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Sample records for facial nerve preservation

  1. Initial Exploration on Temporal Branch of Facial Nerve Function Preservation in Plexiform Neurofibroma Resection

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojie; Bogari, Melia; Tan, Andy; Gao, Xiaoyan; Gao, Yang; Chen, Hui; Li, Wei; Jin, Yunbo; Ma, Gang; Lin, Xiaoxi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Large temporal plexiform neurofibroma (PNF) is an irritating problem that causes facial disfigurement. Surgical resection of PNF is the only effective way to remove the tumor as well as to improve the patient's facial appearance. However, temporal branch of the facial nerve (TBFN) in the tumor is prone to be destroyed during PNF removal. Thus, TBFN palsy is the inevitable complication after surgery and might induce other malformation and dysfunction. Therefore, the aim of this study is to reconstruct a nearly normal face contour while preserving the facial nerve function. Purpose: Selective PNF removal technique was designed to protect TBFN during PNF lesions resection in our patients. Methods: From May 2011 to June 2015, the authors had 10 patients who suffered from PNF in the temporal region with facial disfigurement and underwent selective PNF removal to correct the facial disfigurement while preserving TBFN as well. Result: All patients obtained the improvement of facial appearance after surgery. The temporal PNF was removed and the TBFN function successfully maintained. Plexiform neurofibroma recurrence has not been relapsed during 6 to 49 months’ follow-up. Conclusions: In our initial exploration, TBFN function maintenance and facial appearance improvement can be achieved simultaneously by using PNF-selective removal surgery technique. PMID:27526236

  2. Preservation of Facial Nerve With Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Recurrent Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma of Parotid Gland.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shufang; Ma, Hailong; He, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of salivary glands harbors the recurrent ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion because of the translocation t (12; 15) (p13; q25) and resembles breast secretory carcinoma. This tumor composed of papillary, cystic, solid, and cribriform patterns. Immunohistochemically, the tumors are positive for mammaglobin, CK7, CK8, STAT5a, vimentin, and S100. In this report, the authors presented a patient of recurrent parotid gland mammary analogue secretory carcinoma in a 22-year-old woman. The patient received extended parotidectomy with partial adhesive masseter surgery. The facial nerve was preserved during the surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy was performed postoperation. The patient did not suffer local recurrence and facial paralysis in the 18 months follow-up period. PMID:27192652

  3. Intraparotid facial nerve neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M J; Babyak, J W; Kartush, J M

    1987-02-01

    Neurogenic neoplasms of the intraparotid facial nerve are uncommon and are usually diagnosed intraoperatively by tissue biopsy. Fifty-six cases of primary neurogenic neoplasms involving the facial nerve have been reported. The majority of these have been schwannomas. A case of a solitary neurofibroma involving the main trunk of the facial nerve is presented. Schwannomas and neurofibromas have distinct histological features which must be considered prior to the management of these tumors. The management of neurogenic tumors associated with normal facial function is a particularly difficult problem. A new approach for the diagnosis and management of neurogenic neoplasms is described utilizing electroneurography. PMID:3807626

  4. Facial Nerve Neuroma Management

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Peter C.; Osguthorpe, J. David

    1998-01-01

    Three facial nerve neuromas were identified in the academic year 1994-1995. Each case illustrates different management dilemmas. One patient with a grade III facial nerve palsy had a small geniculate ganglion neuroma with the dilemma of decompression versus resection clear nerve section margins. The second patient underwent facial neuroma resection with cable graft reconstruction, but the permanent sections were positive. The last patient had a massive neuroma in which grafting versus other facial reconstructive options were considered. These three cases illustrate some of the major controversies in facial nerve neuroma management. We discuss our decision-making plan and report our results. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171043

  5. Facial nerve dissection by use of acoustic (loudspeaker) facial EMG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kinney, S E; Prass, R

    1986-11-01

    The development of the surgical microscope in 1953, and the subsequent development of microsurgical instrumentation, signaled the beginning of modern-day acoustic neuroma surgery. Preservation of facial nerve function and total tumor removal is the goal of all acoustic neuroma surgery. The refinement of the translabyrinthine removal of acoustic neuromas by Dr. William House significantly improved preservation of facial nerve function. This is made possible by the anatomic identification of the facial nerve at the lateral end of the internal auditory canal. When the surgery is accomplished from a suboccipital or retrosigmoid approach, the facial nerve may be identified at the brain stem or within the internal auditory canal. Identifying the facial nerve from the posterior approach is not as anatomically precise as from the lateral approach through the labyrinth. The use of a facial nerve stimulator can greatly facilitate identification of the facial nerve in these procedures.

  6. Management of traumatic facial nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Greywoode, Jewel D; Ho, Hao H; Artz, Gregory J; Heffelfinger, Ryan N

    2010-12-01

    Management of facial nerve injuries requires knowledge and skills that should be in every facial plastic surgeon's armamentarium. This article will briefly review the anatomy of the facial nerve, discuss the assessment of facial nerve injury, and describe the management of facial nerve injury after soft tissue trauma. PMID:21086238

  7. Less invasive transjugular approach with Fallopian bridge technique for facial nerve protection and hearing preservation in surgery of glomus jugulare tumors.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Yoichi; Fukushima, Takanori; Watanabe, Kentaro; Friedman, Allan H; McElveen, John T; Cunningham, Calhoun D; Zomorodi, Ali R

    2013-10-01

    For the past three decades, surgery of glomus jugulare tumors (GJTs) has been characterized by extensive combined head and neck, neuro-otologic, and neurosurgical approaches. In recent years, the authors have modified the operative technique to a less invasive approach for preservation of cranial nerves while achieving satisfactory tumor resection. We evaluated and compared the clinical outcomes of our current less invasive approach with our previous more extensive procedures. The clinical records of 39 cases of GJT surgically treated between 1992 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The less invasive transjugular approach with Fallopian bridge technique (LI-TJ) was used for the most recent five cases. The combined transmastoid-transjugular and high cervical (TM-HC) approach was performed in 30 cases, while four cases were treated with a transmastoid-transsigmoid approach with facial nerve translocation. Operative technique, extent of tumor resection, operating time, hospital stay, and morbidity were examined through the operative records, and a comparison was made between the LI-TJ cases and the more invasive cases. No facial nerve palsy was seen in the LI-TJ group while the TM-HC group demonstrated six cases (17.6%) of facial palsy (House-Brackmann facial nerve function grading scale grade II and III). The complication rate was 0 % in the LI-TJ group and 16.7% in the more invasive group. The mean operative time and hospital stay were shorter in the LI-TJ group (6.4 h and 4.3 days, respectively) compared with the more invasive group (10.7 h and 8.0 days, respectively). The LI-TJ approach with Fallopian bridge technique provided adequate tumor resection with cranial preservation and definitive advantage over the more extensive approach. PMID:23739840

  8. Pediatric facial nerve rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Banks, Caroline A; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-11-01

    Facial paralysis is a rare but severe condition in the pediatric population. Impaired facial movement has multiple causes and varied presentations, therefore individualized treatment plans are essential for optimal results. Advances in facial reanimation over the past 4 decades have given rise to new treatments designed to restore balance and function in pediatric patients with facial paralysis. This article provides a comprehensive review of pediatric facial rehabilitation and describes a zone-based approach to assessment and treatment of impaired facial movement.

  9. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  10. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  11. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology.

  12. Parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Tani, Akiko; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Omori, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Parotid lymphangioma is a relatively rare disease that is usually detected in infancy or early childhood, and which has typical features. Clinical reports of facial nerve paralysis caused by lymphangioma, however, are very rare. Usually, facial nerve paralysis in a child suggests malignancy. Here we report a very rare case of parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis. A 7-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a rapidly enlarging mass in the left parotid region. Left peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis was also noted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging also revealed multiple cystic lesions. Open biopsy was undertaken in order to investigate the cause of the facial nerve paralysis. The histopathological findings of the excised tumor were consistent with lymphangioma. Prednisone (40 mg/day) was given in a tapering dose schedule. Facial nerve paralysis was completely cured 1 month after treatment. There has been no recurrent facial nerve paralysis for eight years.

  13. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Mends, Francine; Hagiwara, Mari; Fatterpekar, Girish; Roehm, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell's palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers. PMID:23766904

  14. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Meek, Marcel F

    2009-08-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two cases of sound-induced facial synkinesis (SFS) after facial nerve injury. As far as we know, this phenomenon has not been described in the English literature before. Patient A presented with right hemifacial palsy after lesion of the facial nerve due to skull base fracture. He reported involuntary muscle activity at the right corner of the mouth, specifically on hearing ringing keys. Patient B suffered from left hemifacial palsy following otitis media and developed involuntary muscle contraction in the facial musculature specifically on hearing clapping hands or a trumpet sound. Both patients were evaluated by means of video, audio and EMG analysis. Possible mechanisms in the pathophysiology of SFS are postulated and therapeutic options are discussed.

  15. Facial nerve palsy associated with underwater barotrauma.

    PubMed

    Whelan, T R

    1990-06-01

    This report describes a case of facial nerve palsy following barotitis media sustained at shallow depth. The neuropraxia is likely to have been due to the direct effect of pressure, facilitated by a congenital hiatus in the bony canal protecting the facial nerve in the middle ear.

  16. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    PubMed

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  17. Facial Nerve Laceration and its Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shafaiee, Yousef; Shahbazzadegan, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Facial paralysis is a devastating condition with profound functional, aesthetic and psychosocial consequences. Tumors within or outside the skull, Bell’s palsy and trauma are the most common causes of facial paralysis in adults. Case Presentation Our patient was a 35-year-old man with deep laceration wounds. The patient was taken to the operating room and the nerves were repaired. We observed gradual improvement of muscle performance except branches of the frontal nerve. Conclusions Complete rupture of the facial nerve is challenging and the treatment is surgery, which requires careful planning. PMID:27626005

  18. Facial Nerve Laceration and its Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shafaiee, Yousef; Shahbazzadegan, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Facial paralysis is a devastating condition with profound functional, aesthetic and psychosocial consequences. Tumors within or outside the skull, Bell’s palsy and trauma are the most common causes of facial paralysis in adults. Case Presentation Our patient was a 35-year-old man with deep laceration wounds. The patient was taken to the operating room and the nerves were repaired. We observed gradual improvement of muscle performance except branches of the frontal nerve. Conclusions Complete rupture of the facial nerve is challenging and the treatment is surgery, which requires careful planning.

  19. Communications Between the Facial Nerve and the Vestibulocochlear Nerve, the Glossopharyngeal Nerve, and the Cervical Plexus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Song, Ju Sung; Yang, Su Cheol

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this review is to elucidate the communications between the facial nerves or facial nerve and neighboring nerves: the vestibulocochlear nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the cervical plexus.In a PubMed search, 832 articles were searched using the terms "facial nerve and communication." Sixty-two abstracts were read and 16 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 8 articles were analyzed.The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve was the highest (82.3%) and the frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve was the lowest (20%). The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the cervical plexus was 65.2 ± 43.5%. The frequency of communication between the cervical branch and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was 24.7 ± 1.7%.Surgeons should be aware of the nerve communications, which are important during clinical examinations and surgical procedures of the facial nerves such as those communications involved in facial reconstructive surgery, neck dissection, and various nerve transfer procedures.

  20. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity. PMID:26319412

  1. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity.

  2. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  3. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to a Pleomorphic Adenoma with the Imaging Characteristics of a Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Nader, Marc-Elie; Bell, Diana; Sturgis, Erich M; Ginsberg, Lawrence E; Gidley, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    Background Facial nerve paralysis in a patient with a salivary gland mass usually denotes malignancy. However, facial paralysis can also be caused by benign salivary gland tumors. Methods We present a case of facial nerve paralysis due to a benign salivary gland tumor that had the imaging characteristics of an intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Results The patient presented to our clinic 4 years after the onset of facial nerve paralysis initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. Computed tomography demonstrated filling and erosion of the stylomastoid foramen with a mass on the facial nerve. Postoperative histopathology showed the presence of a pleomorphic adenoma. Facial paralysis was thought to be caused by extrinsic nerve compression. Conclusions This case illustrates the difficulty of accurate preoperative diagnosis of a parotid gland mass and reinforces the concept that facial nerve paralysis in the context of salivary gland tumors may not always indicate malignancy.

  4. Imaging of facial nerve schwannomas: diagnostic pearls and potential pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Mundada, Pravin; Purohit, Bela Satish; Kumar, Tahira Sultana; Tan, Tiong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are uncommon in the facial nerve and account for less than 1% of tumors of temporal bone. They can involve one or more than one segment of the facial nerve. The clinical presentations and the imaging appearances of facial nerve schwannomas are influenced by the topographical anatomy of the facial nerve and vary according to the segment(s) they involve. This pictorial essay illustrates the imaging features of facial nerve schwannomas according to their various anatomical locations and also reviews the pertinent differential diagnoses and potential diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26712680

  5. Facial Nerve Monitoring During Parotidectomy:A Two-Center Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Régloix, Stanislas Ballivet-de; Grinholtz-Haddad, Julia; Maurin, Olga; Genestier, Louise; Lisan, Quentin; Pons, Yoann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We present a retrospective two-center study series and discussion of the current literature to assess the benefits of facial nerve monitoring during parotidectomy. Materials and Methods: From 2007 to 2012, 128 parotidectomies were performed in 125 patients. Of these, 47 procedures were performed without facial nerve monitoring (group 1) and 81 with facial nerve monitoring (group 2). The primary endpoint was the House-Brackmann classification at 1 month and 6 months. Facial palsy was determined when the House-Brackmann grade was 3 or higher. Results: In group 1, 15 facial palsies were noted; 8 were transient and 7 were definitive. In group 2, 19 facial palsies were noted; 12 were transient and 7 were definitive. At both one and six months after parotidectomy, the rate of facial palsy in reoperation cases was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2. Conclusion: Facial nerve monitoring is a simple, effective adjunct method that is available to surgeons to assist with the functional preservation of the facial nerve during parotid surgery. Although it does not improve the facial prognosis in first-line surgery, it does improve the facial prognosis in reoperations. PMID:27602336

  6. Nerve repair and cable grafting for facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Clinton D; Kriet, J David

    2008-05-01

    Facial nerve injury and facial paralysis are devastating for patients. Although imperfect, primary repair is currently the best option to restore facial nerve function. Cable, or interposition, nerve grafting is an acceptable alternative when primary repair is not possible. Several donor nerves are at the surgeon's disposal. Great auricular, sural, or medial and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerves are all easily obtained. Both primary repair and interposition grafting typically result in better facial function than do other dynamic and static rehabilitation strategies. Proficient anastomotic technique and, when necessary, selection of an appropriate interposition graft will optimize patient outcomes. Promising research is under way that will enhance future nerve repair and grafting efforts.

  7. How to Avoid Facial Nerve Injury in Mastoidectomy?

    PubMed

    Ryu, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Unexpected iatrogenic facial nerve paralysis not only affects facial disfiguration, but also imposes a devastating effect on the social, psychological, and economic aspects of an affected person's life at once. The aims of this study were to postulate where surgeons had mistakenly drilled or where obscured by granulations or by fibrous bands and to look for surgical approach with focused on the safety of facial nerve in mastoid surgery. We had found 14 cases of iatrogenic facial nerve injury (IFNI) during mastoid surgery for 5 years in Korea. The medical records of all the patients were obtained and analyzed injured site of facial nerve segment with surgical technique of mastoidectomy. Eleven patients underwent facial nerve exploration and three patients had conservative management. 43% (6 cases) of iatrogenic facial nerve injuries had occurred in tympanic segment, 28.5% (4 cases) of injuries in second genu combined with tympanic segment, and 28.5% (4 cases) of injuries in mastoid segment. Surgeons should try to identify the facial nerve using available landmarks and be kept in mind the anomalies of the facial nerve. With use of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring, the avoidance of in order to avoid IFNI would be possible in more cases. Many authors emphasized the importance of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring, even in primary otologic surgery. However, anatomical understanding of intratemporal landmarks with meticulous dissection could not be emphasized as possible to prevent IFNI. PMID:27626078

  8. How to Avoid Facial Nerve Injury in Mastoidectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Nam-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Unexpected iatrogenic facial nerve paralysis not only affects facial disfiguration, but also imposes a devastating effect on the social, psychological, and economic aspects of an affected person's life at once. The aims of this study were to postulate where surgeons had mistakenly drilled or where obscured by granulations or by fibrous bands and to look for surgical approach with focused on the safety of facial nerve in mastoid surgery. We had found 14 cases of iatrogenic facial nerve injury (IFNI) during mastoid surgery for 5 years in Korea. The medical records of all the patients were obtained and analyzed injured site of facial nerve segment with surgical technique of mastoidectomy. Eleven patients underwent facial nerve exploration and three patients had conservative management. 43% (6 cases) of iatrogenic facial nerve injuries had occurred in tympanic segment, 28.5% (4 cases) of injuries in second genu combined with tympanic segment, and 28.5% (4 cases) of injuries in mastoid segment. Surgeons should try to identify the facial nerve using available landmarks and be kept in mind the anomalies of the facial nerve. With use of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring, the avoidance of in order to avoid IFNI would be possible in more cases. Many authors emphasized the importance of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring, even in primary otologic surgery. However, anatomical understanding of intratemporal landmarks with meticulous dissection could not be emphasized as possible to prevent IFNI. PMID:27626078

  9. How to Avoid Facial Nerve Injury in Mastoidectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Nam-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Unexpected iatrogenic facial nerve paralysis not only affects facial disfiguration, but also imposes a devastating effect on the social, psychological, and economic aspects of an affected person's life at once. The aims of this study were to postulate where surgeons had mistakenly drilled or where obscured by granulations or by fibrous bands and to look for surgical approach with focused on the safety of facial nerve in mastoid surgery. We had found 14 cases of iatrogenic facial nerve injury (IFNI) during mastoid surgery for 5 years in Korea. The medical records of all the patients were obtained and analyzed injured site of facial nerve segment with surgical technique of mastoidectomy. Eleven patients underwent facial nerve exploration and three patients had conservative management. 43% (6 cases) of iatrogenic facial nerve injuries had occurred in tympanic segment, 28.5% (4 cases) of injuries in second genu combined with tympanic segment, and 28.5% (4 cases) of injuries in mastoid segment. Surgeons should try to identify the facial nerve using available landmarks and be kept in mind the anomalies of the facial nerve. With use of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring, the avoidance of in order to avoid IFNI would be possible in more cases. Many authors emphasized the importance of intraoperative facial nerve monitoring, even in primary otologic surgery. However, anatomical understanding of intratemporal landmarks with meticulous dissection could not be emphasized as possible to prevent IFNI.

  10. Extracranial Facial Nerve Schwannoma Treated by Hypo-fractionated CyberKnife Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2016-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannoma is a rare intracranial tumor. Treatment for this benign tumor has been controversial. Here, we report a case of extracranial facial nerve schwannoma treated successfully by hypo-fractionated CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA) radiosurgery and discuss the efficacy of this treatment. A 34-year-old female noticed a swelling in her right mastoid process. The lesion enlarged over a seven-month period, and she experienced facial spasm on the right side. She was diagnosed with a facial schwannoma via a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head and neck and was told to wait until the facial nerve palsy subsides. She was referred to our hospital for radiation therapy. We planned a fractionated CyberKnife radiosurgery for three consecutive days. After CyberKnife radiosurgery, the mass in the right parotid gradually decreased in size, and the facial nerve palsy disappeared. At her eight-month follow-up, her facial spasm had completely disappeared. There has been no recurrence and the facial nerve function has been normal. We successfully demonstrated the efficacy of CyberKnife radiosurgery as an alternative treatment that also preserves neurofunction for facial nerve schwannomas. PMID:27774363

  11. Acute unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Siew Swan; Tassone, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Mrs PS, 78 years of age, presented with acute left-sided otalgia, ear swelling and subsequent unilateral facial paralysis (Figure 1). She denied any otorrhoea or hearing loss. Past medical history relevant to the presenting complaint included: * Bell palsy diagnosed 20 years ago with no residual effect * biopsy confirmed benign parotid lump (diagnosed 3 years previously). Histopathology revealed a pleomorphic adenoma. Mrs PS declined surgical intervention at the time * chicken pox as a child * normal fasting blood glucose 1 month previously and no known immune compromise. Examination revealed yellow crusts and small vesicles on the external acoustic meatus (Figure 2). A 10 mm well defined firm and nontender nodule was palpable at the ramus of the mandible.

  12. [Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy in children].

    PubMed

    Tabarki, B

    2014-10-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy may (secondary) or may not have a detectable cause (idiopathic facial palsy or Bell's palsy). Idiopathic facial palsy is the common form of facial palsy. It remains diagnosis by exclusion. The prognosis is more favourable in children than in adults. We present current diagnostic procedures and recommendations regarding treatment in children.

  13. Transtympanic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nathan; O'Donohue, Peter; French, Heath; Griffin, Aaron; Elliott, Devlin; Gochee, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Facial nerve paralysis because of penetrating trauma through the external auditory canal is extremely rare, with a paucity of published literature. The objective of this study is to review the literature on transtympanic facial nerve paralysis and increase physician awareness of this uncommon injury through discussion of its clinical presentation, management and prognosis. We also aim to improve patient outcomes in those that have sustained this type of injury by suggesting an optimal management plan. In this case report, we present the case of a 46-year-old white woman who sustained a unilateral facial nerve paresis because of a garfish penetrating her tympanic membrane and causing direct damage to the tympanic portion of her facial nerve. On follow-up after 12 months, her facial nerve function has largely returned to normal. Transtympanic facial nerve paralysis is a rare injury but can have a favorable prognosis if managed effectively.

  14. Transtympanic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Nathan; O’Donohue, Peter; French, Heath; Griffin, Aaron; Gochee, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Facial nerve paralysis because of penetrating trauma through the external auditory canal is extremely rare, with a paucity of published literature. The objective of this study is to review the literature on transtympanic facial nerve paralysis and increase physician awareness of this uncommon injury through discussion of its clinical presentation, management and prognosis. We also aim to improve patient outcomes in those that have sustained this type of injury by suggesting an optimal management plan. In this case report, we present the case of a 46-year-old white woman who sustained a unilateral facial nerve paresis because of a garfish penetrating her tympanic membrane and causing direct damage to the tympanic portion of her facial nerve. On follow-up after 12 months, her facial nerve function has largely returned to normal. Transtympanic facial nerve paralysis is a rare injury but can have a favorable prognosis if managed effectively. PMID:26090278

  15. Facial nerve canal: CT analysis of the protruding tympanic segment

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, J.D.

    1984-11-01

    The development and subsequent course of the facial nerve canal are complex. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) provides an opportunity for the study of this often perplexing structure. Normal anatomy and normal variations of the facial nerve canal must be considered when examining patients who have facial nerve palsy referrable to the temporal bone. The author recommends direct axial and coronal imaging supplemented by sagittal and possibly oblique reformations.

  16. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Facial Nerve Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenyin; Jain, Varsha; Kim, Hyun; Champ, Colin; Jain, Gaurav; Farrell, Christopher; Andrews, David W; Judy, Kevin; Liu, Haisong; Artz, Gregory; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Evans, James J

    2016-02-01

    Purpose Data on the clinical course of irradiated facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are lacking. We evaluated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for FNS. Methods Eight consecutive patients with FNS treated at our institution between 1998 and 2011 were included. Patients were treated with FSRT to a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range: 46.8-54 Gy) in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy fractions. We report the radiographic response, symptom control, and toxicity associated with FSRT for FNS. Results The median follow-up time was 43 months (range: 10-75 months). All patients presented with symptoms including pain, tinnitus, facial asymmetry, diplopia, and hearing loss. The median tumor volume was 1.57 cc. On the most recent follow-up imaging, five patients were noted to have stable tumor size; three patients had a net reduction in tumor volume. Additionally, six patients had improvement in clinical symptoms, one patient had stable clinical findings, and one patient had worsened House-Brackmann grade due to cystic degeneration. Conclusion FSRT treatment of FNS results in excellent control of growth and symptoms with a small rate of radiation toxicity. Given the importance of maintaining facial nerve function, FSRT could be considered as a primary management modality for enlarging or symptomatic FNS. PMID:26949592

  17. Modern concepts in facial nerve reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reconstructive surgery of the facial nerve is not daily routine for most head and neck surgeons. The published experience on strategies to ensure optimal functional results for the patients are based on small case series with a large variety of surgical techniques. On this background it is worthwhile to develop a standardized approach for diagnosis and treatment of patients asking for facial rehabilitation. Conclusion A standardized approach is feasible: Patients with chronic facial palsy first need an exact classification of the palsy's aetiology. A step-by-step clinical examination, if necessary MRI imaging and electromyographic examination allow a classification of the palsy's aetiology as well as the determination of the severity of the palsy and the functional deficits. Considering the patient's desire, age and life expectancy, an individual surgical concept is applicable using three main approaches: a) early extratemporal reconstruction, b) early reconstruction of proximal lesions if extratemporal reconstruction is not possible, c) late reconstruction or in cases of congenital palsy. Twelve to 24 months after the last step of surgical reconstruction a standardized evaluation of the therapeutic results is recommended to evaluate the necessity for adjuvant surgical procedures or other adjuvant procedures, e.g. botulinum toxin application. Up to now controlled trials on the value of physiotherapy and other adjuvant measures are missing to give recommendation for optimal application of adjuvant therapies. PMID:21040532

  18. Facial nerve image enhancement from CBCT using supervised learning technique.

    PubMed

    Ping Lu; Barazzetti, Livia; Chandran, Vimal; Gavaghan, Kate; Weber, Stefan; Gerber, Nicolas; Reyes, Mauricio

    2015-08-01

    Facial nerve segmentation plays an important role in surgical planning of cochlear implantation. Clinically available CBCT images are used for surgical planning. However, its relatively low resolution renders the identification of the facial nerve difficult. In this work, we present a supervised learning approach to enhance facial nerve image information from CBCT. A supervised learning approach based on multi-output random forest was employed to learn the mapping between CBCT and micro-CT images. Evaluation was performed qualitatively and quantitatively by using the predicted image as input for a previously published dedicated facial nerve segmentation, and cochlear implantation surgical planning software, OtoPlan. Results show the potential of the proposed approach to improve facial nerve image quality as imaged by CBCT and to leverage its segmentation using OtoPlan. PMID:26736914

  19. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell’s palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell’s palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell’s palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell’s palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell’s palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae. PMID:18368417

  20. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-07-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell's palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell's palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell's palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell's palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell's palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae.

  1. Mandibular Branch of the Facial Nerve in Wistar Rats: New Experimental Model to Assess Facial Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Salomone, Raquel; Nascimento, Silvia Bona do; Ferreira, Ricardo Jose Rodriguez; Silva, Ciro Ferreira da; Costa, Heloisa Juliana Zabeu Rossi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ideal animal model for nerve regeneration studies is the object of controversy, because all models described by the literature have advantages and disadvantages. Objective To describe the histologic and functional patterns of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of Wistar rats to create a new experimental model of facial nerve regeneration. Methods Forty-two male rats were submitted to a nerve conduction test of the mandibular branch to obtain the compound muscle action potential. Twelve of these rats had the mandibular branch surgically removed and submitted to histologic analysis (number, partial density, and axonal diameter) of the proximal and distal segments. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the functional and histologic variables studied. Conclusion These new histologic and functional standards of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of rats establish an objective, easy, and greatly reproducible model for future facial nerve regeneration studies. PMID:25992106

  2. Facial Nerve Trauma: Evaluation and Considerations in Management

    PubMed Central

    Gordin, Eli; Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Arnaoutakis, Demetri

    2014-01-01

    The management of facial paralysis continues to evolve. Understanding the facial nerve anatomy and the different methods of evaluating the degree of facial nerve injury are crucial for successful management. When the facial nerve is transected, direct coaptation leads to the best outcome, followed by interpositional nerve grafting. In cases where motor end plates are still intact but a primary repair or graft is not feasible, a nerve transfer should be employed. When complete muscle atrophy has occurred, regional muscle transfer or free flap reconstruction is an option. When dynamic reanimation cannot be undertaken, static procedures offer some benefit. Adjunctive tools such as botulinum toxin injection and biofeedback can be helpful. Several new treatment modalities lie on the horizon which hold potential to alter the current treatment algorithm. PMID:25709748

  3. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Intracranial Nonacoustic Schwannomas Including Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Kentaro; Abo, Daisuke; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Furuta, Yasushi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Masayori; Fukuda, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Although the effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery for nonacoustic schwannomas is currently being assessed, there have been few studies on the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for these tumors. We investigated the long-term outcome of SRT for nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated between July 1994 and December 2006. Of these patients, 7 had schwannomas located in the jugular foramen, 5 in the trigeminal nerve, 4 in the facial nerve, and 1 in the oculomotor nerve. Radiotherapy was used as an initial treatment without surgery in 10 patients (59%) and after initial subtotal resection in the remaining patients. The tumor volume ranged from 0.3 to 31.3 mL (mean, 8.2 mL). The treatment dose was 40 to 54 Gy in 20 to 26 fractions. The median follow-up period was 59.5 months (range, 7.4-122.6 months). Local control was defined as stable or decreased tumor size on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Tumor size was decreased in 3 patients, stable in 13, and increased in 1 after SRT. Regarding neurologic symptoms, 8 patients (47%) had improvement and 9 patients were unchanged. One patient had an increase in tumor size and received microsurgical resection at 32 months after irradiation. No patient had worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms or development of new cranial nerve deficits at the last follow-up. Conclusions: SRT is an effective alternative to surgical resection for patients with nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas with respect to not only long-term local tumor control but also neuro-functional preservation.

  4. Intraparotid Neurofibroma of the Facial Nerve: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, Ahmed-Abdel-Fattah; El-Anwar, Mohammad-Waheed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Intraparotid neurofibromas of the facial nerve are extremely rare and mostly associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Case Report: This is a case of a healthy 40-year-old man, which underwent surgery for a preoperatively diagnosed benign parotid gland lesion. After identification of the facial nerve main trunk, a single large mass (6 x 3 cm) incorporating the upper nerve division was observed. The nerve portion involved in the mass could not be dissected and was inevitably sacrificed with immediate neuroraphy of the upper division of the facial nerve with 6/0 prolene. The final histopathology revealed the presence of a neurofibroma. Complete left side facial nerve paralysis was observed immediately postoperatively but the function of the lower half was returned within 4 months and the upper half was returned after 1 year. Currently, after 3 years of follow up, there are no signs of recurrence and normal facial nerve function is observed. Conclusion: Neurofibroma should be considered as the diagnosis in a patient demonstrating a parotid mass. In cases where it is diagnosed intraoperatively, excision of part of the nerve with the mass will be inevitable though it can be successfully repaired by end to end anastomosis. PMID:27602341

  5. Intraparotid Neurofibroma of the Facial Nerve: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, Ahmed-Abdel-Fattah; El-Anwar, Mohammad-Waheed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Intraparotid neurofibromas of the facial nerve are extremely rare and mostly associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Case Report: This is a case of a healthy 40-year-old man, which underwent surgery for a preoperatively diagnosed benign parotid gland lesion. After identification of the facial nerve main trunk, a single large mass (6 x 3 cm) incorporating the upper nerve division was observed. The nerve portion involved in the mass could not be dissected and was inevitably sacrificed with immediate neuroraphy of the upper division of the facial nerve with 6/0 prolene. The final histopathology revealed the presence of a neurofibroma. Complete left side facial nerve paralysis was observed immediately postoperatively but the function of the lower half was returned within 4 months and the upper half was returned after 1 year. Currently, after 3 years of follow up, there are no signs of recurrence and normal facial nerve function is observed. Conclusion: Neurofibroma should be considered as the diagnosis in a patient demonstrating a parotid mass. In cases where it is diagnosed intraoperatively, excision of part of the nerve with the mass will be inevitable though it can be successfully repaired by end to end anastomosis.

  6. Differential Reanimation of the Upper and Lower Face Using 2 Interpositional Nerve Grafts in Total Facial Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Radical parotidectomy often results in complex facial nerve defects involving the main nerve trunk and multiple distal nerve branches. Although cable nerve grafting often leads to good nerve regeneration, severe synkinesis due to aberrant axonal regrowth is inevitable. In such situations, the use of 2 motor sources to differentially reanimate the upper and lower face could minimize synkinesis. Here we describe a method of total facial nerve reconstruction in which the upper and lower face are differentially reconstructed with the hypoglossal nerve and facial nerve, respectively, using 2 interpositional nerve grafts. Reconstruction of the lower face with the facial nerve restored voluntary and coordinated animation, and reconstruction of the upper face with the hypoglossal nerve restored frontalis muscle tone and eye closure. These results suggest that our method could serve as an alternative to conventional techniques that use only the facial or hypoglossal nerve. PMID:26579350

  7. [Treatment of facial nerve paralysis using static suspension methods].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, M; Roncević, R; Colić, M; Stojicić, M; Rasulić, L

    2003-01-01

    After the injury of facial nerve, facial muscles are subjected to complex series of biochemical and histological changes, which lead to muscular atrophy if reinnervation is not restored. Facial palsy is very difficult to manage completely. Regardless this fact, the plan of correction has to be directed towards the following: restoration of normal function, normal facial appearance at rest, symmetry in voluntary movements as well as symmetry in involuntary and emotional movements. Static suspension methods were used in our study. All patients had unilateral complete facial nerve palsy but one female patient who experienced the palsy of frontal branch of n.facialis. This method was successfully used to lift the eyebrow, the lid and to improve lagophthalmus on the paralytic side, then the angle and paralytic part of the lip, to reinforce buccal wall of oral cavity as well as to reconstruct new nasolabial fold. The results were satisfactory and permanent. PMID:14619718

  8. Communications Between the Trigeminal Nerve and the Facial Nerve in the Face: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Yang, Su Cheol; Song, Ju Sung

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the article is to elucidate the communications between the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve in the face. In a PubMed search, 328 studies were found using the terms 'trigeminal nerve, facial nerve, and communication.' The abstracts were read and 39 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 11 articles were analyzed. In the studies using dissection, the maxillary branch (V2) had the highest frequency (95.0% ± 8.0%) of communication with the facial nerve, followed by the mandibular branch (V3) (76.7% ± 38.5%). The ophthalmic branch (V1) had the lowest frequency of communication (33.8% ± 19.5%). In a Sihler stain, all of the maxillary branches and mandibular branches had communications with the facial nerve and 85.7% (12/14 hemifaces) of the ophthalmic branches had communications. The frequency of communications between the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve were significantly higher (P = 0.00, t-test) in the studies using a Sihler stain (94.7% ± 1.1%) than the studies using dissection (76.9 ± 35.8). The reason for the significantly higher frequency of trigeminal-facial communication in the studies using a Sihler stain is because of the limitation of the Sihler stain itself. This technique cannot differentiate the motor nerves from sensory nerves at the periphery, and a crossover can be misinterpreted as communication near to nerve terminal.

  9. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  10. Unusual complication of otitis media with effusion: facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Vayisoglu, Yusuf; Gorur, Kemal; Ozcan, Cengiz; Korlu, Savaş

    2011-07-01

    Facial nerve paralysis (FNP) is a very rare complication of otitis media with effusion (OME). There are few patients with OME and FNP in the literature. A 5-year-old girl was admitted to our department with right facial weakness. Right FNP and right OME were diagnosed on the examination. After medical treatment and ventilation tube insertion, FNP completely resolved. The symptoms, signs, and management of this patient are presented.

  11. Amblyopia Associated with Congenital Facial Nerve Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Iwamura, Hitoshi; Kondo, Kenji; Sawamura, Hiromasa; Baba, Shintaro; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    The association between congenital facial paralysis and visual development has not been thoroughly studied. Of 27 pediatric cases of congenital facial paralysis, we identified 3 patients who developed amblyopia, a visual acuity decrease caused by abnormal visual development, as comorbidity. These 3 patients had facial paralysis in the periocular region and developed amblyopia on the paralyzed side. They started treatment by wearing an eye patch immediately after diagnosis and before the critical visual developmental period; all patients responded to the treatment. Our findings suggest that the incidence of amblyopia in the cases of congenital facial paralysis, particularly the paralysis in the periocular region, is higher than that in the general pediatric population. Interestingly, 2 of the 3 patients developed anisometropic amblyopia due to the hyperopia of the affected eye, implying that the periocular facial paralysis may have affected the refraction of the eye through yet unspecified mechanisms. Therefore, the physicians who manage facial paralysis should keep this pathology in mind, and when they see pediatric patients with congenital facial paralysis involving the periocular region, they should consult an ophthalmologist as soon as possible.

  12. [Treatment of idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy)].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin Willy; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2013-01-28

    Bell's palsy is defined as an idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis of sudden onset. It affects 11-40 persons per 100,000 per annum. Many patients recover without intervention; however, up to 30% have poor recovery of facial muscle control and experience facial disfigurement. The aim of this study was to make an overview of which pharmacological treatments have been used to improve outcomes. The available evidence from randomized controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids but shows no benefit from antivirals.

  13. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis after upper third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Cakarer, Sirmahan; Can, Taylan; Cankaya, Burak; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Yazici, Sinem; Ayintap, Emre; Özden, Ali Veysel; Keskin, Cengizhan

    2010-11-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis (PFNP) after mandibular interventions has been reported in the literature. In most cases, paralysis begins immediately after the injection of the mandibular anesthesia, and duration of facial weakness is less than 12 hours. However, there are few documented cases of PFNP after maxillary dental or surgical procedures. A variety of mechanisms have been associated to PFNP, including viral reactivation, demyelination, edema, vasospasm, and trauma. The purpose of this presentation was to report a rare case of facial paralysis that occurred after an upper third molar extraction. The cause of the PFNP and the importance of the multidisciplinary approach in the management are emphasized.

  14. Masseteric-facial nerve transposition for reanimation of the smile in incomplete facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete facial paralysis occurs in about a third of patients with Bell's palsy. Although their faces are symmetrical at rest, when they smile they have varying degrees of disfigurement. Currently, cross-face nerve grafting is one of the most useful techniques for reanimation. Transfer of the masseteric nerve, although widely used for complete paralysis, has not to our knowledge been reported for incomplete palsy. Between December 2008 and November 2013, we reanimated the faces of 9 patients (2 men and 7 women) with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis with transposition of the masseteric nerve. Sex, age at operation, cause of paralysis, duration of denervation, recipient nerves used, and duration of follow-up were recorded. Commissural excursion, velocity, and patients' satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. The mean (SD) age at operation was 39 (±6) years and the duration of denervation was 29 (±19) months. There were no complications that required further intervention. Duration of follow-up ranged from 6-26 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement in both commissural excursion and velocity of more than two thirds in 6 patients, more than one half in 2 patients and less than one half in one. Qualitative evaluation showed a slight or pronounced improvement in 7/9 patients. The masseteric nerve is a reliable alternative for reanimation of the smile in patients with incomplete facial paralysis. Its main advantages include its consistent anatomy, a one-stage operation, and low morbidity at the donor site. PMID:26143295

  15. Masseteric-facial nerve transposition for reanimation of the smile in incomplete facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete facial paralysis occurs in about a third of patients with Bell's palsy. Although their faces are symmetrical at rest, when they smile they have varying degrees of disfigurement. Currently, cross-face nerve grafting is one of the most useful techniques for reanimation. Transfer of the masseteric nerve, although widely used for complete paralysis, has not to our knowledge been reported for incomplete palsy. Between December 2008 and November 2013, we reanimated the faces of 9 patients (2 men and 7 women) with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis with transposition of the masseteric nerve. Sex, age at operation, cause of paralysis, duration of denervation, recipient nerves used, and duration of follow-up were recorded. Commissural excursion, velocity, and patients' satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. The mean (SD) age at operation was 39 (±6) years and the duration of denervation was 29 (±19) months. There were no complications that required further intervention. Duration of follow-up ranged from 6-26 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement in both commissural excursion and velocity of more than two thirds in 6 patients, more than one half in 2 patients and less than one half in one. Qualitative evaluation showed a slight or pronounced improvement in 7/9 patients. The masseteric nerve is a reliable alternative for reanimation of the smile in patients with incomplete facial paralysis. Its main advantages include its consistent anatomy, a one-stage operation, and low morbidity at the donor site.

  16. Hansen's disease and HIV coinfection with facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Gangane, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of HIV leprosy co infection in India in spite of having a large burden of both leprosy and HIV. Herein we are reporting a case of co-infection of Hansen's disease and HIV with facial nerve palsy. PMID:25883486

  17. Temporohyoid osteoarthropathy and unilateral facial nerve paralysis in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Yadernuk, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    A 13-year-old broodmare was referred for weight loss and left facial nerve paralysis. Bilateral temporohyoid osteoarthropathy was diagnosed based on proliferation of the temporohyoid joints and stylohyoid bones on radiographs and guttural pouch endoscopy. The left side was more severely affected. Treatment resulted in little or no improvement. PMID:14703087

  18. Autonomic nerve preserving total mesorectal excision.

    PubMed

    Havenga, Klaas; Enker, Warren E

    2002-10-01

    The main objectives of surgery for rectal cancer are cure and the prevention of local or pelvic recurrence. Preservation of pelvic autonomic functions are important associated goals that have influenced the design of the operation. These changes began with modifications to the art of lateral pelvic lymphadenectomy, and with the introduction of sharp pelvic dissection along anatomical pelvic fascial planes for rectal cancer in the mid-1970s. These changes evolved to include deliberate autonomic nerve preservation as a part of the operation that was ultimately reported as TME with ANP [1]. While it is a small nuance. dissection was generally directed to the widest possible pelvic margin--medial to the autonomic nerves, as opposed to just peripheral to the mesorectum. Both sexual and urinary functions are complex. and patients undergoing surgery for rectal cancer may have differing baseline levels of function. Pre-existing benign prostatic hypertrophy or stress incontinence are common physical conditions. Patients bring personal or cultural attitudes to the subject of sexual function with advancing years. in a population with a median age in the mid-sixties. Other health issues such as coronary artery or peripheral vascular atherosclerotic disease, diabetes mellitus. smoking or alcohol intake, or the use of medications to treat these conditions, may influence sexual function. Radiation therapy, frequently used in conjunction with chemotherapy in the treatment of rectal cancer, may be associated with its own incidence of impotence caused via a different mechanism. While radiation may affect the vasa nervosa of the autonomic nerves, leading to fibrosis and dysfunction. radiation therapy may also be associated with smooth muscle fibrosis, causing vasculogenic impotence due to penile outflow dysfunction in the corpora cavernosa. The causes of impotence after surgery alone or after surgery. radiation, and chemotherapy for rectal cancer are complex, and not all answers to

  19. Comparison of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve transposition with a cross-facial nerve graft and muscle transplant for the rehabilitation of facial paralysis using the facial clima method.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Vila, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    To compare quantitatively the results obtained after hemihypoglossal nerve transposition and microvascular gracilis transfer associated with a cross facial nerve graft (CFNG) for reanimation of a paralysed face, 66 patients underwent hemihypoglossal transposition (n = 25) or microvascular gracilis transfer and CFNG (n = 41). The commissural displacement (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) in the two groups were compared using the system known as Facial clima. There was no inter-group variability between the groups (p > 0.10) in either variable. However, intra-group variability was detected between the affected and healthy side in the transposition group (p = 0.036 and p = 0.017, respectively). The transfer group had greater symmetry in displacement of the commissure (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) than the transposition group and patients were more satisfied. However, the transposition group had correct symmetry at rest but more asymmetry of CCV and CD when smiling.

  20. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... way on both sides while crying No movement (paralysis) on the affected side of the face (from the forehead to the chin in severe ... relieve pressure on the nerve. Infants with permanent paralysis need special therapy.

  1. Facial reanimation with masseteric to facial nerve transfer: a three-dimensional longitudinal quantitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Tarabbia, Filippo; Mapelli, Andrea; Colombo, Valeria; Sidequersky, Fernanda V; Rabbiosi, Dimitri; Annoni, Isabella; Biglioli, Federico

    2014-10-01

    Facial paralysis is a severe pathological condition, negatively affecting patients' quality of life. The altered tone and mobility of the mimetic musculature provoke both functional and morphological deficits. In the present study, we longitudinally measured facial movements in 14 patients (21-69 years) affected by unilateral facial paralysis not lasting longer than 23 months. The patients were analyzed before and after surgical masseteric to facial nerve neurorrhaphy. Examinations were performed at least 3 months after they had clinically started to regain facial mimicry. The displacement of selected facial landmarks was measured using an optoelectronic three-dimensional motion analyzer during: maximum smile without clenching (pre- and postsurgery), maximum smile by clenching on their posterior teeth (only postsurgery), and spontaneous smile (recorded during the vision of a funny video in both examinations). Before facial surgery, in all smiles facial landmarks moved more in the healthy than in the paretic side; after surgery, the differences decreased for both reduction of the healthy-side motion, and increment of the paretic-side motion (motion ratio before 52%, after 87%, p < 0.05, Students' t-test). The ratio between the paretic and healthy-side total motion (asymmetry) did not modify for maximum and spontaneous smiles, but significantly increased for the maximum smiles made with teeth clenching (asymmetry before 32%, after 11%, p < 0.001). Spontaneous smiles were recorded only in a subset of patients, but their execution was modified by surgery, with more symmetrical movements of the rehabilitated-side landmarks (asymmetry before 33%, after 10%), and reduced motion of the healthy-side ones (motion ratio before 51%, after 83%). In conclusion, the significant asymmetry in the magnitude of facial movements that characterized the analyzed patients before surgery reduced after surgery, at least in those facial areas interested by the masseteric to facial nerve

  2. Stereotactic radiotherapy for malignancies involving the trigeminal and facial nerves.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, K C; Zagar, T M; Brizel, D M; Yoo, D S; Hoang, J K; Chang, Z; Wang, Z; Yin, F F; Das, S K; Green, S; Ready, N; Bhatti, M T; Kaylie, D M; Becker, A; Sampson, J H; Kirkpatrick, J P

    2012-06-01

    Involvement of a cranial nerve caries a poor prognosis for many malignancies. Recurrent or residual disease in the trigeminal or facial nerve after primary therapy poses a challenge due to the location of the nerve in the skull base, the proximity to the brain, brainstem, cavernous sinus, and optic apparatus and the resulting complex geometry. Surgical resection caries a high risk of morbidity and is often not an option for these patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy are potential treatment options for patients with cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve. These techniques can deliver high doses of radiation to complex volumes while sparing adjacent critical structures. In the current study, seven cases of cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve are presented. These patients had unresectable recurrent or residual disease after definitive local therapy. Each patient was treated with stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator based system. A multidisciplinary approach including neuroradiology and surgical oncology was used to delineate target volumes. Treatment was well tolerated with no acute grade 3 or higher toxicity. One patient who was reirradiated experienced cerebral radionecrosis with mild symptoms. Four of the seven patients treated had no evidence of disease after a median follow up of 12 months (range 2-24 months). A dosimetric analysis was performed to compare intensity modulated fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (IM-FSRT) to a 3D conformal technique. The dose to 90% (D90) of the brainstem was lower with the IM-FSRT plan by a mean of 13.5 Gy. The D95 to the ipsilateral optic nerve was also reduced with IM-FSRT by 12.2 Gy and the D95 for the optic chiasm was lower with FSRT by 16.3 Gy. Treatment of malignancies involving a cranial nerve requires a multidisciplinary approach. Use of an IM-FSRT technique with a micro-multileaf collimator resulted in a lower dose to the brainstem, optic nerves and chiasm

  3. Anomalous Facial Nerve: An Unusual Cause of Obstruction of Middle Ear Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Tuli, I P

    2015-01-01

    Numerous anomalies and variations of facial nerve anatomy leading to iatrogenic injury are described. However, there are no reports of facial nerve dehiscence near its second genu causing a hump and obstructing middle ear ventilation pathway, as found in our case. This particular anomaly of facial nerve is being reported to highlight its uniqueness and that a dehiscent facial nerve may be a rare but dangerous cause of obstruction of the attic ventilation. One has to be aware of this unusual anomaly to prevent inadvertent damage to the facial nerve while clearing aditus block in persistent otitis media. PMID:26620754

  4. Middle ear osteoma causing progressive facial nerve weakness: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Facial nerve weakness is most commonly due to Bell’s palsy or cerebrovascular accidents. Rarely, middle ear tumor presents with facial nerve dysfunction. Case presentation We report a very unusual case of middle ear osteoma in a 49-year-old Caucasian woman causing progressive facial nerve deficit. A subtle middle ear lesion was observed on otoscopy and computed tomographic images demonstrated an osseous middle ear tumor. Complete surgical excision resulted in the partial recovery of facial nerve function. Conclusions Facial nerve dysfunction is rarely caused by middle ear tumors. The weakness is typically due to a compressive effect on the middle ear portion of the facial nerve. Early recognition is crucial since removal of these lesions may lead to the recuperation of facial nerve function. PMID:25236378

  5. Optical stimulation of the facial nerve: a surgical tool?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Teudt, Ingo Ulrik; Nevel, Adam E.; Izzo, Agnella D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2008-02-01

    One sequela of skull base surgery is the iatrogenic damage to cranial nerves. Devices that stimulate nerves with electric current can assist in the nerve identification. Contemporary devices have two main limitations: (1) the physical contact of the stimulating electrode and (2) the spread of the current through the tissue. In contrast to electrical stimulation, pulsed infrared optical radiation can be used to safely and selectively stimulate neural tissue. Stimulation and screening of the nerve is possible without making physical contact. The gerbil facial nerve was irradiated with 250-μs-long pulses of 2.12 μm radiation delivered via a 600-μm-diameter optical fiber at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Muscle action potentials were recorded with intradermal electrodes. Nerve samples were examined for possible tissue damage. Eight facial nerves were stimulated with radiant exposures between 0.71-1.77 J/cm2, resulting in compound muscle action potentials (CmAPs) that were simultaneously measured at the m. orbicularis oculi, m. levator nasolabialis, and m. orbicularis oris. Resulting CmAP amplitudes were 0.3-0.4 mV, 0.15-1.4 mV and 0.3-2.3 mV, respectively, depending on the radial location of the optical fiber and the radiant exposure. Individual nerve branches were also stimulated, resulting in CmAP amplitudes between 0.2 and 1.6 mV. Histology revealed tissue damage at radiant exposures of 2.2 J/cm2, but no apparent damage at radiant exposures of 2.0 J/cm2.

  6. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography. PMID:26101056

  7. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography.

  8. [Clinical-electroneuromyographical characteristics of facial nerve paralysis in children].

    PubMed

    Gribova, N P; Galitskaia, O S

    2009-01-01

    A clinical-electroneuromyographical study of 40 children (32 (80%) of them aged from 12 to 17 years, mean age 13,9+/-1,8 years, and 8 (20%) - from 1 to 8 years, mean age 4,4+/-2,1 years) were studied in the acute period of facial nerve paralysis (FNP). Six (15%) children had FNP in the anamnesis. Among precipitating factors were the cold exposure the day before disease onset (20 (50%) patients), symptoms of flu (13 (32,5%) patients) and psycho-emotional tension (3 (7,5%) patients). No precipitation was noted in 4 (10%) children. The degree of muscle paresis was 81,9+/-7% that corresponded to clinical stages III-IV according to K. Rosler. An electroneuromyographical analysis of motor ortho- and antidromic response to the facial nerve stimulation on the side of paresis and on the contralateral side in patients and controls revealed the presence of proximal axon- and myelinopathy of facial nerve with the involvement of its own motorneurons and brain stem interneurons. The maintenance of wink reflex and F-wave blocks in the period over 3 weeks are prognostically unfavorable factors for restoration of mimic muscle function in the early stage of disease.

