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Sample records for facial tumor disease

  1. Vincristine Chemotherapy Trials and Pharmacokinetics in Tasmanian Devils with Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumor Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, David N.; Frimberger, Angela; Pyecroft, Stephen; Peck, Sarah; Harmsen, Colette; Lola, Suzanneth; de Mello Mattos, Beatriz; Li, Kong M.; McLachlan, Andrew J.; Moore, Antony

    2013-01-01

    Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer threatening to cause the extinction of Tasmanian Devils in the wild. The aim of this study was to determine the susceptibility of the DFTD to vincristine. Escalating dosage rates of vincristine (0.05 to 0.136 mg/kg) were given to Tasmanian devils in the early stages of DFTD (n = 8). None of these dosage rates impacted the outcome of the disease. A dosage rate of 0.105 mg/kg, a rate significantly higher than that given in humans or domestic animals, was found to the highest dosage rate that could be administered safely. Signs of toxicity included anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and neutropenia. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that, as with other species, there was a rapid drop in blood concentration following a rapid intravenous infusion with a high volume of distribution (1.96 L/kg) and a relatively long elimination half life (11 h). Plasma clearance (1.8 ml/min/kg) was slower in the Tasmanian devil than in humans, suggesting that pharmacodynamics and not pharmacokinetics explain the Tasmanian devil’s ability to tolerate high dosage rates of vincristine. While providing base-line data for the use of vincristine in Tasmanian devils and possibly other marsupials with vincristine susceptible cancers, these findings strongly suggest that vincristine will not be effective in the treatment of DFTD. PMID:23762298

  2. Comparative Analysis of Immune Checkpoint Molecules and Their Potential Role in the Transmissible Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumor Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flies, Andrew S.; Blackburn, Nicholas B.; Lyons, Alan Bruce; Hayball, John D.; Woods, Gregory M.

    2017-01-01

    Immune checkpoint molecules function as a system of checks and balances that enhance or inhibit immune responses to infectious agents, foreign tissues, and cancerous cells. Immunotherapies that target immune checkpoint molecules, particularly the inhibitory molecules programmed cell death 1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), have revolutionized human oncology in recent years, yet little is known about these key immune signaling molecules in species other than primates and rodents. The Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease is caused by transmissible cancers that have resulted in a massive decline in the wild Tasmanian devil population. We have recently demonstrated that the inhibitory checkpoint molecule PD-L1 is upregulated on Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) facial tumor cells in response to the interferon-gamma cytokine. As this could play a role in immune evasion by tumor cells, we performed a thorough comparative analysis of checkpoint molecule protein sequences among Tasmanian devils and eight other species. We report that many of the key signaling motifs and ligand-binding sites in the checkpoint molecules are highly conserved across the estimated 162 million years of evolution since the last common ancestor of placental and non-placental mammals. Specifically, we discovered that the CTLA-4 (MYPPPY) ligand-binding motif and the CTLA-4 (GVYVKM) inhibitory domain are completely conserved across all nine species used in our comparative analysis, suggesting that the function of CTLA-4 is likely conserved in these species. We also found that cysteine residues for intra- and intermolecular disulfide bonds were also highly conserved. For instance, all 20 cysteine residues involved in disulfide bonds in the human 4-1BB molecule were also present in devil 4-1BB. Although many key sequences were conserved, we have also identified immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motifs (ITSMs

  3. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  4. Facial nerve hemangiomas: vascular tumors or malformations?

    PubMed

    Benoit, Margo McKenna; North, Paula E; McKenna, Michael J; Mihm, Martin C; Johnson, Matthew M; Cunningham, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    To reclassify facial nerve hemangiomas in the context of presently accepted vascular lesion nomenclature by examining histology and immunohistochemical markers. Cohort analysis of patients diagnosed with a facial nerve hemangioma between 1990 and 2008. Collaborative analysis at a specialty hospital and a major academic hospital. Seven subjects were identified on composite review of office charts, a pathology database spanning both institutions, and an encrypted patient registry. Clinical data were compiled, and hematoxylin-eosin-stained specimens were reviewed. For six patients, archived pathological tissue was available for immunohistochemical evaluation of markers specific for infantile hemangioma (glucose transporter protein isoform 1 [GLUT1] and Lewis Y antigen) and for lymphatic endothelial cells (podoplanin). All patients clinically presented with slowly progressive facial weakness at a mean age of 45 years without prior symptomatology. Hemotoxylin-eosin-stained histopathological slides showed irregularly shaped, dilated lesional vessels with flattened endothelial cells, scant smooth muscle, and no internal elastic lamina. Both podoplanin staining for lymphatic endothelial cells and GLUT1 and LewisY antigen staining for infantile hemangioma endothelial cells were negative in lesional vessels in all specimens for which immunohistochemical analysis was performed. Lesions of the geniculate ganglion historically referred to as "hemangiomas" do not demonstrate clinical, histopathological, or immunohistochemical features consistent with a benign vascular tumor, but instead are consistent with venous malformation. We propose that these lesions be classified as "venous vascular malformations of the facial nerve." This nomenclature should more accurately predict clinical behavior and guide therapeutic interventions.

  5. [Clinical experience in facial nerve tumors: a review of 27 cases].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Yucheng; Dai, Chunfu; Chi, Fanglu; Zhou, Liang; Chen, Bing; Li, Huawei

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the clinical manifestations and the diagnosis of the facial nerve tumor according to the clinical information, and evaluate the different surgical approaches depending on tumor location. Twenty-seven cases of facial nerve tumors with general clinical informations available from 1999.9 to 2006.12 in the Shanghai EENT Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty (74.1%) schwannomas, 4 (14.8%) neurofibromas ,and 3 (11.1%) hemangiomas were identified with histopathology postoperatively. During the course of the disease, 23 patients (85.2%) suffered facial paralysis, both hearing loss and tinnitus affected 11 (40.7%) cases, 5 (18.5%) manifested infra-auricular mass and the others showed some of otalgia or vertigo or ear fullness or facial numbness/twitches. CT or/and MRI results in 24 cases indicated that the tumors originated from the facial nerve. Intra-operative findings showed that 24 (88.9%) cases involved no less than 2 segments of the facial nerve, of these 24 cases 87.5% (21/24) involved the mastoid portion, 70.8% (17/24) involved the tympanic portion, 62.5% (15/24) involved the geniculate ganglion, only 4.2% (1/24) involved the internal acoustic canal (IAC), and 3 cases (11.1%) had only one segments involved. In all of these 27 cases, the tumors were completely excised, of which 13 were resected followed by an immediate facial nerve reconstruction, including 11 sural nerve cable graft, 1 facial nerve end-to-end anastomosis and 1 hypoglossal-facial nerve end-to-end anastomosis. Tumors were removed with preservation of facial nerve continuity in 2 cases. Facial nerve tumor is a rare and benign lesion, and has numerous clinical manifestations. CT and MRI can help surgeons to make a right diagnosis preoperatively. When and how to give the patients an operation depends on the patients individually.

  6. Detecting Selection on Temporal and Spatial Scales: A Genomic Time-Series Assessment of Selective Responses to Devil Facial Tumor Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brüniche-Olsen, Anna; Austin, Jeremy J.; Jones, Menna E.; Holland, Barbara R.; Burridge, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Detecting loci under selection is an important task in evolutionary biology. In conservation genetics detecting selection is key to investigating adaptation to the spread of infectious disease. Loci under selection can be detected on a spatial scale, accounting for differences in demographic history among populations, or on a temporal scale, tracing changes in allele frequencies over time. Here we use these two approaches to investigate selective responses to the spread of an infectious cancer—devil facial tumor disease (DFTD)—that since 1996 has ravaged the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii). Using time-series ‘restriction site associated DNA’ (RAD) markers from populations pre- and post DFTD arrival, and DFTD free populations, we infer loci under selection due to DFTD and investigate signatures of selection that are incongruent among methods, populations, and times. The lack of congruence among populations influenced by DFTD with respect to inferred loci under selection, and the direction of that selection, fail to implicate a consistent selective role for DFTD. Instead genetic drift is more likely driving the observed allele frequency changes over time. Our study illustrates the importance of applying methods with different performance optima e.g. accounting for population structure and background selection, and assessing congruence of the results. PMID:26930198

  7. Large Intratemporal Facial Nerve Schwannoma without Facial Palsy: Surgical Strategy of Tumor Removal and Functional Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yetiser, Sertac

    2018-06-08

     Three patients with large intratemporal facial schwannomas underwent tumor removal and facial nerve reconstruction with hypoglossal anastomosis. The surgical strategy for the cases was tailored to the location of the mass and its extension along the facial nerve.  To provide data on the different clinical aspects of facial nerve schwannoma, the appropriate planning for management, and the predictive outcomes of facial function.  Three patients with facial schwannomas (two men and one woman, ages 45, 36, and 52 years, respectively) who presented to the clinic between 2009 and 2015 were reviewed. They all had hearing loss but normal facial function. All patients were operated on with radical tumor removal via mastoidectomy and subtotal petrosectomy and simultaneous cranial nerve (CN) 7- CN 12 anastomosis.  Multiple segments of the facial nerve were involved ranging in size from 3 to 7 cm. In the follow-up period of 9 to 24 months, there was no tumor recurrence. Facial function was scored House-Brackmann grades II and III, but two patients are still in the process of functional recovery.  Conservative treatment with sparing of the nerve is considered in patients with small tumors. Excision of a large facial schwannoma with immediate hypoglossal nerve grafting as a primary procedure can provide satisfactory facial nerve function. One of the disadvantages of performing anastomosis is that there is not enough neural tissue just before the bifurcation of the main stump to provide neural suturing without tension because middle fossa extension of the facial schwannoma frequently involves the main facial nerve at the stylomastoid foramen. Reanimation should be processed with extensive backward mobilization of the hypoglossal nerve. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Immunization Strategies Producing a Humoral IgG Immune Response against Devil Facial Tumor Disease in the Majority of Tasmanian Devils Destined for Wild Release

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Ruth; Patchett, Amanda; McLennan, Elspeth; Thomson, Russell; Carver, Scott; Fox, Samantha; Pemberton, David; Kreiss, Alexandre; Baz Morelli, Adriana; Silva, Anabel; Pearse, Martin J.; Corcoran, Lynn M.; Belov, Katherine; Hogg, Carolyn J.; Woods, Gregory M; Lyons, A. Bruce

    2018-01-01

    Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is renowned for its successful evasion of the host immune system. Down regulation of the major histocompatabilty complex class I molecule (MHC-I) on the DFTD cells is a primary mechanism of immune escape. Immunization trials on captive Tasmanian devils have previously demonstrated that an immune response against DFTD can be induced, and that immune-mediated tumor regression can occur. However, these trials were limited by their small sample sizes. Here, we describe the results of two DFTD immunization trials on cohorts of devils prior to their wild release as part of the Tasmanian Government’s Wild Devil Recovery project. 95% of the devils developed anti-DFTD antibody responses. Given the relatively large sample sizes of the trials (N = 19 and N = 33), these responses are likely to reflect those of the general devil population. DFTD cells manipulated to express MHC-I were used as the antigenic basis of the immunizations in both trials. Although the adjuvant composition and number of immunizations differed between trials, similar anti-DFTD antibody levels were obtained. The first trial comprised DFTD cells and the adjuvant combination of ISCOMATRIX™, polyIC, and CpG with up to four immunizations given at monthly intervals. This compared to the second trial whereby two immunizations comprising DFTD cells and the adjuvant combination ISCOMATRIX™, polyICLC (Hiltonol®) and imiquimod were given a month apart, providing a shorter and, therefore, more practical protocol. Both trials incorporated a booster immunization given up to 5 months after the primary course. A key finding was that devils in the second trial responded more quickly and maintained their antibody levels for longer compared to devils in the first trial. The different adjuvant combination incorporating the RNAase resistant polyICLC and imiquimod used in the second trial is likely to be responsible. The seroconversion in the majority of devils in these anti

  9. Useful surgical techniques for facial nerve preservation in tumorous intra-temporal lesions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin; Moon, In Seok; Lee, Jong Dae; Shim, Dae Bo; Lee, Won-Sang

    2010-02-01

    The management of the facial nerve in tumorous temporal lesions is particularly challenging due to its complex anatomic location and potential postoperative complications, including permanent facial paralysis. The most important concern regarding surgical treatment of a tumorous temporal lesion is the inevitable facial paralysis caused by nerve injury during the tumor removal, especially in patients with minimal to no preoperative facial nerve dysfunction. We describe successful four cases in which various surgical techniques were developed for the preservation of the facial nerve in treatment of intratemporal tumorous lesions. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Facial biometrics of peri-oral changes in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, L; Adegun, O K; Willis, A; Fortune, Farida

    2014-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic relapsing and remitting inflammatory condition which affects any part of the gastrointestinal tract. In the oro-facial region, patients can present peri-oral swellings which results in severe facial disfigurement. To date, assessing the degree of facial changes and evaluation of treatment outcomes relies on clinical observation and semi-quantitative methods. In this paper, we describe the development of a robust and reproducible measurement strategy using 3-D facial biometrics to objectively quantify the extent and progression of oro-facial Crohn's disease. Using facial laser scanning, 32 serial images from 13 Crohn's patients attending the Oral Medicine clinic were acquired during relapse, remission, and post-treatment phases. Utilising theories of coordinate metrology, the facial images were subjected to registration, regions of interest identification, and reproducible repositioning prior to obtaining volume measurements. To quantify the changes in tissue volume, scan images from consecutive appointments were compared to the baseline (first scan image). Reproducibility test was performed to ascertain the degree of uncertainty in volume measurements. 3-D facial biometric imaging is a reliable method to identify and quantify peri-oral swelling in Crohn's patients. Comparison of facial scan images at different phases of the disease revealed precisely profile and volume changes. The volume measurements were highly reproducible as adjudged from the 1% standard deviation. 3-D facial biometrics measurements in Crohn's patients with oro-facial involvement offers a quick, robust, economical and objective approach for guided therapeutic intervention and routine assessment of treatment efficacy on the clinic.

  11. Surgical reconstruction of post-tumoral facial defects.

    PubMed

    Tamaş, Camelia; Pintilie, Cătălina Teodora; Atănăsoae, Ionuţ Vivi; Corduneanu, Andreea Mioara; Dabija, Iulia; Olaru, Florin Ştefan; Hreniuc, Irina Mihaela; Tecuceanu, Angela; Munteanu, Ioana; Dobre, Costel; Moraru, Dan Cristian; Ianole, Victor; Tamaş, Ioana; Costan, Victor Vlad

    2018-01-01

    The face is an unfortunate location for any type of tumor - malignant or not - with significant esthetic and functional outcomes. To reconstruct a facial defect may seem simple, but can be rather complicated. The aim of this study is to analyze and discuss our results in order to conclude with specific surgical strategies correlated with the morphopathological results. The most important objective for us is to offer the highest level of expertise to our patients and to prove that the symbiosis between the surgical treatment and the work of the Department of Morphopathology is essential in order to maximize the quality of medical care provided for our patients. A retrospective study was conducted on 116 patients diagnosed with facial malignant tumors, 70 of which were confirmed as basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), 35 confirmed as squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and 11 malignant melanomas (MMs). Most BCC cases (57) showed ulceration, with a long clinical evolution (more than 10 years) in 48 cases. Only in 12 SCC cases, patients showed inflammation and ulceration, with a shorter evolution period (2-5 years). For complete microscopic diagnosis, immunohistochemical (IHC) examination was necessary in 46 cases. The BCC "deceiving" clinical behavior and the generally aggressive character of the MM were found in our patients as well. The most frequent sites were the orbital region (27 cases) and the nasolabial sulcus (26 cases). In order to reconstruct the postexcisional defects, we had to perform local flaps in 62 cases (14 frontal flaps for orbital defects, 32 glabellar flaps for medial epicanthus, lower lid and nasal region, 15 nasolabial flaps for lower lid or nasal alae and one "Z"-plasty for the submental region). Oncological follow-up was performed in all patients and in 15 cases re-excision was necessary (11 BCCs, two SCCs and two MMs). Cervical lymph node metastasis occurred in six cases (three BCCs, one SCC and two MMs). The cooperation between surgeons and

  12. Spontaneous and posed facial expression in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, M C; Smith, M K; Ellgring, H

    1996-09-01

    Spontaneous and posed emotional facial expressions in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD, n = 12) were compared with those of healthy age-matched controls (n = 12). The intensity and amount of facial expression in PD patients were expected to be reduced for spontaneous but not posed expressions. Emotional stimuli were video clips selected from films, 2-5 min in duration, designed to elicit feelings of happiness, sadness, fear, disgust, or anger. Facial movements were coded using Ekman and Friesen's (1978) Facial Action Coding System (FACS). In addition, participants rated their emotional experience on 9-point Likert scales. The PD group showed significantly less overall facial reactivity than did controls when viewing the films. The predicted Group X Condition (spontaneous vs. posed) interaction effect on smile intensity was found when PD participants with more severe disease were compared with those with milder disease and with controls. In contrast, ratings of emotional experience were similar for both groups. Depression was positively associated with emotion rating but not with measures of facial activity. Spontaneous facial expression appears to be selectively affected in PD, whereas posed expression and emotional experience remain relatively intact.

  13. [Emotional facial expression recognition impairment in Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Lachenal-Chevallet, Karine; Bediou, Benoit; Bouvard, Martine; Thobois, Stéphane; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Vighetto, Alain; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre

    2006-03-01

    some behavioral disturbances observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) could be related to impaired recognition of various social messages particularly emotional facial expressions. facial expression recognition was assessed using morphed faces (five emotions: happiness, fear, anger, disgust, neutral), and compared to gender recognition and general cognitive assessment in 12 patients with Parkinson's disease and 14 controls subjects. facial expression recognition was impaired among patients, whereas gender recognitions, visuo-perceptive capacities and total efficiency were preserved. Post hoc analyses disclosed a deficit for fear and disgust recognition compared to control subjects. the impairment of emotional facial expression recognition in PD appears independent of other cognitive deficits. This impairment may be related to the dopaminergic depletion in basal ganglia and limbic brain regions. They could take a part in psycho-behavioral disorders and particularly in communication disorders observed in Parkinson's disease patients.

  14. [Propeller facial artery perforator flap for repairing defect after resection of skin malignant tumor at upper lip].

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuanzhen; Tang, Xiujun; Wang, Dali; Wei, Zairong; Wang, Bo; Deng, Chengliang; Zhang, Ziyang; Jin, Wenhu

    2018-02-01

    To explore the effectiveness of propeller facial artery perforator flap to repair the defect after resection of skin malignant tumor at upper lip. Between July 2012 and January 2017, 17 cases with skin malignant tumor at upper lip underwent tumor resection and the remained defect was repaired with propeller facial artery perforator flap. Among the 17 patients, 3 were male and 14 were female, with an average age of 57 years (range, 35-82 years). There were 5 cases of squamous cell carcinoma and 12 cases of basal cell carcinoma. The disease duration ranged from 4 months to 11 years with an average of 20 months. The tumor size ranged from 1.4 cm×0.3 cm to 3.1 cm×1.4 cm. The extended resection of the tumor tissue was performed according to the characters of tumor. According to the location, size, and shape of the defect and the position of facial artery perforator explored with Doppler ultrasonography, the propeller facial artery perforator flap was designed to repair the defect and partial donor site. The flap size ranged from 5 cm×2 cm to 7 cm×3 cm. The length of the perforator pedicle was 0.5-1.0 cm with an average of 0.8 cm. The defect at donor site was directly closed. Cyanosis occurred in 3 cases of the distal flap after operation, then healing after symptomatic treatment. The remaining flaps survived successfully and the wound healed by first intention. Primary healing was obtained in the donor site. All the patients were followed up 6-36 months with an average of 18 months. The shape of the patient's upper lip was good and the scar on the donor site was unconspicuous. There was no lip deformity, ala nasi deflection, facial tension, entilation dysfunction, or recurrence of tumor during follow-up. At last follow-up, the results of self-evaluation were very satisfactory in 13 cases and satisfactory in 4 cases. Based on multiple advantages of good blood supply, large rotation range, aesthetic outcome, and slight injury of the donor site, propeller facial artery

  15. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: facial nerve palsy after temporal fossa photoillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2003-06-01

    In two randomized prospective studies of brain tumor PDT more than 180 patients have been accrued. At the Toronto site we recognized two patients who developed a lower motor neuron (LMN) facial paralysis in the week following the PDT treatment. In both cases a temporal lobectomy was undertaken and the residual tumor cavity was photo-illuminated. The surface illuminated included the temporal fossa floor, thus potentially exposing the facial nerve to the effect of PDT. The number of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital tumors in this cohort was 39, 24, 12 and 4, respectively. Of the 24 temporal tumors 18 were randomized to Photofrin-PDT. Of these 18 a temporal lobectomy was carried out exposing the middle fossa floor as part of the tumor resection. In two of the 10 patients where the lobectomy was carried out and the fossa floor was exposed to light there occurred a postoperative facial palsy. Both patients recovered facial nerve function in 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. 46 J/cm2 were used in the former and 130 J/cm2 in the latter. We did not encounter a single post-operative LMN facial plasy in the 101 phase 2 patients treated with Photofrin-PDT. Among 688 supratentorial brain tumor operations in the last decade involving all pathologies and all locations no case of early post-operative LMN facial palsy was identified in the absence of PDT. One further patient who had a with post-PDT facial palsy was identified at the Denver site. Although it is possible that these patients had incidental Bell's palsy, we now recommend shielding the temporal fossa floor during PDT.

  16. Collision tumor of the facial nerve: a synchronous seventh nerve schwannoma and neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Gross, Brian C; Carlson, Matthew L; Driscoll, Colin L; Moore, Eric J

    2012-10-01

    To report a novel case of a collision tumor involving an intraparotid neurofibroma and a mastoid segment facial nerve schwannoma. Clinical capsule report. Tertiary academic referral center. A 29-year-old woman with a 2-year history of an asymptomatic enlarging left infraauricular mass and normal FN function presented to a tertiary care referral center. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion in the deep portion of the parotid gland extending into the stylomastoid foramen. The patient underwent superficial parotidectomy, and a cystic parotid mass was found to be intrinsic to the intraparotid facial nerve. A portion of the mass was biopsied, and intraoperative frozen section pathology was consistent with a neurofibroma. A mastoidectomy with FN decompression was then performed until a normal-appearing segment was identified just proximal to the second genu. After biopsy, proximal facial nerve stimulation failed to elicit evoked motor potentials, and en bloc resection was performed. Final pathology demonstrated a schwannoma involving the mastoid segment and a neurofibroma involving the proximal intraparotid facial nerve. We report the first case of a facial nerve collision tumor involving an intraparotid neurofibroma and a mastoid segment facial nerve schwannoma. Benign FN sheath tumors of the parotid gland are rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a parotid mass.

  17. Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Argaud, Soizic; Delplanque, Sylvain; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Auffret, Manon; Duprez, Joan; Vérin, Marc; Grandjean, Didier; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    According to embodied simulation theory, understanding other people’s emotions is fostered by facial mimicry. However, studies assessing the effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion are still controversial. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), one of the most distinctive clinical features is facial amimia, a reduction in facial expressiveness, but patients also show emotional disturbances. The present study used the pathological model of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral). Our results evidenced a significant decrease in facial mimicry for joy in PD, essentially linked to the absence of reaction of the zygomaticus major and the orbicularis oculi muscles in response to happy avatars, whereas facial mimicry for expressions of anger was relatively preserved. We also confirmed that PD patients were less accurate in recognizing positive and neutral facial expressions and highlighted a beneficial effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion. We thus provide additional arguments for embodied simulation theory suggesting that facial mimicry is a potential lever for therapeutic actions in PD even if it seems not to be necessarily required in recognizing emotion as such. PMID:27467393

  18. The recognition of facial emotion expressions in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Assogna, Francesca; Pontieri, Francesco E; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2008-11-01

    A limited number of studies in Parkinson's Disease (PD) suggest a disturbance of recognition of facial emotion expressions. In particular, disgust recognition impairment has been reported in unmedicated and medicated PD patients. However, the results are rather inconclusive in the definition of the degree and the selectivity of emotion recognition impairment, and an associated impairment of almost all basic facial emotions in PD is also described. Few studies have investigated the relationship with neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological symptoms with mainly negative results. This inconsistency may be due to many different problems, such as emotion assessment, perception deficit, cognitive impairment, behavioral symptoms, illness severity and antiparkinsonian therapy. Here we review the clinical characteristics and neural structures involved in the recognition of specific facial emotion expressions, and the plausible role of dopamine transmission and dopamine replacement therapy in these processes. It is clear that future studies should be directed to clarify all these issues.

  19. [Black bone disease of the skull and facial bones].

    PubMed

    Laure, B; Petraud, A; Sury, F; Bayol, J-C; Marquet-Van Der Mee, N; de Pinieux, G; Goga, D

    2009-11-01

    We report the case of a patient with a craniofacial black bone disease. This was discovered accidentally during a coronal approach. A 38-year-old patient was referred to our unit for facial palsy having appeared 10 years before. Rehabilitation of the facial palsy was performed with a lengthening temporal myoplasty and lengthening of the upper eyelid elevator. An unusual black color of the skull was observed at incision of the coronal approach. Subperiostal dissection of skull and malars confirmed the presence of a black bone disease. A postoperative history revealed minocycline intake (200mg per day) during 3 years. This craniofacial black bone disease was caused by minocycline intake. The originality of this case is to see directly the entire craniofacial skeleton black. This abnormal pigmentation may affect various organs or tissues. Bone pigmentation is irreversible unlike that of the mouth mucosa or of the skin. This abnormal pigmentation is usually discovered accidentally.

  20. Microsurgical Resection of Glomus Jugulare Tumors With Facial Nerve Reconstruction: 3-Dimensional Operative Video.

    PubMed

    Cândido, Duarte N C; de Oliveira, Jean Gonçalves; Borba, Luis A B

    2018-05-08

    Paragangliomas are tumors originating from the paraganglionic system (autonomic nervous system), mostly found at the region around the jugular bulb, for which reason they are also termed glomus jugulare tumors (GJT). Although these lesions appear to be histologically benign, clinically they present with great morbidity, especially due to invasion of nearby structures such as the lower cranial nerves. These are challenging tumors, as they need complex approaches and great knowledge of the skull base. We present the case of a 31-year-old woman, operated by the senior author, with a 1-year history of tinnitus, vertigo, and progressive hearing loss, that evolved with facial nerve palsy (House-Brackmann IV) 2 months before surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans demonstrated a typical lesion with intense flow voids at the jugular foramen region with invasion of the petrous and tympanic bone, carotid canal, and middle ear, and extending to the infratemporal fossa (type C2 of Fisch's classification for GJT). During the procedure the mastoid part of the facial nerve was identified involved by tumor and needed to be resected. We also describe the technique for nerve reconstruction, using an interposition graft from the great auricular nerve, harvested at the beginning of the surgery. We achieved total tumor resection with a remarkable postoperative course. The patient also presented with facial function after 6 months. The patient consented with publication of her images.

  1. Deficits in the Mimicry of Facial Expressions in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Steven R.; Vezer, Esztella; McGarry, Lucy M.; Lang, Anthony E.; Russo, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans spontaneously mimic the facial expressions of others, facilitating social interaction. This mimicking behavior may be impaired in individuals with Parkinson's disease, for whom the loss of facial movements is a clinical feature. Objective: To assess the presence of facial mimicry in patients with Parkinson's disease. Method: Twenty-seven non-depressed patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 28 age-matched controls had their facial muscles recorded with electromyography while they observed presentations of calm, happy, sad, angry, and fearful emotions. Results: Patients exhibited reduced amplitude and delayed onset in the zygomaticus major muscle region (smiling response) following happy presentations (patients M = 0.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.15 to 0.18, controls M = 0.26, CI 0.14 to 0.37, ANOVA, effect size [ES] = 0.18, p < 0.001). Although patients exhibited activation of the corrugator supercilii and medial frontalis (frowning response) following sad and fearful presentations, the frontalis response to sad presentations was attenuated relative to controls (patients M = 0.05, CI −0.08 to 0.18, controls M = 0.21, CI 0.09 to 0.34, ANOVA, ES = 0.07, p = 0.017). The amplitude of patients' zygomaticus activity in response to positive emotions was found to be negatively correlated with response times for ratings of emotional identification, suggesting a motor-behavioral link (r = –0.45, p = 0.02, two-tailed). Conclusions: Patients showed decreased mimicry overall, mimicking other peoples' frowns to some extent, but presenting with profoundly weakened and delayed smiles. These findings open a new avenue of inquiry into the “masked face” syndrome of PD. PMID:27375505

  2. Novel mouse model for simulating microsurgical tumor excision with facial nerve preservation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae H; Boyle, Glen M; Panizza, Benedict

    2016-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of using a mouse tumor model as a microsurgical training tool for otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) trainees. Animal study. We injected athymic nude mice with human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (A431 cell line) deep to the parotid region overlying the masseter muscle. We sacrificed the animals 1 to 3 weeks postinjection, once a visible tumor growth was confirmed. We then asked 10 OHNS trainees to excise the tumor with preservation of the facial nerves under a high-magnification dissecting microscope. The trainees graded the tasks in several areas of specific measures using a visual analogue scale (VAS) including 1) tumor texture, 2) surgical realism, 3) usefulness, and 4) difficulty of the task. Noticeable tumor growth occurred within 5 days following A431 cell injection and reached measureable size (0.5-1.5 cm) within 1 to 3 weeks. The tumor displaced the facial nerve laterally and medially, with few demonstrating infiltration of the nerve. VAS scores (± standard deviation) were 8.1 (± 1.7), 7.7 (± 2.5), 9.0 (± 0.9) and 6.6 (± 1.9) for tumor texture, surgical realism, usefulness, and the difficulty of the task, respectively. We demonstrate a novel, reliable and cost-effective mouse model for simulating tumor extirpation microsurgery with preservation of important neural structures. OHNS trainees have found this simulation model to be realistic, useful, and appropriately challenging. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Headache and Facial Pain in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Vgontzas, Angeliki; Charleston, Larry; Robbins, Matthew S

    2016-03-01

    Children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) have a high prevalence of recurrent headaches (24.0-43.9 %). Acute presentation with headache can be diagnostically challenging, as the clinician must consider evaluation of several potentially devastating conditions including vascular diseases (stroke, hemorrhage, venous sinus thrombosis, moyamoya, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome), facial and orbital bone infarcts, dental pain, and osteomyelitis. Patients with SCD and primary headache disorders may benefit from comprehensive headache treatment plans that include abortive therapy, prophylactic therapy, and non-pharmacological modalities. Although there is limited data in adults, those with SCD are at risk for medication overuse headache secondary to frequent opioid use. Addressing headache in patients with SCD may help to reduce their use of opioids and disability and improve pain and quality of life.

  4. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    PubMed

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. Recognition of facial and musical emotions in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Saenz, A; Doé de Maindreville, A; Henry, A; de Labbey, S; Bakchine, S; Ehrlé, N

    2013-03-01

    Patients with amygdala lesions were found to be impaired in recognizing the fear emotion both from face and from music. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), impairment in recognition of emotions from facial expressions was reported for disgust, fear, sadness and anger, but no studies had yet investigated this population for the recognition of emotions from both face and music. The ability to recognize basic universal emotions (fear, happiness and sadness) from both face and music was investigated in 24 medicated patients with PD and 24 healthy controls. The patient group was tested for language (verbal fluency tasks), memory (digit and spatial span), executive functions (Similarities and Picture Completion subtests of the WAIS III, Brixton and Stroop tests), visual attention (Bells test), and fulfilled self-assessment tests for anxiety and depression. Results showed that the PD group was significantly impaired for recognition of both fear and sadness emotions from facial expressions, whereas their performance in recognition of emotions from musical excerpts was not different from that of the control group. The scores of fear and sadness recognition from faces were neither correlated to scores in tests for executive and cognitive functions, nor to scores in self-assessment scales. We attributed the observed dissociation to the modality (visual vs. auditory) of presentation and to the ecological value of the musical stimuli that we used. We discuss the relevance of our findings for the care of patients with PD. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  6. Tumorous diseases of turkeys - an update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This update is primarily focused on addressing various aspects of virus-induced tumorous diseases of turkeys including review of current methods for diagnosis and control of these diseases of turkeys. Virus-induced tumorous diseases of turkeys are caused primarily by retroviruses, namely reticuloend...

  7. An overview of tumorous diseases of turkeys

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This overview is primarily aimed at addressing various aspects of virus-induced tumorous diseases of turkeys including review of current methods for diagnosis and control of these diseases of turkeys. Virus-induced tumorous diseases of turkeys are caused primarily by retroviruses, namely reticuloend...

  8. Analysis of facial expressions in parkinson's disease through video-based automatic methods.

    PubMed

    Bandini, Andrea; Orlandi, Silvia; Escalante, Hugo Jair; Giovannelli, Fabio; Cincotta, Massimo; Reyes-Garcia, Carlos A; Vanni, Paola; Zaccara, Gaetano; Manfredi, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    The automatic analysis of facial expressions is an evolving field that finds several clinical applications. One of these applications is the study of facial bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease (PD), which is a major motor sign of this neurodegenerative illness. Facial bradykinesia consists in the reduction/loss of facial movements and emotional facial expressions called hypomimia. In this work we propose an automatic method for studying facial expressions in PD patients relying on video-based METHODS: 17 Parkinsonian patients and 17 healthy control subjects were asked to show basic facial expressions, upon request of the clinician and after the imitation of a visual cue on a screen. Through an existing face tracker, the Euclidean distance of the facial model from a neutral baseline was computed in order to quantify the changes in facial expressivity during the tasks. Moreover, an automatic facial expressions recognition algorithm was trained in order to study how PD expressions differed from the standard expressions. Results show that control subjects reported on average higher distances than PD patients along the tasks. This confirms that control subjects show larger movements during both posed and imitated facial expressions. Moreover, our results demonstrate that anger and disgust are the two most impaired expressions in PD patients. Contactless video-based systems can be important techniques for analyzing facial expressions also in rehabilitation, in particular speech therapy, where patients could get a definite advantage from a real-time feedback about the proper facial expressions/movements to perform. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mastoiditis and facial paralysis as initial manifestations of temporal bone systemic diseases - the significance of the histopathological examination.

    PubMed

    Maniu, Alma Aurelia; Harabagiu, Oana; Damian, Laura Otilia; Ştefănescu, Eugen HoraŢiu; FănuŢă, Bogdan Marius; Cătană, Andreea; Mogoantă, Carmen Aurelia

    2016-01-01

    Several systemic diseases, including granulomatous and infectious processes, tumors, bone disorders, collagen-vascular and other autoimmune diseases may involve the middle ear and temporal bone. These diseases are difficult to diagnose when symptoms mimic acute otomastoiditis. The present report describes our experience with three such cases initially misdiagnosed. Their predominating symptoms were otological with mastoiditis, hearing loss, and subsequently facial nerve palsy. The cases were considered an emergency and the patients underwent tympanomastoidectomy, under the suspicion of otitis media with cholesteatoma, in order to remove a possible abscess and to decompress the facial nerve. The common features were the presence of severe granulation tissue filling the mastoid cavity and middle ear during surgery, without cholesteatoma. The definitive diagnoses was made by means of biopsy of the granulation tissue from the middle ear, revealing granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis) in one case, middle ear tuberculosis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma respectively. After specific associated therapy facial nerve functions improved, and atypical inflammatory states of the ear resolved. As a group, systemic diseases of the middle ear and temporal bone are uncommon, but aggressive lesions. After analyzing these cases and reviewing the literature, we would like to stress upon the importance of microscopic examination of the affected tissue, required for an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.

  10. Mapping spontaneous facial expression in people with Parkinson's disease: A multiple case study design.

    PubMed

    Gunnery, Sarah D; Naumova, Elena N; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Tickle-Degnen, Linda

    2017-01-01

    People with Parkinson's disease (PD) often experience a decrease in their facial expressivity, but little is known about how the coordinated movements across regions of the face are impaired in PD. The face has neurologically independent regions that coordinate to articulate distinct social meanings that others perceive as gestalt expressions, and so understanding how different regions of the face are affected is important. Using the Facial Action Coding System, this study comprehensively measured spontaneous facial expression across 600 frames for a multiple case study of people with PD who were rated as having varying degrees of facial expression deficits, and created correlation matrices for frequency and intensity of produced muscle activations across different areas of the face. Data visualization techniques were used to create temporal and correlational mappings of muscle action in the face at different degrees of facial expressivity. Results showed that as severity of facial expression deficit increased, there was a decrease in number, duration, intensity, and coactivation of facial muscle action. This understanding of how regions of the parkinsonian face move independently and in conjunction with other regions will provide a new focus for future research aiming to model how facial expression in PD relates to disease progression, stigma, and quality of life.

  11. Evolution in a transmissible cancer: a study of the chromosomal changes in devil facial tumor (DFT) as it spreads through the wild Tasmanian devil population.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Anne-Maree; Swift, Kate; Hodson, Pamela; Hua, Bobby; McCallum, Hamish; Pyecroft, Stephen; Taylor, Robyn; Eldridge, Mark D B; Belov, Katherine

    2012-03-01

    Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) are the largest extant marsupial carnivores. This species, now confined to Tasmania, is endangered from the emergence of a transmissible cancer, devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). In the present study, we use cytogenetic and molecular techniques to examine the stability of devil facial tumor (DFT) cell lines across time and space. This article describes disease progression from February 2004 to June 2011. We demonstrate evolutionary changes in the disease, which affects devils in different sites across Tasmania and over a period of several years, producing several chromosomal variants (strains) that are capable of transmission between devils. We describe the evolution of DFTs in the field and speculate on the possible impacts on the disease, including (1) development of less aggressive forms of the disease; (2) development of more aggressive forms of the disease; (3) development of forms capable of affecting closely related species of dasyurids (e.g., quolls); (4) extinction of the disease as it acquires additional deleterious mutations that affect either cell viability or transmissibility; and (5) co-evolution of the disease and the host. We also speculate about the future of the Tasmanian devil in the wild. We note that although DFTs are regarded as unstable by comparison with another much older transmissible cancer, canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT), the potential for development of less aggressive forms of DFTs or for development of resistance in devils is limited by devils' small numbers, low genetic diversity, and restricted geographical distribution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Altered Kinematics of Facial Emotion Expression and Emotion Recognition Deficits Are Unrelated in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Matteo; Berardelli, Isabella; Paparella, Giulia; Marsili, Luca; Ricciardi, Lucia; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Altered emotional processing, including reduced emotion facial expression and defective emotion recognition, has been reported in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, few studies have objectively investigated facial expression abnormalities in PD using neurophysiological techniques. It is not known whether altered facial expression and recognition in PD are related. To investigate possible deficits in facial emotion expression and emotion recognition and their relationship, if any, in patients with PD. Eighteen patients with PD and 16 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Facial expressions of emotion were recorded using a 3D optoelectronic system and analyzed using the facial action coding system. Possible deficits in emotion recognition were assessed using the Ekman test. Participants were assessed in one experimental session. Possible relationship between the kinematic variables of facial emotion expression, the Ekman test scores, and clinical and demographic data in patients were evaluated using the Spearman's test and multiple regression analysis. The facial expression of all six basic emotions had slower velocity and lower amplitude in patients in comparison to healthy controls (all P s < 0.05). Patients also yielded worse Ekman global score and disgust, sadness, and fear sub-scores than healthy controls (all P s < 0.001). Altered facial expression kinematics and emotion recognition deficits were unrelated in patients (all P s > 0.05). Finally, no relationship emerged between kinematic variables of facial emotion expression, the Ekman test scores, and clinical and demographic data in patients (all P s > 0.05). The results in this study provide further evidence of altered emotional processing in PD. The lack of any correlation between altered facial emotion expression kinematics and emotion recognition deficits in patients suggests that these abnormalities are mediated by separate pathophysiological mechanisms.

  13. [Surgical treatment in otogenic facial nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Feng, Guo-Dong; Gao, Zhi-Qiang; Zhai, Meng-Yao; Lü, Wei; Qi, Fang; Jiang, Hong; Zha, Yang; Shen, Peng

    2008-06-01

    To study the character of facial nerve palsy due to four different auris diseases including chronic otitis media, Hunt syndrome, tumor and physical or chemical factors, and to discuss the principles of the surgical management of otogenic facial nerve palsy. The clinical characters of 24 patients with otogenic facial nerve palsy because of the four different auris diseases were retrospectively analyzed, all the cases were performed surgical management from October 1991 to March 2007. Facial nerve function was evaluated with House-Brackmann (HB) grading system. The 24 patients including 10 males and 14 females were analysis, of whom 12 cases due to cholesteatoma, 3 cases due to chronic otitis media, 3 cases due to Hunt syndrome, 2 cases resulted from acute otitis media, 2 cases due to physical or chemical factors and 2 cases due to tumor. All cases were treated with operations included facial nerve decompression, lesion resection with facial nerve decompression and lesion resection without facial nerve decompression, 1 patient's facial nerve was resected because of the tumor. According to HB grade system, I degree recovery was attained in 4 cases, while II degree in 10 cases, III degree in 6 cases, IV degree in 2 cases, V degree in 2 cases and VI degree in 1 case. Removing the lesions completely was the basic factor to the surgery of otogenic facial palsy, moreover, it was important to have facial nerve decompression soon after lesion removal.

  14. Novel Noninvasive Brain Disease Detection System Using a Facial Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Ting; Zhang, Bob; Tang, Yuan Yan

    2017-01-01

    Brain disease including any conditions or disabilities that affect the brain is fast becoming a leading cause of death. The traditional diagnostic methods of brain disease are time-consuming, inconvenient and non-patient friendly. As more and more individuals undergo examinations to determine if they suffer from any form of brain disease, developing noninvasive, efficient, and patient friendly detection systems will be beneficial. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a novel noninvasive brain disease detection system based on the analysis of facial colors. The system consists of four components. A facial image is first captured through a specialized sensor, where four facial key blocks are next located automatically from the various facial regions. Color features are extracted from each block to form a feature vector for classification via the Probabilistic Collaborative based Classifier. To thoroughly test the system and its performance, seven facial key block combinations were experimented. The best result was achieved using the second facial key block, where it showed that the Probabilistic Collaborative based Classifier is the most suitable. The overall performance of the proposed system achieves an accuracy −95%, a sensitivity −94.33%, a specificity −95.67%, and an average processing time (for one sample) of <1 min at brain disease detection. PMID:29292716

  15. PD-L1 Is Not Constitutively Expressed on Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumor Cells but Is Strongly Upregulated in Response to IFN-γ and Can Be Expressed in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Flies, Andrew S.; Lyons, A. Bruce; Corcoran, Lynn M.; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Murphy, James M.; Knowles, Graeme W.; Woods, Gregory M.; Hayball, John D.

    2016-01-01

    The devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is caused by clonal transmissible cancers that have led to a catastrophic decline in the wild Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) population. The first transmissible tumor, now termed devil facial tumor 1 (DFT1), was first discovered in 1996 and has been continually transmitted to new hosts for at least 20 years. In 2015, a second transmissible cancer [devil facial tumor 2 (DFT2)] was discovered in wild devils, and the DFT2 is genetically distinct and independent from the DFT1. Despite the estimated 136,559 base pair substitutions and 14,647 insertions/deletions in the DFT1 genome as compared to two normal devil reference genomes, the allograft tumors are not rejected by the host immune system. Additionally, genome sequencing of two sub-strains of DFT1 detected greater than 15,000 single-base substitutions that were found in only one of the DFT1 sub-strains, demonstrating the transmissible tumors are evolving and that generation of neoantigens is likely ongoing. Recent evidence in human clinical trials suggests that blocking PD-1:PD-L1 interactions promotes antitumor immune responses and is most effective in cancers with a high number of mutations. We hypothesized that DFTD cells could exploit the PD-1:PD-L1 inhibitory pathway to evade antitumor immune responses. We developed recombinant proteins and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to provide the first demonstration that PD-1 binds to both PD-L1 and PD-L2 in a non-placental mammal and show that PD-L1 is upregulated in DFTD cells in response to IFN-γ. Immunohistochemistry showed that PD-L1 is rarely expressed in primary tumor masses, but low numbers of PD-L1+ non-tumor cells were detected in the microenvironment of several metastatic tumors. Importantly, in vitro testing suggests that PD-1 binding to PD-L1 and PD-L2 can be blocked by mAbs, which could be critical to understanding how the DFT allografts evade the immune system. PMID:28018348

  16. Relative preservation of the recognition of positive facial expression "happiness" in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Maki, Yohko; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Tomoharu; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2013-01-01

    Positivity recognition bias has been reported for facial expression as well as memory and visual stimuli in aged individuals, whereas emotional facial recognition in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients is controversial, with possible involvement of confounding factors such as deficits in spatial processing of non-emotional facial features and in verbal processing to express emotions. Thus, we examined whether recognition of positive facial expressions was preserved in AD patients, by adapting a new method that eliminated the influences of these confounding factors. Sensitivity of six basic facial expressions (happiness, sadness, surprise, anger, disgust, and fear) was evaluated in 12 outpatients with mild AD, 17 aged normal controls (ANC), and 25 young normal controls (YNC). To eliminate the factors related to non-emotional facial features, averaged faces were prepared as stimuli. To eliminate the factors related to verbal processing, the participants were required to match the images of stimulus and answer, avoiding the use of verbal labels. In recognition of happiness, there was no difference in sensitivity between YNC and ANC, and between ANC and AD patients. AD patients were less sensitive than ANC in recognition of sadness, surprise, and anger. ANC were less sensitive than YNC in recognition of surprise, anger, and disgust. Within the AD patient group, sensitivity of happiness was significantly higher than those of the other five expressions. In AD patient, recognition of happiness was relatively preserved; recognition of happiness was most sensitive and was preserved against the influences of age and disease.

  17. Discrimination and categorization of emotional facial expressions and faces in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Recio, Laura; Martín, Pilar; Rubio, Sandra; Serrano, Juan M

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to compare the ability to discriminate and categorize emotional facial expressions (EFEs) and facial identity characteristics (age and/or gender) in a group of 53 individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and another group of 53 healthy subjects. On the one hand, by means of discrimination and identification tasks, we compared two stages in the visual recognition process that could be selectively affected in individuals with PD. On the other hand, facial expression versus gender and age comparison permits us to contrast whether the emotional or non-emotional content influences the configural perception of faces. In Experiment I, we did not find differences between groups, either with facial expression or age, in discrimination tasks. Conversely, in Experiment II, we found differences between the groups, but only in the EFE identification task. Taken together, our results indicate that configural perception of faces does not seem to be globally impaired in PD. However, this ability is selectively altered when the categorization of emotional faces is required. A deeper assessment of the PD group indicated that decline in facial expression categorization is more evident in a subgroup of patients with higher global impairment (motor and cognitive). Taken together, these results suggest that the problems found in facial expression recognition may be associated with the progressive neuronal loss in frontostriatal and mesolimbic circuits, which characterizes PD. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Identification and intensity of disgust: Distinguishing visual, linguistic and facial expressions processing in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sedda, Anna; Petito, Sara; Guarino, Maria; Stracciari, Andrea

    2017-07-14

    Most of the studies since now show an impairment for facial displays of disgust recognition in Parkinson disease. A general impairment in disgust processing in patients with Parkinson disease might adversely affect their social interactions, given the relevance of this emotion for human relations. However, despite the importance of faces, disgust is also expressed through other format of visual stimuli such as sentences and visual images. The aim of our study was to explore disgust processing in a sample of patients affected by Parkinson disease, by means of various tests tackling not only facial recognition but also other format of visual stimuli through which disgust can be recognized. Our results confirm that patients are impaired in recognizing facial displays of disgust. Further analyses show that patients are also impaired and slower for other facial expressions, with the only exception of happiness. Notably however, patients with Parkinson disease processed visual images and sentences as controls. Our findings show a dissociation within different formats of visual stimuli of disgust, suggesting that Parkinson disease is not characterized by a general compromising of disgust processing, as often suggested. The involvement of the basal ganglia-frontal cortex system might spare some cognitive components of emotional processing, related to memory and culture, at least for disgust. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Recognition of facial expression of emotions in Parkinson's disease: a theoretical review].

    PubMed

    Alonso-Recio, L; Serrano-Rodriguez, J M; Carvajal-Molina, F; Loeches-Alonso, A; Martin-Plasencia, P

    2012-04-16

    Emotional facial expression is a basic guide during social interaction and, therefore, alterations in their expression or recognition are important limitations for communication. To examine facial expression recognition abilities and their possible impairment in Parkinson's disease. First, we review the studies on this topic which have not found entirely similar results. Second, we analyze the factors that may explain these discrepancies and, in particular, as third objective, we consider the relationship between emotional recognition problems and cognitive impairment associated with the disease. Finally, we propose alternatives strategies for the development of studies that could clarify the state of these abilities in Parkinson's disease. Most studies suggest deficits in facial expression recognition, especially in those with negative emotional content. However, it is possible that these alterations are related to those that also appear in the course of the disease in other perceptual and executive processes. To advance in this issue, we consider necessary to design emotional recognition studies implicating differentially the executive or visuospatial processes, and/or contrasting cognitive abilities with facial expressions and non emotional stimuli. The precision of the status of these abilities, as well as increase our knowledge of the functional consequences of the characteristic brain damage in the disease, may indicate if we should pay special attention in their rehabilitation inside the programs implemented.

  20. Correlations between the clinical, histological and neurophysiological examinations in patients before and after parotid gland tumor surgery: verification of facial nerve transmission.

    PubMed

    Wiertel-Krawczuk, Agnieszka; Huber, Juliusz; Wojtysiak, Magdalena; Golusiński, Wojciech; Pieńkowski, Piotr; Golusiński, Paweł

    2015-05-01

    Parotid gland tumor surgery sometimes leads to facial nerve paralysis. Malignant more than benign tumors determine nerve function preoperatively, while postoperative observations based on clinical, histological and neurophysiological studies have not been reported in detail. The aims of this pilot study were evaluation and correlations of histological properties of tumor (its size and location) and clinical and neurophysiological assessment of facial nerve function pre- and post-operatively (1 and 6 months). Comparative studies included 17 patients with benign (n = 13) and malignant (n = 4) tumors. Clinical assessment was based on House-Brackmann scale (H-B), neurophysiological diagnostics included facial electroneurography [ENG, compound muscle action potential (CMAP)], mimetic muscle electromyography (EMG) and blink-reflex examinations (BR). Mainly grade I of H-B was recorded both pre- (n = 13) and post-operatively (n = 12) in patients with small (1.5-2.4 cm) benign tumors located in superficial lobes. Patients with medium size (2.5-3.4 cm) malignant tumors in both lobes were scored at grade I (n = 2) and III (n = 2) pre- and mainly VI (n = 4) post-operatively. CMAP amplitudes after stimulation of mandibular marginal branch were reduced at about 25 % in patients with benign tumors after surgery. In the cases of malignant tumors CMAPs were not recorded following stimulation of any branch. A similar trend was found for BR results. H-B and ENG results revealed positive correlations between the type of tumor and surgery with facial nerve function. Neurophysiological studies detected clinically silent facial nerve neuropathy of mandibular marginal branch in postoperative period. Needle EMG, ENG and BR examinations allow for the evaluation of face muscles reinnervation and facial nerve regeneration.

  1. Facial Emotion Recognition and Expression in Parkinson's Disease: An Emotional Mirror Mechanism?

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Visco-Comandini, Federica; Erro, Roberto; Morgante, Francesca; Bologna, Matteo; Fasano, Alfonso; Ricciardi, Diego; Edwards, Mark J; Kilner, James

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have impairment of facial expressivity (hypomimia) and difficulties in interpreting the emotional facial expressions produced by others, especially for aversive emotions. We aimed to evaluate the ability to produce facial emotional expressions and to recognize facial emotional expressions produced by others in a group of PD patients and a group of healthy participants in order to explore the relationship between these two abilities and any differences between the two groups of participants. Twenty non-demented, non-depressed PD patients and twenty healthy participants (HC) matched for demographic characteristics were studied. The ability of recognizing emotional facial expressions was assessed with the Ekman 60-faces test (Emotion recognition task). Participants were video-recorded while posing facial expressions of 6 primary emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear and anger). The most expressive pictures for each emotion were derived from the videos. Ten healthy raters were asked to look at the pictures displayed on a computer-screen in pseudo-random fashion and to identify the emotional label in a six-forced-choice response format (Emotion expressivity task). Reaction time (RT) and accuracy of responses were recorded. At the end of each trial the participant was asked to rate his/her confidence in his/her perceived accuracy of response. For emotion recognition, PD reported lower score than HC for Ekman total score (p<0.001), and for single emotions sub-scores happiness, fear, anger, sadness (p<0.01) and surprise (p = 0.02). In the facial emotion expressivity task, PD and HC significantly differed in the total score (p = 0.05) and in the sub-scores for happiness, sadness, anger (all p<0.001). RT and the level of confidence showed significant differences between PD and HC for the same emotions. There was a significant positive correlation between the emotion facial recognition and expressivity in both groups; the

  2. Facial Emotion Recognition and Expression in Parkinson’s Disease: An Emotional Mirror Mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Visco-Comandini, Federica; Erro, Roberto; Morgante, Francesca; Bologna, Matteo; Fasano, Alfonso; Ricciardi, Diego; Edwards, Mark J.; Kilner, James

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have impairment of facial expressivity (hypomimia) and difficulties in interpreting the emotional facial expressions produced by others, especially for aversive emotions. We aimed to evaluate the ability to produce facial emotional expressions and to recognize facial emotional expressions produced by others in a group of PD patients and a group of healthy participants in order to explore the relationship between these two abilities and any differences between the two groups of participants. Methods Twenty non-demented, non-depressed PD patients and twenty healthy participants (HC) matched for demographic characteristics were studied. The ability of recognizing emotional facial expressions was assessed with the Ekman 60-faces test (Emotion recognition task). Participants were video-recorded while posing facial expressions of 6 primary emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear and anger). The most expressive pictures for each emotion were derived from the videos. Ten healthy raters were asked to look at the pictures displayed on a computer-screen in pseudo-random fashion and to identify the emotional label in a six-forced-choice response format (Emotion expressivity task). Reaction time (RT) and accuracy of responses were recorded. At the end of each trial the participant was asked to rate his/her confidence in his/her perceived accuracy of response. Results For emotion recognition, PD reported lower score than HC for Ekman total score (p<0.001), and for single emotions sub-scores happiness, fear, anger, sadness (p<0.01) and surprise (p = 0.02). In the facial emotion expressivity task, PD and HC significantly differed in the total score (p = 0.05) and in the sub-scores for happiness, sadness, anger (all p<0.001). RT and the level of confidence showed significant differences between PD and HC for the same emotions. There was a significant positive correlation between the emotion facial recognition and

  3. Facial emotion recognition in Parkinson's disease: A review and new hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Vérin, Marc; Sauleau, Paul; Grandjean, Didier

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder classically characterized by motor symptoms. Among them, hypomimia affects facial expressiveness and social communication and has a highly negative impact on patients' and relatives' quality of life. Patients also frequently experience nonmotor symptoms, including emotional‐processing impairments, leading to difficulty in recognizing emotions from faces. Aside from its theoretical importance, understanding the disruption of facial emotion recognition in PD is crucial for improving quality of life for both patients and caregivers, as this impairment is associated with heightened interpersonal difficulties. However, studies assessing abilities in recognizing facial emotions in PD still report contradictory outcomes. The origins of this inconsistency are unclear, and several questions (regarding the role of dopamine replacement therapy or the possible consequences of hypomimia) remain unanswered. We therefore undertook a fresh review of relevant articles focusing on facial emotion recognition in PD to deepen current understanding of this nonmotor feature, exploring multiple significant potential confounding factors, both clinical and methodological, and discussing probable pathophysiological mechanisms. This led us to examine recent proposals about the role of basal ganglia‐based circuits in emotion and to consider the involvement of facial mimicry in this deficit from the perspective of embodied simulation theory. We believe our findings will inform clinical practice and increase fundamental knowledge, particularly in relation to potential embodied emotion impairment in PD. © 2018 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:29473661

  4. Specific Impairments in the Recognition of Emotional Facial Expressions in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Uraina S.; Neargarder, Sandy; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Studies investigating the ability to recognize emotional facial expressions in non-demented individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have yielded equivocal findings. A possible reason for this variability may lie in the confounding of emotion recognition with cognitive task requirements, a confound arising from the lack of a control condition using non-emotional stimuli. The present study examined emotional facial expression recognition abilities in 20 non-demented patients with PD and 23 control participants relative to their performances on a non-emotional landscape categorization test with comparable task requirements. We found that PD participants were normal on the control task but exhibited selective impairments in the recognition of facial emotion, specifically for anger (driven by those with right hemisphere pathology) and surprise (driven by those with left hemisphere pathology), even when controlling for depression level. Male but not female PD participants further displayed specific deficits in the recognition of fearful expressions. We suggest that the neural substrates that may subserve these impairments include the ventral striatum, amygdala, and prefrontal cortices. Finally, we observed that in PD participants, deficiencies in facial emotion recognition correlated with higher levels of interpersonal distress, which calls attention to the significant psychosocial impact that facial emotion recognition impairments may have on individuals with PD. PMID:18485422

  5. Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture Among Children With Facial Palsy in a Lyme Disease Endemic Area.

    PubMed

    Paydar-Darian, Niloufar; Kimia, Amir A; Lantos, Paul M; Fine, Andrew M; Gordon, Caroline D; Gordon, Catherine R; Landschaft, Assaf; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2017-06-01

    We identified 620 children with peripheral facial palsy of which 211 (34%) had Lyme disease. The 140 children who had a lumbar puncture performed were more likely to be hospitalized (73% LP performed vs 2% no LP) and to receive parenteral antibiotics (62% LP performed vs 6% no LP). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Facial and oral aspects of some venereal and tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2004-01-01

    Diseases of the tropical areas include some venereal diseases, and they are still very prevalent in some countries; Brazil is one of them. Very few cases are originated in large cities, as Rio de Janeiro, but at the University Hospital of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro we also see those patients who come from the interior of the State of Rio de Janeiro or from other states to seek medical care at better equipped hospitals for this type of investigation and therapy. Venereal and tropical dermatoses have many different cutaneous manifestations and may affect skin in several locations. The face is one of the affected areas especially when the disease has a predilection for cartilage, oral and/or nasal mucosa. Alterations observed on the skin of the face and on the mucosa of the mouth of some tropical diseases, such as leprosy, leishmaniasis, paracoccidioidomycosis, donovanosis, and syphilis, as they are observed in Brazil, are presented and discussed in this article.

  7. Cerebral, facial, and orbital involvement in Erdheim-Chester disease: CT and MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Drier, Aurélie; Haroche, Julien; Savatovsky, Julien; Godenèche, Gaelle; Dormont, Didier; Chiras, Jacques; Amoura, Zahir; Bonneville, Fabrice

    2010-05-01

    To retrospectively review the brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomographic (CT) findings in patients with Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD). The ethics committee required neither institutional review board approval nor informed patient consent for retrospective analyses of the patients' medical records and imaging data. The patients' medical files were retrospectively reviewed in accordance with human subject research protocols. Three neuroradiologists in consensus analyzed the signal intensity, location, size, number, and gadolinium uptake of lesions detected on brain MR images obtained in 33 patients with biopsy-proved ECD. Thirty patients had intracranial, facial bone, and/or orbital involvement, and three had normal neurologic imaging findings. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis was involved in 16 (53%) of the 30 patients, with six (20%) cases of micronodular or nodular masses of the infundibular stalk. Meningeal lesions were observed in seven (23%) patients. Three (10%) patients had bilateral symmetric T2 high signal intensity in the dentate nucleus areas, and five (17%) had multiple intraaxial enhancing masses. Striking intracranial periarterial infiltration was observed in three (10%) patients. Another patient (3%) had a lesion in the lumen of the superior sagittal sinus. Nine (30%) patients had orbital involvement. Twenty-four (80%) patients had osteosclerosis of the facial and/or skull bones. At least two anatomic sites were involved in two-thirds (n = 20) of the patients. Osteosclerosis of the facial bones associated with orbital masses and either meningeal or infundibular stalk masses was seen in eight (27%) patients. Lesions of the brain, meninges, facial bones, and orbits are frequently observed and should be systematically sought on the brain MR and CT images obtained in patients with ECD, even if these patients are asymptomatic. Careful attention should be directed to the periarterial environment.

  8. Implicit and explicit processing of emotional facial expressions in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wagenbreth, Caroline; Wattenberg, Lena; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Zaehle, Tino

    2016-04-15

    Besides motor problems, Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with detrimental emotional and cognitive functioning. Deficient explicit emotional processing has been observed, whilst patients also show impaired Theory of Mind (ToM) abilities. However, it is unclear whether this PD patients' ToM deficit is based on an inability to infer otherś emotional states or whether it is due to explicit emotional processing deficits. We investigated implicit and explicit emotional processing in PD with an affective priming paradigm in which we used pictures of human eyes for emotional primes and a lexical decision task (LDT) with emotional connoted words for target stimuli. Sixteen PD patients and sixteen matched healthy controls performed a LTD combined with an emotional priming paradigm providing emotional information through the facial eye region to assess implicit emotional processing. Second, participants explicitly evaluated the emotional status of eyes and words used in the implicit task. Compared to controls implicit emotional processing abilities were generally preserved in PD with, however, considerable alterations for happiness and disgust processing. Furthermore, we observed a general impairment of patients for explicit evaluation of emotional stimuli, which was augmented for the rating of facial expressions. This is the first study reporting results for affective priming with facial eye expressions in PD patients. Our findings indicate largely preserved implicit emotional processing, with a specific altered processing of disgust and happiness. Explicit emotional processing was considerably impaired for semantic and especially for facial stimulus material. Poor ToM abilities in PD patients might be based on deficient explicit emotional processing, with preserved ability to implicitly infer other people's feelings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lack of correlation between patient reported location and severity of facial pain and radiographic burden of disease in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Falco, Jeffrey J; Thomas, Andrew J; Quin, Xuan; Ashby, Shaelene; Mace, Jess C; Deconde, Adam S; Smith, Timothy L; Alt, Jeremiah A

    2016-11-01

    Facial pain is a cardinal symptom of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with significant impacts on patient treatment selection, quality of life, and outcomes. The association between facial pain and CRS disease severity has not been systematically evaluated with validated, facial pain-specific questionnaires. Our objective was to measure pain location, severity, and interference in patients with CRS, and correlate these to the location and severity of radiographic evidence of disease. Patients with CRS were enrolled into a prospective, cross-sectional study. Patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form, which is a validated and widely used tool that measures pain location, severity, and interference with daily activities of living. The Lund-Mackay (L-M) computed tomography (CT) scoring system was used to operationalize the radiographic location and severity of inflammation. Facial pain location, severity, and interference scores were correlated to paranasal sinus opacification scores. Consecutive patients with CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP; n = 37) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP; n = 46) were enrolled. No significant relationship was found between the location and severity of reported facial pain and radiographic findings of disease for patients with either CRSwNP or CRSsNP. There was no difference in pain location between patients with and without radiographic disease in a given sinus. Facial pain in CRS is not predicted by the radiographic extent of disease. The location and severity of facial pain reported by the patient is not a reliable marker of the anatomic location and severity of sinonasal inflammation. Pain location should not necessarily be relied upon for guiding targeted therapy. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  10. Bone alloplasty and rehabilitation of children with maxillo-facial tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelezny, P. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Kirilova, I. A.; Zhelezny, S. P.; Podorozhnaya, B. T.; Zheleznaya, A. P.

    2017-09-01

    The clinical observations in the treatment and rehabilitation of 117 children with maxillofacial tumors are presented. Malignant tumors were observed in 4 patients, other 113 children had benign tumors and tumor mass. Different bone defects of maxilla of both sub-total perforating and small segmental cavity appeared after the removal of neoplasms. The orthopedic transplants from the laboratory of tissue preservation of Tsivyan Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics preserved by different methods were used for maxilla defects restoration. Frozen transplants were applied in 48 patients, "Kostma" transplants were used in 14 patients, "Deprodex"—in 28 patients, "Orgamax"—in 27 patients. Orthopedic transplants from mandibular bone were used for chin and condylar process defects restoration. The orthopedic and orthodontic rehabilitation of the patients with the use of removable and unremovable orthodontic equipment and dental implantation systems was carried out in the postoperative period. Good anatomical functional and esthetic results of rehabilitation were received in 92 patients (89.3%) on long dates by 10 years. In some people the face asymmetry, bite disturbance, reduction of masticatory function were registered.

