranial flexion. In this study we test these hypotheses in a sample of adult specimens belonging to three extant hominid genera (Homo, Pan and Gorilla). Intraspecific variation and covariation patterns are analyzed using geometric morphometric methods and multivariate statistics, such as partial least squared on three-dimensional landmarks coordinates. Our results indicate significant intraspecific covariation between facial shape, facial block orientation and basicranial flexion. Hominids share similar characteristics in the relationship between anterior facial shape and facial block orientation. Modern humans exhibit a specific pattern in the covariation between anterior facial shape and basicranial flexion. This peculiar feature underscores the role of modern humans' highly-flexed basicranium in the overall integration of the cranium. Furthermore, our results are consistent with the hypothesis of a relationship between the reduction of the value of the cranial base angle and a downward rotation of the facial block in modern humans, and to a lesser extent in chimpanzees. PMID:23441232

  3. [Inpatient rehabilitation of adults with atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Breuer, K; Kapp, A

    2006-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease which often persists until adulthood. In severe cases, eczematous lesions and pruritus are resistant to therapy and result in depression, impairment of professional activities and social withdrawal. The goal of inpatient rehabilitation measures is to keep the patient involved and active in professional and social activities. Rehabilitative measures include diagnostics and medical therapy according to current guidelines, instruction in basic medical information, psychological intervention (relaxation techniques, improvement of self-confidence), dietetic measures, exercise, and social advice. Patients with atopic dermatitis often have work-related problems which should be identified as early as possible during rehabilitation.

  4. Facial diplegia: a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Debaprasad; Roy, Mukut; Bhattacharyya, Amrit K

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral facial paralysis is a rare clinical entity and presents as a diagnostic challenge. Unlike its unilateral counterpart facial diplegia is seldom secondary to Bell's palsy. Occurring at a frequency of 0.3% to 2% of all facial palsies it often indicates ominous medical conditions. Guillian-Barre syndrome needs to be considered as a differential in all given cases of facial diplegia where timely treatment would be rewarding. Here a case of bilateral facial palsy due to Guillian-Barre syndrome with atypical presentation is reported.

  5. Atopic dermatitis, atopic eczema, or eczema? A systematic review, meta-analysis, and recommendation for uniform use of 'atopic dermatitis'.

    PubMed

    Kantor, R; Thyssen, J P; Paller, A S; Silverberg, J I

    2016-10-01

    The lack of standardized nomenclature for atopic dermatitis (AD) creates unnecessary confusion for patients, healthcare providers, and researchers. It also negatively impacts accurate communication of research in the scientific literature. We sought to determine the most commonly used terms for AD. A systematic review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS (1945-2016) for the terms AD, atopic eczema (AE), and multiple other eczematous disorders. In MEDLINE, 33 060 were identified, of which 21 299 (64.4%) publications used the term 'AD', 15 510 (46.9%) 'eczema', and only 2471 (7.5%) AE. Most of these publications used the term AD (82.0%) or eczema (70.8%) without additional nomenclature; only 1.2% used AE alone. Few publications used the terminology 'childhood eczema', 'flexural eczema', 'infantile eczema', 'atopic neurodermatitis', or 'Besnier's prurigo'. AD was rarely used until the late 1970s, after which it became the most commonly used of the three terms and continuously increased until 2015. Atopic eczema decreased between 2008 and 2015. Atopic dermatitis was the most commonly used term in studies across almost all publication types, languages, and journals. Atopic dermatitis is the most commonly used term and appears to be increasing in popularity. Given that eczema is a nonspecific term that describes the morphological appearance of several forms of dermatitis, we strongly suggest the use of a more specific term, AD, in publications, healthcare clinician training, and patient education. Support from researchers, reviewers, and editors is key to success. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effects of Objective 3-Dimensional Measures of Facial Shape and Symmetry on Perceptions of Facial Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Cory D; Wehby, George L; Nidey, Nichole L; Moreno Uribe, Lina M

    2017-09-01

    Meeting patient desires for enhanced facial esthetics requires that providers have standardized and objective methods to measure esthetics. The authors evaluated the effects of objective 3-dimensional (3D) facial shape and asymmetry measurements derived from 3D facial images on perceptions of facial attractiveness. The 3D facial images of 313 adults in Iowa were digitized with 32 landmarks, and objective 3D facial measurements capturing symmetric and asymmetric components of shape variation, centroid size, and fluctuating asymmetry were obtained from the 3D coordinate data using geo-morphometric analyses. Frontal and profile images of study participants were rated for facial attractiveness by 10 volunteers (5 women and 5 men) on a 5-point Likert scale and a visual analog scale. Multivariate regression was used to identify the effects of the objective 3D facial measurements on attractiveness ratings. Several objective 3D facial measurements had marked effects on attractiveness ratings. Shorter facial heights with protrusive chins, midface retrusion, faces with protrusive noses and thin lips, flat mandibular planes with deep labiomental folds, any cants of the lip commissures and floor of the nose, larger faces overall, and increased fluctuating asymmetry were rated as significantly (P < .001) less attractive. Perceptions of facial attractiveness can be explained by specific 3D measurements of facial shapes and fluctuating asymmetry, which have important implications for clinical practice and research. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Visual attention during the evaluation of facial attractiveness is influenced by facial angles and smile.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seol Hee; Hwang, Soonshin; Hong, Yeon-Ju; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, Kyung-Ho; Chung, Chooryung J