  9. Proteomic analysis of microdissected facial nuclei of the rat following facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Grosheva, Maria; Angelov, Doychin N; Irintchev, Andrey; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2009-12-15

    Recent studies using molecular and genetic techniques just have started to elucidate the complex process that drives successful peripheral nerve regeneration. Introducing proteomics to this field, we unilaterally performed a facial nerve axotomy in 13 adult Wistar rats. Seven days later, a total of 40 20-microm coronary cryostat sections of the operated and contralateral unoperated nucleus facialis were microdissected. On the one hand, microdissected areas were pooled for each side, lysed and applied to ProteinChip Arrays. On the other hand, one microdissected area from the right and left facial nucleus each was directly placed on the affinity chromatographic array. Facial motoneurons were lysed in situ and released their proteins to spatially defined points. 215 laser addressable distinct positions across the surface of the spot enabled a high spatial resolution of measured protein profiles for the analysed tissue area. Protein profiles of the single positions were plotted over the used tissue section to visualize their distribution. The comparative analysis of the protein lysates from operated and normal nuclei facialis revealed, for both approaches used, differentially expressed proteins. Although by direct application of one cryostat section only a few hundred motoneurons were analysed, results comparable to these using lysates were obtained. Additionally, the applied technique revealed differences in the intensity distribution of several proteins of unknown function in the lesioned in comparison to the contralateral normal facial nucleus. This proteomic analysis with ultra high sensitivity paired with potential for a spatial resolution is a promising methodology for peripheral nerve regeneration studies. PMID:19748522

  10. A smartphone-based automatic diagnosis system for facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Seok; Kim, So Young; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2015-10-21

    Facial nerve palsy induces a weakness or loss of facial expression through damage of the facial nerve. A quantitative and reliable assessment system for facial nerve palsy is required for both patients and clinicians. In this study, we propose a rapid and portable smartphone-based automatic diagnosis system that discriminates facial nerve palsy from normal subjects. Facial landmarks are localized and tracked by an incremental parallel cascade of the linear regression method. An asymmetry index is computed using the displacement ratio between the left and right side of the forehead and mouth regions during three motions: resting, raising eye-brow and smiling. To classify facial nerve palsy, we used Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Support Vector Machine (SVM), and Leave-one-out Cross Validation (LOOCV) with 36 subjects. The classification accuracy rate was 88.9%.

  11. Bovine Dermal Matrix as Coverage of Facial Nerve Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Kappos, E. A.; Engels, P. E.; Wettstein, R.; Schaefer, D. J.; Kalbermatten, D. F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Soft tissue defects over functional structures represent a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. Often complex, reconstructive procedures are required. Occasionally, elderly or sick patients do not qualify for these extensive procedures. Case. We present the case of a 91-year-old lady with large hemifacial defect with exposed bone and nerves after tumor resection. We first performed radical resection including the fascia of the temporalis muscle and the frontal branch of the facial nerve. Due to the moribund elderly patient with a potentially high perioperative risk, we decided against flap reconstruction but to use bovine collagen/elastin matrix and split thickness skin graft. Results. No postoperative complications occurred and STSG and matrix healed uneventfully. Discussion. In selected cases, where complex reconstruction is not appropriate, this procedure can be a safe, easy, and fast alternative for covering soft tissue defects even on wound grounds containing nerve grafts. PMID:24550990

  12. Privacy Preserving Facial and Fingerprint Multi-biometric Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzaku, Esla Timothy; Sohn, Hosik; Ro, Yong Man

    The cases of identity theft can be mitigated by the adoption of secure authentication methods. Biohashing and its variants, which utilizes secret keys and biometrics, are promising methods for secure authentication; however, their shortcoming is the degraded performance under the assumption that secret keys are compromised. In this paper, we extend the concept of Biohashing to multi-biometrics - facial and fingerprint traits. We chose these traits because they are widely used, howbeit, little research attention has been given to designing privacy preserving multi-biometric systems using them. Instead of just using a single modality (facial or fingerprint), we presented a framework for using both modalities. The improved performance of the proposed method, using face and fingerprint, as against either facial or fingerprint trait used in isolation is evaluated using two chimerical bimodal databases formed from publicly available facial and fingerprint databases.

  13. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    PubMed

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle.

  14. Management of the Facial Nerve in Lateral Skull Base Surgery Analytic Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Mohamed A.; Mokbel, Mahmoud A.M.; Elbadry, Amr A.; Badran, Hatem S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Surgical approaches to the jugular foramen are often complex and lengthy procedures associated with significant morbidity based on the anatomic and tumor characteristics. In addition to the risk of intra-operative hemorrhage from vascular tumors, lower cranial nerves deficits are frequently increased after intra-operative manipulation. Accordingly, modifications in the surgical techniques have been developed to minimize these risks. Preoperative embolization and intra-operative ligation of the external carotid artery have decreased the intraoperative blood loss. Accurate identification and exposure of the cranial nerves extracranially allows for their preservation during tumor resection. The modification of facial nerve mobilization provides widened infratemporal exposure with less postoperative facial weakness. The ideal approach should enable complete, one stage tumor resection with excellent infratemporal and posterior fossa exposure and would not aggravate or cause neurologic deficit. The aim of this study is to present our experience in handling jugular foramen lesions (mainly glomus jugulare) without the need for anterior facial nerve transposition. Methods: In this series we present our experience in Kasr ElEini University hospital (Cairo—Egypt) in handling 36 patients with jugular foramen lesions over a period of 20 years where the previously mentioned preoperative and operative rules were followed. The clinical status, operative technique and postoperative care and outcome are detailed and analyzed in relation to the outcome. Results: Complete cure without complications was achieved in four cases of congenital cholesteatoma and four cases with class B glomus. In advanced cases of glomus jugulare (28 patients) (C and D stages) complete cure was achieved in 21 of them (75%). The operative complications were also related to this group of 28 patients, in the form of facial paralysis in 20 of them (55.6%) and symptomatic vagal paralysis in 18 of

  15. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell’s palsy, Ramsay–Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell’s phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell’s palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration

  16. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell's palsy, Ramsay-Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell's palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell's palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell's phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell's palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration with

  17. Facial nerve dysfunction in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I and III.

    PubMed

    Glocker, F X; Rösler, K M; Linden, D; Heinen, F; Hess, C W; Lücking, C H

    1999-09-01

    Facial nerve function was studied in 19 patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I (HMSN I) and 2 patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSN III, Déjérine-Sottas), and compared to that in 24 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The facial nerve was stimulated electrically at the stylomastoid fossa, and magnetically in its proximal intracanalicular segment. Additionally, the face-associated motor cortex was stimulated magnetically. The facial nerve motor neurography was abnormal in 17 of 19 HMSN I patients and in both HMSN III patients, revealing moderate to marked conduction slowing in both the extracranial and intracranial nerve segments, along with variable reductions of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes. The facial nerve conduction slowing paralleled that of limb nerves, but was not associated with clinical dysfunction of facial muscles, because none of the HMSN I patients had facial palsy. Conduction slowing was most severe in the HMSN III patients, but only slight facial weakness was present. In GBS, conduction slowing was less marked, but facial weakness exceeded that in HMSN patients in all cases. We conclude that involvement of the facial nerve is common in HMSN I and HMSN III. It affects the intra- and extracranial part of the facial nerve and is mostly subclinical. PMID:10454715

  18. A polylactic acid non-woven nerve conduit for facial nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumine, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    This study developed a biodegradable nerve conduit with PLA non-woven fabric and evaluated its nerve regeneration-promoting effect. The buccal branch of the facial nerve of 8 week-old Lewis rats was exposed, and a 7 mm nerve defect was created. A nerve conduit made of either PLA non-woven fabric (mean fibre diameter 460 nm), or silicone tube filled with type I collagen gel, or an autologous nerve, was implanted into the nerve defect, and their nerve regenerative abilities were evaluated 13 weeks after the surgery. The number of myelinated neural fibres in the middle portion of the regenerated nerve was the highest for PLA tubes (mean ± SD, 5051 ± 2335), followed by autologous nerves (4233 ± 590) and silicone tubes (1604 ± 148). Axon diameter was significantly greater in the PLA tube group (5.17 ± 1.69 µm) than in the silicone tube group (4.25 ± 1.60 µm) and no significant difference was found between the PLA tube and autograft (5.53 ± 1.93 µm) groups. Myelin thickness was greatest for the autograft group (0.65 ± 0.24 µm), followed by the PLA tube (0.54 ± 0.18 µm) and silicone tube (0.38 ± 0.12 µm) groups, showing significant differences among the three groups. The PLA non-woven fabric tube, composed of randomly-connected PLA fibres, is porous and has a number of advantages, such as sufficient strength to maintain luminal structure. The tube has demonstrated a comparable ability to induce peripheral nerve regeneration following autologous nerve transplantation.

  19. Bifid Facial Nerve Trunk: Anatomic and Surgical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Reija, María Fe García; Palacio, Julia C Blasco

    2016-09-01

    The segment of the facial nerve (FN) between its emergence from the skull through the stylomastoid foramen and its bifurcation at the parotid area is referred to as the FN trunk (FNT). Injury to the facial nerve trunk is among the most undesirable outcomes following different otologic, plastic, maxillofacial, and neurosurgical procedures. These procedures frequently involve manipulation and isolation of this segment, and meticulous dissection should be practiced to avoid iatrogenic damage to the nerve. Identification and exposure of the FN trunk, however, may be difficult because it is surrounded by dense connective tissue. This dissection becomes even more difficult and risky when the normal anatomy is distorted.During a routine left conservative superficial parotidectomy of a Pleomorphic Adenoma in the superficial lobe of the left parotid gland, duplication of the FNT was encountered. The FNT after its exit through the stylomastoid foramen, split into 2 main divisions, which rejoined before its penetration into the parotid gland. To the best of our knowledge, this variation has not been previously reported. PMID:27428907

  20. Repair of ocular-oral synkinesis of postfacial paralysis using cross-facial nerve grafting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Chuan; Wang, Wei; Li, Wei

    2010-08-01

    We present the surgical techniques and results of cross-facial nerve grafting that have been developed in the repair of ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis. Eleven patients with ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis underwent the cross-facial nerve grafting with facial nerve transposition at a tertiary academic hospital between 2003 and 2009. The patient selection for the study was based on the degree of disfigurement and facial function parameter rating using the Toronto Facial Grading System. The procedures used were surgeries done in two stages. All cases were followed up for 2 months to 6 years after the second surgery. The degree of improvement was evaluated at 6 to 7 months after the procedures. Six of the patients were followed up for more than 2 years after the stage-two surgery and demonstrated significant reduction in the ocular-oral synkinetic movements. The Toronto Facial Grading System scores from the postoperative follow-ups increased an average of 16 points (28%), and the patients had achieved symmetrical facial movement. We concluded that cross-facial nerve grafting with facial nerve branch transposition is effective and can be considered as an option for the repair of ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis in select patients.

  1. Characteristics of the perception for unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Mun, Sue Jean; Park, Kyung Tae; Kim, Yoonjoong; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-11-01

    Patients with facial nerve palsy (FNP) are actually evaluated by other people rather than doctors or the patients themselves. This study was performed to investigate the characteristics of the perception of unilateral FNP in Korean people. A questionnaire using photographs of four patients with four different grades (House-Brackmann) of FNP was given to two hundred people with no FNP. Subjects of each gender, ranging from 20 to 69 years of age, participated. The questionnaire, showing facial expressions of resting, smiling, whistling, eye closing, and frowning, consisted of questions concerning the identification and the involved side of FNP, the unnatural areas of the face, and the unnaturalness of the facial expressions. The overall identification rate of FNP was 75.0%. The identification rate increased according to the increase in the grade of the patient's FNP (p < .001). The overall detection rate of the involved side was 54.5%, and that rate decreased with increasing subject age (p < .001). The area of the most unnatural facial expression was reported to be the mouth, followed by the eyes and cheeks. The most unnatural facial expression was also reported to be smiling, followed by eye closing and whistling. There was no difference in the identification rate of FNP according to education level. However, the overall detection rate of the involved side was higher in the high-education group (p < .001). The detection rate for the involved side of FNP was lower than the rate of identification of FNP and was significantly low in the middle-aged/elderly and low-education level groups.

  2. Retrolabyrinthine approach for cochlear nerve preservation in neurofibromatosis type 2 and simultaneous cochlear implantation

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Monteiro, Tatiana Alves; Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valeria Schmidt; de Brito, Rubens

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Few cases of cochlear implantation (CI) in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients had been reported in the literature. The approaches described were translabyrinthine, retrosigmoid or middle cranial fossa. Objectives: To describe a case of a NF2- deafened-patient who underwent to vestibular schwannoma resection via RLA with cochlear nerve preservation and CI through the round window, at the same surgical time. Resumed Report: A 36-year-old woman with severe bilateral hearing loss due to NF2 was submitted to vestibular schwannoma resection and simultaneous CI. Functional assessment of cochlear nerve was performed by electrical promontory stimulation. Complete tumor removal was accomplishment via RLA with anatomic and functional cochlear and facial nerve preservation. Cochlear electrode array was partially inserted via round window. Sound field hearing threshold improvement was achieved. Mean tonal threshold was 46.2 dB HL. The patient could only detect environmental sounds and human voice but cannot discriminate vowels, words nor do sentences at 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Cochlear implantation is a feasible auditory restoration option in NF2 when cochlear anatomic and functional nerve preservation is achieved. The RLA is adequate for this purpose and features as an option for hearing preservation in NF2 patients. PMID:25992034

  3. What is expected of the facial nerve in michel aplasia? Anatomic variation.

    PubMed

    Zarandy, Masoud Motasaddi; Kouhi, Ali; Kashany, Shervin Sharif; Rabiei, Sohrab; Hajimohamadi, Fatemeh; Rabbani-Anari, Mahtab

    2010-11-01

    We sought better understanding about the facial nerve anatomy in the rare inner ear Michel anomaly to help better define this aplasia and prevent potential complications in surgery on these patients. The data from computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance images of six Michel aplastic ears (three patients) were evaluated for a facial nerve course. Facial nerve course and anatomic landmarks were noted. Based on data obtained from this group of very rare patients, three different facial nerve anatomies were encountered. The first patient had normal-looking mastoid cells, normal middle ear ossicles, and a completely formed facial nerve canal through the middle ear. The second patient had pneumatized mastoid air cells despite an anomalous ossicular chain. This patient also had a facial nerve canal but not through the middle ear. In the third patient, although mastoid cells were present, neither ossicles nor a definite facial nerve canal could be detected. With guidance provided by the anatomy of the other parts of the ear, such as air cells and the ossicular chain, the danger zones posing a high probability of facial nerve injury can be predicted. Although all Michel aplasias may have aplastic petrous bone in common, there are some degrees of variation. PMID:21772803

  4. Structure-preserving sparse decomposition for facial expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Sima; Qiang Qiu; Chellappa, Rama

    2014-08-01

    Although facial expressions can be decomposed in terms of action units (AUs) as suggested by the facial action coding system, there have been only a few attempts that recognize expression using AUs and their composition rules. In this paper, we propose a dictionary-based approach for facial expression analysis by decomposing expressions in terms of AUs. First, we construct an AU-dictionary using domain experts' knowledge of AUs. To incorporate the high-level knowledge regarding expression decomposition and AUs, we then perform structure-preserving sparse coding by imposing two layers of grouping over AU-dictionary atoms as well as over the test image matrix columns. We use the computed sparse code matrix for each expressive face to perform expression decomposition and recognition. Since domain experts' knowledge may not always be available for constructing an AU-dictionary, we also propose a structure-preserving dictionary learning algorithm, which we use to learn a structured dictionary as well as divide expressive faces into several semantic regions. Experimental results on publicly available expression data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for facial expression analysis.

  5. Tuberculous Otitis Media Leading to Sequentialib Bilateral Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nitin; Dass, Arjun; Goel, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is an uncommon, insidious, and frequently misdiagnosed form of tuberculosis (TB). In particular, TOM is usually secondary to direct transmission from adjacent organs, while the primary form has been rarely reported. The main aim of treatment is to start the patient on an antitubercular regime and early surgical intervention to decompress the facial nerve if involved. Case Report: The case report of a twenty year-old male with bilateral tuberculous otitis media, who presented himself with fever followed by sequential bilateral facial nerve paralysis, bilateral profound hearing loss, and abdominal tuberculosis leading to intestinal perforation, is presented. To the best available knowledge and after researching literature, no such case depicting the extensive otological complications of tuberculosis has been reported till date. Conclusion: Tuberculosis of the ear is a rare entity and in most cases the clinical features resemble that of chronic otitis media. The diagnosis is often delayed due to varied clinical presentations and this can lead to irreversible complications. Early diagnosis is essential for prompt administration of antitubercular therapy and to prevent complications. PMID:26082906

  6. Rare presentation of rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis: bilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Mohebbi, Alireza; Jahandideh, Hesam; Harandi, Ali Amini

    2011-01-01

    Rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis afflicts primarily diabetics and immunocompromised individual, but can also occur in normal hosts rarely. We here presented an interesting case of facial nerve palsy and multiple cold abscesses of neck due to rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis in an otherwise healthy man. Although some reports of facial nerve paralysis in conjunction with rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis exist, no case of bilateral complete facial paralysis has been reported in the literature to date. PMID:21541223

  7. Rat Whisker Movement after Facial Nerve Lesion: Evidence for Autonomic Contraction of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, James T.; Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Hohman, Marc H.; Knox, Christopher J.; Weinberg, Julie S.; Kleiss, Ingrid J.; Hadlock, Tessa A.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervation was from autonomic, cholinergic axons traveling within the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (ION). Rats underwent unilateral facial nerve transection with repair (N=7) or resection without repair (N=11). Post-operative whisking amplitude was measured weekly across 10 weeks, and during intraoperative stimulation of the ION and facial nerves at ≥18 weeks. Whisking was also measured after subsequent ION transection (N=6) or pharmacologic blocking of the autonomic ganglia using hexamethonium (N=3), and after snout cooling intended to elicit a vasodilation reflex (N=3). Whisking recovered more quickly and with greater amplitude in rats that underwent facial nerve repair compared to resection (P<0.05), but individual rats overlapped in whisking amplitude across both groups. In the resected rats, non-facial-nerve mediated whisking was elicited by electrical stimulation of the ION, temporarily diminished following hexamethonium injection, abolished by transection of the ION, and rapidly and significantly (P<0.05) increased by snout cooling. Moreover, fibrillation-related whisker movements decreased in all rats during the initial recovery period (indicative of reinnervation), but re-appeared in the resected rats after undergoing ION transection (indicative of motor denervation). Cholinergic, parasympathetic axons traveling within the ION innervate whisker pad vasculature, and immunohistochemistry for vasoactive intestinal peptide revealed these axons branching extensively over whisker pad muscles and contacting neuromuscular junctions after facial nerve resection. This study provides the first behavioral and anatomical evidence of spontaneous autonomic innervation

  8. Agmatine treatment and vein graft reconstruction enhance recovery after experimental facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Berenholz, Leonard; Segal, Shmuel; Gilad, Varda H; Klein, Collen; Yehezkeli, Eyal; Eviatar, Ephraim; Kessler, Alex; Gilad, Gad M

    2005-09-01

    The rate of nerve regeneration is a critical determinant of the degree of functional recovery after injury. Here, we sought to determine whether treatment with the neuroprotective compound, agmatine, with or without nerve reconstruction utilizing a regional autogenous vein graft would accelerate the rate of facial nerve regeneration. Experiments compared the following seven groups of adult male rats: (A) Intact untreated controls. (B) Sham operation with interruption of the nerve blood supply (controls). (C) Transection of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve (generating a gap of 3 mm) followed by saline treatment. (D) Nerve transection with unsutured autogenous vein (external jugular) graft reconstruction plus saline treatment. (E) Nerve transection with sutured vein graft approximation (coaptation of the proximal and distal nerve stumps) plus saline. (F) Nerve transection with sutured vein graft followed by agmatine treatment (four daily intraperitoneal injections of 100 mg/kg agmatine sulfate). (G) Nerve transection with unsutured vein graft followed by agmatine treatment. Functional recovery, as assessed by grading vibrissae movements and by recording nerve conduction velocity and numbers of regenerated axons, indicated that either vein reconstruction or agmatine treatment resulted in accelerated and more complete recovery as compared with controls. But best results were observed in animals that underwent combined treatment, i.e., vein reconstruction plus agmatine injection. We conclude that agmatine treatment can accelerate facial nerve regeneration and that agmatine treatment together with autogenous vein graft offers an advantageous alternative to other facial nerve reconstruction procedures.

  9. Unilateral Multiple Facial Nerve Branch Reconstruction Using “End-to-side Loop Graft” Supercharged by Hypoglossal Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Ryo; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Niimi, Yosuke; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Mariko; Yamato, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extensive facial nerve defects between the facial nerve trunk and its branches can be clinically reconstructed by incorporating double innervation into an end-to-side loop graft technique. This study developed a new animal model to evaluate the technique’s ability to promote nerve regeneration. Methods: Rats were divided into the intact, nonsupercharge, and supercharge groups. Artificially created facial nerve defects were reconstructed with a nerve graft, which was end-to-end sutured from proximal facial nerve stump to the mandibular branch (nonsupercharge group), or with the graft of which other end was end-to-side sutured to the hypoglossal nerve (supercharge group). And they were evaluated after 30 weeks. Results: Axonal diameter was significantly larger in the supercharge group than in the nonsupercharge group for the buccal (3.78 ± 1.68 vs 3.16 ± 1.22; P < 0.0001) and marginal mandibular branches (3.97 ± 2.31 vs 3.46 ± 1.57; P < 0.0001), but the diameter was significantly larger in the intact group for all branches except the temporal branch. In the supercharge group, compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly higher than in the nonsupercharge group (4.18 ± 1.49 mV vs 1.87 ± 0.37 mV; P < 0.0001) and similar to that in the intact group (4.11 ± 0.68 mV). Retrograde labeling showed that the mimetic muscles were double-innervated by facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei in the supercharge group. Conclusions: Multiple facial nerve branch reconstruction with an end-to-side loop graft was able to achieve axonal distribution. Additionally, axonal supercharge from the hypoglossal nerve significantly improved outcomes. PMID:25426357

  10. Delayed Facial Nerve Palsy After Open Reduction of an Isolated Zygomaticomaxillary Complex Fracture.

    PubMed

    Manosalva, Rodolfo E; Dyckman, Damian; Melzer, Jonathan M

    2016-06-01

    Facial nerve paralysis is a devastating complication which can occur after a variety of otolaryngic procedures, including facial trauma repair. The frontal and marginal branches are most often placed at risk. However, facial nerve paralysis is not typically described as a risk in most uncomplicated facial trauma repairs of the zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC). In particular, buccal branch injury has not been described in a delayed setting following repair of the ZMC. The authors present a patient of delayed buccal branch paralysis following a simple ZMC repair which has not been previously reported.The diagnosis, clinical course, and management strategies for delayed facial nerve paralysis in the setting of a ZMC repair are discussed. This rare complication after facial trauma repair should be discussed with patients as a possible complication. PMID:27213738

  11. Surgical outcomes of lateral approach for jugular foramen schwannoma: postoperative facial nerve and lower cranial nerve functions.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yang-Sun; So, Yoon Kyoung; Park, Kwan; Baek, Chung-Hwan; Jeong, Han-Sin; Hong, Sung Hwa; Chung, Won-Ho

    2009-01-01

    The lateral surgical approach to jugular foramen schwannomas (JFS) may result in complications such as temporary facial nerve palsy (FNP) and hearing loss due to the complicated anatomical location. Ten patients with JFS surgically treated by variable methods of lateral approach were retrospectively reviewed with emphasis on surgical methods, postoperative FNP, and lower cranial nerve status. Gross total removal of the tumors was achieved in eight patients. Facial nerves were rerouted at the first genu (1G) in six patients and at the second genu in four patients. FNP of House-Brackmann (HB) grade III or worse developed immediately postoperatively in six patients regardless of the extent of rerouting. The FNP of HB grade III persisted for more than a year in one patient managed with rerouting at 1G. Among the lower cranial nerves, the vagus nerve was most frequently paralyzed preoperatively and lower cranial nerve palsies were newly developed in two patients. The methods of the surgical approach to JFS can be modified depending on the size and location of tumors to reduce injury of the facial nerve and loss of hearing. Careful manipulation and caution are also required for short facial nerve rerouting as well as for long rerouting to avoid immediately postoperative FNP.

  12. Time-course of Changes in Activation Among Facial Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fu-Long; Gao, Pei-Yi; Sui, Bin-Bin; Wan, Hong; Lin, Yan; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Qian, Tian-Yi; Wang, Shiwei; Li, Dezhi; Liu, Song

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients suffering different intervals of facial nerve injury were investigated by functional magnetic resonance imaging to study changes in activation within cortex. Forty-five patients were divided into 3 groups based on intervals of facial nerve injury. Another 16 age and sex-matched healthy participants were included as a control group. Patients and healthy participants underwent task functional magnetic resonance imaging (eye blinking and lip pursing) examination. Functional reorganization after facial nerve injury is dynamic and time-dependent. Correlation between activation in sensorimotor area and intervals of facial nerve injury was significant, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of −0.951 (P < 0.001) in the left sensorimotor area and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.333 (P = 0.025) in the right sensorimotor area. Increased activation in integration areas, such as supramarginal gyrus and precunes lobe, could be detected in the early-middle stage of facial dysfunction compared with normal individuals. Decreased activation in sensorimotor area contralateral to facial nerve injury could be found in late stage of facial dysfunction compared with normal individuals. Dysfunction in the facial nerve has devastating effects on the activity of sensorimotor areas, whereas enhanced intensity in the sensorimotor area ipsilateral to the facial nerve injury in middle stage of facial dysfunction suggests the possible involvement of interhemispheric reorganization. Behavioral or brain stimulation technique treatment in this stage could be applied to alter reorganization within sensorimotor area in the rehabilitation of facial function, monitoring of therapeutic efficacy, and improvement in therapeutic intervention along the course of recovery. PMID:26512554

  13. Microanatomy and Histological Features of Central Myelin in the Root Exit Zone of Facial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Chan-Jong; Han, Seong-Rok; Choi, Chan-Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the microanatomy and histological features of the central myelin in the root exit zone of facial nerve. Methods Forty facial nerves with brain stem were obtained from 20 formalin fixed cadavers. Among them 17 facial nerves were ruined during preparation and 23 root entry zone (REZ) of facial nerves could be examined. The length of medial REZ, from detach point of facial nerve at the brain stem to transitional area, and the thickness of glial membrane of central myelin was measured. We cut brain stem along the facial nerve and made a tissue block of facial nerve REZ. Each tissue block was embedded with paraffin and serially sectioned. Slices were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), periodic acid-Schiff, and glial fibrillary acid protein. Microscopy was used to measure the extent of central myelin and thickness of outer glial membrane of central myelin. Thickness of glial membrane was examined at two different points, the thickest area of proximal and distal REZ. Results Special stain with PAS and GFAP could be differentiated the central and peripheral myelin of facial nerve. The length of medial REZ was mean 2.6 mm (1.6-3.5 mm). The glial limiting membrane of brain stem is continued to the end of central myelin. We called it glial sheath of REZ. The thickness of glial sheath was mean 66.5 µm (40-110 µm) at proximal REZ and 7.4 µm (5-10 µm) at distal REZ. Conclusion Medial REZ of facial nerve is mean 2.6 mm in length and covered by glial sheath continued from glial limiting membrane of brain stem. Glial sheath of central myelin tends to become thin toward transitional zone. PMID:25132929

  14. Rehabilitation of long-standing facial nerve paralysis with percutaneous suture-based slings.

    PubMed

    Alam, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Long-standing facial paralysis creates significant functional and aesthetic problems for patients affected by this deficit. Traditional approaches to correct this problem have involved aggressive open procedures such as unilateral face-lifts and sling procedures using fascia and implantable materials. Unfortunately, our results with these techniques over the last 5 years have been suboptimal. The traditional face-lift techniques did not address the nasolabial fold to our satisfaction, and suture-based techniques alone, while offering excellent short-term results, failed to provide a long-term solution. This led to the development of a novel percutaneous technique combining the minimally invasive approach of suture-based lifts with the long-term efficacy of Gore-Tex-based slings. We report our results with this technique for static facial suspension in patients with long-standing facial nerve paralysis and our surgical outcomes in 13 patients. The procedure offers re-creation of the nasolabial crease and suspension of the oral commissure to its normal anatomic relationships. The recovery time is minimal, and the operation is performed as a short outpatient procedure. Long-term 2-year follow-up has shown effective preservation of the surgical results.

  15. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongzhi; Feng, Shuwei; Chen, Jiao; Yang, Jie; Yang, Mingxiao; Zhong, Zhendong; Li, Ying; Liang, Fanrong

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP). However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6) and Hegu (LI4) in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP.

  16. Reanimation of reversible facial paralysis by the double innervation technique using an intraneural-dissected sural nerve graft.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Koichi; Hosokawa, Ko; Yano, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    In treating reversible facial paralysis, cross-facial nerve grafting offers voluntary and emotional reanimation. In contrast, rapid re-innervation and strong neural stimulation can be obtained with hypoglossal-facial nerve crossover. In this article, we describe the method of a combination of these techniques as a one-stage procedure. A 39-year-old man presented with facial paralysis due to nerve avulsion within the stylomastoid foramen. The sural nerve was harvested and two branches were created at its distal end by intraneural dissection. One branch was anastomosed to the contralateral facial nerve, and the other branch was used for hypoglossal-facial nerve crossover, followed by connecting the proximal stump of the graft to the trunk of the paralysed facial nerve in an end-to-end fashion. At 9 months postoperatively, almost complete facial symmetry and co-ordinated movements of the mimetic muscles were obtained with no obvious tongue atrophy. Since our method can efficiently gather neural inputs from the contralateral facial nerve and the ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve, it may become a good alternative for reanimation of reversible facial paralysis when the ipsilateral facial nerve is not available.

  17. The masseteric nerve: a versatile power source in facial animation techniques.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, B; Ferri, A; Ferrari, S; Copelli, C; Salvagni, L; Sesenna, E

    2014-03-01

    The masseteric nerve has many advantages including low morbidity, its proximity to the facial nerve, the strong motor impulse, its reliability, and the fast reinnervation that is achievable in most patients. Reinnervation of a neuromuscular transplant is the main indication for its use, but it has been used for the treatment of recent facial palsies with satisfactory results. We have retrospectively evaluated 60 patients who had facial animation procedures using the masseteric nerve during the last 10 years. The patients included those with recent, and established or congenital, unilateral and bilateral palsies. The masseteric nerve was used for coaptation of the facial nerve either alone or in association with crossfacial nerve grafting, or for the reinnervation of gracilis neuromuscular transplants. Reinnervation was successful in all cases, the mean (range) time being 4 (2-5) months for facial nerve coaptation and 4 (3-7) months for neuromuscular transplants. Cosmesis was evaluated (moderate, n=10, good, n=30, and excellent, n=20) as was functional outcome (no case of impairment of masticatory function, all patients able to smile, and achievement of a smile independent from biting). The masseteric nerve has many uses, including in both recent, and established or congenital, cases. In some conditions it is the first line of treatment. The combination of combined techniques gives excellent results in unilateral palsies and should therefore be considered a valid option.

  18. Overview of pediatric peripheral facial nerve paralysis: analysis of 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Özkale, Yasemin; Erol, İlknur; Saygı, Semra; Yılmaz, İsmail

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis in children might be an alarming sign of serious disease such as malignancy, systemic disease, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, middle ear surgery, and hypertension. The cases of 40 consecutive children and adolescents who were diagnosed with peripheral facial nerve paralysis at Baskent University Adana Hospital Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology Unit between January 2010 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. We determined that the most common cause was Bell palsy, followed by infection, tumor lesion, and suspected chemotherapy toxicity. We noted that younger patients had generally poorer outcome than older patients regardless of disease etiology. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis has been reported in many countries in America and Europe; however, knowledge about its clinical features, microbiology, neuroimaging, and treatment in Turkey is incomplete. The present study demonstrated that Bell palsy and infection were the most common etiologies of peripheral facial nerve paralysis.

  19. [Multiple erythema migrans and facial nerve paralysis: clinical manifestations of early disseminated Lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Braun, S A; Baran, A M; Boettcher, C; Kieseier, B C; Reifenberger, J

    2014-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a common vector-borne disease in Europe. The infection follows different stages with a broad variability of clinical symptoms and manifestations in different organs. A 49-year-old man presented with flu-like symptoms, facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythematous macular on his trunk and extremities. We diagnosed Lyme disease (stage II) with facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythema migrans. Intravenous ceftriaxone led to complete healing of hissymptoms within 2 weeks.

  20. The surgical anatomy of the cervical distribution of the facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Ziarah, H A; Atkinson, M E

    1981-09-01

    In an attempt to improve the safety of the submandibular approach to the mandible and submandibular anatomical dissections of 100 facial halves were undertaken. Observations were made on the course of the cervical branch of the facial nerve in relation to bony and soft tissue landmarks and fascial planes. The course of the nerve and its relation to the platysma muscle and investing fascia dictate the placement and depth of incision used for the submandibular approach.

  1. Basal cell adenoma of the major salivary glands. Report of a case with facial nerve encroachment.

    PubMed

    Strauss, M; Abt, A; Mahataphongse, V P; Conner, G H

    1981-02-01

    Basal cell adenoma of the parotid gland showed histopathologic evidence of facial nerve encroachment. A review of the pertinent literature and a discussion of current concepts of histogenesis of the tumor indicate that a spectrum of benign to malignant forms of this unusual tumor may exist. The sparsely reported association of this tumor and its malignant variants to facial nerve pathology is discussed, and recommendations for treatment are made.

  2. The effect of memantine on functional recovery of the facial nerve after crush injury.

    PubMed

    Topdag, Murat; Topdag, Deniz Ozlem; Ila, Kadri; Muezzinoglu, Bahar; Yaprak, Busra; Ozturk, Murat; Caliskan, Sebla; Iseri, Mete

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to establish whether memantine is an alternative and effective treatment on facial nerve recovery after crush injury, and also to analyze the effective doses of this promising agent. This is a randomized controlled animal study. 40 rats underwent crush injury to left main trunk of the facial nerve, and divided into 4 groups; (1) control (saline treated), (2) 5-mg/kg memantine, (3) 10-mg/kg memantine, and (4) 20-mg/kg memantine group. Facial nerve functions were evaluated by eye reflex, and whisker movement compared to the unaffected side. They were scored on a 3-point scale. On day 28, the rats were sacrificed, and the facial nerves were dissected. The paraffin sections were studied with caspase-3 immunostaining. According to statistical data, the recovery in Group 4 began significantly earlier than the other groups on the basis of restoring eye blink reflexes and whisker movement. Groups 2 and 3 showed faster recovery than Group 1 on the basis of whisker movement. The caspase-3 positive staining was rarely detected in all groups. The Kruskal–Wallis test revealed that Group 4 showed fewer apoptotic cells than other groups; this was statistically significant. However, the Mann–Whitney U test with the Bonferroni correction did not reveal any significant difference between the groups. In conclusion, this study revealed that memantine acted to restore facial nerve functions, and accelerate recovery after facial nerve injury by inhibiting apoptosis.

  3. Functional and anatomical basis for brain plasticity in facial palsy rehabilitation using the masseteric nerve.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Javier; Loayza, Francis R; Luis, Elkin O; Celorrio, Marta; Pastor, Maria A; Hontanilla, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Several techniques have been described for smile restoration after facial nerve paralysis. When a nerve other than the contralateral facial nerve is used to restore the smile, some controversy appears because of the nonphysiological mechanism of smile recovering. Different authors have reported natural results with the masseter nerve. The physiological pathways which determine whether this is achieved continue to remain unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activation pattern measuring blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during smiling and jaw clenching was recorded in a group of 24 healthy subjects (11 females). Effective connectivity of premotor regions was also compared in both tasks. The brain activation pattern was similar for smile and jaw-clenching tasks. Smile activations showed topographic overlap though more extended for smile than clenching. Gender comparisons during facial movements, according to kinematics and BOLD signal, did not reveal significant differences. Effective connectivity results of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) from the same seeds located in bilateral facial premotor regions showed significant task and gender differences (p < 0.001). The hypothesis of brain plasticity between the facial nerve and masseter nerve areas is supported by the broad cortical overlap in the representation of facial and masseter muscles.

  4. Unusual delayed presentation of head trauma complicating outcome of facial nerve decompression surgery.

    PubMed

    Thakur, J S; Shekar, Vidya; Saluja, Manika; Mohindroo, N K

    2013-08-20

    Late presentation of head trauma is rare. A young boy presented with a traumatic facial paralysis after head trauma. A CT scan of the head showed temporal bone fracture without intracranial insult. Facial nerve decompression was performed and paralysis started improving. However, he presented with vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss after 2 months. Clinical examination also showed cerebellar sign. We suspected iatrogenic injury to the cochlea; however, brain MRI showed haemorrhage in the area of anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient was managed conservatively and the vertigo improved. This case stresses on unusual late presentation of head trauma and cerebellar artery injury that complicated the outcome of facial nerve paralysis.

  5. Reproducibility of normal facial motor nerve conduction studies and their relevance in the electrophysiological assessment of peripheral facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Di Bella, P; Logullo, F; Lagalla, G; Sirolla, C; Provinciali, L

    1997-09-01

    To determine the intra-examiner intertrial reproducibility of normal facial motor nerve conduction studies (FNCS) and their relevance in electrophysiological assessments of peripheral facial paralysis, 52 patients with acute unilateral Bell's palsy were examined on two separate occasions 1 months apart. Three electroneurographic methods were assessed. On the unaffected side of the face, FNCS are reliable when performed by a single examiner over time. Nevertheless, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) baseline-to-peak and peak-to-peak amplitude showed a rather high intertrial variability. Reproducibility of the assessed surface electrode recording procedures was similar. Regarding the affected side, in patients with mild axonotmesis of the facial nerve variations of electroneurographic parameters 1 months apart fell within the range of normal intertrial variability. In patients with severe or moderate axonotmesis, the distal latency and the M wave amplitude variations showed significant intertrial variations. Reproducibility of FNCS appears to be similar to that found in limb motor nerves. Normal variability curtails the sensitivity of FNCS in detecting mild facial nerve axonotmesis, although this technique remains useful in severe cases.

  6. [Topographic diagnosis of lesions of the acoustico-facial nerve complex using the winking reflex].

    PubMed

    Molina-Negro, P; Martin, E; Bujanda, M

    1979-04-01

    An electrophysiological study in close to 1,500 cases of various lesions of the trigeminal nerve, the acoustico-facial complex and the brain stem was presented. It was concluded that following a detailed clinical examination which, most often, allows precise topographical diagnosis, the study of the trigemino-facial and facial reflexes appears to be an essential diagnostic tool to determine the topography of a lesion. Moreover, this method may give prognostic evaluation as well as facilitate the choice of surgical approach to the lesions of the acoustico-facial complex.

  7. Outcome on hearing and facial nerve function in microsurgical treatment of small vestibular schwannoma via the middle cranial fossa approach.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Scheich, Matthias; Harnisch, Wilma; Bonn, Verena; Ehrmann-Müller, Desiree; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa; Mlynski, Robert; Hagen, Rudolf

    2013-03-01

    Encouraging results regarding hearing preservation and facial nerve function as well as increasing understanding of the natural behaviour of vestibular schwannomas have led to the recommendation of an early treatment in small VS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate current data on functional outcome of patients with small VS treated by middle cranial fossa (MCF) approach. A retrospective chart study of all cases treated by MCF approach between October 2007 and September 2011 was performed. Records were analyzed regarding demographical data, tumor size, hearing status, vestibular function and facial nerve function. Facial nerve function was classified according to the House-Brackmann scale (HB). Hearing status was classified according to the American Association of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and a modified classification of Gardner and Robertson (GR). Eighty-nine patients were included in the study; 41 % of VS was classified as intracanalicular (stage 1) and 59 % as stage 2. From 65 patients with a preoperative hearing status according to AAO-HNS A or B, 74 % still presented with A or B after surgery. Using a modified GR classification, from 70 patients categorized as class I or II prior to surgery, 70 % were still class I or II. Looking to the facial nerve function 1 week after surgery, 82 % of patients presented with HB 1 or 2. Three to twelve months later, 96 % demonstrated HB 1 or 2. A persisting facial palsy was recorded in four patients. Preoperative hearing status was evaluated as a prognostic factor for postoperative hearing, whereas no influence was detected in ABR, vestibular function and tumor length. Early diagnosis of small VS due to high-sensitive MRI requires the management of this tumor entity. Natural behaviour of VS in many cases demonstrates an increase of tumor size over time with deterioration of hearing status. The presented data underline the recommendation of an early surgical treatment in small VS as a valuable

  8. Facial movement before and after masseteric-facial nerves anastomosis: a three-dimensional optoelectronic pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Frigerio, Alice; Mapelli, Andrea; Mandelli, Filippo; Sidequersky, Fernanda V; Colombo, Valeria; Ferrario, Virgilio F; Biglioli, Federico

    2012-07-01

    To quantify the effects of facial palsy reanimation, 14 patients aged 17-66 years were analysed. All patients had unilateral facial paralysis, and were candidates for surgical masseteric to facial nerve anastomosis. Two patient groups were measured: seven patients were waiting for surgery, the other seven patients had already been submitted to surgery, and had regained facial mimicry. Each patient performed three facial animations: brow raise; free smile; lip purse. These were recorded using an optoelectronic motion analyser. The three-dimensional coordinates of facial landmarks were obtained, their movements were computed, and asymmetry indices calculated (differential movements between the two hemi-faces: healthy and paretic/rehabilitated). Before surgery, mobility was larger in the healthy than in the paretic side; after surgery, the differences were reduced (brow raise and lip purse), or even reversed (smile). Before surgery, lip purse was performed with significant labial asymmetry (p=0.042; larger healthy side movement). After surgery, asymmetry indices reduced. Total labial asymmetry during smiling was significantly different from 0 before surgery (p=0.018, larger healthy side movement). After surgery, all asymmetry indices became non-significant. Before surgery the lateral displacements of all labial landmarks were towards the healthy side, while they normalized after surgery.

  9. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) following administration of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paul, R; Stassen, L F A

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral transient paralysis of facial muscles resulting from dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve. Presented here is a 26-year-old female patient with right lower motor neurone facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's palsy, as a possible rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination, and steps taken to manage such a presentation.

  10. Radiological and Clinical Factors Predicting the Facial Nerve Outcome following Retrosigmoid Approach for Large Vestibular Schwannomas (VSs).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayur; Sonig, Ashish; Ambekar, Sudheer; Nanda, Anil

    2013-10-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to identify the radiological and clinical factors that predict postoperative facial nerve outcome following retrosigmoid approach for large vestibular schwannomas (VSs). Methods A total of 72 patients with large (≥ 3 cm) vestibular schwannomas was included in this retrospective study. Various parameters evaluated were age, gender, clinical presentation, tumor diameter in three planes, intrameatal extension, and pattern of growth. Results Age of the patient and presenting symptoms such as headache, ataxia, or preoperative facial nerve dysfunction correlated with poorer facial nerve outcome (p < 0.05). Patients with larger tumor volumes and extrameatal growth experienced a worse outcome (p < 0.05). Anterior and caudal extension (p = 0.001) correlated with poorer outcome, as well. Intrameatal extension and bony changes of the internal acoustic meatus did not correlate with the outcome (p > 0.05). Of the various examined factors, preoperative facial nerve function independently predicted postoperative facial nerve outcome. Conclusion Our study suggests that young patients with small tumor volume and normal facial nerve function at presentation are more likely to experience a good postoperative facial nerve outcome. These clinical and radiological parameters can be used to predict facial nerve outcome prior to surgery.

  11. [Repair of a facial nerve substance loss by interposition of a collagen neurotube].

    PubMed

    Semere, A; Morand, B; Loury, J; Vuillerme, N; Bettega, G

    2014-08-01

    We are exposing the case of a 22 year-old patient presenting a wound of the right cheek, with a palsy of the right corner of the mouth. He has been sent to us 6 days after the trauma for secondary exploration. A section of the buccal branch of the right facial nerve with a 1cm gap has been brought out. We have bypassed the loss of substance with a collagen absorbable biological conduit. The 6-months clinical and electromyographic follow-up has shown a clear improvement of the function of the orbicularis oris, as well as its reinnervation by the buccal branch of the right facial nerve. PMID:24698336

  12. Post Traumatic Delayed Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy (FNP): Diagnostic Dilemma of Expressionless Face.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2015-04-01

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy [FNP] is a rare condition. Mostly it is idiopathic. Post traumatic bilateral FNP is even more rare and having unique neurosurgical considerations. Post traumatic delayed presentation of bilateral FNP is socially debilitating and also having diagnostic challenge. Due to lack of facial asymmetry as present in unilateral facial paralysis, it is difficult to recognize. We are presenting a case of delayed onset bilateral FNP who developed FNP after 12 days of head injury with a brief discussion of its diagnostic dilemma and management along with literature review.

  13. [A case of Moebius syndrome--electrophysiological studies of facial nerve and brainstem].

    PubMed

    Noro, H; Wakai, S; Ishikawa, Y; Okabe, M; Minami, R

    1991-11-01

    A five-year old boy was the product of a 40 week pregnancy by vertex presentation complicated only by threatened abortion at approximately 8 weeks gestation. Apgar score was 5 after one minute. At birth he was noted to have a generalized hypotonia associated with facial diplegia, small mandible, weak suck and swallow reflexes. Admission examination revealed small mandible, mask-like facial expression and mild mental retardation. Cranial nerve examination showed bilateral blepharoptosis and facial nerve palsies. Pupil reflexes were normal, but corneal reflexes were impaired bilaterally. Diplopia due to the left abducens nerve palsy was suggested. There was no atrophy of the tongue. Motor tone, strength, and deep tendon reflexes were normal. A normal 46 XY karyotype was present. The other clinical and laboratory findings were normal. MRI of the brain was unremarkable. The characteristics of electrophysiological studies were summarized as follows: 1) Auditory brainstem evoked responses demonstrated waveforms IV-V were abnormal because their amplitudes were less than 30% of wave I bilaterally. 2) Somatosensory evoked potentials documented by central conduction times from cervical region to sensory cortex were prolonged on both sides. 3) Facial nerve conduction velocity was calculated by evoked EMGs of the mentalis muscle electrically stimulated at two distal points over the marginal mandibular branch. MCV of the left side was reduced (34.2 m/sec). 4) The amplitude of the facial muscle potentials evoked by facial nerve stimulation was reduced on both sides. 5) Blink reflex responses documented by the latency difference of R1 responses between the two sides were prolonged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Masseteric nerve for reanimation of the smile in short-term facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2014-02-01

    Our aim was to describe our experience with the masseteric nerve in the reanimation of short term facial paralysis. We present our outcomes using a quantitative measurement system and discuss its advantages and disadvantages. Between 2000 and 2012, 23 patients had their facial paralysis reanimated by masseteric-facial coaptation. All patients are presented with complete unilateral paralysis. Their background, the aetiology of the paralysis, and the surgical details were recorded. A retrospective study of movement analysis was made using an automatic optical system (Facial Clima). Commissural excursion and commissural contraction velocity were also recorded. The mean age at reanimation was 43(8) years. The aetiology of the facial paralysis included acoustic neurinoma, fracture of the skull base, schwannoma of the facial nerve, resection of a cholesteatoma, and varicella zoster infection. The mean time duration of facial paralysis was 16(5) months. Follow-up was more than 2 years in all patients except 1 in whom it was 12 months. The mean duration to recovery of tone (as reported by the patient) was 67(11) days. Postoperative commissural excursion was 8(4)mm for the reanimated side and 8(3)mm for the healthy side (p=0.4). Likewise, commissural contraction velocity was 38(10)mm/s for the reanimated side and 43(12)mm/s for the healthy side (p=0.23). Mean percentage of recovery was 92(5)mm for commissural excursion and 79(15)mm/s for commissural contraction velocity. Masseteric nerve transposition is a reliable and reproducible option for the reanimation of short term facial paralysis with reduced donor site morbidity and good symmetry with the opposite healthy side.

  15. Primary Nasopharyngeal Tuberculosis Combined with Tuberculous Otomastoiditis and Facial Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Young; Jang, Ji Hye; Lee, Kyung Mi; Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Sang Hoon; Yeo, Seung Geun; Kim, Eui Jong

    2016-01-01

    Primary nasopharyngeal tuberculosis (TB) without pulmonary involvement is rare, even in endemic areas. Herein, we present a rare complication of primary nasopharyngeal TB accompanied with tuberculous otomastoiditis (TOM) and ipsilateral facial nerve palsy, in a 24-year-old female patient, with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imagery findings. PMID:27127580

  16. Unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies associated with posterior fossa exploration surgery.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ayman; Clerkin, James; Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Green, Sandra; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Multiple cranial nerves palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment is a rare clinical presentation. This case report describes a young man who developed a unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment. There are different theories to explain this presentation, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We propose that this patient cranial nerve palsies developed following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, potentially as a consequence of rapid change in CSF dynamics. PMID:26951144

  17. A Systematic Analysis of the Reliability of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography for Facial Nerve Imaging in Patients with Vestibular Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Ung, Nolan; Mathur, Monica; Chung, Lawrance K; Cremer, Nicole; Pelargos, Panayiotis; Frew, Andrew; Thill, Kimberly; Mathur, Ishani; Voth, Brittany; Lim, Michael; Yang, Isaac

    2016-08-01

    Surgeons need to visualize the facial nerve reliably in relation to the vestibular schwannoma (VS) in surgical planning. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography has enabled unprecedented in vivo preoperative visualization. We collected data to measure the accuracy of DTI for an accurate location of the nerve in preoperative VS resection planning. A PubMed search for relevant studies was conducted. Inclusion criteria were gross total resection of VS, preoperative DTI identification of the facial nerve, and intraoperative cranial nerve localization by the surgeon. Exclusion criteria were tumors other than VS and unsuccessful preoperative location of the cranial nerve. Accuracy rate was calculated by comparing the intraoperative and preoperative locations detailed by DTI. The query identified 38 cases of VS that fit our inclusion criteria. Overall, 89% had surgical findings that agreed with the DTI location of the facial nerve. Of these cases, 32 patients had a postoperative House-Brackmann grade I or II. Our findings suggest that DTI is a reliable method for facial nerve imaging. Implementation of this technique may help decrease facial nerve injury during surgery. Limitations and further studies are needed to better understand what factors correlate with successful location of the facial nerve and DTI in patients with VS. PMID:27441156

  18. [Iatrogenic injuries of the facial nerve in the mastoid region].