  11. Joint recognition-expression impairment of facial emotions in Huntington's disease despite intact understanding of feelings.

    PubMed

    Trinkler, Iris; Cleret de Langavant, Laurent; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2013-02-01

    Patients with Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder that causes major motor impairments, also show cognitive and emotional deficits. While their deficit in recognising emotions has been explored in depth, little is known about their ability to express emotions and understand their feelings. If these faculties were impaired, patients might not only mis-read emotion expressions in others but their own emotions might be mis-interpreted by others as well, or thirdly, they might have difficulties understanding and describing their feelings. We compared the performance of recognition and expression of facial emotions in 13 HD patients with mild motor impairments but without significant bucco-facial abnormalities, and 13 controls matched for age and education. Emotion recognition was investigated in a forced-choice recognition test (FCR), and emotion expression by filming participants while they mimed the six basic emotional facial expressions (anger, disgust, fear, surprise, sadness and joy) to the experimenter. The films were then segmented into 60 stimuli per participant and four external raters performed a FCR on this material. Further, we tested understanding of feelings in self (alexithymia) and others (empathy) using questionnaires. Both recognition and expression were impaired across different emotions in HD compared to controls and recognition and expression scores were correlated. By contrast, alexithymia and empathy scores were very similar in HD and controls. This might suggest that emotion deficits in HD might be tied to the expression itself. Because similar emotion recognition-expression deficits are also found in Parkinson's Disease and vascular lesions of the striatum, our results further confirm the importance of the striatum for emotion recognition and expression, while access to the meaning of feelings relies on a different brain network, and is spared in HD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolution of a contagious cancer: epigenetic variation in Devil Facial Tumour Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ujvari, Beata; Pearse, Anne-Maree; Peck, Sarah; Harmsen, Collette; Taylor, Robyn; Pyecroft, Stephen; Madsen, Thomas; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Belov, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD), a highly contagious cancer, is driving Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) to extinction. The cancer is a genetically and chromosomally stable clonal cell line which is transmitted by biting during social interactions. In the present study, we explore the Devil Facial Tumour (DFT) epigenome and the genes involved in DNA methylation homeostasis. We show that tumour cells have similar levels of methylation to peripheral nerves, the tissue from which DFTD originated. We did not observe any strain or region-specific epimutations. However, we revealed a significant increase in hypomethylation in DFT samples over time (p < 0.0001). We propose that loss of methylation is not because of a maintenance deficiency, as an upregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1 gene was observed in tumours compared with nerves (p < 0.005). Instead, we believe that loss of methylation is owing to active demethylation, supported by the temporal increase in MBD2 and MBD4 (p < 0.001). The implications of these changes on disease phenotypes need to be explored. Our work shows that DFTD should not be treated as a static entity, but rather as an evolving parasite with epigenetic plasticity. Understanding the role of epimutations in the evolution of this parasitic cancer will provide unique insights into the role of epigenetic plasticity in cancer evolution and progression in traditional cancers that arise and die with their hosts. PMID:23135679

  13. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors. PMID:26343726

  14. Reversible epigenetic down-regulation of MHC molecules by devil facial tumour disease illustrates immune escape by a contagious cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V.; Kreiss, Alexandre; Tovar, Cesar; Yuen, Chun Kit; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine; Swift, Kate; Pearse, Anne-Maree; Hamede, Rodrigo; Jones, Menna E.; Skjødt, Karsten; Woods, Gregory M.; Kaufman, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Contagious cancers that pass between individuals as an infectious cell line are highly unusual pathogens. Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is one such contagious cancer that emerged 16 y ago and is driving the Tasmanian devil to extinction. As both a pathogen and an allograft, DFTD cells should be rejected by the host–immune response, yet DFTD causes 100% mortality among infected devils with no apparent rejection of tumor cells. Why DFTD cells are not rejected has been a question of considerable confusion. Here, we show that DFTD cells do not express cell surface MHC molecules in vitro or in vivo, due to down-regulation of genes essential to the antigen-processing pathway, such as β2-microglobulin and transporters associated with antigen processing. Loss of gene expression is not due to structural mutations, but to regulatory changes including epigenetic deacetylation of histones. Consequently, MHC class I molecules can be restored to the surface of DFTD cells in vitro by using recombinant devil IFN-γ, which is associated with up-regulation of the MHC class II transactivator, a key transcription factor with deacetylase activity. Further, expression of MHC class I molecules by DFTD cells can occur in vivo during lymphocyte infiltration. These results explain why T cells do not target DFTD cells. We propose that MHC-positive or epigenetically modified DFTD cells may provide a vaccine to DFTD. In addition, we suggest that down-regulation of MHC molecules using regulatory mechanisms allows evolvability of transmissible cancers and could affect the evolutionary trajectory of DFTD. PMID:23479617

  15. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    PubMed

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  16. The influence of facial masking and sex on older adults' impressions of individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hemmesch, Amanda R; Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Zebrowitz, Leslie A

    2009-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) involves facial masking, which may impair social interaction. Older adult observers who viewed segments of videotaped interviews of individuals with PD expressed less interest in relationships with women with higher masking and judged them as less supportive. Masking did not affect ratings of men in these domains, possibly because higher masking violates gender norms for expressivity in women but not in men. Observers formed less accurate ratings of the social supportiveness and social strain of women than men, and higher masking decreased accuracy for ratings of strain. Results suggest that some of the problems with social relationships in PD may be due to inaccurate impressions and reduced desire to interact with individuals with higher masking, especially women. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. A pediatric case with peripheral facial nerve palsy caused by a granulomatous lesion associated with cat scratch disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Chizuko; Inaba, Yuji; Tsukahara, Keiko; Mochizuki, Mie; Sawanobori, Emi; Nakazawa, Yozo; Aoyama, Kouki

    2018-02-01

    Cat scratch disease is a common infectious disorder caused by Bartonella henselae that is transmitted primarily by kittens. It typically exhibits a benign and self-limiting course of subacute regional lymphadenopathy and fever lasting two to eight weeks. The most severe complication of cat scratch disease is involvement of the nervous system, such as encephalitis, meningitis, and polyneuritis. Peripheral facial nerve palsy associated with Bartonella infection is rare; few reported pediatric and adult cases exist and the precise pathogenesis is unknown. A previously healthy 7-year-old boy presented with fever, cervical lymphadenopathy, and peripheral facial nerve palsy associated with serologically confirmed cat scratch disease. The stapedius muscle reflex was absent on the left side and brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion at the left internal auditory meatus. The patient's symptoms and imaging findings were gradually resolved after the antibiotics and corticosteroids treatment. The suspected granulomatous lesion was considered to have resulted from the host's immune reaction to Bartonella infection and impaired the facial nerve. This is the first case report providing direct evidence of peripheral facial nerve palsy caused by a suspected granulomatous lesion associated with cat scratch disease and its treatment course. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Steroid use in Lyme disease-associated facial palsy is associated with worse long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jowett, Nate; Gaudin, Robert A; Banks, Caroline A; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences in long-term facial function outcomes following acute Lyme disease-associated facial palsy (LDFP) exist between patients who received antibiotic monotherapy (MT); dual therapy (DT) with antibiotics and corticosteroids; and triple therapy (TT) with antibiotics, corticosteroids, and antivirals. Retrospective cohort. All patients with a prior diagnosis of unilateral LDFP who presented to our center between 2002 and 2015 were retrospectively assessed for inclusion. Two blinded experts graded static, dynamic, and synkinesis parameters of facial functions using standardized video documentation of facial function. Fifty-one patients were included. The mean time of assessment following LDFP onset was 15.1 months (range 0.3-84 months). Significantly worse facial outcomes were seen among those who received DT and TT as compared to those who received MT, most pronounced among those assessed 12 months or later following onset of LDFP (Dynamic-P = 0.031, post hoc MT vs. TT: mean difference [MD], 15.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54-30.13; P = 0.030. Synkinesis-P = 0.026, post hoc MT vs. DT: MD, 21.50; 95% CI, 0.68-42.32; P = 0.043, post hoc MT vs. TT: MD, 19.22; 95% CI, 2.23-36.22; P = 0.027). An association between corticosteroid use in acute LDFP and worse long-term facial function outcomes has been demonstrated. Care should be taken in differentiating viral or idiopathic facial palsy (e.g., Bell palsy) from LDFP. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:1451-1458, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Bell palsy in lyme disease-endemic regions of canada: a cautionary case of occult bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Karen; Melanson, Michel; Desai, Jamsheed A

    2012-09-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a multisystem disorder characterized by three clinical stages: dermatologic, neurologic, and rheumatologic. The number of known Lyme disease-endemic areas in Canada is increasing as the range of the vector Ixodes scapularis expands into the eastern and central provinces. Southern Ontario, Nova Scotia, southern Manitoba, New Brunswick, and southern Quebec are now considered Lyme disease-endemic regions in Canada. The use of field surveillance to map risk and endemic regions suggests that these geographic areas are growing, in part due to the effects of climate warming. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the most common neurologic abnormality in the second stage of Lyme borreliosis, with up to 25% of Bell palsy (idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy) occurring due to Lyme disease. Here we present a case of occult bilateral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. In Lyme disease-endemic regions of Canada, patients presenting with unilateral or bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy should be evaluated for Lyme disease with serologic testing to avoid misdiagnosis. Serologic testing should not delay initiation of appropriate treatment for presumed Bell palsy.

  20. Carotid body tumor imitator: An interesting case of Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Hakeem J; Diletti, Sara M; Hart, Alexandra M; Meyers, Joshua E; Dumont, Travis M; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2015-01-01

    There are very few reports in the literature of Castleman's disease affecting the carotid artery and a single previous report of a case of Castleman's disease of the neck originally mistaken as a carotid body tumor. We describe a rare case of Castleman's disease, manifesting with classic radiographic hallmarks of a carotid body tumor. The postoperative pathologic examination identified the resected mass as Castleman's lymphadenopathy. The management of this particular case is discussed, and the findings are highlighted. We present a unique case of a tumor initially and incorrectly diagnosed as a carotid body tumor. However, after comprehensive treatment with endovascular and surgical modalities and subsequent pathologic examination, the diagnosis of this rare entity was made.

  1. Culture, Gender and Health Care Stigma: Practitioners’ Response to Facial Masking Experienced by People with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Ma, Hui-ing

    2011-01-01

    Facial masking in Parkinson’s disease is the reduction of automatic and controlled expressive movement of facial musculature, creating an appearance of apathy, social disengagement or compromised cognitive status. Research in western cultures demonstrates that practitioners form negatively biased impressions associated with patient masking. Socio-cultural norms about facial expressivity vary according to culture and gender, yet little research has studied the effect of these factors on practitioners’ responses toward patients who vary in facial expressivity. This study evaluated the effect of masking, culture and gender on practitioners’ impressions of patient psychological attributes. Practitioners (N=284) in the United States and Taiwan judged 12 Caucasian American and 12 Asian Taiwanese women and men patients in video clips from interviews. Half of each patient group had a moderate degree of facial masking and the other half had near-normal expressivity. Practitioners in both countries judged patients with higher masking to be more depressed and less sociable, less socially supportive, and less cognitively competent than patients with lower masking. Practitioners were more biased by masking when judging the sociability of the American patients, and American practitioners’ judgments of patient sociability were more negatively biased in response to masking than were those of Taiwanese practitioners. Practitioners were more biased by masking when judging the cognitive competence and social supportiveness of the Taiwanese patients, and Taiwanese practitioners’ judgments of patient cognitive competence were more negatively biased in response to masking than were those of American practitioners. The negative response to higher masking was stronger in practitioner judgments of women than men patients, particularly American patients. The findings suggest local cultural values as well as ethnic and gender stereotypes operate on practitioners’ use of facial

  2. Culture, gender and health care stigma: Practitioners' response to facial masking experienced by people with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Zebrowitz, Leslie A; Ma, Hui-ing

    2011-07-01

    Facial masking in Parkinson's disease is the reduction of automatic and controlled expressive movement of facial musculature, creating an appearance of apathy, social disengagement or compromised cognitive status. Research in western cultures demonstrates that practitioners form negatively biased impressions associated with patient masking. Socio-cultural norms about facial expressivity vary according to culture and gender, yet little research has studied the effect of these factors on practitioners' responses toward patients who vary in facial expressivity. This study evaluated the effect of masking, culture and gender on practitioners' impressions of patient psychological attributes. Practitioners (N = 284) in the United States and Taiwan judged 12 Caucasian American and 12 Asian Taiwanese women and men patients in video clips from interviews. Half of each patient group had a moderate degree of facial masking and the other half had near-normal expressivity. Practitioners in both countries judged patients with higher masking to be more depressed and less sociable, less socially supportive, and less cognitively competent than patients with lower masking. Practitioners were more biased by masking when judging the sociability of the American patients, and American practitioners' judgments of patient sociability were more negatively biased in response to masking than were those of Taiwanese practitioners. Practitioners were more biased by masking when judging the cognitive competence and social supportiveness of the Taiwanese patients, and Taiwanese practitioners' judgments of patient cognitive competence were more negatively biased in response to masking than were those of American practitioners. The negative response to higher masking was stronger in practitioner judgments of women than men patients, particularly American patients. The findings suggest local cultural values as well as ethnic and gender stereotypes operate on practitioners' use of facial

  3. Toxicity of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Intracranial Tumors in Patients With Collagen Vascular Diseases or Multiple Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell, Dot; Tatter, Stephen B.; Bourland, J. Daniel

    Purpose: To assess toxicity in patients with either a collagen vascular disease (CVD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with intracranial radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between January 2004 and April 2009, 6 patients with MS and 14 patients with a CVD were treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial tumors. Treated lesions included 15 total brain metastases in 7 patients, 11 benign brain tumors, 1 low grade glioma, and 1 cavernous malformation. Toxicities were graded by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute/Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. 'Rare toxicities' were characterized as those reported in the scientific literature at an incidencemore » of <5%. Results: Median follow-up time was 16 months. Median dose to the tumor margin was 13.0 Gy (range, 12-21 Gy). Median size of tumor was 5.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.14-7.8 cm{sup 3}). Of the 14 patients with CVD, none experienced a Grade 3 or 4 toxicity or a toxicity characterized as rare. Of the 6 patients with MS, 3 experienced rare toxicities, and two of these were Grade 3 toxicities. Rare complications included a patient experiencing both communicating hydrocephalus and facial nerve palsy, as well as 2 additional patients with motor cranial nerve palsy. High-grade toxicities included the patient with an acoustic neuroma requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for obstructive hydrocephalus, and 1 patient with a facial nerve schwannoma who experienced permanent facial nerve palsy. Interval between radiosurgery and high-grade toxicities ranged from 1 week to 4 months. Conclusions: Our series suggests that patients with MS who receive GKRS may be at increased risk of rare and high-grade treatment-related toxicity. Given the time course of toxicity, treatment-related edema or demyelination represent potential mechanisms.« less

  4. Facial feedback and autonomic responsiveness reflect impaired emotional processing in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Balconi, Michela; Pala, Francesca; Manenti, Rosa; Brambilla, Michela; Cobelli, Chiara; Rosini, Sandra; Benussi, Alberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara; Cotelli, Maria

    2016-08-11

    Emotional deficits are part of the non-motor features of Parkinson's disease but few attention has been paid to specific aspects such as subjective emotional experience and autonomic responses. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of emotional recognition in Parkinson's Disease (PD) using the following levels: explicit evaluation of emotions (Self-Assessment Manikin) and implicit reactivity (Skin Conductance Response; electromyographic measure of facial feedback of the zygomaticus and corrugator muscles). 20 PD Patients and 34 healthy controls were required to observe and evaluate affective pictures during physiological parameters recording. In PD, the appraisal process on both valence and arousal features of emotional cues were preserved, but we found significant impairment in autonomic responses. Specifically, in comparison to healthy controls, PD patients revealed lower Skin Conductance Response values to negative and high arousing emotional stimuli. In addition, the electromyographic measures showed defective responses exclusively limited to negative and high arousing emotional category: PD did not show increasing of corrugator activity in response to negative emotions as happened in heathy controls. PD subjects inadequately respond to the emotional categories which were considered more "salient": they had preserved appraisal process, but impaired automatic ability to distinguish between different emotional contexts.

  5. Tumors masquerading in patients with thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Griepentrog, Gregory J; Burkat, Cat N; Kikkawa, Don O; Lucarelli, Mark J

    2013-08-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most common cause of proptosis in adults. The external manifestations of TED are characteristic and the diagnosis is typically made without imaging. Although there are multiple descriptions of primary and secondary orbital tumors initially mistaken for TED in the literature, there are limited reports detailing the findings of patients with long-standing TED whom developed an orbital tumor at a later date. Herein, we present a 6-year retrospective multi-center report of three patients with long-standing TED who developed an initially unsuspected orbital or cavernous sinus tumor.

  6. Aggressive fibromatosis (fibrosarcoma) of the facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Pulec, J L

    1993-07-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis of the facial nerve is a very rare tumor. Three cases have been previously reported. The tumor is locally recurrent and often has a fatal outcome. This report is of a ten-year-old boy whose tumor originally developed in the parotid area with subsequent spread to the base of the skull, the neck and the cerebellopontine angle. Treatment was by wide surgical excision, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Despite treatment, the patient died. The clinical features of this case will be described. Only wide surgical excision early in the course of the disease may offer a chance for cure.

  7. Regression of devil facial tumour disease following immunotherapy in immunised Tasmanian devils

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Cesar; Pye, Ruth J.; Kreiss, Alexandre; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Brown, Gabriella K.; Darby, Jocelyn; Malley, Roslyn C.; Siddle, Hannah V. T.; Skjødt, Karsten; Kaufman, Jim; Silva, Anabel; Baz Morelli, Adriana; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Corcoran, Lynn M.; Murphy, James M.; Pearse, Martin J.; Belov, Katherine; Lyons, A. Bruce; Woods, Gregory M.

    2017-01-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer devastating the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) population. The cancer cell is the ‘infectious’ agent transmitted as an allograft by biting. Animals usually die within a few months with no evidence of antibody or immune cell responses against the DFTD allograft. This lack of anti-tumour immunity is attributed to an absence of cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecule expression. While the endangerment of the devil population precludes experimentation on large experimental groups, those examined in our study indicated that immunisation and immunotherapy with DFTD cells expressing surface MHC-I corresponded with effective anti-tumour responses. Tumour engraftment did not occur in one of the five immunised Tasmanian devils, and regression followed therapy of experimentally induced DFTD tumours in three Tasmanian devils. Regression correlated with immune cell infiltration and antibody responses against DFTD cells. These data support the concept that immunisation of devils with DFTD cancer cells can successfully induce humoral responses against DFTD and trigger immune-mediated regression of established tumours. Our findings support the feasibility of a protective DFTD vaccine and ultimately the preservation of the species. PMID:28276463

  8. Canine mammary tumors as a model for human disease.

    PubMed

    Abdelmegeed, Somaia M; Mohammed, Sulma

    2018-06-01

    Animal models for examining human breast cancer (HBC) carcinogenesis have been extensively studied and proposed. With the recent advent of immunotherapy, significant attention has been focused on the dog as a model for human cancer. Dogs develop mammary tumors and other cancer types spontaneously with an intact immune system, which exhibit a number of clinical and molecular similarities to HBC. In addition to the spontaneous tumor presentation, the clinical similarities between human and canine mammary tumors (CMT) include the age at onset, hormonal etiology and course of the diseases. Furthermore, factors that affect the disease outcome, including tumor size, stage and lymph node invasion, are similar in HBC and CMT. Similarly, the molecular characteristics of steroid receptor, epidermal growth factor, proliferation marker, metalloproteinase and cyclooxygenase expression, and the mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in CMT, mimic HBC. Furthermore, ductal carcinomas in situ in human and canine mammary glands are particularly similar in their pathological, molecular and visual characteristics. These CMT characteristics and their similarities to HBC indicate that the dog could be an excellent model for the study of human disease. These similarities are discussed in detail in the present review, and are compared with the in vitro and other in vivo animal models available.

  9. Lyme disease presenting with facial palsy and myocarditis mimicking myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Julieta; Khalighi, Koroush; Elmi, Farhad; Krishnamurthy, Mahesh; Talebian, Amirsina; Toor, Rubinder S

    2017-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented with a sudden episode of typical chest pain, radiating to her neck. The patient denied premature coronary artery disease in the family. Initial EKG showed normal sinus rhythm with a 1 mm ST-elevation involving lead II and lead aVF and a 1 mm ST-depression in lead V1 with associated T-wave inversion. Initial Troponin I (normal <0.4 ng/mL) and CK-MB (normal <7.7 ng/mL) were elevated at 7.82 ng/mL and 55.2 ng/mL, respectively. Six hours later, Troponin I increased to 13.44 ng/mL and CK-MB to 75.7 ng/mL. The patient underwent cardiac catheterization which did not show any significant obstructive coronary artery disease. Two days later the patient developed right-sided facial palsy. Diagnosis of Lyme disease was confirmed by ELISA with positive IgM and IgG antibodies. Treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone and oral steroids was started. Eventually resolution of symptoms and, normalization of cardiac markers and EKG changes, were achieved. This is a rare case of Lyme myocarditis associated with markedly elevated Troponin I, normal left ventricle function, and an absence of conduction abnormalities. To the best of our knowledge, Lyme myocarditis mimicking acute coronary syndrome with such high levels of Troponin I and neurologic compromise has not been previously described. Lyme myocarditis may be a challenging diagnosis in endemic areas especially in patients with coronary artery disease risk factors, presenting with typical chest pain, EKG changes and positive cardiac biomarkers. Therefore, it should be considered a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with clinical symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome. Abbreviations AV: Atrioventricular; CK-MB: Creatinine Kinase-MB; EKG: Electrocardiogram; ELISA: Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; IgG: Immunoglobulin G; IgM: Immunoglobulin M.

  10. [Facial tics and spasms].

    PubMed

    Potgieser, Adriaan R E; van Dijk, J Marc C; Elting, Jan Willem J; de Koning-Tijssen, Marina A J

    2014-01-01

    Facial tics and spasms are socially incapacitating, but effective treatment is often available. The clinical picture is sufficient for distinguishing between the different diseases that cause this affliction.We describe three cases of patients with facial tics or spasms: one case of tics, which are familiar to many physicians; one case of blepharospasms; and one case of hemifacial spasms. We discuss the differential diagnosis and the treatment possibilities for facial tics and spasms. Early diagnosis and treatment is important, because of the associated social incapacitation. Botulin toxin should be considered as a treatment option for facial tics and a curative neurosurgical intervention should be considered for hemifacial spasms.

  11. Lyme disease with facial nerve palsy: rapid diagnosis using a nested polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Takahashi, H; Kishiyama, K; Sato, Y; Nakao, M; Miyamoto, K; Iizuka, H

    1998-02-01

    A 64-year-old woman with Lyme disease and manifesting facial nerve palsy had been bitten by a tick on the left frontal scalp 4 weeks previously. Erythema migrans appeared on the left forehead, accompanied by left facial paralysis. Nested polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (nested PCR-RFLP) was performed on DNA extracted from a skin biopsy of the erythema on the left forehead. Borrelia flagellin gene DNA was detected and its RFLP pattern indicated that the organism was B. garinii, Five weeks later, B. garinii was isolated by conventional culture from the erythematous skin lesion, but not from the cerebrospinal fluid. After treatment with ceftriaxone intravenously for 10 days and oral administration of minocycline for 7 days, both the erythema and facial nerve palsy improved significantly. Nested PCR and culture taken after the lesion subsided, using skin samples obtained from a site adjacent to the original biopsy, were both negative. We suggest that nested PCR-RFLP analysis might be useful for the rapid diagnosis of Lyme disease and for evaluating therapy.

  12. The Facially Disfigured Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moncada, Georgia A.

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews diagnosis and treatments for facially disfigured children including craniofacial reconstruction and microsurgical techniques. Noted are associated disease processes that affect the social and intellectual outcomes of the afflicted child. (Author/DB)

  13. Novel ZBTB24 Mutation Associated with Immunodeficiency, Centromere Instability, and Facial Anomalies Type-2 Syndrome Identified in a Patient with Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Máire A; Dawany, Noor; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Devoto, Marcella; Kelsen, Judith R

    2017-12-01

    Very early onset inflammatory bowel disease, diagnosed in children ≤5 years old, can be the initial presentation of some primary immunodeficiencies. In this study, we describe a 17-month-old boy with recurrent infections, growth failure, facial anomalies, and inflammatory bowel disease. Immune evaluation, whole-exome sequencing, karyotyping, and methylation array were performed to evaluate the child's constellation of symptoms and examination findings. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the child was homozygous for a novel variant in ZBTB24, the gene associated with immunodeficiency, centromere instability, and facial anomalies type-2 syndrome. This describes the first case of inflammatory bowel disease associated with immunodeficiency, centromere instability, and facial anomalies type-2 syndrome in a child with a novel disease-causing mutation in ZBTB24 found on whole-exome sequencing.

  14. [Petrous plasmacytoma revealed by a painful peripheral facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, J; Cret, C; Karlin, L; Ameri, A

    2011-01-01

    The classical hypothesis of Bell's palsy, tempting in cases of peripheral facial palsy of rapid onset, must nevertheless be evoked with caution particularly if an intense pain is present, which should lead to search for a tumor of the skull base, especially the petrous bone. A 43-year-old man presented a peripheral facial palsy of rapidly progressive onset. A petrous bone tumor was diagnosed on the CT scan, which revealed an aspect of a glomic tumor or a metastatic lesion. The final histological diagnosis was plasmacytoma. This type of tumor has been rarely reported in this location. The radiological features are not specific at all, underlying the importance of searching for some associated signs such as a monoclonal protein and performing a histological examination when the firm diagnosis of a systemic disease like multiple myeloma has not been possible. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypereosinophilia and acute bilateral facial palsy: an unusual presentation of a common disease.

    PubMed

    Webb, Alastair John Stewart; Conlon, Chris; Briley, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with an acute, pruritic, erythematous rash associated with marked hypereosinophilia (2.34×10(9)/l (0.04-0.40)). There was eosinophilic infiltration on hepatic, bone marrow and lymph node biopsies, with multiple lung nodules and mild splenomegaly. However, extensive investigation excluded parasitic or bacterial causes, specific allergens or the Fip1L1 mutation seen in myeloproliferative hypereosinophilia. Six months into the illness, he developed an acute, left, complete lower motor neurone facial palsy over hours, and an acute right lower motor neurone facial palsy 2 weeks later, without recovery. Over the subsequent 3 months, he developed complex partial seizures, a transient 72-h non-epileptic encephalopathy and episodic vertigo with ataxia. Further investigation showed bilateral enhancement of the VII nerves and labyrinthis on gadolinium-enhanced MR brain scan, cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis and neurophysiological evidence of polyradicolopathy. His eosinophil count fell with corticosteroids, hydroxycarbamide, imatinib and ultimately mepolezumab, but without symptomatic improvement. Repeat lymph node biopsy showed Kaposi's sarcoma, leading to a diagnosis of HIV-1 infection with a modestly reduced CD4 count of 413×10(6)/l (430-1690). Hypereosinophila and eosinophilic folliculitis are recognised features of advanced HIV infection, and transient bilateral facial palsy occasionally occurs at the time of seroconversion. This is the first report of a chronic bilateral facial palsy likely due to primary HIV infection, not occurring during seroconversion and in association with hypereosinophilia. This case emphasises the protean manifestations of HIV infection and the need for routine testing in atypical clinical presentations.

  16. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Management of metastatic disease and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Vadakara, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Prior to the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors like imatinib, there were few treatment options available to patients with metastatic GIST. Surgery was the mainstay of treatment and the prognosis for patients with metastatic GIST was dismal. With the advent of imatinib the prognosis of metastatic GIST has improved dramatically. Second line tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as sunitinib and regorafenib have further bettered prognosis, however there is still a need for therapies for patients with disease refractory to TKI therapy. Newer agents such as the Hsp90 inhibitors, PI3K-AKT-mTOR inhibitors and IGF1-R inhibitors are currently under investigation and may have promise. This review discusses the current standard of care in terms of pharmacotherapy, both standard and investigational (summarized in Box 1), in the management of metastatic GIST. PMID:24093167

  17. Bilateral Facial Paralysis: A 13-Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Robert A; Jowett, Nathan; Banks, Caroline A; Knox, Christopher J; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2016-10-01

    Bilateral facial palsy is a rare clinical entity caused by myriad disparate conditions requiring different treatment paradigms. Lyme disease, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and leukemia are several examples. In this article, the authors describe the cause, the initial diagnostic approach, and the management of long-term sequelae of bilateral paralysis that has evolved in the authors' center over the past 13 years. A chart review was performed to identify all patients diagnosed with bilateral paralysis at the authors' center between January of 2002 and January of 2015. Demographics, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, initial medical treatment, interventions for facial reanimation, and outcomes were reviewed. Of the 2471 patients seen at the authors' center, 68 patients (3 percent) with bilateral facial paralysis were identified. Ten patients (15 percent) presented with bilateral facial paralysis caused by Lyme disease, nine (13 percent) with Möbius syndrome, nine (13 percent) with neurofibromatosis type 2, five (7 percent) with bilateral facial palsy caused by brain tumor, four (6 percent) with Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, three (4 percent) with bilateral temporal bone fractures, two (3 percent) with Guillain-Barré syndrome, one (2 percent) with central nervous system lymphoma, one (2 percent) with human immunodeficiency virus infection, and 24 (35 percent) with presumed Bell palsy. Treatment included pharmacologic therapy, physical therapy, chemodenervation, and surgical interventions. Bilateral facial palsy is a rare medical condition, and treatment often requires a multidisciplinary approach. The authors outline diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms of a tertiary care center to provide clinicians with a systematic approach to managing these complicated patients.

  18. Meta-Analysis of Facial Emotion Recognition in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia: Comparison With Alzheimer Disease and Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Bora, Emre; Velakoulis, Dennis; Walterfang, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Behavioral disturbances and lack of empathy are distinctive clinical features of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) in comparison to Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this meta-analytic review was to compare facial emotion recognition performances of bvFTD with healthy controls and AD. The current meta-analysis included a total of 19 studies and involved comparisons of 288 individuals with bvFTD and 329 healthy controls and 162 bvFTD and 147 patients with AD. Facial emotion recognition was significantly impaired in bvFTD in comparison to the healthy controls (d = 1.81) and AD (d = 1.23). In bvFTD, recognition of negative emotions, especially anger (d = 1.48) and disgust (d = 1.41), were severely impaired. Emotion recognition was significantly impaired in bvFTD in comparison to AD in all emotions other than happiness. Impairment of emotion recognition is a relatively specific feature of bvFTD. Routine assessment of social-cognitive abilities including emotion recognition can be helpful in better differentiating between cortical dementias such as bvFTD and AD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. [Facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  20. Overview of pediatric peripheral facial nerve paralysis: analysis of 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Özkale, Yasemin; Erol, İlknur; Saygı, Semra; Yılmaz, İsmail

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis in children might be an alarming sign of serious disease such as malignancy, systemic disease, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, middle ear surgery, and hypertension. The cases of 40 consecutive children and adolescents who were diagnosed with peripheral facial nerve paralysis at Baskent University Adana Hospital Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology Unit between January 2010 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. We determined that the most common cause was Bell palsy, followed by infection, tumor lesion, and suspected chemotherapy toxicity. We noted that younger patients had generally poorer outcome than older patients regardless of disease etiology. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis has been reported in many countries in America and Europe; however, knowledge about its clinical features, microbiology, neuroimaging, and treatment in Turkey is incomplete. The present study demonstrated that Bell palsy and infection were the most common etiologies of peripheral facial nerve paralysis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Facial neuroma masquerading as acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Sayegh, Eli T; Kaur, Gurvinder; Ivan, Michael E; Bloch, Orin; Cheung, Steven W; Parsa, Andrew T

    2014-10-01

    Facial nerve neuromas are rare benign tumors that may be initially misdiagnosed as acoustic neuromas when situated near the auditory apparatus. We describe a patient with a large cystic tumor with associated trigeminal, facial, audiovestibular, and brainstem dysfunction, which was suspicious for acoustic neuroma on preoperative neuroimaging. Intraoperative investigation revealed a facial nerve neuroma located in the cerebellopontine angle and internal acoustic canal. Gross total resection of the tumor via retrosigmoid craniotomy was curative. Transection of the facial nerve necessitated facial reanimation 4 months later via hypoglossal-facial cross-anastomosis. Clinicians should recognize the natural history, diagnostic approach, and management of this unusual and mimetic lesion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  3. Cleft Palate, Retrognathia and Congenital Heart Disease in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome: A Phenotype Correlation Study

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marcia A.; Miletta, Nathanial; Roe, Cheryl; Wang, Dongliang; Morrow, Bernice E.; Kates, Wendy R.; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is caused by a microdeletion of approximately 40 genes from one copy of chromosome 22. Expression of the syndrome is a variable combination of over 190 phenotypic characteristics. As of yet, little is known about how these phenotypes correlate with one another or whether there are predictable patterns of expression. Two of the most common phenotypic categories, congenital heart disease and cleft palate, have been proposed to have a common genetic relationship to the deleted T-box 1 gene (TBX1). The purpose of this study is to determine if congenital heart disease and cleft palate are correlated in a large cohort of human subjects with VCFS. Methods This study is a retrospective chart review including 316 Caucasian non-Hispanic subjects with FISH or CGH microarray confirmed chromosome 22q11.2 deletions. All subjects were evaluated by the interdisciplinary team at the Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome International Center at Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY. Each combination of congenital heart disease, cleft palates, and retrognathia was analyzed by chi square or Fisher exact test. Results For all categories of congenital heart disease and cleft palate or retrognathia no significant associations were found, with the exception of submucous cleft palate and retrognathia (nominal p=0.0325) and occult submucous cleft palate and retrognathia (nominal p=0.000013). Conclusions Congenital heart disease and cleft palate do not appear to be correlated in human subjects with VCFS despite earlier suggestions from animal models. Possible explanations include modification of the effect of TBX1 by genes outside of the 22q11.2 region that may further influence the formation of the palate or heart, or the presence of epigenetic factors that may effect genes within the deleted region, modifying genes elsewhere, or polymorphisms on the normal copy of chromosome 22. Lastly, it is possible that TBX1 plays a role in palate formation in some

  4. Cleft palate, retrognathia and congenital heart disease in velo-cardio-facial syndrome: a phenotype correlation study.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Marcia A; Miletta, Nathanial; Roe, Cheryl; Wang, Dongliang; Morrow, Bernice E; Kates, Wendy R; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is caused by a microdeletion of approximately 40 genes from one copy of chromosome 22. Expression of the syndrome is a variable combination of over 190 phenotypic characteristics. As of yet, little is known about how these phenotypes correlate with one another or whether there are predictable patterns of expression. Two of the most common phenotypic categories, congenital heart disease and cleft palate, have been proposed to have a common genetic relationship to the deleted T-box 1 gene (TBX1). The purpose of this study is to determine if congenital heart disease and cleft palate are correlated in a large cohort of human subjects with VCFS. This study is a retrospective chart review including 316 Caucasian non-Hispanic subjects with FISH or CGH microarray confirmed chromosome 22q11.2 deletions. All subjects were evaluated by the interdisciplinary team at the Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome International Center at Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY. Each combination of congenital heart disease, cleft palates, and retrognathia was analyzed by Chi square or Fisher exact test. For all categories of congenital heart disease and cleft palate or retrognathia no significant associations were found, with the exception of submucous cleft palate and retrognathia (nominal p=0.0325) and occult submucous cleft palate and retrognathia (nominal p=0.000013). Congenital heart disease and cleft palate do not appear to be correlated in human subjects with VCFS despite earlier suggestions from animal models. Possible explanations include modification of the effect of TBX1 by genes outside of the 22q11.2 region that may further influence the formation of the palate or heart, or the presence of epigenetic factors that may effect genes within the deleted region, modifying genes elsewhere, or polymorphisms on the normal copy of chromosome 22. Lastly, it is possible that TBX1 plays a role in palate formation in some species, but not in humans. In VCFS

  5. [Anatomicopathological relation between facial nerve and large vestibular Schwannoma].

    PubMed

    Jiang, T; Yu, C; Guo, E; Guan, S; Yan, C

    2001-05-10

    To study the anatomicopathological relation between facial nerve and large vestibular schwannoma. Operation by suboccipital retrosigmoid sinus approach was performed on 40 cases with large vestibular schwannoma, During the operation, the anatomicopathological relation between the facial nerve and the vestibular schwannoma was observed directly. The facial nerve was found to be located ventrally (deep under the tumor), dorsally (over the tumor), at the upper pole of the tumor (near the tentorium cerebelli), at the lower pole of the tumor (near the rear group cranial nerves), or aberrant (unable to be identified because of infiltration of tumor). In 31 cases, mainly with parenchymatous tumor, the facial nerve was flat in shape. In 9 cases, mainly with cystic tumor, the facial nerve was bandlike. The facial nerve varies greatly in neuroanatomy among patients with large vestibular schwannoma. Strengthening of operative monitoring can increase the safety of operation.

  6. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Aboshanif; Omi, Eigo; Honda, Kohei; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients). All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB) grade VI, either caused by trauma or after resection of a tumor. All patients were submitted to a primary nerve reconstruction except 7 patients, where late reconstruction was performed two weeks to four months after the initial surgery. The follow-up period was at least two years. For facial nerve interpositional graft technique, we achieved facial function HB grade III in eight patients and grade IV in three patients. Synkinesis was found in eight patients, and facial contracture with synkinesis was found in two patients. In regards to hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer using different modifications, we achieved facial function HB grade III in nine patients and grade IV in two patients. Facial contracture, synkinesis and tongue atrophy were found in three patients, and synkinesis was found in five patients. However, those who had primary direct facial-hypoglossal end-to-side anastomosis showed the best result without any neurological deficit. Among various reanimation techniques, when indicated, direct end-to-side facial-hypoglossal anastomosis through epineural suturing is the most effective technique with excellent outcomes for facial reanimation and preservation of tongue movement, particularly when performed as a primary technique. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Facial anatomy.

    PubMed

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Facial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Gopalkrishnan, Kulandaswamy

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the incidence of facial fractures along with age, gender predilection, etiology, commonest site, associated dental injuries, and any complications of patients operated in Craniofacial Unit of SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of OMFS, SDM College of Dental Sciences, Dharwad from January 2003 to December 2013. Data were recorded for the cause of injury, age and gender distribution, frequency and type of injury, localization and frequency of soft tissue injuries, dentoalveolar trauma, facial bone fractures, complications, concomitant injuries, and different treatment protocols.All the data were analyzed using statistical analysis that is chi-squared test. A total of 1146 patients reported at our unit with facial fractures during these 10 years. Males accounted for a higher frequency of facial fractures (88.8%). Mandible was the commonest bone to be fractured among all the facial bones (71.2%). Maxillary central incisors were the most common teeth to be injured (33.8%) and avulsion was the most common type of injury (44.6%). Commonest postoperative complication was plate infection (11%) leading to plate removal. Other injuries associated with facial fractures were rib fractures, head injuries, upper and lower limb fractures, etc., among these rib fractures were seen most frequently (21.6%). This study was performed to compare the different etiologic factors leading to diverse facial fracture patterns. By statistical analysis of this record the authors come to know about the relationship of facial fractures with gender, age, associated comorbidities, etc.

  9. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to a Pleomorphic Adenoma with the Imaging Characteristics of a Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Marc-Elie; Bell, Diana; Sturgis, Erich M.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Gidley, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Facial nerve paralysis in a patient with a salivary gland mass usually denotes malignancy. However, facial paralysis can also be caused by benign salivary gland tumors. Methods We present a case of facial nerve paralysis due to a benign salivary gland tumor that had the imaging characteristics of an intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Results The patient presented to our clinic 4 years after the onset of facial nerve paralysis initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. Computed tomography demonstrated filling and erosion of the stylomastoid foramen with a mass on the facial nerve. Postoperative histopathology showed the presence of a pleomorphic adenoma. Facial paralysis was thought to be caused by extrinsic nerve compression. Conclusions This case illustrates the difficulty of accurate preoperative diagnosis of a parotid gland mass and reinforces the concept that facial nerve paralysis in the context of salivary gland tumors may not always indicate malignancy. PMID:25083397

  10. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to a Pleomorphic Adenoma with the Imaging Characteristics of a Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Nader, Marc-Elie; Bell, Diana; Sturgis, Erich M; Ginsberg, Lawrence E; Gidley, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    Background Facial nerve paralysis in a patient with a salivary gland mass usually denotes malignancy. However, facial paralysis can also be caused by benign salivary gland tumors. Methods We present a case of facial nerve paralysis due to a benign salivary gland tumor that had the imaging characteristics of an intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Results The patient presented to our clinic 4 years after the onset of facial nerve paralysis initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. Computed tomography demonstrated filling and erosion of the stylomastoid foramen with a mass on the facial nerve. Postoperative histopathology showed the presence of a pleomorphic adenoma. Facial paralysis was thought to be caused by extrinsic nerve compression. Conclusions This case illustrates the difficulty of accurate preoperative diagnosis of a parotid gland mass and reinforces the concept that facial nerve paralysis in the context of salivary gland tumors may not always indicate malignancy.

  11. Facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in patients with classic infantile Pompe disease treated with enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, C M; van Capelle, C I; Ebbink, B J; Moor-van Nugteren, I; van den Hout, J M P; Hakkesteegt, M M; van Doorn, P A; de Coo, I F M; Reuser, A J J; de Gier, H H W; van der Ploeg, A T

    2012-05-01

    Classic infantile Pompe disease is an inherited generalized glycogen storage disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase. If left untreated, patients die before one year of age. Although enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) has significantly prolonged lifespan, it has also revealed new aspects of the disease. For up to 11 years, we investigated the frequency and consequences of facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia in long-term survivors. Sequential photographs were used to determine the timing and severity of facial-muscle weakness. Using standardized articulation tests and fibreoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, we investigated speech and swallowing function in a subset of patients. This study included 11 patients with classic infantile Pompe disease. Median age at the start of ERT was 2.4 months (range 0.1-8.3 months), and median age at the end of the study was 4.3 years (range 7.7 months -12.2 years). All patients developed facial-muscle weakness before the age of 15 months. Speech was studied in four patients. Articulation was disordered, with hypernasal resonance and reduced speech intelligibility in all four. Swallowing function was studied in six patients, the most important findings being ineffective swallowing with residues of food (5/6), penetration or aspiration (3/6), and reduced pharyngeal and/or laryngeal sensibility (2/6). We conclude that facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in long-term survivors receiving ERT for classic infantile Pompe disease. To improve speech and reduce the risk for aspiration, early treatment by a speech therapist and regular swallowing assessments are recommended.

  12. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the mastoid facial nerve canal mimicking a facial nerve schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew L; Bharatha, Aditya; Aviv, Richard I; Nedzelski, Julian; Chen, Joseph; Bilbao, Juan M; Wong, John; Saad, Reda; Symons, Sean P

    2009-07-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma of the skull base is a rare entity. Involvement of the temporal bone is particularly rare. We present an unusual case of progressive facial nerve paralysis with imaging and clinical findings most suggestive of a facial nerve schwannoma. The lesion was tubular in appearance, expanded the mastoid facial nerve canal, protruded out of the stylomastoid foramen, and enhanced homogeneously. The only unusual imaging feature was minor calcification within the tumor. Surgery revealed an irregular, cystic lesion. Pathology diagnosed a chondromyxoid fibroma involving the mastoid portion of the facial nerve canal, destroying the facial nerve.

  13. Facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Little, Anthony C

    2014-11-01

    Facial attractiveness has important social consequences. Despite a widespread belief that beauty cannot be defined, in fact, there is considerable agreement across individuals and cultures on what is found attractive. By considering that attraction and mate choice are critical components of evolutionary selection, we can better understand the importance of beauty. There are many traits that are linked to facial attractiveness in humans and each may in some way impart benefits to individuals who act on their preferences. If a trait is reliably associated with some benefit to the perceiver, then we would expect individuals in a population to find that trait attractive. Such an approach has highlighted face traits such as age, health, symmetry, and averageness, which are proposed to be associated with benefits and so associated with facial attractiveness. This view may postulate that some traits will be universally attractive; however, this does not preclude variation. Indeed, it would be surprising if there existed a template of a perfect face that was not affected by experience, environment, context, or the specific needs of an individual. Research on facial attractiveness has documented how various face traits are associated with attractiveness and various factors that impact on an individual's judgments of facial attractiveness. Overall, facial attractiveness is complex, both in the number of traits that determine attraction and in the large number of factors that can alter attraction to particular faces. A fuller understanding of facial beauty will come with an understanding of how these various factors interact with each other. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:621-634. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1316 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Acneiform facial eruptions

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Melody J.; Taher, Muba; Lauzon, Gilles J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To summarize clinical recognition and current management strategies for four types of acneiform facial eruptions common in young women: acne vulgaris, rosacea, folliculitis, and perioral dermatitis. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE Many randomized controlled trials (level I evidence) have studied treatments for acne vulgaris over the years. Treatment recommendations for rosacea, folliculitis, and perioral dermatitis are based predominantly on comparison and open-label studies (level II evidence) as well as expert opinion and consensus statements (level III evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Young women with acneiform facial eruptions often present in primary care. Differentiating between morphologically similar conditions is often difficult. Accurate diagnosis is important because treatment approaches are different for each disease. CONCLUSION Careful visual assessment with an appreciation for subtle morphologic differences and associated clinical factors will help with diagnosis of these common acneiform facial eruptions and lead to appropriate management. PMID:15856972

  15. Facial Transplantation Surgery Introduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Severely disfiguring facial injuries can have a devastating impact on the patient's quality of life. During the past decade, vascularized facial allotransplantation has progressed from an experimental possibility to a clinical reality in the fields of disease, trauma, and congenital malformations. This technique may now be considered a viable option for repairing complex craniofacial defects for which the results of autologous reconstruction remain suboptimal. Vascularized facial allotransplantation permits optimal anatomical reconstruction and provides desired functional, esthetic, and psychosocial benefits that are far superior to those achieved with conventional methods. Along with dramatic improvements in their functional statuses, patients regain the ability to make facial expressions such as smiling and to perform various functions such as smelling, eating, drinking, and speaking. The ideas in the 1997 movie "Face/Off" have now been realized in the clinical field. The objective of this article is to introduce this new surgical field, provide a basis for examining the status of the field of face transplantation, and stimulate and enhance facial transplantation studies in Korea. PMID:26028914

  16. Facial transplantation surgery introduction.

    PubMed

    Eun, Seok-Chan

    2015-06-01

    Severely disfiguring facial injuries can have a devastating impact on the patient's quality of life. During the past decade, vascularized facial allotransplantation has progressed from an experimental possibility to a clinical reality in the fields of disease, trauma, and congenital malformations. This technique may now be considered a viable option for repairing complex craniofacial defects for which the results of autologous reconstruction remain suboptimal. Vascularized facial allotransplantation permits optimal anatomical reconstruction and provides desired functional, esthetic, and psychosocial benefits that are far superior to those achieved with conventional methods. Along with dramatic improvements in their functional statuses, patients regain the ability to make facial expressions such as smiling and to perform various functions such as smelling, eating, drinking, and speaking. The ideas in the 1997 movie "Face/Off" have now been realized in the clinical field. The objective of this article is to introduce this new surgical field, provide a basis for examining the status of the field of face transplantation, and stimulate and enhance facial transplantation studies in Korea.

  17. Facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Peeters, N; Lemkens, P; Leach, R; Gemels B; Schepers, S; Lemmens, W

    Facial trauma. Patients with facial trauma must be assessed in a systematic way so as to avoid missing any injury. Severe and disfiguring facial injuries can be distracting. However, clinicians must first focus on the basics of trauma care, following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) system of care. Maxillofacial trauma occurs in a significant number of severely injured patients. Life- and sight-threatening injuries must be excluded during the primary and secondary surveys. Special attention must be paid to sight-threatening injuries in stabilized patients through early referral to an appropriate specialist or the early initiation of emergency care treatment. The gold standard for the radiographic evaluation of facial injuries is computed tomography (CT) imaging. Nasal fractures are the most frequent isolated facial fractures. Isolated nasal fractures are principally diagnosed through history and clinical examination. Closed reduction is the most frequently performed treatment for isolated nasal fractures, with a fractured nasal septum as a predictor of failure. Ear, nose and throat surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons and ophthalmologists must all develop an adequate treatment plan for patients with complex maxillofacial trauma.

  18. Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 in preterm infants with chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, Miho; Mori, Masaaki; Nishimaki, Shigeru; An, Hiromi; Naruto, Takuya; Sugai, Toshiyuki; Shima, Yoshio; Seki, Kazuo; Yokota, Shumpei

    2010-04-01

    It is clear that inflammation plays an important role in developing chronic lung disease in preterm infants. The purpose of the present study is to investigate changes of serum soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 levels over time in infants with chronic lung disease. The serum levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 were measured after delivery, and at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of age in 10 infants with chronic lung disease and in 18 infants without chronic lung disease. The serum level of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 was significantly higher in infants with chronic lung disease than in infants without chronic lung disease after delivery. The differences between these two groups remained up to 28 days of age. Prenatal inflammation with persistence into postnatal inflammation may be involved in the onset of chronic lung disease.

  19. Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomics and Immunogenetics Use of genomics to identify QTL, genes, and proteins associated with resistance to Marek’s disease. Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the p...

  20. Facial manifestations of Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission: Two atypical presentations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Benjamin Y; Kojima, Lisa; Huang, Mary S; Friedmann, Alison M; Ferry, Judith A; Weinstein, Howard J

    2016-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) rarely occurs in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), who have not received hematopoietic transplantation. We describe EBV-LPD manifesting as facial lesions in two children with ALL in remission. One patient was a 16-year-old male with T-cell ALL with an EBV-positive angiocentric polymorphous lip lesion presenting as right-sided facial swelling. The other patient was a 12-year-old male with B-cell ALL with an EBV-positive polymorphous lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate presenting as bilateral dacryoadenitis. Neither patient had known primary immunodeficiencies. Both cases improved with immunosuppressant de-escalation. These cases suggest that immunosuppression induced by maintenance chemotherapy is sufficient to promote EBV-LPD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Apathy and impaired emotional facial recognition networks overlap in Parkinson's disease: a PET study with conjunction analyses.

    PubMed

    Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Dondaine, Thibault; Drapier, Sophie; Péron, Julie; Lozachmeur, Clément; Sauleau, Paul; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Travers, David; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc; Drapier, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    Apathy is a disabling non-motor symptom that is frequently observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). Its description and physiopathology suggest that it is partially mediated by emotional impairment, but this research issue has never been addressed at a clinical and metabolic level. We therefore conducted a metabolic study using (18)fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG PET) in 36 PD patients without depression and dementia. Apathy was assessed on the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES), and emotional facial recognition (EFR) performances (ie, percentage of correct responses) were calculated for each patient. Confounding factors such as age, antiparkinsonian and antidepressant medication, global cognitive functions and depressive symptoms were controlled for. We found a significant negative correlation between AES scores and performances on the EFR task. The apathy network was characterised by increased metabolism within the left posterior cingulate (PC) cortex (Brodmann area (BA) 31). The impaired EFR network was characterised by decreased metabolism within the bilateral PC gyrus (BA 31), right superior frontal gyrus (BAs 10, 9 and 6) and left superior frontal gyrus (BA 10 and 11). By applying conjunction analyses to both networks, we identified the right premotor cortex (BA 6), right orbitofrontal cortex (BA 10), left middle frontal gyrus (BA 8) and left posterior cingulate gyrus (BA 31) as the structures supporting the association between apathy and impaired EFR. These results confirm that apathy in PD is partially mediated by impaired EFR, opening up new prospects for alleviating apathy in PD, such as emotional rehabilitation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomics and Immunogenetics Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the poultry industry. The fear of MD is further enhanced by unpredictable vaccine breaks that result in ...

  3. Engineering 3D Models of Tumors and Bone to Understand Tumor-Induced Bone Disease and Improve Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Vanderburgh, Joseph P.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of Review Bone is a structurally unique microenvironment that presents many challenges for the development of 3D models for studying bone physiology and diseases, including cancer. As researchers continue to investigate the interactions within the bone microenvironment, the development of 3D models of bone has become critical. Recent Findings 3D models have been developed that replicate some properties of bone, but have not fully reproduced the complex structural and cellular composition of the bone microenvironment. This review will discuss 3D models including polyurethane, silk, and collagen scaffolds that have been developed to study tumor-induced bone disease. In addition, we discuss 3D printing techniques used to better replicate the structure of bone. Summary 3D models that better replicate the bone microenvironment will help researchers better understand the dynamic interactions between tumors and the bone microenvironment, ultimately leading to better models for testing therapeutics and predicting patient outcomes. PMID:28646444

  4. Engineering 3D Models of Tumors and Bone to Understand Tumor-Induced Bone Disease and Improve Treatments.

    PubMed

    Kwakwa, Kristin A; Vanderburgh, Joseph P; Guelcher, Scott A; Sterling, Julie A

    2017-08-01

    Bone is a structurally unique microenvironment that presents many challenges for the development of 3D models for studying bone physiology and diseases, including cancer. As researchers continue to investigate the interactions within the bone microenvironment, the development of 3D models of bone has become critical. 3D models have been developed that replicate some properties of bone, but have not fully reproduced the complex structural and cellular composition of the bone microenvironment. This review will discuss 3D models including polyurethane, silk, and collagen scaffolds that have been developed to study tumor-induced bone disease. In addition, we discuss 3D printing techniques used to better replicate the structure of bone. 3D models that better replicate the bone microenvironment will help researchers better understand the dynamic interactions between tumors and the bone microenvironment, ultimately leading to better models for testing therapeutics and predicting patient outcomes.

  5. Facial paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a physical, speech, or occupational therapist. If facial paralysis from Bell palsy lasts for more than 6 to 12 months, plastic surgery may be recommended to help the eye close and improve the appearance of the face. Alternative Names Paralysis of the face Images Ptosis, drooping of the ...

  6. Highly personalized detection of minimal Ewing sarcoma disease burden from plasma tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masanori; Chu, David; Meyer, Christian F; Llosa, Nicolas J; McCarty, Gregory; Morris, Carol D; Levin, Adam S; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Albert, Catherine M; Steppan, Diana A; Park, Ben Ho; Loeb, David M

    2016-10-01

    Even though virtually all patients with Ewing sarcoma achieve a radiographic complete response, up to 30% of patients who present with localized disease and up to 90% of those who present with metastases experience a metastatic disease recurrence, highlighting the inability to identify patients with residual disease at the end of therapy. Up to 95% of Ewing sarcomas carry a driving EWS-ETS translocation that has an intronic breakpoint that is specific to each tumor, and the authors developed a system to quantitatively detect the specific breakpoint DNA fragment in patient plasma. The authors used a long-range multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique to identify tumor-specific EWS-ETS breakpoints in Ewing sarcoma cell lines, patient-derived xenografts, and patient tumors, and this sequence was used to design tumor-specific primer sets to detect plasma tumor DNA (ptDNA) by droplet digital PCR in xenograft-bearing mice and patients. Tumor-specific breakpoint DNA fragments were detected in the plasma of xenograft-bearing mice, and the signal correlated with tumor burden during primary tumor growth, after surgical resection, and at the time of metastatic disease recurrence. Furthermore, the authors were able to detect the specific breakpoint in plasma DNA obtained from 3 patients with Ewing sarcoma and in 2 patients the authors were able to detect ptDNA when there was radiographically undetectable disease present. The use of droplet digital PCR to detect tumor-specific EWS-ETS fusion gene breakpoint ptDNA fragments can be developed into a highly personalized biomarker of disease recurrence that can be optimized in animal studies for ultimate use in patients. Cancer 2016;122:3015-3023. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. Peripheral facial palsy in children.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Unsal; Cubukçu, Duygu; Yılmaz, Tuba Sevim; Akıncı, Gülçin; Ozcan, Muazzez; Güzel, Orkide

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the types and clinical characteristics of peripheral facial palsy in children. The hospital charts of children diagnosed with peripheral facial palsy were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 81 children (42 female and 39 male) with a mean age of 9.2 ± 4.3 years were included in the study. Causes of facial palsy were 65 (80.2%) idiopathic (Bell palsy) facial palsy, 9 (11.1%) otitis media/mastoiditis, and tumor, trauma, congenital facial palsy, chickenpox, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, enlarged lymph nodes, and familial Mediterranean fever (each 1; 1.2%). Five (6.1%) patients had recurrent attacks. In patients with Bell palsy, female/male and right/left ratios were 36/29 and 35/30, respectively. Of them, 31 (47.7%) had a history of preceding infection. The overall rate of complete recovery was 98.4%. A wide variety of disorders can present with peripheral facial palsy in children. Therefore, careful investigation and differential diagnosis is essential. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Risk factors for end stage renal disease in non-WT1-syndromic Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jane; Peterson, Susan M; Takashima, Janice R; Grigoriev, Yevgeny; Ritchey, Michael L; Shamberger, Robert C; Beckwith, J Bruce; Perlman, Elizabeth; Green, Daniel M; Breslow, Norman E

    2011-08-01

    We assessed risk factors for end stage renal disease in patients with Wilms tumor without known WT1 related syndromes. We hypothesized that patients with characteristics suggestive of a WT1 etiology (early onset, stromal predominant histology, intralobar nephrogenic rests) would have a higher risk of end stage renal disease due to chronic renal failure. We predicted a high risk of end stage renal disease due to progressive bilateral Wilms tumor in patients with metachronous bilateral disease. End stage renal disease was ascertained in 100 of 7,950 nonsyndromic patients enrolled in a National Wilms Tumor Study during 1969 to 2002. Risk factors were evaluated with cumulative incidence curves and proportional hazard regressions. The cumulative incidence of end stage renal disease due to chronic renal failure 20 years after Wilms tumor diagnosis was 0.7%. For end stage renal disease due to progressive bilateral Wilms tumor the incidence was 4.0% at 3 years after diagnosis in patients with synchronous bilateral Wilms tumor and 19.3% in those with metachronous bilateral Wilms tumor. For end stage renal disease due to chronic renal failure stromal predominant histology had a HR of 6.4 relative to mixed (95% CI 3.4, 11.9; p<0.001), intralobar rests had a HR of 5.9 relative to no rests (95% CI 2.0, 17.3; p=0.001), and Wilms tumor diagnosis at less than 24 months had a HR of 1.7 relative to 24 to 48 months and 2.8 relative to greater than 48 months (p=0.003 for trend). Metachronous bilateral Wilms tumor is associated with high rates of end stage renal disease due to surgery for progressive Wilms tumor. Characteristics associated with a WT1 etiology markedly increased the risk of end stage renal disease due to chronic renal failure despite the low risk in non-WT1 syndromic cases overall. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  10. Facial paralysis for the plastic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Kosins, Aaron M; Hurvitz, Keith A; Evans, Gregory Rd; Wirth, Garrett A

    2007-01-01

    Facial paralysis presents a significant and challenging reconstructive problem for plastic surgeons. An aesthetically pleasing and acceptable outcome requires not only good surgical skills and techniques, but also knowledge of facial nerve anatomy and an understanding of the causes of facial paralysis.The loss of the ability to move the face has both social and functional consequences for the patient. At the Facial Palsy Clinic in Edinburgh, Scotland, 22,954 patients were surveyed, and over 50% were found to have a considerable degree of psychological distress and social withdrawal as a consequence of their facial paralysis. Functionally, patients present with unilateral or bilateral loss of voluntary and nonvoluntary facial muscle movements. Signs and symptoms can include an asymmetric smile, synkinesis, epiphora or dry eye, abnormal blink, problems with speech articulation, drooling, hyperacusis, change in taste and facial pain.With respect to facial paralysis, surgeons tend to focus on the surgical, or 'hands-on', aspect. However, it is believed that an understanding of the disease process is equally (if not more) important to a successful surgical outcome. The purpose of the present review is to describe the anatomy and diagnostic patterns of the facial nerve, and the epidemiology and common causes of facial paralysis, including clinical features and diagnosis. Treatment options for paralysis are vast, and may include nerve decompression, facial reanimation surgery and botulinum toxin injection, but these are beyond the scope of the present paper.

  11. Facial paralysis for the plastic surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Kosins, Aaron M; Hurvitz, Keith A; Evans, Gregory RD; Wirth, Garrett A

    2007-01-01

    Facial paralysis presents a significant and challenging reconstructive problem for plastic surgeons. An aesthetically pleasing and acceptable outcome requires not only good surgical skills and techniques, but also knowledge of facial nerve anatomy and an understanding of the causes of facial paralysis. The loss of the ability to move the face has both social and functional consequences for the patient. At the Facial Palsy Clinic in Edinburgh, Scotland, 22,954 patients were surveyed, and over 50% were found to have a considerable degree of psychological distress and social withdrawal as a consequence of their facial paralysis. Functionally, patients present with unilateral or bilateral loss of voluntary and nonvoluntary facial muscle movements. Signs and symptoms can include an asymmetric smile, synkinesis, epiphora or dry eye, abnormal blink, problems with speech articulation, drooling, hyperacusis, change in taste and facial pain. With respect to facial paralysis, surgeons tend to focus on the surgical, or ‘hands-on’, aspect. However, it is believed that an understanding of the disease process is equally (if not more) important to a successful surgical outcome. The purpose of the present review is to describe the anatomy and diagnostic patterns of the facial nerve, and the epidemiology and common causes of facial paralysis, including clinical features and diagnosis. Treatment options for paralysis are vast, and may include nerve decompression, facial reanimation surgery and botulinum toxin injection, but these are beyond the scope of the present paper. PMID:19554190

  12. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  13. [Peripheral paralysis of facial nerve in children].

    PubMed

    Steczkowska-Klucznik, Małgorzata; Kaciński, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral facial paresis is one of the most common diagnosed neuropathies in adults and also in children. Many factors can trigger facial paresis and most frequent are infectious, carcinoma and demyelinisation diseases. Very important and interesting problem is an idiopathic facial paresis (Bell's palsy). Actually the main target of scientific research is to assess the etiology (infectious, genetic, immunologic) and to find the most appropriate treatment.

  14. Childhood Sarcoidosis Presenting as Recurrent Facial Palsy.

    PubMed

    Passi, Gouri Rao; Arora, Kriti; Gokhale, Narendra

    2018-04-15

    Recurrent facial palsy in a patient merits investigation for underlying etiology. 8-year-old boy with erythematous itchy skin lesion and recurrent facial palsy. He had a past history of aseptic meningitis and nephrocalcinosis. Raised angiotensin converting enzyme levels, interstitial lung disease on CT chest, and non caseating granulomas on skin biopsy clinched the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Multisystem involvement and recurrent lower motor facial nerve palsy is a clinical clue for sarcoidosis.

  15. Colon tumor mutations and epigenetic changes associated with genetic polymorphism: Insight into disease pathways

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Wolff, Roger K.; Curtin, Karen; Fitzpatrick, Frank; Herrick, Jennifer; Potter, John D.; Caan, Bette J.; Samowitz, Wade S.

    2010-01-01

    Variation in genes associated with serum levels of proteins may be useful for examining specific disease pathways. Using data from a large study of colon cancer, we examine genetic variants in insulin, inflammation, estrogen, metabolizing enzymes, and energy homeostasis genes to explore associations with microsatellite instability (MSI), CpG Island methylator phenotype (CIMP), mutations of p53 in exons 5 through 8, and mutations in codons 12 and 13 of Ki-ras. Insulin-related genes were associated with CIMP positive and MSI tumors, with the strongest associations among aspirin users. The Fok1 Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) polymorphism was associated with CIMP positive/Ki-ras mutated tumors; the Poly A and CDX2 VDR polymorphisms were associated only with Ki-ras mutated tumors. NAT2 was associated with CIMP positive/Ki-ras mutated tumors but not with MSI tumors. The TCF7L2 rs7903146 polymorphism was associated with p53 mutated tumors. Most associations varied by recent aspirin/NSAID use: IL6 rs1800796 and rs1800795 polymorphisms were associated inversely with tumor mutations in the presence of aspirin/NSAIDs; POMC significantly reduced risk of Ki-ras- mutated tumors when aspirin/NSAIDs were not used; the TCF7L2 rs7903146 was associated with reduced risk of Ki-ras-mutated tumors in the presence of aspirin and increased risk in the absence of aspirin. These data, although exploratory, identify specific tumor subsets that may be associated with specific exposures/polymorphism combinations. The important modifying effects of aspirin/NSAIDs on associations with genetic polymorphisms reinforce the underlying role of inflammation in the etiology of colon cancer. PMID:18992263

  16. Facial paralysis caused by metastasis of breast carcinoma to the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ming-Ying; Shiao, An-Suey; Li, Wing-Yin

    2004-11-01

    Metastatic tumors to the temporal bone are very rare. The most common sites of origin of temporal bone metastases are breast, lung, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, larynx, prostate gland, and thyroid gland. The pathogenesis of spread to the temporal bone is most commonly by the hematogenous route. The common otologic symptoms that manifest with facial nerve paralysis are often thought to be due to a mastoid infection. Here is a report on a case of breast carcinoma presenting with otalgia, otorrhea, and facial paralysis for 2 months. The patient was initially diagnosed as mastoiditis, and later the clinical impression was revised to metastatic breast carcinoma to temporal bone, based on the pathologic findings. Metastatic disease should be considered as a possible etiology in patients with a clinical history of malignant neoplasms presenting with common otologic or vestibular symptoms, especially with facial nerve paralysis.