    2018-05-01

    To examine the changes in visual attention influenced by facial angles and smile during the evaluation of facial attractiveness. Thirty-three young adults were asked to rate the overall facial attractiveness (task 1 and 3) or to select the most attractive face (task 2) by looking at multiple panel stimuli consisting of 0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° rotated facial photos with or without a smile for three model face photos and a self-photo (self-face). Eye gaze and fixation time (FT) were monitored by the eye-tracking device during the performance. Participants were asked to fill out a subjective questionnaire asking, "Which face was primarily looked at when evaluating facial attractiveness?" When rating the overall facial attractiveness (task 1) for model faces, FT was highest for the 0° face and lowest for the 90° face regardless of the smile ( P < .01). However, when the most attractive face was to be selected (task 2), the FT of the 0° face decreased, while it significantly increased for the 45° face ( P < .001). When facial attractiveness was evaluated with the simplified panels combined with facial angles and smile (task 3), the FT of the 0° smiling face was the highest ( P < .01). While most participants reported that they looked mainly at the 0° smiling face when rating facial attractiveness, visual attention was broadly distributed within facial angles. Laterally rotated faces and presence of a smile highly influence visual attention during the evaluation of facial esthetics.

  8. Hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy for facial paralysis resulting from closed temporal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Su, Diya; Li, Dezhi; Wang, Shiwei; Qiao, Hui; Li, Ping; Wang, Binbin; Wan, Hong; Schumacher, Michael; Liu, Song

    2018-06-06

    Closed temporal bone fractures due to cranial trauma often result in facial nerve injury, frequently inducing incomplete facial paralysis. Conventional hypoglossal-facial nerve end-to-end neurorrhaphy may not be suitable for these injuries because sacrifice of the lesioned facial nerve for neurorrhaphy destroys the remnant axons and/or potential spontaneous innervation. we modified the classical method by hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy using an interpositional predegenerated nerve graft to treat these injuries. Five patients who experienced facial paralysis resulting from closed temporal bone fractures due to cranial trauma were treated with the "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy. An additional 4 patients did not receive the neurorrhaphy and served as controls. Before treatment, all patients had suffered House-Brackmann (H-B) grade V or VI facial paralysis for a mean of 5 months. During the 12-30 months of follow-up period, no further detectable deficits were observed, but an improvement in facial nerve function was evidenced over time in the 5 neurorrhaphy-treated patients. At the end of follow-up, the improved facial function reached H-B grade II in 3, grade III in 1 and grade IV in 1 of the 5 patients, consistent with the electrophysiological examinations. In the control group, two patients showed slightly spontaneous innervation with facial function improved from H-B grade VI to V, and the other patients remained unchanged at H-B grade V or VI. We concluded that the hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-side neurorrhaphy can preserve the injured facial nerve and is suitable for treating significant incomplete facial paralysis resulting from closed temporal bone fractures, providing an evident beneficial effect. Moreover, this treatment may be performed earlier after the onset of facial paralysis in order to reduce the unfavorable changes to the injured facial nerve and atrophy of its target muscles due to long-term denervation and allow axonal

  9. The face is not an empty canvas: how facial expressions interact with facial appearance.

    PubMed

    Hess, Ursula; Adams, Reginald B; Kleck, Robert E

    2009-12-12

    Faces are not simply blank canvases upon which facial expressions write their emotional messages. In fact, facial appearance and facial movement are both important social signalling systems in their own right. We here provide multiple lines of evidence for the notion that the social signals derived from facial appearance on the one hand and facial movement on the other interact in a complex manner, sometimes reinforcing and sometimes contradicting one another. Faces provide information on who a person is. Sex, age, ethnicity, personality and other characteristics that can define a person and the social group the person belongs to can all be derived from the face alone. The present article argues that faces interact with the perception of emotion expressions because this information informs a decoder's expectations regarding an expresser's probable emotional reactions. Facial appearance also interacts more directly with the interpretation of facial movement because some of the features that are used to derive personality or sex information are also features that closely resemble certain emotional expressions, thereby enhancing or diluting the perceived strength of particular expressions.