    PubMed

    Príhodová, J; Zelený, M; Kozák, J

    1990-09-01

    During the past ten years nine patients were referred to our hospital with lesions of the VIIth nerve. These lesions were inflicted during operation on account of chronic otitis media. One patient recovered after conservative treatment. Based on the EMG examination and clinical picture, eight patients were operated. In one who had an extensive lesion it did not prove possible to find the proximal stump and the patient improved after Normann-Dott's operation. In the remaining seven subjects also severe damage was involved: five times complete severing of the nerve occurred, twice partial severing and contusion, always in the mastoid portion of the VIIth nerve. The authors achieved as a rule a 50-75% restoration of function of the VIIth nerve Ballance-Duel's operation, using a graft of the n. suralis with microsuture of the epineurium and gluing of the nerve by plasma. Evaluation of late functional results was made 1-8 years after Ballance-Duel's operation. The authors recommend to reduce the risk of iatrogenic lesions of the VIIth nerve in beginners by assistance of experienced surgeons at several operations. PMID:2225170

  19. A Cadaveric Study of the Communication Patterns Between the Buccal Trunks of the Facial Nerve and the Infraorbital Nerve in the Midface.

    PubMed

    Tansatit, Tanvaa; Phanchart, Piyaporn; Chinnawong, Dawinee; Apinuntrum, Prawit; Phetudom, Thavorn; Sahraoui, Yasmina M E

    2016-01-01

    Most nerve communications reported in the literature were found between the terminal branches. This study aimed to clarify and classify patterns of proximal communications between the buccal branches (BN) of the facial nerve and the infraorbital nerve (ION).The superficial musculoaponeurotic system protects any communication sites from conventional dissections. Based on this limitation, the soft tissues of each face were peeled off the facial skull and the facial turn-down flap specimens were dissected from the periosteal view. Dissection was performed in 40 hemifaces to classify the communications in the sublevator space. Communication site was measured from the ala of nose.A double communication was the most common type found in 62.5% of hemifaces. Triple and single communications existed in 25% and 10% of 40 hemiface specimens, respectively. One hemiface had no communication. The most common type of communication occurred between the lower trunk of the BN of the facial nerve and the lateral labial (fourth) branch of the ION (70% in 40 hemifaces). Communication site was deep to the levator labii superioris muscle at 16.2 mm from the nasal ala. Communications between the motor and the sensory nerves in the midface may be important to increase nerve endurance and to compensate functional loss from injury.Proximal communications between the main trunks of the facial nerve and the ION in the midface exist in every face. This implies some specific functions in normal individuals. Awareness of these nerves is essential in surgical procedure in the midface.

  20. Facial anatomy.

    PubMed

    Marur, Tania; Tuna, Yakup; Demirci, Selman

    2014-01-01

    Dermatologic problems of the face affect both function and aesthetics, which are based on complex anatomical features. Treating dermatologic problems while preserving the aesthetics and functions of the face requires knowledge of normal anatomy. When performing successfully invasive procedures of the face, it is essential to understand its underlying topographic anatomy. This chapter presents the anatomy of the facial musculature and neurovascular structures in a systematic way with some clinically important aspects. We describe the attachments of the mimetic and masticatory muscles and emphasize their functions and nerve supply. We highlight clinically relevant facial topographic anatomy by explaining the course and location of the sensory and motor nerves of the face and facial vasculature with their relations. Additionally, this chapter reviews the recent nomenclature of the branching pattern of the facial artery.

  1. Transforming growth factor-β3 promotes facial nerve injury repair in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YANMEI; ZHAO, XINXIANG; HUOJIA, MUHTER; XU, HUI; ZHUANG, YOUMEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 on the regeneration of facial nerves in rabbits. A total of 20 adult rabbits were randomly divided into three equal groups: Normal control (n=10), surgical control (n=10) and TGF-β3 treatment (n=10). The total number and diameter of the regenerated nerve fibers was significantly increased in the TGF-β3 treatment group, as compared with in the surgical control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, in the TGF-β3 treatment group, the epineurial repair of the facial nerves was intact and the nerve fibers, which were arranged in neat rows, were morphologically intact with visible myelin swelling. However, in the surgical control group, the epineurial repair was incomplete, as demonstrated by: Atrophic nerve fibers, partially disappeared axons and myelin of uneven thickness with fuzzy borders. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the regenerated fibers in the TGF-β3 treatment group were predominantly myelinated, with clear-layered myelin sheath structures and axoplasms rich in organelles. Although typical layered myelin sheath structures were observed in the surgical control group, the myelin sheaths of the myelinated nerve fibers were poorly developed and few organelles were detected in the axoplasms. Neuro-electrophysiological examination demonstrated that, as compared with the surgical control group, the latency period of the action potentials in the TGF-β3 treatment group were shorter, whereas the stimulus amplitudes of the action potentials were significantly increased (P<0.01). The results of the present study suggest that TGF-β3 may improve the regeneration of facial nerves following trauma or injury. PMID:26997982

  2. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: facial nerve palsy after temporal fossa photoillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2003-06-01

    In two randomized prospective studies of brain tumor PDT more than 180 patients have been accrued. At the Toronto site we recognized two patients who developed a lower motor neuron (LMN) facial paralysis in the week following the PDT treatment. In both cases a temporal lobectomy was undertaken and the residual tumor cavity was photo-illuminated. The surface illuminated included the temporal fossa floor, thus potentially exposing the facial nerve to the effect of PDT. The number of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital tumors in this cohort was 39, 24, 12 and 4, respectively. Of the 24 temporal tumors 18 were randomized to Photofrin-PDT. Of these 18 a temporal lobectomy was carried out exposing the middle fossa floor as part of the tumor resection. In two of the 10 patients where the lobectomy was carried out and the fossa floor was exposed to light there occurred a postoperative facial palsy. Both patients recovered facial nerve function in 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. 46 J/cm2 were used in the former and 130 J/cm2 in the latter. We did not encounter a single post-operative LMN facial plasy in the 101 phase 2 patients treated with Photofrin-PDT. Among 688 supratentorial brain tumor operations in the last decade involving all pathologies and all locations no case of early post-operative LMN facial palsy was identified in the absence of PDT. One further patient who had a with post-PDT facial palsy was identified at the Denver site. Although it is possible that these patients had incidental Bell's palsy, we now recommend shielding the temporal fossa floor during PDT.

  3. [Peculiar features of mastoiditis in a brest-fed infant with the "exposed" facial nerve].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, I G

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the clinical case of mastoiditis in a 5-month old child in whom an unusual localization of the totally "naked" facial nerve outside of the bone canal in the mastoid part was discovered intraoperatively. This finding was quite unexpected because nerves are not visible on CT scanograms. The author emphasizes that the clinical course of otitis media in the breast- fed infants and young children is characterized by a number of peculiarities due to specific anatomical, physiological, and immunological features of the child's organism. She also notes that the number of antromastoidotomies for the treatment of mastoiditis has increased in Tatarstan during the recent years.

  4. A Case of Wegener's Granulomatosis Presenting with Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ujjawal, Roy; Koushik, Pan; Ajay, Panwar; Subrata, Chakrabarti

    2016-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis or granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a necrotizing vasculitis affecting both arterioles and venules. The disease is characterized by the classical triad involving acute inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tracts with renal involvement. However, the disease pathology can affect any organ system. This case presents Wegener's granulomatosis presenting with facial nerve palsy as the first manifestation of the disease, which is rarely reported in medical literature. PMID:27110249

  5. A system for delivering mechanical stimulation and robot-assisted therapy to the rat whisker pad during facial nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heaton, James T; Knox, Christopher J; Malo, Juan S; Kobler, James B; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2013-11-01

    Functional recovery is typically poor after facial nerve transection and surgical repair. In rats, whisking amplitude remains greatly diminished after facial nerve regeneration, but can recover more completely if the whiskers are periodically mechanically stimulated during recovery. Here we present a robotic "whisk assist" system for mechanically driving whisker movement after facial nerve injury. Movement patterns were either preprogrammed to reflect natural amplitudes and frequencies, or movements of the contralateral (healthy) side of the face were detected and used to control real-time mirror-like motion on the denervated side. In a pilot study, 20 rats were divided into nine groups and administered one of eight different whisk assist driving patterns (or control) for 5-20 minutes, five days per week, across eight weeks of recovery after unilateral facial nerve cut and suture repair. All rats tolerated the mechanical stimulation well. Seven of the eight treatment groups recovered average whisking amplitudes that exceeded controls, although small group sizes precluded statistical confirmation of group differences. The potential to substantially improve facial nerve recovery through mechanical stimulation has important clinical implications, and we have developed a system to control the pattern and dose of stimulation in the rat facial nerve model.

  6. Evaluation of variation in the course of the facial nerve, nerve adhesion to tumors, and postoperative facial palsy in acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Sameshima, Tetsuro; Morita, Akio; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Fukushima, Takanori; Friedman, Allan H; Zenga, Francesco; Ducati, Alessandro; Mastronardi, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    Objective To investigate the variation in the course of the facial nerve (FN) in patients undergoing acoustic neuroma (AN) surgery, its adhesion to tumors, and the relationship between such adhesions and postoperative facial palsy. Methods The subjects were 356 patients who underwent AN surgery in whom the course of the FN could be confirmed. Patients were classified into six groups: ventro-central surface of the tumor (VCe), ventro-rostral (VR), ventro-caudal (VCa), rostral (R), caudal (C), and dorsal (D). Results The FN course was VCe in 185 cases, VR in 137, VCa in 19, R in 10, C in 4, and D in one. For tumors < 1.5 cm, VCe was most common. For tumors ≥ 1.5 cm, the proportion of VR increased. No significant difference was observed between the course patterns of the FN in terms of postoperative FN function, but for tumors > 3.0 cm, there was an increasing tendency for the FN to adhere strongly to the tumor capsule, and postoperative facial palsy was more severe in patients with stronger adhesions. Conclusions The VCe pattern was most common for small tumors. Strong or less strong adhesion to the tumor capsule was most strongly associated with postoperative FN palsy.

  7. Evaluation of Variation in the Course of the Facial Nerve, Nerve Adhesion to Tumors, and Postoperative Facial Palsy in Acoustic Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Sameshima, Tetsuro; Morita, Akio; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Fukushima, Takanori; Friedman, Allan H.; Zenga, Francesco; Ducati, Alessandro; Mastronardi, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the variation in the course of the facial nerve (FN) in patients undergoing acoustic neuroma (AN) surgery, its adhesion to tumors, and the relationship between such adhesions and postoperative facial palsy. Methods The subjects were 356 patients who underwent AN surgery in whom the course of the FN could be confirmed. Patients were classified into six groups: ventro-central surface of the tumor (VCe), ventro-rostral (VR), ventro-caudal (VCa), rostral (R), caudal (C), and dorsal (D). Results The FN course was VCe in 185 cases, VR in 137, VCa in 19, R in 10, C in 4, and D in one. For tumors < 1.5 cm, VCe was most common. For tumors ≥ 1.5 cm, the proportion of VR increased. No significant difference was observed between the course patterns of the FN in terms of postoperative FN function, but for tumors > 3.0 cm, there was an increasing tendency for the FN to adhere strongly to the tumor capsule, and postoperative facial palsy was more severe in patients with stronger adhesions. Conclusions The VCe pattern was most common for small tumors. Strong or less strong adhesion to the tumor capsule was most strongly associated with postoperative FN palsy. PMID:24436886

  8. Nimodipine-mediated re-myelination after facial nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yin-da; Zheng, Xue-sheng; Ying, Ting-ting; Yuan, Yan; Li, Shi-ting

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of nimodipine-mediated neural repair after facial nerve crush injury in rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: healthy controls, surgery alone, and surgery plus nimodipine. A facial nerve crush injury model was constructed. Immediately after surgery, the rats in the surgery plus nimodipine group were administered nimodipine, 6 mg/kg/day, for a variable numbers of days. The animals underwent electromyography (EMG) before surgery and at 3, 10, or 20 days after surgery. After sacrifice, nerve samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and luxol fast blue. The EMG at 20 days revealed an apparent recovery of eletroconductivity, with the surgery plus nimodipine group having a higher amplitude and shorter latency time than the surgery only group. H&E staining showed that at 20 days, the rats treated with nimodipine had an obvious recovery of myelination and reduction in the number of infiltrating cells, suggesting less inflammation, compared with the rats in the surgery only group. Luxol fast blue staining was relatively even in the surgery plus nimodipine group, indicating a protective effect against injury-induced demyelination. Staining for S100 calcium-binding protein B (S-100β) was not evident in the surgery alone group, but was evident in the surgery plus nimodipine group, indicating that nimodipine reversed the damage of the crush injury. After a facial nerve crush injury, treatment with nimodipine for 20 days reduced the nerve injury by mediating remyelination by Schwann cells. The protective effect of nimodipine may include a reduction of inflammation and an increase in calcium-binding S-100β protein. PMID:26169537

  9. Nimodipine-mediated re-myelination after facial nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yin-da; Zheng, Xue-sheng; Ying, Ting-ting; Yuan, Yan; Li, Shi-ting

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of nimodipine-mediated neural repair after facial nerve crush injury in rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: healthy controls, surgery alone, and surgery plus nimodipine. A facial nerve crush injury model was constructed. Immediately after surgery, the rats in the surgery plus nimodipine group were administered nimodipine, 6 mg/kg/day, for a variable numbers of days. The animals underwent electromyography (EMG) before surgery and at 3, 10, or 20 days after surgery. After sacrifice, nerve samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and luxol fast blue. The EMG at 20 days revealed an apparent recovery of eletroconductivity, with the surgery plus nimodipine group having a higher amplitude and shorter latency time than the surgery only group. H&E staining showed that at 20 days, the rats treated with nimodipine had an obvious recovery of myelination and reduction in the number of infiltrating cells, suggesting less inflammation, compared with the rats in the surgery only group. Luxol fast blue staining was relatively even in the surgery plus nimodipine group, indicating a protective effect against injury-induced demyelination. Staining for S100 calcium-binding protein B (S-100β) was not evident in the surgery alone group, but was evident in the surgery plus nimodipine group, indicating that nimodipine reversed the damage of the crush injury. After a facial nerve crush injury, treatment with nimodipine for 20 days reduced the nerve injury by mediating remyelination by Schwann cells. The protective effect of nimodipine may include a reduction of inflammation and an increase in calcium-binding S-100β protein.

  10. Glucose transporters GLUT4 and GLUT8 are upregulated after facial nerve axotomy in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Olga; Ballester-Lurbe, Begoña; Mesonero, José E; Terrado, José

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral nerve axotomy in adult mice elicits a complex response that includes increased glucose uptake in regenerating nerve cells. This work analyses the expression of the neuronal glucose transporters GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8 in the facial nucleus of adult mice during the first days after facial nerve axotomy. Our results show that whereas GLUT3 levels do not vary, GLUT4 and GLUT8 immunoreactivity increases in the cell body of the injured motoneurons after the lesion. A sharp increase in GLUT4 immunoreactivity was detected 3 days after the nerve injury and levels remained high on Day 8, but to a lesser extent. GLUT8 also increased the levels but later than GLUT4, as they only rose on Day 8 post-lesion. These results indicate that glucose transport is activated in regenerating motoneurons and that GLUT4 plays a main role in this function. These results also suggest that metabolic defects involving impairment of glucose transporters may be principal components of the neurotoxic mechanisms leading to motoneuron death. PMID:21740425

  11. Cavernous nerve reconstruction to preserve erectile function following non-nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Chang, David W; Wood, Christopher G; Kroll, Stephen S; Youssef, Adel A; Babaian, Richard J

    2003-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction following radical prostatectomy for treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer remains a problem that deters many men from seeking surgical treatment. Sparing the cavernous nerves has been popularized as a method of preserving potency, but men with locally advanced disease may be at increased risk for positive margins with this technique. In this study, sural nerve grafting of the cavernous nerve bundles, to preserve postoperative potency while potentially maximizing cancer control, was examined. Thirty men were enrolled in this prospective phase I study and underwent non-nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy performed by one of two protocol surgeons. Preoperative erectile function was assessed both objectively, using a RigiScan (Timm Medical Technologies, Inc., Eden Prairie, Minn.), and subjectively. The cavernous nerves were identified and resected during the operation with the use of an intraoperative mapping device (CaverMap; Alliant Medical Technologies, Norwood, Mass.). Bilateral autologous sural nerve grafting to the cavernous nerve stumps was performed by one of two protocol plastic surgeons. Postoperative erectile dysfunction therapy, using intracorporeal injection, a vacuum pump, and/or oral sildenafil therapy, was instituted 6 weeks after the operation. Spontaneous erectile activity was subjectively and objectively measured every 3 months after the operation. Follow-up periods ranged from 13 to 33 months (mean, 23 months). Overall, 18 of 30 patients (60 percent) demonstrated both objective and subjective evidence of spontaneous erectile activity. Of those 18 men, 13 (72 percent) were able to have intercourse (seven unassisted and six with the aid of sildenafil). No disease or biochemical recurrences have been noted in this group of patients with locally advanced disease. In conclusion, autologous sural nerve grafting after non-nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy is an effective means of preserving spontaneous erectile activity

  12. Fully Endoscopic Vascular Decompression of the Facial Nerve for Hemifacial Spasm

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Joseph B.; Cha, Sung Tae; Shahinian, Hrayr K.

    2001-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm is an uncommon disorder manifesting as a unilateral, involuntary, sporadic contraction of the musculature innervated by the seventh cranial nerve. Although debated, the etiology of hemifacial spasm is generally accepted as compression of the facial nerve by vessels of the posterior circulation. Early surgical techniques were ineffective and fraught with morbidity. Over the past 25 years microvascular decompression surgery has allowed the safe and effective treatment of hemifacial spasm. Recent reports combining microsurgical and endoscopic techniques have documented the advantages of the endoscope in exposing the anatomy of this region. Enhanced visualization allows a less traumatic dissection and increases the surgeon's ability to locate nerve-vessel conflicts often difficult to identify through the limited view of the microscope. This article reviews the history of hemifacial spasm and describes the first three cases of fully endoscopic vascular decompression for hemifacial spasm, emphasizing the advantages of this novel surgical approach. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17167620

  13. Transient total facial nerve paralysis: an unusual complication of transoral endoscopic-assisted management of subcondylar fracture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Lee, Young Man

    2012-05-01

    Endoscopic-assisted repair of subcondylar fractures is an additional tool for management; however, there is a steep learning curve. Generally, this technique allows good visualization of the fracture site for reduction through an incision with an acceptable cosmetic result. Recently, the surgical techniques and technology as well as the indications for endoscopic facial fracture repair are in development; there are few available data in the literature regarding detail complications and recovery processes following endoscopic fracture treatment. The purpose of this article was to reveal unusual complication following endoscopic repair of subcondylar fracture in terms of radiographic, photographic, and recovering orders of the facial nerve and facial reanimations. In our case, no damage to the facial nerve was observed intraoperatively, but the patient had total facial paralysis, immediately postoperatively. At long-term follow-up, the facial nerve function was recovered well within 6 months. The authors consider that transoral endoscopic-assisted open reduction constitutes a valid alternative to a transcutaneous approach for the reduction and fixation of subcondylar fractures. It provides the benefits of open reduction and internal fixation without the permanent complications, such as facial nerve injury.

  14. Cross-face nerve grafting for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis: quantitative outcomes using the FACIAL CLIMA system and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Although in most cases Bell palsy resolves spontaneously, approximately one-third of patients will present sequela including facial synkinesis and paresis. Currently, the techniques available for reanimation of these patients include hypoglossal nerve transposition, free muscle transfer, and cross-face nerve grafting (CFNG). Between December 2008 and March 2012, eight patients with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis were reanimated with two-stage CFNG. Gender, age at surgery, etiology of paralysis denervation time, donor and recipient nerves, presence of facial synkinesis, and follow-up were registered. Commissural excursion and velocity and patient satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. Mean age at surgery was 33.8 ± 11.5 years; mean time of denervation was 96.6 ± 109.8 months. No complications requiring surgery were registered. Follow-up period ranged from 7 to 33 months with a mean of 19 ± 9.7 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement of both commissural excursion and velocity greater than 75% in 4 patients, greater than 50% in 2 patients, and less than 50% in the remaining two patients. Qualitative evaluation revealed a high grade of satisfaction in six patients (75%). Two-stage CFNG is a reliable technique for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis with a high grade of patient satisfaction.

  15. Peripheral facial nerve lesions induce changes in the firing properties of primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Múnera, A; Cuestas, D M; Troncoso, J

    2012-10-25

    Facial nerve lesions elicit long-lasting changes in vibrissal primary motor cortex (M1) muscular representation in rodents. Reorganization of cortical representation has been attributed to potentiation of preexisting horizontal connections coming from neighboring muscle representation. However, changes in layer 5 pyramidal neuron activity induced by facial nerve lesion have not yet been explored. To do so, the effect of irreversible facial nerve injury on electrophysiological properties of layer 5 pyramidal neurons was characterized. Twenty-four adult male Wistar rats were randomly subjected to two experimental treatments: either surgical transection of mandibular and buccal branches of the facial nerve (n=18) or sham surgery (n=6). Unitary and population activity of vibrissal M1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons recorded in vivo under general anesthesia was compared between sham-operated and facial nerve-injured animals. Injured animals were allowed either one (n=6), three (n=6), or five (n=6) weeks recovery before recording in order to characterize the evolution of changes in electrophysiological activity. As compared to control, facial nerve-injured animals displayed the following sustained and significant changes in spontaneous activity: increased basal firing frequency, decreased spike-associated local field oscillation amplitude, and decreased spontaneous theta burst firing frequency. Significant changes in evoked-activity with whisker pad stimulation included: increased short latency population spike amplitude, decreased long latency population oscillations amplitude and frequency, and decreased peak frequency during evoked single-unit burst firing. Taken together, such changes demonstrate that peripheral facial nerve lesions induce robust and sustained changes of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in vibrissal motor cortex. PMID:22877641

  16. Periocular Reconstruction in Patients with Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shannon S; Joseph, Andrew W; Douglas, Raymond S; Massry, Guy G

    2016-04-01

    Facial paralysis can result in serious ocular consequences. All patients with orbicularis oculi weakness in the setting of facial nerve injury should undergo a thorough ophthalmologic evaluation. The main goal of management in these patients is to protect the ocular surface and preserve visual function. Patients with expected recovery of facial nerve function may only require temporary and conservative measures to protect the ocular surface. Patients with prolonged or unlikely recovery of facial nerve function benefit from surgical rehabilitation of the periorbital complex. Current reconstructive procedures are most commonly intended to improve coverage of the eye but cannot restore blink.

  17. A case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality associated with facial cleft

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Tomoko; Kojima, Shota; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Ueki, Mari; Sugasawa, Jun; Oku, Hidehiro; Tajiri, Kensuke; Shigemura, Yuka; Ueda, Koichi; Harada, Atsuko; Yamasaki, Mami; Yamanaka, Takumi; Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of facial cleft is rare and ranges between 1.43 and 4.85 per 100,000 births. To date, there have been few reports of detailed ophthalmologic examinations performed in cases of facial cleft. Here, we report a case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality associated with facial cleft. Case report A 9-day-old female infant was delivered by cesarian section at 34 weeks of gestational age (the second baby of twins) and weighed 2,276 g upon presentation. She had a facial cleft and ectrodactyly at birth. Right eye-dominant blepharophimosis was obvious. Examination of the right eye revealed inferior corneal opacity with vascularization, downward corectopia, and optic-nerve hypoplasia. The corneal diameter was 8 mm in both eyes, and tonometry by use of a Tono-Pen® XL (Reichert Technologies, Depew, NY, USA) handheld applanation tonometer revealed that her intraocular pressure was 11–22 mmHg (Oculus Dexter) and 8 mmHg (Oculus Sinister). B-mode echo revealed no differences in axial length between her right and left eyes. When she was 15–16 months old, we attempted to examine her eyes before she underwent plastic surgery under general anesthesia. She had a small optic disc in both eyes and the right-eye disc was tilted. After undergoing canthotomy, gonioscopy and ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed that almost all directions were open except for the peripheral anterior synechia. Since magnetic resonance imaging revealed ventriculomegaly associated with an interhemispheric cyst at birth, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted at 12 days of age. At 25 months of age, her condition suddenly deteriorated due to occlusion of the ventricular shunt catheter, and she died 5 days later. In this patient, amniotic band syndrome was presumed to be the primary cause due to the clinical findings. Conclusion We experienced a case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality that occurred with facial cleft. The cause of these

  18. Facial Nerve Palsy: An Unusual Presenting Feature of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ozcan; Buyuktas, Deram; Ekiz, Esra; Selcukbiricik, Fatih; Papila, Irfan; Papila, Cigdem

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world and is the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women; it is responsible for 1.3 million deaths annually worldwide. It can metastasize to any organ. The most common site of metastasis in the head and neck region is the brain; however, it can also metastasize to the oral cavity, gingiva, tongue, parotid gland and lymph nodes. This article reports a case of small cell lung cancer presenting with metastasis to the facial nerve. PMID:21526004

  19. Measurement of cochlea to facial nerve canal with thin-section computed tomographic image.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Liu, Xiangliang; Yao, Jihang; Tian, Yong; Xia, Changli; Li, Youqiong; Fu, Yan; Luo, Qi

    2013-03-01

    Facial nerve (FN) paralysis is a rare but devastating complication of cochlear implant surgery. This study aimed to measure the cupula of the cochlea to the tympanic segment of the FN canal, cupula of the cochlea to the mastoid segment of the FN canal, and the geniculate ganglion to provide a more secure and accurate orientation of the FN canal and to facilitate operation on the cochlea by avoiding potential damage to FN. Using computed tomography, we scanned skulls of 120 volunteers who suffer no cases of skull base lesions. Multiplane reconstruction images were prepared with high-resolution computed tomography. Preoperative evaluation of the FN anatomy within the temporal bone by high-resolution computed tomography helps in minimizing surgical trauma to the nerve, and these results can help guide clinical surgery on the cochlea.

  20. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years.

    PubMed

    Dalla Toffola, Elena; Pavese, Chiara; Cecini, Miriam; Petrucci, Lucia; Ricotti, Susanna; Bejor, Maurizio; Salimbeni, Grazia; Biglioli, Federico; Klersy, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Our study evaluates the grade and timing of recovery in 30 patients with complete facial paralysis (House-Brackmann grade VI) treated with hypoglossal-facial nerve (XII-VII) anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program, consisting of exercises in facial muscle activation mediated by tongue movement and synkinesis control with mirror feedback. Reinnervation after XII-VII anastomosis occurred in 29 patients, on average 5.4 months after surgery. Three years after the anastomosis, 23.3% of patients had grade II, 53.3% grade III, 20% grade IV and 3.3% grade VI ratings on the House-Brackmann scale. Time to reinnervation was associated with the final House-Brackmann grade. Our study demonstrates that patients undergoing XIIVII anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program display a significant recovery of facial symmetry and movement. The recovery continues for at Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years least three years after the anastomosis, meaning that prolonged follow-up of these patients is advisable.

  1. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years.

    PubMed

    Dalla Toffola, Elena; Pavese, Chiara; Cecini, Miriam; Petrucci, Lucia; Ricotti, Susanna; Bejor, Maurizio; Salimbeni, Grazia; Biglioli, Federico; Klersy, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Our study evaluates the grade and timing of recovery in 30 patients with complete facial paralysis (House-Brackmann grade VI) treated with hypoglossal-facial nerve (XII-VII) anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program, consisting of exercises in facial muscle activation mediated by tongue movement and synkinesis control with mirror feedback. Reinnervation after XII-VII anastomosis occurred in 29 patients, on average 5.4 months after surgery. Three years after the anastomosis, 23.3% of patients had grade II, 53.3% grade III, 20% grade IV and 3.3% grade VI ratings on the House-Brackmann scale. Time to reinnervation was associated with the final House-Brackmann grade. Our study demonstrates that patients undergoing XIIVII anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program display a significant recovery of facial symmetry and movement. The recovery continues for at Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years least three years after the anastomosis, meaning that prolonged follow-up of these patients is advisable. PMID:25473738

  2. Facial expression recognition based on image Euclidean distance-supervised neighborhood preserving embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Li, Yingjie; Li, Haibin

    2014-11-01

    High-dimensional data often lie on relatively low-dimensional manifold, while the nonlinear geometry of that manifold is often embedded in the similarities between the data points. These similar structures are captured by Neighborhood Preserving Embedding (NPE) effectively. But NPE as an unsupervised method can't utilize class information to guide the procedure of nonlinear dimensionality reduction. They ignore the geometrical structure information of local data points and the spatial information of pixels, which leads to the failure of classification. For this problem, a feature extraction method based on Image Euclidean Distance-Supervised NPE (IED-SNPE) is proposed, and is applied to facial expression recognition. Firstly, it employs Image Euclidean Distance (IED) to characterize the dissimilarity of data points. And then the neighborhood graph of the input data is constructed according to a certain kind of dissimilarity between data points. Finally, it fuses prior nonlinear facial expression manifold of facial expression images and class-label information to extract discriminative features for expression recognition. In the classification experiments on JAFFE facial expression database, IED-SNPE is used for feature extraction and compared with NPE, SNPE, and IED-NPE. The results reveal that IED-SNPE not only the local structure of expression manifold preserves well but also explicitly considers the spatial relationships among pixels in the images. So it excels NPE in feature extraction and is highly competitive with those well-known feature extraction methods.

  3. Study on distribution of terminal branches of the facial nerve in mimetic muscles (orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle).

    PubMed

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Shiozawa, Kei; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2014-01-01

    There have been many anatomical reports to date regarding the course of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. However, reports are relatively scarce on the detailed distribution of the terminal branches of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. In this study, we performed detailed examination of the terminal facial nerve branches to the mimetic muscles, particularly the branches terminating in the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. Examination was performed on 25 Japanese adult autopsy cases, involving 25 hemifaces. The mean age was 87.4 years (range, 60-102 years). There were 12 men and 13 women (12 left hemifaces and 13 right hemifaces). In each case, the facial nerve was exposed through a preauricular skin incision. The main trunk of the facial nerve was dissected from the stylomastoid foramen. A microscope was used to dissect the terminal branches to the periphery and observe them. The course and distribution were examined for all terminal branches of the facial nerve. However, focus was placed on the course and distribution of the zygomatic branch, buccal branch, and mandibular branch to the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. The temporal branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases and the marginal mandibular branch was distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in all cases. The zygomatic branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases, but it was also distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 10 of 25 cases. The buccal branch was not distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 3 of 25 cases, and it was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in 8 cases. There was no significant difference in the variations. The orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle perform particularly important movements among the facial mimetic muscles. According to textbooks, the temporal branch and zygomatic branch innervate the orbicularis oculi muscle, and the buccal branch

  4. Comparison of trophic factors' expression between paralyzed and recovering muscles after facial nerve injury. A quantitative analysis in time course.

    PubMed

    Grosheva, Maria; Nohroudi, Klaus; Schwarz, Alisa; Rink, Svenja; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Klimaschewski, Lars; Gordon, Tessa; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-05-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, recovery of motor performance negatively correlates with the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) due to excessive sprouting of the terminal Schwann cells. Denervated muscles produce short-range diffusible sprouting stimuli, of which some are neurotrophic factors. Based on recent data that vibrissal whisking is restored perfectly during facial nerve regeneration in blind rats from the Sprague Dawley (SD)/RCS strain, we compared the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), insulin growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1, IGF2) and nerve growth factor (NGF) between SD/RCS and SD-rats with normal vision but poor recovery of whisking function after facial nerve injury. To establish which trophic factors might be responsible for proper NMJ-reinnervation, the transected facial nerve was surgically repaired (facial-facial anastomosis, FFA) for subsequent analysis of mRNA and proteins expressed in the levator labii superioris muscle. A complicated time course of expression included (1) a late rise in BDNF protein that followed earlier elevated gene expression, (2) an early increase in FGF2 and IGF2 protein after 2 days with sustained gene expression, (3) reduced IGF1 protein at 28 days coincident with decline of raised mRNA levels to baseline, and (4) reduced NGF protein between 2 and 14 days with maintained gene expression found in blind rats but not the rats with normal vision. These findings suggest that recovery of motor function after peripheral nerve injury is due, at least in part, to a complex regulation of lesion-associated neurotrophic factors and cytokines in denervated muscles. The increase of FGF-2 protein and concomittant decrease of NGF (with no significant changes in BDNF or IGF levels) during the first week following FFA in SD/RCS blind rats possibly prevents the distal branching of regenerating axons resulting in reduced poly-innervation of motor endplates.

  5. Anastomoses between lower cranial and upper cervical nerves: a comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, part I: trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves.

    PubMed

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Radcliff, Virginia; Loukas, Marios; Chern, Joshua J; Benninger, Brion; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of the anatomy of the neural communications among the cranial nerves and their branches is lacking in the literature. Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found among these nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate in these regions to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections among the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized in two parts. Part I concerns the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches with any other nerve trunk or branch in the vicinity. Part II concerns the anastomoses among the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or among these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part I is presented in this article. An extensive anastomotic network exists among the lower cranial nerves. Knowledge of such neural intercommunications is important in diagnosing and treating patients with pathology of the skull base.

  6. Outcome of patients presenting with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) in a tertiary centre--a five year experience.

    PubMed

    Tang, I P; Lee, S C; Shashinder, S; Raman, R

    2009-06-01

    This is a retrospective study. The objective of this study is to review the factors influencing the outcome of treatment for the patients presented with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis. The demographic data, clinical presentation and management of 84 patients with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) were collected from the medical record office, reviewed and analyzed from 2000 to 2005. Thirty-four (72.3%) out of 47 patients who were treated with oral prednisolone alone, fully recovered from Bell's palsy meanwhile 36 (97%) out of 37 patients who were treated with combination of oral prednisolone and acyclovir fully recovered. The difference was statistically significant. 42 (93.3%) out of 45 patients who presented within three days to our clinic, fully recovered while 28 (71.8%) out of 39 patients presented later then three days had full recovery from Bell's palsy. The difference was statistically significant. The outcome of full recovery is better with the patients treated with combined acyclovir and prednisolone compared with prednisolone alone. The patients who were treated after three days of clinical presentation, who were more than 50 years of age, who had concurrent chronic medical illness and facial nerve paralysis HB Grade IV to VI during initial presentation have reduced chance of full recovery of facial nerve paralysis.

  7. Spontaneous recovery of post-traumatic acute bilateral facial and abducens nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Pravin; Madhivanan, Karthigeyan; Kamali, Nasib; Garg, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral abducens and facial palsy following head injury are extremely rare. We present a patient with post-traumatic bilateral facial and abducens palsy. There were bitemporal fractures that did not correspond with the facial canal. Despite complete facial palsy with axonal degeneration and > 90% facial muscle degenervation, conservative management helped. This report highlights the importance of conservative management in post-traumatic complete facial palsy especially when the fracture line does not correspond with the facial canal.

  8. Spontaneous recovery of post-traumatic acute bilateral facial and abducens nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Pravin; Madhivanan, Karthigeyan; Kamali, Nasib; Garg, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral abducens and facial palsy following head injury are extremely rare. We present a patient with post-traumatic bilateral facial and abducens palsy. There were bitemporal fractures that did not correspond with the facial canal. Despite complete facial palsy with axonal degeneration and > 90% facial muscle degenervation, conservative management helped. This report highlights the importance of conservative management in post-traumatic complete facial palsy especially when the fracture line does not correspond with the facial canal. PMID:27695556

  9. Facial nerve paralysis and frey syndrome in an infant following removal of an internal mandibular distraction device.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Sameer Mehbub; Golinko, Michael Samuel; Williams, Joseph Kerwin

    2013-05-01

    Mandibular distraction using an implantable device has become a widely accepted and utilized procedure for the treatment of retrognathia. Although excellent results have been reported and observed with distraction osteogenesis, complications such as facial nerve injury have been previously reported. Often, this injury is usually temporary and corrects over the course of time. Frey syndrome has been classically described as an injury or severance of the auricotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve. It is commonly seen as a complication of parotid surgery and has never been reported in association with mandibular distraction. The authors report a unique case of both facial nerve paralysis and Frey syndrome in a patient following the removal of an internal mandibular distraction device. A review of the literature along with diagnosis and management are discussed.

  10. Facial functional outcome in monitored versus not-monitored patients in vestibular schwannomas surgery

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Graziano; Marrelli, Alfonso; Trovarelli, Donatella; Ricci, Alessandro; Galzio, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Even though advances in surgical techniques have improved facial nerve outcomes, functional preservation is still an issue because injury to the facial nerve has significant physical and psychological consequences for the patient. We retrospectively review our data in VS surgery to compare the facial outcome in intraoperative facial monitored versus not-monitored patients. Materials and Methods: 51 consecutive patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma in the period from 2005 to 2010 were treated in our Institution. In according to the type of neurophysiological tool used during surgical procedures, two patients groups were identified: Group 1 (facial stimulator only) and Group 2 (stimulator and facial monitoring). Statistical comparison of the two groups was made with the t- test, and facial function results were evaluated with the Fisher's exact test. Results: In the Group 1, of the 22 patients with anatomically preserved facial nerves, 3 (13.6%) showed excellent facial nerve function, 14 (63.6%) showed intermediate function, and 5 (22.7%) showed poor function. In the Group 2, all the 27 patients got anatomically preserved facial nerves, and 18 (66.7%) showed excellent facial nerve function, 9 (33.3%) showed intermediate function, and no one showed poor function. Conclusions: We found that retrosigmoid approach associated with continuous EMG facial monitoring combined with the use of bipolar stimulation is a safe and effective treatment for vestibular schwannomas. PMID:27695545

  11. Facial functional outcome in monitored versus not-monitored patients in vestibular schwannomas surgery

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Graziano; Marrelli, Alfonso; Trovarelli, Donatella; Ricci, Alessandro; Galzio, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Even though advances in surgical techniques have improved facial nerve outcomes, functional preservation is still an issue because injury to the facial nerve has significant physical and psychological consequences for the patient. We retrospectively review our data in VS surgery to compare the facial outcome in intraoperative facial monitored versus not-monitored patients. Materials and Methods: 51 consecutive patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma in the period from 2005 to 2010 were treated in our Institution. In according to the type of neurophysiological tool used during surgical procedures, two patients groups were identified: Group 1 (facial stimulator only) and Group 2 (stimulator and facial monitoring). Statistical comparison of the two groups was made with the t- test, and facial function results were evaluated with the Fisher's exact test. Results: In the Group 1, of the 22 patients with anatomically preserved facial nerves, 3 (13.6%) showed excellent facial nerve function, 14 (63.6%) showed intermediate function, and 5 (22.7%) showed poor function. In the Group 2, all the 27 patients got anatomically preserved facial nerves, and 18 (66.7%) showed excellent facial nerve function, 9 (33.3%) showed intermediate function, and no one showed poor function. Conclusions: We found that retrosigmoid approach associated with continuous EMG facial monitoring combined with the use of bipolar stimulation is a safe and effective treatment for vestibular schwannomas.

  12. Delayed functional recovery in presymptomatic mSOD1(G93A) mice following facial nerve crush axotomy.

    PubMed

    Mesnard, Nichole A; Haulcomb, Melissa M; Tanzer, Lisa; Sanders, Virginia M; Jones, Kathryn J

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease involving progressive loss of motoneurons (MN). Axonal pathology and presynaptic deaf-ferentation precede MN degeneration during disease progression in patients and the ALS mouse model (mSOD1). Previously, we determined that a functional adaptive immune response is required for complete functional recovery following a facial nerve crush axotomy in wild-type (WT) mice. In this study, we investigated the effects of facial nerve crush axotomy on functional recovery and facial MN survival in presymptomatic mSOD1 mice, relative to WT mice. The results indicate that functional recovery and facial MN survival levels are significantly reduced in presymptomatic mSOD1, relative to WT, and similar to what has previously been observed in immunodeficient mice. It is concluded that a potential immune system defect exists in the mSOD1 mouse that negatively impacts neuronal survival and regeneration following target disconnection associated with peripheral nerve axotomy. PMID:24672589

  13. Total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer with emphasis on pelvic autonomic nerve preservation: Expert technical tips for robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Young Wan; Cho, Min Soo

    2015-09-01

    The primary goal of surgical intervention for rectal cancer is to achieve an oncologic cure while preserving function. Since the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME), the oncologic outcome has improved greatly in terms of local recurrence and cancer-specific survival. However, there are still concerns regarding functional outcomes such as sexual and urinary dysfunction, even among experienced colorectal surgeons. Intraoperative nerve damage is the primary reason for sexual and urinary dysfunction and occurs due to lack of anatomical knowledge and poor visualization of the pelvic autonomic nerves. The rectum is located concavely along the curved sacrum and both the ischial tuberosity and iliac wing limit the pelvic cavity boundary. Thus, pelvic autonomic nerve preservation during dissection in a narrow or deep pelvis, with adherence to the TME principles, is very challenging for colorectal surgeons. Recent developments in robotic technology enable overcoming these difficulties caused by complex pelvic anatomy. This system can facilitate better preservation of the pelvic autonomic nerve and thereby achieve favorable postoperative sexual and voiding functions after rectal cancer surgery. The nerve-preserving TME technique includes identification and preservation of the superior hypogastric plexus nerve, bilateral hypogastric nerves, pelvic plexus, and neurovascular bundles. Standardized procedures should be performed sequentially as follows: posterior dissection, deep posterior dissection, anterior dissection, posterolateral dissection, and final circumferential pelvic dissection toward the pelvic floor. In future perspective, a structured education program on nerve-preserving robotic TME should be incorporated in the training for minimally invasive surgery.

  14. Syndromes of a complex lesion of greater and lesser superficial petrosal nerves (paradoxical facial hyperaemia, salivation, lacrimation and mucus excretion).

    PubMed

    Levin, S L

    1987-01-01

    After closed cranial trauma with paralysis of the facial nerve, a patient had a fracture into the petrosus apex with a bony bridge over the nerve, and a subdural haematoma, which were dealt with during an operation for nerve decompression. Examination of the patient 2.5 years later revealed the presence of the crocodile tears syndrome, mucus secretion and the salivary atropine paradox, i.e. severe hyperaemia of the paretic half of the face during intense salivation in response to atropine. Other patients who suffered similar trauma but had no operation demonstrated the same syndrome. The crocodile tears syndrome is considered to be a result of an ephaptic union of the central portion of the damaged lesser superficial petrosal nerve (SPN) with the peripheral portion of the greater SPN. The salivary atropine paradox is then due to the loss of the peripheral portion of the former nerve combined with denervation of the salivary parotid gland. Facial hyperaemia during intense salivation after atropine administration is explained as a result of the intensified release of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide from the gland, stimulated by atropine, into the blood circulation.

  15. Bilateral conjugacy of movement initiation is retained at the eye but not at the mouth following long-term unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Susan E; O'Dwyer, Nicholas J; Adams, Roger D; Croxson, Glen R

    2006-08-01

    Voluntary eyelid closure and smiling were studied in 11 normal subjects and 11 patients with long-term unilateral facial nerve palsy (FNP). The conjugacy of eyelid movements shown previously for blinks was maintained for voluntary eye closures in normal subjects, with movement onset being synchronous in both eyes. Bilateral onset synchrony of the sides of the mouth was also observed in smiling movements in normal subjects. In FNP patients, initiation of movement of the paretic and non-paretic eyelids was also synchronous, but markedly delayed relative to normal (by 136 ms = 32%). The initiation of bilateral movements at the mouth was similarly delayed, but in contrast to the eyes, it was not synchronous. Central neural processing in the FNP subjects was normal, however, since unilateral movements at the mouth were not delayed. The delays therefore point to considerable additional information processing needed for initiating bilateral facial movements after FNP. The maintenance of bilateral onset synchrony in eyelid closure and its loss in smiling following FNP is an important difference in the neural control of these facial regions. Bilateral conjugacy of eyelid movements is probably crucial for coordinating visual input and was achieved apparently without conscious effort on the part of the patients. Bilateral conjugacy of movements at the sides of the mouth may be less critical for normal function, although patients would very much like to achieve it in order to improve the appearance of their smile. Since the everyday frequency of eyelid movements is considerably greater than that of smiling, it is possible that the preserved eyelid conjugacy in these patients with long-term FNP is merely a product of greater experience. However, if synchrony of movement onset is found to be preserved in patients with acute FNP, then it would suggest that eyelid conjugacy has a privileged status in the neural organisation of the face.

  16. Acute pediatric facial nerve paralysis as the first indication for familial cerebral cavernoma: case presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rohani, Pooyan; McRackan, Theodore R; Aulino, Joseph M; Wanna, George B

    2014-01-01

    Familial cerebral cavernoma is an autosomal dominant phenotype with incomplete clinical and neuroimaging penetrance. The most common clinical manifestations include seizures and cerebral hemorrhage. We present the case of a 7-year-old boy who developed acute onset facial nerve paralysis secondary to previously unknown familial cerebral cavernoma. Genetic workup revealed a KRIT1 gene deletion which was later confirmed in the patient's asymptomatic father and younger brother.

  17. Surgery for traumatic facial nerve paralysis: does intraoperative monitoring have a role?

    PubMed

    Ashram, Yasmine A; Badr-El-Dine, Mohamed M K

    2014-09-01

    The use of intraoperative facial nerve (FN) monitoring during surgical decompression of the FN is underscored because surgery is indicated when the FN shows more than 90 % axonal degeneration. The present study proposes including intraoperative monitoring to facilitate decision taking and provide prognostication with more accuracy. This prospective study was conducted on ten patients presenting with complete FN paralysis due to temporal bone fracture. They were referred after variable time intervals for FN exploration and decompression. Intraoperative supramaximal electric stimulation (2-3 mA) of the FN was attempted in all patients both proximal and distal to the site of injury. Postoperative FN function was assessed using House-Brackmann (HB) scale. All patients had follow-up period ranging from 7 to 42 months. Three different patterns of neurophysiological responses were characterized. Responses were recorded proximal and distal to the lesion in five patients (pattern 1); only distal to the lesion in two patients (pattern 2); and neither proximal nor distal to the lesion in three patients (pattern 3). Sporadic, mechanically elicited EMG activity was recorded in eight out of ten patients. Patients with pattern 1 had favorable prognosis with postoperative function ranging between grade I and III. Pattern 3 patients showing no mechanically elicited activity had poor prognosis. Intraoperative monitoring affects decision taking during surgery for traumatic FN paralysis and provides prognostication with sufficient accuracy. The detection of mechanically elicited EMG activity is an additional sign predicting favorable outcome. However, absence of responses did not alter surgeon decision when the nerve was found evidently intact.

  18. Occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Ziahosseini, K; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C; Patel, B; Malhotra, R

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo describe the occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy (FNP).MethodsWe enroled consecutive patients with unilateral FNP into this study. Patients with previous upper eyelid surgery for either side were excluded. We developed a standardised technique to measure the distance between the upper eyelid margin and the lower border of brow (LMBD). FNP was graded using the Sunnybrook grading scale. Its aetiology, duration, and treatment were noted. Upper and lower marginal reflex distance and lagophthalmos were also noted.ResultsSixty-six patients (mean age 51 years) were included. FNP was owing to a variety of aetiologies. LMBD on the paralytic side was shorter than the normal contralateral side in 47 (71%), equal in 15 (23%), and larger in four (6%) patients. The mean contracture was 3.4 mm (median: 3, range: 1-12) with 11 (17%) patients showing 5 mm or more of skin contracture. The mean LMBD on the paralytic side in all patients was significantly smaller than the contralateral side; 30±3.7 (median: 30; 95% CI 29-31) compared with 32±3.7 (median: 32; 95% CI 32-33), respectively, P<0.0001, two-tailed paired t-test.ConclusionTo our knowledge, this is the first study that quantitatively demonstrates contraction of the upper eyelid skin in FNP. This finding is valuable in directing optimal early management to minimise skin contracture and to caution surgeons against unnecessary upper eyelid skin excision.

  19. The role of intercostal nerve preservation in acute pain control after thoracotomy*

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti-Filho, Marco Aurélio; Leão, Luiz Eduardo Villaça; Costa-Junior, Altair da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the acute pain experienced during in-hospital recovery from thoracotomy can be effectively reduced by the use of intraoperative measures (dissection of the neurovascular bundle prior to the positioning of the Finochietto retractor and preservation of the intercostal nerve during closure). METHODS: We selected 40 patients who were candidates for elective thoracotomy in the Thoracic Surgery Department of the Federal University of São Paulo/Paulista School of Medicine, in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The patients were randomized into two groups: conventional thoracotomy (CT, n = 20) and neurovascular bundle preservation (NBP, n = 20). All of the patients underwent thoracic epidural anesthesia and muscle-sparing thoracotomy. Pain intensity was assessed with a visual analog scale on postoperative days 1, 3, and 5, as well as by monitoring patient requests for/consumption of analgesics. RESULTS: On postoperative day 5, the self-reported pain intensity was significantly lower in the NBP group than in the CT group (visual analog scale score, 1.50 vs. 3.29; p = 0.04). No significant differences were found between the groups regarding the number of requests for/consumption of analgesics. CONCLUSIONS: In patients undergoing thoracotomy, protecting the neurovascular bundle prior to positioning the retractor and preserving the intercostal nerve during closure can minimize pain during in-hospital recovery. PMID:24831401

  20. Accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography in locating facial nerve injury sites in temporal bone trauma.

    PubMed

    Rajati, Mohsen; Pezeshki Rad, Masoud; Irani, Shirin; Khorsandi, Mohammad Taghi; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud

    2014-08-01

    In this study, high-resolution, multislice computed tomography findings are compared with surgical findings in terms of the fracture location in patients with traumatic facial paralysis. Patients with traumatic facial paralysis with grade VI House-Brackmann scale who met the criteria for surgical decompression between 2008 and 2012 were included in this study. All the patients underwent a multislice high-resolution, multislice computed tomography (HRCT) using 1-mm-thick slices with a bone window algorithm. The anatomical areas of the temporal bone (including the Fallopian canal) were assessed by CT and during the surgery (separately by the radiologist and the surgeon), and fracture line involvement was recorded. Forty-one patients entered this study. The perigeniculate area was the most commonly involved region (46.34 %) of the facial nerve. The sensitivity and specificity of HRCT to detect a fracture line seems to be different in various sites, but the overall sensitivity and specificity were 77.5 and 77.7 %, respectively. Although HRCT is the modality of choice in traumatic facial paralysis, the diagnostic value may differ according to the fracture location. The results of HRCT should be considered with caution in certain areas.

  1. Comprehensive approach in surgical reconstruction of facial nerve paralysis: a 10-year perspective.

    PubMed

    Gur, Eyal; Stahl, Shy; Barnea, Yoav; Leshem, David; Zaretski, Arik; Amir, Aharon; Meilik, Beni; Miller, Ehud; Shapira, Eyal; Abu Jabel, Amin; Weiss, Jerry; Arad, Ehud

    2010-04-01

    Facial paralysis presents diverse functional and aesthetic abnormalities. Reconstruction may be achieved by several methods. We reviewed the management and outcome of facial paralysis patients to establish principles on which a comprehensive reconstructive approach may be based. Records were reviewed of all patients operated for facial paralysis at our institution between 1998 and 2007. Ninety-five patients were included, of which 15 patients had static reconstruction alone, and 80 patients had dynamic reconstruction. Presented is our experience in reconstruction of facial paralysis over the past decade, delineating a comprehensive approach to this condition. Various surgical techniques are described.