  17. Behavioral and Neuroimaging Evidence for Facial Emotion Recognition in Elderly Korean Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soowon; Kim, Taehoon; Shin, Seong A; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Park, Hyeon-Ju; Youn, Jung-Hae; Lee, Jun-Young

    2017-01-01

    Background: Facial emotion recognition (FER) is impaired in individuals with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) when compared to healthy older adults. Since deficits in emotion recognition are closely related to caregiver burden or social interactions, researchers have fundamental interest in FER performance in patients with dementia. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the performance profiles of six facial emotions (i.e., fear, anger, disgust, sadness, surprise, and happiness) and neutral faces measured among Korean healthy control (HCs), and those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), AD, and FTD. Additionally, the neuroanatomical correlates of facial emotions were investigated. Methods: A total of 110 (33 HC, 32 MCI, 32 AD, 13 FTD) older adult participants were recruited from two different medical centers in metropolitan areas of South Korea. These individuals underwent an FER test that was used to assess the recognition of emotions or absence of emotion (neutral) in 35 facial stimuli. Repeated measures two-way analyses of variance were used to examine the distinct profiles of emotional recognition among the four groups. We also performed brain imaging and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on the participants to examine the associations between FER scores and gray matter volume. Results: The mean score of negative emotion recognition (i.e., fear, anger, disgust, and sadness) clearly discriminated FTD participants from individuals with MCI and AD and HC [F(3,106) = 10.829, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.235], whereas the mean score of positive emotion recognition (i.e., surprise and happiness) did not. A VBM analysis showed negative emotions were correlated with gray matter volume of anterior temporal regions, whereas positive emotions were related to gray matter volume of fronto-parietal regions. Conclusion: Impairment of negative FER in patients with FTD is cross-cultural. The discrete neural correlates of FER indicate that emotional

  18. Mushroom tumor: a new disease on Flammulina velutipes caused by Ochrobactrum pseudogrignonense.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhipeng; Peng, Weihong; He, Xiaolan; Wang, Bo; Gan, Bingcheng; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Mushroom tumor on Flammulina velutipes has become the main disease during the off-season cultivation of F. velutipes while the causal organism has remained unknown. The present study was aimed at identifying the pathogen confirming its pathogenisity following Koch's Postulates, characterizing it using morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular features, and studying its current distribution. We determined that mushroom tumor is a new bacterial infection disease caused by Ochrobactrum pseudogrignonense. It produces tumor-like structures on the surface of the substrate, and inhibits the formation of primordia and fruiting of F. velutipes. The molecular studies showed that this new pathogen is closely related to Ochrobactrum based on 16S rRNA sequences. This is the first time that Ochrobactrum has been shown to be a pathogen of a mushroom. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Measuring Facial Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  20. Epidemiological evidence for an association between use of wireless phones and tumor diseases.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Hansson Mild, Kjell

    2009-08-01

    During recent years there has been increasing public concern on potential cancer risks from microwave emissions from wireless phones. We evaluated the scientific evidence for long-term mobile phone use and the association with certain tumors in case-control studies, mostly from the Hardell group in Sweden and the Interphone study group. Regarding brain tumors the meta-analysis yielded for glioma odds ratio (OR)=1.0, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.9-1.1. OR increased to 1.3, 95% CI=1.1-1.6 with 10 year latency period, with highest risk for ipsilateral exposure (same side as the tumor localisation), OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.4-2.4, lower for contralateral exposure (opposite side) OR=1.2, 95% CI=0.9-1.7. Regarding acoustic neuroma OR=1.0, 95% CI=0.8-1.1 was calculated increasing to OR=1.3, 95% CI=0.97-1.9 with 10 year latency period. For ipsilateral exposure OR=1.6, 95% CI=1.1-2.4, and for contralateral exposure OR=1.2, 95% CI=0.8-1.9 were found. Regarding meningioma no consistent pattern of an increased risk was found. Concerning age, highest risk was found in the age group <20 years at time of first use of wireless phones in the studies from the Hardell group. For salivary gland tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancer no consistent pattern of an association with use of wireless phones was found. One study on uveal melanoma yielded for probable/certain mobile phone use OR=4.2, 95% CI=1.2-14.5. One study on intratemporal facial nerve tumor was not possible to evaluate due to methodological shortcomings. In summary our review yielded a consistent pattern of an increased risk for glioma and acoustic neuroma after >10 year mobile phone use. We conclude that current standard for exposure to microwaves during mobile phone use is not safe for long-term exposure and needs to be revised.

  1. Bilateral Testicular Tumors Resulting in Recurrent Cushing Disease After Bilateral Adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Puar, Troy; Engels, Manon; van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Sweep, Fred C G J; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina; Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin; Chortis, Vasileios; Arlt, Wiebke; Stikkelbroeck, Nike; Claahsen-van der Grinten, Hedi L; Hermus, Ad R M M

    2017-02-01

    Recurrence of hypercortisolism in patients after bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing disease is extremely rare. We present a 27-year-old man who previously underwent bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing disease with complete clinical resolution. Cushingoid features recurred 12 years later, with bilateral testicular enlargement. Hormonal tests confirmed adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing disease. Surgical resection of the testicular tumors led to clinical and biochemical remission. Gene expression analysis of the tumor tissue by quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed high expression of all key steroidogenic enzymes. Adrenocortical-specific genes were 5.1 × 105 (CYP11B1), 1.8 × 102 (CYP11B2), and 6.3 × 104 (MC2R) times higher than nonsteroidogenic fibroblast control. This correlated with urine steroid metabolome profiling showing 2 fivefold increases in the excretion of the metabolites of 11-deoxycortisol, 21-deoxycortisol, and total glucocorticoids. Leydig-specific genes were 4.3 × 101 (LHCGR) and 9.3 × 100 (HSD17B3) times higher than control, and urinary steroid profiling showed twofold increased excretion of the major androgen metabolites androsterone and etiocholanolone. These distinctly increased steroid metabolites were suppressed by dexamethasone but unresponsive to human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation, supporting the role of ACTH, but not luteinizing hormone, in regulating tumor-specific steroid excess. We report bilateral testicular tumors occurring in a patient with recurrent Cushing disease 12 years after bilateral adrenalectomy. Using mRNA expression analysis and steroid metabolome profiling, the tumors demonstrated both adrenocortical and gonadal steroidogenic properties, similar to testicular adrenal rest tumors found in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, suggesting the presence of pluripotent cells even in patients without congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  2. Role of specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients for the assessment of tumor stage and residual disease following tumor resection

    PubMed Central

    Norcic, Gregor; Jelenc, Franc; Cerkovnik, Petra; Stegel, Vida; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the detection of tumor-specific KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (KRAS) and B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) mutations in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients at all stages and adenomas was used for the estimation of disease stage prior to surgery and for residual disease following surgery. A total of 65 CRC patients were enrolled. The primary tumor tested positive for the specific mutations (KRAS mutations in codons 12, 13, 61, 117 or 146 and BRAF mutations in codon 600) in 35 patients. In all these patients, the specimen of normal bowel resected with the tumor was also tested for the presence of the same mutations in order to exclude the germ-line mutations. Only patients who tested positive for the specific mutation in the primary tumor were included in further analysis for the presence of tumor-specific mutation in the peripheral blood. No statistically significant differences were found between the detection rates of tumor mutations in the blood and different tumor stages (P=0.491). However, statistically significant differences in the proportions of patients with detected tumor-specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood were found when comparing the groups of patients with R0 and R2 resections (P=0.038). Tumor-specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood were more frequently detected in the patients with an incomplete surgical clearance of the tumor due to macroscopic residual disease (R2 resections). Therefore, the study concludes that the follow-up of somatic KRAS- and BRAF-mutated DNA in the peripheral blood of CRC patients may be useful in assessing the surgical clearance of the disease. PMID:27900004

  3. Involvement of the Warburg effect in non-tumor diseases processes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Liu, Meiqing; Li, Lanfang; Chen, Linxi

    2018-04-01

    Warburg effect, as an energy shift from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis, is extensively found in various cancers. Interestingly, increasing researchers show that Warburg effect plays a crucial role in non-tumor diseases. For instance, inhibition of Warburg effect can alleviate pulmonary vascular remodeling in the process of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Interference of Warburg effect improves mitochondrial function and cardiac function in the process of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Additionally, the Warburg effect induces vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and contributes to atherosclerosis. Warburg effect may also involve in axonal damage and neuronal death, which are related with multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, Warburg effect significantly promotes cell proliferation and cyst expansion in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Besides, Warburg effect relieves amyloid β-mediated cell death in Alzheimer's disease. And Warburg effect also improves the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Finally, we also introduce some glycolytic agonists. This review focuses on the newest researches about the role of Warburg effect in non-tumor diseases, including PH, tuberculosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), failing heart, cardiac hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's diseases, multiple sclerosis, and PKD. Obviously, Warburg effect may be a potential therapeutic target for those non-tumor diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Land use, macroalgae, and a tumor-forming disease in marine turtles.

    PubMed

    Van Houtan, Kyle S; Hargrove, Stacy K; Balazs, George H

    2010-09-29

    Wildlife diseases are an increasing concern for endangered species conservation, but their occurrence, causes, and human influences are often unknown. We analyzed 3,939 records of stranded Hawaiian green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) over 28 years to understand fibropapillomatosis, a tumor-forming disease linked to a herpesvirus. Turtle size is a consistent risk factor and size-standardized models revealed considerable spatial and temporal variability. The disease peaked in some areas in the 1990s, in some regions rates remained constant, and elsewhere rates increased. Land use, onshore of where the turtles feed, may play a role. Elevated disease rates were clustered in watersheds with high nitrogen-footprints; an index of natural and anthropogenic factors that affect coastal eutrophication. Further analysis shows strong epidemiological links between disease rates, nitrogen-footprints, and invasive macroalgae and points to foraging ecology. These turtles now forage on invasive macroalgae, which can dominate nutrient rich waters and sequester environmental N in the amino acid arginine. Arginine is known to regulate immune activity, promote herpesviruses, and contribute to tumor formation. Our results have implications for understanding diseases in aquatic organisms, eutrophication, herpesviruses, and tumor formation.

  5. Land Use, Macroalgae, and a Tumor-Forming Disease in Marine Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Van Houtan, Kyle S.; Hargrove, Stacy K.; Balazs, George H.

    2010-01-01

    Wildlife diseases are an increasing concern for endangered species conservation, but their occurrence, causes, and human influences are often unknown. We analyzed 3,939 records of stranded Hawaiian green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) over 28 years to understand fibropapillomatosis, a tumor-forming disease linked to a herpesvirus. Turtle size is a consistent risk factor and size-standardized models revealed considerable spatial and temporal variability. The disease peaked in some areas in the 1990s, in some regions rates remained constant, and elsewhere rates increased. Land use, onshore of where the turtles feed, may play a role. Elevated disease rates were clustered in watersheds with high nitrogen-footprints; an index of natural and anthropogenic factors that affect coastal eutrophication. Further analysis shows strong epidemiological links between disease rates, nitrogen-footprints, and invasive macroalgae and points to foraging ecology. These turtles now forage on invasive macroalgae, which can dominate nutrient rich waters and sequester environmental N in the amino acid arginine. Arginine is known to regulate immune activity, promote herpesviruses, and contribute to tumor formation. Our results have implications for understanding diseases in aquatic organisms, eutrophication, herpesviruses, and tumor formation. PMID:20927370

  6. Razi's description and treatment of facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmood; Kalantar Hormozi, Abdoljalil; Asadi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    In the modern medical era, facial paralysis is linked with the name of Charles Bell. This disease, which is usually unilateral and is a peripheral facial palsy, causes facial muscle weakness in the affected side. Bell gave a complete description of the disease; but historically other physicians had described it several hundred years prior although it had been ignored for different reasons, such as the difficulty of the original text language. The first and the most famous of these physicians who described this disease was Mohammad Ibn Zakaryya Razi (Rhazes). In this article, we discuss his opinion.

  7. Facial Reconstruction by Biosurgery: Cell Transplantation Versus Cell Homing

    PubMed Central

    Stosich, Michael S.; Moioli, Eduardo K.; Lee, Chang Hun; Fu, Susan Y.; Bastian, Barbara; Eisig, Sidney B.; Zemnick, Candice; Ascherman, Jeffrey; Wu, June; Rohde, Christine; Ahn, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The face distinguishes one human being from another. When the face is disfigured because of trauma, tumor removal, congenital anomalies, or chronic diseases, the patient has a strong desire for functional and esthetic restoration. Current practice of facial reconstruction using autologous grafts, synthetic fillers, and prostheses is frequently below the surgeon's and patient's expectations. Facial reconstruction is yet to take advantage of recent advances in seemingly unrelated fields of stem cell biology, chemical engineering, biomaterials, and tissue engineering. “Biosurgery,” a new concept that we propose, will incorporate novel principles and strategies of bioactive cues, biopolymers, and/or cells to restore facial defects. Small facial defects can likely be reconstructed by cell homing and without cell transplantation. A critical advantage of cell homing is that agilely recruited endogenous cells have the potential to harness the host's innate capacity for regeneration, thus accelerating the rate of regulatory and commercialization processes for product development. Large facial defects, however, may not be restorable without cell delivery per our understanding at this time. New breakthrough in biosurgery will likely originate from integrated strategies of cell biology, cytokine biology, chemical engineering, biomaterials, and tissue engineering. Regardless of cell homing or cell delivery approaches, biosurgery not only will minimize surgical trauma and repetitive procedures, but also produce long-lasting results. At the same time, caution must be exercised against the development of products that lack scientific basis or dogmatic combination of cells, biomaterials, and biomolecules. Together, scientifically derived biosurgery will undoubtedly develop into new technologies that offer increasingly natural reconstruction and/or augmentation of the face. PMID:19891541

  8. Uptake of genetic testing and long-term tumor surveillance in von Hippel-Lindau disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by germline mutations in the VHL gene. Patients have significant morbidity and mortality secondary to vascular tumors. Disease management is centered on tumor surveillance that allows early detection and treatment. Presymptomatic genetic testing is therefore recommended, including in at-risk children. Methods We tested 17 families (n = 109 individuals) for VHL mutations including 43 children under the age of 18. Personalized genetic counseling was provided pre and post-test and the individuals undergoing presymptomatic testing filled out questionnaires gathering socio-demographic, psychological and psychiatric data. Mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing of the VHL gene. Mutation-carriers were screened for VHL disease-related tumors and were offered follow-up annual examinations. Results Mutations were identified in 36 patients, 17 of whom were asymptomatic. In the initial screening, we identified at least one tumor in five of 17 previously asymptomatic individuals. At the end of five years, only 38.9% of the mutation-carriers continued participating in our tumor surveillance program. During this time, 14 mutation carriers developed a total of 32 new tumors, three of whom died of complications. Gender, education, income, marital status and religiosity were not found to be associated with adherence to the surveillance protocol. Follow-up adherence was also independent of pre-test depression, severity of disease, or number of affected family members. The only statistically significant predictor of adherence was being symptomatic at the time of testing (OR = 5; 95% CI 1.2 - 20.3; p = 0.02). Pre-test anxiety was more commonly observed in patients that discontinued follow-up (64.7% vs. 35.3%; p = 0.01). Conclusions The high initial uptake rate of genetic testing for VHL disease, including in minors, allowed the discontinuation of unnecessary screening procedures in non

  9. Hepatitis Diagnosis Using Facial Color Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingjia; Guo, Zhenhua

    Facial color diagnosis is an important diagnostic method in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). However, due to its qualitative, subjective and experi-ence-based nature, traditional facial color diagnosis has a very limited application in clinical medicine. To circumvent the subjective and qualitative problems of facial color diagnosis of Traditional Chinese Medicine, in this paper, we present a novel computer aided facial color diagnosis method (CAFCDM). The method has three parts: face Image Database, Image Preprocessing Module and Diagnosis Engine. Face Image Database is carried out on a group of 116 patients affected by 2 kinds of liver diseases and 29 healthy volunteers. The quantitative color feature is extracted from facial images by using popular digital image processing techni-ques. Then, KNN classifier is employed to model the relationship between the quantitative color feature and diseases. The results show that the method can properly identify three groups: healthy, severe hepatitis with jaundice and severe hepatitis without jaundice with accuracy higher than 73%.

  10. Shorter telomere length increases age-related tumor risks in von Hippel-Lindau disease patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang-Yi; Peng, Shuang-He; Ning, Xiang-Hui; Li, Teng; Liu, Sheng-Jie; Liu, Jia-Yuan; Hong, Bao-An; Qi, Nie-Nie; Peng, Xiang; Zhou, Bo-Wen; Zhang, Jiu-Feng; Cai, Lin; Gong, Kan

    2017-09-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a rare autosomal dominant cancer syndrome caused by alterations of VHL gene. Patients are predisposed to develop pheochromocytomas and solid or cystic tumors of the central nervous system, kidney, pancreas, and retina. Remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity exits in organ involvement and tumor onset age between and within VHL families. However, no reliable markers have been found to predict the age-related tumor risks in VHL patients. A large Chinese cohort composed of 300 VHL patients and 92 healthy family controls was enrolled in our study. Blood relative telomere length was measured in 184 patients and all the controls available for genomic DNA samples. Age-related risks for the five major VHL-associated tumors were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox regression analysis. Differences in clinical phenotype were observed between Chinese cohort and the United Kingdom cohort. VHL patients showed significantly shorter telomere length than healthy family controls(P = 0.0183), and a positive correlation was found between telomere length and onset age of the five major tumors, respectively. Moreover, patients in the shorter telomere group (age-adjusted telomere length ≤ 0.44) suffered higher age-related risks for VHL-associated central nervous system hemangioblastomas (HR: 1.879, P = 0.004), renal cell carcinoma (HR: 2.126, P = 0.002) and pancreatic cyst and neuroendocrine tumors (HR: 2.093, P = 0.001). These results indicate that blood shorter telomere length is a new biomarker for age-related tumor risks in VHL patients, which will be crucial to genetic counseling and future research about the role of telomere shortening in the pathogenesis of VHL-associated tumors. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Right upper limb bud triplication and polythelia, left sided hemihypertrophy and congenital hip dislocation, facial dysmorphism, congenital heart disease, and scoliosis: disorganisation-like spectrum or patterning gene defect?

    PubMed Central

    Sabry, M A; al-Saleh, Q; al-Saw'an, R; al-Awadi, S A; Farag, T I

    1995-01-01

    A Somali female baby with right upper limb triplication, polythelia, left sided hemihypertrophy, congenital hip dislocation, facial dysmorphism, congenital heart disease, and scoliosis is described. It seems that the above described pattern of anomalies has not been reported before. The possible developmental genetic mechanism responsible for this phenotype is briefly discussed. Images PMID:7562971

  12. Right upper limb bud triplication and polythelia, left sided hemihypertrophy and congenital hip dislocation, facial dysmorphism, congenital heart disease, and scoliosis: disorganisation-like spectrum or patterning gene defect?

    PubMed

    Sabry, M A; al-Saleh, Q; al-Saw'an, R; al-Awadi, S A; Farag, T I

    1995-07-01

    A Somali female baby with right upper limb triplication, polythelia, left sided hemihypertrophy, congenital hip dislocation, facial dysmorphism, congenital heart disease, and scoliosis is described. It seems that the above described pattern of anomalies has not been reported before. The possible developmental genetic mechanism responsible for this phenotype is briefly discussed.

  13. Assessment of tumor vascularization with functional computed tomography perfusion imaging in patients with cirrhotic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Ping; Zhao, De-Li; Jiang, Hui-Jie; Huang, Ya-Hua; Li, Da-Qing; Wan, Yong; Liu, Xin-Ding; Wang, Jin-E

    2011-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignant tumor in China, and early diagnosis is critical for patient outcome. In patients with HCC, it is mostly based on liver cirrhosis, developing from benign regenerative nodules and dysplastic nodules to HCC lesions, and a better understanding of its vascular supply and the hemodynamic changes may lead to early tumor detection. Angiogenesis is essential for the growth of primary and metastatic tumors due to changes in vascular perfusion, blood volume and permeability. These hemodynamic and physiological properties can be measured serially using functional computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging and can be used to assess the growth of HCC. This study aimed to clarify the physiological characteristics of tumor angiogenesis in cirrhotic liver disease by this fast imaging method. CTP was performed in 30 volunteers without liver disease (control subjects) and 49 patients with liver disease (experimental subjects: 27 with HCC and 22 with cirrhosis). All subjects were also evaluated by physical examination, laboratory screening and Doppler ultrasonography of the liver. The diagnosis of HCC was made according to the EASL criteria. All patients underwent contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, pre- and post-contrast triple-phase CT and CTP study. A mathematical deconvolution model was applied to provide hepatic blood flow (HBF), hepatic blood volume (HBV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability of capillary vessel surface (PS), hepatic arterial index (HAI), hepatic arterial perfusion (HAP) and hepatic portal perfusion (HPP) data. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine differences in perfusion parameters between the background cirrhotic liver parenchyma and HCC and between the cirrhotic liver parenchyma with HCC and that without HCC. In normal liver, the HAP/HVP ratio was about 1/4. HCC had significantly higher HAP and HAI and lower HPP than background liver parenchyma adjacent to the HCC. The value of HBF at the tumor

  14. Developmentally arrested structures preceding cerebellar tumors in von Hippel–Lindau disease

    PubMed Central

    Shively, Sharon B; Falke, Eric A; Li, Jie; Tran, Maxine G B; Thompson, Eli R; Maxwell, Patrick H; Roessler, Erich; Oldfield, Edward H; Lonser, Russell R; Vortmeyer, Alexander O

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that suggests that knockout of tumor-suppressor gene function causes developmental arrest and protraction of cellular differentiation. In the peripheral nervous system of patients with the tumor-suppressor gene disorder, von Hippel–Lindau disease, we have demonstrated developmentally arrested structural elements composed of hemangioblast progenitor cells. Some developmentally arrested structural elements progress to a frank tumor, hemangioblastoma. However, in von Hippel–Lindau disease, hemangioblastomas are frequently observed in the cerebellum, suggesting an origin in the central nervous system. We performed a structural and topographic analysis of cerebellar tissues obtained from von Hippel–Lindau disease patients to identify and characterize developmentally arrested structural elements in the central nervous system. We examined the entire cerebella of five tumor-free von Hippel–Lindau disease patients and of three non-von Hippel–Lindau disease controls. In all, 9 cerebellar developmentally arrested structural elements were detected and topographically mapped in 385 blocks of von Hippel–Lindau disease cerebella. No developmentally arrested structural elements were seen in 214 blocks from control cerebella. Developmentally arrested structural elements are composed of poorly differentiated cells that express hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)2α, but not HIF1α or brachyury, and preferentially involve the molecular layer of the dorsum cerebelli. For the first time, we identify and characterize developmentally arrested structural elements in the central nervous system of von Hippel–Lindau patients. We provide evidence that developmentally arrested structural elements in the cerebellum are composed of developmentally arrested hemangioblast progenitor cells in the molecular layer of the dorsum cerebelli. PMID:21499240

  15. Facial fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Boyette, Jennings R

    2014-10-01

    Facial trauma in children differs from adults. The growing facial skeleton presents several challenges to the reconstructive surgeon. A thorough understanding of the patterns of facial growth and development is needed to form an individualized treatment strategy. A proper diagnosis must be made and treatment options weighed against the risk of causing further harm to facial development. This article focuses on the management of facial fractures in children. Discussed are common fracture patterns based on the development of the facial structure, initial management, diagnostic strategies, new concepts and old controversies regarding radiologic examinations, conservative versus operative intervention, risks of growth impairment, and resorbable fixation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diagnosis and surgical outcomes of intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma showing normal facial nerve function.

    PubMed

    Lee, D W; Byeon, H K; Chung, H P; Choi, E C; Kim, S-H; Park, Y M

    2013-07-01

    The findings of intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma (FNS) using preoperative diagnostic tools, including ultrasonography (US)-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy, computed tomography (CT) scan, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were analyzed to determine if there are any useful findings that might suggest the presence of a lesion. Treatment guidelines are suggested. The medical records of 15 patients who were diagnosed with an intraparotid FNS were retrospectively analyzed. US and CT scans provide clinicians with only limited information; gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted images from MRI provide more specific findings. Tumors could be removed successfully with surgical exploration, preserving facial nerve function at the same time. Gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI showed more characteristic findings for the diagnosis of intraparotid FNS. Intraparotid FNS without facial palsy can be diagnosed with MRI preoperatively, and surgical exploration is a suitable treatment modality which can remove the tumor and preserve facial nerve function. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Progress with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carlos; Allocca, Mariangela; Danese, Silvio; Fiorino, Gionata

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is a valid, effective and increasingly used option in inflammatory bowel disease management. Nevertheless, further knowledge and therapeutic indications regarding these drugs are still evolving. Anti-TNF therapy may be essential to achieve recently proposed end points, namely mucosal healing, prevention of bowel damage and prevention of patient's disability. Anti-TNF drugs are also suggested to be more effective in early disease, particularly in early Crohn's disease. Moreover, its efficacy for prevention of postoperative recurrence in Crohn's disease is still debated. Costs and adverse effects, the relevance of drug monitoring and the possibility of anti-TNF therapy withdrawal in selected patients are still debated issues. This review aimed to describe and discuss the most relevant data about the progress with anti-TNF therapy for the management of inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. Objectifying Facial Expressivity Assessment of Parkinson's Patients: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Patsis, Georgios; Jiang, Dongmei; Sahli, Hichem; Kerckhofs, Eric; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can exhibit a reduction of spontaneous facial expression, designated as “facial masking,” a symptom in which facial muscles become rigid. To improve clinical assessment of facial expressivity of PD, this work attempts to quantify the dynamic facial expressivity (facial activity) of PD by automatically recognizing facial action units (AUs) and estimating their intensity. Spontaneous facial expressivity was assessed by comparing 7 PD patients with 8 control participants. To voluntarily produce spontaneous facial expressions that resemble those typically triggered by emotions, six emotions (amusement, sadness, anger, disgust, surprise, and fear) were elicited using movie clips. During the movie clips, physiological signals (facial electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiogram (ECG)) and frontal face video of the participants were recorded. The participants were asked to report on their emotional states throughout the experiment. We first examined the effectiveness of the emotion manipulation by evaluating the participant's self-reports. Disgust-induced emotions were significantly higher than the other emotions. Thus we focused on the analysis of the recorded data during watching disgust movie clips. The proposed facial expressivity assessment approach captured differences in facial expressivity between PD patients and controls. Also differences between PD patients with different progression of Parkinson's disease have been observed. PMID:25478003

  19. Objectifying facial expressivity assessment of Parkinson's patients: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Gonzalez, Isabel; Patsis, Georgios; Jiang, Dongmei; Sahli, Hichem; Kerckhofs, Eric; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can exhibit a reduction of spontaneous facial expression, designated as "facial masking," a symptom in which facial muscles become rigid. To improve clinical assessment of facial expressivity of PD, this work attempts to quantify the dynamic facial expressivity (facial activity) of PD by automatically recognizing facial action units (AUs) and estimating their intensity. Spontaneous facial expressivity was assessed by comparing 7 PD patients with 8 control participants. To voluntarily produce spontaneous facial expressions that resemble those typically triggered by emotions, six emotions (amusement, sadness, anger, disgust, surprise, and fear) were elicited using movie clips. During the movie clips, physiological signals (facial electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiogram (ECG)) and frontal face video of the participants were recorded. The participants were asked to report on their emotional states throughout the experiment. We first examined the effectiveness of the emotion manipulation by evaluating the participant's self-reports. Disgust-induced emotions were significantly higher than the other emotions. Thus we focused on the analysis of the recorded data during watching disgust movie clips. The proposed facial expressivity assessment approach captured differences in facial expressivity between PD patients and controls. Also differences between PD patients with different progression of Parkinson's disease have been observed.

  20. Polyclonal origin of parathyroid tumors is common and is associated with multiple gland disease in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuhong; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Jamingal, Sarada; Wentworth, Shannon; Ferlitch, Janice; Koh, James; Balenga, Nariman; Olson, John A

    2018-01-01

    Parathyroid tumors are mostly considered monoclonal neoplasms, the rationale for focused parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism. We reported that flow sorting parathyroid tumor cells and methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (me-PCR) of polymorphic human androgen receptor gene and phosphoglycerate kinase gene alleles in deoxyribonucleic acid reveals that ≤35% of parathyroid tumors are polyclonal. We sought to confirm these findings and assess for clinical relevance. Parathyroid tumors from 286 female primary hyperparathyroidism patients were analyzed for clonal status. Tumor clonal status was compared with clinical variables and operative findings. Statistical analysis was performed and significance was established at P < .05. In the study, 176 (62%) patients were informative for human androgen receptor gene and/or phosphoglycerate kinase gene. Assignment of clonal status was made in 119 (68%) tumors, of which 64 (54%) were monoclonal and 55 (46%) were polyclonal. Comparison of tumor clonal status to clinical variables in patients with complete operative data (N = 82) showed that while clinical features were the same between tumor types, patients with polyclonal tumors more often had multiple gland disease (risk ratio 4.066, confidence interval, 1.016-16.26; P = .039) potentially missed at unilateral neck exploration. This work confirms that primary hyperparathyroidism is often the result of polyclonal tumors and that parathyroid tumor clonal status may be associated with multiple gland disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Conditional Disease-Free Survival After Surgical Resection of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Danielle A.; Kim, Yuhree; Dodson, Rebecca; Jimenez, M. Carolina; Behman, Ramy; Cocieru, Andrei; Fisher, Sarah B.; Groeschl, Ryan T.; Squires, Malcolm H.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Blazer, Dan G.; Kooby, David A.; Gamblin, T. Clark; Bauer, Todd W.; Quereshy, Fayez A.; Karanicolas, Paul J.; Law, Calvin H. L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most commonly diagnosed mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The risk of recurrence following surgical resection of GISTs is typically reported from the date of surgery. However, disease-free survival (DFS) over time is dynamic and changes based on disease-free time already accumulated following surgery. OBJECTIVES To assess the comparative performance of established GIST recurrence risk prognostic scoring systems and to characterize conditional DFS following surgical resection of GISTs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective cohort study of 502 patients who underwent surgery for a primary, nonmetastatic GIST between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2012, at 7 major academic cancer centers in the United States and Canada. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Disease-free survival of the patients was classified according to 5 prognostic scoring systems, including the National Institutes of Health criteria, modified National Institutes of Health criteria, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center GIST nomogram, and American Joint Committee on Cancer gastric and nongastric categories. The concordance index (also known as the C statistic or the area under the receiver operating curve) of established GIST recurrence risk prognostic scoring systems. Conditional DFS estimates were calculated. RESULTS Overall 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year DFS following resection of GISTs was 95%, 83%, and 74%, respectively. All the prognostic scoring systems had fair prognostic ability. For all tumor sites, the American Joint Committee on Cancer gastric category demonstrated the best discrimination (C = 0.79). Using conditional DFS, the probability of remaining disease free for an additional 3 years given that a patient was disease free at 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years was 82%, 89%, and 92%, respectively. Patients with the highest initial recurrence risk demonstrated the greatest increase in conditional survival as time

  2. Surgical management of internal auditory canal and cerebellopontine angle facial nerve schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Mowry, Sarah; Hansen, Marlan; Gantz, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the long-term patient outcomes following tumor debulking for internal auditory canal facial schwannoma (FNS). Study Design retrospective case review Setting Tertiary referral center Patients Patients operated on between 1998–2010 for a preoperative diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma with the intraoperative identification FNS instead. Intervention diagnostic and therapeutic Main Outcome Measures House-Brackmann facial nerve score immediately and at long term follow up (>1 yr); recurrence of tumor. Results 16 patients were identified who were presumed to have vestibular schwannoma but intraoperatively were diagnosed with facial nerve schwannoma. Eleven underwent debulking surgery (67%–99% tumor removal), 2 underwent decompression only, 2 were diagnosed with nervus intermedius tumors and had total tumor removal with preservation of the motor branch of CN VII, 1 had complete tumor removal with facial nerve grafting. Five of 11 debulking patients underwent the MCF approach for tumor removal; the remainder had translabyrinthine resections. One debulking patient was lost to follow-up. Nine of 10 patients with long term follow up had H/B grade I or II facial function. One patient had recurrence of the tumor that required revision surgery with total removal and facial nerve grafting. Conclusions Tumor debulking for FNS provides an opportunity for tumor removal and excellent facial nerve function. Continuous facial nerve monitoring is vital for successful debulking surgery. FNS debulking is feasible via the MCF approach. Serial postoperative imaging is warranted to monitor for recurrence. PMID:22772011

  3. Facial Nerve Schwannoma: A Case Report, Radiological Features and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Pilloni, Giulia; Mico, Barbara Massa; Altieri, Roberto; Zenga, Francesco; Ducati, Alessandro; Garbossa, Diego; Tartara, Fulvio

    2017-12-22

    Facial nerve schwannoma localized in the middle fossa is a rare lesion. We report a case of a facial nerve schwannoma in a 30-year-old male presenting with facial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 3 cm diameter tumor of the right middle fossa. The tumor was removed using a sub-temporal approach. Intraoperative monitoring allowed for identification of the facial nerve, so it was not damaged during the surgical excision. Neurological clinical examination at discharge demonstrated moderate facial nerve improvement (Grade III House-Brackmann).

  4. Surgical treatment strategy in Warthin tumor of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2018-05-16

    Warthin tumors are the second most common benign tumors of the parotid gland. We examined the clinical features of Warthin tumors in our hospital, and analyzed the consistency within the literatures. The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical features of Warthin tumors in our 10-year experience of 118 Warthin tumors undergoing surgery at a single institute. From December 2006 to December 2016, 110 patients who underwent surgical treatment for Warthin tumors were identified based on their medical records. A total of 118 parotid gland operations were performed in 110 patients. Almost 90% of Warthin tumors were found in males, and average patient age was 66.1±6.1 years. The prevalence of smoking history was 89.1% (98/110). Eight patients (7.3%) had bilateral Warthin tumors. Seventy-seven lesions (65.3%) were located in the parotid tail portion, followed by 34 lesions in the superficial lobe (28.8%) and 7 lesions in the deep lobe (5.9%). We determined the appropriate extent of surgery depending on the fine needle aspiration cytology and tumor location by computed tomography scans. Partial facial dysfunction after the operation was detected in 12 cases, and facial nerve function recovered within 3 months. Only one patient experienced a recurrence, and was disease free after the re-operation. We suggest that our treatment algorithm, depending on the location of tumors and the result of fine needle aspiration cytology, can be useful to determine the appropriate extent of surgery for Warthin tumors. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Middle ear osteoma causing progressive facial nerve weakness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kate; Bance, Manohar; Carter, Michael; Hong, Paul

    2014-09-18

    Facial nerve weakness is most commonly due to Bell's palsy or cerebrovascular accidents. Rarely, middle ear tumor presents with facial nerve dysfunction. We report a very unusual case of middle ear osteoma in a 49-year-old Caucasian woman causing progressive facial nerve deficit. A subtle middle ear lesion was observed on otoscopy and computed tomographic images demonstrated an osseous middle ear tumor. Complete surgical excision resulted in the partial recovery of facial nerve function. Facial nerve dysfunction is rarely caused by middle ear tumors. The weakness is typically due to a compressive effect on the middle ear portion of the facial nerve. Early recognition is crucial since removal of these lesions may lead to the recuperation of facial nerve function.

  6. Intrathoracic tumor of the chest wall: A case of Castleman's disease mimicking myositis of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Tampakis, Athanasios; Tampaki, Ekaterini Christina; Daikeler, Thomas; Lardinois, Didier

    2017-11-01

    Castleman's disease refers to a group of uncommon lymphoproliferative disorders which exhibit common lymph-node histological features. A 72-year-old male patient presented with signs of lower limb myositis. Detailed work-up focused initially on evaluating hematological malignancies, the presence of a solid tumor, autoimmune diseases and degenerative disorders of the peripheral nerves. Finally, a PET-CT scan was performed to exclude paraneoplastic manifestations of a primary tumor, revealing  however a tumor of the thoracic wall. The definite histological diagnosis confirmed the presence of unicentric Castleman's disease of the chest wall. The manifestations of the present case suggest that a systemic inflammation might occur in the unicentric form of the disease possibly due to cytokine hypersecretion. The unicentric manifestation of the disease should be well distinguished from the multicentric appearance. Unicentric disease is a surgical condition and warrants a follow-up based on the systemic inflammation that might occur.

  7. Tumor-Protective Mechanism Identified from Premature Aging Disease | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is an extraordinarily rare genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, which encodes architectural proteins of the human cell nucleus. The mutation causes the production of a mutant protein called progerin. Patients with HGPS display signs of premature aging, such as hair loss, slowed growth, weakening of bone and joint integrity, and cardiovascular disease. Most die in their mid-teens of heart disease or stroke. Intriguingly, these patients do not develop another aging-related disease, cancer, despite having dramatically elevated levels of DNA damage. Tom Misteli, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, and his colleagues hypothesized that, rather than patients not living long enough to develop cancer, a resistance mechanism was operating in HGPS cells to prevent cancer formation. To begin testing this idea, the researchers transformed fibroblasts from HGPS patients or age-matched, healthy controls with telomerase, constitutively-activated HRAS, and SV40 large and small T antigens. Transformed HGPS cells displayed morphological changes and increased proliferation similar to transformed controls but formed fewer colonies in soft agar and fewer tumors when injected into mice. When the investigators examined global gene expression in the two populations of cells, they found that transformed HGPS cells failed to activate many of the genes that are induced in response to transformation in controls, including oncogenic and proliferation pathways. In addition the transformed HGPS cells were unable to undergo oncogenic de-differentiation. Importantly, the tumor resistance in HGPS cells was due to the presence of the progerin protein, which was both necessary and sufficient to protect cells from oncogenic transformation. Together these results suggested that HGPS cells resist cancer-inducing stimuli by not undergoing the genetic reprogramming necessary for tumor initiation. The scientists

  8. Evaluating the Risk of Tumors Diseases Based on Measurement of Urinary and Serumal Antioxidants Using the New Agar Diffusion Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Chen, Jing; Wang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To discuss the characteristics of the amount of urinary total antioxidants in tumor diseases and the possibility of utilizing the changing regulation of urinary antioxidants to diagnose tumor diseases. Method. Urine and serum specimens from 130 healthy people were used to investigate the variation of antioxidant capacity against age. Urine and serum specimens from 44 unselected patients with tumors and 44 healthy people with same age background were used to explore the significance of urinary antioxidant capacity in clinic to diagnose tumor diseases. Potassium permanganate agar method and iodine starch method were used to determine the amount of total antioxidants. Results. In healthy people, more antioxidants in urine were measured in older people, while the results were opposite in serum. More antioxidants were found in urine of tumor patients than in healthy people with same age-range. Conclusions. According to the results of 130 measurements, the amount of antioxidants in urine varies by age. By using agar methods to measure antioxidants, the effect of age is required to be considered. Antioxidants levels from tumor patients were significantly higher than healthy individuals in urine. The combination of urine and serum to determine total antioxidants can better diagnose tumor diseases based on iodine starch method, with area under the receiver operating characteristics curve at 0.787. PMID:28458777

  9. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones in your body. This can cause endocrine diseases such as Cushing's syndrome and hyperthyroidism. Symptoms of pituitary tumors include Headaches Vision problems Nausea and vomiting Problems caused ... the tumor. Other options include medicines, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

  10. [Essential facial neuralgia with bilateral involvement: apropos of a case seen at the Cité Verte Hospital in Yaoundé].

    PubMed

    Djoumessi, A; Mendomo, E M; Onana, J; Djoumessi, S; Ndobo-Epoy, Ph

    2002-09-01

    Despite the fact that essential facial neuralgia is a well known clinical entity as relates to its evolution and treatment, its physiopathology is still a controversial issue. The form with bilateral evolution that we observed and that we are reporting here is extremely rare and its physiopathology is even more controversial. The case of our patient is all the more complicated in that, the pain topography is limited to the right to a sensitive region of the trigeminal nerve (superior maxillary) and to the left to the region of the mandible (inferior maxillary) A similar disease evolution is not described so far in the present literature of the disease. We have therefore seized this opportunity to out line the possible causes of faulty diagnosis in order that essential facial neuralgia should not be labelled as facial pain of tumoral, vascular or other origin.

  11. A Delphic consensus assessment: imaging and biomarkers in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor disease management.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Kjell; Krenning, Eric; Sundin, Anders; Bodei, Lisa; Kidd, Mark; Tesselaar, Margot; Ambrosini, Valentina; Baum, Richard P; Kulke, Matthew; Pavel, Marianne; Cwikla, Jaroslaw; Drozdov, Ignat; Falconi, Massimo; Fazio, Nicola; Frilling, Andrea; Jensen, Robert; Koopmans, Klaus; Korse, Tiny; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Maecke, Helmut; Paganelli, Giovanni; Salazar, Ramon; Severi, Stefano; Strosberg, Jonathan; Prasad, Vikas; Scarpa, Aldo; Grossman, Ashley; Walenkamp, Annemeik; Cives, Mauro; Virgolini, Irene; Kjaer, Andreas; Modlin, Irvin M

    2016-09-01

    The complexity of the clinical management of neuroendocrine neoplasia (NEN) is exacerbated by limitations in imaging modalities and a paucity of clinically useful biomarkers. Limitations in currently available imaging modalities reflect difficulties in measuring an intrinsically indolent disease, resolution inadequacies and inter-/intra-facility device variability and that RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria are not optimal for NEN. Limitations of currently used biomarkers are that they are secretory biomarkers (chromogranin A, serotonin, neuron-specific enolase and pancreastatin); monoanalyte measurements; and lack sensitivity, specificity and predictive capacity. None of them meet the NIH metrics for clinical usage. A multinational, multidisciplinary Delphi consensus meeting of NEN experts (n = 33) assessed current imaging strategies and biomarkers in NEN management. Consensus (>75%) was achieved for 78% of the 142 questions. The panel concluded that morphological imaging has a diagnostic value. However, both imaging and current single-analyte biomarkers exhibit substantial limitations in measuring the disease status and predicting the therapeutic efficacy. RECIST remains suboptimal as a metric. A critical unmet need is the development of a clinico-biological tool to provide enhanced information regarding precise disease status and treatment response. The group considered that circulating RNA was better than current general NEN biomarkers and preliminary clinical data were considered promising. It was resolved that circulating multianalyte mRNA (NETest) had clinical utility in both diagnosis and monitoring disease status and therapeutic efficacy. Overall, it was concluded that a combination of tumor spatial and functional imaging with circulating transcripts (mRNA) would represent the future strategy for real-time monitoring of disease progress and therapeutic efficacy. © 2016 The authors.

  12. Facial reanimation by muscle-nerve neurotization after facial nerve sacrifice. Case report.

    PubMed

    Taupin, A; Labbé, D; Babin, E; Fromager, G

    2016-12-01

    Recovering a certain degree of mimicry after sacrifice of the facial nerve is a clinically recognized finding. The authors report a case of hemifacial reanimation suggesting a phenomenon of neurotization from muscle-to-nerve. A woman benefited from a parotidectomy with sacrifice of the left facial nerve indicated for recurrent tumor in the gland. The distal branches of the facial nerve, isolated at the time of resection, were buried in the masseter muscle underneath. The patient recovered a voluntary hémifacial motricity. The electromyographic analysis of the motor activity of the zygomaticus major before and after block of the masseter nerve showed a dependence between mimic muscles and the masseter muscle. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the spontaneous reanimation of facial paralysis. The clinical case makes it possible to argue in favor of muscle-to-nerve neurotization from masseter muscle to distal branches of the facial nerve. It illustrates the quality of motricity that can be obtained thanks to this procedure. The authors describe a simple implantation technique of distal branches of the facial nerve in the masseter muscle during a radical parotidectomy with facial nerve sacrifice and recovery of resting tone but also a quality voluntary mimicry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Significance of serum and bile tumor markers in the diagnostic approach of patients with malignant pancreatobiliary disease.

    PubMed

    Natsios, Athanasios; Vezakis, Antonios; Kaparos, Georgios; Fragulidis, Georgios; Karakostas, Nikolaos; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Logothetis, Emmanouil; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Serum and bile tumor markers are under intense scrutiny for the diagnosis of malignant disease. The purpose of our study was to report the usefulness of serum and bile tumor markers for the discrimination between benign and malignant pancreatobiliary diseases. Between March 2010 and May 2013, 95 patients with obstructive jaundice or history of biliary obstruction, were included in the study. During ERCP, bile samples were obtained for measurement of tumor markers CEA, CA19- 9, CA125, CA72-4 and CA242. Serum samples were taken before ERCP for the same measurements. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with malignant disease and patients with benign disease. Serum tumor marker levels were significantly higher in patients with malignant disease. Serum CA242 and CA19-9 exhibited the highest diagnostic accuracy (76.8% and 73.7%, respectively). CA125 and CA72-4 levels in bile samples were significantly higher in patients with malignant disease. Bile CA125, CEA and CA72-4 achieved the best diagnostic accuracy (69, 65 and 65), respectively). The combined detection of CA19-9, CA242 in serum and CA125, CA72-4 in bile along with total bilirubin levels, showed the best diagnostic accuracy (81%). Serum and bile tumor markers, when studied alone, lack the diagnostic yield to discriminate benign from malignant pancreatobiliary diseases. In cases of diagnostic dilemmas the combination of serum and bile markers might be helpful.

  14. IMRT for Sinonasal Tumors Minimizes Severe Late Ocular Toxicity and Preserves Disease Control and Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic, E-mail: frederic.duprez@ugent.be; Madani, Indira; Morbee, Lieve

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report late ocular (primary endpoint) and other toxicity, disease control, and survival (secondary endpoints) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2009, 130 patients with nonmetastatic sinonasal tumors were treated with IMRT at Ghent University Hospital. Prescription doses were 70 Gy (n = 117) and 60-66 Gy (n = 13) at 2 Gy per fraction over 6-7 weeks. Most patients had adenocarcinoma (n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (n = 23). One hundred and one (101) patients were treated postoperatively. Of 17 patients with recurrent tumors, 9 were reirradiated. T-stages weremore » T1-2 (n = 39), T3 (n = 21), T4a (n = 38), and T4b (n = 22). Esthesioneuroblastoma was staged as Kadish A, B, and C in 1, 3, and 6 cases, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 52, range 15-121 months. There was no radiation-induced blindness in 86 patients available for late toxicity assessment ({>=}6 month follow-up). We observed late Grade 3 tearing in 10 patients, which reduced to Grade 1-2 in 5 patients and Grade 3 visual impairment because of radiation-induced ipsilateral retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma in 1 patient. There was no severe dry eye syndrome. The worst grade of late ocular toxicity was Grade 3 (n = 11), Grade 2 (n = 31), Grade 1 (n = 33), and Grade 0 (n = 11). Brain necrosis and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6 and 1 patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival were 59% and 52%, respectively. On multivariate analysis local control was negatively affected by cribriform plate and brain invasion (p = 0.044 and 0.029, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.009); overall survival was negatively affected by cribriform plate and orbit invasion (p = 0.04 and <0.001, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT for sinonasal tumors allowed delivering high doses to targets at minimized ocular toxicity, while maintaining disease control and

  15. Incidental finding of upper lip Warthin tumor.

    PubMed

    Petrocelli, Marzia; Sbordone, Carolina; Salzano, Giovanni; Orabona, Giovanni Dell'Aversana; Cassandro, Francesco Maria; Fusetti, Stefano; Califano, Luigi; Cassandro, Ettore

    2017-11-14

    This report shows an incidental finding of Warthin tumor in upper lip mucosa during hospitalization for a biting lesion of cheek mucosa MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 32-year-old male affected by a biting lesion of cheek mucosa was presented at Maxillo- Facial Unit of Federico II University. Clinical examination showed as an incidental finding a solid mass in the superficial layer of upper lip mucosa. We performed mini-invasive surgical treatment to obtain a radical excision of the cheek lesion at the same time as excision of Warthin tumor. a follow up of 12 months was performed. The complete healing of the two wounds was achieved, with no recurrence of any of the pathologies. The location of this Warthin tumor of minor salivary glands is very unusual. The role of imaging in diagnosis of Warthin tumor of minor salivary glands is to define localization, shape and dimension, contour, malignant features, nodal involvement. The role of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is critical in the diagnosis and therapy of minor salivary gland tumors. The surgical treatment in patients affected by Warthin tumour of minor salivary glands is local excision with a wide tumor free margin to prevent potential recurrence. Warthin tumor of minor salivary glands is a rare disease. We report a singular case of Warthin tumor localized in the upper lip mucosa, found as an incidental finding during a recovery for a biting lesion of cheek mucosa. Incidental finding, Minor salivary glands, Warthin tumor.

  16. Preoperative Identification of Facial Nerve in Vestibular Schwannomas Surgery Using Diffusion Tensor Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Sik; Kim, Min-Su; Kwon, Hyeok-Gyu; Jang, Sung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective Facial nerve palsy is a common complication of treatment for vestibular schwannoma (VS), so preserving facial nerve function is important. The preoperative visualization of the course of facial nerve in relation to VS could help prevent injury to the nerve during the surgery. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) for preoperative identification of facial nerve. Methods We prospectively collected data from 11 patients with VS, who underwent preoperative DTT for facial nerve. Imaging results were correlated with intraoperative findings. Postoperative DTT was performed at postoperative 3 month. Facial nerve function was clinically evaluated according to the House-Brackmann (HB) facial nerve grading system. Results Facial nerve courses on preoperative tractography were entirely correlated with intraoperative findings in all patients. Facial nerve was located on the anterior of the tumor surface in 5 cases, on anteroinferior in 3 cases, on anterosuperior in 2 cases, and on posteroinferior in 1 case. In postoperative facial nerve tractography, preservation of facial nerve was confirmed in all patients. No patient had severe facial paralysis at postoperative one year. Conclusion This study shows that DTT for preoperative identification of facial nerve in VS surgery could be a very accurate and useful radiological method and could help to improve facial nerve preservation. PMID:25289119

  17. Small vestibular schwannomas presenting with facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Espahbodi, Mana; Carlson, Matthew L; Fang, Te-Yung; Thompson, Reid C; Haynes, David S

    2014-06-01

    To describe the surgical management and convalescence of two patients presenting with severe facial nerve weakness associated with small intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (VS). Retrospective review. Two adult female patients presenting with audiovestibular symptoms and subacute facial nerve paralysis (House-Brackmann Grade IV and V). In both cases, post-contrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing lesion within the internal auditory canal without lateral extension beyond the fundus. Translabyrinthine exploration demonstrated vestibular nerve origin of tumor, extrinsic to the facial nerve, and frozen section pathology confirmed schwannoma. Gross total tumor resection with VIIth cranial nerve preservation and decompression of the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was performed. Both patients recovered full motor function between 6 and 8 months after surgery. Although rare, small VS may cause severe facial neuropathy, mimicking the presentation of facial nerve schwannomas and other less common pathologies. In the absence of labyrinthine extension on MRI, surgical exploration is the only reliable means of establishing a diagnosis. In the case of confirmed VS, early gross total resection with facial nerve preservation and labyrinthine segment decompression may afford full motor recovery-an outcome that cannot be achieved with facial nerve grafting.

  18. Circulating Tumor Cells Predict Occult Metastatic Disease and Prognosis in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Court, Colin M; Ankeny, Jacob S; Sho, Shonan; Winograd, Paul; Hou, Shuang; Song, Min; Wainberg, Zev A; Girgis, Mark D; Graeber, Thomas G; Agopian, Vatche G; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Tomlinson, James S

    2018-04-01

    Occult metastatic tumors, below imaging thresholds, are a limitation of staging systems that rely on cross-sectional imaging alone and are a cause of the routine understaging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We investigated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as a preoperative predictor of occult metastatic disease and as a prognostic biomarker for PDAC patients. A total of 126 patients (100 with cancer, 26 with benign disease) were enrolled in our study and CTCs were identified and enumerated from 4 mL of venous blood using the microfluidic NanoVelcro assay. CTC enumeration was correlated with clinicopathologic variables and outcomes following both surgical and systemic therapies. CTCs were identified in 78% of PDAC patients and CTC counts correlated with increasing stage (ρ = 0.42, p < 0.001). Of the 53 patients taken for potentially curative surgery, 13 (24.5%) had occult metastatic disease intraoperatively. Patients with occult disease had significantly more CTCs than patients with local disease only (median 7 vs. 1 CTC, p < 0.0001). At a cut-off of three or more CTCs/4 mL, CTCs correctly identified patients with occult metastatic disease preoperatively (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76-0.98, p < 0.0001). CTCs were a univariate predictor of recurrence-free survival following surgery [hazard ratio (HR) 2.36, 95% CI 1.17-4.78, p = 0.017], as well as an independent predictor of overall survival on multivariate analysis (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.01-1.88, p = 0.040). CTCs show promise as a prognostic biomarker for PDAC patients at all stages of disease being treated both medically and surgically. Furthermore, CTCs demonstrate potential as a preoperative biomarker for identifying patients at high risk of occult metastatic disease.

  19. Facial Soft Tissue Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kretlow, James D.; McKnight, Aisha J.; Izaddoost, Shayan A.

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic facial soft tissue injuries are commonly encountered in the emergency department by plastic surgeons and other providers. Although rarely life-threatening, the treatment of these injuries can be complex and may have significant impact on the patient's facial function and aesthetics. This article provides a review of the relevant literature related to this topic and describes the authors' approach to the evaluation and management of the patient with facial soft tissue injuries. PMID:22550459

  20. Guide to Understanding Facial Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to many different facial muscles. These muscles control facial expression. The coordinated activity of this nerve and these ... involves a weakness of the muscles responsible for facial expression and side-to-side eye movement. Moebius syndrome ...

  1. [Emergent Caesarean Section in a Patient with a Mediastinal Tumor and Von Recklinghausen Disease: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Owada, Mayuko; Inomata, Shinichi; Danmura, Masato; Yamada, Kumiko; Tanaka, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    It is rare to encounter a pregnant patient with a mediastinal tumor, and if the tumor size increases as the pregnancy progresses, this increase can cause complications such as airway constriction and vascular occlusion. We report a case of a pregnant patient diagnosed with von Recklinghausen disease at the age of seven and diagnosed with a mediastinal tumors just after her present admission. The impending suffocation progressed and fetal heart rate decreased during her hospitalization. Her trachea was intubated and she was moved to an operating room for an emergent cesarean section under general anesthesia. With this rapid response, we could rescue both patient and infant. If the size of mediastinal tumor increases as pregnancy progresses, the tumor will cause suffocation by airway compression from the outside, in addition to specific airway edema on the inward side. The present case demonstrates that appropriate desisoins must be made for airway manegement and initiation of surgery.

  2. Proactive infectious disease approach to dermatologic patients who are taking tumor necrosis factor-alfa antagonists: Part II. Screening for patients on tumor necrosis factor-alfa antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chirch, Lisa M; Cataline, Philip R; Dieckhaus, Kevin D; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alfa levels are linked to disease severity in patients with inflammatory conditions, such as psoriasis. Inhibitors of this cytokine are commonly used with significant success in the treatment of such inflammatory disorders. Their use, however, can be plagued by infectious complications. An awareness of potential infections associated with these therapies is critical in order to maximize preventive efforts both before and during therapy. This review provides a guide for dermatologists caring for patients in need of this type of biologic therapy to preemptively address the infectious risks. Part II of this continuing medical education article reviews recommended screening methods for patients undergoing evaluations for tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy for psoriasis or other dermatologic diseases, and discusses possible prophylactic strategies to use, including the appropriate use of immunizations. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Preventive medicine for von Hippel-Lindau disease-associated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Tobias; Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Links, Thera P; Wellner, Ulrich; Bancos, Irina; Kvachenyuk, Andrey; Villar Gómez de Las Heras, Karina; Yukina, Marina; Petrov, Roman; Bullivant, Garrett; von Duecker, Laura; Jadhav, Swati S; Ploeckinger, Ursula; Welin, Staffan; Schalin-Jantti, Camilla; Gimm, Oliver; Pfeifer, Marija; Ngeow, Joanne; Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia; Sanso, Gabriela; Qi, Xiao-Ping; Ugurlu, Umit; Diaz, Rene Eduardo; Wohllk, Nelson; Peczkowska, Mariola; Aberle, Jens; Lourenço, Delmar Muniz; Pereira, Maria Adelaide; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares; Hoff, Ana O; Almeida, Madson Queiroz; Violante, Alice H D; Quidute, Ana R P; Zhang, Zheiwei; Recasens, Monica; Robles Diaz, Luis; Kunavisarut, Tada; Wannachalee, Taweesak; Sirinvaravong, Sirinart; Jonasch, Eric; Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Fraenkel, Merav; Beltsevich, Dmitry; Egorov, Viacheslav I; Bausch, Dirk; Schott, Matthias; Tiling, Nikolaus; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Zschiedrich, Stefan; Därr, Roland; Ruf, Juri; Denecke, Timm; Link, Karl-Heinrich; Zovato, Stefania; von Dobschuetz, Ernst; Yaremchuk, Svetlana; Amthauer, Holger; Makay, Ozer; Patocs, Attila; Walz, Martin K; Huber, Tobias B; Seufert, Jochen; Hellman, Per; Kim, Raymond H; Kuchinskaya, Ekaterina; Schiavi, Francesca; Malinoc, Angelica; Reisch, Nicole; Jarzab, Barbara; Barontini, Marta; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Shah, Nalini; Young, William; Opocher, Giuseppe; Eng, Charis; Neumann, Hartmut P H; Bausch, Birke

    2018-05-10

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are rare in von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) but cause serious morbidity and mortality. Management guidelines for VHL-PanNETs continue to be based on limited evidence, and survival data to guide surgical management are lacking. We established the European-American-Asian-VHL-PanNET-Registry to assess data for risks for metastases, survival and long-term outcomes to provide best management recommendations. Of 2,330 VHL patients, 273 had a total of 484 PanNETs. Median age at diagnosis of PanNET was 35 years (range 10-75). Fifty-five (20%) patients had metastatic PanNETs. Metastatic PanNETs were significantly larger (median size 5 vs 2 cm; P<0.001) and tumor volume doubling time (TVDT) was faster (22 vs 126 months; P=0.001). All metastatic tumors were ≥2.8 cm. Codons 161 and 167 were hotspots for VHL germline mutations with enhanced risk for metastatic PanNETs. Multivariate prediction modeling disclosed maximum tumor diameter and TVDT as significant predictors for metastatic disease (positive and negative predictive values of 51% and 100% for diameter cutoff ≥2.8 cm, 44% and 91% for TVDT cutoff of ≤24 months). In 117/273 patients, PanNETs >1.5 cm in diameter were operated. Ten-year survival was significantly longer in operated vs non-operated patients, in particular for PanNETs <2.8cm vs ≥2.8 cm (94% vs 85% by 10 years; P=0.020; 80% vs 50% at 10 years; P=0.030). This study demonstrates that patients with PanNET approaching the cut-off diameter of 2.8 cm should be operated. Mutations in exon 3, especially of codons 161/167 are at enhanced risk for metastatic PanNETs. Survival is significantly longer in operated non-metastatic VHL-PanNETs.

  4. Improving posttraumatic facial scars.

    PubMed

    Ardeshirpour, Farhad; Shaye, David A; Hilger, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Posttraumatic soft-tissue injuries of the face are often the most lasting sequelae of facial trauma. The disfigurement of posttraumatic scarring lies in both their physical deformity and psychosocial ramifications. This review outlines a variety of techniques to improve facial scars and limit their lasting effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to Chronic Otitis Media: Prognosis in Restoration of Facial Function after Surgical Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin; Jung, Gu-Hyun; Park, See-Young

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Facial paralysis is an uncommon but significant complication of chronic otitis media (COM). Surgical eradication of the disease is the most viable way to overcome facial paralysis therefrom. In an effort to guide treatment of this rare complication, we analyzed the prognosis of facial function after surgical treatment. Materials and Methods A total of 3435 patients with COM, who underwent various otologic surgeries throughout a period of 20 years, were analyzed retrospectively. Forty six patients (1.33%) had facial nerve paralysis caused by COM. We analyzed prognostic factors including delay of surgery, the extent of disease, presence or absence of cholesteatoma and the type of surgery affecting surgical outcomes. Results Surgical intervention had a good effect on the restoration of facial function in cases of shorter duration of onset of facial paralysis to surgery and cases of sudden onset, without cholesteatoma. No previous ear surgery and healthy bony labyrinth indicated a good postoperative prognosis. Conclusion COM causing facial paralysis is most frequently due to cholesteatoma and the presence of cholesteatoma decreased the effectiveness of surgical treatment and indicated a poor prognosis after surgery. In our experience, early surgical intervention can be crucial to recovery of facial function. To prevent recurrent cholesteatoma, which leads to local destruction of the facial nerve, complete eradication of the disease in one procedure cannot be overemphasized for the treatment of patients with COM. PMID:22477011

  6. Advances in facial reanimation.

    PubMed

    Tate, James R; Tollefson, Travis T

    2006-08-01

    Facial paralysis often has a significant emotional impact on patients. Along with the myriad of new surgical techniques in managing facial paralysis comes the challenge of selecting the most effective procedure for the patient. This review delineates common surgical techniques and reviews state-of-the-art techniques. The options for dynamic reanimation of the paralyzed face must be examined in the context of several patient factors, including age, overall health, and patient desires. The best functional results are obtained with direct facial nerve anastomosis and interpositional nerve grafts. In long-standing facial paralysis, temporalis muscle transfer gives a dependable and quick result. Microvascular free tissue transfer is a reliable technique with reanimation potential whose results continue to improve as microsurgical expertise increases. Postoperative results can be improved with ancillary soft tissue procedures, as well as botulinum toxin. The paper provides an overview of recent advances in facial reanimation, including preoperative assessment, surgical reconstruction options, and postoperative management.