  10. Physicians' perceptions of an eczema action plan for atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Ntuen, Edidiong; Taylor, Sarah L; Kinney, Megan; O'Neill, Jenna L; Krowchuk, Daniel P; Feldman, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    Poor adherence to topical medications in atopic dermatitis may lead to exposure to more costly and potentially toxic systemic agents. Written action plans (WAPs) improve adherence and treatment outcomes in asthma patients and may be useful for children with atopic dermatitis. To assess physicians' perceptions of a WAP for atopic dermatitis and their openness to using it. An Eczema Action Plan (EAP) was modeled from those used in pediatric asthma. A brief survey to assess the perceived practicality and usefulness of the EAP was sent to 48 pediatricians in our local area and to 17 pediatric dermatologists nationally. Survey items included layout, graphics, readability, accuracy, and utility. Qualitative analyses were performed due to small sample sizes. Seventeen pediatricians from five community practices and eight pediatric dermatologists responded (response rates of 35% and 41%, respectively). Layout was rated as excellent by 59% of pediatricians and 43% of pediatric dermatologists, the graphics were rated good (60% and 70%), the readability as good to excellent (100% and 86%), the accuracy as excellent or good (83% and 86%), and usefulness as good to excellent (100% of both groups). Most (71%) of the pediatric dermatologists reported already having their own patient education materials for atopic dermatitis, but none of the pediatricians did. All pediatricians and 60% of pediatric dermatologists reported they were likely to use the EAP in their clinical practices. Limitations included the sample size being small, but it still provided for qualitative assessment of generalists and sub-specialists. We did not assess how the EAP would be perceived by patients or their families. The practice settings of the community and academic physicians are not identical, which may make for weakened comparisons. Pediatricians are open to using an EAP for atopic dermatitis. If an EAP were effective at improving adherence and outcomes in atopic dermatitis, widespread implementation

  11. Apgar Score Is Related to Development of Atopic Dermatitis: Cotwin Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Naeser, Vibeke; Kahr, Niklas; Stensballe, Lone Graff; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Skytthe, Axel; Backer, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To study the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis in a twin population. Methods. In a population-based questionnaire study of 10,809 twins, 3–9 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we identified 907 twin pairs discordant for parent-reported atopic dermatitis. We cross-linked with data from the Danish National Birth Registry and performed cotwin control analysis in order to test the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis. Results. Apgar score, OR (per unit) = 1.23 (1.06–1.44), P = 0.008, and female sex, OR = 1.31 (1.06–1.61), P = 0.012, were risk factors for atopic dermatitis in cotwin control analysis, whereas birth anthropometric factors were not significantly related to disease development. Risk estimates in monozygotic and dizygotic twins were not significantly different for the identified risk factors. Conclusions. In this population-based cotwin control study, high Apgar score was a risk factor for atopic dermatitis. This novel finding must be confirmed in subsequent studies. PMID:24222775

  12. Analysis of Food Allergy in Atopic Dermatitis Patients – Association with Concomitant Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Čelakovská, Jarmila; Bukač, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Background: A few reports demonstrate the comorbidity of food allergy and allergic march in adult patients. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate, if there is some relation in atopic dermatitis patients at the age 14 years and older who suffer from food allergy to common food allergens to other allergic diseases and parameters as bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Complete dermatological and allergological examination was performed; these parameters were examined: food allergy (to wheat flour, cow milk, egg, peanuts and soy), the occurrence of bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. The statistical evaluation of the relations among individual parameters monitored was performed. Results: Food allergy was altogether confirmed in 65 patients (29%) and these patients suffer significantly more often from bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. Persistent atopic dermatitis lesions and positive data in family history about atopy are recorded significantly more often in patients with confirmed food allergy to examined foods as well. On the other hand, the onset of atopic dermatitis under 5 year of age is not recorded significantly more often in patients suffering from allergy to examined foods. Conclusion: Atopic dermatitis patients suffering from food allergy suffer significantly more often from allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, persistent eczematous lesions and have positive data about atopy in their family history. PMID:25284847

  13. Validating MDS Data about Risk Factors for Perineal Dermatitis by Comparing With Nursing Home Records

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Anna M.; Bliss, Donna Z.; Savik, Kay; Wyman, Jean F.

    2011-01-01

    Perineal dermatitis is one of the main complications of incontinence and increases the cost of health care. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) contains data about factors associated with perineal dermatitis identified in a published conceptual model of perineal dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of MDS data related to perineal dermatitis risk factors by comparing them with data in nursing home chart records. Findings indicate that MDS items defining factors associated with perineal dermatitis were valid and supported use of the MDS in further investigation of a significant, costly, and understudied health problem of nursing home residents. PMID:18512629

  14. [Symptoms of anxiety and depression in atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Brzoza, Zenon; Badura-Brzoza, Karina; Nowakowski, Marek; Matysiakiewicz, Jerzy; Rogala, Barbara; Hese, Robert T

    2005-01-01

    The presence of chronic disease is a risk factor for the development of mood disturbances and panic disorders. They can influence the course of disease and effectiveness of therapy. Depression may be the cause of making light doctor's advice. Anxious patients often aggravate symptoms of the disease. To study symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients suffering from atopic eczema/dermatitis syndrome (ZAZS). Material. We studied 38 patients suffering from adequately controlled moderate ZAZS and 62 volunteers in the control group. Mental status of subjects was assessed by means of State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) questionnaires. ZAZS patients demonstrated higher intensity of anxiety (as a trait and as a state) than healthy subjects. Intensity and prevalence of depression in the atopic eczema/ dermatitis syndrome group was higher than in the control group. Patients suffering from atopic/eczema dermatitis syndrome are pre-disposed to anxiety and depression manifestation. Even adequately controlled symptoms of atopic/eczema dermatitis syndrome may be the cause of those disturbances' occurrence.