  2. The melkersson - rosenthal syndrome as a rare cause of facial nerve palsy - a case report.

    PubMed

    Hathiram, B T; Grewal, D S; Walvekar, R; Dwivedi, A; Kumar, L; Mohorikar, A

    2000-10-01

    The Melkenson Rosenthal syndrome is the rarely encountered triad of intermittent facial paralysis, recurrent facial oedema and lingua plicata. The intervals between the recurrence of symptoms may vary in duration. The cause of this syndrome is yet unknown. This paper discuses the pathology, clinical features and management as well as reports a case of this unusual disorder.

  3. Temporary Neurotrophin Treatment Prevents Deafness-Induced Auditory Nerve Degeneration and Preserves Function.

    PubMed

    Ramekers, Dyan; Versnel, Huib; Strahl, Stefan B; Klis, Sjaak F L; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-09-01

    After substantial loss of cochlear hair cells, exogenous neurotrophins prevent degeneration of the auditory nerve. Because cochlear implantation, the current therapy for profound sensorineural hearing loss, depends on a functional nerve, application of neurotrophins is being investigated. We addressed two questions important for fundamental insight into the effects of exogenous neurotrophins on a degenerating neural system, and for translation to the clinic. First, does temporary treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) prevent nerve degeneration on the long term? Second, how does a BDNF-treated nerve respond to electrical stimulation? Deafened guinea pigs received a cochlear implant, and their cochleas were infused with BDNF for 4 weeks. Up to 8 weeks after treatment, their cochleas were analyzed histologically. Electrically evoked compound action potentials (eCAPs) were recorded using stimulation paradigms that are informative of neural survival. Spiral ganglion cell (SGC) degeneration was prevented during BDNF treatment, resulting in 1.9 times more SGCs than in deafened untreated cochleas. Importantly, SGC survival was almost complete 8 weeks after treatment cessation, when 2.6 times more SGCs were observed. In four eCAP characteristics (three involving alteration of the interphase gap of the biphasic current pulse and one involving pulse trains), we found large and statistically significant differences between normal-hearing and deaf controls. Importantly, for BDNF-treated animals, these eCAP characteristics were near normal, suggesting healthy responsiveness of BDNF-treated SGCs. In conclusion, clinically practicable short-term neurotrophin treatment is sufficient for long-term survival of SGCs, and it can restore or preserve SGC function well beyond the treatment period. Significance statement: Successful restoration of hearing in deaf subjects by means of a cochlear implant requires a healthy spiral ganglion cell population. Deafness

  4. A rare cause of facial nerve palsy in children: hyperostosis corticalis generalisata (Van Buchem disease). Three new pediatric cases and a literature review.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, M E; Dikkers, F G; Boot, A M; van Lierop, A H J M; Papapoulos, S E; Brouwer, O F

    2012-11-01

    Differential diagnosis of facial nerve palsy in children is extensive. We report on three pediatric cases presenting with facial nerve palsy caused by hyperostosis corticalis generalisata (Van Buchem disease). This autosomal recessive disease is characterized by progressive bone overgrowth, with narrowing of the neuroforamina in the skull causing cranial neuropathies. These three new cases of Van Buchem disease are of interest because of exceptionally early presentation of symptoms. Furthermore, this is the first report describing bilateral papilledema in a child with Van Buchem disease. Head computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed thickened calvarium, skull base and mandible in all three children, with narrowed facial nerve canals. Bone mineral density (BMD) was markedly increased at all measured points and biochemical markers of bone formation were significantly elevated. Diagnosis of Van Buchem disease was genetically confirmed. The cases are unique in that these are the first well-documented pediatric cases of Van Buchem disease.

  5. Correlations between the clinical, histological and neurophysiological examinations in patients before and after parotid gland tumor surgery: verification of facial nerve transmission.

    PubMed

    Wiertel-Krawczuk, Agnieszka; Huber, Juliusz; Wojtysiak, Magdalena; Golusiński, Wojciech; Pieńkowski, Piotr; Golusiński, Paweł

    2015-05-01

    Parotid gland tumor surgery sometimes leads to facial nerve paralysis. Malignant more than benign tumors determine nerve function preoperatively, while postoperative observations based on clinical, histological and neurophysiological studies have not been reported in detail. The aims of this pilot study were evaluation and correlations of histological properties of tumor (its size and location) and clinical and neurophysiological assessment of facial nerve function pre- and post-operatively (1 and 6 months). Comparative studies included 17 patients with benign (n = 13) and malignant (n = 4) tumors. Clinical assessment was based on House-Brackmann scale (H-B), neurophysiological diagnostics included facial electroneurography [ENG, compound muscle action potential (CMAP)], mimetic muscle electromyography (EMG) and blink-reflex examinations (BR). Mainly grade I of H-B was recorded both pre- (n = 13) and post-operatively (n = 12) in patients with small (1.5-2.4 cm) benign tumors located in superficial lobes. Patients with medium size (2.5-3.4 cm) malignant tumors in both lobes were scored at grade I (n = 2) and III (n = 2) pre- and mainly VI (n = 4) post-operatively. CMAP amplitudes after stimulation of mandibular marginal branch were reduced at about 25 % in patients with benign tumors after surgery. In the cases of malignant tumors CMAPs were not recorded following stimulation of any branch. A similar trend was found for BR results. H-B and ENG results revealed positive correlations between the type of tumor and surgery with facial nerve function. Neurophysiological studies detected clinically silent facial nerve neuropathy of mandibular marginal branch in postoperative period. Needle EMG, ENG and BR examinations allow for the evaluation of face muscles reinnervation and facial nerve regeneration.

  6. Unusual middle-ear mischief: trans-tympanic trauma from a hair grip resulting in ossicular, facial nerve and oval window disruption.

    PubMed

    Snelling, J D; Bennett, A; Wilson, P; Wickstead, M

    2006-09-01

    A case of piercing of the tympanic membrane, resulting in unusual consequences, is described. This is the first reported case of the long process of a dislocated incus resulting in trauma to the horizontal portion of a dehiscent facial nerve. Simultaneous depression of the stapes footplate resulted in a perilymph leak, but with delayed presentation.

  7. Bell palsy in lyme disease-endemic regions of canada: a cautionary case of occult bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Karen; Melanson, Michel; Desai, Jamsheed A

    2012-09-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a multisystem disorder characterized by three clinical stages: dermatologic, neurologic, and rheumatologic. The number of known Lyme disease-endemic areas in Canada is increasing as the range of the vector Ixodes scapularis expands into the eastern and central provinces. Southern Ontario, Nova Scotia, southern Manitoba, New Brunswick, and southern Quebec are now considered Lyme disease-endemic regions in Canada. The use of field surveillance to map risk and endemic regions suggests that these geographic areas are growing, in part due to the effects of climate warming. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the most common neurologic abnormality in the second stage of Lyme borreliosis, with up to 25% of Bell palsy (idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy) occurring due to Lyme disease. Here we present a case of occult bilateral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. In Lyme disease-endemic regions of Canada, patients presenting with unilateral or bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy should be evaluated for Lyme disease with serologic testing to avoid misdiagnosis. Serologic testing should not delay initiation of appropriate treatment for presumed Bell palsy.

  8. Long-term comparison of a newly designed gold implant with the conventional implant in facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, H Y; Hong, S E; Lew, J M

    1999-11-01

    Patients with complete facial nerve palsy are at risk for eye complications resulting from exposure of the cornea and loss of the blinking reflex. Failure of protection predisposes the patient to exposure keratitis, corneal abrasion and, in rare cases, blindness. The mainstays of non-surgical therapy are cumbersome, obscure vision, and are mostly helpful in patients with acute facial paralysis in whom recovery of orbicularis oculi function is expected. Methods of lid-loading using metal implants and gold eyelid weights have been reported in the literature. Between October of 1988 and March of 1995, 32 patients with lagophthalmos due to facial nerve palsy underwent a total of 34 procedures for the insertion of a gold eyelid weight. Each patient had a gold weight inserted into a small pocket between the orbicularis oculi and the tarsal plate of the upper eyelid. The gold implant is curved to fit the curvature of the eye and contains holes for fixation to the tarsus with sutures. Ingrowth of fibrous tissue through the holes may also help fix the weight in position. Between 1988 and 1991, 10 patients received 10 commercially available rectangular gold implants with 2 holes; these implants resulted in adverse effects, such as infection and exposure in up to 30 percent of the cases. Because of the high complication rate with the rectangular gold implant, the authors began using a new, elliptical gold implant with 3 holes, which is longer, thinner, wider in the center, and narrower in the peripheral portion. This new elliptical implant was used on 22 patients (24 implants) from December of 1991 through March of 1995. The mean follow-up time for the 32 patients in the study was 41.3 months (range, 6 to 63 months), 49.8 months for patients with rectangular implants and 32.8 months for patients with elliptical implants. The elliptical gold implant resulted in dynamic closure of the eyelid and in excellent protection and cosmesis. Lagophthalmos and exposure keratitis resolved

  9. Pseudo-Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea Resulting from Aberrant Cross-Innervation of Trigeminal and Facial Nerves following Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Grannan, Benjamin L; Bi, Wenya Linda; Dunn, Ian F

    2015-07-01

    Objectives Pseudo-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea is a rare phenomenon, presumed to result from aberrant autonomic reinnervation of the paranasal mucosa following injury to the greater superficial petrosal nerve or periarterial plexus. In this report, we discuss the case of a postoperative patient with pseudo-CSF rhinorrhea exacerbated by chewing and propose a novel mechanism of pseudo-CSF rhinorrhea. Case Report A 46-year-old man was found to have mastication-induced unilateral clear rhinorrhea following transtemporal resection of a cerebellopontine angle tumor. Computed tomography cisternogram and β-2 transferrin analysis proved negative for any evidence of CSF leak. Conclusions Pseudo-CSF rhinorrhea exacerbated by mastication has not been previously reported in the literature. We propose aberrant cross-innervation of the trigeminal and facial nerves as the mechanism underlying the patient's condition. Pseudo-CSF rhinorrhea is an important entity to identify following skull base surgery because it may spare patients from the unnecessary invasive procedures and morbidity associated with the management of a presumed CSF leak.

  10. Tumour recurrence after surgical removal of parotid pleomorphic salivary adenoma using a retrograde facial nerve dissection technique.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Barry; Bharadwaj, Girish

    2012-07-01

    Recurrence after surgical removal of parotid pleomorphic salivary adenoma using retrograde facial nerve dissection is not well researched. We adopted retrograde nerve dissection for parotid surgery for benign disease as a standard procedure in 1995. The objective of this study was to establish the rate of recurrence of primary tumours associated with the technique after removal of parotid pleomorphic salivary adenoma. We recruited 59 patients over a 16-year (1995-2011) period and collected the data prospectively. Eight patients were excluded as they had died or had been lost to follow up. Male:female ratio was 16:35 and age range was 15-69 years. The mean tumour size as measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was 27.4mm. Thirty-eight patients had superficial parotidectomy, 8 had total parotidectomy, and 5 had partial superficial parotidectomy. Mean follow up from the date of operation was 104 months (median 98, range 17-171). All patients were reviewed and examined in 2011 to establish whether the tumour had recurred. One patient had developed a solitary nodular recurrence 8 years after the initial procedure. Recurrence was 2%. The rate of clinically apparent recurrence after parotidectomy for pleomorphic salivary adenoma in this study is low and is comparable with others reported.

  11. Initial assessment of facial nerve paralysis based on motion analysis using an optical flow method.

    PubMed

    Samsudin, Wan Syahirah W; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahmad, Amirozi; Salleh, Hasriah

    2016-01-01

    An initial assessment method that can classify as well as categorize the severity of paralysis into one of six levels according to the House-Brackmann (HB) system based on facial landmarks motion using an Optical Flow (OF) algorithm is proposed. The desired landmarks were obtained from the video recordings of 5 normal and 3 Bell's Palsy subjects and tracked using the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) method. A new scoring system based on the motion analysis using area measurement is proposed. This scoring system uses the individual scores from the facial exercises and grades the paralysis based on the HB system. The proposed method has obtained promising results and may play a pivotal role towards improved rehabilitation programs for patients. PMID:26578273

  12. Initial assessment of facial nerve paralysis based on motion analysis using an optical flow method.

    PubMed

    Samsudin, Wan Syahirah W; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahmad, Amirozi; Salleh, Hasriah

    2016-01-01

    An initial assessment method that can classify as well as categorize the severity of paralysis into one of six levels according to the House-Brackmann (HB) system based on facial landmarks motion using an Optical Flow (OF) algorithm is proposed. The desired landmarks were obtained from the video recordings of 5 normal and 3 Bell's Palsy subjects and tracked using the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) method. A new scoring system based on the motion analysis using area measurement is proposed. This scoring system uses the individual scores from the facial exercises and grades the paralysis based on the HB system. The proposed method has obtained promising results and may play a pivotal role towards improved rehabilitation programs for patients.

  13. Acoustic (loudspeaker) facial EMG monitoring: II. Use of evoked EMG activity during acoustic neuroma resection.

    PubMed

    Prass, R L; Kinney, S E; Hardy, R W; Hahn, J F; Lüders, H

    1987-12-01

    Facial electromyographic (EMG) activity was continuously monitored via loudspeaker during eleven translabyrinthine and nine suboccipital consecutive unselected acoustic neuroma resections. Ipsilateral facial EMG activity was synchronously recorded on the audio channels of operative videotapes, which were retrospectively reviewed in order to allow detailed evaluation of the potential benefit of various acoustic EMG patterns in the performance of specific aspects of acoustic neuroma resection. The use of evoked facial EMG activity was classified and described. Direct local mechanical (surgical) stimulation and direct electrical stimulation were of benefit in the localization and/or delineation of the facial nerve contour. Burst and train acoustic patterns of EMG activity appeared to indicate surgical trauma to the facial nerve that would not have been appreciated otherwise. Early results of postoperative facial function of monitored patients are presented, and the possible value of burst and train acoustic EMG activity patterns in the intraoperative assessment of facial nerve function is discussed. Acoustic facial EMG monitoring appears to provide a potentially powerful surgical tool for delineation of the facial nerve contour, the ongoing use of which may lead to continued improvement in facial nerve function preservation through modification of dissection strategy.

  14. Modified gold weights for reanimation of the upper lid in facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Cies, W A

    1993-01-01

    A modified gold weight has been developed for use in paretic upper eyelids following seventh nerve damage. The modified weight is implanted in the pretarsal space. The weight was developed to enhance lid blinking, minimize extrusion, provide better cosmesis, and to provide a good upper lid blinking mechanism.

  15. Safety profile of bone marrow mononuclear stem cells in the rehabilitation of patients with posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis-a novel modality (phase one trial).

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Sushil Kumar; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Modi, Manish; Gupta, Rijuneeta; Marwaha, Neelam

    2012-08-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to study the safety profile and role of mononuclear stem cells in the rehabilitation of posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis not improving with conventional treatment. Study Design This is a prospective nonrandomized controlled trial. Study Setting This study is conducted at Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh between July, 2007 and December, 2008. Patients We included eight patients of either sex aged between 18 and 60 years of posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis not improving with conventional treatment presented to PGIMER, Chandigarh between July 2007 and December 2008. Methods All patients underwent preoperative electroneuronography (ENoG), clinical photography, and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) temporal bone. All patients then underwent facial nerve decompression and stem cell implantation. Stem cells processing was done in well-equipped bone marrow laboratory. Postoperatively, all patients underwent repeat ENoG and clinical photography at 3 and 6 months to assess for objective and clinical improvement. Clinical improvement was graded according to modified House-Brackmann grading system. Intervention Done All patients of posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis who were not improving with conventional surgical treatment were subjected to facial nerve decompression and stem cell implantation. Main Outcome Measures All patients who were subjected to stem cell implantation were followed up for 6 months to assess for any adverse effects of stem cell therapy on human beings; no adverse effects were seen in any of our patients after more than 6 months of follow-up. Results Majority of the patients were male, with motor vehicle accidents as the most common cause of injury in our series. Majority had longitudinal fractures on HRCT temporal bone. The significant improvement in ENoG amplitude was seen between preoperative and postoperative amplitudes on

  16. Surgical treatment of facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ritvik P

    2009-03-01

    The management of facial paralysis is one of the most complex areas of reconstructive surgery. Given the wide variety of functional and cosmetic deficits in the facial paralysis patient, the reconstructive surgeon requires a thorough understanding of the surgical techniques available to treat this condition. This review article will focus on surgical management of facial paralysis and the treatment options available for acute facial paralysis (<3 weeks duration), intermediate duration facial paralysis (3 weeks to 2 yr) and chronic facial paralysis (>2 yr). For acute facial paralysis, the main surgical therapies are facial nerve decompression and facial nerve repair. For facial paralysis of intermediate duration, nerve transfer procedures are appropriate. For chronic facial paralysis, treatment typically requires regional or free muscle transfer. Static techniques of facial reanimation can be used for acute, intermediate, or chronic facial paralysis as these techniques are often important adjuncts to the overall management strategy.

  17. [Techniques of autonomic nerve preservation in laparoscopic radical resection for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongbo; Zheng, Zongheng

    2015-06-01

    Pelvic autonomic nerve is a three-dimensional structure surrounding the rectum. There are several key points related to nerve injury during laparoscopic radical resection for rectal cancer. Hypogastric nerve has close relation with the upper and middle part of the rectum. Combined with S2-S4 pelvic splanchnic nerve, hypogastric nerve forms pelvic plexus. Incorrect operation in pelvic parietal peritoneum during dissection of upper rectum will lead to nerve injury. When performing dissection of inferior mesenteric artery, bilateral nerve tracts should be pushed to posterior abdominal wall and anterior fascia of the abdominal aorta should be well protected to avoid nerve injury. Pelvic plexus fibers located lateral to the rectum of pelvic floor, as well as neurovascular bundle closed to Denonvillier's fascia, also have close relations with nerve injury. Dissection of either lateral or anterior wall of rectum should be performed behind the Denonvillier's fascia and in front of the proper fascia of rectum. Sharp dissection should be performed closed to the mesorectum to protect branches of pelvic plexus.

  18. Effect of facial cooling and cold air inhalation on sympathetic nerve activity in men.

    PubMed

    Heindl, Silke; Struck, Jan; Wellhöner, Peter; Sayk, Friedhelm; Dodt, Christoph

    2004-08-20

    In nine healthy subjects, cold stimuli were administered to the forehead and hand, to the oral and nasal cavities via ice cubes and to the bronchial system via inhalation of cold air (-25 degrees C). Blood pressure, heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) from the peroneal nerve were recorded. MSNA expressed as total activity increased during cold air inhalation, cooling of the forehead (P < 0.001, ANOVA), hand and mouth (P < or = 0.05), paralleled by a rise in blood pressure during cold air inhalation and cooling of the forehead and hand (P < 0.01). Cooling of the forehead provoked a faster increase of MSNA expressed as total activity (P < 0.05) and higher levels of diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.05) compared with cooling of the hand. Bradycardia was observed only during cooling of the nasal cavity (P < 0.001) and the forehead (P < 0.05). It is concluded that cooling of the skin and mucous membranes of the tracheobronchial tract elicits sympathetically mediated hemodynamic adaptations, probably via stimulation of cold-sensitive afferents. PMID:15351305

  19. Facial Nerve Outcome after Vestibular Schwannoma Resection: A Comparative Meta-Analysis of Endoscopic versus Open Retrosigmoid Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alobaid, Abdullah; Aref, Mohammed; Bennardo, Michael Ross; Farrokhyar, Forough; Reddy, Kesava

    2014-01-01

    The minimal access retrosigmoid endoscopic approach to vestibular schwannoma (VS) resection has been used with promising results. However, it has not been compared with the standard open approach in the literature. We performed a meta-analysis review for all articles describing both approaches for VS from 1996 to 2011. We found 1861 articles. After review and discussion, we narrowed our study to 25 articles, 4 endoscopic and 21 open. The total number of patients was 3026 for open and 790 for endoscopic. The mean tumor sizes in the open and endoscopic series were 2.5 cm and 2.7 cm, respectively. Good facial nerve outcome was achieved in 67% of the open series patients and in 94% of the endoscopic series patients. Other outcomes in the open and endoscopic series were the following: gross total resection, 91% versus 97%; functional hearing, 22.6% versus 46%; wound infection, 1.3% versus 2.6%; and recurrence, 5.4% versus 2.2%. We acknowledge the limitations of our study, but we can state that the endoscopic approach is not inferior to the standard open approach. In expert hands the endoscopic approach can offer as good a result as the open, with potential benefits such as less pain and a shorter length of stay in the hospital. There is a need for more controlled studies for a definitive comparison. PMID:25844300

  20. FGF–2 is required to prevent astrogliosis in the facial nucleus after facial nerve injury and mechanical stimulation of denervated vibrissal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Hizay, Arzu; Seitz, Mark; Grosheva, Maria; Sinis, Nektarios; Kaya, Yasemin; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Dunlop, Sarah A.; Angelov, Doychin N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recently, we have shown that manual stimulation of paralyzed vibrissal muscles after facial-facial anastomosis reduced the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions and restored vibrissal whisking. Using gene knock outs, we found a differential dependence of manual stimulation effects on growth factors. Thus, insulin-like growth factor-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are required to underpin manual stimulation-mediated improvements, whereas FGF-2 is not. The lack of dependence on FGF-2 in mediating these peripheral effects prompted us to look centrally, i.e. within the facial nucleus where increased astrogliosis after facial-facial anastomosis follows "synaptic stripping". We measured the intensity of Cy3-fluorescence after immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as an indirect indicator of synaptic coverage of axotomized neurons in the facial nucleus of mice lacking FGF-2 (FGF-2-/- mice). There was no difference in GFAP-Cy3-fluorescence (pixel number, gray value range 17–103) between intact wildtype mice (2.12± 0.37×107) and their intact FGF-2-/- counterparts (2.12± 0.27×107) nor after facial-facial anastomosis +handling (wildtype: 4.06± 0.32×107; FGF-2-/-: 4.39±0.17×107). However, after facial-facial anastomosis, GFAP-Cy3-fluorescence remained elevated in FGF-2-/--animals (4.54±0.12×107), whereas manual stimulation reduced the intensity of GFAP-immunofluorescence in wild type mice to values that were not significantly different from intact mice (2.63± 0.39×10 ). We conclude that FGF-2 is not required to underpin the beneficial effects of manual stimulation at the neuro-muscular junction, but it is required to minimize astrogliosis in the brainstem and, by implication, restore synaptic coverage of recovering facial motoneurons.

  1. Digital Smile Design Meets the Dento-Facial Analyzer: Optimizing Esthetics While Preserving Tooth Structure.

    PubMed

    Tak On, Tse; Kois, John C

    2016-01-01

    This case of an adult male patient with missing maxillary lateral incisors who was unhappy with his smile focuses on implementation of the digital smile design (DSD) concept. Combined with the use of a dento-facial analyzer, DSD, which employs a series of extraoral photographs, allowed the clinician to preoperatively plan different approaches to the treatment and visualize the outcome of each one, as well as to effectively communicate critical tooth position references to the laboratory technician and the patient. The additive approach used in this case minimized tooth preparation while creating an esthetic smile.

  2. [Surgical facial reanimation after persisting facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Pasche, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Facial reanimation following persistent facial paralysis can be managed with surgical procedures of varying complexity. The choice of the technique is mainly determined by the cause of facial paralysis, the age and desires of the patient. The techniques most commonly used are the nerve grafts (VII-VII, XII-VII, cross facial graft), dynamic muscle transfers (temporal myoplasty, free muscle transfert) and static suspensions. An intensive rehabilitation through specific exercises after all procedures is essential to archieve good results.

  3. Voiding and Sexual Function after Autonomic-Nerve-Preserving Surgery for Rectal Cancer in Disease-Free Male Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Kil; Song, Kanghyon; Park, Jong Wook; Moon, Sun-Mi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the effects of surgery for rectal cancer on postoperative voiding and sexual function over the course of time. Materials and Methods Data from 28 patients who underwent autonomic nerve preserving rectal cancer surgery were retrospectively analyzed. Operations were performed between October 2005 and July 2007 and all patients were followed-up for more than 3 years. Preoperatively, all patients underwent urodynamic studies including uroflowmetry, and filled out the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). The evaluation of sexual function consisted of Erectile Function domain score in International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-EFD) and Ejaculation domain score in Male Sexual Health Questionnaire (MSHQ-EjD). Data from uroflowmetry and questionnaires were examined. Results At 3 years postoperatively the prostate volume was similar to the preoperative value (p=0.727). There were no statistically significant postoperative changes in the average maximum flow rate (15.9 ml/s vs. 16.2 ml/s, p=0.637) and post-void residual urine volume (34.7 ml vs. 36.8 ml, p=0.809). No statistically significant differences were observed in the IPSS (13.2 vs. 12.2, p=0.374). However, although pelvic autonomic nerve preservation have been performed, a significant proportion of rectal cancer patients suffer from sexual dysfunction and the average of IIEF-EFD and MSHQ-EjD scores was decreased postoperatively until 3 years (25.1 vs. 16.1 and 28.3 vs. 14.2 respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions Voiding function was not affected after autonomic nerve-preserving rectal cancer surgery, however sexual function was significantly aggravated. We recommend that the baseline genitourinary function should be evaluated before the treatment for male rectal cancer patients, and penile rehabilitation is necessary for their quality of life after treatment. PMID:21221207

  4. Facial disability index (FDI): Adaptation to Spanish, reliability and validity

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cardero, Eduardo; Cayuela, Aurelio; Acosta-Feria, Manuel; Gutierrez-Perez, Jose-Luis

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To adapt to Spanish the facial disability index (FDI) described by VanSwearingen and Brach in 1995 and to assess its reliability and validity in patients with facial nerve paresis after parotidectomy. Study Design: The present study was conducted in two different stages: a) cross-cultural adaptation of the questionnaire and b) cross-sectional study of a control group of 79 Spanish-speaking patients who suffered facial paresis after superficial parotidectomy with facial nerve preservation. The cross-cultural adaptation process comprised the following stages: (I) initial translation, (II) synthesis of the translated document, (III) retro-translation, (IV) review by a board of experts, (V) pilot study of the pre-final draft and (VI) analysis of the pilot study and final draft. Results: The reliability and internal consistency of every one of the rating scales included in the FDI (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient) was 0.83 for the complete scale and 0.77 and 0.82 for the physical and the social well-being subscales. The analysis of the factorial validity of the main components of the adapted FDI yielded similar results to the original questionnaire. Bivariate correlations between FDI and House-Brackmann scale were positive. The variance percentage was calculated for all FDI components. Conclusions: The FDI questionnaire is a specific instrument for assessing facial neuromuscular dysfunction which becomes a useful tool in order to determine quality of life in patients with facial nerve paralysis. Spanish adapted FDI is equivalent to the original questionnaire and shows similar reliability and validity. The proven reproducibi-lity, reliability and validity of this questionnaire make it a useful additional tool for evaluating the impact of facial nerve paralysis in Spanish-speaking patients. Key words:Parotidectomy, facial nerve paralysis, facial disability. PMID:22926474

  5. Peripheral facial nerve axotomy in mice causes sprouting of motor axons into perineuronal central white matter: time course and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Milan; Werner, Alexander; Acosta-Saltos, Alejandro; Gonitel, Roman; Pararajasingam, Abirami; Pararajasingham, Abirami; Ruff, Crystal; Rumajogee, Prakasham; Cuthill, Dan; Galiano, Mathias; Bohatschek, Marion; Wallace, Adam S; Anderson, Patrick N; Mayer, Ulrike; Behrens, Axel; Raivich, Gennadij

    2010-03-01

    Generation of new axonal sprouts plays an important role in neural repair. In the current study, we examined the appearance, composition and effects of gene deletions on intrabrainstem sprouts following peripheral facial nerve axotomy. Axotomy was followed by the appearance of galanin(+) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)(+) sprouts peaking at day 14, matching both large, neuropeptide(+) subpopulations of axotomized facial motoneurons, but with CGRP(+) sprouts considerably rarer. Strong immunoreactivity for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and retrogradely transported MiniRuby following its application on freshly cut proximal facial nerve stump confirmed their axotomized motoneuron origin; the sprouts expressed CD44 and alpha7beta1 integrin adhesion molecules and grew apparently unhindered along neighboring central white matter tracts. Quantification of the galanin(+) sprouts revealed a stronger response following cut compared with crush (day 7-14) as well as enhanced sprouting after recut (day 8 + 6 vs. 14; 14 + 8 vs. 22), arguing against delayed appearance of sprouting being the result of the initial phase of reinnervation. Sprouting was strongly diminished in brain Jun-deficient mice but enhanced in alpha7 null animals that showed apparently compensatory up-regulation in beta1, suggesting important regulatory roles for transcription factors and the sprout-associated adhesion molecules. Analysis of inflammatory stimuli revealed a 50% reduction 12-48 hours following systemic endotoxin associated with neural inflammation and a tendency toward more sprouts in TNFR1/2 null mutants (P = 10%) with a reduced inflammatory response, indicating detrimental effects of excessive inflammation. Moreover, the study points to the usefulness of the facial axotomy model in exploring physiological and molecular stimuli regulating central sprouting. PMID:20034058

  6. SOD1 Overexpression Preserves Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate with an Increase of Aortic Depressor Nerve Function

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Jeffrey; Gu, He; Cheng, Zixi (Jack)

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical (O2∙−), is associated with diseases which compromise cardiac autonomic function. Overexpression of SOD1 may offer protection against ROS damage to the cardiac autonomic nervous system, but reductions of O2∙− may interfere with normal cellular functions. We have selected the C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse as a model to determine whether SOD1 overexpression alters cardiac autonomic function, as measured by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and aortic depressor nerve (ADN) recordings, as well as evaluation of baseline heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Under isoflurane anesthesia, C57 wild-type and SOD1 mice were catheterized with an arterial pressure transducer and measurements of HR and MAP were taken. After establishing a baseline, hypotension and hypertension were induced by injection of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and phenylephrine (PE), respectively, and ΔHR versus ΔMAP were recorded as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). SNP and PE treatment were administered sequentially after a recovery period to measure arterial baroreceptor activation by recording aortic depressor nerve activity. Our findings show that overexpression of SOD1 in C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse preserved the normal HR, MAP, and BRS but enhanced aortic depressor nerve function. PMID:26823951

  7. Anatomical basis and clinical research of pelvic autonomic nerve preservation with laparoscopic radical resection for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Lu, Xiao-ming; Tao, Kai-xiong; Ma, Jian-hua; Cai, Kai-lin; Wang, Lin-fang; Niu, Yan-feng; Wang, Guo-bin

    2016-04-01

    The clinical effect of laparoscopic rectal cancer curative excision with pelvic autonomic nerve preservation (PANP) was investigated. This study evaluated the frequency of urinary and sexual dysfunction of 149 male patients with middle and low rectal cancer who underwent laparoscopic or open total mesorectal excision with pelvic autonomic nerve preservation (PANP) from March 2011 to March 2013. Eighty-four patients were subjected to laparoscopic surgery, and 65 to open surgery respectively. The patients were followed up for 12 months, interviewed, and administered a standardized questionnaire about postoperative functional outcomes and quality of life. In the laparoscopic group, 13 patients (18.37%) presented transitory postoperative urinary dysfunction, and were medically treated. So did 12 patients (21.82%) in open group. Sexual desire was maintained by 52.86%, un-ability to engage in intercourse by 47.15%, and un-ability to achieve orgasm and ejaculation by 34.29% of the patients in the laparoscopic group. Sexual desire was maintained by 56.36%, un-ability to engage in intercourse by 43.63%, and un-ability to achieve orgasm and ejaculation by 33.73% of the patients in the open group. No significant differences in urinary and sexual dysfunction between the laparoscopic and open rectal resection groups were observed (P>0.05). It was concluded that laparoscopic rectal cancer radical excision with PANP did not aggravate or improve sexual and urinary dysfunction. PMID:27072964

  8. Management of the Eye in Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Chi, John J

    2016-02-01

    The preoperative assessment of the eye in facial paralysis is a critical component of surgical management. The degree of facial nerve paralysis, lacrimal secretion, corneal sensation, and lower eyelid position must be assessed accurately. Upper eyelid loading procedures are standard management of lagophthalmos. Lower eyelid tightening repositions the lower eyelid and helps maintain the aqueous tear film. Eyelid reanimation allows an aesthetic symmetry with blinking and restores protective functions vital to ocular preservation. Patients often have multiple nervous deficits, including corneal anesthesia. Other procedures include tarsorrhaphy, spring implantation, and temporalis muscle transposition; associated complications have rendered them nearly obsolete.

  9. Large Kindred Evaluation of Mitofusin 2 Novel Mutation, Extremes of Neurologic Presentations, and Preserved Nerve Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Christopher J.; Kimmel, Grace W.; Pittock, Sean J.; Engelstad, JaNean E.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Wu, Yanhong; Dyck, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitofusin 2 (MFN2) is a mitochondrial membrane protein mediating mitochondrial fusion and function. Mutated MFN2 is responsible for Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A2. In small kindreds, specific MFN2 mutations have been reported to associate with severity of axonal neuropathy, optic atrophy, and involvement of the central nervous system. The results of the nerve biopsy specimens suggested that the mitochondria are structurally abnormal in patients with MFN2 mutations. Objective To study a newly identified MFN2 mutation, Leu146Phe, and the associated phenotypes in a large kindred. Patients An American kindred of Northern European and Cherokee American Indian descent. Results Genetic analysis revealed a novel GTPase domain MFN2 mutation Leu146Phe that associated with clinical status of 15 studied persons (10 affected and 5 unaffected) and not found in 800 control persons. Clinical manifestations were markedly different. In 1 affected person, optic atrophy and brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities led to multiple sclerosis diagnosis and interferon β-1a treatment when neuropathy was initially unrecognized. Age of onset ranged from 1 to 45 years. In some affected family members, severe and rapid-onset motor sensory neuropathy led to early loss of ambulation, whereas other family members experienced minimal neuropathic sensory symptoms. Despite histologically significant loss of nerve fibers, the mitochondria were not distinguishable from diseased sural nerve biopsy specimens and healthy controls. Conclusions Novel MFN2 mutation Leu146Phe causes Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A2. Intrafamilial clinical phenotype variability is emphasized and has important implications in genetic counseling. The clinical phenotype may mimic multiple sclerosis when optic atrophy and the characteristic brain lesions of MFN2 on magnetic resonance imaging are present and neuropathy is mild or unrecognized. The predicted molecular pathogenesis may occur without evident histological

  10. A schwannoma of the S1 dural sleeve was resected while the intact nerve fibers were preserved using a microscope. Report of a case with early MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Uchida, K; Kokubo, Y; Yayama, T; Nakajima, H; Inukai, T; Nomura, E; Baba, H

    2007-04-01

    In this report, we describe a small schwannoma of the dural sleeve and mention that it is often difficult to differentiate this tumor from lumbar disc herniation, especially a sequestered hernia, or a discal cyst. Gadolinium-enhanced MR images were a useful preoperative examination modality for differentiating this lesion from other diseases. Microscopically, the intradural tumor was successfully removed. The dura mater of the S1 nerve root was opened microsurgically, allowing the nerve fibers involved in the tumor to be identified. The involved fibers were cut around the tumor, and the lesion was resected while the intact nerve fibers were preserved. Based on histological examination of the resected specimen, the tumor was diagnosed as a schwannoma with multilocular cystic degeneration. Microsurgery allowed the tumor to be removed with minimal impairment from cutting of nerve fibers in the nerve root. PMID:17674301

  11. Prospective evaluation of early postoperative male and female sexual function after radical prostatectomy with erectile nerves preservation.

    PubMed

    Tran, S-N; Wirth, G J; Mayor, G; Rollini, C; Bianchi-Demicheli, F; Iselin, C E

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer screening has led to the diagnosis of localized prostate cancer in increasingly young and sexually active men. Accordingly, the impact of cancer treatment on sexual function is gaining more attention. To prospectively evaluate the impact of radical prostatectomy (RP) on male, female and conjugal sexual function. Patients were prospectively assessed by an urologist and a sexologist before and 6 months after robot-assisted laparoscopic RP (RALP). RALP was performed with uni- or bilateral neurovascular bundle preservation by a single surgeon. Postoperatively, all patients were prescribed tadalafil 20 mg, 3 times a week during 6 months. Male and female sexual functions were evaluated by using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5), the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and the Lock-Wallace Marital Adjustment Test (MAT). Continuous variables were analyzed with rank-sum and t-tests, as needed, and categorical variables with chi-squared tests. All tests were two-sided, with a P-value ⩽ 0.05 considered significant. Twenty-one couples were included. Mean patient male and female age was 62.4 and 60.7 years, respectively. Bilateral nerve sparing was performed in 12/21 (57%) patients. Median preoperative IIEF-5 was 20/25, corresponding to mild erectile dysfunction (ED). Median preoperative FSFI and MAT were both within normal range (28/36 and 114/158, respectively). Six months following surgery, both IIEF-5 (11/25) and FSFI (25/36) had significantly dropped (P=0.007 and 0.003, respectively). Postoperative decreases in IIEF-5 and FSFI scores were associated within couples. MAT scores (115/158), however, remained unaffected by RALP, showing an unmodified relationship satisfaction postoperatively. Finally, bilateral nerve sparing surgery preserved not only male but also female sexual function. This study shows that the expected short-term post-RALP ED is associated with a worsening of female sexual function, whereas nerve sparing surgery has a

  12. Pelvic autonomic nerve preservation in radical rectal cancer surgery: changes in the past 3 decades

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Min-Hoe; Yeh, Yu-Ting; Lim, Evan; Seow-Choen, Francis

    2016-01-01

    The advent of total mesorectal excision (TME) together with minimally invasive techniques such as laparoscopic colorectal surgery and robotic surgery has improved surgical results. However, the incidence of bladder and sexual dysfunction remains high. This may be particularly distressing for the patient and troublesome to manage for the surgeon when it does occur. The increased use of neoadjuvant and adjuvant radiotherapy is also associated with poorer functional outcomes. In this review, we evaluate current understanding of the anatomy of pelvic nerves which are divided into the areas of the inferior mesenteric artery pedicle, the lateral pelvic wall and dissection around the urogenital organs. Surgical techniques in these areas are discussed. We also discuss the results in functional outcomes of the various techniques including open, laparoscopic and robotic over the last 30 years. PMID:27478196

  13. The effective stimulating pulse for restoration of blink function in unilateral facial nerve paralysis rabbits, verified by a simple FES system.

    PubMed

    Jie, Tan; Zhiqiang, Gao; Guodong, Feng; Yubin, Xue; Xiuyong, Ding; Tingting, Cui; Yang, Zhao

    2016-10-01

    The trains of 200 ms biphasic square pulses with the width of 9 ms delivered at 50 Hz were found to be the most suitable and effective mean as stimulation in FES system of restoring the blink function in unilateral facial nerve paralysis rabbit model. FES system is a reliable tool for these patients. Facial paralysis affects thousands of people every year. Many will have long term facial difficulties and the loss of the ability to blink the eye, which can lead to potential loss of the eye. Although many treatments exist, no one approach corrects all the deficits associated with the loss of orbicularis oculi function. FES is a means of providing movement in paralysed muscles to assist with practical activities and one possible way of restoring blink and other functions in these patients. Although some previous researches had investigated the effect of simple FES system on restoration of paralyzed facial muscles, there is still controversy about the appropriate details of the most effective stimulating pulses, such as the frequency, wave pattern and pulse width. Our aim is to find out the parameters of the most appropriate and effective stimulatin verify it by a simple FES system. 24 healthy adult male New Zealand white rabbits were accepted the surgery of right side facial nerve main trunk transaction under general anesthesia as the unilateral facial nerve paralysis models. The platinum tungsten alloy electrodes were implanted in orbicularis oculi muscle. The parameters of stimulus pulses were set to a 200 ms biphasic pulse with different waveforms (square, sine and triangle), different frequencies (25, 50, 100 Hz) and different widths from 1 to 9 ms. Next, we set up a simple FES system to verify the previous results as the stimulus signal. We observed the movement of the both sides of eyelid when eye blink induced by different kinds of pulses. In all animals, the three kinds of waveforms pulse with frequency of 25 Hz could not evoke the smooth blink movement

  14. The Lesser Palatine Nerve Innervates the Levator Veli Palatini Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Yoshitaka; Kawai, Katsuya; Yamada, Shigehito; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: When the lesser palatine nerve (LPN) is supposed to be a branch of the trigeminal nerve and innervate sensation of the soft palate, whether the LPN contains motor fibers is unclear. In this study, we monitored the electromyogram of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle on stimulating the LPN during palatoplasty in 3 patients. The electromyogram of the muscles showed the myogenic potential induced by electrostimulation of the LPN. Taken together with the finding from our previous anatomical study that the motor fibers come from the facial nerve, this result supports the double innervation theory of the LVP, which posits that both the pharyngeal plexus and the facial nerve innervate it. Identifying and preserving the LPN during palatoplasty might improve postoperative speech results. PMID:27757354

  15. Plasticity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Mouse Bone Marrow in the Presence of Conditioned Medium of the Facial Nerve and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Eudes Euler de Souza; Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná; Cavalcanti, José Rodolfo Lopes de Paiva; Marinho, Maria Jocileide de Medeiros; Pereira, Wogelsanger Oliveira; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão; Costa, Miriam Stela Mariz de Oliveira; Júnior, Expedito Silva do Nascimento; Cavalcante, Jeferson Sousa

    2014-01-01

    A number of evidences show the influence of the growth of injured nerve fibers in peripheral nervous system as well as potential implant stem cells (SCs). The SCs implementation in the clinical field is promising and the understanding of proliferation and differentiation is essential. This study aimed to evaluate the plasticity of mesenchymal SCs from bone marrow of mice in the presence of culture medium conditioned with facial nerve explants and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). The growth and morphology were assessed for over 72 hours. Quantitative phenotypic analysis was taken from the immunocytochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), protein OX-42 (OX-42), protein associated with microtubule MAP-2 (MAP-2), protein β-tubulin III (β-tubulin III), neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), and neurofilament 200 (NF-200). Cells cultured with conditioned medium alone or combined with FGF-2 showed morphological features apparently similar at certain times to neurons and glia and a significant proliferative activity in groups 2 and 4. Cells cultivated only with conditioned medium acquired a glial phenotype. Cells cultured with FGF-2 and conditioned medium expressed GFAP, OX-42, MAP-2, β-tubulin III, NeuN, and NF-200. This study improves our understanding of the plasticity of mesenchymal cells and allows the search for better techniques with SCs. PMID:25614888

  16. Contemporary facial reanimation.

    PubMed

    Bhama, Prabhat K; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-04-01

    The facial nerve is the most commonly paralyzed nerve in the human body. Facial paralysis affects aesthetic appearance, and it has a profound effect on function and quality of life. Management of patients with facial paralysis requires a multidisciplinary approach, including otolaryngologists, plastic surgeons, ophthalmologists, and physical therapists. Regardless of etiology, patients with facial paralysis should be evaluated systematically, with initial efforts focused upon establishing proper diagnosis. Management should proceed with attention to facial zones, including the brow and periocular region, the midface and oral commissure, the lower lip and chin, and the neck. To effectively compare contemporary facial reanimation strategies, it is essential to employ objective intake assessment methods, and standard reassessment schemas during the entire management period.

  17. Facial neuroma masquerading as acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Sayegh, Eli T; Kaur, Gurvinder; Ivan, Michael E; Bloch, Orin; Cheung, Steven W; Parsa, Andrew T

    2014-10-01

    Facial nerve neuromas are rare benign tumors that may be initially misdiagnosed as acoustic neuromas when situated near the auditory apparatus. We describe a patient with a large cystic tumor with associated trigeminal, facial, audiovestibular, and brainstem dysfunction, which was suspicious for acoustic neuroma on preoperative neuroimaging. Intraoperative investigation revealed a facial nerve neuroma located in the cerebellopontine angle and internal acoustic canal. Gross total resection of the tumor via retrosigmoid craniotomy was curative. Transection of the facial nerve necessitated facial reanimation 4 months later via hypoglossal-facial cross-anastomosis. Clinicians should recognize the natural history, diagnostic approach, and management of this unusual and mimetic lesion.

  18. Anesthesia mumps resulting in temporary facial nerve paralysis after the auditory brainstem implantation in a 3-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Özdek, Ali; Bayır, Ömer; Işık, Murat Eray; Tatar, Emel Çadallı; Saylam, Güleser; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    An acute transient sialadenitis of the major salivary glands in the early postoperative period is called 'anesthesia mumps'. It has been reported in different surgical procedures especially in neurosurgical procedures. Anesthesia mumps develops very fast after the extubation period but it usually regresses with no sequelae within a few hours. However, sometimes serious complication can occur such as respiratory distress. In this report, we present a 3-year-old girl with an anesthesia mumps and facial palsy occurring after successful auditory brainstem implantation and we discuss the cause and the management of this rare complication in this report.

  19. Circumferential targeted renal sympathetic nerve denervation with preservation of the renal arterial wall using intra-luminal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Austin; Coleman, Leslie; Sakakura, Kenichi; Ladich, Elena; Virmani, Renu

    2015-03-01

    An intra-luminal ultrasound catheter system (ReCor Medical's Paradise System) has been developed to provide circumferential denervation of the renal sympathetic nerves, while preserving the renal arterial intimal and medial layers, in order to treat hypertension. The Paradise System features a cylindrical non-focused ultrasound transducer centered within a balloon that circulates cooling fluid and that outputs a uniform circumferential energy pattern designed to ablate tissues located 1-6 mm from the arterial wall and protect tissues within 1 mm. RF power and cooling flow rate are controlled by the Paradise Generator which can energize transducers in the 8.5-9.5 MHz frequency range. Computer simulations and tissue-mimicking phantom models were used to develop the proper power, cooling flow rate and sonication duration settings to provide consistent tissue ablation for renal arteries ranging from 5-8 mm in diameter. The modulation of these three parameters allows for control over the near-field (border of lesion closest to arterial wall) and far-field (border of lesion farthest from arterial wall, consisting of the adventitial and peri-adventitial spaces) depths of the tissue lesion formed by the absorption of ultrasonic energy and conduction of heat. Porcine studies have confirmed the safety (protected intimal and medial layers) and effectiveness (ablation of 1-6 mm region) of the system and provided near-field and far-field depth data to correlate with bench and computer simulation models. The safety and effectiveness of the Paradise System, developed through computer model, bench and in vivo studies, has been demonstrated in human clinical studies.

  20. A patient with bilateral facial palsy associated with hypertension and chickenpox: learning points.

    PubMed

    Al-Abadi, Eslam; Milford, David V; Smith, Martin

    2010-11-26

    Bilateral facial nerve paralysis is an uncommon presentation and even more so in children. There are reports of different causes of bilateral facial nerve palsy. It is well-established that hypertension and chickenpox causes unilateral facial paralysis and the importance of checking the blood pressure in children with facial nerve paralysis cannot be stressed enough. The authors report a boy with bilateral facial nerve paralysis in association with hypertension and having recently recovered from chickenpox. The authors review aspects of bilateral facial nerve paralysis as well as hypertension and chickenpox causing facial nerve paralysis.

  1. Preservation of cranial nerves during removal of the brain for an enhanced student experience in neuroanatomy classes.

    PubMed

    Long, Jennifer; Roberts, David J H; Pickering, James D

    2014-01-01

    Neuroanatomy teaching at the University of Leeds includes the examination of isolated brains by students working in small groups. This requires the prosected brains to exhibit all 12 pairs of cranial nerves. Traditional methods of removing the brain from the skull involve elevating the frontal lobes and cutting each cranial nerve as the brain is reflected posteriorly. This can leave a substantial length of each nerve attached to the skull base rather than to the removed brain. We have found a posterior approach more successful. In this study, five adult heads were disarticulated at the level of the thyroid cartilage and placed, prone, in a head stand. A wedge of bone from the occipital region was removed before the cerebellum and brainstem were elevated to visualize the cranial nerves associated with the medulla oblongata, cerebellopontine angle and mesencephalic-pontine junction prior to cutting them as close to the skull as possible. Five brains were successfully removed from the skull, each having a full complement of cranial nerves of good length attached to them. This approach significantly increases the length and number of cranial nerves remaining attached to the brain, which supports student education. For integration into head and neck dissection courses, careful consideration will be required to ensure the necks are suitably dissected and to decide whether the cranial nerves are best left attached to the skull base or brain.

  2. Gland-preserving surgery can effectively preserve gland function without increased recurrence in treatment of benign submandibular gland tumour.

    PubMed

    Min, Ruan; Zun, Zhang; Siyi, Li; Wenjun, Yang; Jian, Sun; Chenping, Zhang

    2013-10-01

    The most widely accepted treatment for neoplasms of the submandibular gland usually involves excision of the entire gland. Our aim was to establish a gland-preserving operation for benign tumours of the submandibular gland and evaluate its efficacy. We treated 40 patients from January 2007 to December 2008 with benign submandibular gland tumours who were listed to have an operation that either preserved the gland or sacrificed it. Duration of operation, extent of injury to the nerve, postoperative function of the gland, aesthetic appearance, and recurrence were assessed. We found no significant difference in baseline characteristics among the 20 patients in each group (19 men; 21 women, mean (SD) age of 34 (33.8 ± 5.72) years. The extent of injury to the lingual nerve and submandibular branch, together with deformities of the facial contour, were significantly less in the group in which the gland was preserved. Postoperative salivary production and overall patients' satisfaction were also better in that group. There was no recurrence in either group during the follow up period of 38 months-5 years. The gland-preserving procedure has advantages over the typical approach in which the gland is sacrificed. There is less risk of injury to the nerve, less deformity of the facial contour, better preservation of function, and patients are more satisfied. The gland-preserving technique should therefore be the first choice for management of benign submandibular tumours.

  3. A Contemporary Approach to Facial Reanimation.

    PubMed

    Jowett, Nate; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2015-01-01

    The management of acute facial nerve insult may entail medical therapy, surgical exploration, decompression, or repair depending on the etiology. When recovery is not complete, facial mimetic function lies on a spectrum ranging from flaccid paralysis to hyperkinesis resulting in facial immobility. Through systematic assessment of the face at rest and with movement, one may tailor the management to the particular pattern of dysfunction. Interventions for long-standing facial palsy include physical therapy, injectables, and surgical reanimation procedures. The goal of the management is to restore facial balance and movement. This article summarizes a contemporary approach to the management of facial nerve insults.

  4. Facial Ringworm (Tinea Faciale)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Ringworm, Facial (Tinea Faciei) Information for adults A A A A ... with scaling along the edge is typical of tinea faciale. Overview Tinea infections are commonly called ringworm ...