  7. ZNF687 Mutations in Severe Paget Disease of Bone Associated with Giant Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Divisato, Giuseppina; Formicola, Daniela; Esposito, Teresa; Merlotti, Daniela; Pazzaglia, Laura; Del Fattore, Andrea; Siris, Ethel; Orcel, Philippe; Brown, Jacques P; Nuti, Ranuccio; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Benassi, Maria Serena; Cancela, M Leonor; Michou, Laetitia; Rendina, Domenico; Gennari, Luigi; Gianfrancesco, Fernando

    2016-02-04

    Paget disease of bone (PDB) is a skeletal disorder characterized by focal abnormalities of bone remodeling, which result in enlarged and deformed bones in one or more regions of the skeleton. In some cases, the pagetic tissue undergoes neoplastic transformation, resulting in osteosarcoma and, less frequently, in giant cell tumor of bone (GCT). We performed whole-exome sequencing in a large family with 14 PDB-affected members, four of whom developed GCT at multiple pagetic skeletal sites, and we identified the c.2810C>G (p.Pro937Arg) missense mutation in the zinc finger protein 687 gene (ZNF687). The mutation precisely co-segregated with the clinical phenotype in all affected family members. The sequencing of seven unrelated individuals with GCT associated with PDB (GCT/PDB) identified the same mutation in all individuals, unravelling a founder effect. ZNF687 is highly expressed during osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis and is dramatically upregulated in the tumor tissue of individuals with GCT/PDB. Interestingly, our preliminary findings showed that ZNF687, indicated as a target gene of the NFkB transcription factor by ChIP-seq analysis, is also upregulated in the peripheral blood of PDB-affected individuals with (n = 5) or without (n = 6) mutations in SQSTM1, encouraging additional studies to investigate its potential role as a biomarker of PDB risk. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ZNF687 Mutations in Severe Paget Disease of Bone Associated with Giant Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Divisato, Giuseppina; Formicola, Daniela; Esposito, Teresa; Merlotti, Daniela; Pazzaglia, Laura; Del Fattore, Andrea; Siris, Ethel; Orcel, Philippe; Brown, Jacques P.; Nuti, Ranuccio; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Benassi, Maria Serena; Cancela, M. Leonor; Michou, Laetitia; Rendina, Domenico; Gennari, Luigi; Gianfrancesco, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Paget disease of bone (PDB) is a skeletal disorder characterized by focal abnormalities of bone remodeling, which result in enlarged and deformed bones in one or more regions of the skeleton. In some cases, the pagetic tissue undergoes neoplastic transformation, resulting in osteosarcoma and, less frequently, in giant cell tumor of bone (GCT). We performed whole-exome sequencing in a large family with 14 PDB-affected members, four of whom developed GCT at multiple pagetic skeletal sites, and we identified the c.2810C>G (p.Pro937Arg) missense mutation in the zinc finger protein 687 gene (ZNF687). The mutation precisely co-segregated with the clinical phenotype in all affected family members. The sequencing of seven unrelated individuals with GCT associated with PDB (GCT/PDB) identified the same mutation in all individuals, unravelling a founder effect. ZNF687 is highly expressed during osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis and is dramatically upregulated in the tumor tissue of individuals with GCT/PDB. Interestingly, our preliminary findings showed that ZNF687, indicated as a target gene of the NFkB transcription factor by ChIP-seq analysis, is also upregulated in the peripheral blood of PDB-affected individuals with (n = 5) or without (n = 6) mutations in SQSTM1, encouraging additional studies to investigate its potential role as a biomarker of PDB risk. PMID:26849110

  9. Safety of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy during pregnancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Androulakis, Ioannis; Zavos, Christos; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Mastorakos, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2015-12-21

    Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease has significantly improved since the introduction of biological agents, such as infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, and golimumab. The Food and Drug Administration has classified these factors in category B, which means that they do not demonstrate a fetal risk. However, during pregnancy fetuses are exposed to high anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels that are measurable in their plasma after birth. Since antibodies can transfer through the placenta at the end of the second and during the third trimesters, it is important to know the safety profile of these drugs, particularly for the fetus, and whether maintaining relapse of the disease compensates for the potential risks of fetal exposure. The limited data available for the anti-TNF drugs to date have not demonstrated any significant adverse outcomes in the pregnant women who continued their therapy from conception to the first trimester of gestation. However, data suggest that anti-TNFs should be discontinued during the third trimester, as they may affect the immunological system of the newborn baby. Each decision should be individualized, based on the distinct characteristics of the patient and her disease. Considering all the above, there is a need for more clinical studies regarding the effect of anti-TNF therapeutic agents on pregnancy outcomes.

  10. Exploring Spirituality in Family Caregivers of Patients With Primary Malignant Brain Tumors Across the Disease Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Alyssa G.; Jean Choi, Chien-Wen; Donovan, Heidi S.; Schulz, Richard; Bender, Catherine; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine whether the perceived level of spirituality in family caregivers of patients with primary malignant brain tumors (PMBTs) changes across the disease trajectory. Design Ongoing descriptive, longitudinal study. Setting Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sample 50 family caregivers of patients with PMBT. Methods Caregivers and care recipients were recruited at time of diagnosis. Participants were interviewed at two subse-quent time points, four and eight months following diagnosis. Main Research Variables Care recipients’ symptoms, neuro-psychologic status, and physical function, as well as caregiver social support. Findings Results showed no significant difference in spirituality scores reported at baseline and eight months (p = 0.8), suggesting that spirituality may be a stable trait across the disease trajectory. Conclusions Spirituality remains relatively stable along the course of the disease trajectory. Reports of caregiver depressive symptoms and anxiety were lower when paired with higher reports of spirituality. Implications for Nursing Clinicians can better identify caregivers at risk for negative outcomes by identifying those who report lower levels of spirituality. Future interventions should focus on the development and implementation of interventions that provide protective buffers such as increased social support. Knowledge Translation Spirituality is a relatively stable trait. High levels of spirituality can serve as a protective buffer from negative mental health outcomes. Caregivers with low levels of spirituality may be at risk for greater levels of burden, anxiety, and stress. PMID:23615145

  11. Update on anti-tumor necrosis factor agents and other new drugs for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Benjamin L; Sachar, David B

    2017-06-19

    The treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD)-has evolved beyond surgery with the introduction of biologic agents, primarily antibodies against mediators of inflammation and cell attraction. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents have been the first line treatment for moderate to severe ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease for more than 15 years. During that time much has been learnt about how best to use these agents. This review will assess the evidence on how to optimize the use of anti-TNF agents; when and how to start treatment; how to monitor treatment and when to de-escalate it; and the potential adverse effects of these drugs. New and emerging treatments such as anti-attractants, anti-interleukins, and Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors will also be discussed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Digital PCR analysis of circulating tumor DNA: a biomarker for chondrosarcoma diagnosis, prognostication, and residual disease detection.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, Alice; Rathbone, Victoria M; Gibbons, Rebecca; Bi, Mark; Archard, Nicholas; Davies, Kate E J; Brown, Jake; Plagnol, Vincent; Pillay, Nischalan; Amary, Fernanda; O'Donnell, Paul; Gupta, Manu; Tirabosco, Roberto; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Forshew, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Conventional chondrosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in adults. Prognosis corresponds with tumor grade but remains variable, especially for individuals with grade (G) II disease. There are currently no biomarkers available for monitoring or prognostication of chondrosarcoma. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) has recently emerged as a promising biomarker for a broad range of tumor types. To date, little has been done to study the presence of ctDNA and its potential utility in the management of sarcomas, including chondrosarcoma. In this study, we have assessed ctDNA levels in a cohort of 71 patients, 32 with sarcoma, including 29 individuals with central chondrosarcoma (CS) and 39 with locally aggressive and benign bone and soft tissue tumors, using digital PCR. In patients with CS, ctDNA was detected in pretreatment samples in 14/29 patients, which showed clear correlation with tumor grade as demonstrated by the detection of ctDNA in all patients with GIII and dedifferentiated disease (n = 6) and in 8/17 patients with GII disease, but never associated with GI CS. Notably detection of ctDNA preoperatively in GII disease was associated with a poor outcome. A total of 14 patients with CS had ctDNA levels assessed at multiple time points and in most patients there was a clear reduction following surgical removal. This research lays the foundation for larger studies to assess the utility of ctDNA for chondrosarcoma diagnosis, prognostication, early detection of residual disease and monitoring disease progression. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Pituitary tumor with gigantism, acromegaly and preclinical Cushing's disease diagnosed from the 10th row.

    PubMed

    Tourtelot, John B; Vesely, David L

    2013-08-01

    A 7'3" basketball player was noted to have 2 to 3 times thicker tissue in his hands than 6'10" players by an endocrinologist sitting 10 rows above the player in a basketball arena. This led to the diagnosis of pituitary gigantism where the history revealed that he was 7'3" at 15 years of age. At age 19 when the acryl enlargement was noted, a diagnostic workup revealed elevated growth hormones and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) with a 2 × 1.3 cm pituitary tumor. His history suggested that his epiphyseal plates had closed at age 15, and because he continued to produce IGF-1, he now has acromegaly. His elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) before surgery suggests that he also had preclinical Cushing's disease. After pituitary transsphenoidal surgery, all acryl enlargement in hands and ligaments disappeared. His growth hormone, IGF-1 and ACTH returned to normal 2 weeks after surgery.

  14. Broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric phenotypes associated with white matter disease in PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Balci, Tugce B; Davila, Jorge; Lewis, Denice; Boafo, Addo; Sell, Erick; Richer, Julie; Nikkel, Sarah M; Armour, Christine M; Tomiak, Eva; Lines, Matthew A; Sawyer, Sarah L

    2018-01-01

    White matter lesions have been described in patients with PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS). How these lesions correlate with the neurocognitive features associated with PTEN mutations, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or developmental delay, has not been well established. We report nine patients with PTEN mutations and white matter changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), eight of whom were referred for reasons other than developmental delay or ASD. Their clinical presentations ranged from asymptomatic macrocephaly with normal development/intellect, to obsessive compulsive disorder, and debilitating neurological disease. To our knowledge, this report constitutes the first detailed description of PTEN-related white matter changes in adult patients and in children with normal development and intelligence. We present a detailed assessment of the neuropsychological phenotype of our patients and discuss the relationship between the wide array of neuropsychiatric features and observed white matter findings in the context of these individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Intratemporal facial nerve ultrastructure in patients with idiopathic facial paralysis: viral infection evidence study.

    PubMed

    Florez, Rosangela Aló Maluza; Lang, Raquel; Veridiano, Adriano Mora; Zanini, Renato de Oliveira; Calió, Pedro Luiz; Simões, Ricardo Dos Santos; Testa, José Ricardo Gurgel

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic peripheral facial palsy (IPFP) is still uncertain; however, some authors suggest the possibility of a viral infection. to analyze the ultrastructure of the facial nerve seeking viral evidences that might provide etiological data. We studied 20 patients with peripheral facial palsy (PFP), with moderate to severe FP, of both genders, between 18-60 years of age, from the Clinic of Facial Nerve Disorders. The patients were broken down into two groups - Study: eleven patients with IPFP and Control: nine patients with trauma or tumor-related PFP. The fragments were obtained from the facial nerve sheath or from fragments of its stumps - which would be discarded or sent to pathology exam during the facial nerve repair surgery. The removed tissue was fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde, and studied under Electronic Transmission Microscopy. In the study group we observed an intense repair cellular activity by increased collagen fibers, fibroblasts containing developed organelles, free of viral particles. In the control group this repair activity was not evident, but no viral particles were observed. There were no viral particles, and there were evidences of intense activity of repair or viral infection.

  16. [A text-book case of tropical facial elephantiasis].

    PubMed

    Dilu, N-J; Sokolo, R

    2007-02-01

    Tropical facial elephantiasis is a nosological entity which can arise from various underlying causes: von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis, lymphatic and cutaneodermal filarioses, deep mycosis. We report an exceptional case of tropical facial elephantiasis caused by onchocercosis and entomophtoromycosis (rhinophycomycosis). The patient's facial morphology was noted "hippopotamus-face" or "dog-face". Onchocercosis and entomophtoromycosis are two diseases known to cause facial elephantiasis. We have not however been able to find any case report in the literature of co-morbidity nor any information on factors predictive of concomitant occurrence.

  17. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  18. Marek's disease in backyard chickens, a study of pathological findings and viral loads in tumorous and non-tumorous birds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a major cause of mortality in backyard chickens. The diagnosis of MD is complex, however, and knowledge on Marek’s disease virus (MDV) in spontaneous field cases such as in backyard chickens is largely unknown. Forty backyard chickens with presumptive MD diagnosis based on hi...

  19. Diagnostic value of inflammatory cell infiltrates, tumor stroma percentage and disease-free survival in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Kisielewski, Wojciech; Kańczuga-Koda, Luiza; Koda, Mariusz; Famulski, Waldemar

    2017-01-01

    disease-free survival (DFS) time (P=0.004). Inflammatory cell infiltrate in the invasive front was identified as an independent predictive factor in CRC (P=0.041). In conclusion, the degree of inflammatory cell infiltration in the invasive front of the primary tumor significantly affects various variables that determine disease progression and DFS rates of patients with CRC. Furthermore, the routine histopathological assessment of this parameter in tissue stained with H&E may have potential prognostic value. PMID:28927159

  20. Proactive infectious disease approach to dermatologic patients who are taking tumor necrosis factor-alfa antagonists: Part I. Risks associated with tumor necrosis factor-alfa antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chirch, Lisa M; Cataline, Philip R; Dieckhaus, Kevin D; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alfa levels are linked to disease severity in patients with inflammatory conditions, such as psoriasis. Inhibitors of this cytokine are commonly used with significant success in the treatment of such inflammatory disorders. Their use, however, can be plagued by infectious complications. An awareness of potential infections associated with these therapies is critical in order to maximize preventive efforts both before and during therapy. This review provides a guide for dermatologists caring for patients in need of this type of biologic therapy to preemptively address the infectious risks. Part I of this continuing medical education article reviews background information on the various infectious risks associated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy and appropriate historical data to obtain in the context of pretherapy evaluations. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Co-registration of multi-modality imaging allows for comprehensive analysis of tumor-induced bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, Erin H.; Wilson, Kevin J.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Johnson, Rachelle W.; Gore, John C.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Matrisian, Lynn M.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases are a clinically significant problem that arises in approximately 70% of metastatic breast cancer patients. Once established in bone, tumor cells induce changes in the bone microenvironment that lead to bone destruction, pain, and significant morbidity. While much is known about the later stages of bone disease, less is known about the earlier stages or the changes in protein expression in the tumor micro-environment. Due to promising results of combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MALDI IMS) ion images in the brain, we developed methods for applying these modalities to models of tumor-induced bone disease in order to better understand the changes in protein expression that occur within the tumor-bone microenvironment. Specifically, we integrated three dimensional-volume reconstructions of spatially resolved MALDI IMS with high-resolution anatomical and diffusion weighted MRI data and histology in an intratibial model of breast tumor-induced bone disease. This approach enables us to analyze proteomic profiles from MALDI IMS data with corresponding in vivo imaging and ex vivo histology data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time these three modalities have been rigorously registered in the bone. The MALDI mass-to-charge ratio peaks indicate differential expression of calcyclin, ubiquitin, and other proteins within the tumor cells, while peaks corresponding to hemoglobin A and calgranulin A provided molecular information that aided in the identification of areas rich in red and white blood cells, respectively. This multimodality approach will allow us to comprehensively understand the bone-tumor microenvironment and thus may allow us to better develop and test approaches for inhibiting bone metastases. PMID:24487126

  2. Varicella zoster meningitis complicating combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and corticosteroid therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christopher; Walters, Brennan; Fedorak, Richard N

    2013-06-07

    Opportunistic viral infections are a well-recognized complication of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cases of severe or atypical varicella zoster virus infection, both primary and latent reactivation, have been described in association with immunosuppression of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. However, central nervous system varicella zoster virus infections have been rarely described, and there are no previous reports of varicella zoster virus meningitis associated with anti-TNF therapy among the CD population. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old male with severe ileocecal-CD who developed a reactivation of dermatomal herpes zoster after treatment with prednisone and adalimumab. The reactivation presented as debilitating varicella zoster virus meningitis, which was not completely resolved despite aggressive antiviral therapy with prolonged intravenous acyclovir and subsequent oral valacyclovir. This is the first reported case of opportunistic central nervous system varicella zoster infection complicating anti-TNF therapy in the CD population. This paper also reviews the literature on varicella zoster virus infections of immunosuppressed IBD patients and the importance of vaccination prior to initiation of anti-TNF therapy.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms predict response to anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Netz, Uri; Carter, Jane Victoria; Eichenberger, Maurice Robert; Dryden, Gerald Wayne; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh Nath; Galandiuk, Susan

    2017-07-21

    To investigate genetic factors that might help define which Crohn's disease (CD) patients are likely to benefit from anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. This was a prospective cohort study. Patients were recruited from a university digestive disease practice database. We included CD patients who received anti-TNF therapy, had available medical records (with information on treatment duration and efficacy) and who consented to participation. Patients with allergic reactions were excluded. Patients were grouped as ever-responders or non-responders. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood, and 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were assessed. The main outcome measure (following exposure to the drug) was response to therapy. The patient genotypes were assessed as the predictors of outcome. Possible confounders and effect modifiers included age, gender, race, and socioeconomic status disease, as well as disease characteristics (such as Montreal criteria). 121 patients were included. Twenty-one were non-responders, and 100 were ever-responders. Fas ligand SNP (rs763110) genotype frequencies, TNF gene -308 SNP (rs1800629) genotype frequencies, and their combination, were significantly different between groups on multivariable analysis controlling for Montreal disease behavior and perianal disease. The odds of a patient with a Fas ligand CC genotype being a non-responder were four-fold higher as compared to a TC or TT genotype ( P = 0.009, OR = 4.30, 95%CI: 1.45-12.80). The presence of the A (minor) TNF gene -308 allele correlated with three-fold higher odds of being a non-responder ( P = 0.049, OR = 2.88, 95%CI: 1.01-8.22). Patients with the combination of the Fas ligand CC genotype and the TNF -308 A allele had nearly five-fold higher odds of being a non-responder ( P = 0.015, OR = 4.76, 95%CI: 1.35-16.77). No difference was seen for the remaining SNPs. The Fas-ligand SNP and TNF gene -308 SNP are associated with anti-TNF treatment response in CD and

  4. [Angiotensin converting enzyme: the antigenic properties of the domain, role in Alzheimer's disease and tumor progression].

    PubMed

    Kugaevskaya, E V; Timoshenko, O S; Solovyeva, N I

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, EC 3.4.15.1) was discovered and characterized in the Laboratory of biochemistry and chemical pathology of proteins under the direction of academician V.N. Orekhovich, where its physiological function, associated with a key role in the regulation of the renin-angiotensin (RAS) and the kallikrein-kinin systems that control blood flow in the body and homeostasis was first deciphered. We carried out a search for structural differences between the two highly homologous domains (N- and C-domains) of somatic ACE (sACE); it was based on a comparative analysis of antigenic determinants (or B-epitopes) of both domains. The revealed epitopes were classified with variable and conserved regions and functionally important sites of the molecule ACE. Essential difference was demonstrated between locations of the epitopes in the N- and C-domains. These data indicate the existence of structural differences between the domains of sACE. We studied the role of the domains of ACE in the metabolism of human amyloid beta peptide (Ab) - the main component of senile plaques, found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our results demonstrated that only N-domain ACE cleaved the Ab between residues R5-H6, while, the C-domain of ACE failed to hydrolyze this region. In addition, the effect of post-translational modifications of Ab on its hydrolysis by the ACE was investigated. We show that isomerization of residue D7, a common non-enzymatic age-related modification found in AD-associated species, does not reduce the affinity of the peptide to the N-domain of ACE, and conversely, it increases. According to our data, the role of ACE in the metabolism of Ab becomes more significant in the development of AD. RAS is involved in malignant transformation and tumor progression. RAS components, including ACE and angiotensin II receptors type 1 (AT1R) are expressed in various human tumors. We found a significant increase in the level of ACE activity

  5. Solitary Metastasis to the Facial/Vestibulocochlear Nerve Complex: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ariai, M Shafie; Eggers, Scott D; Giannini, Caterina; Driscoll, Colin L W; Link, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    Distant metastasis of mucinous adenocarcinoma from the gastrointestinal tract, ovaries, pancreas, lungs, breast, or urogenital system is a well-described entity. Mucinous adenocarcinomas from different primary sites are histologically identical with gland cells producing a copious amount of mucin. This report describes a very rare solitary metastasis of a mucinous adenocarcinoma of unknown origin to the facial/vestibulocochlear nerve complex in the cerebellopontine angle. A 71-year-old woman presented with several month history of progressive neurological decline and a negative extensive workup performed elsewhere. She presented to our institution with complete left facial weakness, left-sided deafness, gait unsteadiness, headache and anorexia. A repeat magnetic resonance imaging scan of the head revealed a cystic, enhancing abnormality involving the left cerebellopontine angle and internal auditory canal. A left retrosigmoid craniotomy was performed and the lesion was completely resected. The final pathology was a mucinous adenocarcinoma of indeterminate origin. Postoperatively, the patient continued with her preoperative deficits and subsequently died of her systemic disease 6 weeks after discharge. The facial/vestibulocochlear nerve complex is an unusual location for metastatic disease in the central nervous system. Clinicians should consider metastatic tumor as the possible etiology of an unusual appearing mass in this location causing profound neurological deficits. The prognosis after metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma to the cranial nerves in the cerebellopontine angle may be poor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fibrocytes Regulate Wilms’ Tumor 1-Positive Cell Accumulation in Severe Fibrotic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sontake, Vishwaraj; Shanmukhappa, Shiva K.; DiPasquale, Betsy A.; Reddy, Geereddy B.; Medvedovic, Mario; Hardie, William D.; White, Eric S.; Madala, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-producing myofibroblast transdifferentiation is considered a crucial determinant in the formation of scar tissue in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Multiple resident pulmonary cell types and bone marrow-derived fibrocytes have been implicated as contributors to fibrotic lesions due to the transdifferentiation potential of these cells into myofibroblasts. In this study, we assessed the expression of Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1), a known marker of mesothelial cells, in various cell types in normal and fibrotic lungs. We demonstrate that WT1 is expressed by both mesothelial and mesenchymal cells in IPF lungs, but has limited or no expression in normal human lungs. We also demonstrate that WT1-positive cells accumulate in fibrotic lung lesions, using two different mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis and WT1 promoter-driven fluorescent reporter mice. Reconstitution of bone-marrow cells into a transforming growth factor-α transgenic-mouse model demonstrated that fibrocytes do not transform into WT1-positive mesenchymal cells, but do augment accumulation of WT1-positive cells in severe fibrotic lung disease. Importantly, the number of WT1-positive cells in fibrotic lesions were correlated with severity of lung disease as assessed by changes in lung function, histology, and hydroxyproline levels in mice. Finally, inhibition of WT1 expression was sufficient to attenuate collagen and other extracellular-matrix gene production by mesenchymal cells from both murine and human fibrotic lungs. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate a novel association between fibrocyte-driven WT1-positive cell accumulation and severe fibrotic lung disease. PMID:26371248

  7. Facial paralysis caused by malignant skull base neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Marzo, Sam J; Leonetti, John P; Petruzzelli, Guy

    2002-12-01

    Bell palsy remains the most common cause of facial paralysis. Unfortunately, this term is often erroneously applied to all cases of facial paralysis. The authors performed a retrospective review of data obtained in 11 patients who were treated at a university-based referral practice between July 1988 and September 2001 and who presented with acute facial nerve paralysis mimicking Bell palsy. All patients were subsequently found to harbor an occult skull base neoplasm. A delay in diagnosis was demonstrated in all cases. Seven patients died of their disease, and four patients are currently free of disease. Although Bell palsy remains the most common cause of peripheral facial nerve paralysis, patients in whom neoplasms invade the facial nerve may present with acute paralysis mimicking Bell palsy that fails to resolve. Delays in diagnosis and treatment in such cases may result in increased rates of mortality and morbidity.

  8. Facial paralysis caused by malignant skull base neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Marzo, Sam J; Leonetti, John P; Petruzzelli, Guy

    2002-05-15

    Bell palsy remains the most common cause of facial paralysis. Unfortunately, this term is often erroneously applied to all cases of facial paralysis. The authors performed a retrospective review of data obtained in 11 patients who were treated at a university-based referral practice between July 1988 and September 2001 and who presented with acute facial nerve paralysis mimicking Bell palsy. All patients were subsequently found to harbor an occult skull base neoplasm. A delay in diagnosis was demonstrated in all cases. Seven patients died of their disease, and four patients are currently free of disease. Although Bell palsy remains the most common cause of peripheral facial nerve paralysis, patients in whom neoplasms invade of the facial nerve may present with acute paralysis mimicking Bell palsy that fails to resolve. Delays in diagnosis and treatment in such cases may result in increased rates of mortality and morbidity.

  9. Traumatic facial nerve neuroma with facial palsy presenting in infancy.

    PubMed

    Clark, James H; Burger, Peter C; Boahene, Derek Kofi; Niparko, John K

    2010-07-01

    To describe the management of traumatic neuroma of the facial nerve in a child and literature review. Sixteen-month-old male subject. Radiological imaging and surgery. Facial nerve function. The patient presented at 16 months with a right facial palsy and was found to have a right facial nerve traumatic neuroma. A transmastoid, middle fossa resection of the right facial nerve lesion was undertaken with a successful facial nerve-to-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis. The facial palsy improved postoperatively. A traumatic neuroma should be considered in an infant who presents with facial palsy, even in the absence of an obvious history of trauma. The treatment of such lesion is complex in any age group but especially in young children. Symptoms, age, lesion size, growth rate, and facial nerve function determine the appropriate management.

  10. Facial bacterial infections: folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Ana Cristina; Schwartz, Robert A; Cohen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Facial bacterial infections are most commonly caused by infections of the hair follicles. Wherever pilosebaceous units are found folliculitis can occur, with the most frequent bacterial culprit being Staphylococcus aureus. We review different origins of facial folliculitis, distinguishing bacterial forms from other infectious and non-infectious mimickers. We distinguish folliculitis from pseudofolliculitis and perifolliculitis. Clinical features, etiology, pathology, and management options are also discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. [Dynamics of lagophthalmos depending on facial nerve repair and its intraoperative monitoring in neurosurgical patients].

    PubMed

    Tabachnikova, T V; Serova, N K; Shimansky, V N

    2014-01-01

    Over 200 patients with acoustic neuromas and over 100 patients with posterior cranial fossa meningiomas are annually operated on at the N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. Intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve function is used in most patients with tumors of the posterior cranial fossa to identify the facial nerve in the surgical wound. If the anatomical integrity of the facial nerve in the cranial cavity cannot be retained, facial nerve repair is performed to restore the facial muscle function. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the facial nerve has a great prognostic significance to evaluate the dynamics of lagophthalmos in the late postoperative period and to select the proper method for lagophthalmos correction. When the facial nerve was reinnervated by the descending branch or trunk of the hypoglossal nerve, sufficient eyelid closure was observed only in 3 patients out of 17.

  12. Classifying Facial Actions

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  13. [Facial paralysis in children].

    PubMed

    Muler, H; Paquelin, F; Cotin, G; Luboinski, B; Henin, J M

    1975-01-01

    Facial paralyses in children may be grouped under headings displaying a certain amount of individuality. Chronologically, first to be described are neonatal facial paralyses. These are common and are nearly always cured within a few days. Some of these cases are due to the mastoid being crushed at birth with or without the use of forceps. The intra-osseous pathway of the facial nerve is then affected throughout its length. However, a cure is often spontaneous. When this desirable development does not take place within three months, the nerve should be freed by decompressive surgery. The special anatomy of the facial nerve in the new-born baby makes this a delicate operation. Later, in all stages of acute otitis, acute mastoiditis or chronic otitis, facial paralysis can be seen. Treatment depends on the stage reached by the otitis: paracentesis, mastoidectomy, various scraping procedures, and, of course, antibiotherapy. The other causes of facial paralysis in children are very much less common: a frigore or viral, traumatic, occur ring in the course of acute poliomyelitis, shingles or tumours of the middle ear. To these must be added exceptional causes such as vitamin D intoxication, idiopathic hypercalcaemia and certain haemopathies.

  14. Chimeric anterolateral thigh free flap for reconstruction of complex cranio-orbito-facial defects after skull base cancers resection.

    PubMed

    Cherubino, Mario; Turri-Zanoni, Mario; Battaglia, Paolo; Giudice, Marco; Pellegatta, Igor; Tamborini, Federico; Maggiulli, Francesca; Guzzetti, Luca; Di Giovanna, Danilo; Bignami, Maurizio; Calati, Carolina; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Valdatta, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Complex cranio-orbito-facial defects after skull base cancers resection entail a functional and esthetic reconstruction. The introduction of endoscopic assisted techniques for excision surgery with the advances in reconstructive surgery and anesthesiology allowed to improve the management of such critical patients. We report a series of chimeric anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps used to reconstruct complex cranio-orbital-facial defects after skull base surgery. A retrospective review of patients that underwent cranio-orbito-facial reconstruction using a chimeric ALT flap from March 2013 to October 2015 at a single tertiary care referral Institute was performed. All patients were affected by locally-advanced malignant tumor and the resulting defects involved the skull base in all cases. The ALT flaps were perforator-based flaps with different components: fascia, skin and muscle. The different flap territories had independent vascular supply and were independent of any physical interconnection except where linked by a common source vessel. Ten patients were included in the study. Three patients underwent adjuvant radiotherapy and to chemotherapy. The mean hospitalization time was 21 days (range, 8-24 days). One failure was observed. After a mean follow-up of 12.4 months, 3 patients died of the disease, 2 are alive with disease, while 5 patients (50%) are currently alive without evidence of disease. Chimeric ALT flap is a reliable and versatile reconstructive option for complex cranio-orbito-facial defects resulting from skull base surgery. The chimeric flap composed of different territories proved to be adequate for a patient-tailored three-dimensional reconstruction of the defects as well as able to resist to the postoperative adjuvant treatments. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical characteristics of patients with facial psoriasis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Syed Nong Chek, Sharifah Rosniza; Robinson, Suganthy; Mohd Affandi, Azura; Baharum, Nurakmal

    2016-10-01

    Psoriasis involving the face is visible and can cause considerable emotional distress to patients. Its presence may also confer a poorer prognosis for the patient. This study sought to evaluate the characteristics of facial psoriasis in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study conducted using data from the Malaysian Psoriasis Registry from 2007 to 2011. Specific risk factors, i.e., age, age of onset, gender, duration of disease, obesity group, body surface area, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), family history of psoriasis, nail involvement, psoriatic arthritis, phototherapy, systemic therapy, clinic visit, days of work/school, and hospital admission due to psoriasis in the last 6 months were analyzed. A total of 48.4% of patients had facial psoriasis. Variables significantly associated with facial psoriasis are younger age, younger age of onset of psoriasis of ≤ 40 years, male, severity of psoriasis involving >10% of the body surface area, higher DLQI of >10, nail involvement, and history of hospitalization due to psoriasis. This study found that facial psoriasis is not as rare as previously thought. Ambient ultraviolet light, sebum, and contact with chemicals from facial products may reduce the severity of facial psoriasis, but these factors do not reduce the prevalence of facial psoriasis. The association with younger age, younger age of onset, higher percentage of body surface area involvement, higher DLQI of > 10, nail involvement, and hospitalization due to psoriasis support the notion that facial psoriasis is a marker of severe disease. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  16. Case analysis of temporal bone lesions with facial paralysis as main manifestation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Jing; Ye, Jing-Ying; Li, Xin; Xu, Jia; Yi, Hai-Jin

    2017-08-23

    This study aims to discuss clinical characteristics, image manifestation and treatment methods of temporal bone lesions with facial paralysis as the main manifestation for deepening the understanding of such type of lesions and reducing erroneous and missed diagnosis. The clinical data of 16 patients with temporal bone lesions and facial paralysis as main manifestation, who were diagnosed and treated from 2009 to 2016, were retrospectively analyzed. Among these patients, six patients had congenital petrous bone cholesteatoma (PBC), nine patients had facial nerve schwannoma, and one patient had facial nerve hemangioma. All the patients had an experience of long-term erroneous diagnosis. The lesions were completely excised by surgery. PBC and primary facial nerve tumors were pathologically confirmed. Facial-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis was performed on two patients. HB grade VI was recovered to HB grade V in one patient. The anastomosis failed due to severe facial nerve fibrosis in one patient. Hence, HB remained at grade VI. Postoperative recovery was good for all patients. No lesion recurrence was observed after 1-6 years of follow-up. For the patients with progressive or complete facial paralysis, imaging examination should be perfected in a timely manner. Furthermore, PBC, primary facial nerve tumors and other temporal bone space-occupying lesions should be eliminated. Lesions should be timely detected and proper intervention should be conducted, in order to reduce operation difficulty and complications, and increase the opportunity of facial nerve function reconstruction.

  17. A rare case of an ACTH/CRH co-secreting midgut neuroendocrine tumor mimicking Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Streuli, Regina; Krull, Ina; Brändle, Michael; Kolb, Walter; Stalla, Günter; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Enzler-Tschudy, Annette; Bilz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumors are a very rare cause of Cushing's syndrome and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Differentiating between Cushing's disease and ectopic Cushing's syndrome may be particularly difficult if predominant ectopic CRH secretion leads to pituitary corticotroph hyperplasia that may mimic Cushing's disease during dynamic testing with both dexamethasone and CRH as well as bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS). We present the case of a 24-year-old man diagnosed with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome caused by an ACTH/CRH co-secreting midgut NET. Both high-dose dexamethasone testing and BIPSS suggested Cushing's disease. However, the clinical presentation with a rather rapid onset of cushingoid features, hyperpigmentation and hypokalemia led to the consideration of ectopic ACTH/CRH-secretion and prompted a further workup. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed a cecal mass which was identified as a predominantly CRH-secreting neuroendocrine tumor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumor of the cecum presenting with biochemical features suggestive of Cushing's disease. The discrimination between a Cushing's disease and ectopic Cushing's syndrome is challenging and has many caveats.Ectopic ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumors are very rare.Dynamic tests as well as BIPSS may be compatible with Cushing's disease in ectopic CRH-secretion.High levels of CRH may induce hyperplasia of the corticotroph cells in the pituitary. This could be the cause of a preserved pituitary response to dexamethasone and CRH.Clinical features of ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism with rapid development of Cushing's syndrome, hyperpigmentation, high circulating levels of cortisol with associated hypokalemia, peripheral edema and proximal myopathy should be a warning flag of ectopic Cushing's syndrome and lead to further investigations.

  18. Minimally invasive brow suspension for facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Peter D; Hiltzik, David H; Moche, Jason; Preminger, Aviva

    2003-01-01

    To report a new technique for unilateral brow suspension for facial paralysis that is minimally invasive, limits supraciliary scar formation, does not require specialized endoscopic equipment or expertise, and has proved to be equal to direct brow suspension in durability and symmetry. Retrospective survey of a case series of 23 patients between January 1997 and December 2000. Metropolitan tertiary care center. Patients with head and neck tumors and brow ptosis caused by facial nerve paralysis. The results of the procedure were determined using the following 3-tier rating system: outstanding (excellent elevation and symmetry); acceptable (good elevation and fair symmetry); and unacceptable (loss of elevation). The results were considered outstanding in 12 patients, acceptable in 9 patients, and unacceptable in only 1 patient. One patient developed a hematoma, and 1 patient required a secondary adjustment. The technique has proved to be superior to standard brow suspension procedures with regard to scar formation and equal with respect to facial symmetry and suspension. These results have caused us to abandon direct brow suspension and to use this minimally invasive method in all cases of brow ptosis due to facial paralysis.

  19. PO-60 - Renal tumors with extensive vascular disease: management challenges in a pediatric series from the Hospital for Sick Children.

    PubMed

    Zamperlini-Netto, G; Zanette, A; Wehbi, E; Williams, S; Grant, R M; Brandao, L R

    2016-04-01

    Venous thrombotic events (VTE) are becoming more and more common in children, particularly in the hospital setting. To date, 1 in 200 children admitted to tertiary pediatric hospitals are now being recognized to develop VTE. Amongst those patients with an identified thrombotic occlusion, pediatric patients diagnosed with renal tumors have long been recognized, but their ideal management in the instances of vascular invasion remains controversial. We describe the clinical behavior of patients diagnosed with renal tumors and extra renal vascular involvement at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. A retrospective analysis was conducted in patients diagnosed from 1990 to 2012. Data collected included: age, gender, symptoms at presentation, staging, pathology report, radiological evidence of intravascular thrombus [i.e. renal veins (RV), inferior vena cava (IVC) and right atrium (RA)], intraoperative findings, therapeutic protocol implemented and anticoagulation; for outcomes, tumor and/or thrombus recurrence, thromboembolic phenomena [i.e. pulmonary embolism (PE)] and survival. Of 299 patients with renal tumors identified, 292 were included: Wilms (219), Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC, 29), Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney (CCSK, 12), others (32). The median age of the group was 4.53years (4days - 18 years). Extra renal vascular disease was identified in 29 patients, with a median age 7.05years (0.6-16 years; p=0.03), including Wilms tumors (22/219, 10%), RCC (2/29, 7%), CCSK (1/12, 8.3%) and others (4/32, 12.5%; p=0.01). Vascular involvement comprised exclusive evidence of RV disease (7), IVC disease (19; 15 infra-hepatic), RA disease (3) and PE (5).Treatment escalation because of vascular disease included neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (12; Wilms [11], RCC [1]), intraoperative cavectomy/ thrombectomy (1; Wilms), and cavotomies (11 Wilms [7], RCC [1], CCSK [1], PNET [1], sarcoma [1]). Four patients were placed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Anticoagulation was

  20. Long-Term Facial Nerve Outcomes after Microsurgical Resection of Vestibular Schwannomas in Patients with Preoperative Facial Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Michael A; Hendricks, Benjamin; Sarris, Christina E; Spetzler, Robert F; Almefty, Kaith K; Porter, Randall W

    2018-06-01

    Objectives  This study aimed at evaluating facial nerve outcomes in vestibular schwannoma patients presenting with preoperative facial nerve palsy. Design  A retrospective review. Setting  Single-institution cohort. Participants  Overall, 368 consecutive patients underwent vestibular schwannoma resection. Patients with prior microsurgery or radiosurgery were excluded. Main Outcome Measures  Incidence, House-Brackmann grade. Results  Of 368 patients, 9 had confirmed preoperative facial nerve dysfunction not caused by prior treatment, for an estimated incidence of 2.4%. Seven of these nine patients had Koos grade 4 tumors. Mean tumor diameter was 3.0 cm (range: 2.1-4.4 cm), and seven of nine tumors were subtotally resected. All nine patients were followed up clinically for ≥ 6 months. Of the six patients with a preoperative House-Brackmann grade of II, two improved to grade I, three were stable, and one patient worsened to grade III. Of the three patients with grade III or worse, all remained stable at last follow-up. Conclusions  Preoperative facial nerve palsy is rare in patients with vestibular schwannoma; it tends to occur in patients with relatively large lesions. Detailed long-term outcomes of facial nerve function after microsurgical resection for these patients have not been reported previously. We followed nine patients and found that eight (89%) of the nine patients had either stable or improved facial nerve outcomes after treatment. Management strategies varied for these patients, including rates of subtotal versus gross-total resection and the use of stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with residual tumor. These results can be used to help counsel patients preoperatively on expected outcomes of facial nerve function after treatment.

  1. The reconstruction of male hair-bearing facial regions.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Emily B; Pribaz, Julian J

    2011-01-01

    Loss of hair-bearing regions of the face caused by trauma, tumor resection, or burn presents a difficult reconstructive task for plastic surgeons. The ideal tissue substitute should have the same characteristics as the facial area affected, consisting of thin, pliable tissue with a similar color match and hair-bearing quality. This is a retrospective study of 34 male patients who underwent reconstruction of hair-bearing facial regions performed by the senior author (J.J.P.). Local and pedicled flaps were used primarily to reconstruct defects after tumor extirpation, trauma, infections, and burns. Two patients had irradiation before reconstruction. Two patients had prior facial reconstruction with free flaps. The authors found that certain techniques of reconstructing defects in hair-bearing facial regions were more successful than others in particular facial regions and in different sizes of defects. The authors were able to develop a simple algorithm for management of facial defects involving the hair-bearing regions of the eyebrow, sideburn, beard, and mustache that may prospectively aid the planning of reconstructive strategy in these cases.

  2. Hearing preservation and facial nerve function after microsurgery for intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas: comparison of middle fossa and retrosigmoid approaches.

    PubMed

    Noudel, R; Gomis, P; Duntze, J; Marnet, D; Bazin, A; Roche, P H

    2009-08-01

    Therapeutic options for vestibular schwannomas (VS) include microsurgery, stereotactic radiosurgery and conservative management. Early treatment of intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (IVS) may be advisable because their spontaneous course will show hearing loss in most cases. Advanced microsurgical techniques and continuous intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerves may allow hearing preservation (HP) without facial nerve damage. However, there are still controversies about the definition of hearing preservation, and the best surgical approach that should be used. In this study, we reviewed the main data from the recent literature on IVS surgery and compared hearing, facial function and complication rates after the retrosigmoid (RS) and middle fossa (MF) approaches, respectively. The results showed that the average HP rate after IVS surgery ranged from 58% (RS) to 62% (MF). HP varied widely depending on the audiometric criteria that were used for definition of serviceable hearing. There was a trend to show that the MF approach offered a better quality of postoperative hearing (not statistically significant), whereas the RS approach offered a better facial nerve preservation and fewer complications (not statistically significant). We believe that the timing of treatment in the course of the disease and selection between radiosurgical versus microsurgical procedure are key issues in the management of IVS. Preservation of hearing and good facial nerve function in surgery for VS is a reasonable goal for many patients with intracanalicular tumors and serviceable hearing. Once open surgery has been decided, selection of the approach mainly depends on individual anatomical considerations and experience of the surgeon.

  3. Facial dynamics and emotional expressions in facial aging treatments.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Thierry; Gassia, Véronique; Belhaouari, Lakhdar

    2015-03-01

    Facial expressions convey emotions that form the foundation of interpersonal relationships, and many of these emotions promote and regulate our social linkages. Hence, the facial aging symptomatological analysis and the treatment plan must of necessity include knowledge of the facial dynamics and the emotional expressions of the face. This approach aims to more closely meet patients' expectations of natural-looking results, by correcting age-related negative expressions while observing the emotional language of the face. This article will successively describe patients' expectations, the role of facial expressions in relational dynamics, the relationship between facial structures and facial expressions, and the way facial aging mimics negative expressions. Eventually, therapeutic implications for facial aging treatment will be addressed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Meek, Marcel F

    2009-08-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two cases of sound-induced facial synkinesis (SFS) after facial nerve injury. As far as we know, this phenomenon has not been described in the English literature before. Patient A presented with right hemifacial palsy after lesion of the facial nerve due to skull base fracture. He reported involuntary muscle activity at the right corner of the mouth, specifically on hearing ringing keys. Patient B suffered from left hemifacial palsy following otitis media and developed involuntary muscle contraction in the facial musculature specifically on hearing clapping hands or a trumpet sound. Both patients were evaluated by means of video, audio and EMG analysis. Possible mechanisms in the pathophysiology of SFS are postulated and therapeutic options are discussed.

  5. A multiantigen vaccine targeting neu, IGFBP-2, and IGF-IR prevents tumor progression in mice with preinvasive breast disease.

    PubMed

    Disis, Mary L; Gad, Ekram; Herendeen, Daniel R; Lai, Vy Phan-; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cecil, Denise L; O'Meara, Megan M; Treuting, Piper M; Lubet, Ronald A

    2013-12-01

    A multiantigen multipeptide vaccine, targeting proteins expressed in preinvasive breast lesions, can stimulate type I CD4(+) T cells which have been shown to be deficient in both patients with breast cancer and mice that develop mammary tumors. Transgenic mice (TgMMTV-neu) were immunized with a multiantigen peptide vaccine specific for neu, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 and insulin-like growth factor receptor-I at a time when some of the animals already had preinvasive lesions (18 weeks of age). Although immunization with each individual antigen was partially effective in inhibiting tumor growth, immunization with the multiantigen vaccine was highly effective, blocking development of palpable lesions in 65% of mice and slowing tumor growth in the infrequent palpable tumors, which did arise. Protection was mediated by CD4(+) T cells, and the few slow-growing tumors that did develop demonstrated a significant increase in intratumoral CD8(+) T cells as compared with controls (P = 0.0007). We also combined the vaccine with agents that were, by themselves, partially effective inhibitors of tumor progression in this model; lapatinib and the RXR agonist bexarotene. Although the combination of lapatinib and vaccination performed similarly to vaccination alone (P = 0.735), bexarotene and vaccination significantly enhanced disease-free survival (P < 0.0001), and approximately 90% of the mice showed no pathologic evidence of carcinomas at one year. The vaccine also demonstrated significant clinical efficacy in an additional transgenic model of breast cancer (TgC3(I)-Tag). Chemoimmunoprevention combinations may be an effective approach to breast cancer prevention even when the vaccine is administered in the presence of subclinical disease.

  6. Caricaturing facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Calder, A J; Rowland, D; Young, A W; Nimmo-Smith, I; Keane, J; Perrett, D I

    2000-08-14

    The physical differences between facial expressions (e.g. fear) and a reference norm (e.g. a neutral expression) were altered to produce photographic-quality caricatures. In Experiment 1, participants rated caricatures of fear, happiness and sadness for their intensity of these three emotions; a second group of participants rated how 'face-like' the caricatures appeared. With increasing levels of exaggeration the caricatures were rated as more emotionally intense, but less 'face-like'. Experiment 2 demonstrated a similar relationship between emotional intensity and level of caricature for six different facial expressions. Experiments 3 and 4 compared intensity ratings of facial expression caricatures prepared relative to a selection of reference norms - a neutral expression, an average expression, or a different facial expression (e.g. anger caricatured relative to fear). Each norm produced a linear relationship between caricature and rated intensity of emotion; this finding is inconsistent with two-dimensional models of the perceptual representation of facial expression. An exemplar-based multidimensional model is proposed as an alternative account.

  7. Control of Disease Recurrence by Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    effective for established tumors. alf a century later, a series of definitive experiments by Prehn and ain [3] showed that inoculation with tumor, but...Third Scientific Report on the Investigations of the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. London: Taylor and Fran- cis; 1908. [3] Prehn RT,Main JM

  8. Early detection of tumor relapse/regrowth by consecutive minimal residual disease monitoring in high-risk neuroblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Hirase, Satoshi; Saitoh, Atsuro; Hartomo, Tri Budi; Kozaki, Aiko; Yanai, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kawasaki, Keiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Mori, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Akira; Iijima, Kazumoto; Nishio, Hisahide; Nishimura, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an aggressive pediatric tumor accounting for ~15% of cancer-associated mortalities in children. Despite the current intensive therapy, >50% of high-risk patients experience tumor relapse or regrowth caused by the activation of minimal residual disease (MRD). Although several MRD detection protocols using various reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) markers have been reported to evaluate the therapeutic response and disease status of neuroblastoma patients, their clinical significance remains elusive. The present study reports two high-risk neuroblastoma patients, whose MRD was consecutively monitored using 11 RT-qPCR markers (CHRNA3, CRMP1, DBH, DCX, DDC, GABRB3, GAP43, ISL1, KIF1A, PHOX2B and TH) during their course of treatment. The two patients initially responded to the induction therapy and reached MRD-negative status. The patients' MRD subsequently became positive with no elevation of their urinary homovanillic acid, urinary vanillylmandelic acid and serum neuron-specific enolase levels at 13 or 19 weeks prior to the clinical diagnosis of tumor relapse or regrowth. The present cases highlight the possibility of consecutive MRD monitoring using 11 markers to enable an early detection of tumor relapse or regrowth in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. PMID:27446404

  9. Societal Value of Surgery for Facial Reanimation.

    PubMed

    Su, Peiyi; Ishii, Lisa E; Joseph, Andrew; Nellis, Jason; Dey, Jacob; Bater, Kristin; Byrne, Patrick J; Boahene, Kofi D O; Ishii, Masaru

    2017-03-01

    .25), respectively. Time trade-off and visual analog scale measures were highly correlated. We calculated mean (SD) WTP per quality-adjusted life-year, which ranged from $10 167 ($14 565) to $17 008 ($38 288) for low- to high-grade paralysis, respectively. Society perceives the repair of facial paralysis to be a high-value intervention. Societal WTP increases and perceived health state utility decreases with increasing House-Brackmann grade. This study demonstrates the usefulness of WTP as an objective measure to inform dimensions of disease severity and signal the value society places on proper facial function. NA.

  10. Compensation procedures for facial asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Kozol, F

    1995-01-01

    Why would a patient complain of "fuzzy and uncomfortable" vision with a variety of glasses? Perhaps because the practitioner has failed to take facial asymmetry into account. Methods of measuring facial asymmetry and optically correcting for it are discussed.

  11. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Gene Promoter Region Polymorphism and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Asifa, Gul Zareen; Kazmi, Syed Ali Raza; Javed, Qamar

    2013-01-01

    Background. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) gene polymorphisms have been implicated in the manifestation of atherosclerosis. Controversy exists regarding the link between the cytokine's variant genotype and CHD among different ethnic groups. There have been fewer studies on the TNF-α gene −1031T>C and −863C>A polymorphisms in relation to CHD. Therefore, the current study was designed to investigate the association of the TNF-α gene −1031T>C and −863C>A polymorphisms with CHD in a Pakistani population. Methods. Patients with CHD (n = 310) and healthy individuals (n = 310) were enrolled in this study. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Results. A significant difference was observed in the −863C>A polymorphism between patients with CHD and control subjects (P < 0.0001). CHD risk was positively associated with the variant allele −863A (P < 0.0001) in the study subjects. There was no significant link between the −1031T>C polymorphism and CHD risk in the study population. Haplotypes A-T and A-C of the TNF-alpha gene loci at −863 and −1031 showed higher frequency in the patient group compared with controls (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The TNF-α  −863C>A gene polymorphism was associated with the pathogenesis of CHD while the −1031T>C polymorphism did not show any link with the disease in a Pakistani population. PMID:24381514

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Xiaomei; Li, Guangxiao; He, Qiao; Dai, Huixu; Ai, Cong; Shi, Jingpu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: A number of studies had reported the association between tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) gene polymorphisms and ischemic heart disease (IHD) risk. However, the results remained controversial. Therefore, we performed a systematic review with multiple meta-analyses to provide the more precise estimations of the relationship. Methods: We systematically searched electronic databases (PubMed, the Web of Science, EMBASE, Medline, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, WanFang and ChongQing VIP Database) for relevant studies published up to February 2017. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for assessing the association. The present meta-analysis was performed using STATA 12.0 software. Results: In total, 45 articles with 17,375 cases and 15,375 controls involved were included. Pooled ORs revealed a significant association between TNF-α −308G/A gene polymorphism and IHD (A vs. G: OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.10–1.35; (AA + GA) vs. GG: OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.03–1.36; (AA vs. (GA+GG): OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.08–1.75)), indicating that the TNF-α −308A allele might be an important risk factor for IHD. No association between other TNF-α gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to IHD were observed. No publication bias were found. Sensitivity analyses indicated that our results were stable. Conclusion: The present study indicated a possible association between the TNF-α −308G/A gene polymorphism and IHD risk. However, evidence was limited to confirm the role of TNF-α −238G/A, −857C/T, −863C/A, −1031T/C and other TNF-α gene polymorphisms in the risk of IHD. PMID:28383437

  13. Effectiveness and Safety of Immunomodulators With Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Osterman, Mark T; Haynes, Kevin; Delzell, Elizabeth; Zhang, Jie; Bewtra, Meenakshi; Brensinger, Colleen M; Chen, Lang; Xie, Fenglong; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Lewis, James D

    2015-07-01

    The benefit of continuing immunomodulators when "stepping up" to anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy for Crohn's disease (CD) is uncertain. This study assessed the effectiveness and safety of immunomodulators with anti-TNF therapy in CD. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of new users of anti-TNF therapy for CD in Medicare. Users of anti-TNF combination therapy with immunomodulators were matched to up to 3 users of anti-TNF monotherapy via propensity score and compared by using 3 metrics of effectiveness-surgery, hospitalization, and discontinuation of anti-TNF therapy or surgery-and 2 metrics of safety-serious infection and non-Candida opportunistic infection. Cox regression was used for all analyses. Among new users of infliximab, we matched 381 users of combination therapy to 912 users of monotherapy; among new users of adalimumab, we matched 196 users of combination therapy to 505 users of monotherapy. Combination therapy occurred predominantly as "step up" after thiopurine therapy. The rates of surgery (hazard ratio [HR], 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.73-1.96), hospitalization (HR, 0.82; 0.57-1.19), discontinuation of anti-TNF therapy or surgery (HR, 1.09; 0.88-1.34), and serious infection (HR, 0.93; 0.88-1.34) did not differ between users of anti-TNF combination therapy and monotherapy. However, the risks of opportunistic infection (HR, 2.64; 1.21-5.73) and herpes zoster (HR, 3.16; 1.25-7.97) were increased with combination therapy. We found that continuation of immunomodulators after "stepping up" to anti-TNF therapy did not improve outcomes but was associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infection. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Computer Recognition of Facial Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    facial recognition 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side It necessary and Identify by block number) A system for the recognition of human faces from...21 2.6 Classification Algorithms ........... ... 32 III FACIAL RECOGNITION AND AUTOMATIC TRAINING . . . 37 3.1 Facial Profile Recognition...provide a fair test of the classification system. The work of Goldstein, Harmon, and Lesk [81 indicates, however, that for facial recognition , a ten class

  15. Managing the Pediatric Facial Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Patrick; Kaufman, Yoav; Hollier, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Facial fracture management is often complex and demanding, particularly within the pediatric population. Although facial fractures in this group are uncommon relative to their incidence in adult counterparts, a thorough understanding of issues relevant to pediatric facial fracture management is critical to optimal long-term success. Here, we discuss several issues germane to pediatric facial fractures and review significant factors in their evaluation, diagnosis, and management. PMID:22110800

  16. Next-generation sequencing of circulating tumor DNA to predict recurrence in triple-negative breast cancer patients with residual disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hsiang; Hancock, Bradley A; Solzak, Jeffrey P; Brinza, Dumitru; Scafe, Charles; Miller, Kathy D; Radovich, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing to detect circulating tumor DNA is a minimally invasive method for tumor genotyping and monitoring therapeutic response. The majority of studies have focused on detecting circulating tumor DNA from patients with metastatic disease. Herein, we tested whether circulating tumor DNA could be used as a biomarker to predict relapse in triple-negative breast cancer patients with residual disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In this study, we analyzed samples from 38 early-stage triple-negative breast cancer patients with matched tumor, blood, and plasma. Extracted DNA underwent library preparation and amplification using the Oncomine Research Panel consisting of 134 cancer genes, followed by high-coverage sequencing and bioinformatics. We detected high-quality somatic mutations from primary tumors in 33 of 38 patients. TP53 mutations were the most prevalent (82%) followed by PIK3CA (16%). Of the 33 patients who had a mutation identified in their primary tumor, we were able to detect circulating tumor DNA mutations in the plasma of four patients (three TP53 mutations, one AKT1 mutation, one CDKN2A mutation). All four patients had recurrence of their disease (100% specificity), but sensitivity was limited to detecting only 4 of 13 patients who clinically relapsed (31% sensitivity). Notably, all four patients had a rapid recurrence (0.3, 4.0, 5.3, and 8.9 months). Patients with detectable circulating tumor DNA had an inferior disease free survival ( p  < 0.0001; median disease-free survival: 4.6 mos. vs. not reached; hazard ratio = 12.6, 95% confidence interval: 3.06-52.2). Our study shows that next-generation circulating tumor DNA sequencing of triple-negative breast cancer patients with residual disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy can predict recurrence with high specificity, but moderate sensitivity. For those patients where circulating tumor DNA is detected, recurrence is rapid.

  17. Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... feeling of warmth in your face and neck (skin flushing), chronic diarrhea, and difficulty breathing, among other signs and symptoms. Carcinoid heart disease. Carcinoid tumors may secrete hormones that can cause ...

  18. Serum miRNA Predicts Viable Disease after Chemotherapy in Patients with Testicular Nonseminoma Germ Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Leão, Ricardo; van Agthoven, Ton; Figueiredo, Arnaldo; Jewett, Michael A S; Fadaak, Kamel; Sweet, Joan; Ahmad, Ardalan E; Anson-Cartwright, Lynn; Chung, Peter; Hansen, Aaron; Warde, Padraig; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; O'Malley, Martin; Bedard, Philippe L; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Hamilton, Robert J

    2018-02-21

    Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection is recommended for residual masses greater than 1 cm after chemotherapy of nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. Currently to our knowledge there is no reliable predictor of post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection histology. Up to 50% of patients harbor necrosis/fibrosis only so that a potentially morbid surgery has limited therapeutic value. In this study we evaluated the ability of defined serum miRNAs to predict residual viable nonseminomatous germ cell tumors after chemotherapy. Levels of serum miRNA, including miR-371a-3p, miR-373-3p and miR-367-3p, were measured using the ampTSmiR (amplification targeted serum miRNA) test in 82 patients, including 39 in cohort 1 and 43 in cohort 2, who were treated with orchiectomy, chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. miRNA levels were compared to clinical characteristics and serum tumor markers. They correlated with the presence of a viable germ cell tumor vs fibrosis/necrosis and teratoma. ROC analysis was done to determine miRNA discriminative capacity. miRNA levels were significantly associated with disease extent at chemotherapy and they decreased significantly after chemotherapy. Conventional serum tumor maker levels were uninformative after chemotherapy. However, after chemotherapy miRNA levels remained elevated in post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection specimens of patients harboring viable germ cell tumors. miR-371a-3p demonstrated the highest discriminative capacity for viable germ cell tumors (AUC 0.874, 95% CI 0.774-0.974, p <0.0001). Using an adapted hypothetical cutoff of 3 cm or less for surgical intervention miR-371a-3p correctly stratified all patients with viable residual retroperitoneal germ cell tumors with 100% sensitivity (p = 0.02). To our knowledge our study demonstrates for the first time the potential value of miR-371a-3p to predict viable germ cell tumors in residual masses after chemotherapy

  19. Extracranial Facial Nerve Schwannoma Treated by Hypo-fractionated CyberKnife Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ayaka; Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2016-09-21

    Facial nerve schwannoma is a rare intracranial tumor. Treatment for this benign tumor has been controversial. Here, we report a case of extracranial facial nerve schwannoma treated successfully by hypo-fractionated CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) radiosurgery and discuss the efficacy of this treatment. A 34-year-old female noticed a swelling in her right mastoid process. The lesion enlarged over a seven-month period, and she experienced facial spasm on the right side. She was diagnosed with a facial schwannoma via a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head and neck and was told to wait until the facial nerve palsy subsides. She was referred to our hospital for radiation therapy. We planned a fractionated CyberKnife radiosurgery for three consecutive days. After CyberKnife radiosurgery, the mass in the right parotid gradually decreased in size, and the facial nerve palsy disappeared. At her eight-month follow-up, her facial spasm had completely disappeared. There has been no recurrence and the facial nerve function has been normal. We successfully demonstrated the efficacy of CyberKnife radiosurgery as an alternative treatment that also preserves neurofunction for facial nerve schwannomas.

  20. Infantile inflammatory pseudotumor of the facial nerve as a complication of epidermal nevus syndrome with cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Hato, Naohito; Tsujimura, Mika; Takagi, Taro; Okada, Masahiro; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Tohyama, Mikiko; Tauchi, Hisamichi

    2013-12-01

    The first reported case of facial paralysis due to an inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the facial nerve as a complication of epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) is herein presented. A 10-month-old female patient was diagnosed with ENS at 3 months of age. She was referred to us because of moderate left facial paralysis. Epidermal nevi of her left auricle extended deep into the external ear canal. Otoscopy revealed polypous nevi and cholesteatoma debris filling the left ear. Computed tomography showed a soft mass filling the ear canal, including the middle ear, and an enormously enlarged facial nerve. Surgical exploration revealed numerous polypous nevi, external ear cholesteatoma, and tumorous swelling of the facial nerve. The middle ear ossicles were completely lost. The facial paralysis was improved after decompression surgery, but recurred 5 months later. A second operation was conducted 10 months after the first. During this operation, facial nerve decompression was completed from the geniculate ganglion to near the stylomastoid foramen. Histological diagnosis of the facial nerve tumor was IPT probably caused by chronic external ear inflammation induced by epidermal nevi. The facial paralysis gradually improved to House-Blackmann grade III 5 years after the second operation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for facial nerve schwannomas: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kano, Hideyuki; Xu, Zhiyuan; Chiang, Veronica; Mathieu, David; Chao, Samuel; Akpinar, Berkcan; Lee, John Y K; Yu, James B; Hess, Judith; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Chung, Wen-Yuh; Pierce, John; Missios, Symeon; Kondziolka, Douglas; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Barnett, Gene H; Lunsford, L Dade

    2015-08-01

    Facial nerve schwannomas (FNSs) are rare intracranial tumors, and the optimal management of these tumors remains unclear. Resection can be undertaken, but the tumor's intimate association with the facial nerve makes resection with neurological preservation quite challenging. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been used to treat FNSs, and this study evaluates the outcome of this approach. At 8 medical centers participating in the North American Gamma Knife Consortium (NAGKC), 42 patients undergoing SRS for an FNS were identified, and clinical and radiographic data were obtained for these cases. Males outnumbered females at a ratio of 1.2:1, and the patients' median age was 48 years (range 11-76 years). Prior resection was performed in 36% of cases. The mean tumor volume was 1.8 cm(3), and a mean margin dose of 12.5 Gy (range 11-15 Gy) was delivered to the tumor. At a median follow-up of 28 months, tumor control was achieved in 36 (90%) of the 40 patients with reliable radiographic follow-up. Actuarial tumor control was 97%, 97%, 97%, and 90% at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years postradiosurgery. Preoperative facial nerve function was preserved in 38 of 42 patients, with 60% of evaluable patients having House-Brackmann scores of 1 or 2 at last follow-up. Treated patients with a House-Brackmann score of 1 to 3 were more likely to demonstrate this level of facial nerve function at last evaluation (OR 6.09, 95% CI 1.7-22.0, p = 0.006). Avoidance of temporary or permanent neurological symptoms was more likely to be achieved in patients who received a tumor margin dose of 12.5 Gy or less (log-rank test, p = 0.024) delivered to a tumor of ≤ 1 cm(3) in volume (log-rank test, p = 0.01). Stereotactic radiosurgery resulted in tumor control and neurological preservation in most FNS patients. When the tumor is smaller and the patient exhibits favorable normal facial nerve function, SRS portends a better result. The authors believe that early, upfront SRS may be the treatment of choice for

  2. Recognizing Facial Slivers.

    PubMed

    Gilad-Gutnick, Sharon; Harmatz, Elia Samuel; Tsourides, Kleovoulos; Yovel, Galit; Sinha, Pawan

    2018-07-01

    We report here an unexpectedly robust ability of healthy human individuals ( n = 40) to recognize extremely distorted needle-like facial images, challenging the well-entrenched notion that veridical spatial configuration is necessary for extracting facial identity. In face identification tasks of parametrically compressed internal and external features, we found that the sum of performances on each cue falls significantly short of performance on full faces, despite the equal visual information available from both measures (with full faces essentially being a superposition of internal and external features). We hypothesize that this large deficit stems from the use of positional information about how the internal features are positioned relative to the external features. To test this, we systematically changed the relations between internal and external features and found preferential encoding of vertical but not horizontal spatial relationships in facial representations ( n = 20). Finally, we employ magnetoencephalography imaging ( n = 20) to demonstrate a close mapping between the behavioral psychometric curve and the amplitude of the M250 face familiarity, but not M170 face-sensitive evoked response field component, providing evidence that the M250 can be modulated by faces that are perceptually identifiable, irrespective of extreme distortions to the face's veridical configuration. We theorize that the tolerance to compressive distortions has evolved from the need to recognize faces across varying viewpoints. Our findings help clarify the important, but poorly defined, concept of facial configuration and also enable an association between behavioral performance and previously reported neural correlates of face perception.

  3. [Effects of a Facial Muscle Exercise Program including Facial Massage for Patients with Facial Palsy].

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyoung Ju; Shin, Sung Hee

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a facial muscle exercise program including facial massage on the facial muscle function, subjective symptoms related to paralysis and depression in patients with facial palsy. This study was a quasi-experimental research with a non-equivalent control group non-synchronized design. Participants were 70 patients with facial palsy (experimental group 35, control group 35). For the experimental group, the facial muscular exercise program including facial massage was performed 20 minutes a day, 3 times a week for two weeks. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, χ²-test, Fisher's exact test and independent sample t-test with the SPSS 18.0 program. Facial muscular function of the experimental group improved significantly compared to the control group. There was no significant difference in symptoms related to paralysis between the experimental group and control group. The level of depression in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Results suggest that a facial muscle exercise program including facial massage is an effective nursing intervention to improve facial muscle function and decrease depression in patients with facial palsy.

  4. Facial diplegia: a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Debaprasad; Roy, Mukut; Bhattacharyya, Amrit K

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral facial paralysis is a rare clinical entity and presents as a diagnostic challenge. Unlike its unilateral counterpart facial diplegia is seldom secondary to Bell's palsy. Occurring at a frequency of 0.3% to 2% of all facial palsies it often indicates ominous medical conditions. Guillian-Barre syndrome needs to be considered as a differential in all given cases of facial diplegia where timely treatment would be rewarding. Here a case of bilateral facial palsy due to Guillian-Barre syndrome with atypical presentation is reported.