  15. Accurate landmarking of three-dimensional facial data in the presence of facial expressions and occlusions using a three-dimensional statistical facial feature model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Dellandréa, Emmanuel; Chen, Liming; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2011-10-01

    Three-dimensional face landmarking aims at automatically localizing facial landmarks and has a wide range of applications (e.g., face recognition, face tracking, and facial expression analysis). Existing methods assume neutral facial expressions and unoccluded faces. In this paper, we propose a general learning-based framework for reliable landmark localization on 3-D facial data under challenging conditions (i.e., facial expressions and occlusions). Our approach relies on a statistical model, called 3-D statistical facial feature model, which learns both the global variations in configurational relationships between landmarks and the local variations of texture and geometry around each landmark. Based on this model, we further propose an occlusion classifier and a fitting algorithm. Results from experiments on three publicly available 3-D face databases (FRGC, BU-3-DFE, and Bosphorus) demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, in terms of landmarking accuracy and robustness, in the presence of expressions and occlusions.

  16. American Contact Dermatitis Society Core Allergen Series: 2017 Update.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C; Dunnick, Cory A; Nedorost, Susan; Brod, Bruce; Warshaw, Erin; Mowad, Christen

    The American Contact Dermatitis Society Core Allergen Series was introduced in 2012. After 4 years of use, changes in our recommended allergens are necessary. For the updated series, we have reordered the first 4 panels to approximately mirror the current TRUE Test and removed parthenolide, triclosan, glutaraldehyde, and jasmine. Polymyxin B, lavender, sodium benzoate, ethylhexylglycerin, and benzoic acid are new additions to the American Contact Dermatitis Society series.

  17. Association between Hair-Induced Oronasal Inflammation and Ulcerative Dermatitis in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Vogel, Sandra M; Lawson, Gregory W

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative dermatitis (UD) is a genetically linked syndrome that affects the neck, torso, and facial regions of C57BL/6 mice and strains with C57BL/6 background. In this study, 96 mice with skin ulcerations in 3 different regions of the body and 40 control animals without ulcerated lesions were evaluated histologically for the presence of hair-induced inflammation in the oronasal cavity. We found that 73.5% (100 of 136) of the mice had hair-induced periodontitis, glossitis, or rhinitis regardless of the presence or absence of UD. Of those mice with UD, 93.9% had hair-induced oronasal inflammation. The mandibular incisors were the most commonly affected site (64.6%), followed by the maxillary molars (20.8%), maxillary incisors (16.7%), tongue (16.7%), nasal cavity (10.4%), and mandibular molars (7.3%). In addition, oronasal hair-induced inflammation occurred in 25% (10 of 40) of the control mice. Here we show a significant association between UD and hair-induced inflammatory lesions of the oronasal cavities. PMID:21819677

  18. Are You at Risk for Contact Dermatitis? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    You probably don’t give much thought to hand health. Until something goes wrong, almost everyone takes for granted that these crucial appendages will continue working as they always have. But hand health is an important consideration, especially at work. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), allergic contact dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis account for 15–20 percent of all reported occupational diseases, and they cost employers an estimated $1 billion each year in lost workdays and decreased productivity.

  19. Large Intratemporal Facial Nerve Schwannoma without Facial Palsy: Surgical Strategy of Tumor Removal and Functional Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yetiser, Sertac

    2018-06-08

     Three patients with large intratemporal facial schwannomas underwent tumor removal and facial nerve reconstruction with hypoglossal anastomosis. The surgical strategy for the cases was tailored to the location of the mass and its extension along the facial nerve.  To provide data on the different clinical aspects of facial nerve schwannoma, the appropriate planning for management, and the predictive outcomes of facial function.  Three patients with facial schwannomas (two men and one woman, ages 45, 36, and 52 years, respectively) who presented to the clinic between 2009 and 2015 were reviewed. They all had hearing loss but normal facial function. All patients were operated on with radical tumor removal via mastoidectomy and subtotal petrosectomy and simultaneous cranial nerve (CN) 7- CN 12 anastomosis.  Multiple segments of the facial nerve were involved ranging in size from 3 to 7 cm. In the follow-up period of 9 to 24 months, there was no tumor recurrence. Facial function was scored House-Brackmann grades II and III, but two patients are still in the process of functional recovery.  Conservative treatment with sparing of the nerve is considered in patients with small tumors. Excision of a large facial schwannoma with immediate hypoglossal nerve grafting as a primary procedure can provide satisfactory facial nerve function. One of the disadvantages of performing anastomosis is that there is not enough neural tissue just before the bifurcation of the main stump to provide neural suturing without tension because middle fossa extension of the facial schwannoma frequently involves the main facial nerve at the stylomastoid foramen. Reanimation should be processed with extensive backward mobilization of the hypoglossal nerve. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Protein Palmitoylation by ZDHHC13 Protects Skin against Microbial-Driven Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Ying; Yang-Yen, Hsin-Fang; Tsai, Chun-Chou; Thio, Christina Li-Ping; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Yang, Liang-Tung; Shen, Li-Fen; Song, I-Wen; Liu, Kai-Ming; Huang, Yen-Te; Liu, Fu-Tong; Chang, Ya-Jen; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Yen, Jeffrey J Y