  5. Facial Reconstruction and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Genther, Dane J; Byrne, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Extracranial infiltration of the facial nerve by salivary gland tumors is the most frequent cause of facial palsy secondary to malignancy. Nevertheless, facial palsy related to salivary gland cancer is uncommon. Therefore, reconstructive facial reanimation surgery is not a routine undertaking for most head and neck surgeons. The primary aims of facial reanimation are to restore tone, symmetry, and movement to the paralyzed face. Such restoration should improve the patient's objective motor function and subjective quality of life. The surgical procedures for facial reanimation rely heavily on long-established techniques, but many advances and improvements have been made in recent years. In the past, published experiences on strategies for optimizing functional outcomes in facial paralysis patients were primarily based on small case series and described a wide variety of surgical techniques. However, in the recent years, larger series have been published from high-volume centers with significant and specialized experience in surgical and nonsurgical reanimation of the paralyzed face that have informed modern treatment. This chapter reviews the most important diagnostic methods used for the evaluation of facial paralysis to optimize the planning of each individual's treatment and discusses surgical and nonsurgical techniques for facial rehabilitation based on the contemporary literature.

  6. [The history of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques. PMID:26088742

  7. IFATS collection: Human adipose tissue-derived stem cells induce angiogenesis and nerve sprouting following myocardial infarction, in conjunction with potent preservation of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liying; Johnstone, Brian H; Cook, Todd G; Tan, Jian; Fishbein, Michael C; Chen, Peng-Sheng; March, Keith L

    2009-01-01

    The administration of therapeutic cell types, such as stem and progenitor cells, has gained much interest for the limitation or repair of tissue damage caused by a variety of insults. However, it is still uncertain whether the morphological and functional benefits are mediated predominantly via cell differentiation or paracrine mechanisms. Here, we assessed the extent and mechanisms of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASC)-dependent tissue repair in the context of acute myocardial infarction. Human ASCs in saline or saline alone was injected into the peri-infarct region in athymic rats following left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery ligation. Cardiac function and structure were evaluated by serial echocardiography and histology. ASC-treated rats consistently exhibited better cardiac function, by all measures, than control rats 1 month following LAD occlusion. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction and fractional shortening were improved in the ASC group, whereas LV remodeling and dilation were limited in the ASC group compared with the saline control group. Anterior wall thinning was also attenuated by ASC treatment, and post-mortem histological analysis demonstrated reduced fibrosis in ASC-treated hearts, as well as increased peri-infarct density of both arterioles and nerve sprouts. Human ASCs were persistent at 1 month in the peri-infarct region, but they were not observed to exhibit significant cardiomyocyte differentiation. Human ASCs preserve heart function and augment local angiogenesis and cardiac nerve sprouting following myocardial infarction predominantly by the provision of beneficial trophic factors. PMID:18772313

  8. Facial Paralysis Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Razfar, Ali; Lee, Matthew K; Massry, Guy G; Azizzadeh, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Facial nerve paralysis is a devastating condition arising from several causes with severe functional and psychological consequences. Given the complexity of the disease process, management involves a multispecialty, team-oriented approach. This article provides a systematic approach in addressing each specific sequela of this complex problem.

  9. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  10. Reflections on the contributions of Harvey Cushing to the surgery of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Patel, Neal; Nahed, Brian Vala; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Spinner, Robert J

    2011-05-01

    By the time Harvey Cushing entered medical school, nerve reconstruction techniques had been developed, but peripheral nerve surgery was still in its infancy. As an assistant surgical resident influenced by Dr. William Halsted, Cushing wrote a series of reports on the use of cocaine for nerve blocks. Following his residency training and a hiatus to further his clinical interests and intellectual curiosity, he traveled to Europe and met with a variety of surgeons, physiologists, and scientists, who likely laid the groundwork for Cushing's increased interest in peripheral nerve surgery. Returning to The Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1901, he began documenting these surgeries. Patient records preserved at Yale's Cushing Brain Tumor Registry describe Cushing's repair of ulnar and radial nerves, as well as his exploration of the brachial plexus for nerve repair or reconstruction. The authors reviewed Harvey Cushing's cases and provide 3 case illustrations not previously reported by Cushing involving neurolysis, nerve repair, and neurotization. Additionally, Cushing's experience with facial nerve neurotization is reviewed. The history, physical examination, and operative notes shed light on Cushing's diagnosis, strategy, technique, and hence, his surgery on peripheral nerve injury. These contributions complement others he made to surgery of the peripheral nervous system dealing with nerve pain, entrapment, and tumor. PMID:21214330

  11. Reflections on the contributions of Harvey Cushing to the surgery of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Patel, Neal; Nahed, Brian Vala; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Spinner, Robert J

    2011-05-01

    By the time Harvey Cushing entered medical school, nerve reconstruction techniques had been developed, but peripheral nerve surgery was still in its infancy. As an assistant surgical resident influenced by Dr. William Halsted, Cushing wrote a series of reports on the use of cocaine for nerve blocks. Following his residency training and a hiatus to further his clinical interests and intellectual curiosity, he traveled to Europe and met with a variety of surgeons, physiologists, and scientists, who likely laid the groundwork for Cushing's increased interest in peripheral nerve surgery. Returning to The Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1901, he began documenting these surgeries. Patient records preserved at Yale's Cushing Brain Tumor Registry describe Cushing's repair of ulnar and radial nerves, as well as his exploration of the brachial plexus for nerve repair or reconstruction. The authors reviewed Harvey Cushing's cases and provide 3 case illustrations not previously reported by Cushing involving neurolysis, nerve repair, and neurotization. Additionally, Cushing's experience with facial nerve neurotization is reviewed. The history, physical examination, and operative notes shed light on Cushing's diagnosis, strategy, technique, and hence, his surgery on peripheral nerve injury. These contributions complement others he made to surgery of the peripheral nervous system dealing with nerve pain, entrapment, and tumor.

  12. A Rare Case of C2 Sensory Blockade with Preserved Phrenic Nerve Function in an Obstetric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Kasey; Cook, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    High neuraxial blockade is a serious complication in obstetric patients and requires prompt recognition and management in order to optimize patient outcomes. In cases of high neuroblockade, patients may present with significant hypotension, dyspnea, agitation, difficulty speaking or inability to speak, or even loss of consciousness. We report the unusual presentation of an obstetric patient that remained hemodynamically stable and had the preserved ability to initiate breaths despite sensory blockade up to C2. The presence of differential motor and sensory block documented in this case helped enable the patient to be managed with noninvasive ventilatory support until the high blockade regressed and we are not aware of any other similar reports in literature. PMID:27559484

  13. A Rare Case of C2 Sensory Blockade with Preserved Phrenic Nerve Function in an Obstetric Patient.

    PubMed

    Coffman, John C; Fiorini, Kasey; Cook, Meghan; Small, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    High neuraxial blockade is a serious complication in obstetric patients and requires prompt recognition and management in order to optimize patient outcomes. In cases of high neuroblockade, patients may present with significant hypotension, dyspnea, agitation, difficulty speaking or inability to speak, or even loss of consciousness. We report the unusual presentation of an obstetric patient that remained hemodynamically stable and had the preserved ability to initiate breaths despite sensory blockade up to C2. The presence of differential motor and sensory block documented in this case helped enable the patient to be managed with noninvasive ventilatory support until the high blockade regressed and we are not aware of any other similar reports in literature. PMID:27559484

  14. Facial paralysis for the plastic surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Kosins, Aaron M; Hurvitz, Keith A; Evans, Gregory RD; Wirth, Garrett A

    2007-01-01

    Facial paralysis presents a significant and challenging reconstructive problem for plastic surgeons. An aesthetically pleasing and acceptable outcome requires not only good surgical skills and techniques, but also knowledge of facial nerve anatomy and an understanding of the causes of facial paralysis. The loss of the ability to move the face has both social and functional consequences for the patient. At the Facial Palsy Clinic in Edinburgh, Scotland, 22,954 patients were surveyed, and over 50% were found to have a considerable degree of psychological distress and social withdrawal as a consequence of their facial paralysis. Functionally, patients present with unilateral or bilateral loss of voluntary and nonvoluntary facial muscle movements. Signs and symptoms can include an asymmetric smile, synkinesis, epiphora or dry eye, abnormal blink, problems with speech articulation, drooling, hyperacusis, change in taste and facial pain. With respect to facial paralysis, surgeons tend to focus on the surgical, or ‘hands-on’, aspect. However, it is believed that an understanding of the disease process is equally (if not more) important to a successful surgical outcome. The purpose of the present review is to describe the anatomy and diagnostic patterns of the facial nerve, and the epidemiology and common causes of facial paralysis, including clinical features and diagnosis. Treatment options for paralysis are vast, and may include nerve decompression, facial reanimation surgery and botulinum toxin injection, but these are beyond the scope of the present paper. PMID:19554190

  15. Facial paralysis reconstruction in children and adolescents with central nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Panossian, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Facial paralysis remains a vexing problem in the treatment of posterior cranial fossa tumors in children. Fortunately, current techniques are available to reconstruct the paralyzed face in restoring balance, symmetry, and amelioration of functional sequelae. The restoration of structure and function of the paralyzed face is tantamount to proper social integration and psychosocial rehabilitation. In addition, the facial nerve is important in preventing drying of the eyes, drooling, and speech abnormalities, among other functions. The most visible evidence of facial paralysis is stark asymmetry, especially with animation. This is perhaps the most troubling aspect of facial paralysis and the one that leads to the greatest amount of psychosocial stress for the child and family members. Management strategies include early and late intervention. Early reconstructive goals focus on preservation and strengthening of intact motor end plates through native stimulatory pathways. Late reconstructive efforts are centered on surgically reconstructing permanently lost function based on each third of the face. Use of adjunct modalities such as chemical or surgical denervation and myectomies are also critical tools in restoring symmetry. Physical therapy plays a large role in both early and late facial nerve paralysis in optimizing cosmetic and functional outcome.

  16. [Objective assessment of facial paralysis using infrared thermography and formal concept analysis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu-Long; Hong, Wen-Xue; Liu, Jie-Min

    2014-04-01

    This paper presented a novel approach to objective assessment of facial nerve paralysis based on infrared thermography and formal concept analysis. Sixty five patients with facial nerve paralysis on one side were included in the study. The facial temperature distribution images of these 65 patients were captured by infrared thermography every five days during one-month period. First, the facial thermal images were pre-processed to identify six potential regions of bilateral symmetry by using image segmentation techniques. Then, the temperature differences on the left and right sides of the facial regions were extracted and analyzed. Finally, the authors explored the relationships between the statistical averages of those temperature differences and the House-Brackmann score for objective assessment degree of nerve damage in a facial nerve paralysis by using formal concept analysis. The results showed that the facial temperature distribution of patients with facial nerve paralysis exhibited a contralateral asymmetry, and the bilateral temperature differences of the facial regions were greater than 0.2 degrees C, whereas in normal healthy individuals these temperature differences were less than 0.2 degrees C. Spearman correlation coefficient between the bilateral temperature differences of the facial regions and the degree of facial nerve damage was an average of 0.508, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Furthermore, if one of the temperature differences of bilateral symmetry on facial regions was greater than 0.2 degrees C, and all were less than 0.5 degrees C, facial nerve paralysis could be determined as for the mild to moderate; if one of the temperature differences of bilateral symmetry was greater than 0.5 degrees C, facial nerve paralysis could be determined as for serious. In conclusion, this paper presents an automated technique for the computerized analysis of thermal images to objectively assess facial nerve related thermal dysfunction by

  17. Cross-Face Nerve Grafting with Infraorbital Nerve Pathway Protection: Anatomic and Histomorphometric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Joseph; Demsey, Daniel R.B.; Ho, Emily S.; Zuker, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Smiling is an important aspect of emotional expression and social interaction, leaving facial palsy patients with impaired social functioning and decreased overall quality of life. Although there are several techniques available for facial reanimation, staged facial reanimation using donor nerve branches from the contralateral, functioning facial nerve connected to a cross-face nerve graft (CFNG) is the only technique that can reliably reproduce an emotionally spontaneous smile. Although CFNGs provide spontaneity, they typically produce less smile excursion than when the subsequent free functioning muscle flap is innervated with the motor nerve to the masseter muscle. This may be explained in part by the larger number of donor motor axons when using the masseter nerve, as studies have shown that only 20% to 50% of facial nerve donor axons successfully cross the nerve graft to innervate their targets. As demonstrated in our animal studies, increasing the number of donor axons that grow into and traverse the CFNG to innervate the free muscle transfer increases muscle movement, and this phenomenon may provide patients with the benefit of improved smile excursion. We have previously shown in animal studies that sensory nerves, when coapted to a nerve graft, improve axonal growth through the nerve graft and improve muscle excursion. Here, we describe the feasibility of and our experience in translating these results clinically by coapting the distal portion of the CFNG to branches of the infraorbital nerve. PMID:27757349

  18. Developmental facial paralysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Julia K; Anesti, Katerina

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the confusing nomenclature and pathogenesis of Developmental Facial Paralysis, and how it can be differentiated from other causes of facial paralysis present at birth. Differentiating developmental from traumatic facial paralysis noted at birth is important for determining prognosis, but also for medicolegal reasons. Given the dramatic presentation of this condition, accurate and reliable guidelines are necessary in order to facilitate early diagnosis and initiate appropriate therapy, while providing support and counselling to the family. The 30 years experience of our center in the management of developmental facial paralysis is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve embryology, anatomy, nerve physiology, and an appreciation of well-recognized mishaps during fetal development. It is hoped that a better understanding of this condition will in the future lead to early targeted screening, accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment in this population of facially disfigured patients, which will facilitate their emotional and social rehabilitation, and their reintegration among their peers.

  19. Recurrent Facial Palsy and Electrophysiological Findings in Oligosymptomatic Melkersson Rosenthal Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sankhyan, Naveen; Padmanabh, Hansashree; Das, Ashim; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-10-01

    Melkersson Rosenthal Syndrome is a rare neuro-mucocutaneous disorder characterized by the classic triad of facial swelling, recurrent facial nerve palsy and fissured tongue. The clinical course is usually progressive, and etiology is unknown. The authors describe oligosymptomatic Melkersson Rosenthal Syndrome in a young girl presenting sequentially with recurrent, metachronous facial nerve palsy and hemifacial swelling in early childhood followed by fissuring in the tongue in late-childhood. Histopathological examination from the affected labial area showed non-granulomatous inflammation. Bilateral facial nerve conduction and blink reflex studies showed asymmetrical affection of both facial nerves with mixed features of axonal and demyelinating involvement. The patient remained steroid-refractory, and subsequent attacks remitted with partial recovery. The combination of facial edema and facial palsy in a child should alert the physicians to the diagnosis of Melkersson Rosenthal Syndrome. A diagnostic mucosal biopsy, evaluation for systemic and oro-facial granulomatous disorders, and short course of corticosteroid treatment are recommended. PMID:27165478

  20. Recurrent Facial Palsy and Electrophysiological Findings in Oligosymptomatic Melkersson Rosenthal Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sankhyan, Naveen; Padmanabh, Hansashree; Das, Ashim; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-10-01

    Melkersson Rosenthal Syndrome is a rare neuro-mucocutaneous disorder characterized by the classic triad of facial swelling, recurrent facial nerve palsy and fissured tongue. The clinical course is usually progressive, and etiology is unknown. The authors describe oligosymptomatic Melkersson Rosenthal Syndrome in a young girl presenting sequentially with recurrent, metachronous facial nerve palsy and hemifacial swelling in early childhood followed by fissuring in the tongue in late-childhood. Histopathological examination from the affected labial area showed non-granulomatous inflammation. Bilateral facial nerve conduction and blink reflex studies showed asymmetrical affection of both facial nerves with mixed features of axonal and demyelinating involvement. The patient remained steroid-refractory, and subsequent attacks remitted with partial recovery. The combination of facial edema and facial palsy in a child should alert the physicians to the diagnosis of Melkersson Rosenthal Syndrome. A diagnostic mucosal biopsy, evaluation for systemic and oro-facial granulomatous disorders, and short course of corticosteroid treatment are recommended.

  1. Injury of the peripheral cranial nerves during carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Theodotou, B; Mahaley, M S

    1985-01-01

    The incidence of local nerve injury among 192 consecutive carotid endarterectomies in 162 patients between 1977-1983 was determined from review of the medical records. Two facial nerve, 5 hypoglossal nerve, and 2 vagus nerve injuries were discovered for a total incidence of 4.7%. Only the 2 facial nerve injuries failed to improve over 2 years. Followup ranged from 1 to 60 months in this group of patients. Careful attention to details of tissue dissection at surgery should lower the incidence of nerve injury during carotid endarterectomy. PMID:4049454

  2. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  3. An unusual complication of condylectomy: fracture of the temporal bone and intratemporal facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Unlü, Ramazan Erkin; Uysal, Ahmet Cağr; Alagöz, Murat Sahin; Tekin, Fatih; Sensöz, Omer

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis appears to be decreasing with the increased socioeconomic status of society. The intraoperative complications were reported to be few, the most dangerous of which are facial nerve injury during the extended preauricular incision and maxillary artery injury during condylectomy. The authors report a case of fracture of the temporal bone tearing the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve, resulting in a total facial nerve paralysis. PMID:15699674

  4. Facial Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jack E; Genden, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of severe facial deformities poses a unique surgical challenge: restoring the aesthetic form and function of the face. Facial transplantation has emerged over the last decade as an option for reconstruction of these defects in carefully selected patients. As the world experience with facial transplantation grows, debate remains regarding whether such a highly technical, resource-intensive procedure is warranted, all to improve quality of life but not necessarily prolong it. This article reviews the current state of facial transplantation with focus on the current controversies and challenges, with particular attention to issues of technique, immunology, and ethics. PMID:27400850

  5. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  6. Facial reanimations: part I--recent paralyses.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, F

    2015-12-01

    Unilateral facial paralysis is a common condition: 1 in every 60 people will experience Bell's palsy during the course of their life, and the residual deficits are particularly problematic for those who do not spontaneously recover the function of the facial nerve. Functionally the most relevant defect is lack of corneal lubrication because of inability to close the eyelid or blink. Morphologically, this presents as obvious ptosis caused by absence of the muscle tone at rest. "Restitutio ad integrum" of a paralysed face by operation is currently impossible, but realistic targets are improvement of facial symmetry and partial recovery of closure of the eyelids and smiling. Movements of the forehead and lower lip tend to be neglected targets for intervention because they are of less functional importance. Recent paralyses are those in which the mimetic musculature may be reactivated by provision of neural input, and the time limit is generally 18-24 months. Electromyography helps to detect it by assessing the presence of muscular fibrillations. If those are not detectable paralyses are considered to be long-standing, and new musculature must be transferred into the face, generally by transplantation of a muscular free flap or of the temporalis muscle in several different ways. When the facial nerve has been severed by trauma or during operation, immediate reconstruction must be considered and the simplest and most efficient is direct neurorrhaphy. If an appreciable part of the nerve is missing and the proximal and distal nerve stumps do not meet, an interpositional nerve graft must be placed to guarantee neural continuity. When reconstruction of the total extracranial branch of the facial nerve is required, the thoracodorsal nerve has proved to be highly effective. In case immediate reconstruction cannot be accomplished and the trunk of the facial nerve is not available as a donor nerve, mimetic musculature may be reactivated by provision of new neural input. Strong

  7. Facial baroparesis caused by scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Kamide, Daisuke; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Middle ear barotrauma is one of the common complications of SCUBA diving representing acute otalgia, hearing loss, and bleeding. But occurrence of facial palsy is rare. Here we report a case of a 30-year-old navy diver suffered middle ear barotrauma with transient facial palsy after SCUBA diving. He felt difficulty in equalizing the pressure in middle ear with Valsalva maneuver during diving, and suffered right facial palsy and aural fullness after diving. Clinical examination showed remarkable bulging of the right tympanic membrane and right facial palsy without other neurological findings. But facial palsy was disappeared immediately after myringotomy. We considered that the etiology of this case was neuropraxia of facial nerve in middle ear caused by over pressure of middle ear.

  8. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  9. Intraoperative monitoring of motor cranial nerves in skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Maurer, J; Pelster, H; Amedee, R G; Mann, W J

    1995-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerves is performed to minimize postoperative cranial nerve dysfunction. We performed electrophysiologic monitoring of motor cranial nerves with a NIM 2 unit from Xomed Treace and a patient multiplexer developed in our clinic. This multiplexer allows simultaneous monitoring of four cranial nerves and is additionally equipped with a bipolar stimulation mode. This intraoperative monitoring was used during 102 skull base operations. Of these, 44 operations were acoustic neuroma removals by translabyrinthine approach and 36 by a middle fossa approach. Various operations, including removal of tumors of the jugular foramen and the infratemporal fossa, were performed in the remaining 22 patients. The facial nerve, being the most frequently monitored nerve, was evaluated both preoperatively and intraoperatively. Electrophysiologic data were evaluated with respect to their predictive value for postoperative facial nerve function. The relative percent decrease in amplitude of the electromyogram after resection compared to that observed before resection seems to be of some predictive value for the postoperative facial nerve function. A 50 to 60% decrease or more is associated with an increase in the House classification. Intraoperative monitoring is a useful tool in skull base surgery, allowing for safer and faster identification of motor nerves in pathologic-anatomic conditions. It allows the surgeon a degree of comfort by providing immediate information regarding the status of the nerve. It may also improve postoperative nerve function and shorten operating time. Additionally, neuromonitoring provides some information about expected postoperative facial nerve function.

  10. Facial trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Kellman RM. Maxillofacial trauma. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . ... Facial trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and ...

  11. Facial paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches, seizures, or hearing loss. In newborns, facial paralysis may be caused by trauma during birth. Other causes include: Infection of the brain or surrounding tissues Lyme disease Sarcoidosis Tumor that ...

  12. Facial tics

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2010;33:641-655. Jankovic J, Lang AE. Movement disorders. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta ... Malhotra R. Review and update of involuntary facial movement disorders presenting in the ophthalmological setting. Surv Ophthalmol. Ryan ...

  13. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  14. Facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Little, Anthony C

    2014-11-01

    Facial attractiveness has important social consequences. Despite a widespread belief that beauty cannot be defined, in fact, there is considerable agreement across individuals and cultures on what is found attractive. By considering that attraction and mate choice are critical components of evolutionary selection, we can better understand the importance of beauty. There are many traits that are linked to facial attractiveness in humans and each may in some way impart benefits to individuals who act on their preferences. If a trait is reliably associated with some benefit to the perceiver, then we would expect individuals in a population to find that trait attractive. Such an approach has highlighted face traits such as age, health, symmetry, and averageness, which are proposed to be associated with benefits and so associated with facial attractiveness. This view may postulate that some traits will be universally attractive; however, this does not preclude variation. Indeed, it would be surprising if there existed a template of a perfect face that was not affected by experience, environment, context, or the specific needs of an individual. Research on facial attractiveness has documented how various face traits are associated with attractiveness and various factors that impact on an individual's judgments of facial attractiveness. Overall, facial attractiveness is complex, both in the number of traits that determine attraction and in the large number of factors that can alter attraction to particular faces. A fuller understanding of facial beauty will come with an understanding of how these various factors interact with each other. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:621-634. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1316 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26308869

  15. Facial blindsight

    PubMed Central

    Solcà, Marco; Guggisberg, Adrian G.; Schnider, Armin; Leemann, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Blindsight denotes unconscious residual visual capacities in the context of an inability to consciously recollect or identify visual information. It has been described for color and shape discrimination, movement or facial emotion recognition. The present study investigates a patient suffering from cortical blindness whilst maintaining select residual abilities in face detection. Our patient presented the capacity to distinguish between jumbled/normal faces, known/unknown faces or famous people’s categories although he failed to explicitly recognize or describe them. Conversely, performance was at chance level when asked to categorize non-facial stimuli. Our results provide clinical evidence for the notion that some aspects of facial processing can occur without perceptual awareness, possibly using direct tracts from the thalamus to associative visual cortex, bypassing the primary visual cortex. PMID:26483655

  16. Facial blindsight.

    PubMed

    Solcà, Marco; Guggisberg, Adrian G; Schnider, Armin; Leemann, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Blindsight denotes unconscious residual visual capacities in the context of an inability to consciously recollect or identify visual information. It has been described for color and shape discrimination, movement or facial emotion recognition. The present study investigates a patient suffering from cortical blindness whilst maintaining select residual abilities in face detection. Our patient presented the capacity to distinguish between jumbled/normal faces, known/unknown faces or famous people's categories although he failed to explicitly recognize or describe them. Conversely, performance was at chance level when asked to categorize non-facial stimuli. Our results provide clinical evidence for the notion that some aspects of facial processing can occur without perceptual awareness, possibly using direct tracts from the thalamus to associative visual cortex, bypassing the primary visual cortex. PMID:26483655

  17. Motonuclear changes after cranial nerve injury and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, E; Pallini, R; Lauretti, L; La Marca, F; Scogna, A; Rossi, G F

    1997-09-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms at play in nerve regeneration after nerve injury. Personal studies are reported regarding motonuclear changes after regeneration of injured cranial nerves, in particular of the facial and oculomotor nerves, as well as the influence that the natural molecule acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) has on post-axotomy cranial nerve motoneuron degeneration after facial and vagus nerve lesions. Adult and newborn animal models were used. Massive motoneuron response after nerve section and reconstruction was observed in the motonuclei of all nerves studied. ALC showed to have significant neuroprotective effects on the degeneration of axotomized motoneurons. Complex quantitative, morphological and somatotopic nuclear changes occurred that sustain new hypotheses regarding the capacities of motoneurons to regenerate and the possibilities of new neuron proliferation. The particularities of such observations are described and discussed.

  18. Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Argaud, Soizic; Delplanque, Sylvain; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Auffret, Manon; Duprez, Joan; Vérin, Marc; Grandjean, Didier; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    According to embodied simulation theory, understanding other people's emotions is fostered by facial mimicry. However, studies assessing the effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion are still controversial. In Parkinson's disease (PD), one of the most distinctive clinical features is facial amimia, a reduction in facial expressiveness, but patients also show emotional disturbances. The present study used the pathological model of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral). Our results evidenced a significant decrease in facial mimicry for joy in PD, essentially linked to the absence of reaction of the zygomaticus major and the orbicularis oculi muscles in response to happy avatars, whereas facial mimicry for expressions of anger was relatively preserved. We also confirmed that PD patients were less accurate in recognizing positive and neutral facial expressions and highlighted a beneficial effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion. We thus provide additional arguments for embodied simulation theory suggesting that facial mimicry is a potential lever for therapeutic actions in PD even if it seems not to be necessarily required in recognizing emotion as such. PMID:27467393

  19. Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Argaud, Soizic; Delplanque, Sylvain; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Auffret, Manon; Duprez, Joan; Vérin, Marc; Grandjean, Didier; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    According to embodied simulation theory, understanding other people's emotions is fostered by facial mimicry. However, studies assessing the effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion are still controversial. In Parkinson's disease (PD), one of the most distinctive clinical features is facial amimia, a reduction in facial expressiveness, but patients also show emotional disturbances. The present study used the pathological model of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral). Our results evidenced a significant decrease in facial mimicry for joy in PD, essentially linked to the absence of reaction of the zygomaticus major and the orbicularis oculi muscles in response to happy avatars, whereas facial mimicry for expressions of anger was relatively preserved. We also confirmed that PD patients were less accurate in recognizing positive and neutral facial expressions and highlighted a beneficial effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion. We thus provide additional arguments for embodied simulation theory suggesting that facial mimicry is a potential lever for therapeutic actions in PD even if it seems not to be necessarily required in recognizing emotion as such.

  20. Foreign body resulting in chronic otomastoiditis and facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Roshan Kumar; Gupta, Bhumika; Panda, Naresh K

    2015-02-01

    We present a case of a foreign body in the ear of 5-year-old girl child. She presented with features of chronic suppurative otitis media with facial nerve palsy. On exploration exuberant granulation was found in attic and middle ear. A foreign body (seed) was found buried within the granulation tissue which was removed. Bony facial canal was dehiscent in the tympanic segment. She had recovery of facial nerve function. The case is being reported to increase awareness among otolaryngologist and to consider foreign body as a differential diagnosis in cases of complicated CSOM; especially in children. PMID:25500549

  1. Automatic recognition of facial movement for paralyzed face.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Dong, Junyu; Sun, Xin; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Shengke

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve paralysis is a common disease due to nerve damage. Most approaches for evaluating the degree of facial paralysis rely on a set of different facial movements as commanded by doctors. Therefore, automatic recognition of the patterns of facial movement is fundamental to the evaluation of the degree of facial paralysis. In this paper, a novel method named Active Shape Models plus Local Binary Patterns (ASMLBP) is presented for recognizing facial movement patterns. Firstly, the Active Shape Models (ASMs) are used in the method to locate facial key points. According to these points, the face is divided into eight local regions. Then the descriptors of these regions are extracted by using Local Binary Patterns (LBP) to recognize the patterns of facial movement. The proposed ASMLBP method is tested on both the collected facial paralysis database with 57 patients and another publicly available database named the Japanese Female Facial Expression (JAFFE). Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is efficient for both paralyzed and normal faces.

  2. Different discharge properties of facial nucleus motoneurons following neurotmesis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Suming; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Wang, Haibo

    2016-08-26

    Facial nucleus motoneurons innervating the facial expressive muscles are involved in a wide range of motor activities, however, the types of movement related neurons and their electrophysiological transformation after peripheral facial nerve injury haven't been revealed. This study was designed to elucidate the types of facial nucleus motoneurons and their alterations of discharge parameters following peripheral facial nerve injury in vivo. Here we set up a rat model by implanting electrode arrays into the brainstem and recorded the electrophysiological signals of facial nucleus neurons in the intact rats for 5 days, then transected the trunk of facial nerve (TF), and continued the record for 4 weeks. At the 4th week post-surgery, the morphological changes of TFs were analyzed. In this paper, we described two types of putative facial nucleus motoneurons based on their electrophysiological properties and their firing frequency adaptation. Type I motoneurons (n=57.6%) were characterized by a sustained spike adaptation, Type II motoneurons (n=26.2%) were identified by a phasic fast spike firing. Facial palsy and synkinesia, caused by neurotmesis of TF, were accompanied by firing rates reduction and firing pattern alteration of motoneurons. Our findings suggest the presence of two types of facial nucleus motorneurons, and their response patterns after neurotmesis support the notion that the discharge pattern of motorneurons may play an important role in the facial nerve function.

  3. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  4. PHACE syndrome associated with congenital oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Ramesh; Naik, Milind N; Desai, Savari; Honavar, Santosh G

    2009-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a multisystem disorder presenting with facial hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, posterior fossa malformations and eye abnormalities. The eye abnormalities include microphthalmos, cataracts, optic atrophy and iris hypoplasia. Amongst the neurological anomalies, posterior fossa malformations are common. Fourth nerve palsy has been reported with PHACE syndrome. We report a child presenting with a triad of congenital third nerve palsy, cerebellar hypoplasia and facial capillary hemangioma.

  5. Facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Thornhill; Gangestad

    1999-12-01

    Humans in societies around the world discriminate between potential mates on the basis of attractiveness in ways that can dramatically affect their lives. From an evolutionary perspective, a reasonable working hypothesis is that the psychological mechanisms underlying attractiveness judgments are adaptations that have evolved in the service of choosing a mate so as to increase gene propagation throughout evolutionary history. The main hypothesis that has directed evolutionary psychology research into facial attractiveness is that these judgments reflect information about what can be broadly defined as an individual's health. This has been investigated by examining whether attractiveness judgments show special design for detecting cues that allow us to make assessments of overall phenotypic condition. This review examines the three major lines of research that have been pursued in order to answer the question of whether attractiveness reflects non-obvious indicators of phenotypic condition. These are studies that have examined facial symmetry, averageness, and secondary sex characteristics as hormone markers. PMID:10562724

  6. [Facial erythrosis].

    PubMed

    Coget, J M; Merlen, J F

    1979-01-01

    At the borders of two sister disciplines, facial erythrosis is a fairly disabling microvascular phenomenon, since it appears most frequently in women. From several rather special cases, the authors review the aetiology and differential diagnosis of these manifestations. An attempt is made to explain the pathogenesis of these phenomena. The authors stress the absence of treatment, but base their hopes on certain dimers or tetramers of hyaluronic acid, provided for their use by Dr CURRI. PMID:545362

  7. Bilateral traumatic facial paralysis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Undabeitia, Jose; Liu, Brian; Pendleton, Courtney; Nogues, Pere; Noboa, Roberto; Undabeitia, Jose Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Although traumatic injury of the facial nerve is a relatively common condition in neurosurgical practice, bilateral lesions related to fracture of temporal bones are seldom seen. We report the case of a 38-year-old patient admitted to Intensive Care Unit after severe head trauma requiring ventilatory support (Glasgow Coma Scale of 7 on admission). A computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed a longitudinal fracture of the right temporal bone and a transversal fracture of the left. After successful weaning from respirator, bilateral facial paralysis was observed. The possible aetiologies for facial diplegia differ from those of unilateral injury. Due to the lack of facial asymmetry, it can be easily missed in critically ill patients, and both the high resolution CT scan and electromyographic studies can be helpful for correct diagnosis.

  8. Simultaneous anterolateral thigh flap and temporalis tendon transfer to optimize facial form and function after radical parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Revenaugh, Peter C; Knott, P Daniel; Scharpf, Joseph; Fritz, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Background Extirpation of aggressive parotid or cutaneous facial tumors often involves facial nerve sacrifice and the creation of a large soft-tissue defect. We describe a method for single-stage reconstruction during radical parotidectomy to restore facial form and function without additional morbidity. Methods We conducted a review of immediate reconstruction/reanimation of radical parotidectomy defects with the use of anterolateral thigh (ALT) fat and fascia flaps for facial contouring, orthodromic temporalis tendon transfer (OTTT), cable grafting of the facial nerve, and fascia lata lower lip suspension. Results Five patients (mean age, 67.4 years) underwent extirpation of malignant tumors with facial nerve sacrifice resulting in large soft-tissue deficits. All patients had ALT free tissue transfer to correct facial contour defects and OTTT to restore facial form and function. Four patients underwent cable grafting of facial nerve branches. Branches of the motor nerve to the vastus lateralis harvested from the ALT surgical site were used for cable nerve grafting in 3 patients. Fascia lata from the same ALT harvest site was used for lower lip suspension to the OTTT in 4 patients. There were no donor site complications. All patients achieved midfacial symmetry at rest, oral competence with dynamic corner-of-mouth movement, and full eye closure. Conclusions Tumor clearance, symmetric facial appearance, as well as dynamic facial rehabilitation were accomplished in a single-stage procedure using the method described herein. The ALT free flap provides versatile options for soft-tissue defects as well as access to motor nerves optimal for grafting without additional morbidity. Patients undergoing extirpation of malignant tumors requiring facial nerve sacrifice can undergo immediate free tissue contour reconstruction and facial reanimation procedures with no additional morbidity.

  9. Trochlear Nerve Schwannoma With Repeated Intratumoral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Bao, Yuhai; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2016-09-01

    Trochlear nerve schwannoma is extremely rare, with only 35 pathologically confirmed patients being reported in the literature. Here, the authors report a patient of trochlear nerve schwannoma in the prepontine cistern manifesting as facial pain and double vision and presenting the image characteristics of repeated intratumoral hemorrhage, which has never been reported in the literature. Total tumor along with a portion of the trochlear nerve was removed by using a retrosigmoid approach. Facial pain disappeared after operation, and the diplopia remained. Follow-up studies have shown no tumor recurrence for 2 years and the simultaneous alleviation of diplopia. Information regarding the clinical presentation, radiological features and surgical outcomes of trochlear nerve schwannoma are discussed and reviewed in the paper. PMID:27607129

  10. Facial Diplegia with Paresthesia: An Uncommon Variant of Guillain–Barre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charaniya, Riyaz; Bahl, Anish; Ghosh, Anindya; Dixit, Juhi

    2016-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a common medical problem and can be unilateral or bilateral. Unilateral facial palsy has an incidence of 25 per 100,000 population and most of them are idiopathic. However, facial diplegia or bilateral facial nerve palsy (B-FNP) is rare with an incidence of just 1 per 5,000,000 population and only 20 percent cases are idiopathic. Facial diplegia is said to be simultaneous if the other side is affected within 30 days of involvement of first side. Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) is a common cause of facial diplegia and almost half of these patients have facial nerve involvement during their illness. Facial Diplegia with Paresthesias (FDP) is a rare localized variant of GBS which is characterized by simultaneous facial diplegia, distal paresthesias and minimal or no motor weakness. We had a patient who presented with simultaneous weakness of bilateral facial nerve and paresthesias. A diagnosis of GBS was made after diligent clinical examination and relevant investigations. Patient responded to IVIG therapy and symptoms resolved within two weeks of therapy. PMID:27630886

  11. Facial Diplegia with Paresthesia: An Uncommon Variant of Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Charaniya, Riyaz; Bahl, Anish; Ghosh, Anindya; Dixit, Juhi

    2016-07-01

    Facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a common medical problem and can be unilateral or bilateral. Unilateral facial palsy has an incidence of 25 per 100,000 population and most of them are idiopathic. However, facial diplegia or bilateral facial nerve palsy (B-FNP) is rare with an incidence of just 1 per 5,000,000 population and only 20 percent cases are idiopathic. Facial diplegia is said to be simultaneous if the other side is affected within 30 days of involvement of first side. Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) is a common cause of facial diplegia and almost half of these patients have facial nerve involvement during their illness. Facial Diplegia with Paresthesias (FDP) is a rare localized variant of GBS which is characterized by simultaneous facial diplegia, distal paresthesias and minimal or no motor weakness. We had a patient who presented with simultaneous weakness of bilateral facial nerve and paresthesias. A diagnosis of GBS was made after diligent clinical examination and relevant investigations. Patient responded to IVIG therapy and symptoms resolved within two weeks of therapy. PMID:27630886

  12. Facial Diplegia with Paresthesia: An Uncommon Variant of Guillain–Barre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charaniya, Riyaz; Bahl, Anish; Ghosh, Anindya; Dixit, Juhi

    2016-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a common medical problem and can be unilateral or bilateral. Unilateral facial palsy has an incidence of 25 per 100,000 population and most of them are idiopathic. However, facial diplegia or bilateral facial nerve palsy (B-FNP) is rare with an incidence of just 1 per 5,000,000 population and only 20 percent cases are idiopathic. Facial diplegia is said to be simultaneous if the other side is affected within 30 days of involvement of first side. Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) is a common cause of facial diplegia and almost half of these patients have facial nerve involvement during their illness. Facial Diplegia with Paresthesias (FDP) is a rare localized variant of GBS which is characterized by simultaneous facial diplegia, distal paresthesias and minimal or no motor weakness. We had a patient who presented with simultaneous weakness of bilateral facial nerve and paresthesias. A diagnosis of GBS was made after diligent clinical examination and relevant investigations. Patient responded to IVIG therapy and symptoms resolved within two weeks of therapy.

  13. Deep plane facelifting for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Neil; Adam, Stewart

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide the facial plastic surgeon with anatomical and embryologic evidence to support the use of the deep plane technique for optimal treatment of facial aging. A detailed description of the procedure is provided to allow safe and consistent performance. Insights into anatomical landmarks, technical nuances, and alternative approaches for facial variations are presented. The following points will be further elucidated in the article. The platysma muscle/submuscular aponeurotic system/galea are the continuous superficial cervical fascia encompassing the majority of facial fat, and this superficial soft tissue envelope is poorly anchored to the face. The deep cervical fascia binds the structural aspects of the face and covers the facial nerve and buccal fat pad. Facial aging is mainly due to gravity's long-term effects on the superficial soft tissue envelope, with more subtle effects on the deeper structural compartments. The deep plane is the embryologic cleavage plane between these fascial layers, and is the logical place for facial dissection. The deep plane allows access to the buccal fat pad for treatment of jowling. Soft tissue mobilization is maximized in deep plane dissections and requires careful hairline planning. Flap advancement creates tension only at the fascia level allowing natural, tension-free skin closure, and long-lasting outcomes. The deep plane advancement flap is well vascularized and resistant to complications.

  14. Outcomes of Direct Facial-to-Hypoglossal Neurorrhaphy with Parotid Release

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Joel; Rihani, Jordan; Lin, Karen; Miller, Phillip J.; Roland, J. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Lesions of the temporal bone and cerebellopontine angle and their management can result in facial nerve paralysis. When the nerve deficit is not amenable to primary end-to-end repair or interpositional grafting, nerve transposition can be used to accomplish the goals of restoring facial tone, symmetry, and voluntary movement. The most widely used nerve transposition is the hypoglossal-facial nerve anastamosis, of which there are several technical variations. Previously we described a technique of single end-to-side anastamosis using intratemporal facial nerve mobilization and parotid release. This study further characterizes the results of this technique with a larger patient cohort and longer-term follow-up. The design of this study is a retrospective chart review and the setting is an academic tertiary care referral center. Twenty-one patients with facial nerve paralysis from proximal nerve injury at the cerebellopontine angle underwent facial-hypoglossal neurorraphy with parotid release. Outcomes were assessed using the Repaired Facial Nerve Recovery Scale, questionnaires, and patient photographs. Of the 21 patients, 18 were successfully reinnervated to a score of a B or C on the recovery scale, which equates to good oral and ocular sphincter closure with minimal mass movement. The mean duration of paralysis between injury and repair was 12.1 months (range 0 to 36 months) with a mean follow-up of 55 months. There were no cases of hemiglossal atrophy, paralysis, or subjective dysfunction. Direct facial-hypoglossal neurorrhaphy with parotid release achieved a functional reinnervation and good clinical outcome in the majority of patients, with minimal lingual morbidity. This technique is a viable option for facial reanimation and should be strongly considered as a surgical option for the paralyzed face. PMID:22451794

  15. Facial restoration.

    PubMed

    Diner, J

    1975-07-01

    Medical science has demonstrated that fiction can be turned into fact. It is prophesied that man will be able to liver longer due to the development of synthetic organs. Sophisticated facial prostheses will be included in this progressive field. Perhaps the next century will make synthetic substitutes past history with the transplantation of organs as established practice. Or, perhaps some of the latest developments of growing skin or the use of carbonated teflon inserts will replace currently used plastics. In the meantime, we must continue to work within the limitations of our present technology. PMID:1228185

  16. Facial restoration.

    PubMed

    Diner, J

    1975-07-01

    Medical science has demonstrated that fiction can be turned into fact. It is prophesied that man will be able to liver longer due to the development of synthetic organs. Sophisticated facial prostheses will be included in this progressive field. Perhaps the next century will make synthetic substitutes past history with the transplantation of organs as established practice. Or, perhaps some of the latest developments of growing skin or the use of carbonated teflon inserts will replace currently used plastics. In the meantime, we must continue to work within the limitations of our present technology.

  17. Physical rehabilitation of paralysed facial muscles: functional and morphological correlates.

    PubMed

    Angelov, Doychin N

    2011-01-01

    Using a combined morphofunctional approach, we recently found that polyinnervation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the critical factor for recovery of function after transection and suture of the facial nerve. Since polyinnervation is activity-dependent and can be manipulated, we tried to design a clinically feasible therapy by electrical stimulation or by soft tissue massage. First, electrical stimulation was applied to the transected facial nerve or to paralyzed facial muscles. Both procedures did not improve vibrissal motor performance (video-based motion analysis of whisking), failed to diminish polyinnervation, and even reduced the number of innervated NMJ to one-fifth of normal values. In contrast, gentle stroking of the paralyzed vibrissal muscles by hand resulted in full recovery of whisking. Manual stimulation depended on the intact sensory supply of the denervated muscle targets and was also effective after hypoglossal-facial anastomosis, after interpositional nerve grafting, when applied to the orbicularis oculi muscle and after transection and suture of the hypoglossal nerve. From these results, we conclude that manual stimulation is a noninvasive procedure with immediate potential for clinical rehabilitation following facial nerve reconstruction.

  18. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  19. Management of Facial Paralysis due to Extracranial Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Michael; Rolfes, Bryan N

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of advanced parotid or cutaneous malignancies often requires sacrifice of the facial nerve as well as resection of the parotid gland and surrounding structures. In addition to considerations regarding reinnervation and dynamic reanimation, reconstruction in this setting must take into account unique factors such as soft tissue volume deficits and the high likelihood of adjunctive radiation therapy. Furthermore, considerations of patient comorbidities including advanced age and poor long-term prognosis often influence reconstructive modality. The optimal reconstructive technique would provide potential for restoration of facial tone and voluntary movement as well as immediate restoration of facial support and function. Beyond considerations of facial movement and rest position, restoration of lost soft tissue volume is critical to obtain facial symmetry. To control long-term volume in the setting of adjunctive radiation therapy, vascularized tissue is required. In this chapter, we describe a comprehensive approach to the management of radical parotidectomy and similar facial defects that addresses these concerns and also describes management strategies over time. Specific techniques employed include anterolateral thigh free flaps, nerve grafting utilizing motor nerves to the vastus lateralis muscle, and orthodromic temporalis tendon transfer. Further considerations relative to the eye, forehead, and long-term facial refinement are also discussed.

  20. Facial paralysis and lymphocytic facial neuritis in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) positive for simian retrovirus type D2.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Anna L; Colby, Lesley A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2011-12-01

    Simian retrovirus type D (SRVD) is a naturally occurring betaretrovirus in nonhuman primates of the genus Macaca. Infection can lead to a variety of clinical, hematologic, and histopathologic abnormalities. We report an unusual clinical presentation of facial paralysis and histologic lymphocytic neuritis in an SRVD type 2 (SRVD2)-infected rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a catheter-associated vena caval thrombus, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and multisystemic lymphoid hyperplasia. At initial presentation, a right atrial mass was detected by echocardiography. The macaque was clinically asymptomatic but had persistent anemia, thrombocytopenia, hyperglobulinemia, and later neutropenia. It was seropositive for SRV and PCR-positive for SRVD 2. Approximately 1 mo after initial presentation, the macaque developed right facial paralysis and was euthanized. Histologic lesions included lymphoplasmacytic aggregates affecting multiple organs, consistent with SRV-related lymphoid hyperplasia. The right facial nerve showed lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. The nerve itself was negative immunohistochemically for SRV antigen, but antigen was present infrequently in pericapillary lymphoid cells within the facial nerve and abundantly within lymphoid aggregates in the adjacent parotid salivary gland, bone marrow, and soft tissue. Known neurotropic viruses could not be identified. Given the widespread inflammation in this macaque, particularly in the area surrounding the facial nerve, lymphocytic neuritis and facial paralysis likely were an indirect effect of SRV infection due to local extension of SRV-related inflammation in the surrounding tissue.

  1. Ramsay Hunt syndrome and zoster laryngitis with multiple cranial nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Shinha, Takashi; Krishna, Pasala

    2015-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by varicella zoster virus infection affecting the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. It typically presents with vesicles in the external auditory canal associated with auricular pain and peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Although vestibulocochlear nerve is frequently co-involved during the course of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple lower cranial nerve involvement has rarely been described in the literature. In addition, laryngitis due to varicella zoster virus is a diagnostic challenge due to its unfamiliarity among clinicians. We report a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with laryngitis involving multiple lower cranial nerves.

  2. Arterial supply of the lower cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Loukas, Marios; Fisher, Winfield S; Rizk, Elias; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    The lower cranial nerves receive their arterial supply from an intricate network of tributaries derived from the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories. A contemporary, comprehensive literature review of the vascular supply of the lower cranial nerves was performed. The vascular supply to the trigeminal, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, spinal accessory, and hypoglossal nerves are illustrated with a special emphasis on clinical issues. Frequently the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories all contribute to the vascular supply of an individual cranial nerve along its course. Understanding of the vasculature of the lower cranial nerves is of great relevance for skull base surgery.

  3. Measuring Facial Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  4. [Intraoperative monitoring of motor cranial nerves in operations of the neck and cranial base].

    PubMed

    Maurer, J; Pelster, H; Mann, W

    1994-11-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerves is performed to minimize postoperative cranial nerve dysfunction. We performed electrophysiological monitoring of motor cranial nerves with a NIM 2 unit from Xomed Treace and a patient multiplexer developed in our clinic. This multiplexer allows simultaneous monitoring of 4 cranial nerves and is additionally equipped with a bipolar stimulation mode. This intraoperative monitoring was employed during 102 skull base operations. Of these 102 operations, 44 were acoustic neuroma removals by translabyrinthine approach and 36 by a middle fossa approach. Various operations including removal of tumours of the jugular foramen and the infratemporal fossa were performed in the remaining 22 patients. The facial nerve, being the most frequently monitored nerve, was evaluated both pre- and intraoperatively. Electrophysiologic data were evaluated with respect to their predictive value for postoperative facial nerve function. The relative per cent decrease in amplitude of the EMG after resection compared to that observed before resection seems to be of some predictive value for postoperative facial nerve function. A 50-60% decrease or more is associated with an increase in the House classification. Intraoperative monitoring is a useful tool in skull base surgery allowing for safer and faster identification of motor nerves in pathologic anatomic conditions. It allows the surgeon a degree of comfort by providing immediate information regarding the status of the nerve. It may also improve post-operative nerve function and shorten operating time. Additionally, neuromonitoring provides some information about expected postoperative facial nerve function.

  5. Comparison of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted and 3D constructive interference in steady state images for predicting outcome after hearing-preservation surgery for vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, M; Bulakbasi, N; Ucoz, T; Ustunsoz, B; Pabuscu, Y; Tayfun, C; Somuncu, I

    2003-07-01

    We compared contrast-enhanced T1-weighted and 3D constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequences for demonstrating possible prognostic factors in hearing-preservation surgery for vestibular schwannoma. We studied 22 patients with vestibular schwannomas having hearing-preservation surgery. Postoperatively six (27%) had a facial palsy and eight (36%) had hearing loss. There was a significant correlation between the size of the tumour and facial palsy (r=-0.72). Both techniques adequately demonstrated all tumours. Involvement of the fundus of the internal auditory canal (IAC) and a small distance between the lateral border of the tumour and the fundus were correlated significantly with hearing loss (r=-0.81 and -0.75, respectively). The 3D-CISS sequence, by virtue of its high contrast resolution was superior to T1-weighted images ( P<0.05) for detection of the fundal involvement. The direction of displacement of the facial nerve did not correlate with facial palsy or hearing loss. We think that 3D-CISS images better show the features influencing surgical outcome, but that contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images are required for diagnosis. PMID:12802547

  6. Nerve injuries due to obstetric trauma.

    PubMed

    Bhat, V; Ravikumara; Oumachigui, A

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of nerve injuries among 32,637 deliveries over a period of ten years was 1.81/1000. Brachial plexus injury (1/1000) and facial nerve injury (0.74/1000) accounted for 98% of nerve injuries. Both the right and left side were involved equally. Bilateral nerve injury was not seen. Lack of antenatal care, macrosomia, abnormal presentations, and operative vaginal deliveries significantly increased the risk of nerve injuries. These babies had significantly higher incidence of meconium stained liquor and intrapartum asphyxia. Parity of the mother, gestational age and sex of the baby did not have significant role in the causation of nerve injuries. Injuries to brachial plexus and facial nerve were seen even in babies born by caesarean section, when it was performed for obstructed labour caused by cephalo-pelvic disproportion and abnormal presentations. Three babies with injuries expired and forty-three could be followed up for varying periods. None of the babies had residual defects. Detection of cephalopelvic disproportion and abnormal lie in the third trimester and their appropriate management would decrease the incidence of obstetric palsies to a significant extent. PMID:10829869

  7. Low-reactive-level laser treatment in facial paralysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Ladalardo, Thereza C.; Bologna, Elisangela; Castanho Garrini, Ana E.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Campos, Roberto A. d. C.