  5. Fertility preservation in women with borderline ovarian tumors - how does it impact disease outcome? A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Helpman, Limor; Yaniv, Assaf; Beiner, Mario E; Aviel-Ronen, Sarit; Perri, Tamar; Ben-Baruch, Gilad; Hogen Ben-David, Liat; Jakobson-Setton, Ariella; Korach, Jacob

    2017-11-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors are typically indolent neoplasms. Since many are diagnosed in younger women, fertility conservation is an important consideration and has been advocated based on retrospective data. The objective of this study was to identify features impacting on recurrence and survival in a series of borderline ovarian tumors, and to assess the safety of a fertility-sparing approach. A historical cohort study of consecutive borderline ovarian tumors cases treated at a single institution over 30 years (1981-2011). Data on surgical approach (fertility-sparing or otherwise), disease stage, CA125 levels, histological features, adjuvant treatment and follow-up data were collected. Recurrence and survival were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method and associations with the variables of interest were evaluated using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. 213 patients were included. Of 132 women age 40 years and below at diagnosis, 112 (85%) had a fertility-sparing procedure and 60 (46%) had conservation of an involved ovary. Fifty patients (24%) developed recurrences; fertility preservation (hazard ratio = 2.57; 95% confidence interval 1.1-6; p = 0.029) and advanced stage (hazard ratio = 4.15; 95% confidence interval 2.3-7.6; p < 0.001) were independently associated with recurrence on multivariate analysis. Eleven (5%) patients died of their disease. Fertility preservation was not associated with compromised survival. Borderline ovarian tumors carry a good prognosis overall. Fertility preservation is associated with a higher risk of disease relapse; however, as most relapses are localized and may be salvaged with surgical treatment, overall survival is not compromised. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Revealing common disease mechanisms shared by tumors of different tissues of origin through semantic representation of genomic alterations and topic modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Vicky; Paisley, John; Lu, Xinghua

    2017-03-14

    Cancer is a complex disease driven by somatic genomic alterations (SGAs) that perturb signaling pathways and consequently cellular function. Identifying patterns of pathway perturbations would provide insights into common disease mechanisms shared among tumors, which is important for guiding treatment and predicting outcome. However, identifying perturbed pathways is challenging, because different tumors can have the same perturbed pathways that are perturbed by different SGAs. Here, we designed novel semantic representations that capture the functional similarity of distinct SGAs perturbing a common pathway in different tumors. Combining this representation with topic modeling would allow us to identify patterns in altered signaling pathways. We represented each gene with a vector of words describing its function, and we represented the SGAs of a tumor as a text document by pooling the words representing individual SGAs. We applied the nested hierarchical Dirichlet process (nHDP) model to a collection of tumors of 5 cancer types from TCGA. We identified topics (consisting of co-occurring words) representing the common functional themes of different SGAs. Tumors were clustered based on their topic associations, such that each cluster consists of tumors sharing common functional themes. The resulting clusters contained mixtures of cancer types, which indicates that different cancer types can share disease mechanisms. Survival analysis based on the clusters revealed significant differences in survival among the tumors of the same cancer type that were assigned to different clusters. The results indicate that applying topic modeling to semantic representations of tumors identifies patterns in the combinations of altered functional pathways in cancer.

  7. Impact of tumor architecture on disease recurrence and cancer-specific mortality of upper tract urothelial carcinoma treated with radical nephroureterectomy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Bo; Hu, Bin; Yuan, Qingmin; Wen, Shuang; Liu, Tianqing; Bai, Shanshan; Qi, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xin; Yang, Deyong; Sun, Xiuzhen; Song, Xishuang

    2017-07-01

    Upper tract urinary carcinoma (UTUC) is a relatively uncommon but aggressive disease. Recent publications have assessed the prognostic significance of tumor architecture in UTUC, but there is still controversy regarding the significance and importance of tumor architecture on disease recurrence. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 101 patients with clinical UTUC who had undergone surgery. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with disease recurrence and cancer-specific mortality. As our single center study and the limited sample size may influence the clinical significance, we further quantitatively combined the results with those of existing published literature through a meta-analysis compiled from searching several databases. At a median follow-up of 41.3 months, 25 patients experienced disease recurrence. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that tumor architecture was found to be positively correlated with the tumor location and the histological grade. Kaplan-Meier curves showed that patients with sessile tumor architecture had significantly poor recurrence free survival (RFS) and cancer specific survival (CSS). Furthermore, multivariate analysis suggested that tumor architecture was independent prognostic factors for RFS (Hazard ratio, HR = 2.648) and CSS (HR = 2.072) in UTUC patients. A meta-analysis of investigating tumor architecture and its effects on UTUC prognosis was conducted. After searching PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, 17 articles met the eligibility criteria for this analysis. The eligible studies included a total of 14,368 patients and combined results showed that sessile tumor architecture was associated with both disease recurrence with a pooled HR estimate of 1.454 and cancer-specific mortality with a pooled HR estimate of 1.416. Tumor architecture is an independent predictor for disease recurrence after radical nephroureterectomy for UTUC

  8. Networking for ovarian rare tumors: a significant breakthrough improving disease management.

    PubMed

    Chiannilkulchai, N; Pautier, P; Genestie, C; Bats, A S; Vacher-Lavenu, M C; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, M; Treilleux, I; Floquet, A; Croce, S; Ferron, G; Mery, E; Pomel, C; Penault-Llorca, F; Lefeuvre-Plesse, C; Henno, S; Leblanc, E; Lemaire, A S; Averous, G; Kurtz, J E; Ray-Coquard, I

    2017-06-01

    Rare ovarian tumors represent >20% of all ovarian cancers. Given the rarity of these tumors, natural history, prognostic factors are not clearly identified. The extreme variability of patients (age, histological subtypes, stage) induces multiple and complex therapeutic strategies. Since 2011, a national network with a dedicated system for referral, up to 22 regional and three national reference centers (RC) has been supported by the French National Cancer Institute (INCa). The network aims to prospectively monitor the management of rare ovarian tumors and provide an equal access to medical expertise and innovative treatments to all French patients through a dedicated website, www.ovaire-rare.org. Over a 5-year activity, 4612 patients have been included. Patients' inclusions increased from 553 in 2011 to 1202 in 2015. Expert pathology review and patients' files discussion in dedicated multidisciplinary tumor boards increased from 166 cases in 2011 (25%) to 538 (45%) in 2015. Pathology review consistently modified the medical strategy in 5-9% every year. The rate of patients' files discussed in RC similarly increased from 294 (53%) to 789 (66%). An increasing number (357 in 5 years) of gynecologic (non-ovarian) rare tumors were also registered by physicians seeking for pathological or medical advice from expert tumor boards. Such a nation-wide organization for rare gynecological tumors has invaluable benefits, not only for patients, but also for epidemiological, clinical and biological research. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Management of salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Andry, Guy; Hamoir, Marc; Locati, Laura D; Licitra, Lisa; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2012-09-01

    Surgery after proper imaging (MRI or CT scan) is the main stay of treatment for salivary gland tumors. Although excision margins should be ≥5 mm for malignant tumors in cases of parotid gland carcinoma, the facial nerve should be preserved whenever it is not infiltrated. Adjuvant external radiation is indicated for malignant tumors with high-risk features such as close (or invaded) margins, perineural speed, lymphatic and/or vascular invasion, lymph-node involvement and high-grade histology. A Phase II trial testing adjuvant concomitant cisplatin plus radiation therapy versus adjuvant radiation therapy alone after surgery is currently under investigation for high-risk salivary gland cancer. For inoperable cancers, photons combined with proton boost seem to be a valuable option. Even if protons or carbon ions are promising, access to the latter is limited for usual treatment. For recurrent and/or metastatic cancer, polychemotherapy (cisplatin based) gives a 25% response rate in adenoid cystic carcinoma and should be used when the disease is overtly in progression. Targeted therapies with anti-EGF receptor molecules, antiangiogenic agents and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are ongoing, but more trials are needed to establish their efficacy, as is the use of bortezomib followed by doxorubicin. The products of fusion oncogenes, which have a pathogenic role in some adenoid cystic carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, are of interest as potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Multicenter validation study of pathologic response and tumor thickness at the tumor-normal liver interface as independent predictors of disease-free survival after preoperative chemotherapy and surgery for colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Brouquet, Antoine; Zimmitti, Giuseppe; Kopetz, Scott; Stift, Judith; Julié, Catherine; Lemaistre, Anne-Isabelle; Agarwal, Atin; Patel, Viren; Benoist, Stephane; Nordlinger, Bernard; Gandini, Alessandro; Rivoire, Michel; Stremitzer, Stefan; Gruenberger, Thomas; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Maru, Dipen M

    2013-08-01

    To validate pathologic markers of response to preoperative chemotherapy as predictors of disease-free survival (DFS) after resection of colorectal liver metastases (CLM). One hundred seventy-one patients who underwent resection of CLM after preoperative chemotherapy at 4 centers were studied. Pathologic response-defined as the proportion of tumor cells remaining (complete, 0%; major, <50%; minor, ≥50%) and tumor thickness at the tumor-normal liver interface (TNI) (<0.5 mm, 0.5 to <5 mm, ≥5 mm)-was assessed by a central pathology reviewer and local pathologists. Pathologic response was complete in 8% of patients, major in 49% of patients, and minor in 43% of patients. Tumor thickness at the TNI was <0.5 mm in 21% of patients, 0.5 to <5 mm in 56% of patients, and ≥5 mm in 23% of patients. On multivariate analyses, using either pathologic response or tumor thickness at TNI, pathologic response (P = .002, .009), tumor thickness at TNI (P = 0.015, <.001), duration of preoperative chemotherapy (P = .028, .043), number of CLM (P = .038, . 037), and margin (P = .011, .016) were associated with DFS. In a multivariate analysis using both parameters, tumor thickness at TNI (P = .004, .015), duration of preoperative chemotherapy (P = .025), number of nodules (P = .027), and margin (P = .014) were associated with DFS. Tumor size by pathology examination was the predictor of pathologic response. Predictors of tumor thickness at the TNI were tumor size and chemotherapy regimen. There was near perfect agreement for pathologic response (κ = .82) and substantial agreement (κ = .76) for tumor thickness between the central reviewer and local pathologists. Pathologic response and tumor thickness at the TNI are valid predictors of DFS after preoperative chemotherapy and surgery for CLM. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  11. Oculopalatal tremor, facial myokymia and truncal ataxia in a patient with neurosarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Christos; Sripathi, Naganand; Nasrallah, Khalil; Mitsias, Panayiotis

    2014-12-01

    Symptomatic palatal tremor (SPT) is the result of a structural lesion, in the form of stroke, trauma or demyelinating disease. SPT is due to contractions of the levator veli palatini and can be accompanied by simultaneous movements of the facial and ocular muscles. Facial myokymia (FM) is a persistent quivering of the facial muscles. FM is usually encountered with conditions involving the pontine tegmentum. We report, to our knowledge, the first patient with neurosarcoidosis with simultaneous SPT and FM. A 49-year-old African American woman, with non-caseating granulomas in a paratracheal lymph node biopsy, presented with progressive gait disturbances for the last 3 years. Neurological examination revealed ataxic speech, bilateral rotatory nystagmus, myokymia of the chin and perioral muscles, palatal tremor without ear click and marked truncal ataxia. MRI demonstrated a lesion involving the facial nucleus and the right middle cerebellar peduncle. Based on exclusion of alternative etiologies, a diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis was made and the patient was started on methotrexate for 9 months, with minimal improvement. She was then switched to intravenous infliximab without major adverse events. The patient's speech and gait ataxia improved and follow up MRI demonstrated resolution of the enhancing lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the combination of palatal tremor and FM due to neurosarcoidosis. Methotrexate may fail to produce clinical or radiographic response in up to 39% of patients. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, such as infliximab, should be considered in refractory cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetic Ketoacidosis with Concurrent Pancreatitis, Pancreatic β Islet Cell Tumor, and Adrenal Disease in an Obese Ferret (Mustela putorius furo)

    PubMed Central

    Phair, Kristen A; Carpenter, James W; Schermerhorn, Thomas; Ganta, Chanran K; DeBey, Brad M

    2011-01-01

    A 5.5-y-old spayed female ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with a history of adrenal disease, respiratory disease, and chronic obesity was evaluated for progressive lethargy and ataxia, diminished appetite, and possible polyuria and polydipsia. Physical examination revealed obesity, lethargy, tachypnea, dyspnea, a pendulous abdomen, significant weakness and ataxia of the hindlimbs, prolonged skin tenting, and mild tail-tip alopecia. Clinicopathologic analysis revealed severe hyperglycemia, azotemia, an increased anion gap, glucosuria, ketonuria, proteinuria, and hematuria. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hyperechoic hepatomegaly, bilateral adrenomegaly, splenic nodules, mild peritoneal effusion, and thickened and mildly hypoechoic limbs of the pancreas with surrounding hyperechoic mesentery. Fine-needle aspirates of the liver were highly suggestive of hepatic lipidosis. In light of a diagnosis of concurrent diabetic ketoacidosis and pancreatitis, the ferret was treated with fluid therapy, regular and long-acting insulin administration, and pain medication. However, electrolyte derangements, metabolic acidosis, dyspnea, and the clinical appearance of the ferret progressively worsened despite treatment, and euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed severe hepatic lipidosis, severe suppurative pancreatitis and vacuolar degeneration of pancreatic islet cells, a pancreatic β islet cell tumor, bilateral adrenal cortical adenomas, and myocardial fibrosis. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of concurrent diabetes mellitus, pancreatitis, pancreatic β islet cell tumor (insulinoma), and adrenal disease in a domestic ferret. The simultaneous existence of 3 endocrine diseases, pancreatitis, and their associated complications is a unique and clinically challenging situation. PMID:21838985

  13. A rare case of an ACTH/CRH co-secreting midgut neuroendocrine tumor mimicking Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Streuli, Regina; Krull, Ina; Brändle, Michael; Kolb, Walter; Stalla, Günter; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Enzler-Tschudy, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumors are a very rare cause of Cushing’s syndrome and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Differentiating between Cushing’s disease and ectopic Cushing’s syndrome may be particularly difficult if predominant ectopic CRH secretion leads to pituitary corticotroph hyperplasia that may mimic Cushing’s disease during dynamic testing with both dexamethasone and CRH as well as bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS). We present the case of a 24-year-old man diagnosed with ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome caused by an ACTH/CRH co-secreting midgut NET. Both high-dose dexamethasone testing and BIPSS suggested Cushing’s disease. However, the clinical presentation with a rather rapid onset of cushingoid features, hyperpigmentation and hypokalemia led to the consideration of ectopic ACTH/CRH-secretion and prompted a further workup. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed a cecal mass which was identified as a predominantly CRH-secreting neuroendocrine tumor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumor of the cecum presenting with biochemical features suggestive of Cushing’s disease. Learning points: The discrimination between a Cushing’s disease and ectopic Cushing’s syndrome is challenging and has many caveats. Ectopic ACTH/CRH co-secreting tumors are very rare. Dynamic tests as well as BIPSS may be compatible with Cushing’s disease in ectopic CRH-secretion. High levels of CRH may induce hyperplasia of the corticotroph cells in the pituitary. This could be the cause of a preserved pituitary response to dexamethasone and CRH. Clinical features of ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism with rapid development of Cushing’s syndrome, hyperpigmentation, high circulating levels of cortisol with associated hypokalemia, peripheral edema and proximal myopathy should be a warning flag of ectopic Cushing’s syndrome and lead to further investigations

  14. Tumor SHB gene expression affects disease characteristics in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jamalpour, Maria; Li, Xiujuan; Cavelier, Lucia; Gustafsson, Karin; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Höglund, Martin; Welsh, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The mouse Shb gene coding for the Src Homology 2-domain containing adapter protein B has recently been placed in context of BCRABL1-induced myeloid leukemia in mice and the current study was performed in order to relate SHB to human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Publicly available AML databases were mined for SHB gene expression and patient survival. SHB gene expression was determined in the Uppsala cohort of AML patients by qPCR. Cell proliferation was determined after SHB gene knockdown in leukemic cell lines. Despite a low frequency of SHB gene mutations, many tumors overexpressed SHB mRNA compared with normal myeloid blood cells. AML patients with tumors expressing low SHB mRNA displayed longer survival times. A subgroup of AML exhibiting a favorable prognosis, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with a PMLRARA translocation, expressed less SHB mRNA than AML tumors in general. When examining genes co-expressed with SHB in AML tumors, four other genes ( PAX5, HDAC7, BCORL1, TET1) related to leukemia were identified. A network consisting of these genes plus SHB was identified that relates to certain phenotypic characteristics, such as immune cell, vascular and apoptotic features. SHB knockdown in the APL PMLRARA cell line NB4 and the monocyte/macrophage cell line MM6 adversely affected proliferation, linking SHB gene expression to tumor cell expansion and consequently to patient survival. It is concluded that tumor SHB gene expression relates to AML survival and its subgroup APL. Moreover, this gene is included in a network of genes that plays a role for an AML phenotype exhibiting certain immune cell, vascular and apoptotic characteristics.

  15. Comparison of Facial Nerve Paralysis in Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chang Il; Hong, Chang Kee; Park, Moon Suh

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Facial nerve injury can occur in the regions ranging from the cerebral cortex to the motor end plate in the face, and from many causes including trauma, viral infection, and idiopathic factors. Facial nerve paralysis in children, however, may differ from that in adults. We, therefore, evaluated its etiology and recovery rate in children and adults. Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated the records of 975 patients, ranging in age from 0 to 88 years, who displayed facial palsy at Kyung Hee Medical Center between January 1986 and July 2005. Results The most frequent causes of facial palsy in adults were Bell's palsy (54.9%), infection (26.8%), trauma (5.9%), iatrogenic (2.0%), and tumors (1.8%), whereas the most frequent causes of facial palsy in children were Bell's palsy (66.2%), infection (14.6%), trauma (13.4%), birth trauma (3.2%), and leukemia (1.3%). Recovery rates in adults were 91.4% for Bell's palsy, 89.0% for infection, and 64.3% for trauma, whereas recovery rates in children were 93.1% for Bell's palsy, 90.9% for infection, and 42.9% for trauma. Conclusion These results show that causes of facial palsy are similar in adults and children, and recovery rates in adults and children are not significantly different. PMID:18972592

  16. Novel association of familial testicular germ cell tumor and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with PKD1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Laurel; Gell, Joanna; Chang, Vivian Y; Lee, Hane; Strom, Samuel P; Pillai, Rex; Sisk, Anthony; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Anderson, Martin; Federman, Noah

    2017-01-01

    Adolescent brothers were diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors within the same month. Both were found to have multiple renal cysts on pretreatment imaging done for staging. The proband, his brother, and their mother, were all found to have a novel splice variant in intron 8 of the PKD1 gene by clinical exome sequencing. This is the second family reported with both familial testicular germ cell tumor (FTGCT) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), and the first described association of FTGCT with a splice variant in PKD1. We suggest that this novel variant in PKD1 may convey increased risk for FTGCT in addition to causing ADPKD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Contemporary Role of Radiotherapy in the Management of Primary Penile Tumors and Metastatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Crook, Juanita

    2016-11-01

    Squamous cell cancer of the penis is a radiocurable malignancy all too often managed solely by partial or total penectomy. Effective management of the primary tumor while preserving penile morphology and function is a priority. External radiotherapy and brachytherapy have a role to play in the definitive management of the primary tumor. Surgical nodal staging remains a cornerstone of management because it is the strongest predictor of survival, and inguinal status determines pelvic management. Postoperative radiotherapy of the regional nodes for high-risk pathology is indicated. Chemoradiotherapy should be considered as neoadjuvant treatment for unresectable nodes or as definitive management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Is a comparative clinical trial for breast cancer tumor markers to monitor disease recurrence warranted? A value of information analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thariani, Rahber; Henry, Norah Lynn; Ramsey, Scott D; Blough, David K; Barlow, Bill; Gralow, Julie R; Veenstra, David L

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer tumor markers are used by some clinicians to screen for disease recurrence risk. Since there is limited evidence of benefit, additional research may be warranted. Aim To assess the potential value of a randomized clinical trial of breast tumor marker testing in routine follow-up of high-risk, stage II–III breast cancer survivors. Materials & methods We developed a decision-analytic model of tumor marker testing plus standard surveillance every 3–6 months for 5 years. The expected value of sample information was calculated using probabilistic simulations and was a function of: the probability of selecting the optimal monitoring strategy with current versus future information; the impact of choosing the nonoptimal strategy; and the size of the population affected. Results The value of information for a randomized clinical trial involving 9000 women was US$214 million compared with a cost of US$30–60 million to conduct such a trial. The probability of making an alternate, nonoptimal decision and choosing testing versus no testing was 32% with current versus future information from the trial. The impact of a nonoptimal decision was US$2150 and size of population impacted over 10 years was 308,000. The value of improved information on overall survival was US$105 million, quality of life US$37 million and test performance US$71 million. Conclusion Conducting a randomized clinical trial of breast cancer tumor markers appears to offer a good societal return on investment. Retrospective analyses to assess test performance and evaluation of patient quality of life using tumor markers may also offer valuable areas of research. However, alternative investments may offer even better returns in investments and, as such, the trial concept deserves further study as part of an overall research-portfolio evaluation. PMID:24236631

  19. Promising Technique for Facial Nerve Reconstruction in Extended Parotidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Ithzel Maria; Rodríguez-Valiente, Antonio; Castelló, Jose Ramon; Górriz, Carmen; Montero, Oscar Alvarez; García-Berrocal, Jose Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant tumors of the parotid gland account scarcely for 5% of all head and neck tumors. Most of these neoplasms have a high tendency for recurrence, local infiltration, perineural extension, and metastasis. Although uncommon, these malignant tumors require complex surgical treatment sometimes involving a total parotidectomy including a complete facial nerve resection. Severe functional and aesthetic facial defects are the result of a complete sacrifice or injury to isolated branches becoming an uncomfortable distress for patients and a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Case Report: A case of a 54-year-old, systemically healthy male patient with a 4 month complaint of pain and swelling on the right side of the face is presented. The patient reported a rapid increase in the size of the lesion over the past 2 months. Imaging tests and histopathological analysis reported an adenoid cystic carcinoma. A complete parotidectomy was carried out with an intraoperative notice of facial nerve infiltration requiring a second intervention for nerve and defect reconstruction. A free ALT flap with vascularized nerve grafts was the surgical choice. A 6 month follow-up showed partial facial movement recovery and the facial defect mended. Conclusion: It is of critical importance to restore function to patients with facial nerve injury. Vascularized nerve grafts, in many clinical and experimental studies, have shown to result in better nerve regeneration than conventional non-vascularized nerve grafts. Nevertheless, there are factors that may affect the degree, speed and regeneration rate regarding the free fasciocutaneous flap. In complex head and neck defects following a total parotidectomy, the extended free fasciocutaneous ALT (anterior-lateral thigh) flap with a vascularized nerve graft is ideally suited for the reconstruction of the injured site. Donor–site morbidity is low and additional surgical time is minimal compared with the time of a single

  20. Promising Technique for Facial Nerve Reconstruction in Extended Parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Ithzel Maria; Rodríguez-Valiente, Antonio; Castelló, Jose Ramon; Górriz, Carmen; Montero, Oscar Alvarez; García-Berrocal, Jose Ramon

    2015-11-01

    Malignant tumors of the parotid gland account scarcely for 5% of all head and neck tumors. Most of these neoplasms have a high tendency for recurrence, local infiltration, perineural extension, and metastasis. Although uncommon, these malignant tumors require complex surgical treatment sometimes involving a total parotidectomy including a complete facial nerve resection. Severe functional and aesthetic facial defects are the result of a complete sacrifice or injury to isolated branches becoming an uncomfortable distress for patients and a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons. A case of a 54-year-old, systemically healthy male patient with a 4 month complaint of pain and swelling on the right side of the face is presented. The patient reported a rapid increase in the size of the lesion over the past 2 months. Imaging tests and histopathological analysis reported an adenoid cystic carcinoma. A complete parotidectomy was carried out with an intraoperative notice of facial nerve infiltration requiring a second intervention for nerve and defect reconstruction. A free ALT flap with vascularized nerve grafts was the surgical choice. A 6 month follow-up showed partial facial movement recovery and the facial defect mended. It is of critical importance to restore function to patients with facial nerve injury. Vascularized nerve grafts, in many clinical and experimental studies, have shown to result in better nerve regeneration than conventional non-vascularized nerve grafts. Nevertheless, there are factors that may affect the degree, speed and regeneration rate regarding the free fasciocutaneous flap. In complex head and neck defects following a total parotidectomy, the extended free fasciocutaneous ALT (anterior-lateral thigh) flap with a vascularized nerve graft is ideally suited for the reconstruction of the injured site. Donor-site morbidity is low and additional surgical time is minimal compared with the time of a single ALT flap transfer.

  1. Realistic facial animation generation based on facial expression mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Garrod, Oliver; Jack, Rachael; Schyns, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Facial expressions reflect internal emotional states of a character or in response to social communications. Though much effort has been taken to generate realistic facial expressions, it still remains a challenging topic due to human being's sensitivity to subtle facial movements. In this paper, we present a method for facial animation generation, which reflects true facial muscle movements with high fidelity. An intermediate model space is introduced to transfer captured static AU peak frames based on FACS to the conformed target face. And then dynamic parameters derived using a psychophysics method is integrated to generate facial animation, which is assumed to represent natural correlation of multiple AUs. Finally, the animation sequence in the intermediate model space is mapped to the target face to produce final animation.

  2. Laser correlation spectroscopy in the diagnosis of tumor diseases of the female reproductive system (preliminary results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneeva, A. A.; Sekerskaya, M. N.; Zhordaniya, K. I.; Sapezhinskiy, V. S.; Golubtsova, N. V.; Barmashov, A. E.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Ivanov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The study of blood serum of cancer patients by laser correlation spectroscopy to determine the possibility of differentiation of benign and malignant tumors of the female reproductive system. We analyzed the data and assessed the applicability of the method mentioned above target.

  3. Synchronous bilateral warthin tumors: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Ferreira, Julia Alessandra Santos; Pio, Raquel Baptista; Takano, Gustavo Henrique Soares; Miziara, Hélcio Luiz

    2014-04-01

    Introduction Warthin tumor is described as papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum and is the second most common tumor of the parotid glands. Bilateral synchronous incidence is rare, occurring in 7 to 10% of the cases. It is more common in males between 60 and 70 years of age and is closely related to smoking. There is slow growth and the condition is a delimited nodule of regular outlines; it has low rates of malignant progression and recurrence. Objective Report a case of synchronous bilateral Warthin tumor occurring in an elderly patient, and review incidence and peculiarities of this tumor. Case Report A 78-year-old man who used to smoke had a history of mild pain in the topography of right parotid three weeks ago. Patient with hypertension, diabetes and a longtime smoker (smoking a pack per day for 32 years) noticed a progressive bulging in the right parotid region for about 2.5 years ago, and noticed another progressive bulging (althought in the left parotid region), for about one year ago. Patient denied fever, redness, skin lesions and pain during this period until last three weeks, when he sought medical attention for a mild pain in the right facial region. The patient underwent cervical magnetic resonance imaging that showed tumor lesions in both parotids. Fine needle aspiration revealed a typical lesion of epithelial oxyphilic cells associated with reactive lymphoid proliferation, suggesting Warthin tumor. The patient underwent two superficial parotidectomies, and the histopathologic result from both tumors of parotid glands showed papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum. Conclusion The occurrence of synchronous bilateral Warthin tumor is extremely rare, and anamnesis and physical examination, as well as some complementary examinations, are important means for diagnostic evaluation. Confirmation of the diagnosis can only be obtained through a histopathologic study. A superficial or total parotidectomy is the recommended treatment for the disease.

  4. Synchronous Bilateral Warthin Tumors: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Ferreira, Julia Alessandra Santos; Pio, Raquel Baptista; Takano, Gustavo Henrique Soares; Miziara, Hélcio Luiz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Warthin tumor is described as papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum and is the second most common tumor of the parotid glands. Bilateral synchronous incidence is rare, occurring in 7 to 10% of the cases. It is more common in males between 60 and 70 years of age and is closely related to smoking. There is slow growth and the condition is a delimited nodule of regular outlines; it has low rates of malignant progression and recurrence. Objective Report a case of synchronous bilateral Warthin tumor occurring in an elderly patient, and review incidence and peculiarities of this tumor. Case Report A 78-year-old man who used to smoke had a history of mild pain in the topography of right parotid three weeks ago. Patient with hypertension, diabetes and a longtime smoker (smoking a pack per day for 32 years) noticed a progressive bulging in the right parotid region for about 2.5 years ago, and noticed another progressive bulging (althought in the left parotid region), for about one year ago. Patient denied fever, redness, skin lesions and pain during this period until last three weeks, when he sought medical attention for a mild pain in the right facial region. The patient underwent cervical magnetic resonance imaging that showed tumor lesions in both parotids. Fine needle aspiration revealed a typical lesion of epithelial oxyphilic cells associated with reactive lymphoid proliferation, suggesting Warthin tumor. The patient underwent two superficial parotidectomies, and the histopathologic result from both tumors of parotid glands showed papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum. Conclusion The occurrence of synchronous bilateral Warthin tumor is extremely rare, and anamnesis and physical examination, as well as some complementary examinations, are important means for diagnostic evaluation. Confirmation of the diagnosis can only be obtained through a histopathologic study. A superficial or total parotidectomy is the recommended treatment for the disease. PMID

  5. Facial paralysis due to an occult parotid abscess.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Demirel, Tayfun; Kocasoy-Orhan, Elif; Yenigül, Kubilay

    2008-01-01

    Facial paralysis associated with benign diseases of the parotid gland is very rare. It has been reported in approximately 16 cases of acute suppurative parotitis or parotid abscess. We presented a 45-year-old woman who developed facial paralysis secondary to an occult parotid abscess. Initially, there was no facial paralysis and the signs and symptoms were suggestive of acute parotitis, for which medical treatment was initiated. Three days later, left-sided facial palsy of HB (House-Brackmann) grade 5 developed. Ultrasonography revealed a pretragal, hypoechoic mass, 10x8 mm in size, causing inflammation in the surrounding tissue. Fine needle aspiration biopsy obtained from the mass revealed polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes. No malignant cells were observed. The lesion was diagnosed as an occult parotid abscess. After a week, the mass disappeared and facial paralysis improved to HB grade 4. At the end of the first month, facial paralysis improved to HB grade 1. At three months, facial nerve function was nearly normal.

  6. APSA Awardee Submission: Tumor/cancer stem cell marker doublecortin-like kinase 1 in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Charles B; Houchen, Courtney W; Ali, Naushad

    2017-02-01

    Liver diseases are the fourth leading cause of mortality among adults in the United States. Patients with chronic liver diseases such as viral hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis have significantly higher risks of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). With a dismal five-year survival rate of 11%, HCC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Regardless of the underlying cause, late presentation and a lack of effective therapy are the major impediments for successful treatment of HCC. Therefore, there is a considerable interest in developing new strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic liver diseases at the early stages. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small cell subpopulation in a tumor, exhibit unlimited self-renewal and differentiation capacity. These cells are believed to play pivotal roles in the initiation, growth, metastasis, and drug-resistance of tumors. In this review, we will briefly discuss pivotal roles of the CSC marker doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) in hepatic tumorigenesis. Recent evidence suggests that anti-DCLK1 strategies hold promising clinical potential for the treatment of cancers of the liver, pancreas, and colon.

  7. Altered Blood Gene Expression of Tumor-Related Genes (PRKCB, BECN1, and CDKN2A) in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Antonell, Anna; Lladó, Albert; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Sanfeliu, Coral; Casserras, Teresa; Rami, Lorena; Muñoz-García, Cristina; Dangla-Valls, Adrià; Balasa, Mircea; Boya, Patricia; Kalko, Susana G; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common of the neurodegenerative diseases. Recent diagnostic criteria have defined a preclinical disease phase during which neuropathological substrates are thought to be present in the brain. There is an urgent need to find measurable alterations in this phase as well as a good peripheral biomarker in the blood. We selected a cohort of 100 subjects (controls = 47; preclinical AD = 11; patients with AD = 42) and analyzed whole blood expression of 20 genes by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The selected genes belonged to calcium signaling, senescence and autophagy, and mitochondria/oxidative stress pathways. Additionally, two genes associated with an increased risk of developing AD (clusterin (CLU) and bridging integrator 1 (BIN1)) were also analyzed. We detected significantly different gene expressions of BECN1 and PRKCB between the control and the AD groups and of CDKN2A between the control and the preclinical AD groups. Notably, these three genes are also considered tumor suppressor (CDKN2A and BECN1) or tumor promoter (PRKCB) genes. Gene-gene expression Pearson correlations were computed separately for controls and patients with AD. The significant correlations (p < 0.001) were represented in a network analysis with Cytoscape tool, which suggested an uncoupling of mitochondria-related genes in AD group. Whole blood is emerging as a valuable tissue in the study of the physiopathology of AD.

  8. A Comparison of the Local Flap and Skin Graft by Location of Face in Reconstruction after Resection of Facial Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Suk; Kim, Jun Oh; Kim, Nam Gyun; Lee, Yoon Jung; Park, Young Ji; Kim, Jun Sik

    2017-12-01

    Surgery for reconstruction of defects after surgery should be performed selectively and the many points must be considered. The authors conducted this study to compare the local flap and skin graft by facial location in the reconstruction after resection of facial skin cancer. The authors performed the study in patients that had received treatment in Department of Plastic Surgery, Gyeongsang National University. The cases were analyzed according to the reconstruction methods for the defects after surgery, sex, age, tumor site, and tumor size. Additionally, the authors compared differences of aesthetic satisfaction (out of 5 points) of patients in the local flap and skin graft by facial location after resection of facial skin cancer by dividing the face into eight areas. A total of 153 cases were confirmed. The most common facial skin cancer was basal cell carcinoma (56.8%, 87 cases), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (37.2%, 57 cases) and bowen's disease (5.8%, 9 cases). The most common reconstruction method was local flap 119 cases (77.7%), followed by skin graft 34 cases (22.3%). 86 patients answered the questionnaire and mean satisfaction of the local flap and skin graft were 4.3 and 3.5 ( p =0.04), respectively, indicating that satisfaction of local flap was significantly high. When comparing satisfaction of patients according to results, local flap shows excellent effects in functional and cosmetic aspects would be able to provide excellent results rather than using a skin graft with poor touch and tone compared to the surrounding normal skin.

  9. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Mohd Noor, Nor Farid; Basri, Rehana; Yew, Tan Fo; Wen, Tay Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18-25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects' evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05) but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1%) were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5%) short and 81 (28.3%) long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population.

  10. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18–25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects’ evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05) but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1%) were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5%) short and 81 (28.3%) long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. In conclusion: 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population. PMID:26562655

  11. Automatic 2.5-D Facial Landmarking and Emotion Annotation for Social Interaction Assistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Zou, Jianhua; Li, Huibin; Dellandrea, Emmanuel; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A; Chen, Liming

    2016-09-01

    People with low vision, Alzheimer's disease, and autism spectrum disorder experience difficulties in perceiving or interpreting facial expression of emotion in their social lives. Though automatic facial expression recognition (FER) methods on 2-D videos have been extensively investigated, their performance was constrained by challenges in head pose and lighting conditions. The shape information in 3-D facial data can reduce or even overcome these challenges. However, high expenses of 3-D cameras prevent their widespread use. Fortunately, 2.5-D facial data from emerging portable RGB-D cameras provide a good balance for this dilemma. In this paper, we propose an automatic emotion annotation solution on 2.5-D facial data collected from RGB-D cameras. The solution consists of a facial landmarking method and a FER method. Specifically, we propose building a deformable partial face model and fit the model to a 2.5-D face for localizing facial landmarks automatically. In FER, a novel action unit (AU) space-based FER method has been proposed. Facial features are extracted using landmarks and further represented as coordinates in the AU space, which are classified into facial expressions. Evaluated on three publicly accessible facial databases, namely EURECOM, FRGC, and Bosphorus databases, the proposed facial landmarking and expression recognition methods have achieved satisfactory results. Possible real-world applications using our algorithms have also been discussed.

  12. A semi-quantitative World Health Organization grading scheme evaluating worst tumor differentiation predicts disease-free survival in oral squamous carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Jain, Dhruv; Tikku, Gargi; Bhadana, Pallavi; Dravid, Chandrashekhar; Grover, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-08-01

    We investigated World Health Organization (WHO) grading and pattern of invasion based histological schemes as independent predictors of disease-free survival, in oral squamous carcinoma patients. Tumor resection slides of eighty-seven oral squamous carcinoma patients [pTNM: I&II/III&IV-32/55] were evaluated. Besides examining various patterns of invasion, invasive front grade, predominant and worst (highest) WHO grade were recorded. For worst WHO grading, poor-undifferentiated component was estimated semi-quantitatively at advancing tumor edge (invasive growth front) in histology sections. Tumor recurrence was observed in 31 (35.6%) cases. The 2-year disease-free survival was 47% [Median: 656; follow-up: 14-1450] days. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we defined poor-undifferentiated component exceeding 5% of tumor as the cutoff to assign an oral squamous carcinoma as grade-3, when following worst WHO grading. Kaplan-Meier curves for disease-free survival revealed prognostic association with nodal involvement, tumor size, worst WHO grading; most common pattern of invasion and invasive pattern grading score (sum of two most predominant patterns of invasion). In further multivariate analysis, tumor size (>2.5cm) and worst WHO grading (grade-3 tumors) independently predicted reduced disease-free survival [HR, 2.85; P=0.028 and HR, 3.37; P=0.031 respectively]. The inter-observer agreement was moderate for observers who semi-quantitatively estimated percentage of poor-undifferentiated morphology in oral squamous carcinomas. Our results support the value of semi-quantitative method to assign tumors as grade-3 with worst WHO grading for predicting reduced disease-free survival. Despite limitations, of the various histological tumor stratification schemes, WHO grading holds adjunctive value for its prognostic role, ease and universal familiarity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Denosumab for the management of bone disease in patients with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Body, Jean-Jacques

    2012-03-01

    Many patients with advanced cancer develop bone metastases, which reduces their quality of life. Bone metastases are associated with an increased risk of skeletal-related events, which can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. In patients with bone metastases, tumor cells disrupt the normal process of bone remodeling, leading to increased bone destruction. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), a key regulatory factor in bone remodeling. By binding to RANKL, denosumab disrupts the cycle of bone destruction. In clinical studies in patients with prostate or breast cancer and bone metastases, denosumab was superior to the current standard of care, zoledronic acid, for delaying skeletal-related events, while in patients with other solid tumors or multiple myeloma, denosumab was noninferior to zoledronic acid. This article examines the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety and tolerability of denosumab for the management of bone events in patients with cancer.

  14. Disease Control and Ototoxicity Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Tumor-Bed Boost for Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Polkinghorn, William R.; Dunkel, Ira J.; Souweidane, Mark M.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We previously reported excellent local control for treating medulloblastoma with a limited boost to the tumor bed. In order to decrease ototoxicity, we subsequently implemented a tumor-bed boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the clinical results of which we report here. Patients and Methods: A total of 33 patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma, 25 with standard risk, and 8 with high risk, were treated on an IMRT tumor-bed boost following craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Six standard-risk patients were treated with an institutional protocol with 18 Gy CSI in conjunction with intrathecal iodine-131-labeled monoclonal antibody. The majority of patients received concurrentmore » vincristine and standard adjuvant chemotherapy. Pure-tone audiograms were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median age was 9 years old (range, 4-46 years old). Median follow-up was 63 months. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for standard-risk patients who received 23.4 or 36 Gy CSI (not including those who received 18 Gy CSI with radioimmunotherapy) were 81.4% and 88.4%, respectively, at 5 years; 5-year PFS and OS rates for high-risk patients were both 87.5%. There were no isolated posterior fossa failures outside of the boost volume. Posttreatment audiograms were available for 31 patients, of whom 6%, at a median follow-up of 19 months, had developed Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusion: An IMRT tumor-bed boost results in excellent local control while delivering a low mean dose to the cochlea, resulting in a low rate of ototoxicity.« less

  15. A promising approach for treatment of tumor-induced bone diseases: utilizing bisphosphonate derivatives of nucleoside antimetabolites.

    PubMed

    Reinholz, Monica M; Zinnen, Shawn P; Dueck, Amylou C; Dingli, David; Reinholz, Gregory G; Jonart, Leslie A; Kitzmann, Kathleen A; Bruzek, Amy K; Negron, Vivian; Abdalla, Abdalla K; Arendt, Bonnie K; Croatt, Anthony J; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Sebesta, David P; Lönnberg, Harri; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Nath, Karl A; Jelinek, Diane F; Russell, Stephen J; Ingle, James N; Spelsberg, Thomas C; Dixon, Henry B F Hal; Karpeisky, Alexander; Lingle, Wilma L

    2010-07-01

    Despite palliative treatments, tumor-induced bone disease (TIBD) remains highly debilitating for many cancer patients and progression typically results in death within two years. Therefore, more effective therapies with enhanced anti-resorptive and cytotoxic characteristics are needed. We developed bisphosphonate-chemotherapeutic conjugates designed to bind bone and hydrolyze, releasing both compounds, thereby targeting both osteoclasts and tumor cells. This study examined the effects of our lead compound, MBC-11 (the anhydride formed between arabinocytidine (AraC)-5'-phosphate and etidronate), on bone tumor burden, bone volume, femur bone mineral density (BMD), and overall survival using two distinct mouse models of TIBD, the 4T1/luc breast cancer and the KAS-6/1-MIP1alpha multiple myeloma models. In mice orthotopically inoculated with 4T1/luc mouse mammary cells, MBC-11 (0.04 microg/day; s.c.) reduced the incidence of bone metastases to 40% (4/10), compared to 90% (9/10; p=0.057) and 100% (5/5; p=0.04) of PBS- or similarly-dosed, zoledronate-treated mice, respectively. MBC-11 also significantly decreased bone tumor burden compared to PBS- or zoledronate-treated mice (p=0.021, p=0.017, respectively). MBC-11 and zoledronate (0.04 microg/day) significantly increased bone volume by two- and four-fold, respectively, compared to PBS-treated mice (p=0.005, p<0.001, respectively). In mice systemically injected with human multiple myeloma KAS-6/1-MIP1alpha cells, 0.04 and 4.0 microg/day MBC-11 improved femur BMD by 13% and 16%, respectively, compared to PBS (p=0.025, p=0.017, respectively) at 10 weeks post-tumor cell injection and increased mean survival to 95 days compared to 77 days in mice treated with PBS (p=0.047). Similar doses of zoledronate also improved femur BMD (p< or =0.01 vs PBS) and increased mean survival to 86 days, but this was not significantly different than in PBS-treated mice (p=0.53). These results demonstrate that MBC-11 decreases bone tumor burden

  16. [Prosopagnosia and facial expression recognition].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews clinical neuropsychological studies that have indicated that the recognition of a person's identity and the recognition of facial expressions are processed by different cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. The fusiform gyrus, especially the right fusiform gyrus, plays an important role in the recognition of identity. The superior temporal sulcus, amygdala, and medial frontal cortex play important roles in facial-expression recognition. Both facial recognition and facial-expression recognition are highly intellectual processes that involve several regions of the brain.

  17. Easy facial analysis using the facial golden mask.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha

    2007-05-01

    For over 2000 years, many artists and scientists have tried to understand or quantify the form of the perfect, ideal, or most beautiful face both in art and in vivo (life). A mathematical relationship has been consistently and repeatedly reported to be present in beautiful things. This particular relationship is the golden ratio. It is a mathematical ratio of 1.618:1 that seems to appear recurrently in beautiful things in nature as well as in other things that are seen as beautiful. Dr. Marquardt made the facial golden mask that contains and includes all of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional geometric golden elements formed from the golden ratio. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of the golden facial mask. In 40 cases, the authors applied the facial golden mask to preoperative and postoperative photographs and scored each photograph on a 1 to 5 scale from the perspective of their personal aesthetic views. The score was lower when the facial deformity was severe, whereas it was higher when the face was attractive. Compared with the average scores of facial mask applied photographs and nonapplied photographs using a nonparametric test, statistical significance was not reached (P > 0.05). This implies that the facial golden mask may be used as an analytical tool. The facial golden mask is easy to apply, inexpensive, and relatively objective. Therefore, the authors introduce it as a useful facial analysis.

  18. Cyclin D1 expression and facial function outcome after vestibular schwannoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Lassaletta, Luis; Del Rio, Laura; Torres-Martin, Miguel; Rey, Juan A; Patrón, Mercedes; Madero, Rosario; Roda, Jose Maria; Gavilan, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The proto-oncogen cyclin D1 has been implicated in the development and behavior of vestibular schwannoma. This study evaluates the association between cyclin D1 expression and other known prognostic factors in facial function outcome 1 year after vestibular schwannoma surgery. Sixty-four patients undergoing surgery for vestibular schwannoma were studied. Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed with anticyclin D1 in all cases. Cyclin D1 expression, as well as other demographic, clinical, radiologic, and intraoperative data, was correlated with 1-year postoperative facial function. Good 1-year facial function (Grades 1-2) was achieved in 73% of cases. Cyclin D1 expression was found in 67% of the tumors. Positive cyclin D1 staining was more frequent in patients with Grades 1 to 2 (75%) than in those with Grades 3 to 6 (25%). Other significant variables were tumor volume and facial nerve stimulation after tumor resection. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve increased when adding cyclin D1 expression to the multivariate model. Cyclin D1 expression is associated to facial outcome after vestibular schwannoma surgery. The prognostic value of cyclin D1 expression is independent of tumor size and facial nerve stimulation at the end of surgery.

  19. Risk of Lymphoma in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treated With Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Agents: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Huang, Junlin; Huang, Xiaowen; Huang, Shaozhuo; Cheng, Jiaxin; Liao, Weixin; Chen, Xuewen; Wang, Xueyi; Dai, Shixue

    2018-05-12

    The association between anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents and the risk of lymphoma in patients with inflammatory bowel disease has already been sufficiently reported. However, the results of these studies are inconsistent. Hence, this analysis was conducted to investigate whether anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents can increase the risk of lymphoma in inflammatory bowel disease patients. MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify relevant studies which evaluated the risk of lymphoma in inflammatory bowel disease patients treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed to calculate the pooled incidence rate ratios as well as risk ratios. Twelve studies comprising 285811 participants were included. The result showed that there was no significantly increased risk of lymphoma between anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents exposed and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents unexposed groups (random effects: incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.43 95%CI, 0.91-2.25, p= 0.116; random effects: risk ratio [RR], 0.83 95%CI, 0.47-1.48, p=0.534). However, monotherapy of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents (random effects: IRR=1.65, 95%CI, 1.16-2.35; p=0.006; random effects: RR=1.00, 95%CI, 0.39-2.59; p=0.996) or combination therapy (random effects: IRR=3.36, 95%CI, 2.23-5.05; p< 0.001; random effects: RR=1.90, 95%CI, 0.66-5.44; p=0.233) can significantly increase the risk of lymphoma. Exposition of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents in patients with inflammatory bowel disease is not associated with a higher risk of lymphoma. Combination therapy and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents monotherapy can significantly increase the risk of lymphoma in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. Role of endogenous avian leukosis virus and serotype 2 Marek’s disease virus in enhancement of spontaneous lymphoid-leukosis-like tumors in chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The influence of endogenous subgroup E avian Leukosis virus (ALV-E) and strain SB-1 of serotype 2 Marek’s disease virus (MDV) on the enhancement of spontaneous lymphoid leukosis (LL)-like tumors was studied in chickens of Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory (ADOL) line named 0.TVB*S1, or RFS. This...

  1. [Myxoma of the mastoid with destruction of the facial nerve (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Neiger, M

    1978-10-01

    A case of Myxoma of the mastoid with initial facial spasme followed by palsy of the nerve is reported. After removing the tumor the nerve has been reconstructed from the secound knee until the stylomastoid foramen. The probable origine of the tumor is discussed.

  2. Facial lacerations in children.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Hwang, Pil Joong; Sohn, In Ah

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the demographics and treatment of facial lacerations in pediatric patients. A retrospective record-based analysis was administered on 3783 patients (<15 years of age) presenting with facial lacerations from March 2002 to February 2011. Males were injured more frequently across all age groups (65.3%) and especially in the 13- to 15-year-old group (81.3%) (P = 0.012, Pearson χ). Overall, 48.9% of injuries occurred outdoors and 45.1% in homes. Only 6.0% occurred in schools or kindergartens. Injuries that occurred in schools or kindergarten increased with the age groups (from 2.3% for 0- to 3-year-olds to 19.1% for 13- to 15-year-olds). In the age groups younger than 12 years, injury occurred more frequently on the weekend. In the 13-to 15-year-old group, however, injury occurred more frequently on weekdays (odds ratio, 2.46). Injury occurred most frequently at the times of 7 to 9 PM and least frequently from midnight to 6 AM. The most frequent cause of injury in children was by being struck or by bumping something (32.5%), followed by slip-down (31.5%). Accidents involving furniture and stairs accounted for 9% each. Accidents caused by stairs decreased with age (from 10.2% for 0-3 years of age to 5.5% for 13-15 years of age, P = 0.000, Pearson χ). In a little less than half (47.2%) of the cases, parents accompanied their children at the time of injury. In the 13- to 15-year age group, only 17.9% of the children were accompanied by their parents. Foreheads (26.4%) took the brunt of most frequent injuries, followed by the eyelids (20.6%), eyebrows including the glabella (19.7%), and chin injuries (15.7%). Only 58 cases had associated injuries. Among 3783 cases of facial lacerations, 3745 patients did not have facial bone fractures or associated injuries and were managed under local anesthesia or through dressings only. A sound knowledge about the epidemiology of lacerations might be beneficial for the prevention of pediatric

  3. Children's Facial Trustworthiness Judgments: Agreement and Relationship with Facial Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fengling; Xu, Fen; Luo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined developmental changes in children's abilities to make trustworthiness judgments based on faces and the relationship between a child's perception of trustworthiness and facial attractiveness. One hundred and one 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds, along with 37 undergraduates, were asked to judge the trustworthiness of 200 faces. Next, they issued facial attractiveness judgments. The results indicated that children made consistent trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments based on facial appearance, but with-adult and within-age agreement levels of facial judgments increased with age. Additionally, the agreement levels of judgments made by girls were higher than those by boys. Furthermore, the relationship between trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments increased with age, and the relationship between two judgments made by girls was closer than those by boys. These findings suggest that face-based trait judgment ability develops throughout childhood and that, like adults, children may use facial attractiveness as a heuristic cue that signals a stranger's trustworthiness.

  4. Children's Facial Trustworthiness Judgments: Agreement and Relationship with Facial Attractiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fengling; Xu, Fen; Luo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined developmental changes in children's abilities to make trustworthiness judgments based on faces and the relationship between a child's perception of trustworthiness and facial attractiveness. One hundred and one 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds, along with 37 undergraduates, were asked to judge the trustworthiness of 200 faces. Next, they issued facial attractiveness judgments. The results indicated that children made consistent trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments based on facial appearance, but with-adult and within-age agreement levels of facial judgments increased with age. Additionally, the agreement levels of judgments made by girls were higher than those by boys. Furthermore, the relationship between trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments increased with age, and the relationship between two judgments made by girls was closer than those by boys. These findings suggest that face-based trait judgment ability develops throughout childhood and that, like adults, children may use facial attractiveness as a heuristic cue that signals a stranger's trustworthiness. PMID:27148111

  5. [Facial femalization in transgenders].

    PubMed

    Yahalom, R; Blinder, D; Nadel, S

    2015-07-01

    Transsexualism is a gender identity disorder in which there is a strong desire to live and be accepted as a member of the opposite sex. In male-to-female transsexuals with strong masculine facial features, facial feminization surgery is performed as part of the gender reassignment. A strong association between femininity and attractiveness has been attributed to the upper third of the face and the interplay of the glabellar prominence of the forehead. Studies have shown that a certain lower jaw shape is characteristic of males with special attention to the strong square mandibular angle and chin and also suggest that the attractive female jaw is smaller with a more round shape mandibular angles and a pointy chin. Other studies have shown that feminization of the forehead through cranioplasty have the most significant impact in determining the gender of a patient. Facial feminization surgeries are procedures aimed to change the features of the male face to that of a female face. These include contouring of the forehead, brow lift, mandible angle reduction, genioplasty, rhinoplasty and a variety of soft tissue adjustments. In our maxillofacial surgery department at the Sheba Medical Center we perform forehead reshaping combining with brow lift and at the same surgery, mandibular and chin reshaping to match the remodeled upper third of the face. The forehead reshaping is done by cranioplasty with additional reduction of the glabella area by burring of the frontal bone. After reducing the frontal bossing around the superior orbital rims we manage the soft tissue to achieve the brow lift. The mandibular reshaping, is performed by intraoral approach and include contouring of the angles by osteotomy for a more round shape (rather than the manly square shape angles), as well as reshaping of the bone in the chin area in order to make it more pointy, by removing the lateral parts of the chin and in some cases performing also genioplasty reduction by AP osteotomy.

  6. Miscellaneous indications in bone scintigraphy: metabolic bone diseases and malignant bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Cook, Gary J R; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Chua, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The diphosphonate bone scan is ideally suited to assess many global, focal or multifocal metabolic bone disorders and there remains a role for conventional bone scintigraphy in metabolic bone disorders at diagnosis, investigation of complications, and treatment response assessment. In contrast, the role of bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of primary malignant bone tumors has reduced with the improvement of morphologic imaging, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, an increasing role for (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography is emerging as a functional assessment at diagnosis, staging, and neoadjuvant treatment response assessment.

  7. Effect of a Facial Muscle Exercise Device on Facial Rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ui-jae; Kwon, Oh-yun; Jung, Sung-hoon; Ahn, Sun-hee; Gwak, Gyeong-tae

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background The efficacy of facial muscle exercises (FMEs) for facial rejuvenation is controversial. In the majority of previous studies, nonquantitative assessment tools were used to assess the benefits of FMEs. Objectives This study examined the effectiveness of FMEs using a Pao (MTG, Nagoya, Japan) device to quantify facial rejuvenation. Methods Fifty females were asked to perform FMEs using a Pao device for 30 seconds twice a day for 8 weeks. Facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area were measured sonographically. Facial surface distance, surface area, and volumes were determined using a laser scanning system before and after FME. Facial muscle thickness, cross-sectional area, midfacial surface distances, jawline surface distance, and lower facial surface area and volume were compared bilaterally before and after FME using a paired Student t test. Results The cross-sectional areas of the zygomaticus major and digastric muscles increased significantly (right: P < 0.001, left: P = 0.015), while the midfacial surface distances in the middle (right: P = 0.005, left: P = 0.047) and lower (right: P = 0.028, left: P = 0.019) planes as well as the jawline surface distances (right: P = 0.004, left: P = 0.003) decreased significantly after FME using the Pao device. The lower facial surface areas (right: P = 0.005, left: P = 0.006) and volumes (right: P = 0.001, left: P = 0.002) were also significantly reduced after FME using the Pao device. Conclusions FME using the Pao device can increase facial muscle thickness and cross-sectional area, thus contributing to facial rejuvenation. Level of Evidence: 4 PMID:29365050

  8. Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor in a 65-year-old man presenting with disseminated leptomeningeal disease: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Babi, Marc-Alain; Fecci, Peter; Luedke, Matthew; Pineda, Olinda; O'Keefe, Yasmin Ali

    2018-01-01

    Central nervous system atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors are very rare aggressive tumor of childhood, primarily occurring at age of less than 3 years old. The prognosis of these tumors is very poor, with a reported median survival of 6-12 months in most cases. Treatment typically consists of aggressive chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with progressive encephalopathy and change in personality over 3 months period. The patient had further accelerated decline over 3 weeks. The diagnosis of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor initially remained elusive despite very extensive workup, but was eventually confirmed via open brain biopsy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the oldest reported case of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor in the literature. We further extend the spectrum of this rare disease.

  9. [Clinicopathologic study of sinonasal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor].

    PubMed

    He, Chun-yan; Jin, Yu-lan; Yang, Dong-mei; Liu, Hong-gang

    2010-03-01

    To study the clinicopathologic features, immunophenotype and ultrastructural features of sinonasal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT). The clinical and histologic features of 5 cases of sinonasal IMT were reviewed. Immunohistochemical study for vimentin, MSA, SMA, calponin, h-caldesmon, desmin, ALK, fibronectin, CK, S-100 and Ki-67 was carried out. Ultrastructural examination was also performed in two of the cases. The patients age ranged from 28 to 62 years (mean = 43 years). The male-to-female ratio was 2:3. The clinical presentation included nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, nasal bleeding, facial pain, facial swelling, toothache and tear overflow. All of the 5 patients suffered from disease relapses; and 4 of them had recurrences for more than 5 times. One patient had lymph node metastasis and 3 patients died of the disease. Histologically, the tumor cells were arranged in interlacing fascicles and sometimes haphazard in fashion. They were spindly in shape, cytoplasm eosinophilic with mild nuclear atypia and a low mitotic activity. The intervening stroma was myxoid in appearance accompanied by lymphocyte and plasma cell infiltration, abundant blood vessels and focal collagenized areas. In 3 of the recurrent cases, the tumor cells displayed increased nuclear atypia and mitotic activity (average about 5 to 6 per 10 high-power fields), accompanied by patchy necrosis, less inflammatory cell infiltration and focal sarcomatous changes. Immunohistochemical study showed that the tumor cells were diffusely positive for vimentin. SMA, MSA, calponin and fibronectin were variably expressed. Desmin was weakly positive in 1 case. The staining for h-caldesmon, ALK, S-100 and CK was negative. The Ki-67 proliferation index increased with tumor recurrences. Electron microscopy revealed abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum and dense body formation in the cytoplasm. There were an increased amount of collagen fibers in the stroma. IMT rarely occurs in nasal cavity and

  10. Complications in Pediatric Facial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Mimi T.; Losee, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of pediatric facial fractures, little has been published on the complications of these fractures. The existing literature is highly variable regarding both the definition and the reporting of adverse events. Although the incidence of pediatric facial fractures is relative low, they are strongly associated with other serious injuries. Both the fractures and their treatment may have long-term consequence on growth and development of the immature face. This article is a selective review of the literature on facial fracture complications with special emphasis on the complications unique to pediatric patients. We also present our classification system to evaluate adverse outcomes associated with pediatric facial fractures. Prospective, long-term studies are needed to fully understand and appreciate the complexity of treating children with facial fractures and determining the true incidence, subsequent growth, and nature of their complications. PMID:22110803

  11. Management of Chronic Facial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher G.; Dellon, A. Lee; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2009-01-01

    Pain persisting for at least 6 months is defined as chronic. Chronic facial pain conditions often take on lives of their own deleteriously changing the lives of the sufferer. Although much is known about facial pain, it is clear that those physicians who treat these conditions should continue elucidating the mechanisms and defining successful treatment strategies for these life-changing conditions. This article will review many of the classic causes of chronic facial pain due to the trigeminal nerve and its branches that are amenable to surgical therapies. Testing of facial sensibility is described and its utility introduced. We will also introduce some of the current hypotheses of atypical facial pain and headaches secondary to chronic nerve compressions and will suggest possible treatment strategies. PMID:22110799

  12. Spinal Cord Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... are linked to known inherited syndromes, such as neurofibromatosis 2 and von Hippel-Lindau disease. Risk factors ... tumors are more common in people who have: Neurofibromatosis 2. In this hereditary disorder, benign tumors develop ...

  13. Increased Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α and Its Promoter Polymorphisms Correlate with Disease Progression and Higher Susceptibility towards Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Laddha, Naresh C.; Dwivedi, Mitesh; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α, is a paracrine inhibitor of melanocytes, which plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases including vitiligo, as abnormal immune responses have frequently been observed in vitiligo patients. Moreover, vitiligo patients show higher lesion levels of TNF-α. Genetic polymorphisms in the promoter region of TNF-α are involved in the regulation of its expression. The present study explores TNF-α promoter polymorphisms and correlates them with TNF-α transcript and protein levels in vitiligo patients and controls of Gujarat along with its effect on disease onset and progression. PCR-RFLP technique was used for genotyping of these polymorphisms in 977 vitiligo patients and 990 controls. TNF-α transcript and protein levels were measured by Real time PCR and ELISA respectively. The genotype and allele frequencies for the investigated polymorphisms were significantly associated with vitiligo patients. The study revealed significant increase in TNF-α transcript and protein levels in vitiligo patients compared to controls. In particular, haplotypes: AATCC, AACCT, AGTCT, GATCT, GATCC and AGCCT were found to increase the TNF-α levels in vitiligo patients. Analysis of TNF-α levels based on the gender and disease progression suggests that female patients and patients with active vitiligo had higher levels of TNF-α. Also, the TNF-α levels were high in patients with generalized vitiligo as compared to localized vitiligo. Age of onset analysis of the disease suggests that the haplotypes: AACAT, AACCT, AATCC and AATCT had a profound effect in the early onset of the disease. Moreover, the analysis suggests that female patients had an early onset of vitiligo. Overall, our results suggest that TNF-α promoter polymorphisms may be genetic risk factors for susceptibility and progression of the disease. The up-regulation of TNF-α transcript and protein levels in individuals with susceptible haplotypes advocates

  14. Reverse-flow retroauricular island flap in facial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Benlier, Erol; Top, Husamettin; Cinar, Can; Yazar, Sukru; Aygit, A Cemal; Cetinkale, Oguz

    2007-12-01

    Reconstruction of facial skin defects requires good-quality skin cover to satisfy aesthetic expectations of patient, especially when the skin defect is on the uncovered area of the face. Limitations in the available local tissue and donor-site morbidity restrict the options. In an effort to solve these problems, we have begun to use a subcutaneous pedicled retroauricular reverse-flow flap. Between January 1997 and December 2005, reverse-flow subcutaneous pedicled retroauricular island flap was used to cover facial defects in 12 patients who underwent surgical excision of skin tumor. The patients ranged in age from 44 to 81 years with a mean age of 58 years. Only one case experienced a superficial necrosis in the distal one-quarter part of the flap. The functional and aesthetic results were satisfactory for both patients and surgeons, and no tumor recurrence was observed during the 12 to 28 months (mean, 18.8 months) follow-up period. This flap can be used reliably for the reconstruction of facial skin defects of small and medium size. The preference of frontal branch pedicled flap enables more distal facial area defects to be covered, such as dorsal nasal, nasolabial, and upper lip, than flaps based on parietal branch.