    2017-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a complex chronic inflammatory skin disorder that results from intimate interactions among genetic predisposition, host environment, skin barrier defects, and immunological factors. However, a clear genetic roadmap leading to atopic dermatitis remains to be fully explored. From a genome-wide mutagenesis screen, deficiency of ZDHHC13, a palmitoylacyl transferase, has previously been associated with skin and multitissue inflammatory phenotypes. Here, we report that ZDHHC13 is required for skin barrier integrity and that deficiency of ZDHHC13 renders mice susceptible to environmental bacteria, resulting in persistent skin inflammation and an atopic dermatitis-like disease. This phenotype is ameliorated in a germ-free environment and is also attenuated by antibiotic treatment, but not by deletion of the Rag1 gene, suggesting that a microbial factor triggers inflammation rather than intrinsic adaptive immunity. Furthermore, skin from ZDHHC13-deficient mice has both elevated levels of IL-33 and type 2 innate lymphoid cells, reinforcing the role of innate immunity in the development of atopic dermatitis. In summary, our study suggests that loss of ZDHHC13 in skin impairs the integrity of multiple barrier functions and leads to a dermatitis lesion in response to microbial encounters. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gold--a controversial sensitizer. European Environmental and Contact Dermatitis Research Group.

    PubMed

    Bruze, M; Andersen, K E

    1999-06-01

    Until recently, gold allergy was considered to be extremely rare. Gold has been used and worshipped for thousands of years without any obvious complaints of skin problems, either in those participating in mining and other ways of prospecting, or in those wearing jewellery. When studies on contact allergy to gold sodium thiosulfate were published at the beginning of the 1990s, the allergic nature of the reported positive patch test reactions to gold was questioned. The major argument for such questioning was the lack of demonstrable clinical relevance in most positive reactors. A major reason for the questioning may have been confusion in differentiating between contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis. To arrive at a diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis, 3 steps have, in principle, to be fulfilled: (i) establishment of contact allergy; (ii) demonstration of present exposure; (iii) assessment of clinical relevance, i.e., causing or aggravating a contact dermatitis. In this paper, these steps are discussed with regard to gold. With our present knowledge of contact allergy-allergic contact dermatitis, we do not recommend including gold sodium thiosulfate in the standard series. It should be applied for scientific purposes and when allergic contact dermatitis from gold is suspected.

  2. Computer Recognition of Facial Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    facial recognition 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side It necessary and Identify by block number) A system for the recognition of human faces from...21 2.6 Classification Algorithms ........... ... 32 III FACIAL RECOGNITION AND AUTOMATIC TRAINING . . . 37 3.1 Facial Profile Recognition...provide a fair test of the classification system. The work of Goldstein, Harmon, and Lesk [81 indicates, however, that for facial recognition , a ten class

  3. Impaired Overt Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions in High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshimura, Sayaka; Sato, Wataru; Uono, Shota; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Previous electromyographic studies have reported that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibited atypical patterns of facial muscle activity in response to facial expression stimuli. However, whether such activity is expressed in visible facial mimicry remains unknown. To investigate this issue, we videotaped facial responses in…

  4. Evidence-based treatment of atopic dermatitis with topical moisturizers.

    PubMed

    Micali, Giuseppe; Paternò, Valentina; Cannarella, Rossella; Dinotta, Franco; Lacarrubba, Francesco

    2018-06-01

    Skin barrier restoration represents the mainstay of the treatment of atopic dermatitis and the use of moisturizers is recommended by several international guidelines. The aim of the study was to investigate through an evidence-based medicine analysis the effectiveness and safety of different moisturizing products available for a non-pharmacological treatment of atopic dermatitis. A total of 92 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been identified and analyzed. The results confirm the presence of a reasonable number of studies highlighting moisturizers safety and effectiveness in the treatment of atopic dermatitis by improving disease severity, increasing the time of relapse and reducing the time of flares. Moisturizers containing urea, glycerin or glycyrrhetinic acid seem to show the greater evidence of efficacy being supported by more clinical trials. Among the existing moisturizers, those containing a single agent generally work although the heterogeneity of RCTs does not allow reaching more definitive conclusions. Moisturizers made of a mixture of substances seem to be more effective thanks to the presence of different active substances that may exert a synergistic effect. A meta-analysis of 4 RCTs confirms the efficacy of a medical device containing glycyrrhetinic acid, hyaluronic acid, shea butter, telmesteine, and vitis vinifera in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  5. Differences in itch characteristics between psoriasis and atopic dermatitis patients: results of a web-based questionnaire.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Jenna L; Chan, Yiong Huak; Rapp, Stephen R; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2011-09-01

    Differences in itch characteristics between different inflammatory dermatoses are not well described. The aim of this study was to assess differences in itch characteristics between patients with psoriasis and atopic dermatitis using a previously validated web-based questionnaire that was made available through the National Psoriasis Foundation and National Eczema Association for Science and Education websites. Participants rated frequency and intensity of itch, associated symptoms, itch descriptors, and effect of scratching. A total of 524 subjects with atopic dermatitis and 195 subjects with psoriasis completed the survey. Atopic dermatitis responders experienced more frequent and more intense itch. Associated sweating and heat sensation were also more common in atopic dermatitis. Scratching was considered pleasurable in both atopic dermatitis and psoriasis; pleasurability correlated weakly with itch intensity in atopic dermatitis. Psoriasis respondents reported higher embarrassment associated with itch. Itch sensation is experienced differently among patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Future therapeutic interventions may be developed to target these differences.