    2000-03-01

    This study was carried out with a 41-year-old female patient with facial paralysis as a consequence of facial nerve injury during neurosurgery. Low-reactive level laser treatment (LLLT) with a diode laser of 830 nm, 40 mw, continuous wave, spot area 3 mm2, was applied twice a week for 2 weeks, then 1 weekly session following up to 30 sessions, resulting in about 80% improvement of the motor activity.

  8. Facial baroparesis: a critical differential diagnosis for scuba diving accidents--case report.

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, E V; Iakovlev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve baroparesis is a rare and potentially under-reported complication of scuba diving. A diver, after surfacing from a shallow dive, developed isolated left-sided facial palsy accompanied by pain and decreased hearing in the left ear. No other signs or symptoms attributable to a scuba diving accident were detected. Forty minutes later, he heard a "pop" in the affected ear, after which all symptoms quickly resolved. Repeat neurological and ear examinations were normal. He showed no residual or new symptoms 24 hours later. The differential diagnosis of facial neurological deficit after diving includes decompression sickness, cerebral air embolism due to pulmonary barotrauma, facial nerve barotrauma and common conditions such as stroke and Bell's palsy. It is important to recognize the condition since recompression treatment can further damage the facial nerve.

  9. Facial baroparesis: a critical differential diagnosis for scuba diving accidents--case report.

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, E V; Iakovlev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve baroparesis is a rare and potentially under-reported complication of scuba diving. A diver, after surfacing from a shallow dive, developed isolated left-sided facial palsy accompanied by pain and decreased hearing in the left ear. No other signs or symptoms attributable to a scuba diving accident were detected. Forty minutes later, he heard a "pop" in the affected ear, after which all symptoms quickly resolved. Repeat neurological and ear examinations were normal. He showed no residual or new symptoms 24 hours later. The differential diagnosis of facial neurological deficit after diving includes decompression sickness, cerebral air embolism due to pulmonary barotrauma, facial nerve barotrauma and common conditions such as stroke and Bell's palsy. It is important to recognize the condition since recompression treatment can further damage the facial nerve. PMID:25558550

  10. [Dynamic rehabilitation in facial paralysis with the surgical flap and temporalis muscle transposition without muscle lengthening: review and case report].

    PubMed

    Shipkov, Kh; Anastasov, Iu

    2005-01-01

    There are various surgical procedures for the reanimation of patients with long-standing facial paralysis. Temporalis muscle transfer is reliable for the reanimation of long-standing facial paralysis often employed when facial nerve reinnervation. It can be used as well for the immediate treatment of complete facial paralysis (more than 1 year) because temporalis muscle transposition does not interfere with neuronal regeneration. During the last few years the techniques employing the tendon of the temporalis muscle for the rehabilitation of the oral commissure gain increasing importance. The authors analyse the different options for reanimation after facial paralysis and report on a case of facial reanimation via temporalis muscle transfer.

  11. Does Facial Amimia Impact the Recognition of Facial Emotions? An EMG Study in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Argaud, Soizic; Delplanque, Sylvain; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Auffret, Manon; Duprez, Joan; Vérin, Marc; Grandjean, Didier; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    According to embodied simulation theory, understanding other people’s emotions is fostered by facial mimicry. However, studies assessing the effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion are still controversial. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), one of the most distinctive clinical features is facial amimia, a reduction in facial expressiveness, but patients also show emotional disturbances. The present study used the pathological model of PD to examine the role of facial mimicry on emotion recognition by investigating EMG responses in PD patients during a facial emotion recognition task (anger, joy, neutral). Our results evidenced a significant decrease in facial mimicry for joy in PD, essentially linked to the absence of reaction of the zygomaticus major and the orbicularis oculi muscles in response to happy avatars, whereas facial mimicry for expressions of anger was relatively preserved. We also confirmed that PD patients were less accurate in recognizing positive and neutral facial expressions and highlighted a beneficial effect of facial mimicry on the recognition of emotion. We thus provide additional arguments for embodied simulation theory suggesting that facial mimicry is a potential lever for therapeutic actions in PD even if it seems not to be necessarily required in recognizing emotion as such. PMID:27467393

  12. Bilateral Facial Paralysis Caused by Temporal Bone Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Samad; Banaei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although bilateral facial nerve palsy is a rare condition, its etiology is more detectable than the unilateral type. A temporal bone fracture is one cause of bilateral facial nerve palsy, contributing in 3% of the cases. Case Presentation Here, we report the case of a 35-year-old man complaining of bilateral incomplete eye closure, two weeks after a closed head injury caused by a motor vehicle accident. Conclusions The high resolution computed tomography findings revealed a bilateral temporal bone fracture line, which extended to the fallopian canal. With regard to treatment, near complete recovery was obvious after two weeks of treatment with oral corticosteroids. Overall, bilateral facial palsy is hard to diagnose; therefore, clinical suspicion and the early detection of facial nerve injuries is necessary for good nerve recovery in temporal bone fractures. PMID:27679786

  13. Bilateral Facial Paralysis Caused by Temporal Bone Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Samad; Banaei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although bilateral facial nerve palsy is a rare condition, its etiology is more detectable than the unilateral type. A temporal bone fracture is one cause of bilateral facial nerve palsy, contributing in 3% of the cases. Case Presentation Here, we report the case of a 35-year-old man complaining of bilateral incomplete eye closure, two weeks after a closed head injury caused by a motor vehicle accident. Conclusions The high resolution computed tomography findings revealed a bilateral temporal bone fracture line, which extended to the fallopian canal. With regard to treatment, near complete recovery was obvious after two weeks of treatment with oral corticosteroids. Overall, bilateral facial palsy is hard to diagnose; therefore, clinical suspicion and the early detection of facial nerve injuries is necessary for good nerve recovery in temporal bone fractures.

  14. [Herpes zoster oticus -- neuropathologic contribution to the genesis of concomitant facial paralysis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pilz, P

    1981-12-25

    A woman of 71 years suffered from herpes zoster oticus, 7th and 10th nerve paralysis, vertigo and hearing loss; she died after 5 weeks. Neuropathologic examination revealed intensive inflammation in the pons and medulla oblongata and necrotizing arteritis in the cerebello-pontine angle, predominantly on the clinically affected side. The adjacent facial nerve was severely damaged. For the first time, necrotizing arteritis appears as important cause of facial paralysis in the Ramsey-Hunt syndrome.

  15. Anomaly of the facial canal in a Mondini malformation with recurrent meningitis

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Vignaud, J.; Bar, D.

    1982-07-01

    A patient with recurrent meningitis and congenital hearing loss was evaluated with tomography and metrizamide cisternography. Tomography showed an aberrant first portion of the facial nerve canal, while on cisternography, communication between the internal auditory canal and the dilated labyrinthine remnant was evident. The authors describe the radiographic findings and their significance and propose a mechanism for the formation of the anomalous facial nerve canal.

  16. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... fascicles) that contain hundreds of individual nerve fibers (neurons). Neurons consist of dendrites, axon, and cell body. The ... tree-like structures that receive signals from other neurons and from special sensory cells that sense the ...

  17. [Objective assessment of facial paralysis using local binary pattern in infrared thermography].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xulong; Hong, Wenxue; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Zhenying

    2013-02-01

    Facial paralysis is a frequently-occurring disease, which causes the loss of the voluntary muscles on one side of the face due to the damages the facial nerve and results in an inability to close the eye and leads to dropping of the angle of the mouth. There have been few objective methods to quantitatively diagnose it and assess this disease for clinically treating the patients so far. The skin temperature distribution of a healthy human body exhibits a contralateral symmetry. Facial paralysis usually causes an alteration of the temperature distribution of body with the disease. This paper presents the use of the histogram distance of bilateral local binary pattern (LBP) in the facial infrared thermography to measure the asymmetry degree of facial temperature distribution for objective assessing the severity of facial paralysis. Using this new method, we performed a controlled trial to assess the facial nerve function of the healthy subjects and the patients with Bell's palsy respectively. The results showed that the mean sensitivity and specificity of this method are 0.86 and 0.89 respectively. The correlation coefficient between the asymmetry degree of facial temperature distribution and the severity of facial paralysis is an average of 0.657. Therefore, the histogram distance of local binary pattern in the facial infrared thermography is an efficient clinical indicator with respect to the diagnosis and assessment of facial paralysis.

  18. [Nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Okada, K; Tada, M; Nakano, A; Konno, T

    1988-04-01

    The neuroanatomy of the pelvic space was studied in order to clarify the course of cavernous nerves responsible for erectile function. The cavernous nerves travel along the dorsolateral portion at the base toward the apex of the prostate, then penetrate urogenital diaphragm at the lateral aspect of the membranous urethra. According to the anatomical findings, nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy was performed through the antegrade approach in 28 patients with prostate cancer. No significant surgical complications were encountered in the present series. Of the 28, evaluable cases were limited to 22 in terms of erection. Fifteen patients (68%) recovered their erectile function after nerve-sparing surgery. Therefore, the present surgical technique seems to be effective for the preservation of male sexual function following radical pelvic surgery.

  19. Schwannomatosis of Cervical Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical vagal schwannoma is a rare entity among lesions presenting as a neck mass. They are usually slow-growing benign lesions closely associated with the vagus nerve. They are usually solitary and asymptomatic. Multiple schwannomas occurring in patients without neurofibromatosis (NF) are rare and have recently been referred to as schwannomatosis. Here, we present a case of a neck mass that had imaging features suggestive of vagal schwannoma and was operated upon. Intraoperatively, it was discovered to be a case of multiple vagal cervical schwannoma, all directly related to the right vagus nerve, and could be resected from the nerve in toto preserving the function of the vagus nerve. Final HPR confirmed our pre-op suspicion of vagal schwannomatosis.

  20. Morphological abnormalities of embryonic cranial nerves after in utero exposure to valproic acid: implications for the pathogenesis of autism with multiple developmental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yasura; Oyabu, Akiko; Imura, Yoshio; Uchida, Atsuko; Narita, Naoko; Narita, Masaaki

    2011-06-01

    Autism is often associated with multiple developmental anomalies including asymmetric facial palsy. In order to establish the etiology of autism with facial palsy, research into developmental abnormalities of the peripheral facial nerves is necessary. In the present study, to investigate the development of peripheral cranial nerves for use in an animal model of autism, rat embryos were treated with valproic acid (VPA) in utero and their cranial nerves were visualized by immunostaining. Treatment with VPA after embryonic day 9 had a significant effect on the peripheral fibers of several cranial nerves. Following VPA treatment, immunoreactivity within the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves was significantly reduced. Additionally, abnormal axonal pathways were observed in the peripheral facial nerves. Thus, the morphology of several cranial nerves, including the facial nerve, can be affected by prenatal VPA exposure as early as E13. Our findings indicate that disruption of early facial nerve development is involved in the etiology of asymmetric facial palsy, and may suggest a link to the etiology of autism.

  1. Interfascial Dissection for Protection of the Nerve Branches to the Frontalis Muscles during Supraorbital Trans-Eyebrow Approach: An Anatomical Study and Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Roger Neves; Lieber, Stefan; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires; Maldaun, Marcos Vinícius Calfat; Gardner, Paul; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Preservation of the temporal branches of the facial nerve during anterolateral craniotomies is important. Damaging it can inflict undesirable cosmetic defects to the patient. The supraorbital trans-eyebrow approach (SOTE) is a versatile keyhole craniotomy but still has a high rate of frontalis muscle (FM) palsy. Objective Anatomical study to implement the interfascial dissection during the SOTE to preserve the nerves to the FM. Methods Slight modification of the standard technique of the SOTE was performed in 6 cadaveric specimens (12 sides). Results Distal rami to the FM were exposed. The standard "u-shape" incision of the FM can cross over the nerves. Alternatively, an "l-shape" incision was performed until the superior temporal line (STL). An interfascial dissection was performed near to the STL and the interfascial fat pad was used as a protective layer for the nerves. Conclusion Various pathologies can be addressed with the SOTE. In the majority of the cases the cosmetic results are good, but FM palsy remains a drawback of this approach. The interfascial dissection may be used in an attempt to prevent frontalis rami palsy. PMID:27175323

  2. Investigation of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for the Differentiation of Nerve and Gland Tissue—A Possible Application for a Laser Surgery Feedback Control Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehari, F.; Rohde, M.; Knipfer, C.; Kanawade, R.; Klämpfl, F.; W., Adler; Oetter, N.; Stelzle, F.; Schmidt, M.

    2016-06-01

    Laser surgery provides clean, fast and accurate modeling of tissue. However, the inability to determine what kind of tissue is being ablated at the bottom of the cut may lead to the iatrogenic damage of structures that were meant to be preserved. In this context, nerve preservation is one of the key challenges in any surgical procedure. One example is the treatment of parotid gland pathologies, where the facial nerve (N. VII) and its main branches run through and fan out inside the glands parenchyma. A feedback system that automatically stops the ablation to prevent nerve-tissue damage could greatly increase the applicability and safety of surgical laser systems. In the present study, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to differentiate between nerve and gland tissue of an ex-vivo pig animal model. The LIBS results obtained in this preliminary experiment suggest that the measured spectra, containing atomic and molecular emissions, can be used to differentiate between the two tissue types. The measurements and differentiation were performed in open air and under normal stray light conditions.

  3. Preservation of the superficial lobe for deep-lobe parotid tumors: a better aesthetic outcome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Akhtar; Murray, Daran P

    2005-08-01

    Deep-lobe parotid tumors are relatively uncommon. Most of these tumors present as external masses. They can also present in the oral cavity or oropharynx. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for biopsy and cytology have made it possible to establish a definitive diagnosis and identify the exact location of the tumor in almost all cases before surgery. Traditionally, deep-lobe tumors have been managed by a formal superficial parotidectomy and identification and preservation of the facial nerve, followed by removal of the deep lobe that contains the tumor Superficialparotidectomy is associated in most cases with periauricular depression secondary to a loss of volume, leading to variable aesthetic deformities. A complete parotidectomy is more likely to be associated with a larger aesthetic deficit secondary to a greater loss of tissue volume. The incidence of gustatory sweating is high after superficial parotidectomy, particularly in the early postoperative period. We hypothesize that if the superficial lobe is preserved, there is less likelihood of gustatory sweating because of the interposition of tissue between the skin and the cut ends of the secretomotor fibers. Approximately 80% of parotid tissue volume is made up of the superficial lobe, and therefore preservation of the superficial lobe should be associated with less postparotidectomy depression. Therefore, we decided to preserve the superficial lobe of the gland for deep-lobe tumors. Nine patients underwent deep-lobe parotidectomy with preservation of the superficial lobe over a 6-year period. Patients were studied prospectively with regard to technical difficulty, complications, and cosmetic outcome. Follow-up ranged from 12 months to 6 years. We did not experience any undue technical difficulty, and there were no cases of facial weakness. One patient developed gustatory sweating, which almost completely resolved over a 2-year period. There were no cases of post

  4. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, ... your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For ...

  5. Penetration and Splitting of Optic Nerve by Tuberculum Sellae Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Preservation of the optic nerves is an important issue in the resection of tuberculum sellae meningiomas. We report the case of a patient whose optic nerve was penetrated by a tuberculum sellae meningioma. During surgery, a bulging tumor was found to penetrate the right optic nerve. The tumor was gross totally removed, including tumors bulging through the optic nerve. Two trunks of the split optic nerve were preserved. The penetrated shape of the optic nerve may lead to misjudgment and its damage. Divided trunks of optic nerves are difficult to recognize and may be confused for the tumor capsule, because they may be thinned and seem to contain tumors. In addition, a single trunk may be confused for the whole nerve; thus, the other trunk may be easily damaged if not dissected cautiously. Treatment strategy according to the remnant visual acuity was suggested. PMID:27651874

  6. Facial paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sashank; Redett, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Facial paralysis can have devastating physical and psychosocial consequences. These are particularly severe in children in whom loss of emotional expressiveness can impair social development and integration. The etiologies of facial paralysis, prospects for spontaneous recovery, and functions requiring restoration differ in children as compared with adults. Here we review contemporary management of facial paralysis with a focus on special considerations for pediatric patients.

  7. Raman microspectroscopy for visualization of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Koizumi, Noriaki; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2013-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery is essential for improving quality of life of patients. To preserve peripheral nerves, detection of ne peripheral nerves that cannot be identi ed by human eye or under white light imaging is necessary. In this study, we sought to provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerve tissues against adjacent tissues that employs spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy. A line-illumination confocal Raman microscope was used for the experiment. A laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm was used as an excitation laser light. We obtained Raman spectra of peripheral nerve, brous connective tissue, skeletal muscle, blood vessel, and adipose tissue of Wistar rats, and extracted speci c spectral features of peripheral nerves and adjacent tissues. By applying multivariate image analysis, peripheral nerves were clearly detected against adjacent tissues without any preprocessing neither xation nor staining. These results suggest the potential of the Raman spectroscopic observation for noninvasive and label-free nerve detection, and we expect this method could be a key technique for nerve-sparing surgery.

  8. The vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for reconstruction of the inferior alveolar nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenji; Hiroto, Saijo; Morooka, Shin; Kuwabara, Kaoru; Fujioka, Masaki

    2015-03-01

    The sural nerve has been described for nerve reconstruction of the maxillofacial region since it provides many advantages. We report a case of a vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for immediate reconstruction after the removal of intraosseous neuroma originating in the inferior alveolar nerve. The patient had a neuroma caused by iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. A 4-cm long neuroma existed in the inferior alveolar nerve and was resected. A peroneal perforator was chosen as the pedicle of the vascularized sural nerve graft for the nerve gap. The graft including the skin paddle for monitoring the perfusion supplied by this perforator was transferred to the lesion. The nerve gap between the two stumps of the inferior alveolar nerve was repaired using the 6-cm long vascularized sural nerve. The perforator of the peroneal artery was anastomosed to the branch of the facial artery in a perforator-to-perforator fashion. There was no need to sacrifice any main arteries. The skin paddle with 1 cm × 3 cm in size was inset into the incised medial neck. Perceptual function tests with a Semmes-Weinstein pressure esthesiometer and two-point discrimination in the lower lip and chin at 10 months after surgery showed recovery almost to the level of the normal side. This free vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator may be a good alternative for reconstruction of inferior alveolar nerve defects. PMID:25346479

  9. Cryoanalgesia in the management of chronic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Barnard, D; Lloyd, J; Evans, J

    1981-05-01

    The results of 85 cryogenic nerve blocks in 43 patients with chronic facial pain over a period of 4 years are reviewed. In 67% of patients with non-herpetic neuralgia the duration of pain relief (median 93 days) exceeded the duration of sensory loss (median 60 days). PMID:6167650

  10. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  11. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  12. Population calcium imaging of spontaneous respiratory and novel motor activity in the facial nucleus and ventral brainstem in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Persson, Karin; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-05-15

    The brainstem contains rhythm and pattern forming circuits, which drive cranial and spinal motor pools to produce respiratory and other motor patterns. Here we used calcium imaging combined with nerve recordings in newborn mice to reveal spontaneous population activity in the ventral brainstem and in the facial nucleus. In Fluo-8AM loaded brainstem-spinal cord preparations, respiratory activity on cervical nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventrolateral brainstem surface. Individual ventrolateral neurons at the level of the parafacial respiratory group showed perfect or partial synchrony with respiratory nerve bursts. In brainstem-spinal cord preparations, cut at the level of the mid-facial nucleus, calcium signals were recorded in the dorsal, lateral and medial facial subnuclei during respiratory activity. Strong activity initiated in the dorsal subnucleus, followed by activity in lateral and medial subnuclei. Whole-cell recordings from facial motoneurons showed weak respiratory drives, and electrical field potential recordings confirmed respiratory drive to particularly the dorsal and lateral subnuclei. Putative facial premotoneurons showed respiratory-related calcium signals, and were predominantly located dorsomedial to the facial nucleus. A novel motor activity on facial, cervical and thoracic nerves was synchronized with calcium signals at the ventromedial brainstem extending from the level of the facial nucleus to the medulla–spinal cord border. Cervical dorsal root stimulation induced similar ventromedial activity. The medial facial subnucleus showed calcium signals synchronized with this novel motor activity on cervical nerves, and cervical dorsal root stimulation induced similar medial facial subnucleus activity. In conclusion, the dorsal and lateral facial subnuclei are strongly respiratory-modulated, and the brainstem contains a novel pattern forming circuit that drives the medial facial subnucleus and cervical motor pools.

  13. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively. PMID:27144227

  14. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively. PMID:27144227

  15. Soft tissue facial morphometry in subjects with Moebius syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Grandi, Gaia; Pisoni, Luca; Di Blasio, Chiara; Gandolfini, Mauro; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2009-12-01

    Moebius syndrome is a congenital facial palsy associated with the impairment of ocular abduction. The three-dimensional characteristics of the facial soft tissues of 12 male and 14 female subjects [3-52 yr of age (mean age + standard deviation: 17 + 14 yr)] were measured using a non-invasive, computerized system; facial volumes, areas, angles, and distances were computed and compared with those obtained in reference subjects of the same age and gender. When compared with reference subjects, patients with Moebius syndrome had a more prominent and hyperdivergent face in the sagittal plane, a smaller and more prominent upper facial third; a smaller middle facial width; a smaller nose; smaller mandibular volume, depth, corpus length, and ramus height; and a more posterior positioned mandible, with a less prominent chin. In conclusion, patients with Moebius syndrome had a tendency towards a skeletal Class II pattern. These morphological variations may be the combined effect of a general alteration of the motor and sensitive facial nerves, including the trigeminal nerve, and of a maldevelopment of the brainstem.

  16. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively.

  17. Lithium enhances remyelination of peripheral nerves

    PubMed Central

    Makoukji, Joelle; Belle, Martin; Meffre, Delphine; Stassart, Ruth; Grenier, Julien; Shackleford, Ghjuvan'Ghjacumu; Fledrich, Robert; Fonte, Cosima; Branchu, Julien; Goulard, Marie; de Waele, Catherine; Charbonnier, Frédéric; Sereda, Michael W.; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile; Schumacher, Michael; Bernard, Sophie; Massaad, Charbel

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) inhibitors, especially the mood stabilizer lithium chloride, are also used as neuroprotective or anti-inflammatory agents. We studied the influence of LiCl on the remyelination of peripheral nerves. We showed that the treatment of adult mice with LiCl after facial nerve crush injury stimulated the expression of myelin genes, restored the myelin structure, and accelerated the recovery of whisker movements. LiCl treatment also promoted remyelination of the sciatic nerve after crush. We also demonstrated that peripheral myelin gene MPZ and PMP22 promoter activities, transcripts, and protein levels are stimulated by GSK3β inhibitors (LiCl and SB216763) in Schwann cells as well as in sciatic and facial nerves. LiCl exerts its action in Schwann cells by increasing the amount of β-catenin and provoking its nuclear localization. We showed by ChIP experiments that LiCl treatment drives β-catenin to bind to T-cell factor/lymphoid-enhancer factor response elements identified in myelin genes. Taken together, our findings open perspectives in the treatment of nerve demyelination by administering GSK3β inhibitors such as lithium. PMID:22355115

  18. Successful Function-Preserving Therapy for Chondroblastoma of the Temporal Bone Involving the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Junkichi; Yoshimoto, Hitoshi; Ito, Shin; Ohba, Shinichi; Fujimaki, Mitsuhisa; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Yazawa, Masaki; Fujimiya, Nozomi; Hanaguri, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    We present a case involving a late diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the temporal skull base involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Following an initial misdiagnosis and unsuccessful treatment over a period of 5 years, the patient was referred to our department for further evaluation and possible surgical intervention for occlusal abnormalities, trismus, clicking of the TMJ, and hearing impairment. Based on preoperative immunochemical studies showing positive reaction of multinucleated giant cells for S-100 protein, the final diagnosis was chondroblastoma. The surgical approach – postauricular incision and total parotidectomy, with complete removal of the temporal bone, including the TMJ via the extended middle fossa – was successful in preserving facial nerves and diminishing clinical manifestations. This study highlights a misdiagnosed case in an effort to underline the importance of medical examinations and accurate differential diagnosis in cases involving any tumor mass in the temporal bone. PMID:21475594

  19. Successful function-preserving therapy for chondroblastoma of the temporal bone involving the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Junkichi; Yoshimoto, Hitoshi; Ito, Shin; Ohba, Shinichi; Fujimaki, Mitsuhisa; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Yazawa, Masaki; Fujimiya, Nozomi; Hanaguri, Makoto

    2011-02-14

    We present a case involving a late diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the temporal skull base involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Following an initial misdiagnosis and unsuccessful treatment over a period of 5 years, the patient was referred to our department for further evaluation and possible surgical intervention for occlusal abnormalities, trismus, clicking of the TMJ, and hearing impairment. Based on preoperative immunochemical studies showing positive reaction of multinucleated giant cells for S-100 protein, the final diagnosis was chondroblastoma. The surgical approach - postauricular incision and total parotidectomy, with complete removal of the temporal bone, including the TMJ via the extended middle fossa - was successful in preserving facial nerves and diminishing clinical manifestations. This study highlights a misdiagnosed case in an effort to underline the importance of medical examinations and accurate differential diagnosis in cases involving any tumor mass in the temporal bone.

  20. Endoscopic Transcanal Retrocochlear Approach to the Internal Auditory Canal with Cochlear Preservation: Pilot Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Kempfle, Judith; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Eckhard, Andreas; Edge, Albert; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    Contemporary operative approaches to the internal auditory canal (IAC) require the creation of large surgical portals for visualization with associated morbidity, including hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, facial nerve injury, and skull base defects that increase the risk of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Transcanal approaches to the IAC have been possible only via a transcochlear technique. To preserve cochlear function, we describe a novel endoscopic transcanal infracochlear approach to the IAC in cadaveric temporal bones. Navigation fiducials were secured on fresh cadaveric heads, and real-time computed tomography imaging was used for surgical guidance. With a combination of curved instruments and rigid angled endoscopy, a transcanal hypotympanotomy and subcochlear tunnel were created with superior extension to access the IAC. Postprocedure imaging and temporal bone dissection confirmed access to the IAC without injury to the cochlea or neighboring neurovascular structures. PMID:26932951

  1. Facial Palsy, a Disorder Belonging to Influential Neurological Dynasty: Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Newadkar, Ujwala R; Chaudhari, Lalit; Khalekar, Yogita K

    2016-07-01

    Facial paralysis is one of the common problem leading to facial deformation. Bell's palsy (BP) is defined as a lower motor neuron palsy of acute onset and idiopathic origin. BP is regarded as a benign common neurological disorder of unknown cause. It has an acute onset and is almost always a mononeuritis. The facial nerve is a mixed cranial nerve with a predominant motor component, which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Knowledge of its course is vital for anatomic localization and clinical correlation. BP accounts for approximately 72% of facial palsies. Almost a century later, the management and etiology of BP is still a subject of controversy. Here, we present a review of literature on this neurologically significant entity. PMID:27583233

  2. Facial Palsy, a Disorder Belonging to Influential Neurological Dynasty: Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Newadkar, Ujwala R.; Chaudhari, Lalit; Khalekar, Yogita K.

    2016-01-01

    Facial paralysis is one of the common problem leading to facial deformation. Bell's palsy (BP) is defined as a lower motor neuron palsy of acute onset and idiopathic origin. BP is regarded as a benign common neurological disorder of unknown cause. It has an acute onset and is almost always a mononeuritis. The facial nerve is a mixed cranial nerve with a predominant motor component, which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Knowledge of its course is vital for anatomic localization and clinical correlation. BP accounts for approximately 72% of facial palsies. Almost a century later, the management and etiology of BP is still a subject of controversy. Here, we present a review of literature on this neurologically significant entity. PMID:27583233

  3. Novel methods for mapping the cavernous nerves during radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Fried, Nathaniel M; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-08-01

    The cavernous nerves, which course along the surface of the prostate gland, are responsible for erectile function. During radical prostatectomy, urologists are challenged in preserving these nerves and their function. Cavernous nerves are microscopic and show variable location in different patients; therefore, postoperative sexual potency rates are widely variable following radical prostatectomy. A variety of technologies, including electrical and optical nerve stimulation, dye-based optical fluorescence and microscopy, spectroscopy, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have all been used to study cavernous nerve anatomy and physiology, and some of these methods are also potential intraoperative methods for identifying and preserving cavernous nerves. However, all of these technologies have inherent limitations, including slow or inconsistent nerve responses, poor image resolution, shallow image depth, slow image acquisition times and/or safety concerns. New and emerging technologies, as well as multimodal approaches combining existing methods, hold promise for improved postoperative sexual outcomes and patient quality of life following radical prostatectomy.

  4. The Evolution and Technique of Nerve-Sparing Retroperitoneal Lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Timothy A; Cary, Clint; Rice, Kevin R; Foster, Richard S

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection technique and associated template modifications for nonseminomatous germ cell tumors have resulted in significant improvement in the long-term morbidity. Through the preservation of sympathetic nerves via exclusion from or prospective identification within the boundaries of resection, maintenance and recovery of antegrade ejaculation are achieved. Nerve-sparing strategies in early-stage disease are feasible in most patients. Postchemotherapy, select patients can be considered for nerve preservation. This article describes the anatomic and physiologic basis for, indications and technical aspects of, and functional and oncologic outcomes reported after nerve-sparing retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy in testicular cancer. PMID:26216818

  5. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates nerve regeneration following inferior alveolar nerve transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mai; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Masamichi; Iwata, Koichi; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury, which is frequently caused by orofacial surgery or trauma, induces sensory loss in orofacial regions innervated by the IAN. However, no effective treatment for orofacial sensory loss currently exists. We determined whether sensory loss in facial skin above the mental foramen following IAN transection was recovered by exposure of the transected IAN to low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS). Inferior alveolar nerve transection (IANX) was performed in 7-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. On day 7 after IANX, the effect of daily LIPUS (from day 0) on the transected IAN, in terms of sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, was examined. Moreover, the number of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the facial skin above the mental foramen of rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS was counted using the retrograde neurotracing technique. Daily exposure of the transected IAN to LIPUS significantly promoted recovery of the head-withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, and the number of TG neurons innervating the facial skin above mental foramen was significantly increased in rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS compared with sham or LIPUS-unexposed rats. Daily treatment of stumps of the transected IAN with LIPUS facilitated morphological and functional regeneration, suggesting that LIPUS is an effective and novel therapy for IAN injury. PMID:27058986

  6. Alternating facial paralysis in a girl with hypertension: case report.

    PubMed

    Bağ, Özlem; Karaarslan, Utku; Acar, Sezer; Işgüder, Rana; Unalp, Aycan; Öztürk, Aysel

    2013-12-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of acquired unilateral facial nerve palsy in childhood. Although the diagnosis depends on the exclusion of less common causes such as infectious, traumatic, malignancy associated and hypertension associated etiologies, pediatricians tend to diagnose idiopatic Bell's palsy whenever a child admits with acquired facial weakness. In this report, we present an eight year old girl, presenting with recurrent and alternant facial palsy as the first symptom of systemic hypertension. She received steroid treatment without measuring blood pressure and this could worsen hypertension. Clinicians should be aware of this association and not neglect to measure the blood pressure before considering steroid therapy for Bell's palsy. In addition, the less common causes of acquired facial palsy should be kept in mind, especially when recurrent and alternant courses occur.

  7. Facial Soft Tissue Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kretlow, James D.; McKnight, Aisha J.; Izaddoost, Shayan A.

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic facial soft tissue injuries are commonly encountered in the emergency department by plastic surgeons and other providers. Although rarely life-threatening, the treatment of these injuries can be complex and may have significant impact on the patient's facial function and aesthetics. This article provides a review of the relevant literature related to this topic and describes the authors' approach to the evaluation and management of the patient with facial soft tissue injuries. PMID:22550459

  8. [Facial tics and spasms].

    PubMed

    Potgieser, Adriaan R E; van Dijk, J Marc C; Elting, Jan Willem J; de Koning-Tijssen, Marina A J

    2014-01-01

    Facial tics and spasms are socially incapacitating, but effective treatment is often available. The clinical picture is sufficient for distinguishing between the different diseases that cause this affliction.We describe three cases of patients with facial tics or spasms: one case of tics, which are familiar to many physicians; one case of blepharospasms; and one case of hemifacial spasms. We discuss the differential diagnosis and the treatment possibilities for facial tics and spasms. Early diagnosis and treatment is important, because of the associated social incapacitation. Botulin toxin should be considered as a treatment option for facial tics and a curative neurosurgical intervention should be considered for hemifacial spasms.

  9. Facial expression recognition with facial parts based sparse representation classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Ruicong; Ruan, Qiuqi

    2009-10-01

    Facial expressions play important role in human communication. The understanding of facial expression is a basic requirement in the development of next generation human computer interaction systems. Researches show that the intrinsic facial features always hide in low dimensional facial subspaces. This paper presents facial parts based facial expression recognition system with sparse representation classifier. Sparse representation classifier exploits sparse representation to select face features and classify facial expressions. The sparse solution is obtained by solving l1 -norm minimization problem with constraint of linear combination equation. Experimental results show that sparse representation is efficient for facial expression recognition and sparse representation classifier obtain much higher recognition accuracies than other compared methods.

  10. Neoplastic causes of nonacute facial paralysis: A review of 221 cases.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, John P; Marzo, Sam J; Anderson, Douglas A; Sappington, Joshua M

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a retrospective review to assess the clinical presentation of patients with tumor-related nonacute complete peripheral facial weakness or an incomplete partial facial paresis and to provide an algorithm for the evaluation and management of these patients. Our study population was made up of 221 patients-131 females and 90 males, aged 14 to 79 years (mean: 49.7)-who had been referred to the Facial Nerve Disorders Clinic at our tertiary care academic medical center over a 23-year period with a documented neoplastic cause of facial paralysis. In addition to demographic data, we compiled information on clinical signs and symptoms, radiologic and pathologic findings, and surgical approaches. All patients exhibited gradual-onset facial weakness or facial twitching. Imaging identified an extratemporal tumor in 128 patients (58%), an intratemporal lesion in 55 patients (25%), and an intradural mass in 38 (17%). Almost all of the extratemporal tumors (99%) were malignant, while 91% of the intratemporal and intradural tumors were benign. A transtemporal surgical approach was used in the 93 intratemporal and intradural tumor resections, while the 128 extratemporal lesions required a parotidectomy with partial temporal bone dissection. The vast majority of patients (97%) underwent facial reanimation. We conclude that gradual-onset facial paralysis or twitching may occur as a result of a neoplastic invasion of the facial nerve along its course from the cerebellopontine angle to the parotid gland. We caution readers to beware of a diagnosis of "atypical Bell's palsy."

  11. Neoplastic causes of nonacute facial paralysis: A review of 221 cases.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, John P; Marzo, Sam J; Anderson, Douglas A; Sappington, Joshua M

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a retrospective review to assess the clinical presentation of patients with tumor-related nonacute complete peripheral facial weakness or an incomplete partial facial paresis and to provide an algorithm for the evaluation and management of these patients. Our study population was made up of 221 patients-131 females and 90 males, aged 14 to 79 years (mean: 49.7)-who had been referred to the Facial Nerve Disorders Clinic at our tertiary care academic medical center over a 23-year period with a documented neoplastic cause of facial paralysis. In addition to demographic data, we compiled information on clinical signs and symptoms, radiologic and pathologic findings, and surgical approaches. All patients exhibited gradual-onset facial weakness or facial twitching. Imaging identified an extratemporal tumor in 128 patients (58%), an intratemporal lesion in 55 patients (25%), and an intradural mass in 38 (17%). Almost all of the extratemporal tumors (99%) were malignant, while 91% of the intratemporal and intradural tumors were benign. A transtemporal surgical approach was used in the 93 intratemporal and intradural tumor resections, while the 128 extratemporal lesions required a parotidectomy with partial temporal bone dissection. The vast majority of patients (97%) underwent facial reanimation. We conclude that gradual-onset facial paralysis or twitching may occur as a result of a neoplastic invasion of the facial nerve along its course from the cerebellopontine angle to the parotid gland. We caution readers to beware of a diagnosis of "atypical Bell's palsy." PMID:27657317

  12. [Skin tumors in facial plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Heppt, W

    2009-04-01

    As the incidence of facial skin tumors is rising, otorhinolaryngologists are becoming more and more involved in the field of facial plastic surgery. The most common tumor locations on the head are the sun-exposed areas such as the nose, forehead, cheek, and auricle. The most common histologic findings are actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. In planning tumor resection and defect repair, many factors, including histology, size, and localization of the tumor as well as conditions of the adjacent skin, must be considered. The key to defect repair after tumor resection is to choose the most appropriate technique from a range of possibilities. Because of skin laxity, most small and midsize facial defects can be closed directly or with high-tension sutures under skin expansion. More extensive defects and those located in critical areas require pedicled flaps or free grafts transferring skin from adjacent or distant areas. In patients with recurrent or deeply infiltrative tumors, reconstructive procedures of the facial nerve, parotid duct, and lacrimal duct might be needed. This is also true for reconstruction of the anatomic framework of the eyelids, the nose, and the pinna. PMID:19347378

  13. OCT image segmentation of the prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Weldon, Thomas P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-08-01

    The cavernous nerves course along the surface of the prostate and are responsible for erectile function. Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery may improve nerve preservation and postoperative sexual potency. In this study, 2-D OCT images of the rat prostate were segmented to differentiate the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland. Three image features were employed: Gabor filter, Daubechies wavelet, and Laws filter. The features were segmented using a nearestneighbor classifier. N-ary morphological post-processing was used to remove small voids. The cavernous nerves were differentiated from the prostate gland with a segmentation error rate of only 0.058 +/- 0.019.

  14. Retinal and optic nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2003-11-01

    A variety of disease processes can affect the retina and/or the optic nerve, including vascular or ischemic disease, inflammatory or infectious disease, and degenerative disease. These disease processes may selectively damage certain parts of the retina or optic nerve, and the specific areas that are damaged may have implications for the design of potential therapeutic visual prosthetic devices. Outer retinal diseases include age-related macular degeneration, pathologic myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Although the retinal photoreceptors may be lost, the inner retina is relatively well-preserved in these diseases and may be a target for retinal prosthetic devices. Inner retinal diseases include retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal venous occlusive disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Other retinal diseases such as ocular infections (retinitis, endophthalmitis) may affect all retinal layers. Because the inner retinal cells, including the retinal ganglion cells, may be destroyed in these diseases (inner retinal or whole retinal), prosthetic devices that stimulate the inner retina may not be effective. Common optic nerve diseases include glaucoma, optic neuritis, and ischemic optic neuropathy. Because the ganglion cell nerve fibers themselves are damaged, visual prosthetics for these diseases will need to target more distal portions of the visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. Clearly, a sound understanding of retinal and optic nerve disease pathophysiology is critical for designing and choosing the optimal visual prosthetic device.

  15. Electrical stimulation treatment for facial palsy after revision pleomorphic adenoma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goldie, Simon; Sandeman, Jack; Cole, Richard; Dennis, Simon; Swain, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Surgery for pleomorphic adenoma recurrence presents a significant risk of facial nerve damage that can result in facial weakness effecting patients’ ability to communicate, mental health and self-image. We report two case studies that had marked facial weakness after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma and their progress with electrical stimulation. Subjects received electrical stimulation twice daily for 24 weeks during which photographs of expressions, facial measurements and Sunnybrook scores were recorded. Both subjects recovered good facial function demonstrating Sunnybrook scores of 54 and 64 that improved to 88 and 96, respectively. Neither subjects demonstrated adverse effects of treatment. We conclude that electrical stimulation is a safe treatment and may improve facial palsy in patients after resection of recurrent pleomorphic adenoma. Larger studies would be difficult to pursue due to the low incidence of cases. PMID:27106613

  16. Tick induced facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Patil, M M; Walikar, B N; Kalyanshettar, S S; Patil, S V

    2012-01-01

    We report a 3-year old boy with acute onset of left sided facial palsy secondary to tick infestation in the left ear. On 7th day of follow-up, following tick removal, the facial palsy had resolved. PMID:22318101

  17. [Facial recognition and autism].

    PubMed

    Assumpçäo Júnior, F B; Sprovieri, M H; Kuczynski, E; Farinha, V

    1999-12-01

    Through the presentation of four facial expressions' illustrations, we evaluate the capacity of autistic children recognition, comparing with normal intelligence children and adults. The comparison of results was accomplished through the qui-square test. The differences observed were significant, showing that a disturbance of the facial expressions' perception is present in autistic children, and that it interferes directly in the social relationships.

  18. Nonsurgical facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Monheit, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    Facial rejuvenation has evolved from purely surgical to the use of nonsurgical techniques such as lasers and injectable fillers and toxins. This has occurred as a product of consumer demand for less down time and risk, as well as a new scientific knowledge of facial aging. A review of patient consultation evaluation and use of injectable products will be discussed in this chapter.

  19. Holistic facial expression classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, John; McDonald, J.

    2005-06-01

    This paper details a procedure for classifying facial expressions. This is a growing and relatively new type of problem within computer vision. One of the fundamental problems when classifying facial expressions in previous approaches is the lack of a consistent method of measuring expression. This paper solves this problem by the computation of the Facial Expression Shape Model (FESM). This statistical model of facial expression is based on an anatomical analysis of facial expression called the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). We use the term Action Unit (AU) to describe a movement of one or more muscles of the face and all expressions can be described using the AU's described by FACS. The shape model is calculated by marking the face with 122 landmark points. We use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to analyse how the landmark points move with respect to each other and to lower the dimensionality of the problem. Using the FESM in conjunction with Support Vector Machines (SVM) we classify facial expressions. SVMs are a powerful machine learning technique based on optimisation theory. This project is largely concerned with statistical models, machine learning techniques and psychological tools used in the classification of facial expression. This holistic approach to expression classification provides a means for a level of interaction with a computer that is a significant step forward in human-computer interaction.

  20. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27399242

  1. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  2. Facial artery flaps in facial oncoplastic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Tommaso

    2013-10-01

    The face is one of the common sites for cutaneous cancer localization. It is well known that the face is the localization of more than 50% of skin cancers. Nowadays, the principles of modern "oncoplasty" recommend the complete excision of the cancer and the reconstruction with respect to cosmetic features of the face in terms of good color, good softness, and good texture of the flaps, utilized in cancer repair. The oncological and cosmetic results of facial reconstruction are strictly linked and the modern plastic and reconstructive surgeon must respect both oncological and cosmetic aspects. For that reason the best solution in facial cancer repair is the utilization of locoregional flaps based on the tributary vessels of the facial artery. In consideration of the dimension of recipient area to repair, the retroangular flap (RAF) or the submental flap could be used. This article is voted to illustrate a very large and long-term casuistry dedicated to these flaps.

  3. [An uncommon reason for facial hypoesthesia].

    PubMed

    Stienen, M N; Seule, M A; Weber, J; Gautschi, O P

    2011-05-25

    A 58-year-old female admitted herself to the emergency department with progressive left-sided facial hypoesthesia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 20 mm-sized aneurysm of the left vertebral artery leading to compression of the trigeminal nerve. An endovascular occlusion with a combined coiling and flow-diverter was performed. The left posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) arised from the aneurysmal sac. Despite an extensive infarction of the left PICA-territory, the patient convalesced well and presented completely independent and without symptoms at the 4-week follow-up. PMID:21614764

  4. [Lengthening temporalis myoplasty: A new approach to facial rehabilitation with the "mirror-effect" method].

    PubMed

    Blanchin, T; Martin, F; Labbe, D

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis often reveals two conditions that are hard to control: labial occlusion and palpebral closure. Today, there are efforts to go beyond the sole use of muscle stimulation techniques, and attention is being given to cerebral plasticity stimulation? This implies using the facial nerves' efferent pathway as the afferent pathway in rehabilitation. This technique could further help limit the two recalcitrant problems, above. We matched two groups of patients who underwent surgery for peripheral facial paralysis by lengthening the temporalis myoplasty (LTM). LTM is one of the best ways to examine cerebral plasticity. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed nerve and is both motor and sensory. After a LTM, patients have to use the trigeminal nerve differently, as it now has a direct role in generating the smile. The LTM approach, using the efferent pathway, therefore, creates a challenge for the brain. The two groups followed separate therapies called "classical" and "mirror-effect". The "mirror-effect" method gave a more precise orientation of the patient's cerebral plasticity than did the classical rehabilitation. The method develops two axes: voluntary movements patients need to control their temporal smile; and spontaneous movements needed for facial expressions. Work on voluntary movements is done before a "digital mirror", using an identical doubled hemiface, providing the patient with a fake copy of his face and, thus, a 7 "mirror-effect". The spontaneous movements work is based on what we call the "Therapy of Motor Emotions". The method presented here is used to treat facial paralysis (Bell's Palsies type), whether requiring surgery or not. Importantly, the facial nerve, like the trigeminal nerve above, is also a mixed nerve and is stimulated through the efferent pathway in the same manner. PMID:23598073

  5. [Lengthening temporalis myoplasty: A new approach to facial rehabilitation with the "mirror-effect" method].

    PubMed

    Blanchin, T; Martin, F; Labbe, D

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis often reveals two conditions that are hard to control: labial occlusion and palpebral closure. Today, there are efforts to go beyond the sole use of muscle stimulation techniques, and attention is being given to cerebral plasticity stimulation? This implies using the facial nerves' efferent pathway as the afferent pathway in rehabilitation. This technique could further help limit the two recalcitrant problems, above. We matched two groups of patients who underwent surgery for peripheral facial paralysis by lengthening the temporalis myoplasty (LTM). LTM is one of the best ways to examine cerebral plasticity. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed nerve and is both motor and sensory. After a LTM, patients have to use the trigeminal nerve differently, as it now has a direct role in generating the smile. The LTM approach, using the efferent pathway, therefore, creates a challenge for the brain. The two groups followed separate therapies called "classical" and "mirror-effect". The "mirror-effect" method gave a more precise orientation of the patient's cerebral plasticity than did the classical rehabilitation. The method develops two axes: voluntary movements patients need to control their temporal smile; and spontaneous movements needed for facial expressions. Work on voluntary movements is done before a "digital mirror", using an identical doubled hemiface, providing the patient with a fake copy of his face and, thus, a 7 "mirror-effect". The spontaneous movements work is based on what we call the "Therapy of Motor Emotions". The method presented here is used to treat facial paralysis (Bell's Palsies type), whether requiring surgery or not. Importantly, the facial nerve, like the trigeminal nerve above, is also a mixed nerve and is stimulated through the efferent pathway in the same manner.

  6. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  7. Comparison of hemihypoglossal- and accessory-facial neurorrhaphy for treating facial paralysis in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Dezhi; Wan, Hong; Feng, Jie; Wang, Shiwei; Su, Diya; Hao, Shuyu; Schumacher, Michael; Liu, Song

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hypoglossal-facial nerve "side"-to-end (HemiHN-FN) and accessory-facial nerve end-to-end (AN-FN) neurorrhaphy using a predegenerated nerve graft (PNG) for reanimating facial paralysis in a rat FN injury model. A total of 25 rats with complete unilateral facial paralysis resulting from section of the right FN were divided into 5 groups (n=5 each) that were submitted to immediate, delayed (3 months after FN injury) or no (control) FN reconstruction procedures involving HemiHN-FN or AN-FN neurorrhaphy. Approximately 3 months after FN reconstruction, cholera toxin subunit B conjugate Alexa 555 (CTB-Alexa 555) was injected into the ipsilateral whisker pad muscle and CTB-Alexa 555-labeled neurons were observed in the hypoglossal or accessory nuclei of all the FN reconstruction rats, but none of these neurons were found in the controls. There were numerous myelinated and nonmyelinated axons in both PNG and repaired FN of the FN reconstruction rats. No differences were found for these numbers between the two neurorrhaphy methods for each of the treatment time points, indicating the equal effectiveness of axon regeneration. However, a significantly higher number of CTB-Alexa 555-labeled neurons was observed in the hypoglossal nucleus of the immediate HemiHN-FN neurorrhaphy-treated rats when compared to that in the accessory nucleus of the immediate AN-FN neurorrhaphy-treated rats, consistent with the surface values of the recorded MAPs at the whisker pad muscle while electro-stimulating the FN. These results suggest that HemiHN-FN neurorrhaphy produces more efficient innervation of the paralyzed facial muscles than AN-FN neurorrhaphy without sacrificing ipsilateral hypoglossal function. Taking into consideration the clinical relevance of these findings for postoperative complications and functional reanimation in relation to the central plasticity, we suggest that HemiHN-FN neurorrhaphy may be the preferable facial

  8. Schwannoma originating from lower cranial nerves: report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Noda, Tomoyuki; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    Four cases of schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves are presented. Case 1 is a schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the parapharyngeal space. The operation was performed by the transcervical approach. Although the tumor capsule was not dissected from the vagus nerve, hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Case 2 is a schwannoma in the jugular foramen. The operation was performed by the infralabyrinthine approach. Although only the intracapsular tumor was enucleated, facial palsy, hoarseness, dysphagia and paresis of the deltoid muscle occurred transiently after the operation. The patient's hearing had also slightly deteriorated. Case 3 is a dumbbell-typed schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal canal was markedly enlarged by the tumor. As the hypoglossal nerves were embedded in the tumor, the tumor around the hypoglossal nerves was not resected. The tumor was significantly enlarged for a while after stereotactic irradiation. Case 4 is an intracranial cystic schwannoma originating from the IXth or Xth cranial nerves. The tumor was resected through the cerebello-medullary fissure. The tumor capsule attached to the brain stem was not removed. Hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Cranial nerve palsy readily occurs after the removal of the schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves. Mechanical injury caused by retraction, extension and compression of the nerve and heat injury during the drilling of the petrous bone should be cautiously avoided.

  9. Preservation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.

    2004-01-01

    The long-term preservation of digital entities requires mechanisms to manage the authenticity of massive data collections that are written to archival storage systems. Preservation environments impose authenticity constraints and manage the evolution of the storage system technology by building infrastructure independent solutions. This seeming paradox, the need for large archives, while avoiding dependence upon vendor specific solutions, is resolved through use of data grid technology. Data grids provide the storage repository abstractions that make it possible to migrate collections between vendor specific products, while ensuring the authenticity of the archived data. Data grids provide the software infrastructure that interfaces vendor-specific storage archives to preservation environments.

  10. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  11. Facial paralysis and the role of free muscle transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zuker, R M

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis can have significant functional, psychological and aesthetic concerns that alter the lives of our patients. These effects can be functional, affecting the eye, nose and mouth, or aesthetic, affecting the symmetry of the face and particularly the mimetic function of smile. Several reanimation procedures have been described to address this. In this chapter, we will outline our technique for reanimation utilizing segmental gracilis muscle transplants to the face. These are innervated either by the contralateral normal 7th nerve via a cross face nerve graft, or a different ipsilateral motor where no 7th nerve is available or would not produce the required result. The other ipsilateral motor that we have found extremely effective is the motor nerve to masseter. This can power a segmental gracilis muscle transplant and lead to excursion that is near normal. These techniques will be described in detail.