  15. Microvascular Decompression for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia in Patient with Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, John P; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Link, Michael J; Carlson, Matthew L

    2018-05-01

    Secondary trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is uncommon. When a space-occupying lesion with mass effect is identified, the associated TN is often exclusively attributed to the tumor. This report illustrates the importance of considering coexistent actionable pathology when surgically treating secondary TN. A 51-year-old woman presented with abrupt-onset TN of the V2 and V3 nerve divisions with hypesthesia. She denied changes in hearing, balance, or facial nerve dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 1.6-cm contrast-enhancing cerebellopontine angle tumor that effaced the trigeminal nerve, consistent with a vestibular schwannoma. In addition, a branch of the superior cerebellar artery abutted the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve on T2-weighted thin-slice magnetic resonance imaging. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the tumor elicited a response from the facial nerve at low threshold over the entire accessible tumor surface, indicating that the tumor was a facial nerve schwannoma. Considering the patient's lack of facial nerve deficit and that the tumor exhibited no safe entry point for intracapsular debulking, tumor resection was not performed. Working between the tumor and tentorium, a branch of the superior cerebellar artery was identified and decompressed with a Teflon pad. At last follow-up, the patient exhibited resolution of her TN. Her hearing and facial nerve function remained intact. Despite obstruction from a medium-sized tumor, it is still possible to achieve microvascular decompression of the fifth cranial nerve. This emphasizes the importance of considering other actionable pathology during surgical management of presumed tumor-induced TN. Further, TN is relatively uncommon with medium-sized vestibular schwannomas and coexistent causes should be considered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Influencing Factors Analysis of Facial Nerve Function after the Microsurgical Resection of Acoustic Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, WenMing; Cheng, HongWei; Wang, XiaoJie; Feng, ChunGuo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore and analyze the influencing factors of facial nerve function retainment after microsurgery resection of acoustic neurinoma. Methods Retrospective analysis of our hospital 105 acoustic neuroma cases from October, 2006 to January 2012, in the group all patients were treated with suboccipital sigmoid sinus approach to acoustic neuroma microsurgery resection. We adopted researching individual patient data, outpatient review and telephone followed up and the House-Brackmann grading system to evaluate and analyze the facial nerve function. Results Among 105 patients in this study group, complete surgical resection rate was 80.9% (85/105), subtotal resection rate was 14.3% (15/105), and partial resection rate 4.8% (5/105). The rate of facial nerve retainment on neuroanatomy was 95.3% (100/105) and the mortality rate was 2.1% (2/105). Facial nerve function when the patient is discharged from the hospital, also known as immediate facial nerve function which was graded in House-Brackmann: excellent facial nerve function (House-Brackmann I–II level) cases accounted for 75.2% (79/105), facial nerve function III–IV level cases accounted for 22.9% (24/105), and V–VI cases accounted for 1.9% (2/105). Patients were followed up for more than one year, with excellent facial nerve function retention rate (H-B I–II level) was 74.4% (58/78). Conclusion Acoustic neuroma patients after surgery, the long-term (≥1 year) facial nerve function excellent retaining rate was closely related with surgical proficiency, post-operative immediate facial nerve function, diameter of tumor and whether to use electrophysiological monitoring techniques; while there was no significant correlation with the patient’s age, surgical approach, whether to stripping the internal auditory canal, whether there was cystic degeneration, tumor recurrence, whether to merge with obstructive hydrocephalus and the length of the duration of symptoms. PMID:28264236

  17. Tumors and other diseases following childhood x-ray treatment for ringworm of the scalp (Tinea capitis).

    PubMed

    Shore, Roy E; Moseson, Miriam; Harley, Naomi; Pasternack, Bernard S

    2003-10-01

    The objective of the study is to characterize the risk of tumors from radiation exposure to the head and neck. A cohort of 2,224 children given x-ray treatment and 1,380 given only topical medications for ringworm of the scalp (tinea capitis) during 1940-1959 have been followed up for a median of 39 y to determine tumor incidence. Follow-ups were by mail/telephone questionnaire, with 84-88% of the original cohort followed and with medical verification of diseases of interest. Sixteen intracranial tumors [7 brain cancers, 4 meningiomas, and 5 acoustic neuromas (vestibular schwannomas)] occurred in the x-irradiated group following an average brain dose of about 1.4 Gy, compared to 1 acoustic neuroma in the control group. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for brain cancer was 3.0 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 5.9]. Even though the dose to the thyroid gland was only about 60 mGy, 2 thyroid cancers were found in the irradiated group vs. none among controls, and 11 vs. 1 thyroid adenomas were found in the respective groups. Following an average dose of about 4 Gy to cranial marrow, 8 cases of leukemia (SIR = 3.2, CI: 1.5, 6.1) were observed in the irradiated group and 1 in the control group. There was also a suggestive excess of blood dyscrasias. There was no difference between the groups in the frequency of other cancers of the head and neck (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer) or in total mortality.

  18. Inhibition of mTOR's Catalytic Site by PKI-587 Is a Promising Therapeutic Option for Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor Disease.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Helma; Christen, Friederike; Lewens, Florentine; Grass, Irina; Briest, Franziska; Iwaszkiewicz, Sara; Siegmund, Britta; Grabowski, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The characteristic clinical heterogeneity and mostly slow-growing behavior of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) cause problems in finding appropriate treatments. Thus, the current therapy options are not satisfactory. PKI-587 is a highly potent, novel dual inhibitor of PI3K and mTORC1/C2. We assessed the effects of PKI-587 in different GEP-NEN tumor models, including the poorly differentiated cell line LCC-18, and compared them with those of the established mTORC1 inhibitor everolimus. We treated BON, QGP-1, KRJ-I, and LCC-18 cell lines with increasing concentrations of the inhibitor PKI-587, and compared the results with those of everolimus and DMSO. We assessed the impact of the treatments on viability (WST-1 assay), on apoptotic processes (caspase 3/7 assay, JC-1), and on cell cycle regulation (flow cytometry). We determined alterations in signaling mediators by phosphor-specific Western blot analysis and conducted multiplexed gene expression analysis (nCounter® technology). In all cell lines, PKI-587 dose-dependently inhibited proliferation, whereas everolimus was less effective. Treatment with PKI-587 led to cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis and successfully suppressed activity of the direct mTORC1 target 4E-BP1, a crucial factor for tumor genesis only partially inhibited by everolimus. Gene expression analyses revealed relevant changes of RAS, MAPK, STAT, and PI3K pathway genes after treatment. Treatment-dependent and cell line-characteristic effects on AKT/Rb/E2F signaling regarding cell cycle control and apoptosis are extensively discussed in this paper. PI3K/mTOR dual targeting is a promising new therapeutic approach in neuroendocrine tumor disease that should be evaluated in further clinical trials. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Inhibition of mTOR's Catalytic Site by PKI-587 Is a Promising Therapeutic Option for Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor Disease

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Helma; Christen, Friederike; Lewens, Florentine; Grass, Irina; Briest, Franziska; Iwaszkiewicz, Sara; Siegmund, Britta; Grabowski, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Background The characteristic clinical heterogeneity and mostly slow-growing behavior of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) cause problems in finding appropriate treatments. Thus, the current therapy options are not satisfactory. PKI-587 is a highly potent, novel dual inhibitor of PI3K and mTORC1/C2. Aim We assessed the effects of PKI-587 in different GEP-NEN tumor models, including the poorly differentiated cell line LCC-18, and compared them with those of the established mTORC1 inhibitor everolimus. Methods We treated BON, QGP-1, KRJ-I, and LCC-18 cell lines with increasing concentrations of the inhibitor PKI-587, and compared the results with those of everolimus and DMSO. We assessed the impact of the treatments on viability (WST-1 assay), on apoptotic processes (caspase 3/7 assay, JC-1), and on cell cycle regulation (flow cytometry). We determined alterations in signaling mediators by phosphor-specific Western blot analysis and conducted multiplexed gene expression analysis (nCounter® technology). Results In all cell lines, PKI-587 dose-dependently inhibited proliferation, whereas everolimus was less effective. Treatment with PKI-587 led to cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis and successfully suppressed activity of the direct mTORC1 target 4E-BP1, a crucial factor for tumor genesis only partially inhibited by everolimus. Gene expression analyses revealed relevant changes of RAS, MAPK, STAT, and PI3K pathway genes after treatment. Treatment-dependent and cell line-characteristic effects on AKT/Rb/E2F signaling regarding cell cycle control and apoptosis are extensively discussed in this paper. Conclusion PI3K/mTOR dual targeting is a promising new therapeutic approach in neuroendocrine tumor disease that should be evaluated in further clinical trials. PMID:27513674

  20. “Sentinel” Circulating Tumor Cells Allow Early Diagnosis of Lung Cancer in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ilie, Marius; Hofman, Véronique; Long-Mira, Elodie; Selva, Eric; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Padovani, Bernard; Mouroux, Jérôme; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Hofman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a risk factor for lung cancer. Migration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the blood stream is an early event that occurs during carcinogenesis. We aimed to examine the presence of CTCs in complement to CT-scan in COPD patients without clinically detectable lung cancer as a first step to identify a new marker for early lung cancer diagnosis. The presence of CTCs was examined by an ISET filtration-enrichment technique, for 245 subjects without cancer, including 168 (68.6%) COPD patients, and 77 subjects without COPD (31.4%), including 42 control smokers and 35 non-smoking healthy individuals. CTCs were identified by cytomorphological analysis and characterized by studying their expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. COPD patients were monitored annually by low-dose spiral CT. CTCs were detected in 3% of COPD patients (5 out of 168 patients). The annual surveillance of the CTC-positive COPD patients by CT-scan screening detected lung nodules 1 to 4 years after CTC detection, leading to prompt surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of early-stage lung cancer. Follow-up of the 5 patients by CT-scan and ISET 12 month after surgery showed no tumor recurrence. CTCs detected in COPD patients had a heterogeneous expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, which was similar to the corresponding lung tumor phenotype. No CTCs were detected in control smoking and non-smoking healthy individuals. CTCs can be detected in patients with COPD without clinically detectable lung cancer. Monitoring “sentinel” CTC-positive COPD patients may allow early diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:25360587

  1. Societal Value of Surgery for Facial Reanimation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Peiyi; Ishii, Lisa E.; Joseph, Andrew; Nellis, Jason; Dey, Jacob; Bater, Kristin; Byrne, Patrick J.; Boahene, Kofi D. O.; Ishii, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    standard gamble metric for low- and high-grade paralysis were 0.98 (0.09) and 0.77 (0.25), respectively. Time trade-off and visual analog scale measures were highly correlated. We calculated mean (SD) WTP per quality-adjusted life-year, which ranged from $10 167 ($14 565) to $17 008 ($38 288) for low- to high-grade paralysis, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Society perceives the repair of facial paralysis to be a high-value intervention. Societal WTP increases and perceived health state utility decreases with increasing House-Brackmann grade. This study demonstrates the usefulness of WTP as an objective measure to inform dimensions of disease severity and signal the value society places on proper facial function. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE NA. PMID:27892977

  2. [Facial palsy: diagnosis and management by primary care physicians].

    PubMed

    Alvarez, V; Dussoix, P; Gaspoz, J-M

    2009-01-28

    The incidence of facial palsy is about 50/100000/year, i.e. 210 cases/year in Geneva. Clinicians can be puzzled by it, because it encompasses aetiologies with very diverse prognoses. Most patients suffer from Bell palsy that evolves favourably. Some, however, suffer from diseases such as meningitis, HIV infection, Lyme's disease, CVA, that require fast identification because of their severity and of the need for specific treatments. This article proposes an algorithm for pragmatic and evidence-based management of facial palsy.

  3. Quality management and accreditation of research tissue banks: experience of the National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) Heidelberg.

    PubMed

    Herpel, Esther; Röcken, Christoph; Manke, Heike; Schirmacher, Peter; Flechtenmacher, Christa

    2010-12-01

    Tissue banks are key resource and technology platforms in biomedical research that address the molecular pathogenesis of diseases as well as disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Due to the central role of tissue banks in standardized collection, storage, and distribution of human tissues and their derivatives, quality management and its external assessment is becoming increasingly relevant for the maintenance, acceptance, and funding of tissue banks. Little experience exists regarding formalized external evaluation of tissue banks, especially regarding certification and accreditation. Based on the accreditation of the National Center of Tumor Diseases (NCT) tissue bank in Heidelberg (Germany), criteria, requirements, processes, and implications were compiled and evaluated. Accreditation formally approved professional competence and performance of the tissue bank in all steps involved in tissue collection, storage, handling as well as macroscopic and histologic examination and final (exit) examination of the tissue and transfer supervised by board-certified competent histopathologists. Thereby, accreditation provides a comprehensive measure to evaluate and document the quality standard of tissue research banks and may play a significant role in the future assessment of tissue banks. Furthermore, accreditation may support harmonization and standardization of tissue banking for biomedical research purposes.

  4. Inhibition of Inflammation Mediated Through the Tumor Necrosis Factor α Biochemical Pathway Can Lead to Favorable Outcomes in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Daniah; Laskowski, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) inhibitors have long been used as disease-modifying agents in immune disorders. Recently, research has shown a role of chronic neuroinflammation in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, and interest has been generated in the use of anti-TNF agents and TNF-modulating agents for prevention and treatment. This article extensively reviewed literature on animal studies testing these agents. The results showed a role for direct and indirect TNF-α inhibition through agents such as thalidomide, 3,6-dithiothalidomide, etanercept, infliximab, exendin-4, sodium hydrosulfide, minocycline, imipramine, and atorvastatin. Studies were performed on mice, rats, and monkeys, with induction of neurodegenerative physiology either through the use of chemical agents or through the use of transgenic animals. Most of these agents showed an improvement in cognitive function as tested with the Morris water maze, and immunohistochemical and histopathological staining studies consistently showed better outcomes with these agents. Brains of treated animals showed significant reduction in pro-inflammatory TNF-α and reduced the burden of neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid precursor protein, and β-amyloid plaques. Also, recruitment of microglial cells in the central nervous system was significantly reduced through these drugs. These studies provide a clearer mechanistic understanding of the role of TNF-α modulation in Alzheimer disease. All studies in this review explored the use of these drugs as prophylactic agents to prevent Alzheimer disease through immune modulation of the TNF inflammatory pathway, and their success highlights the need for further research of these drugs as therapeutic agents. PMID:28811745

  5. Growth and Adult Height in Patients with Crohn's Disease Treated with Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor α Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, Sarah; Martinez Vinson, Christine; Mohamed, Damir; Viala, Jérôme; Carel, Jean-Claude; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Simon, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation contributes to growth failure associated with inflammatory bowel diseases. Anti-TNFα therapy induces sustained remission and short-term improvements in height velocity and/or height standard deviation score (H-SDS) patients with Crohn's disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate growth and adult height in patients with Crohn's disease taking maintenance infliximab or adalimumab therapy.This university-hospital based retrospective study included 61 patients, with a median follow-up of 2.6 years (2.0; 3.3). 38 patients (62%) reached their adult height. H-SDS was collected at diagnosis and together with disease activity markers (Harvey-Bradshaw Index, albumin, and C-reactive protein) at treatment initiation (baseline), and follow-up completion. Wilcoxon's signed-rank test was chosen for comparisons. Median H-SDS decreased from diagnosis to baseline (-0.08 [-0.73; +0.77] to -0.94 [-1.44; +0.11], p<0.0001) and then increased to follow-up completion (-0.63 [-1.08; 0.49], p = 0.003 versus baseline), concomitantly with an improvement in disease activity. Median adult H-SDS was within the normal range (-0.72 [-1.25; +0.42]) but did not differ from baseline H-SDS and was significantly lower than the target H-SDS (-0.09 [-0.67; +0.42], p = 0.01). Only 2 (6%) males had adult heights significantly below their target heights (10.5 and -13.5 cm [-1.75 and -2.25 SD]). In conclusion, anti-tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) therapy prevented loss of height without fully restoring the genetic growth potential in this group of patients with CD. Earlier treatment initiation might improve growth outcomes in these patients.

  6. Inhibition of Inflammation Mediated Through the Tumor Necrosis Factor α Biochemical Pathway Can Lead to Favorable Outcomes in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Daniah; Laskowski, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) inhibitors have long been used as disease-modifying agents in immune disorders. Recently, research has shown a role of chronic neuroinflammation in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, and interest has been generated in the use of anti-TNF agents and TNF-modulating agents for prevention and treatment. This article extensively reviewed literature on animal studies testing these agents. The results showed a role for direct and indirect TNF-α inhibition through agents such as thalidomide, 3,6-dithiothalidomide, etanercept, infliximab, exendin-4, sodium hydrosulfide, minocycline, imipramine, and atorvastatin. Studies were performed on mice, rats, and monkeys, with induction of neurodegenerative physiology either through the use of chemical agents or through the use of transgenic animals. Most of these agents showed an improvement in cognitive function as tested with the Morris water maze, and immunohistochemical and histopathological staining studies consistently showed better outcomes with these agents. Brains of treated animals showed significant reduction in pro-inflammatory TNF-α and reduced the burden of neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid precursor protein, and β-amyloid plaques. Also, recruitment of microglial cells in the central nervous system was significantly reduced through these drugs. These studies provide a clearer mechanistic understanding of the role of TNF-α modulation in Alzheimer disease. All studies in this review explored the use of these drugs as prophylactic agents to prevent Alzheimer disease through immune modulation of the TNF inflammatory pathway, and their success highlights the need for further research of these drugs as therapeutic agents.

  7. Diagnostic relevance of transcranial magnetic and electric stimulation of the facial nerve in the management of facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dennis A; Linder, Stefan; Topka, Helge

    2005-09-01

    Earlier investigations have suggested that isolated conduction block of the facial nerve to transcranial magnetic stimulation early in the disorder represents a very sensitive and potentially specific finding in Bell's palsy differentiating the disease from other etiologies. Stimulation of the facial nerve was performed electrically at the stylomastoid foramen and magnetically at the labyrinthine segment of the Fallopian channel within 3 days from symptom onset in 65 patients with Bell's palsy, five patients with Zoster oticus, one patient with neuroborreliosis and one patient with nuclear facial nerve palsy due to multiple sclerosis. Absence or decreased amplitudes of muscle responses to early transcranial magnetic stimulation was not specific for Bell's palsy, but also evident in all cases of Zoster oticus and in the case of neuroborreliosis. Amplitudes of electrically evoked muscle responses were more markedly reduced in Zoster oticus as compared to Bell's palsy, most likely due to a more severe degree of axonal degeneration. The degree of amplitude reduction of the muscle response to electrical stimulation reliably correlated with the severity of facial palsy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the early diagnosis of Bell's palsy is less specific than previously thought. While not specific with respect to the etiology of facial palsy, transcranial magnetic stimulation seems capable of localizing the site of lesion within the Fallopian channel. Combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation, early electrical stimulation of the facial nerve at the stylomastoid foramen may help to establish correct diagnosis and prognosis.

  8. [Neural mechanisms of facial recognition].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Chiyoko

    2007-01-01

    We review recent researches in neural mechanisms of facial recognition in the light of three aspects: facial discrimination and identification, recognition of facial expressions, and face perception in itself. First, it has been demonstrated that the fusiform gyrus has a main role of facial discrimination and identification. However, whether the FFA (fusiform face area) is really a special area for facial processing or not is controversial; some researchers insist that the FFA is related to 'becoming an expert' for some kinds of visual objects, including faces. Neural mechanisms of prosopagnosia would be deeply concerned to this issue. Second, the amygdala seems to be very concerned to recognition of facial expressions, especially fear. The amygdala, connected with the superior temporal sulcus and the orbitofrontal cortex, appears to operate the cortical function. The amygdala and the superior temporal sulcus are related to gaze recognition, which explains why a patient with bilateral amygdala damage could not recognize only a fear expression; the information from eyes is necessary for fear recognition. Finally, even a newborn infant can recognize a face as a face, which is congruent with the innate hypothesis of facial recognition. Some researchers speculate that the neural basis of such face perception is the subcortical network, comprised of the amygdala, the superior colliculus, and the pulvinar. This network would relate to covert recognition that prosopagnosic patients have.

  9. Does Facial Resemblance Enhance Cooperation?

    PubMed Central

    Giang, Trang; Bell, Raoul; Buchner, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Facial self-resemblance has been proposed to serve as a kinship cue that facilitates cooperation between kin. In the present study, facial resemblance was manipulated by morphing stimulus faces with the participants' own faces or control faces (resulting in self-resemblant or other-resemblant composite faces). A norming study showed that the perceived degree of kinship was higher for the participants and the self-resemblant composite faces than for actual first-degree relatives. Effects of facial self-resemblance on trust and cooperation were tested in a paradigm that has proven to be sensitive to facial trustworthiness, facial likability, and facial expression. First, participants played a cooperation game in which the composite faces were shown. Then, likability ratings were assessed. In a source memory test, participants were required to identify old and new faces, and were asked to remember whether the faces belonged to cooperators or cheaters in the cooperation game. Old-new recognition was enhanced for self-resemblant faces in comparison to other-resemblant faces. However, facial self-resemblance had no effects on the degree of cooperation in the cooperation game, on the emotional evaluation of the faces as reflected in the likability judgments, and on the expectation that a face belonged to a cooperator rather than to a cheater. Therefore, the present results are clearly inconsistent with the assumption of an evolved kin recognition module built into the human face recognition system. PMID:23094095

  10. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Lung: Current Challenges and Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Well-Differentiated Disease.

    PubMed

    Hendifar, Andrew E; Marchevsky, Alberto M; Tuli, Richard

    2017-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a heterogeneous group of malignancies that arise from neuroendocrine cells throughout the body, most commonly originating from the lungs and gastrointestinal tract. Lung NETs can be classified as well differentiated (low-grade typical carcinoids [TCs] and intermediate-grade atypical carcinoids [ACs]) and poorly differentiated (high-grade large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma or SCLC). The incidence of these tumors is increasing, but disease awareness remains low among thoracic specialists, who are often involved in the diagnosis and early treatment for these patients. An accurate and timely diagnosis can ensure the implementation of appropriate treatment and have a substantial impact on prognosis. However, lung NET classification and diagnosis, particularly for TCs/ACs, are complicated by several factors, including a variable natural history and nonspecific symptoms. Surgery remains the only curative option for TCs/ACs, but there is a lack of consensus between lung NET management guidelines regarding optimal treatment approaches in the unresectable/metastatic setting on account of the limited availability of high-level clinical evidence. As a result, a multidisciplinary approach to management of lung NETs is required to ensure a consistent and optimal level of care. RADIANT-4 is the first phase III trial involving a large subpopulation of patients with advanced well-differentiated lung NETs to report reductions in the risk for disease progression and death with everolimus over placebo. This led to the recent U.S. approval of everolimus-the first agent approved for advanced lung TCs/ACs. To further improve evidence-based care, additional randomized controlled trials in patients with lung carcinoids are needed. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Facial neuropathy with imaging enhancement of the facial nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Sehreen; Jensen, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    A young women developed unilateral facial neuropathy 2 weeks after a motor vehicle collision involving fractures of the skull and mandible. MRI showed contrast enhancement of the facial nerve. We review the literature describing facial neuropathy after trauma and facial nerve enhancement patterns with different causes of facial neuropathy. PMID:25574155

  12. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... An infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at the time of delivery. ...

  13. Facial transplantation for massive traumatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Alam, Daniel S; Chi, John J

    2013-10-01

    This article describes the challenges of facial reconstruction and the role of facial transplantation in certain facial defects and injuries. This information is of value to surgeons assessing facial injuries with massive soft tissue loss or injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Peripheral Facial Palsy in Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Penêda, José; Robles, Raquel; Gomes-Pinto, Isabel; Valente, Pedro; Barros-Lima, Nuno; Condé, Artur

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral facial palsy (PFP) is commonly diagnosed in every emergency department. Despite being a benign condition in most cases, PFP causes loss in quality of life mostly due to facial dysmorphia. The etiology of PFP remains unknown in most cases, while medical opinion on epidemiology, risk factors and optimal treatment is not consensual. The aim of this study was to review the demographic characteristics of our patients and the medical care administered in our emergency department. Materials and Methods: Emergency episodes occurring in a 4-year period and codified as facial nerve pathology were analyzed. IBM SPSS software was used for statistical analysis. Results: In total, 582 emergency episodes were obtained. Due to inexpressive representation of other causes of PFP in our study, we focused our analyses on the 495 patients who were considered to have idiopathic PFP. There was equal distribution among genders, and all age ranges were affected. There were no clear epidemic phenomena. Hypertension was not a statistically significant risk factor for Bell's palsy. Most patients sought medical care in the early stages of the disease and complained of isolated facial weakness. Most patients had mild-to-moderate symptoms. Previous upper way infections (PUAI) were more frequent among children. There was a statistically significant difference regarding computed tomography (CT) scan requests among specialties. Conclusion: Epidemiologic findings were consistent with most literature on Bell's palsy. Drug therapy is widely used and follows current guidelines. The role of PUAI in the pediatric population must be investigated. Despite evidence of good medical practice, there was an excess of CT scans requested by physicians other than otorhinolaryngologists. PMID:29876329

  15. Unexpected Effect of Propranolol and Prednisolone on Infantile Facial Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shilpakar, Rojina; Lemperle, Gottfried; Mentzel, Thomas; Shakya, Jaswan; Bhandari, Santosh Bikram

    2017-11-01

    A 14-month-old Nepalese infant had developed a rapidly growing facial tumor originating from a dark spot on her upper eyelid. A cavernous hemangioma was suspected and treated with high doses of propranolol and prednisolone. Remission was dramatic. Histology confirmed alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Chemotherapy was planned but not carried out due to complicated logistics. The girl died at the age of 3. We present this case for discussion as to whether propranolol and prednisolone might be effective in rapidly growing rhabdomyosarcomas.

  16. Facial measurements for frame design.

    PubMed

    Tang, C Y; Tang, N; Stewart, M C

    1998-04-01

    Anthropometric data for the purpose of spectacle frame design are scarce in the literature. Definitions of facial features to be measured with existing systems of facial measurement are often not specific enough for frame design and manufacturing. Currently, for individual frame design, experienced personnel collect data with facial rules or instruments. A new measuring system is proposed, making use of a template in the form of a spectacle frame. Upon fitting the template onto a subject, most of the measuring references can be defined. Such a system can be administered by lesser-trained personnel and can be used for researches covering a larger population.

  17. Iatrogenic facial palsy: the cost.

    PubMed

    Pulec, J L

    1996-11-01

    The cost of iatrogenic facial paralysis can be high. Ways to avoid facial nerve injury during surgery and, should it occur, ways to minimize the disability and cost are discussed. These include adequate preparation and training by the surgeon, the exercise of sound judgment, the presence of high morals by the surgeon, adequate preoperative diagnosis and surgical instrumentation and thorough preoperative oral and written informed consent. Should facial nerve injury occur, immediate consultation and reparative decompression, anastomosis or grafting should be performed to obtain the best ultimate result. The value of prompt, competent, sympathetic and continuing concern offered by the surgeon to the patient cannot be over emphasized.

  18. [Presurgical orthodontics for facial asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Labarrère, H

    2003-03-01

    As with the treatment of all facial deformities, orthodontic pre-surgical preparation for facial asymmetry should aim at correcting severe occlusal discrepancies not solely on the basis of a narrow occlusal analysis but also in a way that will not disturb the proposed surgical protocol. In addition, facial asymmetries require specific adjustments, difficult to derive and to apply because of their inherent atypical morphological orientation of both alveolar and basal bony support. Three treated cases illustrate different solutions to problems posed by pathological torque: this torque must be considered with respect to proposed surgical changes, within the framework of their limitations and their possible contra-indications.

  19. Facial recognition in education system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krithika, L. B.; Venkatesh, K.; Rathore, S.; Kumar, M. Harish

    2017-11-01

    Human beings exploit emotions comprehensively for conveying messages and their resolution. Emotion detection and face recognition can provide an interface between the individuals and technologies. The most successful applications of recognition analysis are recognition of faces. Many different techniques have been used to recognize the facial expressions and emotion detection handle varying poses. In this paper, we approach an efficient method to recognize the facial expressions to track face points and distances. This can automatically identify observer face movements and face expression in image. This can capture different aspects of emotion and facial expressions.

  20. Chronic, burning facial pain following cosmetic facial surgery.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, E; Yaari, A; Har-Shai, Y

    1996-01-01

    Chronic, burning facial pain as a result of cosmetic facial surgery has rarely been reported. During the year of 1994, two female patients presented themselves at our Pain Relief Clinic with chronic facial pain that developed following aesthetic facial surgery. One patient underwent bilateral transpalpebral surgery for removal of intraorbital fat for the correction of the exophthalmus, and the other had classical face and anterior hairline forehead lifts. Pain in both patients was similar in that it was bilateral, symmetric, burning in quality, and aggravated by external stimuli, mainly light touch. It was resistant to multiple analgesic medications, and was associated with significant depression and disability. Diagnostic local (lidocaine) and systemic (lidocaine and phentolamine) nerve blocks failed to provide relief. Psychological evaluation revealed that the two patients had clear psychosocial factors that seemed to have further compounded their pain complaints. Tricyclic antidepressants (and biofeedback training in one patient) were modestly effective and produced only partial pain relief.

  1. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the lung with unique histological pattern and association with Sjögren's disease and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Shlopov, Boris V; French, Samuel W

    2011-10-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) of the lung is a rare condition. Radiological properties and clinical presentation of this disease can mimic malignant process. We present a case of IMT of the lung in a 58 year old female patient with a single lung nodule. Tumor was unencapsulated, firm, and well circumscribed. Microscopically tumor had multinodular structure with single or multiple small blood vessels in the center of each nodule surrounded in circular pattern by connective tissue containing spindle cells embedded into the thick layers of extracellular matrix. Extracellular matrix was identified as type I and type III collagen fibrils embedded into type IV collagen and laminin. The tumor was surrounded by T-, B-lymphocytes and polyclonal plasma cells. Histological organization of this lesion's stromal component was unique, but cell composition was similar to inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung. In addition, tumor tissue sections exhibited strong positivity for IgG, weak positivity for IgA, 1Cq, but were negative for IgM, and C3. Mutational analysis of the EGFR, KRAS genes and ALK locus rearrangement were performed and did not reveal any mutations. This is the first report of an IMT associated with Sjögren's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma developing in the lungs. Patient was clinically followed up for 18 months and no recurrence of the tumor observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Castleman's disease presenting as a pleural tumor: a case report with CT findings.

    PubMed

    Doo, Kyung Won; Kim, Bomi

    2018-02-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is an uncommon benign lymphoproliferative disorder which most commonly involves the mediastinum but rarely affects the pleura. We report a case of unicentric CD that presents as a pleural mass in a 45-year-old man, which was subsequently resected followed by an unexpected diagnosis on histologic examination. Although rare, CD should be included in the differential diagnosis of well-enhancing pleural mass.

  3. Emotional facial activation induced by unconsciously perceived dynamic facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Jakob; Davey, Graham C L; Parkhouse, Thomas; Meeres, Jennifer; Scott, Ryan B

    2016-12-01

    Do facial expressions of emotion influence us when not consciously perceived? Methods to investigate this question have typically relied on brief presentation of static images. In contrast, real facial expressions are dynamic and unfold over several seconds. Recent studies demonstrate that gaze contingent crowding (GCC) can block awareness of dynamic expressions while still inducing behavioural priming effects. The current experiment tested for the first time whether dynamic facial expressions presented using this method can induce unconscious facial activation. Videos of dynamic happy and angry expressions were presented outside participants' conscious awareness while EMG measurements captured activation of the zygomaticus major (active when smiling) and the corrugator supercilii (active when frowning). Forced-choice classification of expressions confirmed they were not consciously perceived, while EMG revealed significant differential activation of facial muscles consistent with the expressions presented. This successful demonstration opens new avenues for research examining the unconscious emotional influences of facial expressions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Measuring facial expression of emotion.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Karsten

    2015-12-01

    Research into emotions has increased in recent decades, especially on the subject of recognition of emotions. However, studies of the facial expressions of emotion were compromised by technical problems with visible video analysis and electromyography in experimental settings. These have only recently been overcome. There have been new developments in the field of automated computerized facial recognition; allowing real-time identification of facial expression in social environments. This review addresses three approaches to measuring facial expression of emotion and describes their specific contributions to understanding emotion in the healthy population and in persons with mental illness. Despite recent progress, studies on human emotions have been hindered by the lack of consensus on an emotion theory suited to examining the dynamic aspects of emotion and its expression. Studying expression of emotion in patients with mental health conditions for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes will profit from theoretical and methodological progress.

  5. Alveolar macrophage release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in chronic alcoholics without liver disease.

    PubMed

    Omidvari, K; Casey, R; Nelson, S; Olariu, R; Shellito, J E

    1998-05-01

    Alcohol is an immunosuppressive drug, and chronic abuse has been associated with increased susceptibility to a variety of infections, including bacterial pneumonia and tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophages are the resident phagocytes of the lung and play a central role in lung host defenses against infection ranging from direct antibacterial activity to the release of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). TNFalpha, in particular, plays a key role in the development of the early inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on alveolar macrophage release of TNFalpha in vitro. We prospectively studied lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated release of TNFalpha from alveolar macrophages obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in 22 alcoholic (18 smokers, 4 nonsmokers) and 7 nondrinking healthy volunteers (3 smokers, 4 nonsmokers). The total number of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and their differential distribution were not significantly different in alcoholics versus controls (43 +/- 8 x 10(6) and 39 +/- 13 x 10(6), respectively). However, the total number of cells recovered from BALF was significantly higher in smokers (51 +/- 8 x 10(6)) than in nonsmokers (19 +/- 5 x 10(6)). Spontaneous (basal) release of TNFalpha by alveolar macrophages was the same in alcoholics and controls. In contrast, LPS-stimulated release of TNFalpha was significantly suppressed in alcoholics compared with that of controls (1343 +/- 271 vs. 3806 +/- 926 U TNF/ml/10(6) cells, respectively, p < 0.015). When controlled for smoking, LPS-stimulated TNFalpha production was suppressed in alcoholic nonsmokers (563 +/- 413 U TNF/ml/10(6)) compared with control nonsmokers (5113 +/- 1264 U TNF/ml/10(6)). LPS-stimulated TNFalpha production was also less in control smokers (2063 +/- 386 U TNF/ml/10(6) cells) than in control nonsmokers (5113 +/- 1264 U TNF/ml/10(6) cells). There was no difference

  6. Pediatric facial injuries: It's management

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Geeta; Mohammad, Shadab; Pal, U. S.; Hariram; Malkunje, Laxman R.; Singh, Nimisha

    2011-01-01

    Background: Facial injuries in children always present a challenge in respect of their diagnosis and management. Since these children are of a growing age every care should be taken so that later the overall growth pattern of the facial skeleton in these children is not jeopardized. Purpose: To access the most feasible method for the management of facial injuries in children without hampering the facial growth. Materials and Methods: Sixty child patients with facial trauma were selected randomly for this study. On the basis of examination and investigations a suitable management approach involving rest and observation, open or closed reduction and immobilization, trans-osseous (TO) wiring, mini bone plate fixation, splinting and replantation, elevation and fixation of zygoma, etc. were carried out. Results and Conclusion: In our study fall was the predominant cause for most of the facial injuries in children. There was a 1.09% incidence of facial injuries in children up to 16 years of age amongst the total patients. The age-wise distribution of the fracture amongst groups (I, II and III) was found to be 26.67%, 51.67% and 21.67% respectively. Male to female patient ratio was 3:1. The majority of the cases of facial injuries were seen in Group II patients (6-11 years) i.e. 51.67%. The mandibular fracture was found to be the most common fracture (0.60%) followed by dentoalveolar (0.27%), mandibular + midface (0.07) and midface (0.02%) fractures. Most of the mandibular fractures were found in the parasymphysis region. Simple fracture seems to be commonest in the mandible. Most of the mandibular and midface fractures in children were amenable to conservative therapies except a few which required surgical intervention. PMID:22639504

  7. Pediatric facial injuries: It's management.

    PubMed

    Singh, Geeta; Mohammad, Shadab; Pal, U S; Hariram; Malkunje, Laxman R; Singh, Nimisha

    2011-07-01

    Facial injuries in children always present a challenge in respect of their diagnosis and management. Since these children are of a growing age every care should be taken so that later the overall growth pattern of the facial skeleton in these children is not jeopardized. To access the most feasible method for the management of facial injuries in children without hampering the facial growth. Sixty child patients with facial trauma were selected randomly for this study. On the basis of examination and investigations a suitable management approach involving rest and observation, open or closed reduction and immobilization, trans-osseous (TO) wiring, mini bone plate fixation, splinting and replantation, elevation and fixation of zygoma, etc. were carried out. In our study fall was the predominant cause for most of the facial injuries in children. There was a 1.09% incidence of facial injuries in children up to 16 years of age amongst the total patients. The age-wise distribution of the fracture amongst groups (I, II and III) was found to be 26.67%, 51.67% and 21.67% respectively. Male to female patient ratio was 3:1. The majority of the cases of facial injuries were seen in Group II patients (6-11 years) i.e. 51.67%. The mandibular fracture was found to be the most common fracture (0.60%) followed by dentoalveolar (0.27%), mandibular + midface (0.07) and midface (0.02%) fractures. Most of the mandibular fractures were found in the parasymphysis region. Simple fracture seems to be commonest in the mandible. Most of the mandibular and midface fractures in children were amenable to conservative therapies except a few which required surgical intervention.

  8. Increased risk of borderline ovarian tumors in women with a history of pelvic inflammatory disease: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Christina B; Jensen, Allan; Albieri, Vanna; Andersen, Klaus K; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2016-11-01

    Some studies suggest that pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a potential risk factor for ovarian cancer. However, only few studies have investigated the association between PID and risk of borderline ovarian tumors. We conducted a population-based cohort study to investigate the association between PID and risk of borderline ovarian tumors. Using various nationwide Danish registries we identified all women in Denmark during 1978-2012, who were born during 1940-1970 (n=1,318,925). Of these, 81,263 women were diagnosed with PID in the study period, and 2736 women had a borderline ovarian tumor (1290 serous and 1344 mucinous). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between PID and risk of borderline tumors were estimated using Cox regression models with adjustment for potential confounders. A history of PID was associated with an increased risk of borderline ovarian tumors (HR=1.39; 95% CI: 1.19-1.61). However, histotype-specific analyses revealed significant variation in risk as PID was only associated with an increased risk of serous borderline tumors (HR=1.85; 95% CI: 1.52-2.24), but not with mucinous borderline tumors (HR=1.06; 95% CI: 0.83-1.35). PID is associated with an increased risk of serous borderline tumors. Further research on the potential underlying biological mechanisms and on the identification of the subset of women with PID who are at increased risk of serous borderline tumors is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Facial transplantation: A concise update

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Pulido, Fernando; Gomez-Cia, Tomas; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Gacto-Sanchez, Purificacion; Hernandez-Guisado, Jose-Maria; Lagares-Borrego, Araceli; Narros-Gimenez, Rocio; Gonzalez-Padilla, Juan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Update on clinical results obtained by the first worldwide facial transplantation teams as well as review of the literature concerning the main surgical, immunological, ethical, and follow-up aspects described on facial transplanted patients. Study design: MEDLINE search of articles published on “face transplantation” until March 2012. Results: Eighteen clinical cases were studied. The mean patient age was 37.5 years, with a higher prevalence of men. Main surgical indication was gunshot injuries (6 patients). All patients had previously undergone multiple conventional surgical reconstructive procedures which had failed. Altogether 8 transplant teams belonging to 4 countries participated. Thirteen partial face transplantations and 5 full face transplantations have been performed. Allografts are varied according to face anatomical components and the amount of skin, muscle, bone, and other tissues included, though all were grafted successfully and remained viable without significant postoperative surgical complications. The patient with the longest follow-up was 5 years. Two patients died 2 and 27 months after transplantation. Conclusions: Clinical experience has demonstrated the feasibility of facial transplantation as a valuable reconstructive option, but it still remains considered as an experimental procedure with unresolved issues to settle down. Results show that from a clinical, technical, and immunological standpoint, facial transplantation has achieved functional, aesthetic, and social rehabilitation in severely facial disfigured patients. Key words:Face transplantation, composite tissue transplantation, face allograft, facial reconstruction, outcomes and complications of face transplantation. PMID:23229268

  10. Intestinal Helminths Regulate Lethal Acute Graft Versus Host Disease and Preserve Graft Versus Tumor Effect in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Chen, Hung-lin; Bannick, Nadine; Henry, Michael; Holm, Adrian N.; Metwali, Ahmed; Urban, Joseph F.; Rothman, Paul B.; Weiner, George J.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Elliott, David E.; Ince, M. Nedim

    2014-01-01

    Donor T lymphocyte transfer with hematopoietic stem cells suppresses residual tumor growth (graft-versus-tumor; GVT) in cancer patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, donor T cell reactivity to host organs causes severe and potentially lethal inflammation, called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). High dose steroids or other immune suppressives are used to treat GVHD that have limited ability to control the inflammation while incurring long-term toxicity. Novel strategies are needed to modulate GVHD, preserve GVT and improve the outcome of BMT. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control alloantigen-sensitized inflammation of GVHD, sustain GVT and prevent mortality in bone marrow transplantation. Helminths colonizing the alimentary tract dramatically increase the Treg activity, thereby modulating intestinal or systemic inflammatory responses. These observations led us to hypothesize that helminths can regulate GVHD and maintain GVT in mice. Acute GVHD was induced in helminth (Heligmosomoides polygyrus)-infected or uninfected Balb/C recipients of C57BL/6 donor grafts. Helminth infection suppressed donor T cell inflammatory cytokine generation along with reduction in GVHD lethality and maintenance of GVT. H. polygyrus colonization promoted the survival of TGFβ generating recipient Tregs after a conditioning regimen with total body irradiation and led to a TGFβ-dependent in vivo expansion/maturation of donor Tregs after BMT. Helminths did not control GVHD, when T cells unresponsive to TGFβ-mediated immune regulation were used as donor T lymphocytes. These results suggest that helminths suppress acute GVHD, employing regulatory T cells and TGFβ-dependent pathways in mice. Helminthic regulation of GVHD and GVT through intestinal immune conditioning may improve the outcome of BMT. PMID:25527786

  11. Intestinal helminths regulate lethal acute graft-versus-host disease and preserve the graft-versus-tumor effect in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Chen, Hung-Lin; Bannick, Nadine; Henry, Michael; Holm, Adrian N; Metwali, Ahmed; Urban, Joseph F; Rothman, Paul B; Weiner, George J; Blazar, Bruce R; Elliott, David E; Ince, M Nedim

    2015-02-01

    Donor T lymphocyte transfer with hematopoietic stem cells suppresses residual tumor growth (graft-versus-tumor [GVT]) in cancer patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, donor T cell reactivity to host organs causes severe and potentially lethal inflammation called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). High-dose steroids or other immunosuppressive drugs are used to treat GVHD that have limited ability to control the inflammation while incurring long-term toxicity. Novel strategies are needed to modulate GVHD, preserve GVT, and improve the outcome of BMT. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control alloantigen-sensitized inflammation of GVHD, sustain GVT, and prevent mortality in BMT. Helminths colonizing the alimentary tract dramatically increase the Treg activity, thereby modulating intestinal or systemic inflammatory responses. These observations led us to hypothesize that helminths can regulate GVHD and maintain GVT in mice. Acute GVHD was induced in helminth (Heligmosomoides polygyrus)-infected or uninfected BALB/c recipients of C57BL/6 donor grafts. Helminth infection suppressed donor T cell inflammatory cytokine generation and reduced GVHD-related mortality, but maintained GVT. H. polygyrus colonization promoted the survival of TGF-β-generating recipient Tregs after a conditioning regimen with total body irradiation and led to a TGF-β-dependent in vivo expansion/maturation of donor Tregs after BMT. Helminths did not control GVHD when T cells unresponsive to TGF-β-mediated immune regulation were used as donor T lymphocytes. These results suggest that helminths suppress acute GVHD using Tregs and TGF-β-dependent pathways in mice. Helminthic regulation of GVHD and GVT through intestinal immune conditioning may improve the outcome of BMT. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Outcomes and management of patients with Cushing's disease without pathological confirmation of tumor resection after transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Pouratian, Nader; Prevedello, Daniel M; Jagannathan, Jay; Lopes, M Beatriz; Vance, Mary Lee; Laws, Edward R

    2007-09-01

    Despite the success of transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for the treatment of Cushing's disease, in a number of cases, an ACTH-staining pituitary adenoma is not identified histologically. The clinical significance of lack of histological confirmation remains unclear. This was a retrospective review of patients treated at the University of Virginia Medical Center. Of 490 TSS procedures for Cushing's disease between 1993 and 2004, we identified 111 cases without histological adenoma confirmation. Remission and recurrence of Cushing's disease were measured. Overall, 50% of these patients achieved remission, a figure lower than for our entire series (79%) and for patients with histological confirmation of an ACTH-staining adenoma (88%) (P < 0.001). Patients with a history of two prior TSS achieved remission less often than patients with a history of fewer TSS (P = 0.026). No other factors influenced remission rates. Although the overall recurrence rate (21%, seven of 33 evaluated) was not different from previously published long-term studies, in three of seven cases of recurrence, early recurrences were noted between 2 and 4 months after remission. In patients who did not achieve remission, the most common and effective treatment options were repeat TSS, gamma-knife radiosurgery, and bilateral adrenalectomy. The lower remission rate in patients without histological evidence of an adenoma is most likely a result of a decreased rate of adenoma extirpation. The incidence of early recurrence may be a unique feature of this patient population; patients without histological confirmation of tumor resection therefore require close and consistent monitoring postoperatively.

  13. Survival outcomes of patients with germ cell tumors treated with high-dose chemotherapy for refractory or relapsing disease.

    PubMed

    Zschäbitz, Stefanie; Distler, Florian A; Krieger, Benjamin; Wuchter, Patrick; Schäfer-Eckart, Kerstin; Jenzer, Maximilian; Hohenfellner, Markus; Dreger, Peter; Haag, Georg Martin; Jäger, Dirk; Pahernik, Sascha; Grüllich, Carsten

    2018-04-27

    Male patients with metastatic germ cell tumors can be cured in up to 96% of cases depending on stage and IGCCCG prognosis group. Treatment in relapse consists of conventional or high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) combined with local treatment modalities. Most patients were classified as poor risk according to IGCCCG ( n = 24; 52%) and as intermediate ( n = 12), high ( n = 16), or very high risk ( n = 9) at time of first relapse according to IPFSG criteria. In 67% of patients ( n = 31) HDCT/ASCT was performed as first salvage treatment in relapse or for primary refractory disease following first line chemotherapy. In 46% of patients ( n = 21) progressive disease was documented after mobilization and prior to HDCT/ASCT. Median progression free survival (mPFS) was 7.4 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-13.6) while median overall survival (mOS) was 22.2 months (95% CI: 8.9-35.5). When stratified for IPFSG risk group, mPFS ( p < 0.001) and mOS ( p = 0.009) differed significantly between risk groups (very low vs. low vs. intermediate vs. high vs. very high). Metastases to liver/bone/brain and platinum refractory disease were independent risk factors for inferior PFS ( p = 0.024; p = 0.008) but not OS. Forty-six patients treated with HDCT/ASCT at the university clinics in Heidelberg and Nuremberg between 2000-2016 were identified and analyzed. Data was collected retrospectively. HDCT/ASCT offers a potential curative strategy for patients with relapsed GCT. Improvement is still needed in patients with intermediate, high, and very high IPFSG risk group.

  14. Ghrelin levels in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment and disease activity.

    PubMed

    Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Trachana, Maria; Agakidis, Charalampos; Pratsidou-Gertsi, Polyxeni; Taparkou, Anna; Lampoudi, Sotiria; Kanakoudi-Tsakalidou, Florentia

    2011-10-01

    Studies in adults with rheumatoid arthritis reported low serum ghrelin that increased following anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) infusion. Data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are lacking. The aim of this pilot study was to explore serum ghrelin levels in patients with JIA and the possible association with anti-TNF treatment, disease activity, and nutritional status. Fifty-two patients with JIA (14/52 on anti-TNF treatment) were studied. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was inactive in 3 of 14 anti-TNF-treated patients and in 11 of 38 non-anti-TNF-treated patients. The nutritional status, energy intake/requirements, appetite, and fasting serum ghrelin levels were assessed. Ghrelin control values were obtained from 50 individuals with minor illness matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Ghrelin levels in patients with JIA were significantly lower than in controls (P < .001, confidence interval [CI] = -101 to -331). Analysis according to anti-TNF treatment and disease activity showed that ghrelin levels were comparable to control values only in 3 patients with anti-TNF-induced remission. Ghrelin in non-anti-TNF-treated patients in remission was low. Multiple regression analysis showed that disease activity (P = .002, CI = -84.16 to -20.01) and anti-TNF treatment (P = .003, CI = -82.51 to -18.33) were significant independent predictors of ghrelin after adjusting for other potential confounders. Ghrelin did not correlate with nutritional status, energy balance, and appetite. Serum ghrelin is low in patients with JIA and is restored to values similar to those in controls following anti-TNF-induced remission. Our study provides evidence that TNF blockade is independently associated with serum ghrelin, which possibly contributes to anti-TNF-induced remission. These preliminary results could form the basis for future research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nerve crush but not displacement-induced stretch of the intra-arachnoidal facial nerve promotes facial palsy after cerebellopontine angle surgery.

    PubMed

    Bendella, Habib; Brackmann, Derald E; Goldbrunner, Roland; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the reasons for occurrence of facial nerve palsy after removal of cerebellopontine angle tumors. Since the intra-arachnoidal portion of the facial nerve is considered to be so vulnerable that even the slightest tension or pinch may result in ruptured axons, we tested whether a graded stretch or controlled crush would affect the postoperative motor performance of the facial (vibrissal) muscle in rats. Thirty Wistar rats, divided into five groups (one with intact controls and four with facial nerve lesions), were used. Under inhalation anesthesia, the occipital squama was opened, the cerebellum gently retracted to the left, and the intra-arachnoidal segment of the right facial nerve exposed. A mechanical displacement of the brainstem with 1 or 3 mm toward the midline or an electromagnet-controlled crush of the facial nerve with a tweezers at a closure velocity of 50 and 100 mm/s was applied. On the next day, whisking motor performance was determined by video-based motion analysis. Even the larger (with 3 mm) mechanical displacement of the brainstem had no harmful effect: The amplitude of the vibrissal whisks was in the normal range of 50°-60°. On the other hand, even the light nerve crush (50 mm/s) injured the facial nerve and resulted in paralyzed vibrissal muscles (amplitude of 10°-15°). We conclude that, contrary to the generally acknowledged assumptions, it is the nerve crush but not the displacement-induced stretching of the intra-arachnoidal facial trunk that promotes facial palsy after cerebellopontine angle surgery in rats.

  16. Genetics, the facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon, and the future.

    PubMed

    Seidman, M D

    2001-01-01

    Predicting the future is a daunting task that is typically reserved for visionaries or tarot card readers. Nonetheless, the challenge is set, and this brief essay will predict how genetics and molecular biology may affect diseases in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphism in the tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene affects inflammatory bowel diseases risk

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Huebner, Claudia; Petermann, Ivonne; Gearry, Richard B; Barclay, Murray L; Demmers, Pieter; McCulloch, Alan; Han, Dug Yeo

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter of the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) gene play in the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) in a New Zealand population, in the context of international studies. METHODS: DNA samples from 388 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), 405 ulcerative colitis (UC), 27 indeterminate colitis (IC) and 201 randomly selected controls, from Canterbury, New Zealand were screened for 3 common polymorphisms in the TNF-α receptor: -238 G→A, -308 G→A and -857C→T, using a TaqmanR assay. A meta-analysis was performed on the data obtained on these polymorphisms combined with that from other published studies. RESULTS: Individuals carrying the -308 G/A allele had a significantly (OR = 1.91, χ2 = 17.36, P < 0.0001) increased risk of pancolitis, and a 1.57-fold increased risk (OR = 1.57, χ2 = 4.34, P = 0.037) of requiring a bowel resection in UC. Carrying the -857 C/T variant decreased the risk of ileocolonic CD (OR = 0.56, χ2 = 4.32, P = 0.037), and the need for a bowel resection (OR = 0.59, χ2 = 4.85, P = 0.028). The risk of UC was reduced in individuals who were smokers at diagnosis, (OR = 0.48, χ2 = 4.86, P = 0.028). CONCLUSION: TNF-α is a key cytokine known to play a role in inflammatory response, and the locus for the gene is found in the IBD3 region on chromosome 6p21, known to be associated with an increased risk for IBD. The -308 G/A SNP in the TNF-α promoter is functional, and may account in part for the increased UC risk associated with the IBD3 genomic region. The -857 C/T SNP may decrease IBD risk in certain groups. Pharmaco- or nutrigenomic approaches may be desirable for individuals with such affected genotypes. PMID:18698679

  18. Lyme Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread to the nervous system, causing facial paralysis ( Bell's palsy ) or meningitis . The last stage of Lyme disease ... feeling back to normal within several weeks after treatment starts. Is Lyme Disease Contagious? Lyme disease is ...

  19. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  20. Adult cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney are the same disease entity: molecular and histologic evidence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Kort, Eric; Hoekstra, Philip; Westphal, Michael; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Sercia, Linda; Lane, Brian; Rini, Brian; Bukowski, Ronald; Teh, Bin T

    2009-01-01

    Adult cystic nephroma (CN) and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney (MEST) are considered as separate entities in the 2004 World Health Organization classification of renal neoplasms. Recent studies suggested that the two share clinicopathologic features and may represent the same disease process of varying morphology. However, definitive genetic evidence is lacking. We examined their relationship using gene expression profiling and histologic analysis. Gene expression profiles of 3 CN and 3 MEST were analyzed using HGU133 Plus 2.0 microarrays (Affymetrix) and were compared with each other and also with 48 other renal tumors and 13 normal kidneys. Histologic examination of 26 CN and 13 MEST focused on the cystic septal thickness, cyst-to-stroma ratio, stromal cellularity and composition, types of epithelial cells lining cysts and glands, and estrogen and progesterone receptors expression. Patients' age, sex distribution, and tumor size were similar between the two. They also shared many histologic features, including lining epithelium of cysts and glands, stromal cellularity and composition. Unsupervised clustering of mRNA expression profiles demonstrated that they had very similar expression profiles that were distinct from other renal tumors. By microarray analysis, progesterone receptor expression was significantly higher in CN and MEST relative to both normal and other renal tumors, while estrogen receptor expression was not. By immunohistochemistry, expression of both receptors was similar between CN and MEST. This study provides the most convincing molecular evidence that CN and MEST represent different parts of the morphologic spectrum of the same disease.

  1. Glial tumors with neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Kee; Phi, Ji Hoon; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical studies for neuronal differentiation in glial tumors revealed subsets of tumors having both characteristics of glial and neuronal lineages. Glial tumors with neuronal differentiation can be observed with diverse phenotypes and histologic grades. The rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle and papillary glioneuronal tumor have been newly classified as distinct disease entities. There are other candidates for classification, such as the glioneuronal tumor without pseudopapillary architecture, glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands, and the malignant glioneuronal tumor. The clinical significance of these previously unclassified tumors should be confirmed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhancing facial features by using clear facial features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rofoo, Fanar Fareed Hanna

    2017-09-01

    The similarity of features between individuals of same ethnicity motivated the idea of this project. The idea of this project is to extract features of clear facial image and impose them on blurred facial image of same ethnic origin as an approach to enhance a blurred facial image. A database of clear images containing 30 individuals equally divided to five different ethnicities which were Arab, African, Chines, European and Indian. Software was built to perform pre-processing on images in order to align the features of clear and blurred images. And the idea was to extract features of clear facial image or template built from clear facial images using wavelet transformation to impose them on blurred image by using reverse wavelet. The results of this approach did not come well as all the features did not align together as in most cases the eyes were aligned but the nose or mouth were not aligned. Then we decided in the next approach to deal with features separately but in the result in some cases a blocky effect was present on features due to not having close matching features. In general the available small database did not help to achieve the goal results, because of the number of available individuals. The color information and features similarity could be more investigated to achieve better results by having larger database as well as improving the process of enhancement by the availability of closer matches in each ethnicity.

  3. Therapeutic profile of single-fraction radiosurgery of vestibular schwannoma: unrelated malignancy predicts tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Wowra, Berndt; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph; Schichor, Christian; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Radiosurgery has become an accepted treatment option for vestibular schwannomas. Nevertheless, predictors of tumor control and treatment toxicity in current radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas are not well understood. To generate new information on predictors of tumor control and cranial nerve toxicity of single-fraction radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas, we conducted a single-institution long-term observational study of radiosurgery for sporadic vestibular schwannomas. Minimum follow-up was 3 years. Investigated as potential predictors of tumor control and cranial nerve toxicity were treatment technology; tumor resection preceding radiosurgery; tumor size; gender; patient age; history of cancer, vascular disease, or metabolic disease; tumor volume; radiosurgical prescription dose; and isodose line. Three hundred eighty-six patients met inclusion criteria. Treatment failure was observed in 27 patients. History of unrelated cancer (strongest predictor) and prescription dose significantly predicted tumor control. The cumulative incidence of treatment failure was 30% after 6.5 years in patients with unrelated malignancy and 10% after ≥15 years in patients without such cancer (P < .02). Tumor volume was the only predictor of trigeminal neuropathy (observed in 6 patients). No predictor of facial nerve toxicity was found. On the House and Brackmann scale, 1 patient had a permanent one-level drop and 7 a transient drop of 1 to 3 levels. Serviceable hearing was preserved in 75.1%. Tumor hearing before radiosurgery, recurrence, and prescription isodose predicted ototoxicity. Unrelated malignancy is a strong predictor of tumor control. Tumor recurrence predominantly predicts ototoxicity. These findings potentially will aid future clinical decision making in ambiguous cases. PMID:22561798

  4. [Idiopathic facial paralysis in children].

    PubMed

    Achour, I; Chakroun, A; Ayedi, S; Ben Rhaiem, Z; Mnejja, M; Charfeddine, I; Hammami, B; Ghorbel, A

    2015-05-01

    Idiopathic facial palsy is the most common cause of facial nerve palsy in children. Controversy exists regarding treatment options. The objectives of this study were to review the epidemiological and clinical characteristics as well as the outcome of idiopathic facial palsy in children to suggest appropriate treatment. A retrospective study was conducted on children with a diagnosis of idiopathic facial palsy from 2007 to 2012. A total of 37 cases (13 males, 24 females) with a mean age of 13.9 years were included in this analysis. The mean duration between onset of Bell's palsy and consultation was 3 days. Of these patients, 78.3% had moderately severe (grade IV) or severe paralysis (grade V on the House and Brackmann grading). Twenty-seven patients were treated in an outpatient context, three patients were hospitalized, and seven patients were treated as outpatients and subsequently hospitalized. All patients received corticosteroids. Eight of them also received antiviral treatment. The complete recovery rate was 94.6% (35/37). The duration of complete recovery was 7.4 weeks. Children with idiopathic facial palsy have a very good prognosis. The complete recovery rate exceeds 90%. However, controversy exists regarding treatment options. High-quality studies have been conducted on adult populations. Medical treatment based on corticosteroids alone or combined with antiviral treatment is certainly effective in improving facial function outcomes in adults. In children, the recommendation for prescription of steroids and antiviral drugs based on adult treatment appears to be justified. Randomized controlled trials in the pediatric population are recommended to define a strategy for management of idiopathic facial paralysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Down syndrome detection from facial photographs using machine learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qian; Rosenbaum, Kenneth; Sze, Raymond; Zand, Dina; Summar, Marshall; Linguraru, Marius George

    2013-02-01

    Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition; one in every 691 babies in United States is born with it. Patients with Down syndrome have an increased risk for heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems and the early detection of the syndrome is fundamental for managing the disease. Clinically, facial appearance is an important indicator in diagnosing Down syndrome and it paves the way for computer-aided diagnosis based on facial image analysis. In this study, we propose a novel method to detect Down syndrome using photography for computer-assisted image-based facial dysmorphology. Geometric features based on facial anatomical landmarks, local texture features based on the Contourlet transform and local binary pattern are investigated to represent facial characteristics. Then a support vector machine classifier is used to discriminate normal and abnormal cases; accuracy, precision and recall are used to evaluate the method. The comparison among the geometric, local texture and combined features was performed using the leave-one-out validation. Our method achieved 97.92% accuracy with high precision and recall for the combined features; the detection results were higher than using only geometric or texture features. The promising results indicate that our method has the potential for automated assessment for Down syndrome from simple, noninvasive imaging data.

  6. Patients with Parkinson's disease display a dopamine therapy related negative bias and an enlarged range in emotional responses to facial emotional stimuli.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Daniel; Svärd, Joakim; Michelgård Palmquist, Åsa; Fischer, Håkan; Svenningsson, Per

    2017-09-01

    The literature on emotional processing in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients shows mixed results. This may be because of various methodological and/or patient-related differences, such as failing to adjust for cognitive functioning, depression, and/or mood. In the current study, we tested PD patients and healthy controls (HCs) using emotional stimuli across a variety of tasks, including visual search, short-term memory (STM), categorical perception, and emotional stimulus rating. The PD and HC groups were matched on cognitive ability, depression, and mood. We also explored possible relationships between task results and antiparkinsonian treatment effects, as measured by levodopa equivalent dosages (LED), in the PD group. The results show that PD patients use a larger emotional range compared with HCs when reporting their impression of emotional faces on rated emotional valence, arousal, and potency. The results also show that dopaminergic therapy was correlated with stimulus rating results such that PD patients with higher LED scores rated negative faces as less arousing, less negative, and less powerful. Finally, results also show that PD patients display a general slowing effect in the visual search tasks compared with HCs, indicating overall slowed responses. There were no group differences observed in the STM or categorical perception tasks. Our results indicate a relationship between emotional responses, PD, and dopaminergic therapy, in which PD per se is associated with stronger emotional responses, whereas LED levels are negatively correlated with the strength of emotional responses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. NF-κB activating complex engaged in response to EGFR oncogene inhibition drives tumor cell survival and residual disease in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Collin M.; Pazarentzos, Evangelos; Olivas, Victor; Asthana, Saurabh; Yan, Jenny Jiacheng; Tan, Irena; Hrustanovic, Gorjan; Chan, Elton; Lin, Luping; Neel, Dana S.; Newton, William; Bobb, Kathryn; Fouts, Timothy; Meshulam, Jeffrey; Gubens, Matthew A.; Jablons, David M.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Krogan, Nevan J.; Bivona, Trever G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Although oncogene-targeted therapy often elicits profound initial tumor responses in patients, responses are generally incomplete because some tumor cells survive initial therapy as residual disease that enables eventual acquired resistance. The mechanisms underlying tumor cell adaptation and survival during initial therapy are incompletely understood. Here, through the study of EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma we show that NF-κB signaling is rapidly engaged upon initial EGFR inhibitor treatment to promote tumor cell survival and residual disease. EGFR oncogene inhibition induced an EGFR-TRAF2-RIP1-IKK complex that stimulated an NF-κB-mediated transcriptional survival program. The direct NF-κB inhibitor PBS-1086 suppressed this adaptive survival program and increased the magnitude and duration of initial EGFR inhibitor response in multiple NSCLC models, including a patient-derived xenograft. These findings unveil NF-κB activation as a critical adaptive survival mechanism engaged by EGFR oncogene inhibition and provide rationale for EGFR and NF-κB co-inhibition to eliminate residual disease and enhance patient responses. PMID:25843712

  8. [Correlation between facial nerve functional evaluation and efficacy evaluation of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhang-ling; Li, Cheng-xin; Jiang, Yue-bo; Zuo, Cong; Cai, Yun; Wang, Rui

    2012-09-01

    To assess and grade facial nerve dysfunction according to the extent of facial paralysis in the clinical course of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy, and to observe the interrelationship between the grade, the efficacy and the period of treatment, as well as the effect on prognosis. The authors employed the House-Brackmann scale, a commonly used evaluation scale for facial paralysis motor function, and set standards for eye fissure and lips. According to the improved scale, the authors assessed and graded the degree of facial paralysis in terms of facial nerve dysfunction both before and after treatment. The grade was divided into five levels: mild, moderate, moderately severe, severe dysfunction and complete paralysis. The authors gave acupuncture treatment according to the state of the disease without artificially setting the treatment period. The observation was focused on the efficacy and the efficacy was evaluated throughout the entire treatment process. Fifty-three cases out of 68 patients with Bell's palsy were cured and the overall rate of efficacy was 97%. Statistically significant differences (P<0.01) were perceived among the efficacy of five levels of facial nerve dysfunction. Efficacy was correlated with the damage level of the disease (correlation coefficient r=0.423, P<0.01). The course of treatment also extended with the severity of facial nerve dysfunction (P<0.01). Differences exist in patients with Bell's palsy in terms of severity of facial nerve dysfunction. Efficacy is reduced in correlation with an increase in facial nerve dysfunction, and the period of treatment varies in need of different levels of facial nerve dysfunction. It is highly necessary to assess and grade patients before observation and treatment in clinical study, and choose corresponding treatment according to severity of damage of the disease.

  9. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Arthur B; Awomolo, Agboola O; Szabo, Sara

    2017-03-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions.

  10. [Tuberculoma mimicking the tumor of ponto-cerebellum angle as complication after postvaccinated tuberculous otitis media].