  6. Contact dermatitis is an unrecognized problem in the construction industry: Comparison of four different assessment methods.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Johan G; Heederik, Dick; Spee, Ton; van Rooy, Frits G; Krop, Esmeralda J M; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Smit, Lidwien A M

    2017-10-01

    A high contact dermatitis symptoms prevalence has been observed in Dutch construction workers. Contact dermatitis was diagnosed by an expert panel using questionnaire data and photographs of 751 subjects' hands. A subset was evaluated by two occupational physicians. Their diagnoses were compared to those of the expert panel. In addition, two self-reported questionnaire-based assessment methods were compared to the expert panel evaluation. Associations between contact dermatitis and determinants were assessed using log-binomial regression analysis. Contact dermatitis prevalence was high: 61.4% (expert panel's diagnosis) and 32.9% (self-reported). Agreement between occupational physicians and the expert panel was low but increased after training. Washing hands with solvents and performing job-related tasks at home were related to contact dermatitis. Contact dermatitis prevalence among construction workers is high. Recognition of contact dermatitis by occupational physicians is poor but can be improved by training. Awareness of skin disorders should be raised. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Outcome of a graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation in patients with facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Holtmann, Laura C; Eckstein, Anja; Stähr, Kerstin; Xing, Minzhi; Lang, Stephan; Mattheis, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    Peripheral paralysis of the facial nerve is the most frequent of all cranial nerve disorders. Despite advances in facial surgery, the functional and aesthetic reconstruction of a paralyzed face remains a challenge. Graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation is based on a modular principle. According to the patients' needs, precondition, and expectations, the following modules can be performed: temporalis muscle transposition and facelift, nasal valve suspension, endoscopic brow lift, and eyelid reconstruction. Applying a concept of a graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation may help minimize surgical trauma and reduce morbidity. Twenty patients underwent a graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation. A retrospective chart review was performed with a follow-up examination between 1 and 8 months after surgery. The FACEgram software was used to calculate pre- and postoperative eyelid closure, the level of brows, nasal, and philtral symmetry as well as oral commissure position at rest and oral commissure excursion with smile. As a patient-oriented outcome parameter, the Glasgow Benefit Inventory questionnaire was applied. There was a statistically significant improvement in the postoperative score of eyelid closure, brow asymmetry, nasal asymmetry, philtral asymmetry as well as oral commissure symmetry at rest (p < 0.05). Smile evaluation revealed no significant change of oral commissure excursion. The mean Glasgow Benefit Inventory score indicated substantial improvement in patients' overall quality of life. If a primary facial nerve repair or microneurovascular tissue transfer cannot be applied, graduated minimally invasive facial reanimation is a promising option to restore facial function and symmetry at rest.

  8. Food Allergy and Atopic Dermatitis: Fellow Travelers or Triggers?

    PubMed

    Tom, Wynnis L

    2016-03-01

    Many children with atopic dermatitis also have an allergy to one or more foods, but the presence of these two conditions in an individual does not necessarily indicate a causal link between them. Testing and interpretation, sometimes with specialist consultation, may be required to discern whether food allergy is present in a child with atopic dermatitis and-if it is present-whether the food is triggering or exacerbating signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis. Recent milestone trials have demonstrated that early introduction of peanuts can reduce the development of peanut allergy in at-risk children. Parents may benefit from education about current revised guidelines that now recommend offering peanut-containing foods to most children at the time he or she is ready for solid food. Semin Cutan Med Surg 36(supp4):S95-S97. 2017 published by Frontline Medical Communications.

  9. Mime therapy improves facial symmetry in people with long-term facial nerve paresis: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Beurskens, Carien H G; Heymans, Peter G

    2006-01-01

    What is the effect of mime therapy on facial symmetry and severity of paresis in people with facial nerve paresis? Randomised controlled trial. 50 people recruited from the Outpatient department of two metropolitan hospitals with facial nerve paresis for more than nine months. The experimental group received three months of mime therapy consisting of massage, relaxation, inhibition of synkinesis, and co-ordination and emotional expression exercises. The control group was placed on a waiting list. Assessments were made on admission to the trial and three months later by a measurer blinded to group allocation. Facial symmetry was measured using the Sunnybrook Facial Grading System. Severity of paresis was measured using the House-Brackmann Facial Grading System. After three months of mime therapy, the experimental group had improved their facial symmetry by 20.4 points (95% CI 10.4 to 30.4) on the Sunnybrook Facial Grading System compared with the control group. In addition, the experimental group had reduced the severity of their paresis by 0.6 grade (95% CI 0.1 to 1.1) on the House-Brackmann Facial Grading System compared with the control group. These effects were independent of age, sex, and duration of paresis. Mime therapy improves facial symmetry and reduces the severity of paresis in people with facial nerve paresis.