  12. Controversies in Contemporary Facial Reanimation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Leslie; Byrne, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    Facial palsy is a devastating condition with profound functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial implications. Although the complexity of facial expression and intricate synergy of facial mimetic muscles are difficult to restore, the goal of management is to reestablish facial symmetry and movement. Facial reanimation surgery requires an individualized treatment approach based on the cause, pattern, and duration of facial palsy while considering patient age, comorbidities, motivation, and goals. Contemporary reconstructive options include a spectrum of static and dynamic procedures. Controversies in the evaluation of patients with facial palsy, timing of intervention, and management decisions for dynamic smile reanimation are discussed. PMID:27400842

  13. Automated tracking of facial features in patients with facial neuromuscular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wachtman, G S; Cohn, J F; VanSwearingen, J M; Manders, E K

    2001-04-15

    Facial neuromuscular dysfunction severely impacts adaptive and expressive behavior and emotional health. Appropriate treatment is aided by quantitative and efficient assessment of facial motion impairment. We validated a newly developed method of quantifying facial motion, automated face analysis (AFA), by comparing it with an established manual marking method, the Maximal Static Response Assay (MSRA). In the AFA, motion of facial features is tracked automatically by computer vision without the need for placement of physical markers or restrictions of rigid head motion. Nine patients (seven women and two men) with a mean age of 39.3 years and various facial nerve disorders (five with Bell's palsy, three with trauma, and one with tumor resection) participated. The patients were videotaped while performing voluntary facial action tasks (brow raise, eye closure, and smile). For comparison with MSRA, physical markers were placed on facial landmarks. Image sequences were digitized into 640 x 480 x 24-bit pixel arrays at 30 frames per second (1 pixel congruent with0.3 mm). As defined for the MSRA, the coordinates of the center of each marker were manually recorded in the initial and final digitized frames, which correspond to repose and maximal response. For the AFA, these points were tracked automatically in the image sequence. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to evaluate consistency of measurement between manual (the MSRA) and automated (the AFA) tracking methods, and paired t tests were used to assess the mean difference between methods for feature tracking. Feature measures were highly consistent between methods, Pearson's r = 0.96 or higher, p < 0.001 for each of the action tasks. The mean differences between the methods were small; the mean error between methods was comparable to the error within the manual method (less than 1 pixel). The AFA demonstrated strong concurrent validity with the MSRA for pixel-wise displacement. Tracking was fully automated

  14. Urine Preservative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M. (Inventor); Nillen, Jeannie (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is CPG, a combination of a chlorhexidine salt (such as chlorhexidine digluconate, chlorhexidine diacetate, or chlorhexidine dichloride) and n-propyl gallate that can be used at ambient temperatures as a urine preservative.

  15. PCA facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hori, Inas H.; El-Momen, Zahraa K.; Ganoun, Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. The comparative study of Facial Expression Recognition (FER) techniques namely Principal Component's analysis (PCA) and PCA with Gabor filters (GF) is done. The objective of this research is to show that PCA with Gabor filters is superior to the first technique in terms of recognition rate. To test and evaluates their performance, experiments are performed using real database by both techniques. The universally accepted five principal emotions to be recognized are: Happy, Sad, Disgust and Angry along with Neutral. The recognition rates are obtained on all the facial expressions.

  16. Three-Dimensional Facial Adaptation for MPEG-4 Talking Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammalidis, Nikos; Sarris, Nikos; Deligianni, Fani; Strintzis, Michael G.

    2002-12-01

    This paper studies a new method for three-dimensional (3D) facial model adaptation and its integration into a text-to-speech (TTS) system. The 3D facial adaptation requires a set of two orthogonal views of the user's face with a number of feature points located on both views. Based on the correspondences of the feature points' positions, a generic face model is deformed nonrigidly treating every facial part as a separate entity. A cylindrical texture map is then built from the two image views. The generated head models are compared to corresponding models obtained by the commonly used adaptation method that utilizes 3D radial bases functions. The generated 3D models are integrated into a talking head system, which consists of two distinct parts: a multilingual text to speech sub-system and an MPEG-4 compliant facial animation sub-system. Support for the Greek language has been added, while preserving lip and speech synchronization.

  17. Delayed Facial Paralysis following Uneventful KTP Laser Stapedotomy: Two Case Reports and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Révész, P.; Piski, Z.; Burián, A.; Harmat, K.; Gerlinger, I.

    2014-01-01

    Facial palsy that occurs immediately after middle ear surgery (stapedectomy, stapedotomy, and tympanoplasty) can be a consequence of the local anesthetics and it regresses completely within a few hours. In the case of delayed facial palsy, the alarming symptom occurs several days or even weeks after uneventful surgery. The mechanism of the neural dysfunction is not readily defined. Surgical stress, intraoperative trauma, or laceration of the chorda tympani nerve with a resultant retrograde facial nerve edema can all be provoking etiological factors. A dehiscent bony facial canal or a multiple microporotic fallopian canal (microtrauma or laser effect) can also contribute to the development of this rare phenomenon. The most popular theory related to the explanation of delayed facial palsy at present is the reactivation of dormant viruses. Both the thermal effect of the laser and the elevation of the tympanomeatal flap can reactivate viruses resting inside the ganglion geniculi, facial nerve, or facial nuclei. The authors report the case histories of a 55-year-old female, and a 45-year-old male who presented with a delayed facial palsy following laser stapedotomy. The clinical characteristics, the therapeutic options, and the possibility of prevention are discussed. PMID:25435882

  18. Reanimation of the middle and lower face in facial paralysis: review of the literature and personal approach.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Shadi; MacQuillan, Anthony; Grobbelaar, Adriaan O

    2011-04-01

    Facial paralysis refers to a condition in which all or portions of the facial nerve are paralysed. The facial nerve controls the muscles of facial expression, paralysis which results in a lack of facial expression which is not only an aesthetic issue, but has functional consequences as the patient cannot communicate effectively. The treatment of long-standing facial paralysis has challenged plastic surgeons for centuries, and still the ultimate goal of normality of the paralysed hemi-face with symmetry at rest as well as the generation of a spontaneous symmetrical smile with corneal protection has not yet fully been reached. Until the end of the 19th century, the treatment of this condition involved non-surgical means such as ointments, medicines and electrotherapy. With the advent and refinement of microvascular surgical techniques in the latter half of the 20th century, vascularised free muscle transfers coupled with cross-facial nerve grafts were introduced, allowing the possibility of spontaneous emotion being restored to the paralysed face became reality. The aim of this article is to revisit the surgical evolution and current options available as well as outcomes for patients suffering from facial paralysis concentrating on middle and lower face reanimation.

  19. Neurogenic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Schott, G D

    1980-07-01

    Neurogenic facial pain can be classified as either paroxysmal or persistent. Trigeminal neuralgia is the commonest example of the former, and postherpetic neuralgia, atypical facial pain, and tension head and facial pains are examples of the latter. The cause of many of these pains is poorly understood, the complex neuroanatomy of the head and neck being a contributory factor. Even when the aetiology is known, the mechanism whereby pain is produced is usually obscure. While treatment with drugs and surgical measures for trigeminal neuralgia are often satisfactory, and acupuncture for pain due to "muscle tension" may be beneficial, there is often little effective treatment for a considerable proportion of patients with neurogenic facial pain. PMID:6943844

  20. Cosmetic Facial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    Canadians have committed themselves to a healthier lifestyle, and many are seeking to look as well as they feel. For patients with realistic expectations, modern techniques of cosmetic facial surgery can enhance appearance and be of psychological benefit. Today most procedures can be done under local anesthesia on an out-patient basis. Facial contour defects can be improved by means of procedures such as rhinoplasty, mentoplasty, otoplasty and malarplasty. Facial rejuvenation surgery to decrease the signs of aging includes the forehead lift, eyebrow and eyelid lift, rhytidectomy, liposuction and chemical peeling. Newer controversial trends in cosmetic facial surgery include collagen implantation and fat transfer for contour defects, and eyelid tattooing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263984

  1. [A further discussion on acupuncture treatment plan of facial neuritis in Evidence-based Guidelines of Clinical Practice in Acupuncture and Moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Yu; Jiang, Yue-Bo

    2014-06-01

    The treatment plan of facial neuritis in Evidence-based Guidelines of Clinical Practice in Acupuncture and Moxibustion (2011 edition) is discussed, and case information of facial neuritis during the recent five years in department of acupuncture and moxibustion, PLA General Hospital, is retrospectively analyzed. In accordance with anatomy of the facial nerve to form the acupuncture prescription, the detailed diagnosis and treatment method for facial neuritis are introduced. The advantages of the diagnosis and treatment method for facial neuritis are summarized, hoping to establish a more comprehensive, standardized and unified treatment plan.

  2. Simultaneous facial feature tracking and facial expression recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Wang, Shangfei; Zhao, Yongping; Ji, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    The tracking and recognition of facial activities from images or videos have attracted great attention in computer vision field. Facial activities are characterized by three levels. First, in the bottom level, facial feature points around each facial component, i.e., eyebrow, mouth, etc., capture the detailed face shape information. Second, in the middle level, facial action units, defined in the facial action coding system, represent the contraction of a specific set of facial muscles, i.e., lid tightener, eyebrow raiser, etc. Finally, in the top level, six prototypical facial expressions represent the global facial muscle movement and are commonly used to describe the human emotion states. In contrast to the mainstream approaches, which usually only focus on one or two levels of facial activities, and track (or recognize) them separately, this paper introduces a unified probabilistic framework based on the dynamic Bayesian network to simultaneously and coherently represent the facial evolvement in different levels, their interactions and their observations. Advanced machine learning methods are introduced to learn the model based on both training data and subjective prior knowledge. Given the model and the measurements of facial motions, all three levels of facial activities are simultaneously recognized through a probabilistic inference. Extensive experiments are performed to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed model on all three level facial activities.

  3. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes.

  4. Secondary optic nerve tumors.

    PubMed

    Christmas, N J; Mead, M D; Richardson, E P; Albert, D M

    1991-01-01

    Secondary tumors of the optic nerve are more common than primary optic nerve tumors. The involvement of the optic nerve may arise from direct invasion from intraocular malignancies, from hematopoietic malignancy, from meningeal carcinomatosis, or from distant primary tumors. Orbital tumors rarely invade the optic nerve, and brain tumors involve it only in their late stages.

  5. Pediatric facial burns.

    PubMed

    Kung, Theodore A; Gosain, Arun K

    2008-07-01

    Despite major advances in the area of burn management, burn injury continues to be a leading cause of pediatric mortality and morbidity. Facial burns in particular are devastating to the affected child and result in numerous physical and psychosocial sequelae. Although many of the principles of adult burn management can be applied to a pediatric patient with facial burns, the surgeon must be cognizant of several important differences. Facial burns and subsequent scar formation can drastically affect the growth potential of a child's face. Structures such as the nose and teeth may become deformed due to abnormal external forces caused by contractures. Serious complications such as occlusion amblyopia and microstomia must be anticipated and urgently addressed to avert permanent consequences, whereas other reconstructive procedures can be delayed until scar maturation occurs. Furthermore, because young children are actively developing the concept of self, severe facial burns can alter a child's sense of identity and place the child at high risk for future emotional and psychologic disturbances. Surgical reconstruction of burn wounds should proceed only after thorough planning and may involve a variety of skin graft, flap, and tissue expansion techniques. The most favorable outcome is achieved when facial resurfacing is performed with respect to the aesthetic units of the face. Children with facial burns remain a considerable challenge to their caregivers, and these patients require long-term care by a multidisciplinary team of physicians and therapists to optimize functional, cosmetic, and psychosocial outcomes. PMID:18650717

  6. [Small fiber neuropathy in a patient with complete Heerfordt syndrome manifesting as refractory facial pain].

    PubMed

    Hirai, Toshiaki; Miyagawa, Shinji; Matsui, Kazutaka; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of complete Heerfordt syndrome accompanied by the involvement of small fiber neuropathy (SFN) manifesting as refracory facial pain. A 30-year-old man presented with pyrexia, a 2-week history of facial burning pain, and difficulty of mastication. After admission to our hospital, neurological examinations showed bilateral facial pain, trigeminal motor palsy, left facial nerve palsy, bilateral sensory neural deafness, uveitis and swelling of the parotid gland. Other examinations revealed bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, high serum titer of angiotensin coenzyme, and no response in a tuberculin-tested, non-caseating epithelioid granuloma from lip biopsy, leading to the diagnosis of complete Heerfordt syndrome. Mandibular skin biopsy with immunostaining for PGP 9.5 showed SFN. High-dose corticosteroids proved somewhat effective against SFN as facial pain, but reducing the corticosteroid dose proved difficult, as symptoms were refractory to other immunosuppressants and pain-control drugs such as anti-epileptics and anti-depressants. The patient died of acute pancreatitis 3 years after disease onset. Autopsy showed no granuloma in hilar lymph node, trigeminal nerve, cranial base, nerve root, and muscle. SFN in this case probably represent a cause of refractory facial pain. PMID:25087562

  7. Motor unit number in a small facial muscle, dilator naris.

    PubMed

    Patel-Khurana, Nilam; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2015-10-01

    A loss of functioning motor units underlies many neuromuscular disorders. The facial nerve innervates the muscles of facial expression, including nasal muscles, which also play an important role in the regulation of airflow resistance. It is difficult to accurately assess motor unit number in the facial muscles, because the muscles are difficult to activate in isolation. Here, we apply the manual McComas method to estimate the number of motor units in a nasal dilator muscle. EMG of the dilator naris was recorded during graded stimulation of the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve in 26 subjects (12 males and 14 females), aged 20-41 years. Each subject was studied twice, on separate days, to estimate method reproducibility. As a check on our use of the McComas method, we also estimated motor unit number in the first dorsal interosseus muscle (FDI) of six subjects, as the muscle is also small and has been studied with the McComas method. Reproducibility was evaluated with a rigorous statistical approach, the Bland-Altman procedure. We estimate that dilator naris is composed of 75 ± 15.6 (SD) motor units, compared to 144 ± 35.5 in FDI. The coefficient of variation for test-retest reproducibility of dilator naris motor unit estimates was 29.6 %, similar to separate-day reproducibility reported for other muscles. Recording and stimulation were done with surface electrodes, and the recordings were of high quality and reproducible. This simple technique could be applied clinically to track motor neuron loss and to monitor facial nerve integrity.

  8. Motor unit number in a small facial muscle, dilator naris

    PubMed Central

    Patel-Khurana, Nilam; Fregosi, Ralph F.

    2015-01-01

    A loss of functioning motor units underlies many neuromuscular disorders. The facial nerve innervates the muscles of facial expression, including nasal muscles, which also play an important role in the regulation of airflow resistance. It is difficult to accurately assess motor unit number in the facial muscles, because the muscles are difficult to activate in isolation. Here we apply the manual McComas method to estimate the number of motor units in a nasal dilator muscle. EMG of the dilator naris was recorded during graded stimulation of the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve in 26 subjects (12 M/14 F), aged 20–41 years. Each subject was studied twice, on separate days, to estimate method reproducibility. As a check on our use of the McComas method, we also estimated motor unit number in the first dorsal interosseus muscle (FDI) of 6 subjects, as the muscle is also small, and has been studied with the McComas method. Reproducibility was evaluated with a rigorous statistical approach, the Bland-Altman procedure. We estimate that dilator naris is composed of 75 ±15.6 (SD) motor units, compared to 144 ± 35.5 in FDI. The coefficient of variation for test-retest reproducibility of dilator naris motor unit estimates was 29.6%, similar to separate-day reproducibility reported for other muscles. Recording and stimulation were done with surface electrodes, and the recordings were of high quality and reproducible. This simple technique could be applied clinically to track motor neuron loss, and to monitor facial nerve integrity. PMID:26169101

  9. Posttraumatic Cholesteatoma Complicated by a Facial Paralysis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chihani, M.; Aljalil, A.; Touati, M.; Bouaity, B.; Ammar, H.

    2012-01-01

    The posttraumatic cholesteatoma is a rare complication of different types of the temporal bone damage. Its diagnosis is often done after several years of evolution, sometimes even at the stage of complications. A case of posttraumatic cholesteatoma is presented that was revealed by a facial nerve paralysis 23 years after a crash of the external auditory canal underlining the importance of the otoscopic and radiological regular monitoring of the patients with a traumatism of the temporal bone. PMID:22953104

  10. Preserved Hearing Following Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery: Audiological Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauch, Christopher D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Audiologic test results were reviewed for 30 patients whose hearing was preserved following eighth nerve tumor surgery. Improved auditory brainstem response tracings were seen as probably indicating increased neural synchrony due to reduced pressure on the cochlear nerve following surgery, whereas reduced hearing sensitivity probably reflects…

  11. Osteopathic manipulative treatment for facial numbness and pain after whiplash injury.

    PubMed

    Genese, Josephine Sun

    2013-07-01

    Whiplash injury is often caused by rear-end motor vehicle collisions. Symptoms such as neck pain and stiffness or arm pain or numbness are common with whiplash injury. The author reports a case of right facial numbness and right cheek pain after a whiplash injury. Osteopathic manipulative treatment techniques applied at the level of the cervical spine, suboccipital region, and cranial region alleviated the patient's facial symptoms by treating the right-sided strain of the trigeminal nerve. The strain on the trigeminal nerve likely occurred at the upper cervical spine, at the nerve's cauda, and at the brainstem, the nerve's point of origin. The temporal portion of the cranium played a major role in the strain on the maxillary.

  12. Use of triple-convergence polypropylene thread for the aesthetic correction of partial facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Citarella, Enzo Rivera; Sterodimas, Aris; Green, Alexandra Conde; Sinder, Ramil; Pitanguy, Ivo

    2008-07-01

    Rehabilitation and reanimation of the paralyzed face remains a challenge. A variety of autografts and allografts have been used for static facial suspension. We report two cases of long-standing partial facial paralysis treated with 3C triple-convergence polypropylene thread. A 39-year-old woman with right-sided partial facial paralysis underwent an endoscopy-assisted facial suspension using the 3C threads and a 60-year-old woman with right-sided partial facial paralysis underwent a round face-lifting combined with endoscopic brow lift and placement of 3C triple-convergence polypropylene threads. Its use for partial facial paralysis has not been previously described. The 1-year follow-up shows effective preservation of the surgical result and patient satisfaction.

  13. Facial dynamics and emotional expressions in facial aging treatments.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Thierry; Gassia, Véronique; Belhaouari, Lakhdar

    2015-03-01

    Facial expressions convey emotions that form the foundation of interpersonal relationships, and many of these emotions promote and regulate our social linkages. Hence, the facial aging symptomatological analysis and the treatment plan must of necessity include knowledge of the facial dynamics and the emotional expressions of the face. This approach aims to more closely meet patients' expectations of natural-looking results, by correcting age-related negative expressions while observing the emotional language of the face. This article will successively describe patients' expectations, the role of facial expressions in relational dynamics, the relationship between facial structures and facial expressions, and the way facial aging mimics negative expressions. Eventually, therapeutic implications for facial aging treatment will be addressed.

  14. Digital Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakel, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research on digital preservation issues, including born-digital and digitally recreated documents. Discusses electronic records research; metadata and other standards; electronic mail; Web-based documents; moving images media; selection of materials for digitization, including primary sources; administrative issues; media stability…

  15. Preservation & Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue on preservation and restoration presents selected resources for elementary and secondary education that include Web sites, CD-ROM and software, videos, books, magazines, and professional resources as well as classroom activities. Age levels are specified for most materials. I Sidebars discuss restoring a masterpiece, a bug's life,…

  16. Preservation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noriega, Chon A.

    2005-01-01

    One must undertake multi-institutional efforts that include universities, archives, museums, libraries and community-based arts organizations and the artists to preserve Latino art history. Arts infrastructure can be strengthened by various Chicano Studies Research Center projects that are concerned with archive building and scholarship, and with…

  17. Digitizing Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of digital imaging technology focuses on its potential use for preservation of library materials. Topics addressed include converting microfilm to digital; the high cost of conversion from paper or microfilm; quality; indexing; database management issues; incompatibility among imaging systems; longevity; cooperative pilot projects; and…

  18. Recurrent facial hemiparesis due to dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery: an unusual and ignored cause.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vijay Nath; Chaurasia, Rameshwar Nath; Gupta, Shailesh; Joshi, Deepika

    2013-01-01

    Dolichoectatic arteries are elongated tortuous aneurysms of intracranial arteries most commonly of vertebrobasilar tree presenting with ischaemic, haemorrhagic, thromboembolic lesions or with cranial nerve compression. The clinical presentation includes tic douloureux, neuralgia, tinnitus, vertigo, motor or sensory deficits, ataxia, dementia, Parkinsonism, hydrocephalus, headache, migraine, aneurysm, neoplasm, stroke/transient ischaemic attacks, leukoencephalopathy, central sleep apnoea and cerebellar dysfunctions. We present a case of recurrent facial nerve palsy secondary to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, an interesting and rare condition. PMID:23505276

  19. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Collins, K; Storey, M; Peterson, K; Nutter, P

    1988-01-01

    In brief: Nerve injuries in athletes may be serious and may delay or prevent an athlete's return to his or her sport. Over a two-year period, the authors evaluated the condition of 65 patients who had entrapments of a nerve or nerve root, documented with electromyography. They describe four case histories: Two patients had radial nerve entrapments, one caused by baseball pitching and the other by kayaking; one football player had combined suprascapular neuropathy and upper trunk brachial plexopathy; and one patient had carpal tunnel syndrome of a median nerve secondary to rowing. Sports-related peripheral nerve lesions of the lower extremity were not seen during the study period. Based on a literature review, the nerve injuries discussed represent the spectrum of nerve entrapments likely to be seen in US clinics. The authors conclude that peripheral nerve lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sports injuries, particularly at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

  20. The asymmetric facial skin perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy discovered by laser speckle imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han; Chen, Yi; Zhong, Weizheng; Yu, Haibo; Li, Zhifeng; He, Yuhai; Yu, Wenlong; Jin, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a kind of peripheral neural disease that cause abrupt onset of unilateral facial weakness. In the pathologic study, it was evidenced that ischemia of facial nerve at the affected side of face existed in Bell's palsy patients. Since the direction of facial nerve blood flow is primarily proximal to distal, facial skin microcirculation would also be affected after the onset of Bell's palsy. Therefore, monitoring the full area of facial skin microcirculation would help to identify the condition of Bell's palsy patients. In this study, a non-invasive, real time and full field imaging technology - laser speckle imaging (LSI) technology was applied for measuring facial skin blood perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy patients. 85 participants with different stage of Bell's palsy were included. Results showed that Bell's palsy patients' facial skin perfusion of affected side was lower than that of the normal side at the region of eyelid, and that the asymmetric distribution of the facial skin perfusion between two sides of eyelid is positively related to the stage of the disease (P <  0.001). During the recovery, the perfusion of affected side of eyelid was increasing to nearly the same with the normal side. This study was a novel application of LSI in evaluating the facial skin perfusion of Bell's palsy patients, and we discovered that the facial skin blood perfusion could reflect the stage of Bell's palsy, which suggested that microcirculation should be investigated in patients with this neurological deficit. It was also suggested LSI as potential diagnostic tool for Bell's palsy. PMID:26444618

  1. The asymmetric facial skin perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy discovered by laser speckle imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han; Chen, Yi; Zhong, Weizheng; Yu, Haibo; Li, Zhifeng; He, Yuhai; Yu, Wenlong; Jin, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a kind of peripheral neural disease that cause abrupt onset of unilateral facial weakness. In the pathologic study, it was evidenced that ischemia of facial nerve at the affected side of face existed in Bell's palsy patients. Since the direction of facial nerve blood flow is primarily proximal to distal, facial skin microcirculation would also be affected after the onset of Bell's palsy. Therefore, monitoring the full area of facial skin microcirculation would help to identify the condition of Bell's palsy patients. In this study, a non-invasive, real time and full field imaging technology - laser speckle imaging (LSI) technology was applied for measuring facial skin blood perfusion distribution of Bell's palsy patients. 85 participants with different stage of Bell's palsy were included. Results showed that Bell's palsy patients' facial skin perfusion of affected side was lower than that of the normal side at the region of eyelid, and that the asymmetric distribution of the facial skin perfusion between two sides of eyelid is positively related to the stage of the disease (P <  0.001). During the recovery, the perfusion of affected side of eyelid was increasing to nearly the same with the normal side. This study was a novel application of LSI in evaluating the facial skin perfusion of Bell's palsy patients, and we discovered that the facial skin blood perfusion could reflect the stage of Bell's palsy, which suggested that microcirculation should be investigated in patients with this neurological deficit. It was also suggested LSI as potential diagnostic tool for Bell's palsy.

  2. [Advantage of facial rehabilitation after facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Gatignol, Peggy; Lannadère, Elodie; Bernat, Isabelle; Tankéré, Frédéric; Lamas, Georges

    2011-10-01

    Visible and immediate trauma, facial palsy (FP) covers functional but also psychological damage and it is essential to evaluate before a comprehensive therapeutic care tailored. Few patients, however, are emerging with a prescription for rehabilitation after a consultation. Why? This rehabilitation is it ignored? Is it absolutely necessary? It is evident in the extension of medical care to minimize the effects. Yet the foundation of rehabilitation is sadly little known and often poorly enforced. In addition to its specificity, this therapy preceded by a report called "pretreatments offers a prognosis for recovery to patient" regardless of the origin and degree of involvement of the PF.

  3. Histomorphogenesis of cranial nerves in Huso huso larvae

    PubMed Central

    Tavighi, Sherma; Saadatfar, Zohreh; Shojaei, Bahador; Behnam Rassouli, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    In this study the cranial nerves development of H. huso are explained from 1 to 54-days-old (1, 3, 6, 15, 21 and 54 days). Despite all the researches on fish brain, there are no study on nerves evolution on H. huso during their larvae life. For this research 40 samples of larvae H. huso were obtained (from each age, about six samples were selected). The specimens were maintained in fiberglass tank, then histological samples were taken from tissues and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for general histological studies using light microscope. According to the results, on 1 and 3-days-old, no nerve was observed. The terminal nerve and their dendrites were observed around the nasal cavity and the axons projected to different areas in forebrain especially around olfactory bulb diffusely, on 6-day-old fish. Also, olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, lateral line and vagus nerves were detected on 6-day-old fish, however two parts of lateral line nerve were separated on 54-day-old. Three nerves, profundus, facial and octaval were observed on 54-day-old, however, up to this age, epiphysial nerve was not observed. PMID:27482355

  4. Histomorphogenesis of cranial nerves in Huso huso larvae.

    PubMed

    Tavighi, Sherma; Saadatfar, Zohreh; Shojaei, Bahador; Behnam Rassouli, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    In this study the cranial nerves development of H. huso are explained from 1 to 54-days-old (1, 3, 6, 15, 21 and 54 days). Despite all the researches on fish brain, there are no study on nerves evolution on H. huso during their larvae life. For this research 40 samples of larvae H. huso were obtained (from each age, about six samples were selected). The specimens were maintained in fiberglass tank, then histological samples were taken from tissues and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for general histological studies using light microscope. According to the results, on 1 and 3-days-old, no nerve was observed. The terminal nerve and their dendrites were observed around the nasal cavity and the axons projected to different areas in forebrain especially around olfactory bulb diffusely, on 6-day-old fish. Also, olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, lateral line and vagus nerves were detected on 6-day-old fish, however two parts of lateral line nerve were separated on 54-day-old. Three nerves, profundus, facial and octaval were observed on 54-day-old, however, up to this age, epiphysial nerve was not observed. PMID:27482355

  5. Histomorphogenesis of cranial nerves in Huso huso larvae.

    PubMed

    Tavighi, Sherma; Saadatfar, Zohreh; Shojaei, Bahador; Behnam Rassouli, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    In this study the cranial nerves development of H. huso are explained from 1 to 54-days-old (1, 3, 6, 15, 21 and 54 days). Despite all the researches on fish brain, there are no study on nerves evolution on H. huso during their larvae life. For this research 40 samples of larvae H. huso were obtained (from each age, about six samples were selected). The specimens were maintained in fiberglass tank, then histological samples were taken from tissues and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for general histological studies using light microscope. According to the results, on 1 and 3-days-old, no nerve was observed. The terminal nerve and their dendrites were observed around the nasal cavity and the axons projected to different areas in forebrain especially around olfactory bulb diffusely, on 6-day-old fish. Also, olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, lateral line and vagus nerves were detected on 6-day-old fish, however two parts of lateral line nerve were separated on 54-day-old. Three nerves, profundus, facial and octaval were observed on 54-day-old, however, up to this age, epiphysial nerve was not observed.

  6. Minimum intervention in restorative dentistry with V-shaped facial and palatal ceramic veneers: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Soares, Juliana Volpato; Cunali, Rafael Schlögel; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2016-05-01

    The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of worn anterior teeth should follow the principles of minimally invasive dentistry. When dental wear occurs at both the facial and palatal surfaces, the sandwich approach of reconstructing eroded anterior teeth with palatal followed by facial veneers is a straightforward treatment that preserves sound dental structure.

  7. Minimum intervention in restorative dentistry with V-shaped facial and palatal ceramic veneers: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Soares, Juliana Volpato; Cunali, Rafael Schlögel; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2016-05-01

    The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of worn anterior teeth should follow the principles of minimally invasive dentistry. When dental wear occurs at both the facial and palatal surfaces, the sandwich approach of reconstructing eroded anterior teeth with palatal followed by facial veneers is a straightforward treatment that preserves sound dental structure. PMID:26774321

  8. Intermittent facial swelling

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Charlie; Gopala Pillai, Suresh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent facial swelling is an unusual presentation in the emergency department. The differential diagnosis may range from a variety of causes. Most common differential diagnosis is angio-oedema. However, more serious presentations such as superior venacaval obstruction must not be ignored. This case report presents a patient who was investigated in the hospital for 2 weeks (2 admissions) with intermittent facial swelling. He presented to the emergency department (3rd admission) and was diagnosed to have superior venacaval obstruction secondary to metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma. He underwent emergency endovascular stenting; however, he died within a few weeks. PMID:25326556

  9. [Conservative treatment and rehabilitation in peripheral facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Paternostro-Sluga, T; Herceg, M; Frey, M

    2010-04-01

    Facial paralysis may be treated by physical therapies with different therapeutic strategies and devices. Exercise therapy, electrotherapy, massage, lymph-drainage, biofeedback therapy are applied. Therapeutic strategies are based on the course of disease. It may be assumed that paralysis in moderate and moderate to severe courses of disease in acute lesions, moreover in chronic partial lesions and after gracilis muscle transplantation will benefit best from physical therapies. Course of disease depends on the degree of lesion, low-grade lesion will improve earlier and prognosis of motor recovery is good. To predict the course of disease in idiopathic facial paralysis nerve conduction studies can render valuable information by measuring the amplitude of the motor evoked potential in side to side comparison. In regard to scientific studies there is limited evidence that exercise therapy and biofeedback therapy improve the course of disease, motor performance recovers earlier and motor synkinesis are decreased. There is no evidence for electrotherapy to improve the course of disease nor to have any adverse effects. There is no relevant literature for massage and lymph-drainage in regard to facial paralysis. Every patient with facial paralysis--regardless to the degree of lesion--should receive a brochure with mimic exercises and instructions to support facial symmetry as basic intervention.

  10. Another Scale for the Assessment of Facial Paralysis? ADS Scale: Our Proposition, How to Use It

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several authors in the years propose different methods to evaluate areas and specific movement’s disease in patient affected by facial palsy. Despite these efforts the House Brackmann is anyway the most used assessment in medical community. Aim The aims of our study is the proposition and assessing a new rating Arianna Disease Scale (ADS) for the clinical evaluation of facial paralysis. Materials and Methods Sixty patients affected by unilateral facial Bell paralysis were enrolled in a prospective study from 2012 to 2014. Their facial nerve function was evaluated with our assessment analysing facial district divided in upper, middle and lower third. We analysed different facial expressions. Each movement corresponded to the action of different muscles. The action of each muscle was scored from 0 to 1, with 0 corresponding from complete flaccid paralysis to muscle’s normal function ending with a score of 1. Synkinesis was considered and evaluated also in the scale with a fixed 0.5 score. Our results considered ease and speed of evaluation of the assessment, the accuracy of muscle deficit and the ability to calculate synkinesis using a score. Results All the three observers agreed 100% in the highest degree of deficit. We found some discrepancies in intermediate score with 92% agreement in upper face, 87% in middle and 80% in lower face, where there were more muscles involved in movements. Conclusion Our scale had some limitations linked to the small group of patients evaluated and we had a little difficulty understanding the intermediate score of 0.3 and 0.7. However, this was an accurate tool to quickly evaluate facial nerve function. This has potential as an alternative scale to and to diagnose facial nerve disorders. PMID:26814596

  11. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... toe-out movements Tests of nerve activity include: Electromyography (EMG, a test of electrical activity in muscles) Nerve ... Peroneal neuropathy. In: Preston DC, Shapiro BE, eds. Electromyography and Neuromuscular Disorders . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  12. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... to measure the speed of the nerve signals. Electromyography (recording from needles placed into the muscles) is ... Often, the nerve conduction test is followed by electromyography (EMG). In this test, needles are placed into ...

  13. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  14. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  15. Optic Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Paul; Kokemüller, Horst; Tavassol, Frank; Lindhorst, Daniel; Lemound, Juliana; Essig, Harald; Rücker, Martin; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Orbital and anterior skull base surgery is generally performed close to the prechiasmatic visual pathway, and clear strategies for detecting and handling visual pathway damage are essential. To overcome the common problem of a missed clinical examination because of an uncooperative or unresponsive patient, flash visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms should be used. These electrophysiologic examination techniques can provide evidence of intact, pathologic, or absent conductivity of the visual pathway when clinical assessment is not feasible. Visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms are thus essential diagnostic procedures not only for primary diagnosis but also for intraoperative evaluation. A decision for or against treatment of a visual pathway injury has to be made as fast as possible due to the enormous importance of the time elapsed with such injuries; this can be achieved additionally using multislice spiral computed tomography. The first-line conservative treatment of choice for such injuries is megadose methylprednisolone therapy. Surgery is used to decompress the orbital compartment by exposure of the intracanalicular part of the optic nerve in the case of optic canal compression. Modern craniomaxillofacial surgery requires detailed consideration of the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic visual pathway damage with the ultimate goal of preserving visual acuity. PMID:24436741

  16. Facial flap complications.

    PubMed

    Zoumalan, Richard A; Murakami, Craig S

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of fundamental concepts can help decrease the chance of complications in plastic surgery. Local flap reconstruction for facial defects has many pitfalls. This article describes common complications in local flap reconstruction of the face and describes strategies that prevent problems.

  17. [Quantitative assessment of facial palsy by Moiré topography].

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, I

    1992-05-01

    It is essential to establish an objective and quantitative method for evaluating facial palsy and to measure the extent of paralysis in order to evaluate therapeutic efficacy, determine prognosis, select appropriate treatment and observe the process of recovery. This study utilized Moiré topography, which displays three-dimensional facial symmetry with high precision and is based on light interference theory, to determine the extent of facial palsy in 38 patients (20 men and 18 women) 5 months to 73 years of age. A stereoscopic lattice type Moiré camera (FM3013) was connected to a CCD camera and to the monitoring device for confirming Moiré stripes. Moiré photographs were taken with a thermal imager (FTI-200). The photos were visually and objectively evaluated on the basis of the Moiré pattern and were then input into a personal computer with a digitizer for data processing and analysis. To view the functions of facial nerve branches, five Moiré photographs were taken: at rest, wrinkling the forehead, closing the eyes lightly, blowing out the cheeks and grinning. Results indicated that the number of stripes and their polarization adequately reflected the function of individual facial nerve branches. Thus, a well-defined Moiré pattern could clarify the characteristics of the site and the degree of facial palsy and of recovery from paralysis. It is an analytical method that can be quickly applied and seems especially useful in infants and young children, in whom point-based assessment is difficult. It is possible to quantitatively evaluate facial palsy in terms of the Asymmetry Index (AI), which is 20-25% for severe paralysis, 12-19% for partial paralysis, and 5-10% for an essentially normal condition. However, the numerical value of the AI overlap in all three paralysis categories, indicating that quantitative assessment of paralysis would be difficult. Moiré topography is an excellent method of determining the extent of facial palsy, compensating for the

  18. Role of thermography in the assessment of infraorbital nerve injury after malar fractures.

    PubMed

    McGimpsey, J G; Vaidya, A; Biagioni, P A; Lamey, P J

    2000-12-01

    We studied 45 patients with malar fractures who had some degree of infraorbital nerve deficit. Thermographic facial images failed to show any substantial changes in the temperature profiles of the affected and the normal control sides in relation to reco very of their facial sensation. Although some patients who had thermography on the day of injury showed significant temperature differences between the affected and the normal sides, these differences were probably the result of the acute inflammatory ch anges caused by the injury. We suggest that infrared thermography has little place in the assessment of infraorbital nerve deficits. PMID:11092769

  19. Facial diplegia revealing ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure in a patient with Crouzon syndrome. Case report.

    PubMed

    Thines, Laurent; Vinchon, Matthieu; Lahlou, Amine; Pellerin, Philippe; Dhellemmes, Patrick

    2007-07-01

    The authors report on the case of a 15-year-old boy with Crouzon syndrome (CS) who presented with headache and facial diplegia. He had undergone several craniofacial interventions and a posterior fossa decompression for tonsillar herniation caused by the CS. A ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt had been inserted for hydrocephalus. Emergency computed tomography (CT) disclosed slight dilation of the ventricular cavities compared with their appearance on a baseline CT scan. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a deformed brainstem but no compression at the occipital foramen; there was no apparent explanation for the facial diplegia. The neuroophthalmological examination revealed neither papilledema nor oculomotor palsy. Electromyography confirmed incomplete peripheral facial diplegia. The patient underwent emergency shunt revision, during which complete obstruction of the ventricular catheter and severe cerebrospinal fluid hypertension were found. After surgery, cranial hypertension symptoms completely resolved and the facial diplegia improved slowly with a persistent and incomplete right superior facial palsy. Cranial 3D CT scanning reconstructions and brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated severe petrous bone distortion that could have been responsible for direct stretching injuries on the facial nerves at the level of the internal acoustic meatus. The present case represents the first reported occurrence of VP shunt failure as revealed by a facial palsy; the authors discuss the pathophysiology of facial palsy in intracranial hypertension.

  20. Comparison of nerve, vessel, and cartilage grafts in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Firat, Cemal; Geyik, Ylmaz; Aytekin, Ahmet Hamdi; Gül, Mehmet; Kamşl, Suat; Yiğitcan, Birgül; Ozcan, Cemal

    2014-07-01

    Peripheral nerve injury primarily occurs due to trauma as well as factors such as tumors, inflammatory diseases, congenital deformities, infections, and surgical interventions. The surgical procedure to be performed as treatment depends on the etiology, type of injury, and the anatomic region. The goal of treatment is to minimize loss of function due to motor and sensory nerve loss at the distal part of the injury. Regardless of the cause of the injury, the abnormal nerve regeneration due to incomplete nerve regeneration, optimal treatment of peripheral nerve injuries should provide adequate coaptation of proximal and distal sides without tension, preserving the neurotrophic factors within the repair line. The gold standard for the treatment of nerve defects is the autograft; however, due to denervation of the donor site, scarring, and neuroma formation, many studies have aimed to develop simpler methods, better functional results, and less morbidity. In this study, a defect 1 cm in length was created on the sciatic nerve of rats. The rats were treated with the following procedures: group 1, autograft; group 2, allogeneic aorta graft; group 3, diced cartilage graft in allogeneic aorta graft; and group 4, tubularized cartilage graft in allogeneic aorta graft. Group 5 was the control group. The effects of cartilage tissue in nerve regeneration were evaluated by functional and histomorphological methods.Group 1, for which the repair was performed with an autograft, was evaluated to be the most similar to the control group. There was not a statistically significant difference in myelination and Schwann cell rates between group 2, in which an allogeneic aorta graft was used, and group 3, in which diced cartilage in an allogeneic aorta graft was used. In group 4, myelination and Schwann cell formation were observed; however, they were scattered and irregular, likely due to increased fibrosis.In all of the groups, nerve regeneration at various rates was observed both

  1. Distal nerve entrapment following nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, T; Otto, A; Wechselberger, G; Pommer, B; Papp, C

    1998-04-01

    Failure of nerve repair or poor functional outcome after reconstruction can be influenced by various causes. Besides improper microsurgical technique, fascicular malalignment and unphysiologic tension, we found in our clinical series that a subclinical nerve compression distal to the repair site can seriously impair regeneration. We concluded that the injured nerve, whether from trauma or microsurgical intervention, could be more susceptible to distal entrapment in the regenerative stage because of its disturbed microcirculation, swelling and the increase of regenerating axons followed by increased nerve volume. In two cases we found the regenerating nerve entrapped at pre-existing anatomical sites of narrowing resulting in impaired functional recovery. In both cases the surgical therapy was decompression of the distal entrapped nerve and this was followed by continued regeneration. Thorough clinical and electrophysiologic follow-up is necessary to detect such adverse compression effects and to distinguish between the various causes of failed regeneration. Under certain circumstances primary preventive decompression may be beneficial if performed at the time of nerve coaptation.

  2. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons' Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Urrego, Diana; Troncoso, Julieta; Múnera, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3 weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1). It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans.

  3. Comparative Discussion on Psychophysiological Effect of Self-administered Facial Massage by Treatment Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Akio; Takei, Yuya

    The aim of study was to quantitatively evaluate the effects of self-administered facial massage, which was done by hand or facial roller. In this study, the psychophysiological effects of facial massage were evaluated. The central nerves system and the autonomic nervous system were administered to evaluate physiological system. The central nerves system was assessed by Electroencephalogram (EEG). The autonomic nervous system were assessed by peripheral skin temperature(PST) and heart rate variability (HRV) with spectral analysis. In the spectral analysis of HRV, the high-frequency components (HF) were evaluated. State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Profile of Mood Status (POMS) and subjective sensory amount with Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were administered to evaluate psychological status. These results suggest that kept brain activity and had strong effects on stress alleviation.

  4. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis and facial palsy: Literature review and insight in the autoimmune pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Greco, Antonio; Granata, Guido; Manno, Alessandra; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Angeletti, Diletta; Didona, Dario; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is an autoimmune systemic necrotizing small-vessel vasculitis associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Oto-neurological manifestations of ANCA-associated vasculitis according to PR3-ANCA positivity and MPO-ANCA positivity are usually reported. Facial nerve palsy is usually reported during the clinical course of the disease but it might appear as the presenting sign of GPA. Necrotizing vasculitis of the facial nerve 'vasa nervorum' is nowadays the most widely accepted etiopathogenetic theory to explain facial damage in GPA patients. A central role for PR3-ANCA in the pathophysiology of vasculitis in GPA patients with oto-neurological manifestation is reported. GPA requires prompt, effective management of the acute and chronic manifestations. Once the diagnosis of GPA has been established, clinicians should devise an appropriate treatment strategy for each individual patient, based on current clinical evidence, treatment guidelines and recommendations.

  5. [A case of Möbius syndrome with congenital facial palsy and supranuclear oculomotor palsy].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Mitsuru; Mihara, Masahito; Kimura, Yasuyoshi; Okuno, Tatsusada; Takahashi, Masanori P; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old man with congenital weakness in the facial and mastication muscles was referred to us. His facial senses were intact; however, the bilateral massetter and facial muscles were extremely weak and atrophic. He presented lagophthalmos and had difficulty in closing his mouth. The voluntary movements of his left eye, such as abduction, adduction, and elevation, were partially impaired, without the impairment of the Bell phenomenon. Nerve conduction studies of the facial nerves revealed normal distal latencies for bilateral orbicularis oculi. Blink reflexes were not evoked on both sides. Needle electromyography showed a chronic neurogenic change in the tongue. A biopsy of the biceps brachii and skin did not show abnormality. We diagnosed his condition as Möbius syndrome with congenital facial palsy and supranuclear oculomotor palsy. Möbius syndrome, which manifests itself as congenital and non-progressing facial and abducens palsy, is associated with many clinical symptoms and is probably heterogenous nosological entity. Although several cases of Möbius syndrome with supranuclear binocular elevation palsy were previously known, this is the first case of Möbius syndrome presenting supranuclear monocular elevation palsy. PMID:25904251

  6. [Structural anatomy of cranial nerves (V, VII, VIII, IX, X)].

    PubMed

    Guclu, B; Meyronet, D; Simon, E; Streichenberger, N; Sindou, M; Mertens, P

    2009-04-01

    This study reports a review of the literature on the structural anatomy of the Vth, VIIth, VIIIth, IXth, and Xth cranial nerves, known to harbor dysfunction syndromes in humans. Because these dysfunctions are hypothesized to be caused by neurovascular conflicts at the root entry/exit zone and the transitional zone between central and peripheral myelinization, this investigation focused on the study and description of this junction. All the cranial nerves, except the optic and olfactory nerves, which are considered to be more a direct expansion of the central nervous system, have a transitional zone between central myelin (coming from oligodendrocytes) and peripheral myelin (produced by Schwann cells). The human studies reported in the literature argue in favor of a dome-shaped transitional zone directed to the periphery. It seems that this junctional region is situated more peripherally in sensory nerves than in motor nerves. The transitional zone is situated very peripherally for the cochlear and vestibular nerves, and on the contrary very close to its exit from the brain stem for the facial nerve.

  7. Single-stage dynamic reanimation of the smile in irreversible facial paralysis by free functional muscle transfer.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Jan; Bannasch, Holger; Stark, G Bjoern; Eisenhardt, Steffen U

    2015-03-01

    Unilateral facial paralysis is a common disease that is associated with significant functional, aesthetic and psychological issues. Though idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy) is the most common diagnosis, patients can also present with a history of physical trauma, infectious disease, tumor, or iatrogenic facial paralysis. Early repair within one year of injury can be achieved by direct nerve repair, cross-face nerve grafting or regional nerve transfer. It is due to muscle atrophy that in long lasting facial paralysis complex reconstructive methods have to be applied. Instead of one single procedure, different surgical approaches have to be considered to alleviate the various components of the paralysis. The reconstruction of a spontaneous dynamic smile with a symmetric resting tone is a crucial factor to overcome the functional deficits and the social handicap that are associated with facial paralysis. Although numerous surgical techniques have been described, a two-stage approach with an initial cross-facial nerve grafting followed by a free functional muscle transfer is most frequently applied. In selected patients however, a single-stage reconstruction using the motor nerve to the masseter as donor nerve is superior to a two-stage repair. The gracilis muscle is most commonly used for reconstruction, as it presents with a constant anatomy, a simple dissection and minimal donor site morbidity. Here we demonstrate the pre-operative work-up, the post-operative management, and precisely describe the surgical procedure of single-stage microsurgical reconstruction of the smile by free functional gracilis muscle transfer in a step by step protocol. We further illustrate common pitfalls and provide useful tips which should enable the reader to truly comprehend the procedure. We further discuss indications and limitations of the technique and demonstrate representative results.

  8. Approaches to Peripheral Nerve Repair: Generations of Biomaterial Conduits Yielding to Replacing Autologous Nerve Grafts in Craniomaxillofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Knipfer, Christian; Hadlock, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical entity, which may arise due to traumatic, tumorous, or even iatrogenic injury in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Despite advances in biomaterials and techniques over the past several decades, reconstruction of nerve gaps remains a challenge. Autografts are the gold standard for nerve reconstruction. Using autografts, there is donor site morbidity, subsequent sensory deficit, and potential for neuroma development and infection. Moreover, the need for a second surgical site and limited availability of donor nerves remain a challenge. Thus, increasing efforts have been directed to develop artificial nerve guidance conduits (ANCs) as new methods to replace autografts in the future. Various synthetic conduit materials have been tested in vitro and in vivo, and several first- and second-generation conduits are FDA approved and available for purchase, while third-generation conduits still remain in experimental stages. This paper reviews the current treatment options, summarizes the published literature, and assesses future prospects for the repair of peripheral nerve injury in craniomaxillofacial surgery with a particular focus on facial nerve regeneration. PMID:27556032

  9. Approaches to Peripheral Nerve Repair: Generations of Biomaterial Conduits Yielding to Replacing Autologous Nerve Grafts in Craniomaxillofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Robert; Knipfer, Christian; Henningsen, Anders; Smeets, Ralf; Heiland, Max; Hadlock, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical entity, which may arise due to traumatic, tumorous, or even iatrogenic injury in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Despite advances in biomaterials and techniques over the past several decades, reconstruction of nerve gaps remains a challenge. Autografts are the gold standard for nerve reconstruction. Using autografts, there is donor site morbidity, subsequent sensory deficit, and potential for neuroma development and infection. Moreover, the need for a second surgical site and limited availability of donor nerves remain a challenge. Thus, increasing efforts have been directed to develop artificial nerve guidance conduits (ANCs) as new methods to replace autografts in the future. Various synthetic conduit materials have been tested in vitro and in vivo, and several first- and second-generation conduits are FDA approved and available for purchase, while third-generation conduits still remain in experimental stages. This paper reviews the current treatment options, summarizes the published literature, and assesses future prospects for the repair of peripheral nerve injury in craniomaxillofacial surgery with a particular focus on facial nerve regeneration. PMID:27556032

  10. A comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, Part II: glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves and cervical spinal nerves 1-4.

    PubMed

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Chern, Joshua J; Rizk, Elias B; Loukas, Marios; Miller, Joseph H; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate on the skull base and upper neck regions in order to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized into two parts. Part I discusses the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches and other nerve trunks or branches in the vicinity. Part II deals with the anastomoses between the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or between these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part II is presented in this article. Extensive and variable neural anastomoses exist between the lower cranial nerves and between the upper cervical nerves in such a way that these nerves with their extra-axial communications can be collectively considered a plexus.