    PubMed

    Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Jamróz, Barbara; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Bruzgielewicz, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major problem of constant importance all over the world. Notably, in the developed countries it is due to immunosuppressive therapy and AIDS. Primary otological tuberculosis constitutes a very small share of cases of this disease. Moreover, the appearance of tuberculomas remains unique to even greater extent. Clinical history of a patient who has already been infected tuberculosis for 60 years in result of the BCG vaccination. Ponto-cerebellum angle tumour appeared in his brain as complication ensuing the disease. The first therapeutic method used was based on antituberculous drugs, subsequent surgical intervention (cerebello-pontine angle tumor removal via translabirynthin approche) was necessary however. We suspected another cause of this lesion - cholesteatoma or facial nerve neurinoma. Correct diagnosis give only histopatological examination. Because of facial nerve palsy, facial nerve reconstruction was necessary (connection of n. VII and n. This case reminds us that correct diagnosis of tuberculosis remains a serious problem despite the long experience and the development of diagnostics and treatment methods. Nowadays we observe the unusual clinical manifestations of the disease (e.g. such as ear pain, tinnitus, rapid hearing loss) more frequently. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. A meta-analysis of patient outcomes with subcentimeter disease after chemotherapy for metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, P.; Gray, K. P.; O'Donnell, E. K.; Sweeney, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately a quarter of men with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumor (NSGCT) have a residual mass, typically in the retroperitoneum, after chemotherapy. The management of small residual masses (≤1 cm) is controversial, with good outcomes seen with either post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND) or surveillance. We sought to review our experience of surveillance and synthesize the cumulative findings with the current literature in the form of a meta-analysis. Patients and methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE and abstracts from ASCO and AUA to identify relevant, English-language studies for the meta-analysis. The DFCI (Dana Farber Cancer Institute) database was constructed from a database of men undergoing cisplatin-based chemotherapy for metastatic NSGCT. The outcomes of interest were the proportion with necrosis, teratoma or active cancer on histology at PC-RPLND (literature) and the total number of relapses, RP-only relapses and overall survival in men undergoing surveillance (literature and DFCI cohort). Results Three of 47 men undergoing post-chemotherapy surveillance at our institution relapsed over a median follow-up of 5.4 years. All three were alive at a median of 4.2 years after relapse. On meta-analysis, the pooled estimates of necrosis, teratoma and active cancer in the 588 men who underwent PC-RPLND were 71, 24 and 4%, respectively. Of the combined 455 men who underwent surveillance, the pooled estimate of the relapse rate was 5%, with an RP-only relapse rate of 3%. Of the 15 men who suffered an RP-only relapse on surveillance, two died of disease. Conclusion Surveillance is a reasonable strategy for men with minimal residual RP disease after chemotherapy and avoids an RPLND in ∼97% of men who are cured with chemotherapy alone. PMID:24276027

  12. AIM1 and LINE-1 Epigenetic Aberrations In Tumor and Serum Relate to Melanoma Progression and Disease Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hoshimoto, Sojun; Kuo, Christine; Chong, Kelly; Takeshima, Ling; Takei, Yoshiki; Li, Michelle; Huang, Sharon; Sim, Myung-Shin; Morton, Donald L.; Hoon, Dave S.B.

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in the methylation status of non-coding genomic repeat DNA sequences and specific gene promoter region are important epigenetic events in melanoma progression. Promoter methylation status in LINE-1 and Absent in melanoma-1(AIM1;6q21) associated with melanoma progression and disease outcome was assessed. LINE-1 and AIM1 methylation status was assessed in paraffin-embedded archival tissues(PEAT)(n=133) and melanoma patients’ serum(n=56). LINE-1 U-Index(hypomethylation) and AIM1 were analyzed in microdissected melanoma PEAT sections. The LINE-1 U-Index of melanoma(n=100) was significantly higher than that of normal skin(n=14) and nevi(n=12)(P=0.0004). LINE-1 U-Index level was elevated with increasing AJCC stage(P<0.0001). AIM1 promoter hypermethylation was found in higher frequency(P=0.005) in metastatic melanoma(65%) than in primary melanomas(38%). When analyzed, high LINE-1 U-Index and/or AIM1 methylation in melanomas were associated with disease-free survival(DFS) and overall survival(OS) in Stage I/II patients (P=0.017, 0.027; respectively). In multivariate analysis, melanoma AIM1 methylation status was a significant prognostic factor of OS(P=0.032). Furthermore, serum unmethylated LINE-1 was at higher levels in both stage III(n=20) and stage IV(n=36) patients compared to healthy donors(n=14)(P=0.022). Circulating methylated AIM1 was detected in patients’ serum and was predictive of OS in Stage IV patients (P=0.009). LINE-1 hypomethylation and AIM1 hypermethylation have prognostic utility in both melanoma patients’ tumors and serum. PMID:22402438

  13. Disseminated Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer Patients after Radical Prostatectomy and without Evidence of Disease Predicts Biochemical Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Todd M.; Lange, Paul H.; Porter, Michael P.; Lin, Daniel W.; Ellis, William J.; Gallaher, Ian S.; Vessella, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Men with apparently localized prostate cancer often relapse years after radical prostatectomy (RP). We sought to determine if epithelial-like cells identified from bone marrow (BM) in patients after RP (commonly called disseminated tumor cells, DTC) were associated with biochemical recurrence (BR). Experimental Design We obtained BM aspirates from 569 men prior to RP and from 34 healthy men with PSA<2.5 ng/ml to establish a comparison group. Additionally, an analytic cohort consisting of 98 patients after RP with no evidence of disease (NED) was established to evaluate the relationship between DTC and BR. Epithelial cells in the BM were detected by magnetic bead enrichment with antibodies to CD45 and CD61 (negative selection) followed by antibodies to human epithelial antigen (positive selection) and confirmation with FITC-labeled anti-BerEP4 antibody. Results DTC were present in 72% (408/569) of patients prior to RP. There was no correlation with pathologic stage, Gleason grade, or pre-operative PSA. Three of 34 controls (8.8%) had DTC present. In patients NED post-RP, DTC were present in 56/98 (57%). DTC were detected in 12/14 (86%) NED patients post-RP who subsequently suffered BR. Presence of DTC in NED patients was an independent predictor of recurrence (HR 6.9, CI 1.03–45.9). Conclusions Approximately 70% of men undergoing RP had DTC detected in their BM prior to surgery, suggesting that these cells escape early in the disease. Though pre-operative DTC status does not correlate with pathologic risk factors, persistence of DTC after RP in NED patients was an independent predictor of recurrence. PMID:19147774

  14. Tumor cell anaplasia and multinucleation are predictors of disease recurrence in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, including among just the human papillomavirus-related cancers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James S; Scantlebury, Juliette B; Luo, Jingqin; Thorstad, Wade L

    2012-07-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is frequently related to high risk human papillomavirus. This tumor expresses p16, frequently has a nonkeratinizing morphology, and has improved outcomes. Despite having a good prognosis, tumors can have focal or diffuse nuclear anaplasia or multinucleation, the significance of which is unknown. From a database of 270 oropharyngeal SCCs with known histologic typing (using our established system) and p16 immunohistochemistry, all surgically resected cases (149) were reviewed. Anaplasia was defined as any × 40 field with ≥ 3 tumor nuclei with diameters ≥ 5 lymphocyte nuclei (~25 μm), and multinucleation was defined as any × 40 field with ≥ 3 tumor cells with multiple nuclei. p16 was positive in 128 cases (85.9%), 64 cases (43.0%) showed anaplasia, and 71 (47.7%) showed multinucleation. Anaplasia and multinucleation were highly related (P<0.001), and both also correlated with histologic type (P<0.001 and P=0.01, respectively), p16 status (P=0.09 and 0.03, respectively), and partially with nodal extracapsular extension. There was no correlation with any of the other variables. In univariate analysis, cases showing anaplasia or multinucleation had worse overall, disease-specific, and disease-free survival (P<0.006 for all). Higher T-stage, keratinizing histologic type, extracapsular extension, and smoking also all correlated with worse survival. In multivariate analysis, anaplasia and multinucleation both predicted worse disease-specific survival (hazard ratio 9.9, P=0.04; and hazard ratio 11.9, P=0.02, respectively) independent of the other variables. In summary, among surgically resectable oropharyngeal SCC (including among just the p16-positive cohort), tumor cell anaplasia and multinucleation independently correlated with disease recurrence and poorer survival.

  15. Tumor Cell Anaplasia and Multinucleation Are Predictors of Disease Recurrence in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Including Among Just the Human Papillomavirus-Related Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James S.; Scantlebury, Juliette B.; Luo, Jingqin; Thorstad, Wade L.

    2013-01-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is frequently related to high risk human papillomavirus. This tumor expresses p16, frequently has a nonkeratinizing morphology, and has improved outcomes. Despite having a good prognosis, tumors can have focal or diffuse nuclear anaplasia or multinucleation, the significance of which is unknown. From a database of 270 oropharyngeal SCCs with known histologic typing (using our established system) and p16 immunohistochemistry, all surgically resected cases (149) were reviewed. Anaplasia was defined as any ×40 field with ≥ 3 tumor nuclei with diameters ≥ 5 lymphocyte nuclei (~25 μm), and multinucleation was defined as any ×40 field with ≥ 3 tumor cells with multiple nuclei. p16 was positive in 128 cases (85.9%), 64 cases (43.0%) showed anaplasia, and 71 (47.7%) showed multinucleation. Anaplasia and multinucleation were highly related (P < 0.001), and both also correlated with histologic type (P < 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively), p16 status (P = 0.09 and 0.03, respectively), and partially with nodal extracapsular extension. There was no correlation with any of the other variables. In univariate analysis, cases showing anaplasia or multinucleation had worse overall, disease-specific, and disease-free survival (P < 0.006 for all). Higher T-stage, keratinizing histologic type, extracapsular extension, and smoking also all correlated with worse survival. In multivariate analysis, anaplasia and multinucleation both predicted worse disease-specific survival (hazard ratio 9.9, P = 0.04; and hazard ratio 11.9, P = 0.02, respectively) independent of the other variables. In summary, among surgically resectable oropharyngeal SCC (including among just the p16-positive cohort), tumor cell anaplasia and multinucleation independently correlated with disease recurrence and poorer survival. PMID:22743286

  16. [The history of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Acupuncture treatment of facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Syed Zahid Hussain; Zahid, Syeda Samina

    2010-01-01

    Bell's palsy is an idiopathic, acute peripheral-nerve palsy involving the facial nerve which supplies all the muscles of facial expression. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of electro-A=acupuncture on patients with facial palsy. This study was conducted on patients with facial palsy at a private clinic at Peshawar during 1999-2009, and 49 cases were included in the study. All those cases that were within first two weeks of illness or who had related history of stroke or they had upper motor neuron lesion were not included in the study. Electroacupuncture was used as the main therapeutic technique to treat these cases. Patients were subjected to acupuncture treatment at four major points on the face for 20-25 minutes everyday for 10 days. Specific points were used for nasolabial fold and watering of the eye. After rest for a week patients were again evaluated and another course of treatment comprising of 5-10 days was sufficient in most cases. Frequency of electro-acupuncture is kept at 60-80 cycles per minute. Total number of patients studied was 49 with duration of illness as early as 3 weeks to a year and above. Cases with duration of illness from 3 weeks onward showed rapid recovery of palsy symptoms with electro-acupuncture. All cases showed recovery. Palsy of the angle of the mouth did not recover completely. Electro-acupuncture is effective in treating facial palsy cases.

  18. [Reconstruction of zygomatic-facial massive defect using modified bilobed flap after resection of skin cancer].

    PubMed

    Ling, Bin; Abass, Keremu; Hu, Mei; Yin, Xiaopeng; Hu, Lulu; Lin, Zhaoquan; Gong, Zhongcheng

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the clinical application of the modified bilobed flap in the reconstruction of zygomatic-facial massive defect after resection of skin cancer. Between August 2009 and October 2011, 15 patients with skin cancer in the zygomatic-facial region underwent defect reconstruction using modified bilobed flaps after surgical removal. There were 12 males and 3 females, aged 52-78 years (mean, 64.1 years). The disease duration was 1-14 months (mean, 4.6 months). Among the patients, there were 11 cases of basal cell carcinoma and 4 cases of squamous cell carcinoma; 1 patient had infection and the others had no skin ulceration; and tumor involved the skin layer in all patients. According to TNM staging, 13 cases were rated as T2N0M2 and 2 cases as T3N0M3. The defect size ranged from 4.0 cm x 2.5 cm to 6.5 cm x 4.0 cm after cancer resection. The modified bilobed flaps consisting of pre-auricular flap and post-auricular flap was used to repair the defect after cancer resection. The size ranged from 4.0 cm x 2.5 cm to 6.5 cm x 4.0 cm of the first flap and from 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm to 5.0 cm x 3.0 cm of the second flap. Partial incision dehiscence occurred in 1 case, and was cured after dressing change; the flaps survived and incision healed primarily in the other cases. Fourteen patients were followed up 12-24 months (mean, 18.7 months). No recurrence was found, and the patients had no obvious face asymmetry or skin scar with normal closure of eyelid and facial nerve function. At last follow-up, the results were very satisfactory in 5 cases, satisfactory in 7 cases, generally satisfactory in 1 case, and dissatisfactory in 1 case. The pre- and post-auricular bilobed flaps could be used to reconstruct the massive defects in the zygomatic-facial region after resection of skin cancer.

  19. Mask face: bilateral simultaneous facial palsy in an 11-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Serdal; Güngör Raif, Sabiha; Arslan, Müjgan

    2013-04-01

    Bilateral facial paralysis is an uncommon clinical entity especially in the pediatric age group and occurs frequently as a manifestation of systemic disease. The most important causes are trauma, infectious diseases, neurological diseases, metabolic, neoplastic, autoimmune diseases and idiopathic disease (Bell's palsy). We report a case of an 11-year-old boy presenting with bilateral simultaneous peripheral facial paralysis. All possible infectious causes were excluded and the patient was diagnosed as having Bell's palsy (idiopathic). The most important approach in these cases is to rule out a life-threatening disease. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. Facial Nerve Paralysis after Onyx Embolization of a Jugular Paraganglioma: A Case Report with a Long-Term Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Odat, Haitham; Alawneh, Khaled; Al-Qudah, Mohannad

    2018-01-01

    Jugular paragangliomas are slow growing highly vascular tumors arising from jugular paraganglia. The gold standard of treatment is complete surgical resection. Pre-operative embolization of these highly vascular tumors is essential to reduce intra-operative bleeding, allow safe dissection, and decrease operative time and post-operative complications. Onyx (ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer) has been widely used as permanent occluding material for vascular tumors of skull base because of its unique physical properties. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman who had left-sided facial nerve paralysis after Onyx embolization of jugular paraganglioma. The tumor was resected on the next day of embolization. The patient was followed up for 30 months with serial imaging studies and facial nerve assessment. The facial verve function improved from House–Brackmann grade V to grade II at the last visit. PMID:29518926

  1. Facial Nerve Paralysis after Onyx Embolization of a Jugular Paraganglioma: A Case Report with a Long-Term Follow Up.

    PubMed

    Odat, Haitham; Alawneh, Khaled; Al-Qudah, Mohannad

    2018-03-07

    Jugular paragangliomas are slow growing highly vascular tumors arising from jugular paraganglia. The gold standard of treatment is complete surgical resection. Pre-operative embolization of these highly vascular tumors is essential to reduce intra-operative bleeding, allow safe dissection, and decrease operative time and post-operative complications. Onyx (ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer) has been widely used as permanent occluding material for vascular tumors of skull base because of its unique physical properties. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman who had left-sided facial nerve paralysis after Onyx embolization of jugular paraganglioma. The tumor was resected on the next day of embolization. The patient was followed up for 30 months with serial imaging studies and facial nerve assessment. The facial verve function improved from House-Brackmann grade V to grade II at the last visit.

  2. [A rare parotid tumor].

    PubMed

    Doh, Kwame; Thiam, Ibou; Takin, Romulus Carmen Adechina; Sonhaye, Khaled; Woto-Gaye, Gisèle

    2018-06-04

    Sebaceous lymphadenoma of the parotid (SLP) is a rare, benign tumor with similar epidemiological and macroscopic characteristics with other sebaceous differentiated tumors of the parotid (SDTP). The authors report a case of SLP in an 80-year-old woman. They then recall the distinctive histological and immunohistochemical criteria of SDTP. Mrs P. D. was received during a surgical consultation for the management of a painless right parotid swelling that has evolved for 10years, increasing slightly in volume. At admission, the mass was movable, firm with a healthy skin without facial paralysis or satellite lymphadenopathy. The surgical intervention performed removed a nodular mass measuring 7cm, encapsulated, yellowish. It was made of regular epithelial cells without atypia or mitoses organized in nests, trabeculae and massifs. This tumor also included small canalicular cystic dilatations associated with several islands of sebaceous glands. The stroma was dense lymphoid with follicles and germinal centers. The tumor cells were CK7+, P63+, MSA+ and had a Ki67<5%. The diagnosis of an SLP was retained. No additional therapy was performed. One year after surgery, the patient had no local recurrence or metastatic foci. SLP is a rare tumor with a particular histological and immunohistochemical profile. It is an epithelial tumor with sebaceous islands, a dense reactional lymphoid stroma, expression of luminal and basal epithelial markers and a low proliferation index. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Supradural inflammatory soup in awake and freely moving rats induces facial allodynia that is blocked by putative immune modulators.

    PubMed

    Wieseler, Julie; Ellis, Amanda; McFadden, Andrew; Stone, Kendra; Brown, Kimberley; Cady, Sara; Bastos, Leandro F; Sprunger, David; Rezvani, Niloofar; Johnson, Kirk; Rice, Kenner C; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2017-06-01

    Facial allodynia is a migraine symptom that is generally considered to represent a pivotal point in migraine progression. Treatment before development of facial allodynia tends to be more successful than treatment afterwards. As such, understanding the underlying mechanisms of facial allodynia may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying migraine. Migraine facial allodynia is modeled by applying inflammatory soup (histamine, bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E2) over the dura. Whether glial and/or immune activation contributes to such pain is unknown. Here we tested if trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Sp5C) glial and/or immune cells are activated following supradural inflammatory soup, and if putative glial/immune inhibitors suppress the consequent facial allodynia. Inflammatory soup was administered via bilateral indwelling supradural catheters in freely moving rats, inducing robust and reliable facial allodynia. Gene expression for microglial/macrophage activation markers, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α increased following inflammatory soup along with robust expression of facial allodynia. This provided the basis for pursuing studies of the behavioral effects of 3 diverse immunomodulatory drugs on facial allodynia. Pretreatment with either of two compounds broadly used as putative glial/immune inhibitors (minocycline, ibudilast) prevented the development of facial allodynia, as did treatment after supradural inflammatory soup but prior to the expression of facial allodynia. Lastly, the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist (+)-naltrexone likewise blocked development of facial allodynia after supradural inflammatory soup. Taken together, these exploratory data support that activated glia and/or immune cells may drive the development of facial allodynia in response to supradural inflammatory soup in unanesthetized male rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Five Loci Influencing Facial Morphology in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fan; van der Lijn, Fedde; Schurmann, Claudia; Zhu, Gu; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Hysi, Pirro G.; Wollstein, Andreas; Lao, Oscar; de Bruijne, Marleen; Ikram, M. Arfan; van der Lugt, Aad; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Niessen, Wiro J.; Homuth, Georg; de Zubicaray, Greig; McMahon, Katie L.; Thompson, Paul M.; Daboul, Amro; Puls, Ralf; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Bevan, Liisa; Pausova, Zdenka; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Wright, Margaret J.; Wicking, Carol; Boehringer, Stefan; Spector, Timothy D.; Paus, Tomáš; Martin, Nicholas G.; Biffar, Reiner; Kayser, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Inter-individual variation in facial shape is one of the most noticeable phenotypes in humans, and it is clearly under genetic regulation; however, almost nothing is known about the genetic basis of normal human facial morphology. We therefore conducted a genome-wide association study for facial shape phenotypes in multiple discovery and replication cohorts, considering almost ten thousand individuals of European descent from several countries. Phenotyping of facial shape features was based on landmark data obtained from three-dimensional head magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and two-dimensional portrait images. We identified five independent genetic loci associated with different facial phenotypes, suggesting the involvement of five candidate genes—PRDM16, PAX3, TP63, C5orf50, and COL17A1—in the determination of the human face. Three of them have been implicated previously in vertebrate craniofacial development and disease, and the remaining two genes potentially represent novel players in the molecular networks governing facial development. Our finding at PAX3 influencing the position of the nasion replicates a recent GWAS of facial features. In addition to the reported GWA findings, we established links between common DNA variants previously associated with NSCL/P at 2p21, 8q24, 13q31, and 17q22 and normal facial-shape variations based on a candidate gene approach. Overall our study implies that DNA variants in genes essential for craniofacial development contribute with relatively small effect size to the spectrum of normal variation in human facial morphology. This observation has important consequences for future studies aiming to identify more genes involved in the human facial morphology, as well as for potential applications of DNA prediction of facial shape such as in future forensic applications. PMID:23028347

  5. Circulating tumor DNA profiling reveals clonal evolution and real-time disease progression in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhi-Xiong; Chen, Geng; Zeng, Yong-Yi; Dong, Xiu-Qing; Lin, Min-Jie; Huang, Xin-Hui; Zhang, Da; Liu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Jing-Feng

    2017-09-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) provides a potential non-invasive biomarker for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, but whether it could reflect tumor heterogeneity and monitor therapeutic responses in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. Focusing on 574 cancer genes known to harbor actionable mutations, we identified the mutation repertoire of HCC tissues, and monitored the corresponding ctDNA features in blood samples to evaluate its clinical significance. Analysis of 3 HCC patients' mutation profiles revealed that ctDNA could overcome tumor heterogeneity and provide information of tumor burden and prognosis. Further analysis was conducted on the 4th HCC case with multiple lesion samples and sequential plasma samples. We identified 160 subclonal SNVs in tumor tissues as well as matched peritumor tissues with PBMC as control. 96.9% of this patient's tissue mutations could be also detected in plasma samples. These subclonal SNVs were grouped into 9 clusters according to their trends of cellular prevalence shift in tumor tissues. Two clusters constituted of tumor stem somatic mutations showed circulating levels relating with cancer progression. Analysis of tumor somatic mutations revealed that circulating level of such tumor stem somatic mutations could reflect tumor burden and even predict prognosis earlier than traditional strategies. Furthermore, HCK (p.V174M), identified as a recurrent/metastatic related mutation site, could promote migration and invasion of HCC cells. Taken together, study of mutation profiles in biopsy and plasma samples in HCC patients showed that ctDNA could overcome tumor heterogeneity and real-time track the therapeutic responses in the longitudinal monitoring. © 2017 UICC.

  6. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with complete replacement of the pancreas by serous cystic neoplasms in a patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shimpei; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Oana, Shuhei; Ariake, Kyohei; Mizuma, Masamichi; Morikawa, Takanori; Hayashi, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Kei; Kamei, Takashi; Naitoh, Takeshi; Unno, Michiaki

    2017-09-25

    von Hippel-Lindau disease is a dominantly inherited multi-system syndrome with neoplastic hallmarks. Pancreatic lesions associated with von Hippel-Lindau include serous cystic neoplasms, simple cysts, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and serous cystic neoplasms is relatively rare, and the surgical treatment of these lesions must consider both preservation of pancreatic function and oncological clearance. We report a patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease successfully treated with pancreas-sparing resection of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor where the pancreas had been completely replaced by serous cystic neoplasms, in which pancreatic function was preserved. A 39-year-old female with von Hippel-Lindau disease was referred to our institution for treatment of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a well-enhanced mass, 4 cm in diameter in the tail of the pancreas, and two multilocular tumors with several calcifications, 5 cm in diameter, in the head of the pancreas. There was complete replacement of the pancreas by multiple cystic lesions with diameters ranging from 1 to 3 cm. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed innumerable cystic lesions on the whole pancreas and no detectable main pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the mass in the pancreatic tail showed characteristic features of a neuroendocrine tumor. A diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in the tail of the pancreas and mixed-type serous cystic neoplasms replacing the whole pancreas was made and she underwent distal pancreatectomy while avoiding total pancreatectomy. The stump of the pancreas was sutured as firm as possible using a fish-mouth closure. The patient made a good recovery and was discharged on postoperative day 9. She is currently alive and well with no symptoms of endocrine or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency 8 months after surgery. A pancreas

  7. Tumor Macroenvironment and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S.; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%–20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient’s outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described. PMID:24787299

  8. Tumor macroenvironment and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%-20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient's outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Automatic Contour Extraction of Facial Organs for Frontal Facial Images with Various Facial Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Seiji; Takahashi, Hisanori; Tange, Akira; Kikuchi, Kohki

    This study deals with a method to realize automatic contour extraction of facial features such as eyebrows, eyes and mouth for the time-wise frontal face with various facial expressions. Because Snakes which is one of the most famous methods used to extract contours, has several disadvantages, we propose a new method to overcome these issues. We define the elastic contour model in order to hold the contour shape and then determine the elastic energy acquired by the amount of modification of the elastic contour model. Also we utilize the image energy obtained by brightness differences of the control points on the elastic contour model. Applying the dynamic programming method, we determine the contour position where the total value of the elastic energy and the image energy becomes minimum. Employing 1/30s time-wise facial frontal images changing from neutral to one of six typical facial expressions obtained from 20 subjects, we have estimated our method and find it enables high accuracy automatic contour extraction of facial features.

  10. The Tumor Macroenvironment: Cancer-Promoting Networks Beyond Tumor Beds.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Melanie R; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. THE TUMOR MACROENVIRONMENT: CANCER-PROMOTING NETWORKS BEYOND TUMOR BEDS

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Puchalt, Alfredo Perales; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, and myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. PMID:26216635

  12. Evidence for Anger Saliency during the Recognition of Chimeric Facial Expressions of Emotions in Underage Ebola Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ardizzi, Martina; Evangelista, Valentina; Ferroni, Francesca; Umiltà, Maria A.; Ravera, Roberto; Gallese, Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    One of the crucial features defining basic emotions and their prototypical facial expressions is their value for survival. Childhood traumatic experiences affect the effective recognition of facial expressions of negative emotions, normally allowing the recruitment of adequate behavioral responses to environmental threats. Specifically, anger becomes an extraordinarily salient stimulus unbalancing victims’ recognition of negative emotions. Despite the plethora of studies on this topic, to date, it is not clear whether this phenomenon reflects an overall response tendency toward anger recognition or a selective proneness to the salience of specific facial expressive cues of anger after trauma exposure. To address this issue, a group of underage Sierra Leonean Ebola virus disease survivors (mean age 15.40 years, SE 0.35; years of schooling 8.8 years, SE 0.46; 14 males) and a control group (mean age 14.55, SE 0.30; years of schooling 8.07 years, SE 0.30, 15 males) performed a forced-choice chimeric facial expressions recognition task. The chimeric facial expressions were obtained pairing upper and lower half faces of two different negative emotions (selected from anger, fear and sadness for a total of six different combinations). Overall, results showed that upper facial expressive cues were more salient than lower facial expressive cues. This priority was lost among Ebola virus disease survivors for the chimeric facial expressions of anger. In this case, differently from controls, Ebola virus disease survivors recognized anger regardless of the upper or lower position of the facial expressive cues of this emotion. The present results demonstrate that victims’ performance in the recognition of the facial expression of anger does not reflect an overall response tendency toward anger recognition, but rather the specific greater salience of facial expressive cues of anger. Furthermore, the present results show that traumatic experiences deeply modify the perceptual

  13. Evidence for Anger Saliency during the Recognition of Chimeric Facial Expressions of Emotions in Underage Ebola Survivors.

    PubMed

    Ardizzi, Martina; Evangelista, Valentina; Ferroni, Francesca; Umiltà, Maria A; Ravera, Roberto; Gallese, Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    One of the crucial features defining basic emotions and their prototypical facial expressions is their value for survival. Childhood traumatic experiences affect the effective recognition of facial expressions of negative emotions, normally allowing the recruitment of adequate behavioral responses to environmental threats. Specifically, anger becomes an extraordinarily salient stimulus unbalancing victims' recognition of negative emotions. Despite the plethora of studies on this topic, to date, it is not clear whether this phenomenon reflects an overall response tendency toward anger recognition or a selective proneness to the salience of specific facial expressive cues of anger after trauma exposure. To address this issue, a group of underage Sierra Leonean Ebola virus disease survivors (mean age 15.40 years, SE 0.35; years of schooling 8.8 years, SE 0.46; 14 males) and a control group (mean age 14.55, SE 0.30; years of schooling 8.07 years, SE 0.30, 15 males) performed a forced-choice chimeric facial expressions recognition task. The chimeric facial expressions were obtained pairing upper and lower half faces of two different negative emotions (selected from anger, fear and sadness for a total of six different combinations). Overall, results showed that upper facial expressive cues were more salient than lower facial expressive cues. This priority was lost among Ebola virus disease survivors for the chimeric facial expressions of anger. In this case, differently from controls, Ebola virus disease survivors recognized anger regardless of the upper or lower position of the facial expressive cues of this emotion. The present results demonstrate that victims' performance in the recognition of the facial expression of anger does not reflect an overall response tendency toward anger recognition, but rather the specific greater salience of facial expressive cues of anger. Furthermore, the present results show that traumatic experiences deeply modify the perceptual

  14. The asymmetric facial skin perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy discovered by laser speckle imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han; Chen, Yi; Zhong, Weizheng; Yu, Haibo; Li, Zhifeng; He, Yuhai; Yu, Wenlong; Jin, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a kind of peripheral neural disease that cause abrupt onset of unilateral facial weakness. In the pathologic study, it was evidenced that ischemia of facial nerve at the affected side of face existed in Bell's palsy patients. Since the direction of facial nerve blood flow is primarily proximal to distal, facial skin microcirculation would also be affected after the onset of Bell's palsy. Therefore, monitoring the full area of facial skin microcirculation would help to identify the condition of Bell's palsy patients. In this study, a non-invasive, real time and full field imaging technology - laser speckle imaging (LSI) technology was applied for measuring facial skin blood perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy patients. 85 participants with different stage of Bell's palsy were included. Results showed that Bell's palsy patients' facial skin perfusion of affected side was lower than that of the normal side at the region of eyelid, and that the asymmetric distribution of the facial skin perfusion between two sides of eyelid is positively related to the stage of the disease (P <  0.001). During the recovery, the perfusion of affected side of eyelid was increasing to nearly the same with the normal side. This study was a novel application of LSI in evaluating the facial skin perfusion of Bell's palsy patients, and we discovered that the facial skin blood perfusion could reflect the stage of Bell's palsy, which suggested that microcirculation should be investigated in patients with this neurological deficit. It was also suggested LSI as potential diagnostic tool for Bell's palsy.

  15. Facial nerve palsy: analysis of cases reported in children in a suburban hospital in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Folayan, M O; Arobieke, R I; Eziyi, E; Oyetola, E O; Elusiyan, J

    2014-01-01

    The study describes the epidemiology, treatment, and treatment outcomes of the 10 cases of facial nerve palsy seen in children managed at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife over a 10 year period. It also compares findings with report from developed countries. This was a retrospective cohort review of pediatric cases of facial nerve palsy encountered in all the clinics run by specialists in the above named hospital. A diagnosis of facial palsy was based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Information retrieved from the case note included sex, age, number of days with lesion prior to presentation in the clinic, diagnosis, treatment, treatment outcome, and referral clinic. Only 10 cases of facial nerve palsy were diagnosed in the institution during the study period. Prevalence of facial nerve palsy in this hospital was 0.01%. The lesion more commonly affected males and the right side of the face. All cases were associated with infections: Mainly mumps (70% of cases). Case management include the use of steroids and eye pads for cases that presented within 7 days; and steroids, eye pad, and physical therapy for cases that presented later. All cases of facial nerve palsy associated with mumps and malaria infection fully recovered. The two cases of facial nerve palsy associated with otitis media only partially recovered. Facial nerve palsy in pediatric patients is more commonly associated with mumps in the study environment. Successes are recorded with steroid therapy.

  16. Heritabilities of Facial Measurements and Their Latent Factors in Korean Families

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Im, Sun-Wha; Jargal, Ganchimeg; Lee, Siwoo; Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Park, Jeong-Yeon; Sung, Joohon; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Jong-Yeol; Kim, Jong-Il; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Genetic studies on facial morphology targeting healthy populations are fundamental in understanding the specific genetic influences involved; yet, most studies to date, if not all, have been focused on congenital diseases accompanied by facial anomalies. To study the specific genetic cues determining facial morphology, we estimated familial correlations and heritabilities of 14 facial measurements and 3 latent factors inferred from a factor analysis in a subset of the Korean population. The study included a total of 229 individuals from 38 families. We evaluated a total of 14 facial measurements using 2D digital photographs. We performed factor analysis to infer common latent variables. The heritabilities of 13 facial measurements were statistically significant (p < 0.05) and ranged from 0.25 to 0.61. Of these, the heritability of intercanthal width in the orbital region was found to be the highest (h2 = 0.61, SE = 0.14). Three factors (lower face portion, orbital region, and vertical length) were obtained through factor analysis, where the heritability values ranged from 0.45 to 0.55. The heritability values for each factor were higher than the mean heritability value of individual original measurements. We have confirmed the genetic influence on facial anthropometric traits and suggest a potential way to categorize and analyze the facial portions into different groups. PMID:23843774

  17. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition markers expressed in circulating tumor cells in hepatocellular carcinoma patients with different stages of disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y-M; Xu, S-C; Li, J; Han, K-Q; Pi, H-F; Zheng, L; Zuo, G-H; Huang, X-B; Li, H-Y; Zhao, H-Z; Yu, Z-P; Zhou, Z; Liang, P

    2013-01-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood is associated with metastasis and prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) has a pivotal role in tumor invasion and dissemination. To identify more sensitive biomarkers for evaluating metastasis and prognosis, we investigated the expression of EMT markers, including vimentin, twist, ZEB1, ZEB2, snail, slug and E-cadherin in CTCs, primary HCC tumors and adjacent non-tumoral liver tissues. After isolating viable CTCs from the peripheral blood of HCC patients using asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs), the CTCs were identified with immunofluorescence staining. CTCs were detected in the peripheral blood obtained from 46 of 60 (76.7%) HCC patients. Triple-immunofluorescence staining showed that twist and vimentin expression could be detected in CTCs obtained from 39 (84.8%) and 37 (80.4%) of the 46 patients, respectively. The expression of both twist and vimentin in CTCs was significantly correlated with portal vein tumor thrombus. Coexpression of twist and vimentin in CTCs could be detected in 32 (69.6%) of the 46 patients and was highly correlated with portal vein tumor thrombus, TNM classification and tumor size. Quantitative fluorescence western blot analysis revealed that the expression levels of E-cadherin, vimentin and twist in HCC tumors were significantly associated with the positivity of isolated CTCs (P=0.013, P=0.012, P=0.009, respectively). However, there was no significant difference in ZEB1, ZEB2, snail and slug expression levels in CTCs, primary HCC tumors and adjacent non-tumoral liver tissues across samples with regard to the clinicopathological parameters. Our results demonstrate that the EMT has a role in promoting the blood-borne dissemination of primary HCC cells, and the twist and vimentin expression levels in CTCs could serve as promising biomarkers for evaluating metastasis and prognosis in HCC patients. PMID:24091674

  18. Facial Specialty. Teacher Edition. Cosmetology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication is one of a series of curriculum guides designed to direct and support instruction in vocational cosmetology programs in the State of Oklahoma. It contains seven units for the facial specialty: identifying enemies of the skin, using aromatherapy on the skin, giving facials without the aid of machines, giving facials with the aid…

  19. Facial expressions and pair bonds in hylobatids.

    PubMed

    Florkiewicz, Brittany; Skollar, Gabriella; Reichard, Ulrich H

    2018-06-06

    Facial expressions are an important component of primate communication that functions to transmit social information and modulate intentions and motivations. Chimpanzees and macaques, for example, produce a variety of facial expressions when communicating with conspecifics. Hylobatids also produce various facial expressions; however, the origin and function of these facial expressions are still largely unclear. It has been suggested that larger facial expression repertoires may have evolved in the context of social complexity, but this link has yet to be tested at a broader empirical basis. The social complexity hypothesis offers a possible explanation for the evolution of complex communicative signals such as facial expressions, because as the complexity of an individual's social environment increases so does the need for communicative signals. We used an intraspecies, pair-focused study design to test the link between facial expressions and sociality within hylobatids, specifically the strength of pair-bonds. The current study compared 206 hr of video and 103 hr of focal animal data for ten hylobatid pairs from three genera (Nomascus, Hoolock, and Hylobates) living at the Gibbon Conservation Center. Using video footage, we explored 5,969 facial expressions along three dimensions: repertoire use, repertoire breadth, and facial expression synchrony [FES]. We then used focal animal data to compare dimensions of facial expressiveness to pair bond strength and behavioral synchrony. Hylobatids in our study overlapped in only half of their facial expressions (50%) with the only other detailed, quantitative study of hylobatid facial expressions, while 27 facial expressions were uniquely observed in our study animals. Taken together, hylobatids have a large facial expression repertoire of at least 80 unique facial expressions. Contrary to our prediction, facial repertoire composition was not significantly correlated with pair bond strength, rates of territorial synchrony

  20. Optimizing screening for tuberculosis and hepatitis B prior to starting tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    van der Have, Mike; Oldenburg, Bas; Fidder, Herma H; Belderbos, Tim D G; Siersema, Peter D; van Oijen, Martijn G H

    2014-03-01

    Treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with potentially serious infections, including tuberculosis (TB) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). We assessed the cost-effectiveness of extensive TB screening and HBV screening prior to initiating TNF-α inhibitors in CD. We constructed two Markov models: (1) comparing tuberculin skin test (TST) combined with chest X-ray (conventional TB screening) versus TST and chest X-ray followed by the interferon-gamma release assay (extensive TB screening) in diagnosing TB; and (2) HBV screening versus no HBV screening. Our base-case included an adult CD patient starting with infliximab treatment. Input parameters were extracted from the literature. Direct medical costs were assessed and discounted following a third-party payer perspective. The main outcome was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Sensitivity and Monte Carlo analyses were performed over wide ranges of probability and cost estimates. At base-case, the ICERs of extensive screening and HBV screening were €64,340 and €75,760 respectively to gain one quality-adjusted life year. Sensitivity analyses concluded that extensive TB screening was a cost-effective strategy if the latent TB prevalence is more than 12 % or if the false positivity rate of TST is more than 20 %. HBV screening became cost-effective if HBV reactivation or HBV-related mortality is higher than 37 and 62 %, respectively. Extensive TB screening and HBV screening are not cost-effective compared with conventional TB screening and no HBV screening, respectively. However, when targeted at high-risk patient groups, these screening strategies are likely to become cost-effective.

  1. Serum levels of ghrelin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in infants and children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Afify, Mohamed Farouk; Mohamed, Gamal B; El-Maboud, Mohamed Abd; Abdel-Latif, Esmat A

    2009-12-01

    To estimate serum levels of ghrelin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD), compared with levels in age-matched controls, and to correlate the levels of ghrelin with TNF-alpha and IL-6. Case-control study. Suzan Moubarak Hospital of Al-Minya University, Egypt. We measured serum ghrelin, TNF-alpha and IL-6 levels using ELISA in 60 patients with CHD (40 acyanotic and 20 cyanotic) and in 20 control subjects. Our results showed that patients with CHD, regardless of the presence or absence of cyanosis, had significantly higher serum ghrelin, TNF-alpha and IL-6 than controls (p = 0.000). Serum levels of ghrelin and TNF-alpha in the acyanotic patients were significantly higher than in the cyanotic patients (p = 0.000). On the other hand, there was no significant difference in serum levels of IL-6 between the acyanotic and the cyanotic patients (p = 0.126). In acyanotic and cyanotic patients with CHD, there was a positive correlation between ghrelin and TNF-alpha (r = 0.424; p = 0.006 and r = 0.577; p = 0.008, respectively). Ghrelin levels were not correlated to IL-6 in the acyanotic and cyanotic patients with CHD (r = -0.211; p = 0.216 and r = -0.341; p = 0.08, respectively). Serum ghrelin, TNF-alpha and IL-6 levels are elevated in patients with CHD whether acyanotic or cyanotic. Increased ghrelin levels represent malnutrition and growth retardation in these patients. The relation of ghrelin with TNF-alpha may be explained by the possible effect of chronic congestive heart failure and chronic shunt hypoxemia.

  2. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  3. Quantitative Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Heterogeneous Tissue: Application to the Detection of Residual Disease in Tumor Margins.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jenna L; Harmany, Zachary T; Mito, Jeffrey K; Kennedy, Stephanie A; Kim, Yongbaek; Dodd, Leslie; Geradts, Joseph; Kirsch, David G; Willett, Rebecca M; Brown, J Quincy; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2013-01-01

    To develop a robust tool for quantitative in situ pathology that allows visualization of heterogeneous tissue morphology and segmentation and quantification of image features. TISSUE EXCISED FROM A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MOUSE MODEL OF SARCOMA WAS IMAGED USING A SUBCELLULAR RESOLUTION MICROENDOSCOPE AFTER TOPICAL APPLICATION OF A FLUORESCENT ANATOMICAL CONTRAST AGENT: acriflavine. An algorithm based on sparse component analysis (SCA) and the circle transform (CT) was developed for image segmentation and quantification of distinct tissue types. The accuracy of our approach was quantified through simulations of tumor and muscle images. Specifically, tumor, muscle, and tumor+muscle tissue images were simulated because these tissue types were most commonly observed in sarcoma margins. Simulations were based on tissue characteristics observed in pathology slides. The potential clinical utility of our approach was evaluated by imaging excised margins and the tumor bed in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of sarcoma. Simulation experiments revealed that SCA+CT achieved the lowest errors for larger nuclear sizes and for higher contrast ratios (nuclei intensity/background intensity). For imaging of tumor margins, SCA+CT effectively isolated nuclei from tumor, muscle, adipose, and tumor+muscle tissue types. Differences in density were correctly identified with SCA+CT in a cohort of ex vivo and in vivo images, thus illustrating the diagnostic potential of our approach. The combination of a subcellular-resolution microendoscope, acriflavine staining, and SCA+CT can be used to accurately isolate nuclei and quantify their density in anatomical images of heterogeneous tissue.

  4. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. Results: In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. Conclusions: The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh. PMID:26550216

  5. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh.

  6. Obesity and Peritoneal Surface Disease: Outcomes after Cytoreductive Surgery with Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy for Appendiceal and Colon Primary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Swords, Douglas S.; Swett, Katrina R.; Randle, Reese W.; Shen, Perry; Stewart, John H.; Levine, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is estimated that 37 % of the U.S. population is obese. It is unknown how obesity influences the operative and survival outcomes of cytoreductive surgery (CRS)/hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) procedures. Methods A retrospective analysis of a prospective database of 1,000 procedures was performed. Type of malignancy, performance status, resection status, hospital and intensive care unit stay, comorbidities, morbidity, mortality, and survival were reviewed. Results A total of 246 patients with body mass index (BMI) of >30 kg/m2 underwent 272 CRS/HIPEC procedures. Ninety-five (38.6 %) were severely obese (BMI > 35 kg/m2). A total of 135 (49.6 %) procedures were performed for appendiceal and 60 (22.1 %) for colon cancer. Median follow-up was 52 months. Both major and minor morbidity were similar for obese and non-obese patients. The 30-day mortality rates for obese and nonobese patients were 1.5 and 2.5 %, respectively. Median intensive care unit and hospital stay were 1 and 9 days, regardless of BMI. The 30-day readmission rate was similar between obese and non-obese patients (24.8 vs. 19.4 %, p = 0.11). Median survival for low-grade appendiceal cancer (LGA) was 76 months for obese patients and 107 months for non-obese patients (p = 0.32). Survival was worse for severely obese patients (median survival 54 months) versus non-obese patients with LGA (p = 0.04). Survival was similar for obese and non-obese patients with peritoneal surface disease (PSD) from colon cancer or high-grade appendiceal cancer. Conclusions Obesity does not influence postoperative morbidity or mortality of patients with PSD, regardless of primary tumor. Severe obesity is associated with decreased long-term survival only in patients with LGA primary disease; however, application of CRS/HIPEC still offers meaningful prolongation of life. Obesity should not be considered a contraindication for CRS/HIPEC procedures. PMID:23800899

  7. Genetic associations with adverse events from anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lew, Daniel; Yoon, Soon Man; Yan, Xiaofei; Robbins, Lori; Haritunians, Talin; Liu, Zhenqiu; Li, Dalin; McGovern, Dermot Pb

    2017-10-28

    To study the type and frequency of adverse events associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy and evaluate for any serologic and genetic associations. This study was a retrospective review of patients attending the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) centers at Cedars-Sinai IBD Center from 2005-2016. Adverse events were identified via chart review. IBD serologies were measured by ELISA. DNA samples were genotyped at Cedars-Sinai using Illumina Infinium Immunochipv1 array per manufacturer's protocol. SNPs underwent methodological review and were evaluated using several SNP statistic parameters to ensure optimal allele-calling. Standard and rigorous QC criteria were applied to the genetic data, which was generated using immunochip. Genetic association was assessed by logistic regression after correcting for population structure. Altogether we identified 1258 IBD subjects exposed to anti-TNF agents in whom Immunochip data were available. 269/1258 patients (21%) were found to have adverse events to an anti-TNF-α agent that required the therapy to be discontinued. 25% of women compared to 17% of men experienced an adverse event. All adverse events resolved after discontinuing the anti-TNF agent. In total: n = 66 (5%) infusion reactions; n = 49 (4%) allergic/serum sickness reactions; n = 19 (1.5%) lupus-like reactions, n = 52 (4%) rash, n = 18 (1.4%) infections. In Crohn's disease, IgA ASCA ( P = 0.04) and IgG-ASCA ( P = 0.02) levels were also lower in patients with any adverse events, and anti-I2 level in ulcerative colitis was significantly associated with infusion reactions ( P = 0.008). The logistic regression/human annotation and network analyses performed on the Immunochip data implicated the following five signaling pathways: JAK-STAT (Janus Kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription), measles, IBD, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, and toxoplasmosis for any adverse event. Our study shows 1 in 5 IBD patients experience an adverse

  8. Acoustic schwannoma with intracochlear extension and primary intracochlear schwannoma: removal through translabyrinthine approach with facial bridge cochleostomy and transcanal approach.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, A; Zanoletti, E; Faccioli, C; Martini, A

    2017-05-01

    Intracochlear schwannomas can occur either as an extension of a larger tumor from the internal auditory canal, or as a solitary labyrinthine tumor. They are currently removed via a translabyrinthine approach extended to the basal turn, adding a transotic approach for tumors lying beyond the basal turn. Facial bridge cochleostomy may be associated with the translabyrinthine approach to enable the whole cochlea to be approached without sacrificing the external auditory canal and tympanum. We describe seven cases, five of which underwent cochlear schwannoma resection with facial bridge cochleostomy, one case with the same procedure for a suspect tumor and one, previously subjected to radical tympanomastoidectomy, who underwent schwannoma resection via a transotic approach. Facial bridge cochleostomy involved removing the bone between the labyrinthine and tympanic portions of the fallopian canal, and exposing the cochlea from the basal to the apical turn. Patients' recovery was uneventful, and long-term magnetic resonance imaging showed no residual tumor. Facial bridge cochleostomy can be a flexible extension of the translabyrinthine approach for tumors extending from the internal auditory canal to the cochlea. The transcanal approach is suitable for the primary exclusive intralabyrinthine tumor. The indications for the different approaches are discussed.

  9. Definitive Radiotherapy for Ewing Tumors of Extremities and Pelvis: Long-Term Disease Control, Limb Function, and Treatment Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Shahlaee, Amir H.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: More than 70% of Ewing tumors occur in the extremities and pelvis. This study identified factors influencing local control and functional outcomes after management with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Patients and Methods: A total of 75 patients with a localized Ewing tumor of the extremity or pelvis were treated with definitive RT at the University of Florida between 1970 and 2006 (lower extremity tumors in 30, pelvic tumors in 26, and upper extremity tumors in 19). RT was performed on a once-daily (40%) or twice-daily (60%) basis. The median dose was 55.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions or 55.0 Gymore » in 1.2-Gy twice-daily fractions. The median observed follow-up was 4.7 years. Functional outcome was assessed using the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score. Results: The 10-year actuarial overall survival, cause-specific survival, freedom from relapse, and local control rate was 48%, 48%, 42%, and 71%, respectively. Of the 72 patients, 3 required salvage amputation. Inferior cause-specific survival was associated with larger tumors (81% for tumors <8 cm vs. 39% for tumors {>=}8 cm, p <0.05). No patient characteristics or treatment variables were predictive of local failure. No fractures occurred in patients treated with hyperfractionation or with tumors of the distal extremities. Severe late complications were more frequently associated with use of <8-MV photons and fields encompassing the entire bone or hemipelvis. A significantly better Toronto Extremity Salvage Score was associated with a late-effect biologically effective dose of <91.7 Gy{sub 3}. Conclusions: Limb preservation was effectively achieved through definitive RT. Treating limited field sizes with hyperfractionated high-energy RT could minimize long-term complications and provides superior functional outcomes.« less

  10. Mapping and Manipulating Facial Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Brick, Timothy R.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Boker, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Nonverbal visual cues accompany speech to supplement the meaning of spoken words, signify emotional state, indicate position in discourse, and provide back-channel feedback. This visual information includes head movements, facial expressions and body gestures. In this article we describe techniques for manipulating both verbal and nonverbal facial…

  11. Facial paralysis induced by ear inoculation of herpes simplex virus in rat.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Matsuda, Seiji; Tanaka, Junya; Hato, Naohito

    2017-02-01

    Bell's palsy is caused by the reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Using Balb/c mice inoculated with the KOS strain of HSV-1, we previously developed an animal disease model that simulated mild Bell's palsy. The current study developed an animal disease model of more severe facial palsy than that seen in the mouse model. Three-week-old female Wister rats weighing 60-80g were inoculated on the auricle with HSV-1 and acyclovir was administered intraperitoneally to deactivate the infected HSV-1. Instead of HSV-1, phosphate-buffered saline was used for inoculation as a negative control. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), behavior testing (blink reflex), electroneuronography, histopathology of the peripheral nerve, and immunohistochemistry of the facial nerve nucleus were evaluated. Facial palsy occurred 3-5 days after virus inoculation, and the severity of the facial palsy progressed for up to 7 days. Quantitative PCR showed an increase in HSV-1 DNA copies in the facial nerve from 24 to 72h, suggesting that HSV-1 infection occurred in the nerve. Electroneuronography values were 33.0±15.3% and 110.0±18.0% in HSV-1-inoculated and control rats, respectively. The histopathology of the peripheral nerve showed demyelination and loss of the facial nerve, and the facial nerve nucleus showed degeneration. Facial palsy developed in Wister rats following inoculation of the KOS strain of HSV-1 onto the auricles. The behavioral, histopathological, and electroneuronography data suggested that the severity of facial palsy was greater in our rats than in animals in the previous mouse disease model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of Sema4D/CD100 as a therapeutic target for tumor microenvironments and for autoimmune, neuroimmune and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingfu; Li, Jing; Gao, Qinglei; Ye, Fei

    2016-07-01

    Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D), also known as CD100, has been implicated in physiologic roles in the immune and nervous systems. However, the interaction of Sema4D with its high affinity receptor, Plexin-B1, reveals a novel role for Sema4D produced by the tumor microenvironment in tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. The ligation of Sema4D/CD100 with CD72 on immune and inflammatory cells is known to stimulate immune responses and regulation. Because CD100 and CD72 are expressed on lung immune and nonimmune cells, as well as on mast cells, the CD100/CD72 interaction plays another important role in allergic airway inflammation and mast cell functions. A better understanding of Sema4D-mediated cell signaling in physiological and pathological processes may be crucial for crafting new Sema4D-based therapeutics for human disease and tumor microenvironments. Strategies to achieve effective management through treatment with Sema4D include special siRNAs, neutralizing antibodies and knockdown. This review focuses on the links between Sema4D and human diseases such as cancer, bone metabolism, immune responses and organ development. The current knowledge regarding the expression of Sema4D and its receptors and its functional roles is systemically reviewed to explore Sema4D as both a target and a therapeutic in human diseases.

  13. The Transactivation Domain of Marek's Disease Virus (MDV) Meq Oncoprotein Does Not Affect Tumor Incidence But Plays a Role in Tumor Phenotype

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marek’s disease virus encoded oncoprotein, Meq, is responsible for the tumorigenic phenotype of the virus. We have previously shown that replacement of the meq gene in the very virulent strain Md5 with that of vaccine strain CVI988/Rispens results in virus attenuation in chickens. To determine the...

  14. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer and Borderline Ovarian Tumors: A Pooled Analysis of 13 Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Christina B; Kjaer, Susanne K; Albieri, Vanna; Bandera, Elisa V; Doherty, Jennifer A; Høgdall, Estrid; Webb, Penelope M; Jordan, Susan J; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G; Goodman, Marc T; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Edwards, Robert P; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Berchuck, Andrew; Olson, Sara H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Narod, Steven A; Phelan, Catherine M; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Risch, Harvey A; Jensen, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation has been implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis. However, studies investigating the association between pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and ovarian cancer risk are few and inconsistent. We investigated the association between PID and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer according to tumor behavior and histotype. We pooled data from 13 case-control studies, conducted between 1989 and 2009, from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC), including 9,162 women with ovarian cancers, 2,354 women with borderline tumors, and 14,736 control participants. Study-specific odds ratios were estimated and subsequently combined into a pooled odds ratio using a random-effects model. A history of PID was associated with an increased risk of borderline tumors (pooled odds ratio (pOR) = 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10, 1.58). Women with at least 2 episodes of PID had a 2-fold increased risk of borderline tumors (pOR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.08, 4.24). No association was observed between PID and ovarian cancer risk overall (pOR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.19); however, a statistically nonsignificantly increased risk of low-grade serous tumors (pOR = 1.48, 95% CI: 0.92, 2.38) was noted. In conclusion, PID was associated with an increased risk of borderline ovarian tumors, particularly among women who had had multiple episodes of PID. Although our results indicated a histotype-specific association with PID, the association of PID with ovarian cancer risk is still somewhat uncertain and requires further investigation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer and Borderline Ovarian Tumors: A Pooled Analysis of 13 Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Christina B.; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Albieri, Vanna; Bandera, Elisa V.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Høgdall, Estrid; Webb, Penelope M.; Jordan, Susan J.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Goodman, Marc T.; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Edwards, Robert P.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Olson, Sara H.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Narod, Steven A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Risch, Harvey A.; Jensen, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation has been implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis. However, studies investigating the association between pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and ovarian cancer risk are few and inconsistent. We investigated the association between PID and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer according to tumor behavior and histotype. We pooled data from 13 case-control studies, conducted between 1989 and 2009, from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC), including 9,162 women with ovarian cancers, 2,354 women with borderline tumors, and 14,736 control participants. Study-specific odds ratios were estimated and subsequently combined into a pooled odds ratio using a random-effects model. A history of PID was associated with an increased risk of borderline tumors (pooled odds ratio (pOR) = 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10, 1.58). Women with at least 2 episodes of PID had a 2-fold increased risk of borderline tumors (pOR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.08, 4.24). No association was observed between PID and ovarian cancer risk overall (pOR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.19); however, a statistically nonsignificantly increased risk of low-grade serous tumors (pOR = 1.48, 95% CI: 0.92, 2.38) was noted. In conclusion, PID was associated with an increased risk of borderline ovarian tumors, particularly among women who had had multiple episodes of PID. Although our results indicated a histotype-specific association with PID, the association of PID with ovarian cancer risk is still somewhat uncertain and requires further investigation. PMID:27941069

  16. Operant conditioning of facial displays of pain.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Miriam; Rainville, Pierre; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    The operant model of chronic pain posits that nonverbal pain behavior, such as facial expressions, is sensitive to reinforcement, but experimental evidence supporting this assumption is sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate in a healthy population a) whether facial pain behavior can indeed be operantly conditioned using a discriminative reinforcement schedule to increase and decrease facial pain behavior and b) to what extent these changes affect pain experience indexed by self-ratings. In the experimental group (n = 29), the participants were reinforced every time that they showed pain-indicative facial behavior (up-conditioning) or a neutral expression (down-conditioning) in response to painful heat stimulation. Once facial pain behavior was successfully up- or down-conditioned, respectively (which occurred in 72% of participants), facial pain displays and self-report ratings were assessed. In addition, a control group (n = 11) was used that was yoked to the reinforcement plans of the experimental group. During the conditioning phases, reinforcement led to significant changes in facial pain behavior in the majority of the experimental group (p < .001) but not in the yoked control group (p > .136). Fine-grained analyses of facial muscle movements revealed a similar picture. Furthermore, the decline in facial pain displays (as observed during down-conditioning) strongly predicted changes in pain ratings (R(2) = 0.329). These results suggest that a) facial pain displays are sensitive to reinforcement and b) that changes in facial pain displays can affect self-report ratings.

  17. Recognizing Facial Expressions Automatically from Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Caifeng; Braspenning, Ralph

    Facial expressions, resulting from movements of the facial muscles, are the face changes in response to a person's internal emotional states, intentions, or social communications. There is a considerable history associated with the study on facial expressions. Darwin [22] was the first to describe in details the specific facial expressions associated with emotions in animals and humans, who argued that all mammals show emotions reliably in their faces. Since that, facial expression analysis has been a area of great research interest for behavioral scientists [27]. Psychological studies [48, 3] suggest that facial expressions, as the main mode for nonverbal communication, play a vital role in human face-to-face communication. For illustration, we show some examples of facial expressions in Fig. 1.

  18. Facial Displays Are Tools for Social Influence.

    PubMed

    Crivelli, Carlos; Fridlund, Alan J

    2018-05-01

    Based on modern theories of signal evolution and animal communication, the behavioral ecology view of facial displays (BECV) reconceives our 'facial expressions of emotion' as social tools that serve as lead signs to contingent action in social negotiation. BECV offers an externalist, functionalist view of facial displays that is not bound to Western conceptions about either expressions or emotions. It easily accommodates recent findings of diversity in facial displays, their public context-dependency, and the curious but common occurrence of solitary facial behavior. Finally, BECV restores continuity of human facial behavior research with modern functional accounts of non-human communication, and provides a non-mentalistic account of facial displays well-suited to new developments in artificial intelligence and social robotics. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Mends, Francine; Hagiwara, Mari; Fatterpekar, Girish; Roehm, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell's palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers. PMID:23766904

  20. Genetic Factors That Increase Male Facial Masculinity Decrease Facial Attractiveness of Female Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony J.; Mitchem, Dorian G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework. PMID:24379153

  1. Genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity decrease facial attractiveness of female relatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony J; Mitchem, Dorian G; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Keller, Matthew C; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2014-02-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework.

  2. Use of Wilms Tumor 1 Gene Expression as a Reliable Marker for Prognosis and Minimal Residual Disease Monitoring in Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Normal Karyotype Patients.

    PubMed

    Marjanovic, Irena; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Ugrin, Milena; Virijevic, Marijana; Vidovic, Ana; Tomin, Dragica; Suvajdzic Vukovic, Nada; Pavlovic, Sonja; Tosic, Natasa

    2017-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK) represents the largest group of AML patients classified with an intermediate prognosis. A constant need exists to introduce new molecular markers for more precise risk stratification and for minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring. Quantitative assessment of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene transcripts was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The bone marrow samples were collected at the diagnosis from 104 AML-NK patients and from 34 of these patients during follow-up or disease relapse. We found that overexpression of the WT1 gene (WT1 high status), present in 25.5% of patients, was an independent unfavorable factor for achieving complete remission. WT1 high status was also associated with resistance to therapy and shorter disease-free survival and overall survival. Assessment of the log reduction value of WT1 expression, measured in paired diagnosis/complete remission samples, revealed that patients with a log reduction of < 2 had a tendency toward shorter disease-free survival and overall survival and a greater incidence of disease relapse. Combining WT1 gene expression status with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutational status, we found that the tumor behavior of intermediate patients (FLT3-ITD - /NPM1 - double negative) with WT1 high status is almost the same as the tumor behavior of the adverse risk group. WT1 expression status represents a good molecular marker of prognosis, response to treatment, and MRD monitoring. Above all, the usage of the WT1 expression level as an additional marker for more precise risk stratification of AML-NK patients could lead to more adapted, personalized treatment protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    DOE PAGES

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treatmore » the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 μm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.« less

  4. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treatmore » the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 μm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.« less

  5. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure vari-ations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treatmore » the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagran-gian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respira-tions of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug de-livery protocol.« less

  6. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treatmore » the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug de- livery protocol.« less

  7. Osteogenic Sarcoma of the Maxilla: Neutron Therapy for Unresectable Disease

    DOE PAGES

    Smoron, Geoffrey L.; Lennox, Arlene J.; Mcgee, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. To present a case study involving the use of fast neutron therapy to treat an extensive unresectable osteogenic sarcoma arising from the left maxilla. Patient. A 14-year-old male presented with a massive tumor producing severe distortion of his facial structures. He had already received six courses of chemotherapy, which had reduced his pain, but had not measurably reduced the tumor. Methods. The patient was treated with 66 MeV fast neutrons to a dose of 20.4 Gy in 13 fractions over 35 days. Results. CT assessments indicate gradually increasing calcification and noticeable reduction of soft-tissue disease in the frontal sinus,more » orbit and maxillary antrum.There has been some recontouring of the facial structures.The boy conducts an active life, has no pain, and feels well. He was 17 years old at the last follow-up. Discussion. Fast neutrons have a greater biological effectiveness than conventional photon beams. Their use has been associated with improved chance for local control of unresectable disease.This case illustrates their effectiveness in controlling an unusual and aggressive osteogenic sarcoma of the facial bone and sinuses.« less

  8. Facial Dermatitis and Rosacea.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joseph F

    2016-06-01

    Rosacea is a chronic skin disorder associated with flushing, erythema, dryness, burning and stinging, and inflammatory papules and pustules. New treatments available or in development target the inflammatory and erythematous components of the disease. These agents include the selective α2 receptor agonist brimonidine, the topical agents ivermectin cream 1% and azelaic acid foam 15%, and use of tetracyclinetype antibiotics, which affect the cathelicidin pathway. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S107-S109. 2016 published by Frontline Medical Communications.

  9. MiR-21 Expression in the Tumor Stroma of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: An Independent Biomarker of Disease Free Survival

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Lena; Fiehn, Anne-Marie K.; Therkildsen, Marianne H.; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Dabelsteen, Erik; von Buchwald, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients have a high mortality rate; thus, new clinical biomarkers and therapeutic options are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that regulate posttranscriptional gene expression and are commonly deregulated in OSCC and other cancers. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is the most consistently overexpressed miRNA in several types of cancer, and it might be a useful clinical biomarker and therapeutic target. To better understand the role of miR-21 in OSCC, paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples from 86 patients with primary OSCC were analyzed by in situ hybridization. We found that miR-21 was primarily expressed in the tumor stroma and in some tumor-associated blood vessels with no expression in the adjacent normal epithelia or stroma. Using image analysis, we quantitatively estimated miR-21 expression levels specifically in the stroma of a cohort of OSCC samples. These miR-21 levels significantly correlated with disease free survival with the highest levels being located in the stroma. Stromal miR-21 expression was independently associated with a poorer prognosis, even after adjusting for clinical parameters (perineural invasion and N-stage) in a multivariate analysis. In summary, we have shown that miR-21 is located in the carcinoma cells, stroma and blood vessels of tumors, and its expression specifically in the stromal compartment has a negative prognostic value in OSCC. PMID:24755828

  10. Quantitative Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Heterogeneous Tissue: Application to the Detection of Residual Disease in Tumor Margins

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Jenna L.; Harmany, Zachary T.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Kennedy, Stephanie A.; Kim, Yongbaek; Dodd, Leslie; Geradts, Joseph; Kirsch, David G.; Willett, Rebecca M.; Brown, J. Quincy; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a robust tool for quantitative in situ pathology that allows visualization of heterogeneous tissue morphology and segmentation and quantification of image features. Materials and Methods Tissue excised from a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma was imaged using a subcellular resolution microendoscope after topical application of a fluorescent anatomical contrast agent: acriflavine. An algorithm based on sparse component analysis (SCA) and the circle transform (CT) was developed for image segmentation and quantification of distinct tissue types. The accuracy of our approach was quantified through simulations of tumor and muscle images. Specifically, tumor, muscle, and tumor+muscle tissue images were simulated because these tissue types were most commonly observed in sarcoma margins. Simulations were based on tissue characteristics observed in pathology slides. The potential clinical utility of our approach was evaluated by imaging excised margins and the tumor bed in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of sarcoma. Results Simulation experiments revealed that SCA+CT achieved the lowest errors for larger nuclear sizes and for higher contrast ratios (nuclei intensity/background intensity). For imaging of tumor margins, SCA+CT effectively isolated nuclei from tumor, muscle, adipose, and tumor+muscle tissue types. Differences in density were correctly identified with SCA+CT in a cohort of ex vivo and in vivo images, thus illustrating the diagnostic potential of our approach. Conclusion The combination of a subcellular-resolution microendoscope, acriflavine staining, and SCA+CT can be used to accurately isolate nuclei and quantify their density in anatomical images of heterogeneous tissue. PMID:23824589

  11. Effects of vedolizumab induction therapy for patients with Crohn's disease in whom tumor necrosis factor antagonist treatment failed.