  10. A woman with dermatitis and dissociative periods.

    PubMed

    Wise, T N; Reading, A J

    1975-01-01

    A nineteen year old female with pustular eczema and dissociative spells is presented. The patient has a three year history of severe dermatitis beginning shortly after her marriage. Central dynamic issues appear to be difficulty separating from her mother and an ambivalent identification with a hostile father. The patient also describes fugue-like episodes which occur with emerging aggressive feelings. Psychological testing supported these hypotheses. The relevant literature describing the correlation between aggression and skin disease is reviewed. A final uniform formulation was tentatively proposed that this patient, in addition to a strong genetic component for atopic dermatitis, had her illness abetted by inability to cope with aggressive affects.

  11. [Relevant allergans by periorbital allergic contact dermatitis. Oxybuprocain, an underestimated allergen].

    PubMed

    Blaschke, V; Fuchs, T

    2003-08-01

    Periorbital allergic contact dermatitis is a rare disease and the main differential diagnoses are atopic and seborrhoeic dermatitis. The diagnosis is based on clinical appearance, patient history and patch testing. Current systematic overviews on contact allergens involved are lacking and with changes in medical preparations, new relevant antigens may emerge. Based on the systematic data of the information network of dermatological clinics (IVDK), patch test reactions in 48,969 patients tested between 1996 and 2000 were evaluated. A total of 763 patients suffered from periorbital dermatitis which was suspected to be due to the use of topical medication. The most common epidermal sensitizations in the general population were observed against nickel and fragrances. In the periorbital dermatitis group, sensitization against local anaesthetics and antibiotics was more frequent than in the general population. In three patients, oxybuprocain was identified as the causative agent, which has not yet been recognized as a common allergen.

  12. Guide to Understanding Facial Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to many different facial muscles. These muscles control facial expression. The coordinated activity of this nerve and these ... involves a weakness of the muscles responsible for facial expression and side-to-side eye movement. Moebius syndrome ...

  13. Burden of atopic dermatitis in Japanese adults: Analysis of data from the 2013 National Health and Wellness Survey.

    PubMed

    Arima, Kazuhiko; Gupta, Shaloo; Gadkari, Abhijit; Hiragun, Takaaki; Kono, Takeshi; Katayama, Ichiro; Demiya, Sven; Eckert, Laurent

    2018-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. The objective of this study was to characterize the burden of atopic dermatitis in Japanese adult patients relative to the general population. Japanese adults (≥18 years) with a self-reported diagnosis of atopic dermatitis and adult controls without atopic dermatitis/eczema/dermatitis were identified from the 2013 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey. Atopic dermatitis patients were propensity-score matched with non-atopic dermatitis controls (1:2 ratio) on demographic variables. Patient-reported outcome data on comorbidities, mood and sleep disorders, health-related quality of life, work productivity and activity impairment, and health-care resource utilization were analyzed in atopic dermatitis patients and matched controls. A total of 638 Japanese adult patients with atopic dermatitis were identified, of whom 290 (45.5%) rated their disease as "moderate/severe" and 348 (54.5%) as "mild". The analysis cohort comprised 634 atopic dermatitis patients and 1268 matched controls. Atopic dermatitis patients reported a significantly higher prevalence of arthritis, asthma, nasal allergies/hay fever, anxiety, depression and sleep disorders compared with controls (all P < 0.001). Atopic dermatitis patients also reported a significantly poorer health-related quality of life, higher overall work and activity impairment, and higher health-care resource utilization (all P < 0.001). Self-rated disease severity was not associated with disease burden, except for a significantly higher overall work and activity impairment. In conclusion, Japanese adult patients with atopic dermatitis reported a substantial disease burden relative to adults without atopic dermatitis, suggesting an unmet need for effective strategies targeting disease management. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Dermatological Association.

  14. Managing the Pediatric Facial Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Patrick; Kaufman, Yoav; Hollier, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Facial fracture management is often complex and demanding, particularly within the pediatric population. Although facial fractures in this group are uncommon relative to their incidence in adult counterparts, a thorough understanding of issues relevant to pediatric facial fracture management is critical to optimal long-term success. Here, we discuss several issues germane to pediatric facial fractures and review significant factors in their evaluation, diagnosis, and management. PMID:22110800

  15. Live bee acupuncture (Bong-Chim) dermatitis: dermatitis due to live bee acupuncture therapy in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Soo; Lee, Min Jung; Chung, Ki Hun; Ko, Dong Kyun; Chung, Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Live bee acupuncture (Bong-Chim) dermatitis is an iatrogenic disease induced by so-called live bee acupuncture therapy, which applies the honeybee (Apis cerana) stinger directly into the lesion to treat various diseases in Korea. We present two cases of live bee acupuncture dermatitis and review previously published articles about this disease. We classify this entity into three stages: acute, subacute, and chronic. The acute stage is an inflammatory reaction, such as anaphylaxis or urticaria. In the chronic stage, a foreign body granuloma may develop from the remaining stingers, similar to that of a bee sting reaction. However, in the subacute stage, unlike bee stings, we see the characteristic histological "flame" figures resulting from eosinophilic stimulation induced by excessive bee venom exposure. We consider this stage to be different from the adverse skin reaction of accidental bee sting. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  16. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis and patch test results of leather workers at two Indonesian tanneries.

    PubMed

    Febriana, Sri Awalia; Jungbauer, Frank; Soebono, Hardyanto; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan

    2012-11-01

    Tannery workers are at considerable risk of developing occupational contact dermatitis. Occupational skin diseases in tannery workers in newly industrialized countries have been reported, but neither the prevalence of occupational allergic contact dermatitis nor the skin-sensitizing agents were specifically examined in those studies. To assess the prevalence of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in Indonesian tanneries, identify the causative allergens, and propose a tannery work series of patch test allergens. A cross-sectional study in all workers at two Indonesian tanneries was performed to assess the prevalence of occupational contact dermatitis via a questionnaire-based interview and skin examination. Workers with occupational contact dermatitis were patch tested to identify the causative allergens. Occupational contact dermatitis was suspected in 77 (16%) of the 472 workers. Thirteen (3%) of these 472 workers were confirmed to have occupational allergic contact dermatitis. Potassium dichromate (9.2%), N,N-diphenylguanidine (5.3%), benzidine (3.9%) and sodium metabisulfite (2.6%) were found to be the occupationally relevant sensitizers. The sensitization pattern showed some differences from the data in studies reported from other newly industrial countries. We compiled a 'tannery work series' of allergens for patch testing. A number of these allergens may also be considered for patch testing in patients with (leather) shoe dermatitis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Increasing Comorbidities Suggest that Atopic Dermatitis Is a Systemic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Patrick M; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Paller, Amy S; Kabashima, Kenji; Amagai, Masayuki; Luger, Thomas A; Deleuran, Mette; Werfel, Thomas; Eyerich, Kilian; Stingl, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis comorbidities extend well beyond the march to allergic conditions (food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis), suggesting both cutaneous and systemic immune activation. In reviewing atopic dermatitis comorbidities, Councilors of the International Eczema Council found a strong pattern of immune activation in peripheral blood and the propensity to both skin and systemic infections. Associations with cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, and malignant diseases were increasingly reported, but confirmation of their link with atopic dermatitis requires longitudinal studies. Given the possibility of atopic dermatitis-related systemic immune activation, future investigations of new interventions should concurrently examine the impact on these comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Facial paralysis in children].

    PubMed

    Muler, H; Paquelin, F; Cotin, G; Luboinski, B; Henin, J M

    1975-01-01

    Facial paralyses in children may be grouped under headings displaying a certain amount of individuality. Chronologically, first to be described are neonatal facial paralyses. These are common and are nearly always cured within a few days. Some of these cases are due to the mastoid being crushed at birth with or without the use of forceps. The intra-osseous pathway of the facial nerve is then affected throughout its length. However, a cure is often spontaneous. When this desirable development does not take place within three months, the nerve should be freed by decompressive surgery. The special anatomy of the facial nerve in the new-born baby makes this a delicate operation. Later, in all stages of acute otitis, acute mastoiditis or chronic otitis, facial paralysis can be seen. Treatment depends on the stage reached by the otitis: paracentesis, mastoidectomy, various scraping procedures, and, of course, antibiotherapy. The other causes of facial paralysis in children are very much less common: a frigore or viral, traumatic, occur ring in the course of acute poliomyelitis, shingles or tumours of the middle ear. To these must be added exceptional causes such as vitamin D intoxication, idiopathic hypercalcaemia and certain haemopathies.

  19. Photocontact dermatitis on the hand (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This person is sensitive to chemicals used in perfumes, and now develops a rash when the area is exposed to light (photocontact dermatitis). These perfumes include Oil of Bergamot, an oil also found ...

  20. [Occupational allergic "march". Rapid evolution of contact dermatitis to ammonium persulfate into airborne contact dermatitis with rhinitis and asthma in a hairdresser].

    PubMed

    Poltronieri, Anna; Patrini, L; Pigatto, P; Riboldi, L; Marsili, Chiara; Previdi, M; Margonari, M; Marraccini, P

    2010-01-01

    Hairdressers are exposed to irritants and allergenic compounds that may cause contact dermatitis, rhinitis and asthma. In this paper we describe the case of a female, age 33 years, who developed contact dermatitis after 10 years of exposure to ammonium persulfate. After 7 months of progressively extensive and persistent skin lesions, respiratory symptoms appeared that were related to the occupational exposure (on-off test). SIDAPA and specific occupational patch test for hairdressers and occupational challenge with ammonium persulfate were performed. Clinical parameters of inflammation, ECP (eosinophil cationic protein) and exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) were detected before and after the specific bronchial challenge. The patch test was positive to ammonium persulfate (++), and bronchial challenge for ammonium persulfate showed a significant late response (FEV1 decrease--33%). Both FeNO and ECP showed a significant increase after 24 hours. Dermatitis, urticaria and angioedema occurred on the uncovered skin due to airborne contact. Topic steroids and anti-histaminic drugs resolved the clinical symptoms. Bronchial challenge is, in fact, considered to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of occupational asthma, although new inflammatory parameters can contribute to the diagnosis and can be useful for monitoring after a specific inhalation test with occupational agents. The described case summarizes the evolution from contact dermatitis to inhalation allergy, suggesting the occurrence of an allergic "march" for occupational allergy.