    PubMed

    Sands, Bruce E; Feagan, Brian G; Rutgeerts, Paul; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Sandborn, William J; Sy, Richmond; D'Haens, Geert; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Xu, Jing; Rosario, Maria; Fox, Irving; Parikh, Asit; Milch, Catherine; Hanauer, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    There is an increasing need for new treatments for patients with Crohn's disease (CD) in whom previous therapy with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists has failed. We performed a placebo-controlled, phase 3, double-blind trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of vedolizumab, an antibody against the integrin α4β7, as induction therapy. Patients with moderately to severely active CD (CD activity index [CDAI] score, 220-400 points) were assigned randomly to groups given vedolizumab (300 mg) or placebo intravenously at weeks 0, 2, and 6. The primary analysis involved 315 patients with previous TNF antagonist failure (ie, an inadequate response to, loss of response to, or intolerance of ≥1 TNF antagonists); we determined the proportion of patients in clinical remission (CDAI, ≤150 points) at week 6. Secondary analyses evaluated outcomes at weeks 6 and 10 in this population and in the overall population (N = 416), which included patients naive to TNF antagonist therapy (n = 101). Among patients who had experienced previous TNF antagonist failure, 15.2% of those given vedolizumab and 12.1% of those given placebo were in remission at week 6 (P = .433). At week 10, a higher proportion of this population given vedolizumab was in remission (26.6%) than those given placebo (12.1%) (nominal P = .001; relative risk, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.6). A higher proportion of patients with previous TNF antagonist failure given vedolizumab also had a CDAI-100 response (≥100-point decrease in CDAI score from baseline) at week 6 than those given placebo (39.2% vs 22.3%; nominal P = .001; relative risk, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.5). Adverse event results were similar among all groups. Vedolizumab was not more effective than placebo in inducing clinical remission at week 6 among patients with CD in whom previous treatment with TNF antagonists had failed. The therapeutic benefits of vedolizumab in these patients were detectable at week 10. Clinical

  12. Vaccination With Patient-Specific Tumor-Derived Antigen in First Remission Improves Disease-Free Survival in Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Stephen J.; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Gause, Barry L.; Janik, John E.; Muggia, Franco M.; Gockerman, Jon P.; Winter, Jane N.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Nikcevich, Daniel A.; Sotomayor, Eduardo M.; McGaughey, Dean S.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Chong, Elise A.; Reynolds, Craig W.; Berry, Donald A.; Santos, Carlos F.; Popa, Mihaela A.; McCord, Amy M.; Kwak, Larry W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Vaccination with hybridoma-derived autologous tumor immunoglobulin (Ig) idiotype (Id) conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and administered with granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces follicular lymphoma (FL) –specific immune responses. To determine the clinical benefit of this vaccine, we conducted a double-blind multicenter controlled phase III trial. Patients and Methods Treatment-naive patients with advanced stage FL achieving complete response (CR) or CR unconfirmed (CRu) after chemotherapy were randomly assigned two to one to receive either Id vaccine (Id-KLH + GM-CSF) or control (KLH + GM-CSF). Primary efficacy end points were disease-free survival (DFS) for all randomly assigned patients and DFS for randomly assigned patients receiving at least one dose of Id vaccine or control. Results Of 234 patients enrolled, 177 (81%) achieved CR/CRu after chemotherapy and were randomly assigned. For 177 randomly assigned patients, including 60 patients not vaccinated because of relapse (n = 55) or other reasons (n = 5), median DFS between Id-vaccine and control arms was 23.0 versus 20.6 months, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.16; P = .256). For 117 patients who received Id vaccine (n = 76) or control (n = 41), median DFS after randomization was 44.2 months for Id-vaccine arm versus 30.6 months for control arm (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.99; P = .047) at median follow-up of 56.6 months (range, 12.6 to 89.3 months). In an unplanned subgroup analysis, median DFS was significantly prolonged for patients receiving IgM-Id (52.9 v 28.7 months; P = .001) but not IgG-Id vaccine (35.1 v 32.4 months; P = .807) compared with isotype-matched control-treated patients. Conclusion Vaccination with patient-specific hybridoma-derived Id vaccine after chemotherapy-induced CR/CRu may prolong DFS in patients with FL. Vaccine isotype may affect clinical outcome and explain differing results between this and other

  13. Influence of facial convexity on facial attractiveness in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Ioi, H; Nakata, S; Nakasima, A; Counts, Al

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and determine the range of the top three most-favored facial profiles for each sex from a series of varying facial convexity, and to evaluate the clinically acceptable facial profiles for Japanese adults. Questionnaire-based study. Silhouettes of average male and female profiles were constructed from the profiles of 30 Japanese males and females with normal occlusions. Chin positions were protruded or retruded by 2 degrees , 4 degrees , 6 degrees , 8 degrees and 10 degrees , respectively, from the average profile. Forty-one orthodontists and 50 dental students were asked to select the three most-favored profiles for each sex, and they were also asked to indicate whether they would seek surgical orthodontic treatment if that image represented their own profile. For males, both the orthodontists and dental students chose the average profile as the most-favored profile. For females, both the orthodontists and dental students chose a slightly more retruded chin position as the most-favored profile. Japanese raters tended to choose class II profiles as more acceptable profiles than class III profiles for both males and females. These findings suggest that Japanese patients with class III profiles tend to seek surgical orthodontic treatment more often.

  14. Yonsei nomogram: A predictive model of new-onset chronic kidney disease after on-clamp partial nephrectomy in patients with T1 renal tumors.

    PubMed

    Abdel Raheem, Ali; Shin, Tae Young; Chang, Ki Don; Santok, Glen Denmer R; Alenzi, Mohamed Jayed; Yoon, Young Eun; Ham, Won Sik; Han, Woong Kyu; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho

    2018-06-19

    To develop a predictive nomogram for chronic kidney disease-free survival probability in the long term after partial nephrectomy. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 698 patients with T1 renal tumors undergoing partial nephrectomy at a tertiary academic institution. A multivariable Cox regression analysis was carried out based on parameters proven to have an impact on postoperative renal function. Patients with incomplete data, <12 months follow up and preoperative chronic kidney disease stage III or greater were excluded. The study end-points were to identify independent risk factors for new-onset chronic kidney disease development, as well as to construct a predictive model for chronic kidney disease-free survival probability after partial nephrectomy. The median age was 52 years, median tumor size was 2.5 cm and mean warm ischemia time was 28 min. A total of 91 patients (13.1%) developed new-onset chronic kidney disease at a median follow up of 60 months. The chronic kidney disease-free survival rates at 1, 3, 5 and 10 year were 97.1%, 94.4%, 85.3% and 70.6%, respectively. On multivariable Cox regression analysis, age (1.041, P = 0.001), male sex (hazard ratio 1.653, P < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio 1.921, P = 0.046), tumor size (hazard ratio 1.331, P < 0.001) and preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (hazard ratio 0.937, P < 0.001) were independent predictors for new-onset chronic kidney disease. The C-index for chronic kidney disease-free survival was 0.853 (95% confidence interval 0.815-0.895). We developed a novel nomogram for predicting the 5-year chronic kidney disease-free survival probability after on-clamp partial nephrectomy. This model might have an important role in partial nephrectomy decision-making and follow-up plan after surgery. External validation of our nomogram in a larger cohort of patients should be considered. © 2018 The Japanese Urological Association.

  15. The psychological impact of facial changes in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Amin, Kavit; Clarke, A; Sivakumar, B; Puri, A; Fox, Z; Brough, V; Denton, C P; Peter, E M; Butler, P; Butler, M D

    2011-05-01

    The physical disabilities associated with scleroderma are well known but the psychological impact of the condition has received less attention. Few studies have examined appearance related issues, most notably of the face. The aim of this study is to evaluate the psychological impact of facial, aesthetic and functional changes in scleroderma. One hundred seventy-one patients with a clinical diagnosis of scleroderma were recruited into the study. Digital photographs were objectively graded into groups based on severity of disfigurement as judged by an observer. Facial movement was recorded using a modified House-Brackmann Grading Scale. Psychological evaluation comprised the Derriford Appearance Scale short-form (DAS), the Noticeability and Worry score and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Severity of disfigurement predicted decreased mouth opening, the extent to which participants judged their appearance as noticeable to others, and the level of appearance-related concern as measured by the DAS24. There was an inverse relationship with age. Facial changes were ranked as the most worrying aspect of the condition. This study shows facial disfigurement impacts on patient with scleroderma independent of functional changes related to systemic disease. The major difficulty is with the perceived noticeably of the condition to other people and the resulting self-consciousness in social encounters. © 2011 Taylor & Francis

  16. Recognizing Action Units for Facial Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ying-li; Kanade, Takeo; Cohn, Jeffrey F.

    2010-01-01

    Most automatic expression analysis systems attempt to recognize a small set of prototypic expressions, such as happiness, anger, surprise, and fear. Such prototypic expressions, however, occur rather infrequently. Human emotions and intentions are more often communicated by changes in one or a few discrete facial features. In this paper, we develop an Automatic Face Analysis (AFA) system to analyze facial expressions based on both permanent facial features (brows, eyes, mouth) and transient facial features (deepening of facial furrows) in a nearly frontal-view face image sequence. The AFA system recognizes fine-grained changes in facial expression into action units (AUs) of the Facial Action Coding System (FACS), instead of a few prototypic expressions. Multistate face and facial component models are proposed for tracking and modeling the various facial features, including lips, eyes, brows, cheeks, and furrows. During tracking, detailed parametric descriptions of the facial features are extracted. With these parameters as the inputs, a group of action units (neutral expression, six upper face AUs and 10 lower face AUs) are recognized whether they occur alone or in combinations. The system has achieved average recognition rates of 96.4 percent (95.4 percent if neutral expressions are excluded) for upper face AUs and 96.7 percent (95.6 percent with neutral expressions excluded) for lower face AUs. The generalizability of the system has been tested by using independent image databases collected and FACS-coded for ground-truth by different research teams. PMID:25210210

  17. Combination prosthetic design providing a superior retention for mid-facial defect rehabilitation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nilanonth, Supassra; Shakya, Prana; Srithavaj, Theerathavaj

    2017-01-01

    Large maxillofacial defects from malignant tumor treatment are rarely rehabilitated by surgical reconstruction alone. Ameloblastic carcinoma, a rare aggressive odontogenic malignant tumor, requires wide surgical excision to gain a tumor-free margin. In the post-surgical defect, prosthetic rehabilitation is the treatment of choice to restore function and esthetics. Moreover, an intra-oral prosthesis such as an obturator restores speech, mastication and deglutition. Retention of the obturator is a major problem while rehabilitating large defects. The existing anatomical structures from the defect with the help of magnet attachments are suitable to enhance retention, stability and support of the prostheses. This case report presents a patient with an intraoral and extra-oral combination defect following surgical resection of ameloblastic carcinoma and describes the prosthetic techniques and design considerations for a magnet-retained obturator and mid-facial prosthesis. An implant-retained mid-facial prosthesis was fabricated. The retention of combined prostheses was obtained from the remaining right posterior teeth only. The patient had an unfavorable defect due to the large size and presence of scar contracture that vertically tends to dislodge the obturator. Magnet attachments were used to combine the facial and oral prosthesis, minimize the vertical dislodging forces and enhance retention. In addition, the retention was also gained from the scar band at lower border of mid-facial defect that avoided the need for more implants surgery. Magnet attachment with anatomical structure of the mid-facial defect provides an acceptable means of retention in large extraoral-intraoral combinations defects, improving the function, esthetic and the patients’ quality of life. Key words:Mid-facial prosthesis, obturator, magnet attachment, maxillectomy. PMID:28469829

  18. Extraordinarily Large Renal Cell Carcinoma With Metasynchronous Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Ileocecal Valve: A Rare Presentation of Disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Daniel C; Gitman, Robert; May, Noah R; Amster, Melanie I

    2017-01-01

    A 71-year-old female presented with a large, protuberant abdominal mass, and was found to have both a left renal mass and a biopsy-proven neuroendocrine tumor of the ileocecal valve. Ultimately, right hemicolectomy revealed a well-differentiated and low-grade neuroendocrine tumor of the ileocecal valve, whereas left radical nephrectomy revealed a 23 cm × 22 cm × 15 cm renal cell carcinoma, chromophobe-type (RCC-CT) weighing 3564 g. RCC-CT represents a small portion of diagnosed RCC, and generally portends a more favorable prognosis than other variants. Modern reports of renal tumors exceeding 20 cm are exceedingly rare. In spite of massive size, favorable histology may allow for surgical cure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of air bags and restraining devices on the pattern of facial fractures in motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Payman; Ostendorf, Robert; Cox, Artemus J

    2003-01-01

    To examine the relationship between the use of restraining devices and the incidence of specific facial fractures in motor vehicle crashes. Retrospective analysis of patients with facial fractures following a motor vehicle crash. University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital level I trauma center from 1996 to 2000. Of 3731 patients involved in motor vehicle crashes, a total of 497 patients were found to have facial fractures as determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes. Facial fractures were categorized as mandibular, orbital, zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC), and nasal. Use of seat belts alone was more effective in decreasing the chance of facial fractures in this population (from 17% to 8%) compared with the use of air bags alone (17% to 11%). The use of seat belts and air bags together decreased the incidence of facial fractures from 17% to 5%. Use of restraining devices in vehicles significantly reduces the chance of incurring facial fractures in a severe motor vehicle crash. However, use of air bags and seat belts does not change the pattern of facial fractures greatly except for ZMC fractures. Air bags are least effective in preventing ZMC fractures. Improving the mechanics of restraining devices might be needed to minimize facial fractures.

  20. Retrospective study of orthovoltage radiation therapy for nasal tumors in 42 dogs.

    PubMed

    Northrup, N C; Etue, S M; Ruslander, D M; Rassnick, K M; Hutto, D L; Bengtson, A; Rand, W; Moore, A S

    2001-01-01

    Megavoltage radiation therapy currently is the standard of care for dogs with nasal tumors. Some studies report that surgery and adjunctive orthovoltage radiation therapy result in longer control of these tumors than does megavoltage radiation therapy alone. This study reports less effective control of nasal tumors in dogs treated with surgery and orthovoltage radiation than previously observed, supporting the superiority of megavoltage radiation therapy for these tumors. In addition, this study suggests 2 new prognostic indicators for dogs with nasal tumors and describes toxicity associated with surgery and orthovoltage therapy. Forty-two dogs with nasal tumors were treated with surgical cytoreduction and 48 Gy orthovoltage radiation therapy administered in twelve 4-Gy fractions. Median survival was 7.4 months. One- and 2-year survival rates were 37% and 17%, respectively. Dogs with facial deformity had shorter survival than those without deformity (P = .005). Dogs with resolution of clinical signs after treatment had longer survival than those with chronic nasal signs (P = .0001). Acute radiation toxicity was moderate to severe for skin and eye and negligible for oral mucosa. Toxicity healed within 1 month after radiation therapy. Late toxicity was mild, but 70% of evaluable dogs experienced persistent ocular signs. Only 39% of dogs achieved a disease-free period.

  1. Determinants of satisfaction with the health state of the facial skin in patients undergoing surgery for facial basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Essers, Brigitte A B; Nieman, Fred H M; Prins, Martin H; Krekels, Gertruud A M; Smeets, Nicole W J; Neumann, H A Martino

    2006-02-01

    The main objective of the study was to assess which health beliefs predict and explain satisfaction with the facial health state of patients undergoing surgery for basal cell carcinoma. Data were collected by administering a newly developed questionnaire pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively (n = 222). Results show that satisfaction as measured by post-operative worrying, susceptibility and fear of developing a new BCC at other facial sites can be predicted by pre-operative health beliefs. In addition, some patients an increase in perceived susceptibility, fear of recurrence of BCC on the same site or fear of developing a new BCC at other facial sites. Our findings indicate that both pre- and post-operative perceptions predict and explain for a substantial part the extent to which patients are satisfied with their facial health state 6 months after surgery. Administering a short questionnaire at the start of the treatment period will give physicians a better understanding of how patients experience this skin disease. It will also help them to adjust information about BCC and its consequences to the needs of the patient.

  2. Facial expression perception correlates with verbal working memory function in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Kumiko; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Kanie, Ayako; Pu, Shenghong; Kaneko, Koichi; Mogami, Tamiko; Oshima, Sachie; Niwa, Shin-ichi; Inagaki, Akiko; Ikebuchi, Emi; Kikuchi, Akiko; Yamasaki, Syudo; Iwata, Kazuhiko; Nakagome, Kazuyuki

    2015-12-01

    Facial emotion perception is considered to provide a measure of social cognition. Numerous studies have examined the perception of emotion in patients with schizophrenia, and the majority has reported impaired ability to recognize facial emotion perception. We aimed to investigate the correlation between facial expression recognition and other domains of social cognition and neurocognition in Japanese patients with schizophrenia. Participants were 52 patients with schizophrenia and 53 normal controls with no history of psychiatric diseases. All participants completed the Hinting Task and the Social Cognition Screening Questionnaire. The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia was administered only to the patients. Facial emotion perception measured by the Facial Emotion Selection Test (FEST) was compared between the patients and normal controls. Patients performed significantly worse on the FEST compared to normal control subjects. The FEST total score was significantly positively correlated with scores of the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia attention subscale, Hinting Task, Social Cognition Screening Questionnaire Verbal Working Memory and Metacognition subscales. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that verbal working memory function was positively related to the facial emotion perception ability in patients with schizophrenia. These results point to the concept that facial emotion perception and some types of working memory use common cognitive resources. Our findings may provide implications for cognitive rehabilitation and related interventions in schizophrenia. © 2015 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2015 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  3. What do patients with urothelial cancer know about the association of their tumor disease with smoking habits? Results of a German survey study

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche, Hans-Martin; Gilfrich, Christian; Dombrowski, Mirja; Maurer, Odilo; Spachmann, Philipp; Kumar, Manju Ganesh; Bjurlin, Marc; Burger, Maximilian; Brookman-May, Sabine

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Smoking represents a primary risk factor for the development of urothelial carcinoma (UC) and a relevant factor impacting UC-specific prognosis. Data on the accordant knowledge of UC-patients in this regard and the significance of physicians in the education of UC-patients is limited. Materials and Methods Eighty-eight UC-patients were enrolled in a 23-items-survey-study aimed to analyse patient knowledge and awareness of their tumor disease with smoking along with physician smoking cessation counselling. Results The median age of the study patients was 69 years; 26.1% (n=23), 46.6% (n=41), and 27.3% (n=24), respectively, were non-smokers, previous, and active smokers. Exactly 50% of active smokers reported a previous communication with a physician about the association of smoking and their tumor disease; however, only 25.0% were aware of smoking as main risk factor for UC development. Merely 33% of the active smokers had been prompted directly by their physicians to quit smoking. About 42% of active smokers had received the information that maintaining smoking could result in a tumor-specific impairment of their prognosis. Closely 29% of active and about 5% of previous smokers (during the time-period of active smoking) had been offered support from physicians for smoking cessation. No association was found between smoking anamnesis (p=0.574) and pack-years (p=0.912), respectively, and tumor stage of UC. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that the medical conversation of physicians with UC-patients about the adverse significance of smoking is limited. Implementation of structured educational programs for smoking cessation may be an opportunity to further enhance comprehensive cancer care. PMID:29520384

  4. Facial Fractures: Pearls and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Obaid; Isakson, Matthew; Franklin, Adam; Maqusi, Suhair; El Amm, Christian

    2018-05-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the A-frame configuration of anterior facial buttresses, recognize the importance of restoring anterior projection in frontal sinus fractures, and describe an alternative design and donor site of pericranial flaps in frontal sinus fractures. 2. Describe the symptoms and cause of pseudo-Brown syndrome, describe the anatomy and placement of a buttress-spanning plate in nasoorbitoethmoid fractures, and identify appropriate nasal support alternatives for nasoorbitoethmoid fractures. 3. Describe the benefits and disadvantages of different lower lid approaches to the orbital floor and inferior rim, identify late exophthalmos as a complication of reconstructing the orbital floor with nonporous alloplast, and select implant type and size for correction of secondary enophthalmos. 4. Describe closed reduction of low-energy zygomatic body fractures with the Gillies approach and identify situations where internal fixation may be unnecessary, identify situations where plating the inferior orbital rim may be avoided, and select fixation points for osteosynthesis of uncomplicated displaced zygomatic fractures. 5. Understand indications and complications of use for intermaxillary screw systems, understand sequencing panfacial fractures, describe the sulcular approach to mandible fractures, and describe principles and techniques of facial reconstruction after self-inflicted firearm injuries. Treating patients with facial trauma remains a core component of plastic surgery and a significant part of the value of a plastic surgeon to a health system.

  5. Facial Resurfacing With Coblation Technology

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Stephen M.; Downs, Brian W.; Ferraz, Mario B.J.; Wang, Tom D.; Cook, Ted A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To describe our experience with coblation technology for facial resurfacing Methods Retrospective chart review of all patients treated with coblation at our institution Results Twenty-four patients (22 female) underwent a total of 29 coblation procedures for aging face (n = 21) or acne scarring (n = 3). The perioral region was the most frequently treated aesthetic subunit (n = 14), followed by the lower eyelid (n = 7). Five patients underwent full-face coblation. Three patients underwent a second coblation procedure for aging face while a single patient with severe acne scarring underwent 3 procedures. Repeat coblation was delayed at least 5 months (mean, 9 months). Seventeen coblation procedures (59%) were performed concurrently with procedures including, but not limited to, injection treatment, rhinoplasty, blepharoplasty, or combined face/necklift; no adverse events occurred. Seven procedures, including a full-face coblation, were performed in the office under local anesthesia and oral sedation without any adverse events. Mean follow-up was 6 months (range, 1 week to 24 months). No complications were observed. All patients were satisfied with the results after their final coblation treatment. Conclusions Facial coblation is a safe and effective treatment modality for facial resurfacing. PMID:18769690

  6. Redefining the Ki-67 Index Stratification for Low-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Improving Its Prognostic Value for Recurrence of Disease.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Aguiar, Alexandra G; Ethun, Cecilia G; Postlewait, Lauren M; Zhelnin, Kristen; Krasinskas, Alyssa; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Russell, Maria C; Sarmiento, Juan M; Kooby, David A; Staley, Charles A; Maithel, Shishir K; Cardona, Kenneth

    2018-01-01

    The Ki-67 index is an established prognostic marker for recurrence after resection of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) that groups tumors into three categories: low grade (< 3%), intermediate grade (3-20%), and high grade (> 20%). Given that the majority of resected PanNETs have a Ki-67 less than 3%, this study aimed to stratify this group further to predict disease recurrence more accurately. The Ki-67 index was pathologically re-reviewed and scored by a pathologist blinded to all other clinicopathologic variables using tissue microarray blocks made in triplicate. All patients who underwent curative-intent resection of non-metastatic PanNETs at a single institution from 2000 to 2013 were included in the study. The primary outcome was recurrence-free survival (RFS). Of 113 patients with well-differentiated PanNETs resected, 83 had tissue available for pathologic re-review. The Ki-67 index was lower than 3% for 72 tumors (87%) and between 3 and 20% for 11 tumors (13%). Considering only Ki-67 less than 3%, the tumors were further stratified by Ki-67 into three groups: group A (< 1%, n = 43), group B (1-1.99%, n = 23), and group C (2-2.99%, n = 6). Compared with group A, groups B and C more frequently had advanced T stage (T3: 44% and 67% vs 12%; p = 0.003) and lymphovascular invasion (50% and 83% vs 23%; p = 0.007). Groups B and C had similar 1- and 3-year RFS, both less than group A. After combining groups B and C, a Ki-67 of 1-2.99% was associated with decreased RFS compared with group A (< 1%). This persisted in the multivariable analysis (hazard ratio [HR] 8.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-70.7; p = 0.045), with control used for tumor size, margin-positivity, lymph node involvement, and advanced T stage. PanNETs with a Ki-67 of 1-2.99% exhibit distinct biologic behavior and earlier disease recurrence than those with a Ki-67 lower than 1%. This new stratification scheme, if externally validated, should be incorporated into future

  7. Three-Dimensional Accuracy of Facial Scan for Facial Deformities in Clinics: A New Evaluation Method for Facial Scanner Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Xiong, Yu-Xue; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the practical accuracy (PA) of optical facial scanners for facial deformity patients in oral clinic was evaluated. Ten patients with a variety of facial deformities from oral clinical were included in the study. For each patient, a three-dimensional (3D) face model was acquired, via a high-accuracy industrial "line-laser" scanner (Faro), as the reference model and two test models were obtained, via a "stereophotography" (3dMD) and a "structured light" facial scanner (FaceScan) separately. Registration based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm was executed to overlap the test models to reference models, and "3D error" as a new measurement indicator calculated by reverse engineering software (Geomagic Studio) was used to evaluate the 3D global and partial (upper, middle, and lower parts of face) PA of each facial scanner. The respective 3D accuracy of stereophotography and structured light facial scanners obtained for facial deformities was 0.58±0.11 mm and 0.57±0.07 mm. The 3D accuracy of different facial partitions was inconsistent; the middle face had the best performance. Although the PA of two facial scanners was lower than their nominal accuracy (NA), they all met the requirement for oral clinic use.

  8. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell’s palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell’s palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell’s palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell’s palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell’s palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae. PMID:18368417

  9. Repeated short presentations of morphed facial expressions change recognition and evaluation of facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Jun; Tanno, Yoshihiko; Sugiura, Yoshinori

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated whether sensitivity to and evaluation of facial expressions varied with repeated exposure to non-prototypical facial expressions for a short presentation time. A morphed facial expression was presented for 500 ms repeatedly, and participants were required to indicate whether each facial expression was happy or angry. We manipulated the distribution of presentations of the morphed facial expressions for each facial stimulus. Some of the individuals depicted in the facial stimuli expressed anger frequently (i.e., anger-prone individuals), while the others expressed happiness frequently (i.e., happiness-prone individuals). After being exposed to the faces of anger-prone individuals, the participants became less sensitive to those individuals' angry faces. Further, after being exposed to the faces of happiness-prone individuals, the participants became less sensitive to those individuals' happy faces. We also found a relative increase in the social desirability of happiness-prone individuals after exposure to the facial stimuli.

  10. External facial features modify the representation of internal facial features in the fusiform face area.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Vadim; Yovel, Galit

    2010-08-15

    Most studies of face identity have excluded external facial features by either removing them or covering them with a hat. However, external facial features may modify the representation of internal facial features. Here we assessed whether the representation of face identity in the fusiform face area (FFA), which has been primarily studied for internal facial features, is modified by differences in external facial features. We presented faces in which external and internal facial features were manipulated independently. Our findings show that the FFA was sensitive to differences in external facial features, but this effect was significantly larger when the external and internal features were aligned than misaligned. We conclude that the FFA generates a holistic representation in which the internal and the external facial features are integrated. These results indicate that to better understand real-life face recognition both external and internal features should be included. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Improved facial nerve identification during parotidectomy with fluorescently labeled peptide.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Timon; Nguyen, Linda T; Whitney, Michael; Hasselmann, Jonathan; Nguyen, Quyen T

    2016-12-01

    Additional intraoperative guidance could reduce the risk of iatrogenic injury during parotid gland cancer surgery. We evaluated the intraoperative use of fluorescently labeled nerve binding peptide NP41 to aid facial nerve identification and preservation during parotidectomy in an orthotopic model of murine parotid gland cancer. We also quantified the accuracy of intraoperative nerve detection for surface and buried nerves in the head and neck with NP41 versus white light (WL) alone. Twenty-eight mice underwent parotid gland cancer surgeries with additional fluorescence (FL) guidance versus WL reflectance (WLR) alone. Eight mice were used for additional nerve-imaging experiments. Twenty-eight parotid tumor-bearing mice underwent parotidectomy. Eight mice underwent imaging of both sides of the face after skin removal. Postoperative assessment of facial nerve function measured by automated whisker tracking were compared between FL guidance (n = 13) versus WL alone (n=15). In eight mice, nerve to surrounding tissue contrast was measured under FL versus WLR for all nerve branches detectable in the field of view. Postoperative facial nerve function after parotid gland cancer surgery tended to be better with additional FL guidance. Fluorescent labeling significantly improved nerve to surrounding tissue contrast for both large and smaller buried nerve branches compared to WLR visualization and improved detection sensitivity and specificity. NP41 FL imaging significantly aids the intraoperative identification of nerve braches otherwise nearly invisible to the naked eye. Its application in a murine model of parotid gland cancer surgery tended to improve functional preservation of the facial nerve. NA Laryngoscope, 126:2711-2717, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Improved Facial Nerve Identification During Parotidectomy With Fluorescently Labeled Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Timon; Nguyen, Linda T.; Whitney, Michael; Hasselmann, Jonathan; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Additional intraoperative guidance could reduce the risk of iatrogenic injury during parotid gland cancer surgery. We evaluated the intraoperative use of fluorescently labeled nerve binding peptide NP41 to aid facial nerve identification and preservation during parotidectomy in an orthotopic model of murine parotid gland cancer. We also quantified the accuracy of intraoperative nerve detection for surface and buried nerves in the head and neck with NP41 versus white light (WL) alone. Study Design Twenty-eight mice underwent parotid gland cancer surgeries with additional fluorescence (FL) guidance versus WL reflectance (WLR) alone. Eight mice were used for additional nerve-imaging experiments. Methods Twenty-eight parotid tumor-bearing mice underwent parotidectomy. Eight mice underwent imaging of both sides of the face after skin removal. Postoperative assessment of facial nerve function measured by automated whisker tracking were compared between FL guidance (n = 13) versus WL alone (n = 15). In eight mice, nerve to surrounding tissue contrast was measured under FL versus WLR for all nerve branches detectable in the field of view. Results Postoperative facial nerve function after parotid gland cancer surgery tended to be better with additional FL guidance. Fluorescent labeling significantly improved nerve to surrounding tissue contrast for both large and smaller buried nerve branches compared to WLR visualization and improved detection sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions NP41 FL imaging significantly aids the intraoperative identification of nerve braches otherwise nearly invisible to the naked eye. Its application in a murine model of parotid gland cancer surgery tended to improve functional preservation of the facial nerve. PMID:27171862

  13. Agency and facial emotion judgment in context.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenichi; Masuda, Takahiko; Li, Liman Man Wai

    2013-06-01

    Past research showed that East Asians' belief in holism was expressed as their tendencies to include background facial emotions into the evaluation of target faces more than North Americans. However, this pattern can be interpreted as North Americans' tendency to downplay background facial emotions due to their conceptualization of facial emotion as volitional expression of internal states. Examining this alternative explanation, we investigated whether different types of contextual information produce varying degrees of effect on one's face evaluation across cultures. In three studies, European Canadians and East Asians rated the intensity of target facial emotions surrounded with either affectively salient landscape sceneries or background facial emotions. The results showed that, although affectively salient landscapes influenced the judgment of both cultural groups, only European Canadians downplayed the background facial emotions. The role of agency as differently conceptualized across cultures and multilayered systems of cultural meanings are discussed.

  14. Reconstruction of facial nerve injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Fattah, Adel; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ron M

    2011-05-01

    Facial nerve trauma is uncommon in children, and many spontaneously recover some function; nonetheless, loss of facial nerve activity leads to functional impairment of ocular and oral sphincters and nasal orifice. In many cases, the impediment posed by facial asymmetry and reduced mimetic function more significantly affects the child's psychosocial interactions. As such, reconstruction of the facial nerve affords great benefits in quality of life. The therapeutic strategy is dependent on numerous factors, including the cause of facial nerve injury, the deficit, the prognosis for recovery, and the time elapsed since the injury. The options for treatment include a diverse range of surgical techniques including static lifts and slings, nerve repairs, nerve grafts and nerve transfers, regional, and microvascular free muscle transfer. We review our strategies for addressing facial nerve injuries in children.

  15. Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast: 307 Treated Cases, the Largest Mexican Experience at a Single Breast Disease Institution

    PubMed Central

    Ruvalcaba-Limón, Eva; Jiménez-López, Josefina; Bautista-Piña, Verónica; Ramírez-Bollas, Julio; Morales-Vásquez, Flavia; Domínguez-Reyes, Carlos; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Phyllodes tumor (PT) of the breast in Hispanic patients is more frequently reported with large tumors and with more borderline/malignant subtypes compared with other populations. The objective of this study was to describe characteristics of patients with PT and to identify differences among subtypes in a Mexican population. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on patients with PT. Sociodemographic, histopathologic, and treatment characteristics were compared among subtypes, including only surgically treated cases due the complete surgical-specimen study requirement for appropriate WHO classification. Results: During 10 years, 346 PT were diagnosed; only 307 were included (305 patients), with a mean age of 41.7 yr. Self-detected lump took place in 91.8%, usually discovered 6 months previously, with median tumor size of 4.5 cm. Local wide excisions were done in 213 (69.8%) and mastectomies in 92 (30.1%). Immediate breast reconstruction took place in 38% and oncoplastic procedures in 23%. PT were classified as benign in 222 (72.3%) cases, borderline in 50 (16.2%), and malignant in 35 (11.4%), with pathological tumor size of 4.2, 5.4, and 8.7 cm, respectively (P<0.001). Patients with malignant PT were older (48 yr), with more diabetics (14.3%), less breastfeeding (37.1%), more smokers (17.1%), with more postmenopausal cases (42.9%), and older age at menopause (51.5 years) compared with the remaining subtypes (P<0.05). Relapse occurred in 8.2% of patients with follow-up. Conclusion: In comparison with other Hispanic publications, these Mexican patients had similar age, with smaller tumors, modestly higher benign PT, fewer malignant PT, and lower documented relapse cases. PMID:28855932

  16. Surgical Approaches to Facial Nerve Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Birgfeld, Craig; Neligan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The facial nerve is one of the most commonly injured cranial nerves. Once injured, the effects on form, function, and psyche are profound. We review the anatomy of the facial nerve from the brain stem to its terminal branches. We also discuss the physical exam findings of facial nerve injury at various levels. Finally, we describe various reconstructive options for reanimating the face and restoring both form and function. PMID:22451822

  17. Biometrics: A Look at Facial Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    a facial recognition system in the city’s Oceanfront tourist area. The system has been tested and has recently been fully implemented. Senator...Kenneth W. Stolle, the Chairman of the Virginia State Crime Commission, established a Facial Recognition Technology Sub-Committee to examine the issue of... facial recognition technology. This briefing begins by defining biometrics and discussing examples of the technology. It then explains how biometrics

  18. Analysis of Facial Expression by Taste Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobitani, Kensuke; Kato, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    In this study, we focused on the basic taste stimulation for the analysis of real facial expressions. We considered that the expressions caused by taste stimulation were unaffected by individuality or emotion, that is, such expressions were involuntary. We analyzed the movement of facial muscles by taste stimulation and compared real expressions with artificial expressions. From the result, we identified an obvious difference between real and artificial expressions. Thus, our method would be a new approach for facial expression recognition.

  19. Influence of gravity upon some facial signs.

    PubMed

    Flament, F; Bazin, R; Piot, B

    2015-06-01

    Facial clinical signs and their integration are the basis of perception than others could have from ourselves, noticeably the age they imagine we are. Facial modifications in motion and their objective measurements before and after application of skin regimen are essential to go further in evaluation capacities to describe efficacy in facial dynamics. Quantification of facial modifications vis à vis gravity will allow us to answer about 'control' of facial shape in daily activities. Standardized photographs of the faces of 30 Caucasian female subjects of various ages (24-73 year) were successively taken at upright and supine positions within a short time interval. All these pictures were therefore reframed - any bias due to facial features was avoided when evaluating one single sign - for clinical quotation by trained experts of several facial signs regarding published standardized photographic scales. For all subjects, the supine position increased facial width but not height, giving a more fuller appearance to the face. More importantly, the supine position changed the severity of facial ageing features (e.g. wrinkles) compared to an upright position and whether these features were attenuated or exacerbated depended on their facial location. Supine station mostly modifies signs of the lower half of the face whereas those of the upper half appear unchanged or slightly accentuated. These changes appear much more marked in the older groups, where some deep labial folds almost vanish. These alterations decreased the perceived ages of the subjects by an average of 3.8 years. Although preliminary, this study suggests that a 90° rotation of the facial skin vis à vis gravity induces rapid rearrangements among which changes in tensional forces within and across the face, motility of interstitial free water among underlying skin tissue and/or alterations of facial Langer lines, likely play a significant role. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Fran

  20. Facial trauma: general principles of management.

    PubMed

    Hollier, Larry H; Sharabi, Safa E; Koshy, John C; Stal, Samuel

    2010-07-01

    Facial fractures are common problems encountered by the plastic surgeon. Although ubiquitous in nature, their optimal treatment requires precise knowledge of the most recent evidence-based and technologically advanced recommendations. This article discusses a variety of contemporary issues regarding facial fractures, including physical and radiologic diagnosis, treatment pearls and caveats, and the role of various synthetic materials and plating technologies for optimal facial fracture fixation.

  1. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals with ASD remained emotionally unaffected. Thus, individuals with ASD do not experience feedback from activated facial expressions as controls do. This facial feedback-impairment enhances our understanding of the social and emotional lives of individuals with ASD. PMID:18293075

  2. Facial Anthropometric Norms among Kosovo - Albanian Adults.

    PubMed

    Staka, Gloria; Asllani-Hoxha, Flurije; Bimbashi, Venera

    2017-09-01

    The development of an anthropometric craniofacial database is a necessary multidisciplinary proposal. The aim of this study was to establish facial anthropometric norms and to investigate into sexual dimorphism in facial variables among Kosovo Albanian adults. The sample included 204 students of Dental School, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pristina. Using direct anthropometry, a series of 8 standard facial measurements was taken on each subject with digital caliper with an accuracy of 0.01 mm (Boss, Hamburg-Germany). The normative data and percentile rankings were calculated. Gender differences in facial variables were analyzed using t- test for independent samples (p<0.05). The index of sexual dimorphism (ISD) and percentage of sexual dimorphism were calculated for each facial measurement. ormative data for all facial anthropometric measurements in males were higher than in females. Male average norms compared with the female average norms differed significantly from each other (p>0.05).The highest index of sexual dimorphism (ISD) was found for the lower facial height 1.120, for which the highest percentage of sexual dimorphism, 12.01%., was also found. The lowest ISD was found for intercanthal width, 1.022, accompanied with the lowest percentage of sexual dimorphism, 2.23%. The obtained results have established the facial anthropometric norms among Kosovo Albanian adults. Sexual dimorphism has been confirmed for each facial measurement.

  3. Social Use of Facial Expressions in Hylobatids

    PubMed Central

    Scheider, Linda; Waller, Bridget M.; Oña, Leonardo; Burrows, Anne M.; Liebal, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates use various communicative means in interactions with others. While primate gestures are commonly considered to be intentionally and flexibly used signals, facial expressions are often referred to as inflexible, automatic expressions of affective internal states. To explore whether and how non-human primates use facial expressions in specific communicative interactions, we studied five species of small apes (gibbons) by employing a newly established Facial Action Coding System for hylobatid species (GibbonFACS). We found that, despite individuals often being in close proximity to each other, in social (as opposed to non-social contexts) the duration of facial expressions was significantly longer when gibbons were facing another individual compared to non-facing situations. Social contexts included grooming, agonistic interactions and play, whereas non-social contexts included resting and self-grooming. Additionally, gibbons used facial expressions while facing another individual more often in social contexts than non-social contexts where facial expressions were produced regardless of the attentional state of the partner. Also, facial expressions were more likely ‘responded to’ by the partner’s facial expressions when facing another individual than non-facing. Taken together, our results indicate that gibbons use their facial expressions differentially depending on the social context and are able to use them in a directed way in communicative interactions with other conspecifics. PMID:26978660

  4. The neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews the definition, etiology and evaluation, and medical and neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain. A neuropathic origin for facial pain should be considered when evaluating a patient for rhinologic surgery because of complaints of facial pain. Neuropathic facial pain is caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in the prepontine cistern and is characterized by an intermittent prickling or stabbing component or a constant burning, searing pain. Medical treatment consists of anticonvulsant medication. Neurosurgical treatment may require microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Periocular Reconstruction in Patients with Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shannon S; Joseph, Andrew W; Douglas, Raymond S; Massry, Guy G

    2016-04-01

    Facial paralysis can result in serious ocular consequences. All patients with orbicularis oculi weakness in the setting of facial nerve injury should undergo a thorough ophthalmologic evaluation. The main goal of management in these patients is to protect the ocular surface and preserve visual function. Patients with expected recovery of facial nerve function may only require temporary and conservative measures to protect the ocular surface. Patients with prolonged or unlikely recovery of facial nerve function benefit from surgical rehabilitation of the periorbital complex. Current reconstructive procedures are most commonly intended to improve coverage of the eye but cannot restore blink. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A metastatic glomus jugulare tumor. A temporal bone report

    SciTech Connect

    El Fiky, F.M.; Paparella, M.M.

    The clinicopathologic findings in the temporal bone of a patient with a highly malignant metastasizing glomus jugulare tumor are reported. The patient exhibited all the symptoms of primary malignant tumors of the ear, including facial paralysis, otorrhea, pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and vertigo. He was treated with cobalt irradiation followed by radium implant in the ear canal for a residual tumor; then a left-sided radical mastoidectomy was performed.

  7. The Relationships between Processing Facial Identity, Emotional Expression, Facial Speech, and Gaze Direction during Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Sibylle M.; Schwarzer, Gudrun; Korell, Monika; Maier-Karius, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with 5- to 11-year-olds and adults to investigate whether facial identity, facial speech, emotional expression, and gaze direction are processed independently of or in interaction with one another. In a computer-based, speeded sorting task, participants sorted faces according to facial identity while disregarding…

  8. Effects of Objective 3-Dimensional Measures of Facial Shape and Symmetry on Perceptions of Facial Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Cory D; Wehby, George L; Nidey, Nichole L; Moreno Uribe, Lina M

    2017-09-01

    Meeting patient desires for enhanced facial esthetics requires that providers have standardized and objective methods to measure esthetics. The authors evaluated the effects of objective 3-dimensional (3D) facial shape and asymmetry measurements derived from 3D facial images on perceptions of facial attractiveness. The 3D facial images of 313 adults in Iowa were digitized with 32 landmarks, and objective 3D facial measurements capturing symmetric and asymmetric components of shape variation, centroid size, and fluctuating asymmetry were obtained from the 3D coordinate data using geo-morphometric analyses. Frontal and profile images of study participants were rated for facial attractiveness by 10 volunteers (5 women and 5 men) on a 5-point Likert scale and a visual analog scale. Multivariate regression was used to identify the effects of the objective 3D facial measurements on attractiveness ratings. Several objective 3D facial measurements had marked effects on attractiveness ratings. Shorter facial heights with protrusive chins, midface retrusion, faces with protrusive noses and thin lips, flat mandibular planes with deep labiomental folds, any cants of the lip commissures and floor of the nose, larger faces overall, and increased fluctuating asymmetry were rated as significantly (P < .001) less attractive. Perceptions of facial attractiveness can be explained by specific 3D measurements of facial shapes and fluctuating asymmetry, which have important implications for clinical practice and research. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain responses to facial attractiveness induced by facial proportions: evidence from an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Chau, Desmond K. P.; Su, Jianpo; Zeng, Ling-Li; Jiang, Weixiong; He, Jufang; Fan, Jintu; Hu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    Brain responses to facial attractiveness induced by facial proportions are investigated by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in 41 young adults (22 males and 19 females). The subjects underwent fMRI while they were presented with computer-generated, yet realistic face images, which had varying facial proportions, but the same neutral facial expression, baldhead and skin tone, as stimuli. Statistical parametric mapping with parametric modulation was used to explore the brain regions with the response modulated by facial attractiveness ratings (ARs). The results showed significant linear effects of the ARs in the caudate nucleus and the orbitofrontal cortex for all of the subjects, and a non-linear response profile in the right amygdala for only the male subjects. Furthermore, canonical correlation analysis was used to learn the most relevant facial ratios that were best correlated with facial attractiveness. A regression model on the fMRI-derived facial ratio components demonstrated a strong linear relationship between the visually assessed mean ARs and the predictive ARs. Overall, this study provided, for the first time, direct neurophysiologic evidence of the effects of facial ratios on facial attractiveness and suggested that there are notable gender differences in perceiving facial attractiveness as induced by facial proportions. PMID:27779211

  10. Brain responses to facial attractiveness induced by facial proportions: evidence from an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Chau, Desmond K P; Su, Jianpo; Zeng, Ling-Li; Jiang, Weixiong; He, Jufang; Fan, Jintu; Hu, Dewen

    2016-10-25

    Brain responses to facial attractiveness induced by facial proportions are investigated by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in 41 young adults (22 males and 19 females). The subjects underwent fMRI while they were presented with computer-generated, yet realistic face images, which had varying facial proportions, but the same neutral facial expression, baldhead and skin tone, as stimuli. Statistical parametric mapping with parametric modulation was used to explore the brain regions with the response modulated by facial attractiveness ratings (ARs). The results showed significant linear effects of the ARs in the caudate nucleus and the orbitofrontal cortex for all of the subjects, and a non-linear response profile in the right amygdala for only the male subjects. Furthermore, canonical correlation analysis was used to learn the most relevant facial ratios that were best correlated with facial attractiveness. A regression model on the fMRI-derived facial ratio components demonstrated a strong linear relationship between the visually assessed mean ARs and the predictive ARs. Overall, this study provided, for the first time, direct neurophysiologic evidence of the effects of facial ratios on facial attractiveness and suggested that there are notable gender differences in perceiving facial attractiveness as induced by facial proportions.

  11. Pathophysiology of Tumor Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Mitsuko; Nishiyama, Mariko; Kasuya, Yoshitoshi; Kimura, Sadao; Ishikura, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Neovascularization is essential to the process of development and differentiation of tissues in the vertebrate embryo, and is also involved in a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions in adults, including wound repair, metabolic diseases, inflammation, cardiovascular disorders, and tumor progression. Thanks to cumulative studies on vasculature, new therapeutic approaches have been opened for us to some life-threatening diseases by controlling angiogenesis in the affected organs. In cancer therapy, for example, modulation of factors responsible for tumor angiogenesis may be beneficial in inhibiting of tumor progression. Several antiangiogenic approaches are currently under preclinical trial. However, the mechanisms of neovascularization in tumors are complicated and each tumor shows unique features in its vasculature, depending on tissue specificity, angiogenic micromilieu, grades and stages, host immunity, and so on. For better understanding and effective therapeutic approaches, it is important to clarify both the general mechanism of angiogenic events and the disease-specific mechanism of neovascularization. This review discusses the general features of angiogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions, mainly in tumor progression. In addition, recent topics such as contribution of the endothelial progenitor cells, tumor vasculogenic mimicry, markers for tumor-derived endothelial cells and pericytes, and angiogenic/angiostatic chemokines are summarized. PMID:17315600

  12. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the parotid gland associated with facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Haen, P; Ben Slama, L; Goudot, P; Schouman, T

    2017-02-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign inflammatory lesion involving most frequently the minor salivary gland of the hard palate. Involvement of the parotid gland is rare, involvement of the parotid gland associated with facial palsy is exceptional. A 56-year-old male patient with Marfan syndrome presented with swelling and inflammation of the left parotid gland associated with progressively complete facial nerve paralysis. CT scan and MRI showed a parotid collection with hyper signal of the nearest tissues associated with erosion of the styloid process. A malignant tumor was suspected. The histological examination of a biopsy showed a lobulocentric process with necrosis, squamous metaplasia, and inflammation. The immunohistochemical examination supported a final diagnosis of necrotizing sialometaplasia. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the parotid gland associated with facial nerve paralysis presents like a malignant neoplasm, both clinically and histologically. Only advanced immunohistochemical examination can really confirm the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Another Scale for the Assessment of Facial Paralysis? ADS Scale: Our Proposition, How to Use It.

    PubMed

    Di Stadio, Arianna

    2015-12-01

    Several authors in the years propose different methods to evaluate areas and specific movement's disease in patient affected by facial palsy. Despite these efforts the House Brackmann is anyway the most used assessment in medical community. The aims of our study is the proposition and assessing a new rating Arianna Disease Scale (ADS) for the clinical evaluation of facial paralysis. Sixty patients affected by unilateral facial Bell paralysis were enrolled in a prospective study from 2012 to 2014. Their facial nerve function was evaluated with our assessment analysing facial district divided in upper, middle and lower third. We analysed different facial expressions. Each movement corresponded to the action of different muscles. The action of each muscle was scored from 0 to 1, with 0 corresponding from complete flaccid paralysis to muscle's normal function ending with a score of 1. Synkinesis was considered and evaluated also in the scale with a fixed 0.5 score. Our results considered ease and speed of evaluation of the assessment, the accuracy of muscle deficit and the ability to calculate synkinesis using a score. All the three observers agreed 100% in the highest degree of deficit. We found some discrepancies in intermediate score with 92% agreement in upper face, 87% in middle and 80% in lower face, where there were more muscles involved in movements. Our scale had some limitations linked to the small group of patients evaluated and we had a little difficulty understanding the intermediate score of 0.3 and 0.7. However, this was an accurate tool to quickly evaluate facial nerve function. This has potential as an alternative scale to and to diagnose facial nerve disorders.

  14. Changes in plasma ACTH levels and corticotroph tumor size in patients with Cushing's disease during long-term treatment with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone.

    PubMed

    Fleseriu, Maria; Findling, James W; Koch, Christian A; Schlaffer, Sven-Martin; Buchfelder, Michael; Gross, Coleman

    2014-10-01

    Pituitary effects of long-term therapy with mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, in Cushing's disease (CD) patients are not well understood. Our objective was to report changes in ACTH and pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings during long-term use of mifepristone in CD patients. The Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Mifepristone in the Treatment of Endogenous Cushing's Syndrome (SEISMIC) was a 24-week, open-label study of mifepristone, and its long-term extension (LTE) is a multicenter U.S. study. Forty-three CD patients (mean age 45.3 years) were enrolled in SEISMIC with 27 continuing into the LTE study. Mifepristone (300-1200 mg) was administered once daily. ACTH and pituitary MRI were assessed at baseline and at regular intervals during treatment. A ≥2-fold increase in ACTH was observed in 72% of patients treated for a median duration of 11.3 months. The mean peak increase in ACTH was 2.76 ± 1.65-fold during SEISMIC, and mean ACTH concentrations remained stable during the LTE. ACTH was directly correlated with mifepristone dose and declined to near baseline levels after mifepristone discontinuation. Tumor regressed in 2 patients and progressed in 3 patients with macroadenomas. An additional microadenoma was identified after 25 months of treatment after a baseline tumor-negative MRI. In the largest prospective study to date, long-term mifepristone treatment increased ACTH in approximately two-thirds of patients with CD. ACTH elevations were observed within the first few weeks of treatment, were dose-dependent, and generally remained stable over time. Corticotroph tumor progression and regression may occur over time, but patients may have significant increases in ACTH levels without evidence of tumor growth.

  15. Changes in Plasma ACTH Levels and Corticotroph Tumor Size in Patients With Cushing's Disease During Long-term Treatment With the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone

    PubMed Central

    Findling, James W.; Koch, Christian A.; Schlaffer, Sven-Martin; Buchfelder, Michael; Gross, Coleman

    2014-01-01

    Context: Pituitary effects of long-term therapy with mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, in Cushing's disease (CD) patients are not well understood. Objective: Our objective was to report changes in ACTH and pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings during long-term use of mifepristone in CD patients. Design and Setting: The Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Mifepristone in the Treatment of Endogenous Cushing's Syndrome (SEISMIC) was a 24-week, open-label study of mifepristone, and its long-term extension (LTE) is a multicenter U.S. study. Patients: Forty-three CD patients (mean age 45.3 years) were enrolled in SEISMIC with 27 continuing into the LTE study. Interventions: Mifepristone (300–1200 mg) was administered once daily. Main Outcome Measures: ACTH and pituitary MRI were assessed at baseline and at regular intervals during treatment. Results: A ≥2-fold increase in ACTH was observed in 72% of patients treated for a median duration of 11.3 months. The mean peak increase in ACTH was 2.76 ± 1.65-fold during SEISMIC, and mean ACTH concentrations remained stable during the LTE. ACTH was directly correlated with mifepristone dose and declined to near baseline levels after mifepristone discontinuation. Tumor regressed in 2 patients and progressed in 3 patients with macroadenomas. An additional microadenoma was identified after 25 months of treatment after a baseline tumor-negative MRI. Conclusions: In the largest prospective study to date, long-term mifepristone treatment increased ACTH in approximately two-thirds of patients with CD. ACTH elevations were observed within the first few weeks of treatment, were dose-dependent, and generally remained stable over time. Corticotroph tumor progression and regression may occur over time, but patients may have significant increases in ACTH levels without evidence of tumor growth. PMID:25013998

  16. Slowing down Presentation of Facial Movements and Vocal Sounds Enhances Facial Expression Recognition and Induces Facial-Vocal Imitation in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tardif, Carole; Laine, France; Rodriguez, Melissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on…

  17. Branches of the Facial Artery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Lee, Geun In; Park, Hye Jin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review the name of the branches, to review the classification of the branching pattern, and to clarify a presence percentage of each branch of the facial artery, systematically. In a PubMed search, the search terms "facial," AND "artery," AND "classification OR variant OR pattern" were used. The IBM SPSS Statistics 20 system was used for statistical analysis. Among the 500 titles, 18 articles were selected and reviewed systematically. Most of the articles focused on "classification" according to the "terminal branch." Several authors classified the facial artery according to their terminal branches. Most of them, however, did not describe the definition of "terminal branch." There were confusions within the classifications. When the inferior labial artery was absent, 3 different types were used. The "alar branch" or "nasal branch" was used instead of the "lateral nasal branch." The angular branch was used to refer to several different branches. The presence as a percentage of each branch according to the branches in Gray's Anatomy (premasseteric, inferior labial, superior labial, lateral nasal, and angular) varied. No branch was used with 100% consistency. The superior labial branch was most frequently cited (95.7%, 382 arteries in 399 hemifaces). The angular branch (53.9%, 219 arteries in 406 hemifaces) and the premasseteric branch were least frequently cited (53.8%, 43 arteries in 80 hemifaces). There were significant differences among each of the 5 branches (P < 0.05) except between the angular branch and the premasseteric branch and between the superior labial branch and the inferior labial branch. The authors believe identifying the presence percentage of each branch will be helpful for surgical procedures.

  18. Association Among Facial Paralysis, Depression, and Quality of Life in Facial Plastic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nellis, Jason C.; Ishii, Masaru; Byrne, Patrick J.; Boahene, Kofi D. O.; Dey, Jacob K.; Ishii, Lisa E.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Though anecdotally linked, few studies have investigated the impact of facial paralysis on depression and quality of life (QOL). OBJECTIVE To measure the association between depression, QOL, and facial paralysis in patients seeking treatment at a facial plastic surgery clinic. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS Data were prospectively collected for patients with all-cause facial paralysis and control patients initially presenting to a facial plastic surgery clinic from 2013 to 2015. The control group included a heterogeneous patient population presenting to facial plastic surgery clinic for evaluation. Patients who had prior facial reanimation surgery or missing demographic and psychometric data were excluded from analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Demographics, facial paralysis etiology, facial paralysis severity (graded on the House-Brackmann scale), Beck depression inventory, and QOL scores in both groups were examined. Potential confounders, including self-reported attractiveness and mood, were collected and analyzed. Self-reported scores were measured using a 0 to 100 visual analog scale. RESULTS There was a total of 263 patients (mean age, 48.8 years; 66.9% were female) were analyzed. There were 175 control patients and 88 patients with facial paralysis. Sex distributions were not significantly different between the facial paralysis and control groups. Patients with facial paralysis had significantly higher depression, lower self-reported attractiveness, lower mood, and lower QOL scores. Overall, 37 patients with facial paralysis (42.1%) screened positive for depression, with the greatest likelihood in patients with House-Brackmann grade 3 or greater (odds ratio, 10.8; 95% CI, 5.13–22.75) compared with 13 control patients (8.1%) (P < .001). In multivariate regression, facial paralysis and female sex were significantly associated with higher depression scores (constant, 2.08 [95% CI, 0.77–3.39]; facial paralysis effect, 5.98 [95% CI, 4.38–7

  19. [Summary of professor YANG Jun's experience for intractable facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Li, Zaiyuan; Ge, Tingqiu; Zhang, Man; Yuan, Aihong; Yang, Jun

    2017-06-12

    Professor YANG Jun 's experience of diagnosis and treatment for intractable facial paralysis is introduced. Professor YANG focuses on the thinking model that combines TCM, western medicine and acupuncture, and adopts the differentiation system that combines disease differentiation, syndrome differentiation and meridian differentiation; he adopts the treatment integrates etiological treatment, overall regulation, symptomatic treatment as well as acupuncture, moxibustion, medication and flash cupping. The acupoints of yangming meridians are mostly selected, and acupoints of governor vessel such as Dazhui (GV 14) and Jinsuo (GV 8) are highly valued. The multiple-needles shallow-penetration-insertion twirling lifting and thrusting technique are mostly adopted to achieve slow and mild acupuncture sensation; in addition, the facial muscles are pulled up with mechanics action. The intensive stimulation with electroacupuncture is recommended at Qianzheng (Extra), Yifeng (TE 17) and Yangbai (GB 14), which is given two or three treatments per week.

  20. Current options for the treatment of facial angiofibromas.

    PubMed

    Salido-Vallejo, R; Garnacho-Saucedo, G; Moreno-Giménez, J C

    2014-01-01

    Facial angiofibromas are hamartomatous growths that are closely associated with tuberous sclerosis complex and, in fact, they constitute one of the main diagnostic criteria for that disease. These lesions composed of blood vessels and fibrous tissue appear on the face at an early age. Since they have important physical and psychological repercussions for patients, several treatment options have been used to remove them or improve their appearance. However, the lack of treatment guidelines prevents us from developing a common protocol for patients with this condition. The present article aims to review the treatments for facial angiofibromas used to date and to propose a new evidence-based treatment protocol. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Infections in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease treated with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors: systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Toussi, Sima S; Pan, Nancy; Walters, Heather M; Walsh, Thomas J

    2013-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors are increasingly administered to children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (pIBD). Adult studies indicate that TNF-α inhibitors lead to an increased risk of serious infections compared to other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. We report herein a systematic literature review detailing the epidemiology and types of infections reported in children with JIA and pIBD treated with TNF-α inhibitors. The most frequently reported infections were mild and characterized as viral in etiology. Severe bacterial and fungal infections also occurred, but were less common and possibly associated with intrinsic risk factors and concurrent immunosuppressive therapy. Few pediatric patients developed Mycobacterium tuberculosis, likely due to effective screening. There were 8 infectious fatalities in children treated with TNF-α inhibitors. Overall, although rare, serious infections occur in immunocompromised children and adolescents with JIA and pIBD receiving TNF-α inhibitors.

  2. Renal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Puay Hoon; Cheng, Liang; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Merino, Maria J.; Netto, George; Reuter, Victor E.; Shen, Steven S.; Grignon, David J.; Montironi, Rodolfo; Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R.; Delahunt, Brett; Moch, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology convened a consensus conference on renal cancer, preceded by an online survey, to address issues relating to the diagnosis and reporting of renal neoplasia. In this report, the role of biomarkers in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of renal tumors is addressed. In particular we focused upon the use of immunohistochemical markers and the approach to specific differential diagnostic scenarios. We enquired whether cytogenetic and molecular tools were applied in practice and asked for views on the perceived prognostic role of biomarkers. Both the survey and conference voting results demonstrated a high degree of consensus in participants’ responses regarding prognostic/predictive markers and molecular techniques, whereas it was apparent that biomarkers for these purposes remained outside the diagnostic realm pending clinical validation. Although no individual antibody or panel of antibodies reached consensus for classifying renal tumors, or for confirming renal metastatic disease, it was noted from the online survey that 87% of respondents used immunohistochemistry to subtype renal tumors sometimes or occasionally, and a majority (87%) used immunohistochemical markers (Pax 2 or Pax 8, renal cell carcinoma [RCC] marker, panel of pan-CK, CK7, vimentin, and CD10) in confirming the diagnosis of metastatic RCC. There was consensus that immunohistochemistry should be used for histologic subtyping and applied before reaching a diagnosis of unclassified RCC. At the conference, there was consensus that TFE3 and TFEB analysis ought to be requested when RCC was diagnosed in a young patient or when histologic appearances were suggestive of the translocation subtype; whereas Pax 2 and/or Pax 8 were considered to be the most useful markers in the diagnosis of a renal primary. PMID:24025522

  3. A radiation hybrid map of the distal short arm of human chromosome II, containing the Beckwith-Weidemann and associated embroyonal tumor disease loci

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, C.W. III; Berg, D.J.; Meeker, T.C.

    1993-05-01

    The authors describe a high-resolution radiation hybrid (RH) map of the distal short arm of human chromosome 11 containing the Beckwith-Weidemann gene and the associated embryonal tumor disease loci. Thirteen human 11p15 genes and 17 new anonymous probes were mapped by a statistical analysis of the cosegregation of markers in 102 rodent-human radiation hybrids retaining fragments of human chromosome 11. The 17 anonymous probes were generated from lambda phage containing human 11p15.5 inserts, by using ALU-PCR. A comprehensive map of all 30 loci and a framework map of nine clusters of loci ordered at odds of 1,000:1 were constructed bymore » a multipoint maximum-likelihood approach by using the computer program RHMAP. This RH map localizes one new gene to chromosome 11p15 (WEE1), provides more precise order information for several 11p15 genes (CTSD, H19, HPX,.ST5, RNH, and SMPD1), confirms previous map orders for other 11p15 genes (CALCA, PTH, HBBC, TH, HRAS, and DRD4), and maps 17 new anonymous probes within the 11p15.5 region. This RH map should prove useful in better defining the positions of the Beckwith-Weidemann and associated embryonal tumor disease-gene loci. 41 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.« less

  4. Human Facial Expressions as Adaptations:Evolutionary Questions in Facial Expression Research

    PubMed Central

    SCHMIDT, KAREN L.; COHN, JEFFREY F.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of the face in social interaction and social intelligence is widely recognized in anthropology. Yet the adaptive functions of human facial expression remain largely unknown. An evolutionary model of human facial expression as behavioral adaptation can be constructed, given the current knowledge of the phenotypic variation, ecological contexts, and fitness consequences of facial behavior. Studies of facial expression are available, but results are not typically framed in an evolutionary perspective. This review identifies the relevant physical phenomena of facial expression and integrates the study of this behavior with the anthropological study of communication and sociality in general. Anthropological issues with relevance to the evolutionary study of facial expression include: facial expressions as coordinated, stereotyped behavioral phenotypes, the unique contexts and functions of different facial expressions, the relationship of facial expression to speech, the value of facial expressions as signals, and the relationship of facial expression to social intelligence in humans and in nonhuman primates. Human smiling is used as an example of adaptation, and testable hypotheses concerning the human smile, as well as other expressions, are proposed. PMID:11786989

  5. Facial approximation-from facial reconstruction synonym to face prediction paradigm.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N

    2015-05-01

    Facial approximation was first proposed as a synonym for facial reconstruction in 1987 due to dissatisfaction with the connotations the latter label held. Since its debut, facial approximation's identity has morphed as anomalies in face prediction have accumulated. Now underpinned by differences in what problems are thought to count as legitimate, facial approximation can no longer be considered a synonym for, or subclass of, facial reconstruction. Instead, two competing paradigms of face prediction have emerged, namely: facial approximation and facial reconstruction. This paper shines a Kuhnian lens across the discipline of face prediction to comprehensively review these developments and outlines the distinguishing features between the two paradigms. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. [Evidence of facial palsy and facial malformations in pottery from Peruvian Moche and Lambayeque pre-Columbian cultures].

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, F J; Vázquez Cabrera, C B

    2006-01-01

    Moche (100-700 AD) and Lambayeque-Sicán (750-1100 AD) are pre-Columbian cultures from Regional States Period, developed in Northern Peru. Information about daily life, religion and medicine has been obtained through the study of Moche ceramics found in lords and priests tombs, pyramids and temples. To analyze archeological evidences of Moche Medicine and neurological diseases through ceramics. Representations of diseases in Moche and Lambayeque iconography and Moche pottery collections exposed in Casinelli m