  11. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18–25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects’ evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05) but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1%) were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5%) short and 81 (28.3%) long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. In conclusion: 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population. PMID:26562655

  12. Adolescents with HIV and facial lipoatrophy: response to facial stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gabana-Silveira, Jesus Claudio; Mangilli, Laura Davison; Sassi, Fernanda C.; Braga, Arnaldo Feitosa; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of facial stimulation over the superficial muscles of the face in individuals with facial lipoatrophy associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and with no indication for treatment with polymethyl methacrylate. METHOD: The study sample comprised four adolescents of both genders ranging from 13 to 17 years in age. To participate in the study, the participants had to score six or less points on the Facial Lipoatrophy Index. The facial stimulation program used in our study consisted of 12 weekly 30-minute sessions during which individuals received therapy. The therapy consisted of intra- and extra-oral muscle contraction and stretching maneuvers of the zygomaticus major and minor and the masseter muscles. Pre- and post-treatment results were obtained using anthropometric static measurements of the face and the Facial Lipoatrophy Index. RESULTS: The results suggest that the therapeutic program effectively improved the volume of the buccinators. No significant differences were observed for the measurements of the medial portion of the face, the lateral portion of the face, the volume of the masseter muscle, or Facial Lipoatrophy Index scores. CONCLUSION: The results of our study suggest that facial maneuvers applied to the superficial muscles of the face of adolescents with facial lipoatrophy associated with HIV improved the facial area volume related to the buccinators muscles. We believe that our results will encourage future research with HIV patients, especially for patients who do not have the possibility of receiving an alternative aesthetic treatment. PMID:25141118

  13. The fibre spectrum of the chorda nerve in the chicken (Gallus gallus var. domesticus).

    PubMed Central

    Gentle, M J; Clark, J S

    1985-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, the numbers and diameters of all nerve fibres were studied in the chorda tympani nerve of the domestic fowl. The mean diameter of the whole nerve was 64.6 micron and contained 203-407 (mean 302) myelinated and 205-345 (mean 265.6) unmyelinated fibres. Of the myelinated fibres (including sheath) 95% were in the range 0.5-3 micron in diameter and 94% of the unmyelinated fibres ranged from 0.2 to 0.9 micron in diameter. After section of the facial nerve within the facial canal, there was a marked reduction in the number of myelinated fibres present in the chorda tympani nerve (range 12-160, mean 103) but a less marked reduction in the unmyelinated fibres (range 94-362, mean 223). The loss of myelinated fibres was not confined to any one fibre size whereas the loss of unmyelinated fibres was mainly in the smaller fibres (range 0.1-0.5 micron). Since facial nerve section results in degeneration of efferent fibres it would seem that a large proportion of the afferent fibres are unmyelinated. PMID:4066464

  14. Intraoperative Vagus Nerve Monitoring: A Transnasal Technique during Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schutt, Christopher A.; Paskhover, Boris; Judson, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Intraoperative vagus nerve monitoring during skull base surgery has been reported with the use of an oral nerve monitoring endotracheal tube. However, the intraoral presence of an endotracheal tube can limit exposure by its location in the operative field during transfacial approaches and by limiting superior mobilization of the mandible during transcervical approaches. We describe a transnasal vagus nerve monitoring technique. Design and Participants Ten patients underwent open skull base surgery. Surgical approaches included transcervical (five), transfacial/maxillary swing (three), and double mandibular osteotomy (two). The vagus nerve was identified, stimulated, and monitored in all cases. Main Outcome Measures Intraoperative nerve stimulation, pre- and postoperative vagus nerve function through the use of flexible laryngoscopy in conjunction with assessment of subjective symptoms of hoarseness, voice change, and swallowing difficulty. Results Three patients had extensive involvement of the nerve by tumor with complete postoperative nerve deficit, one patient had a transient deficit following dissection of tumor off of nerve with resolution, and the remaining patients had nerve preservation. One patient experienced minor epistaxis during monitor tube placement that was managed conservatively. Conclusions Transnasal vagal nerve monitoring is a simple method that allows for intraoperative monitoring during nerve preservation surgery without limiting surgical exposure. PMID:25844292

  15. Carbon dioxide laser vaporization of facial siliconomas: flash in the pan or way of the future?

    PubMed

    Chui, Christopher Hoe Kong; Fong, Poh Him

    2008-03-01

    In 1988, Becker first described the "laser silicone flash" encountered while using the CO2 laser to remove breast siliconosis, but no subsequent use of the CO2 laser to remove siliconomas has been reported since. To our knowledge, lasers have not been described to treat facial silicone granulomas. Three cases of facial silicone granuloma (cheek, upper eyelids, and chin) were treated using the technique of CO2 laser vaporization.We describe a novel and effective method to remove facial siliconomas. This technique could avoid the need for radical resection of functional facial tissues such as nerves. Tiny globules of injected silicone in the face were vaporized without any untoward effects. Whether larger siliconomas can be treated in the same way remains to be seen and is an area of potential study.

  16. Merkel cells in the vellus hair follicles of human facial skin: a study using confocal laser microscopy.

    PubMed

    Uchigasaki, Shuhko; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Kinji

    2004-03-01

    Many cases of Merkel cell carcinoma have recently been reported, and most of them have been localized on the facial skin. In this study, we investigated Merkel cells in the vellus hair follicles of facial region to characterize these cells in human subjects. Skin specimens doubly stained with cytokeratin (CK) 20 and either protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 or vasoreactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) were examined by confocal laser microscopy. Many of the Merkel cells in the vellus hair follicles of the facial skin were localized in the bulge area. Some of these cells were attached to nerve terminals, although most of them were not associated with them. Our results suggest that there are two types of Merkel cells in the bulge area of the vellus hair follicles of facial skin: cells wholly unassociated with the nerve terminals and cells associated with thin nerve fibers. We postulate that the former cells may be undifferentiated (immature) and the latter differentiated (mature). If this is so, there is a chance that Merkel cell carcinoma originates from the undifferentiated Merkel cells in the bulge of the vellus hair with the formation of tumor masses in the dermis and no involvement of the epidermis. The Merkel cells connected with nerve fibers may secrete endocrine substances via a regulation of autonomic nerves.

  17. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/professionals involved in spine care. PMID:25317309

  18. Visualizing Oxazine 4 nerve-specific fluorescence ex vivo in frozen tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Connor W.; Gibbs, Summer L.

    2016-03-01

    Nerve damage plagues surgical outcomes and remains a major burden for patients, surgeons, and the healthcare system. Fluorescence image-guided surgery using nerve specific small molecule fluorophores offers a solution to diminish surgical nerve damage through improved intraoperative nerve identification and visualization. Oxazine 4 has shown superior nerve specificity in initial testing in vivo, while exhibiting a red shifted excitation and emission spectra compared to other nerve-specific fluorophores. However, Oxazine 4 does not exhibit near-infrared (NIR) excitation and emission, which would be ideal to improve penetration depth and nerve signal to background ratios for in vivo imaging. Successful development of a NIR nerve-specific fluorophore will require understanding of the molecular target of fluorophore nerve specificity. While previous small molecule nerve-specific fluorophores have demonstrated excellent ex vivo nerve specificity, Oxazine 4 ex vivo nerve specific fluorescence has been difficult to visualize. In the present study, we examined each step of the ex vivo fluorescence microscopy sample preparation procedure to discover how in vivo nerve-specific fluorescence is changed during ex vivo tissue sample preparation. Through step-by-step examination we found that Oxazine 4 fluorescence was significantly diminished by washing and mounting tissue sections for microscopy. A method to preserve Oxazine 4 nerve specific fluorescence ex vivo was determined, which can be utilized for visualization by fluorescence microscopy.

  19. Fat grafting in facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Marten, Timothy J; Elyassnia, Dino

    2015-04-01

    Patients with significant facial atrophy and age-related loss of facial fat generally achieve suboptimal improvement from both surface treatments of facial skin and surgical lifts. Restoring lost facial volume by fat grafting is a powerful technique that is now acknowledged by most plastic surgeons and other physicians engaged in treating the aging face as one of the most important advances in aesthetic surgery. Properly performed, the addition of fat to areas of the face that have atrophied because of age or disease can produce a significant and sustained improvement in appearance that is unobtainable by other means.

  20. Pediatric facial transplantation: Ethical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jennifer; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik; Hanson, Mark D; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Facial transplantation is becoming increasingly accepted as a method of reconstructing otherwise unreconstructable adult faces. As this modality is made more available, we must turn our attention to pediatric patients who may benefit from facial transplantation. In the current article, the authors present and briefly examine the most pressing ethical challenges posed by the possibility of performing facial transplantation on pediatric patients. Furthermore, they issue a call for a policy statement on pediatric facial transplantation. The present article may serve as a first step in that direction, highlighting ethical issues that would need to be considered in the creation of such a statement. PMID:25114614

  1. A Neural Basis of Facial Action Recognition in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramprakash; Golomb, Julie D.

    2016-01-01

    neuroimaging data, we identify for the first time a brain region responsible for the recognition of actions associated with specific facial muscles. Furthermore, this representation is preserved across subjects. Our machine learning analysis does not require mapping the data to a standard brain and may serve as an alternative to hyperalignment. PMID:27098688

  2. Modified technique to fabricate a hollow light-weight facial prosthesis for lateral midfacial defect: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Large oro-facial defects result from cancer treatment consequences in serious functional as well as cosmetic deformities. Acceptable cosmetic results usually can be obtained with a facial prosthesis. However, retention of a large facial prosthesis can be challenging because of its size and weight. This article describes prosthetic rehabilitation of a 57-year-old man having a right lateral mid-facial defect with intraoral-extraoral combination prosthesis. A modified technique to fabricate a hollow substructure in heat-polymerizing polymethyl-methacrylate to support silicone facial prosthesis was illustrated. The resultant facial prosthesis was structurally durable and light in weight facilitating the retention with magnets satisfactorily. This technique is advantageous as there is no need to fabricate the whole prosthesis again in case of damage of the silicone layer because the outer silicone layer can be removed and re-packed on the substructure if the gypsum-mold is preserved. PMID:21165271

  3. Emotional proprioception: Treatment of depression with afferent facial feedback.

    PubMed

    Finzi, Eric; Rosenthal, Norman E

    2016-09-01

    We develop the concept of emotional proprioception, whereby the muscles of facial expression play a central role in encoding and transmitting information to the brain's emotional circuitry, and describe its underlying neuroanatomy. We explore the role of facial expression in both reflecting and influencing depressed mood. The circuitry involved in this latter effect is a logical target for treatment with botulinum toxin, and we review the evidence in support of this strategy. Clinical trial data suggest that botulinum toxin is effective in treating depression. We discuss the clinical and theoretical implications of these data. This novel treatment approach is just one example of the potential importance of the cranial nerves in the treatment of depression. PMID:27344227

  4. Bell's palsy before Bell: Evert Jan Thomassen à Thuessink and idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    van de Graaf, R C; IJpma, F F A; Nicolai, J-P A; Werker, P M N

    2009-11-01

    Bell's palsy is the eponym for idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis. It is named after Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842), who, in the first half of the nineteenth century, discovered the function of the facial nerve and attracted the attention of the medical world to facial paralysis. Our knowledge of this condition before Bell's landmark publications is very limited and is based on just a few documents. In 1804 and 1805, Evert Jan Thomassen à Thuessink (1762-1832) published what appears to be the first known extensive study on idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis. His description of this condition was quite accurate. He located several other early descriptions and concluded from this literature that, previously, the condition had usually been confused with other afflictions (such as 'spasmus cynicus', central facial paralysis and trigeminal neuralgia). According to Thomassen à Thuessink, idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis and trigeminal neuralgia were related, being different expressions of the same condition. Thomassen à Thuessink believed that idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis was caused by 'rheumatism' or exposure to cold. Many aetiological theories have since been proposed. Despite this, the cold hypothesis persists even today.

  5. Coexpression of neurotrophic growth factors and their receptors in human facial motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, J M; Brackmann, D E; Hitselberger, W E; Linthicum, F H; Lim, D J

    1999-09-01

    Neuronal development and maintenance of facial motor neurons is believed to be regulated by neurotrophic growth factors. Using celloidin-embedded sections, we evaluated immunoreactivity of 11 neurotrophic factors and their receptors in facial nuclei of human brain stems (4 normal cases, and 1 from a patient with facial palsy and synkinesis). In the normal subjects, positive immunoreactivity of the growth factor neurotrophin-4 and acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) was observed in facial motor neurons, as was positive immunoreactivity against ret, the receptor shared by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and neurturin. Immunoreactivity was moderate for the receptor trkB and strong for trkC. In the case of partial facial palsy, surviving cells failed to show immunoreactivity against neurotrophins. However, immunoreactivity of aFGF was up-regulated in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells in this patient. Results suggest that these trophic growth factors and their receptors may protect facial neurons from secondary degeneration and promote regrowth of the facial nerve after axotomy or injury. PMID:10527284

  6. TRPA1 contributes to capsaicin-induced facial cold hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kuniya; Shinoda, Masamichi; Furukawa, Akihiko; Kita, Kozue; Noma, Noboru; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-12-01

    Orofacial cold hyperalgesia is known to cause severe persistent pain in the face following trigeminal nerve injury or inflammation, and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankylin 1 (TRPA1) are thought to be involved in cold hyperalgesia. However, how these two receptors are involved in cold hyperalgesia is not fully understood. To clarify the mechanisms underlying facial cold hyperalgesia, nocifensive behaviors to cold stimulation, the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons, and TG neuronal excitability to cold stimulation following facial capsaicin injection were examined in rats. The head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWRT) to cold stimulation of the lateral facial skin was significantly decreased following facial capsaicin injection. This reduction of HWRT was significantly recovered following local injection of TRPV1 antagonist as well as TRPA1 antagonist. Approximately 30% of TG neurons innervating the lateral facial skin expressed both TRPV1 and TRPA1, and about 64% of TRPA1-positive neurons also expressed TRPV1. The TG neuronal excitability to noxious cold stimulation was significantly increased following facial capsaicin injection and this increase was recovered by pretreatment with TRPA1 antagonist. These findings suggest that TRPA1 sensitization via TRPV1 signaling in TG neurons is involved in cold hyperalgesia following facial skin capsaicin injection.

  7. Decellularisation and histological characterisation of porcine peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Zilic, Leyla; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul; Haycock, John W

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries affect a large proportion of the global population, often causing significant morbidity and loss of function. Current treatment strategies include the use of implantable nerve guide conduits (NGC's) to direct regenerating axons between the proximal and distal ends of the nerve gap. However, NGC's are limited in their effectiveness at promoting regeneration Current NGCs are not suitable as substrates for supporting either neuronal or Schwann cell growth, as they lack an architecture similar to that of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) of the nerve. The aim of this study was to create an acellular porcine peripheral nerve using a novel decellularisation protocol, in order to eliminate the immunogenic cellular components of the tissue, while preserving the three-dimensional histoarchitecture and ECM components. Porcine peripheral nerve (sciatic branches were decellularised using a low concentration (0.1%; w/v) sodium dodecyl sulphate in conjunction with hypotonic buffers and protease inhibitors, and then sterilised using 0.1% (v/v) peracetic acid. Quantitative and qualitative analysis revealed a ≥95% (w/w) reduction in DNA content as well as preservation of the nerve fascicles and connective tissue. Acellular nerves were shown to have retained key ECM components such as collagen, laminin and fibronectin. Slow strain rate to failure testing demonstrated the biomechanical properties of acellular nerves to be comparable to fresh controls. In conclusion, we report the production of a biocompatible, biomechanically functional acellular scaffold, which may have use in peripheral nerve repair. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2041-2053. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26926914

  8. Children's Facial Trustworthiness Judgments: Agreement and Relationship with Facial Attractiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fengling; Xu, Fen; Luo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined developmental changes in children's abilities to make trustworthiness judgments based on faces and the relationship between a child's perception of trustworthiness and facial attractiveness. One hundred and one 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds, along with 37 undergraduates, were asked to judge the trustworthiness of 200 faces. Next, they issued facial attractiveness judgments. The results indicated that children made consistent trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments based on facial appearance, but with-adult and within-age agreement levels of facial judgments increased with age. Additionally, the agreement levels of judgments made by girls were higher than those by boys. Furthermore, the relationship between trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments increased with age, and the relationship between two judgments made by girls was closer than those by boys. These findings suggest that face-based trait judgment ability develops throughout childhood and that, like adults, children may use facial attractiveness as a heuristic cue that signals a stranger's trustworthiness. PMID:27148111

  9. Children's Facial Trustworthiness Judgments: Agreement and Relationship with Facial Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fengling; Xu, Fen; Luo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined developmental changes in children's abilities to make trustworthiness judgments based on faces and the relationship between a child's perception of trustworthiness and facial attractiveness. One hundred and one 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds, along with 37 undergraduates, were asked to judge the trustworthiness of 200 faces. Next, they issued facial attractiveness judgments. The results indicated that children made consistent trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments based on facial appearance, but with-adult and within-age agreement levels of facial judgments increased with age. Additionally, the agreement levels of judgments made by girls were higher than those by boys. Furthermore, the relationship between trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments increased with age, and the relationship between two judgments made by girls was closer than those by boys. These findings suggest that face-based trait judgment ability develops throughout childhood and that, like adults, children may use facial attractiveness as a heuristic cue that signals a stranger's trustworthiness. PMID:27148111

  10. Plexin a4 expression in adult rat cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E

    2014-11-01

    PlexinsA1-A4 participate in class 3 semaphorin signaling as co-receptors to neuropilin 1 and 2. PlexinA4 is the latest member of the PlexinA subfamily to be identified. In previous studies, we described the expression of PlexinA4 in the brain and spinal cord of the adult rat. Here, antibodies to PlexinA4 were used to reveal immunolabeling in most of the cranial nerve surveyed. Labeling was found in the olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, abducens, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, and hypoglossal nerves. This is the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of PlexinA4 in the adult cranial nerves. The findings will set the basis for future studies on the potential role of PlexinA4 in regeneration and repair of the adult central and peripheral nervous system.

  11. Imaging of facial anomalies.

    PubMed

    Castillo, M; Mukherji, S K

    1995-01-01

    Anomalies of the face may occur in its lower or middle segments. Anomalies of the lower face generally involve the derivatives of the branchial apparatus and therefore manifest as defects in the mandible, pinnae, external auditory canals, and portions of the middle ears. These anomalies are occasionally isolated, but most of them occur in combination with systemic syndromes. These anomalies generally do not occur with respiratory compromise. Anomalies of the midface may extend from the upper lip to the forehead, reflecting the complex embryology of this region. Most of these deformities are isolated, but some patients with facial clefts, notably the midline cleft syndrome and holoprosencephaly, have anomalies in other sites. This is important because these patients will require detailed imaging of the face and brain. Anomalies of the midface tend to involve the nose and its air-conducting passages. We prefer to divide these anomalies into those with and without respiratory obstruction. The most common anomalies that result in airway compromise include posterior choanal stenoses and atresias, bilateral cysts (mucoceles) of the distal lacrimal ducts, and stenosis of the pyriform (anterior) nasal aperture. These may be optimally evaluated with computed tomography (CT) and generally require immediate treatment to ensure adequate ventilation. Rare nasal anomalies that also result in airway obstruction are agenesis of the pharynx, agenesis of the nose, and hypoplasia of the nasal alae. Agenesis of the nasopharynx and nose are complex anomalies that require both CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The diagnosis of hypoplasia of the nasal alae is a clinical one; these anomalies do not require imaging studies. Besides facial clefts, anomalies of the nose without respiratory obstruction tend to be centered around the nasofrontal region. This is the site of the most common sincipital encephaloceles. Patients with frontonasal and nasoethmoidal encephaloceles require both

  12. A Case of Transient, Isolated Cranial Nerve VI Palsy due to Skull Base Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ammar

    2014-01-01

    Otitis externa affects both children and adults. It is often treated with topical antibiotics, with good clinical outcomes. When a patient fails to respond to the treatment, otitis externa can progress to malignant otitis externa. The common symptoms of skull bone osteomyelitis include ear ache, facial pain, and cranial nerve palsies. However, an isolated cranial nerve is rare. Herein, we report a case of 54-year-old female who presented with left cranial nerve VI palsy due to skull base osteomyelitis which responded to antibiotic therapy. PMID:25045551

  13. Primary glioblastoma of the trigeminal nerve root entry zone: case report.

    PubMed

    Breshears, Jonathan D; Ivan, Michael E; Cotter, Jennifer A; Bollen, Andrew W; Theodosopoulos, Phillip V; Berger, Mitchel S

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas of the cranial nerve root entry zone are rare clinical entities. There have been 11 reported cases in the literature, including only 2 glioblastomas. The authors report the case of a 67-year-old man who presented with isolated facial numbness and was found to have a glioblastoma involving the trigeminal nerve root entry zone. After biopsy the patient completed treatment with conformal radiation and concomitant temozolomide, and at 23 weeks after surgery he demonstrated symptom progression despite the treatment described. This is the first reported case of a glioblastoma of the trigeminal nerve root entry zone. PMID:25380115

  14. Facial pain: trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Lee, K H

    1993-03-01

    Atypical facial pain is a loose term used to encompass a wide range of facial pain syndromes including those of dental and ear, nose and throat (ENT) aetiology. Often, it is associated with psychiatric conditions like depression and psychosomatic illnesses. This facial pain typically does not follow anatomical boundaries or its explainable by present day neurophysiological understanding. The pain is often constant with no remission and is aggravated by stress. Treatment is difficult and often directed to the psychiatric cause. Surgical treatment is contraindicated. Trigeminal neuralgia on the other hand, can be effectively treated. Pain in the trigeminal distribution is paroxysmal, precipitated by trigger factors and there is no pain in between attacks. The aetiology of trigeminal neuralgia is still unknown though current thinking is that there is a peripheral disturbance or damage with cerebral brainstem disinhibition of the trigeminal apparatus. This results in a paroxysmal discharge and reverberation of pain impulses when a trigger point is elicited. Therefore, anti-epileptic drugs like tegretol can be effective in controlling trigeminal neuralgia in the majority of patients, at least in the initial stages. For unknown reasons however, medical treatment either is not effective at all from the very beginning or fails after a few years. Surgery then becomes the only available therapeutic option. If the peripheral disturbance is due to an organic cause like a tumour, surgical approaches should be directed towards its removal. Often the pain will also resolve. If the trigeminal neuralgia is of the idiopathic variety, then the surgeon has a choice of either peripheral percutaneous retrogasserian ganglionectomies or central approaches like microvascular decompression and trigeminal tractotomy. PMID:8363331

  15. A Computational Framework for Electrical Stimulation of Vestibular Nerve.

    PubMed

    Marianelli, Prisca; Capogrosso, Marco; Bassi Luciani, Lorenzo; Panarese, Alessandro; Micera, Silvestro

    2015-09-01

    The vestibular organs are very important to generate reflexes critical for stabilizing gaze and body posture. Vestibular diseases significantly reduce the quality of life of people who are affected by them. Some research groups have recently started developing vestibular neuroprostheses to mitigate these symptoms. However, many scientific and technological issues need to be addressed to optimise their use in clinical trials. We developed a computational model able to mimic the response of human vestibular nerves and which can be exploited for "in-silico" testing of new strategies to design implantable vestibular prostheses. First, a digital model of the vestibular system was reconstructed from anatomical data. Monopolar stimulation was delivered at different positions and distances from ampullary nerves. The electrical potential induced by the injected current was computed through finite-element methods and drove extra-cellular stimulation of fibers in the vestibular, facial, and cochlear nerves. The electrical activity of vestibular nerves and the resulting eye movements elicited by different stimulation protocols were investigated. A set of electrode configurations was analyzed in terms of selectivity at increasing injected current. Electrode position along the nerve plays a major role in producing undesired activity in other nontargeted nerves, whereas distance from the fiber does not significantly affect selectivity. Indications are provided to minimize misalignment in nonoptimal electrode locations. Eye movements elicited by the different stimulation protocols are calculated and compared to experimental values, for the purpose of model validation. PMID:25751868

  16. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery.

  17. Facial perception in autism.

    PubMed

    Volkmar, F R; Sparrow, S S; Rende, R D; Cohen, D J

    1989-07-01

    Disturbances in gaze and patterns of facial interaction are prominent aspects of social dysfunction in autism; the nature of this disturbance has up to the present been unclear. This study examined the ability of autistic subjects to use the human face as a source of information. Autistic and age- and MA-matched retarded control subjects assembled a series of puzzles displaying photographs of human faces; puzzles differed in complexity, familiarity of the faces and configuration (normal vs scrambled faces). Significant effects of all three factors, but not of diagnostic group, were observed. The autistic subjects did not exhibit specific deficits in perception of faces. PMID:2768360

  18. Facial asymmetry in ocular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Khorrami Nejad, Masoud; Askarizadeh, Farshad; Pour, Fatemeh Farahbakhsh; Ranjbar Pazooki, Mahsa; Moeinitabar, Mohamad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Torticollis can arise from nonocular (usually musculoskeletal) and ocular conditions. Some facial asymmetries are correlated with a history of early onset ocular torticollis supported by the presence of torticollis on reviewing childhood photographs. When present in an adult, this type of facial asymmetry with an origin of ocular torticollis should help to confirm the chronicity of the defect and prevent unnecessary neurologic evaluation in patients with an uncertain history. Assessment of facial asymmetry consists of a patient history, physical examination, and medical imaging. Medical imaging and facial morphometry are helpful for objective diagnosis and measurement of the facial asymmetry, as well as for treatment planning. The facial asymmetry in congenital superior oblique palsy is typically manifested by midfacial hemihypoplasia on the side opposite the palsied muscle, with deviation of the nose and mouth toward the hypoplastic side. Correcting torticollis through strabismus surgery before a critical developmental age may prevent the development of irreversible facial asymmetry. Mild facial asymmetry associated with congenital torticollis has been reported to resolve with continued growth after early surgery, but if asymmetry is severe or is not treated in the appropriate time, it might remain even with continued growth after surgery.

  19. Facial injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Guyette, R F

    1993-04-01

    As the popularity of basketball increases and the style of the game becomes more physical, there is an increasing number of basketball-related injuries. Although most facial injuries sustained while playing basketball are relatively minor, severe and permanent injuries do occur. This article reviews the most common facial injuries incurred by basketball players with emphasis on diagnosis, early treatment, and prevention.

  20. Cryotherapy and nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Drez, D; Faust, D C; Evans, J P

    1981-01-01

    Ice application is one of the most extensively used treatments for athletic injuries. Frostbite is a recognized danger. Five cases of nerve palsy resulting from ice application are reported here. These palsies were temporary. They usually resolve spontaneously without any significant sequelae. This complication can be avoided by not using ice for more than 30 minutes and by guarding superficial nerves in the area.

  1. Imaging the cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew T; Volk, Holger A

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of the normal course of the cranial nerves (CN) is essential when interpreting images of patients with cranial neuropathies. CN foramina are depicted best using computed X-ray tomography, but the nerves are depicted best using magnetic resonance imaging. The function and anatomy of the CN in the dog are reviewed and selected examples of lesions affecting the CN are illustrated.

  2. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  3. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... canals). The optic nerve is the “nerve of vision” and extends from the brain, through your skull, and into your eye. A ... limited to, the following: loss of vision, double vision, inadequate ... leakage of brain fluid (CSF), meningitis, nasal bleeding, infection of the ...

  4. Allograft pretreatment for the repair of sciatic nerve defects: green tea polyphenols versus radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng-hu; Zhen, Ping; Li, Shen-song; Liang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Ming-xuan; Tian, Qi; Li, Xu-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment of nerve allografts by exposure to irradiation or green tea polyphenols can eliminate neuroimmunogenicity, inhibit early immunological rejection, encourage nerve regeneration and functional recovery, improve tissue preservation, and minimize postoperative infection. In the present study, we investigate which intervention achieves better results. We produced a 1.0 cm sciatic nerve defect in rats, and divided the rats into four treatment groups: autograft, fresh nerve allograft, green tea polyphenol-pretreated (1 mg/mL, 4°C) nerve allograft, and irradiation-pretreated nerve allograft (26.39 Gy/min for 12 hours; total 19 kGy). The animals were observed, and sciatic nerve electrophysiology, histology, and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at 6 and 12 weeks after grafting. The circumference and structure of the transplanted nerve in rats that received autografts or green tea polyphenol-pretreated nerve allografts were similar to those of the host sciatic nerve. Compared with the groups that received fresh or irradiation-pretreated nerve allografts, motor nerve conduction velocity in the autograft and fresh nerve allograft groups was greater, more neurites grew into the allografts, Schwann cell proliferation was evident, and a large number of new blood vessels was observed; in addition, massive myelinated nerve fibers formed, and abundant microfilaments and microtubules were present in the axoplasm. Our findings indicate that nerve allografts pretreated by green tea polyphenols are equivalent to transplanting autologous nerves in the repair of sciatic nerve defects, and promote nerve regeneration. Pretreatment using green tea polyphenols is better than pretreatment with irradiation. PMID:25788934

  5. Main trajectories of nerves that traverse and surround the tympanic cavity in the rat

    PubMed Central

    WEIJNEN, J. A. W. M.; SURINK, S.; VERSTRALEN, M. J. M.; MOERKERKEN, A.; DE BREE, G. J.; BLEYS, R. L. A. W.

    2000-01-01

    To guide surgery of nerves that traverse and surround the tympanic cavity in the rat, anatomical illustrations are required that are topographically correct. In this study, maps of this area are presented, extending from the superior cervical ganglion to the otic ganglion. They were derived from observations that were made during dissections using a ventral approach. Major blood vessels, bones, transected muscles of the tongue and neck and supra and infrahyoid muscles serve as landmarks in the illustrations. The course of the mandibular, facial, glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves with their branches, and components of the sympathetic system, are shown and discussed with reference to data available in the literature. Discrepancies in this literature can be clarified and new data are presented on the trajectories of several nerves. The course of the tympanic nerve was established. This nerve originates from the glossopharyngeal nerve, enters the tympanic cavity, crosses the promontory, passes the tensor tympani muscle dorsally, and continues its route intracranially to the otic ganglion as the lesser petrosal nerve after intersecting with the greater petrosal nerve. Auricular branches of the glossopharyngeal and of the vagus nerve were noted. We also observed a pterygopalatine branch of the internal carotid nerve, that penetrates the tympanic cavity and courses across the promontory. PMID:11005717

  6. Ulnar nerve tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Chandra, V V; Prasad, Bodapati Chandramowliswara; Varaprasad, Gangumolu

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a very rare case of tuberculoma involving the ulnar nerve. The patient, a 7-year-old girl, presented with swelling over the medial aspect of her right forearm just below the elbow joint, with features of ulnar nerve palsy, including paresthesias along the little and ring fingers and claw hand deformity. There was a history of trauma and contact with a contagious case of tuberculosis. There were no other signs of tuberculosis. At surgical exploration the ulnar nerve was found to be thickened, and on opening the sheath there was evidence of caseous material enclosed in a fibrous capsule compressing and displacing the nerve fibers. The lesion, along with the capsule, was subtotally removed using curettage, and a part of the capsule that was densely adherent to the nerve fibers was left in the patient. Histopathological examination of the specimen was consistent with tuberculoma. The patient received adequate antitubercular treatment and showed significant improvement.

  7. Peripheral nerve stimulation: definition.

    PubMed

    Abejón, David; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a tremendous evolution in the field of neurostimulation, both from the technological point of view and from development of the new and different indications. In some areas, such as peripheral nerve stimulation, there has been a boom in recent years due to the variations in the surgical technique and the improved results documented by in multiple published papers. All this makes imperative the need to classify and define the different types of stimulation that are used today. The confusion arises when attempting to describe peripheral nerve stimulation and subcutaneous stimulation. Peripheral nerve stimulation, in its pure definition, involves implanting a lead on a nerve, with the aim to produce paresthesia along the entire trajectory of the stimulated nerve.

  8. Neurovascularized free short head of the biceps femoris muscle transfer for one-stage reanimation of facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akiteru; Maruyama, Yu

    2005-02-01

    The single-stage technique for cross-face reanimation of the paralyzed face without nerve graft is an improvement over the two-stage procedure because it results in early reinnervation of the transferred muscle and shortens the period of rehabilitation. On the basis of an anatomic investigation, the short head of the biceps femoris muscle with attached lateral intermuscular septum of the thigh was identified as a new candidate for microneurovascular free muscle transfer. The authors performed one-stage transfer of the short head of the biceps femoris muscle with a long motor nerve for reanimation of established facial paralysis in seven patients. The dominant nutrient vessels of the short head were the profunda perforators (second or third) in six patients and the direct branches from the popliteal vessels in one patient. The recipient vessels were the facial vessels in all cases. The length of the motor nerve of the short head ranged from 10 to 16 cm, and it was sutured directly to several zygomatic and buccal branches of the contralateral facial nerve in six patients. One patient required an interpositional nerve graft of 3 cm to reach the suitable facial nerve branches on the intact side. The period required for initial voluntary movement of the transferred muscles ranged from 4 to 10 months after the procedures. The period of postoperative follow-up ranged from 5 to 42 months. Transfer of the vascularized innervated short head of the biceps femoris muscle is thought to be an alternative for one-stage reconstruction of the paralyzed face because of the reliable vascular anatomy of the muscle and because it allows two teams to operate together without the need to reposition the patient. The nerve to the short head of the biceps femoris enters the side opposite the vascular pedicle of the muscle belly, and this unique relationship between the vascular pedicle and the motor nerve is anatomically suitable for one-stage reconstruction of the paralyzed face. As much

  9. Reinnervation by axon collaterals from single facial motoneurons to multiple muscle targets following axotomy in the adult guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Kudo, M

    1994-01-01

    To study the process of recovery from facial palsy experimentally, the location of cranial motoneurons supplying the posterior belly of the digastric muscle (PDG) and the extratemporal portion of the facial nerve trunk was examined in a double-labeling paradigm using two retrograde tracers in the adult guinea pig of which the facial nerve had been surgically injured. In different stages after the induced facial palsy had recovered functionally (4-13 weeks after the surgical operation), wheat germ-agglutinated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was injected into the PDG and Fluoro-Ruby (FR) was applied to the proximal cut end of the extratemporal portion of the facial nerve trunk. Distribution of neurons retrogradely labeled with WGA-HRP and/or FR was plotted in the brainstem and compared with that of the controls. In the intact cases, HRP-labeled neurons were restrictedly seen in the accessory facial nucleus (Acs7), while FR-labeled neurons were found within the main facial nucleus (FMN). In the axotomized cases: (1) HRP-labeled neurons were seen diffusely in the Acs7 as well as in the FMN, where normal myotopical representation no longer seemed to be maintained. (2) FR-labeled neurons were also observed diffusely in the FMN and the Acs7. (3) A considerable number of neurons were doubly labeled with WGA-HRP and FR in both the Acs and the FMN in cases with shorter survival periods (4-7 weeks), but not in cases with longer survival periods (12-13 weeks). Thus, new findings show that connections are temporarily maintained by single, facial motoneurons with axon collaterals to multiple muscle targets in adult mammals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. High prostatic fascia release or standard nerve sparing? A viewpoint from Columbia University Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Badani, Ketan K

    2008-09-01

    The technique of lateral prostatic fascia nerve sparing has shown improved recovery of sexual function results after robotic prostatectomy. Using strict criteria to identify men with low-risk prostate cancer, this form of nerve preservation can be safely performed without compromising cancer control. PMID:27628258

  11. Preservation of Digital Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to preservation of digital objects: practical examples; stakeholders; recordkeeping standards; genre-specific problems; trusted repository standards; preservation methods; preservation metadata standards; and future directions. (Contains 82 references.) (MES)

  12. Susuks: charm needles in facial soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Shanmuhasuntharam, P; Ghani, S H

    1991-04-20

    Susuks or charm needles are a form of talisman inserted and worn subcutaneously, in the face and other parts of the body, in the belief that they will enhance or preserve the wearer's beauty, youth, charisma, strength or health, or bring success in business. This mystic practice is found among some south-east Asian people, especially Malayan and Muslim females. Most susuk wearers are secretive about their hidden talismans, but these gold or silver needles are being discovered with increasing frequency now that radiographs are used more widely. An understanding of this practice and an awareness of its existence is important to avoid misdiagnosis and mismanagement of these patients. The practice of susuk wearing and its relevance to dentistry is discussed. Nine cases of facial susuk wearers are presented and previous reports are reviewed.

  13. The Facial Profile in the Context of Facial Aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Heppt, Werner J; Vent, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Beauty has been an intriguing issue since the evolving of a culture in mankind. Even the Neanderthals are believed to have applied makeover to enhance facial structures and thus underline beauty. The determinants of beauty and aesthetics have been defined by artists and scientists alike. This article will give an overview of the evolvement of a beauty concept and the significance of the facial profile. It aims at sharpening the senses of the facial plastic surgeon for analyzing the patient's face, consulting the patient on feasible options, planning, and conducting surgery in the most individualized way.

  14. The Facial Profile in the Context of Facial Aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Heppt, Werner J; Vent, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Beauty has been an intriguing issue since the evolving of a culture in mankind. Even the Neanderthals are believed to have applied makeover to enhance facial structures and thus underline beauty. The determinants of beauty and aesthetics have been defined by artists and scientists alike. This article will give an overview of the evolvement of a beauty concept and the significance of the facial profile. It aims at sharpening the senses of the facial plastic surgeon for analyzing the patient's face, consulting the patient on feasible options, planning, and conducting surgery in the most individualized way. PMID:26579858

  15. Optical coherence tomography of the rat cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Chuang, Ying; Burnett, Arthur L.; Su, Li-Ming

    2007-02-01

    Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during radical prostatectomy, which are responsible for erectile function, may improve nerve preservation and postoperative potency. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of real-time, high-resolution, cross-sectional, in vivo tissue imaging. The rat prostate serves as an excellent model for studying the use of OCT for imaging the cavernous nerves, as the rat cavernous nerve is a large, visible, and distinct bundle allowing for easy identification with OCT in addition to histologic confirmation. Imaging was performed with the Niris OCT system and a handheld 8 Fr probe, capable of acquiring real-time images with 11-μm axial and 25-μm lateral resolution in tissue. Open surgical exposure of the prostate was performed on a total of 6 male rats, and OCT images of the prostate, cavernous nerve, pelvic plexus ganglion, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, and periprostatic fat were acquired. Cavernous nerve electrical stimulation with simultaneous intracorporeal pressure measurements was performed to confirm proper identification of the cavernous nerves. The prostate and cavernous nerves were also processed for histologic analysis and further confirmation. Cross-sectional and longitudinal OCT images of the cavernous nerves were acquired and compared with histologic sections. The cavernous nerve and ganglion could be differentiated from the surrounding prostate gland, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, bladder, and fatty tissue. We report preliminary results of OCT images of the rat cavernous nerves with histologic correlation and erectile stimulation measurements, thus providing interpretation of prostate structures as they appear in OCT images.

  16. Purinergic nerves and receptors.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G

    1980-01-01

    The presence of a non-cholinergic, non-adrenergic component in the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is now well established. Evidence that ATP is the transmitter released from some of these nerves (called "purinergic') includes: (a) synthesis and storage of ATP in nerves: (b) release of ATP from the nerves when they are stimulated; (c) exogenously applied ATP mimicking the action of nerve-released transmitter; (d) the presence of ectoenzymes which inactivate ATP; (e) drugs which produce similar blocking or potentiating effects on the response to exogenously applied ATP and nerve stimulation. A basis for distinguishing two types of purinergic receptors has been proposed according to four criteria: relative potencies of agonists, competitive antagonists, changes in levels of cAMP and induction of prostaglandin synthesis. Thus P1 purinoceptors are most sensitive to adenosine, are competitively blocked by methylxanthines and their occupation leads to changes in cAMP accumulation; while P2 purinoceptors are most sensitive to ATP, are blocked (although not competitively) by quinidine, 2-substituted imidazolines, 2,2'-pyridylisatogen and apamin, and their occupation leads to production of prostaglandin. P2 purinoceptors mediate responses of smooth muscle to ATP released from purinergic nerves, while P1 purinoceptors mediate the presynaptic actions of adenosine on adrenergic, cholinergic and purinergic nerve terminals. PMID:6108568

  17. Management of Facial Synkinesis with a Combination of BTX-A and Biofeedback: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pourmomeny, Abbas Ali; Asadi, Sahar; Cheatsaz, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Synkinesis and facial asymmetry due to facial nerve palsy are distressing conditions that affect quality of life. Unfortunately, these sequelae of facial nerve palsy are unresolved. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a combination of biofeedback therapy and botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection for the management of synkinesis and asymmetry of facial muscles. Materials and Methods: Among referrals from three university hospitals, 34 patients with facial synkinesis were divided randomly into two groups. All participants were evaluated using Photoshop software, videotape, and facial grading system (FGS). The first group received a single dose of BTX-A at the start of treatment, while the second group received normal saline as a control. Both groups received electromyography (EMG) biofeedback three times a week for 4 months. Results: The mean FGS values for the BTX group before and after treatment were 55.17 and 74.17, respectively, and those for the biofeedback group were 66.31 and 81.37, respectively. Moreover, it was shown that in both groups oral-ocular and oculo-oral synkinesis decreased significantly after treatment compared with before treatment (P<0.01).When these measurements were performed using Photoshop and videotape, these differences were even greater. Despite the decrease in synkinesis in both groups after treatment, there were no significant differences between the two treatment groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: Biofeedback therapy is as effective as the combination of biofeedback and BTX in reducing synkinesis and recovery of facial symmetry in Bell's palsy. PMID:26788484

  18. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  19. A comprehensive approach to long-standing facial paralysis based on lengthening temporalis myoplasty.

    PubMed

    Labbè, D; Bussu, F; Iodice, A

    2012-06-01

    Long-standing peripheral monolateral facial paralysis in the adult has challenged otolaryngologists, neurologists and plastic surgeons for centuries. Notwithstanding, the ultimate goal of normality of the paralyzed hemi-face with symmetry at rest, and the achievement of a spontaneous symmetrical smile with corneal protection, has not been fully reached. At the beginning of the 20(th) century, the main options were neural reconstructions including accessory to facial nerve transfer and hypoglossal to facial nerve crossover. In the first half of the 20(th) century, various techniques for static correction with autologous temporalis muscle and fascia grafts were proposed as the techniques of Gillies (1934) and McLaughlin (1949). Cross-facial nerve grafts have been performed since the beginning of the 1970s often with the attempt to transplant free-muscle to restore active movements. However, these transplants were non-vascularized, and further evaluations revealed central fibrosis and minimal return of function. A major step was taken in the second half of the 1970s, with the introduction of microneurovascular muscle transfer in facial reanimation, which, often combined in two steps with a cross-facial nerve graft, has become the most popular option for the comprehensive treatment of long-standing facial paralysis. In the second half of the 1990s in France, a regional muscle transfer technique with the definite advantages of being one-step, technically easier and relatively fast, namely lengthening temporalis myoplasty, acquired popularity and consensus among surgeons treating facial paralysis. A total of 111 patients with facial paralysis were treated in Caen between 1997 and 2005 by a single surgeon who developed 2 variants of the technique (V1, V2), each with its advantages and disadvantages, but both based on the same anatomo-functional background and aim, which is transfer of the temporalis muscle tendon on the coronoid process to the lips. For a comprehensive

  20. Sleep Wrinkles: Facial Aging and Facial Distortion During Sleep.

    PubMed

    Anson, Goesel; Kane, Michael A C; Lambros, Val

    2016-09-01

    Wrinkles are just one indicator of facial aging, but an indicator that is of prime importance in our world of facial aesthetics. Wrinkles occur where fault lines develop in aging skin. Those fault lines may be due to skin distortion resulting from facial expression or may be due to skin distortion from mechanical compression during sleep. Expression wrinkles and sleep wrinkles differ in etiology, location, and anatomical pattern. Compression, shear, and stress forces act on the face in lateral or prone sleep positions. We review the literature relating to the development of wrinkles and the biomechanical changes that occur in response to intrinsic and extrinsic influences. We explore the possibility that compression during sleep not only results in wrinkles but may also contribute to facial skin expansion. PMID:27329660

  1. Replacing facial hair.

    PubMed

    Straub, Paul M

    2008-11-01

    The face is the second most common area for hair transplantation after the scalp. Areas that are transplanted include eyebrows, eyelashes, moustaches, beards, temples and temporal points, as well as scars either traumatic or the side effect of cosmetic procedures such as rhytidectomies or brow lifts. The hair is harvested from the same area as the hair that is transplanted to the head. For this reason, it grows longer than nongrafted facial hair and must be trimmed regularly. Occasionally, hair lower in the neck region is harvested, which is finer than occipital hair; however, because of movement in the neck area, the scars are often larger. Body hair has been suggested as donor hair but is not recommended because it spends as much as 85% of its time in the telogen phase.

  2. Ocular Manifestations of Oblique Facial Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Ortube, Maria Carolina; Dipple, Katrina; Setoguchi, Yoshio; Kawamoto, Henry K.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the Tessier classification, craniofacial clefts are numbered from 0 to 14 and extend along constant axes through the eyebrows, eyelids, maxilla, nostrils, and the lips. We studied a patient with bilateral cleft 10 associated with ocular abnormalities. Method Clinical report with orbital and cranial computed tomography. Results After pregnancy complicated by oligohydramnios, digoxin, and lisinopril exposure, a boy was born with facial and ocular dysmorphism. Examination at age 26 months showed bilateral epibulbar dermoids, covering half the corneal surface, and unilateral morning glory anomaly of the optic nerve. Ductions of the right eye were normal, but the left eye had severely impaired ductions in all directions, left hypotropia, and esotropia. Under anesthesia, the left eye could not be rotated freely in any direction. Bilateral Tessier cleft number 10 was implicated by the presence of colobomata of the middle third of the upper eyelids and eyebrows. As the cleft continued into the hairline, there was marked anterior scalp alopecia. Computed x-ray tomography showed a left middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst and calcification of the reflected tendon of the superior oblique muscle, trochlea, and underlying sclera, with downward and lateral globe displacement. Discussion Tessier 10 clefts are very rare and usually associated with encephalocele. Bilateral 10 clefts have not been reported previously. In this case, there was coexisting unilateral morning glory anomaly and arachnoid cyst of the left middle cranial fossa but no encephalocele. Conclusions Bilateral Tessier facial cleft 10 may be associated with alopecia, morning glory anomaly, epibulbar dermoids, arachnoid cyst, and restrictive strabismus. PMID:20856062

  3. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  4. Facial infiltrating lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Padwa, B L; Mulliken, J B

    2001-11-01

    Facial infiltrating lipomatosis is a rare congenital disorder in which mature lipocytes invade adjacent tissue. The phenotypic features include soft-tissue and skeletal hypertrophy, premature dental eruption, and regional macrodontia. There is a high risk for regrowth after resection that is, perforce, subtotal. The etiology, natural history, optimal management, and relationship to other disorders of fatty overgrowth are unclear. In this study, the clinical features, radiographic findings, histopathology, and postoperative results were analyzed in 13 patients with facial infiltrating lipomatosis. The condition was diagnosed in infancy (eight male subjects, five female subjects) and characterized by enlargement of the cheek (n = 12) or chin (n = 1). Other findings included cutaneous capillary blush (n = 9), ipsilateral macroglossia (n = 8), and mucosal neuromas (n = 6). Most patients had early eruption of ipsilateral deciduous and permanent teeth (n = 12). Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed an infiltrated soft-tissue mass of fatty density (n = 13) and skeletal overgrowth (n = 9). Multiple resection was performed on six patients (mean number of operations per patient, 2.5; range, one to six operations); regrowth and/or worsening of the capillary stain occurred in all six patients. Because surgical removal of the mass is usually unsuccessful, specific management of this condition will require insight into its etiopathogenesis. Given the presence of mucosal neuromas and lipomatosis, this study included testing for the known mutations in three entities that are associated with these soft-tissue findings (Cowden syndrome, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcava syndrome, and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B). Results of DNA analyses for these germline mutations were negative. It is more likely that this disorder is caused by a somatic mutation involving a local increase in growth factor(s).

  5. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  6. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  7. Sacral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matzel, K E; Stadelmaier, U; Besendörfer, M

    2004-01-01

    The current concept of recruiting residual function of an inadequate pelvic organ by electrostimulation involves stimulation of the sacral spinal nerves at the level of the sacral canal. The rationale for applying SNS to fecal incontinence was based on clinical observations of its effect on bowel habits and anorectal continence function in urologic patients (increased anorectal angulation and anal canal closure pressure) and on anatomic considerations: dissection demonstrated a dual peripheral nerve supply of the striated pelvic floor muscles that govern these functions. Because the sacral spinal nerve site is the most distal common location of this dual nerve supply, stimulating here can elicit both functions. Since the first application of SNS in fecal incontinence in 1994, this technique has been improved, the patient selection process modified, and the spectrum of indications expanded. At present SNS has been applied in more than 1300 patients with fecal incontinence limited.

  8. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  9. Damaged axillary nerve (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Conditions associated with axillary nerve dysfunction include fracture of the humerus (upper arm bone), pressure from casts or splints, and improper use of crutches. Other causes include systemic disorders that cause neuritis (inflammation of ...

  10. Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed Central

    London, J.; London, N. J.; Kay, S. P.

    1996-01-01

    Accessory nerve injury produces considerable disability. The nerve is most frequently damaged as a complication of radical neck dissection, cervical lymph node biopsy and other surgical procedures. The problem is frequently compounded by a failure to recognise the error immediately after surgery when surgical repair has the greatest chance of success. We present cases which outline the risk of accessory nerve injury, the spectrum of clinical presentations and the problems produced by a failure to recognise the deficit. Regional anatomy, consequences of nerve damage and management options are discussed. Diagnostic biopsy of neck nodes should not be undertaken as a primary investigation and, when indicated, surgery in this region should be performed by suitably trained staff under well-defined conditions. Awareness of iatrogenic injury and its consequences would avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 2 PMID:8678450

  11. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  12. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  13. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy.

  14. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  15. A detailed investigation of facial expression processing in congenital prosopagnosia as compared to acquired prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Kate; Avidan, Galia; Behrmann, Marlene

    2007-01-01

    Whether the ability to recognize facial expression can be preserved in the absence of the recognition of facial identity remains controversial. The current study reports the results of a detailed investigation of facial expression recognition in three congenital prosopagnosic (CP) participants, in comparison with two patients with acquired prosopagnosia (AP) and a large group of 30 neurologically normal participants, including individually age- and gender-matched controls. Participants completed a fine-grained expression recognition paradigm requiring a six-alternative forced-choice response to continua of morphs of six different basic facial expressions (e.g. happiness and surprise). Accuracy, sensitivity and reaction times were measured. The performance of all three CP individuals was indistinguishable from that of controls, even for the most subtle expressions. In contrast, both individuals with AP displayed pronounced difficulties with the majority of expressions. The results from the CP participants attest to the dissociability of the processing of facial identity and of facial expression. Whether this remarkably good expression recognition is achieved through normal, or compensatory, mechanisms remains to be determined. Either way, this normal level of performance does not extend to include facial identity. PMID:16917773

  16. Facial Weakness, Otalgia, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Novel Neurological Syndrome in a Case-Series of 3 Patients With Rheumatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-10-01

    Bell palsy occurs in different rheumatic diseases, causes hemifacial weakness, and targets the motor branch of the 7th cranial nerve. Severe, persistent, and refractory otalgia having features of neuropathic pain (ie, burning and allodynic) does not characteristically occur with Bell palsy. Whereas aberrant regeneration of the 7th cranial nerve occurring after a Bell palsy may lead to a variety of clinical findings, hemifacial spasm only rarely occurs. We identified in 3 rheumatic disease patients (2 with Sjögren syndrome, 1 with rheumatoid arthritis) a previously unreported neurological syndrome of facial weakness, otalgia with neuropathic pain features, and hemifacial spasm. We characterized symptoms, examination findings, and response to therapy. All 3 patients experienced vertigo, as well as severe otalgia which persisted after mild facial weakness had completely resolved within 1 to 4 weeks. The allodynic nature of otalgia was striking. Two patients were rendered homebound, as even the barest graze of outdoor breezes caused intolerable ear pain. Patients developed hemifacial spasm either at the time of or within 3 months of facial weakness. Two patients had a polyphasic course, with recurrent episodes of facial weakness and increased otalgia. In all cases, otalgia and hemifacial spasm were unresponsive to neuropathic pain regimens, but responded in 1 case to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. No patients had vesicles or varicella zoster virus in spinal-fluid studies. We have defined a novel neurological syndrome in 3 rheumatic disease patients, characterized by facial weakness, otalgia, and hemifacial spasm. As described in infectious disorders, the combination of otalgia, facial weakness, and 8th cranial nerve deficits suggests damage to the geniculate ganglia (ie, the sensory ganglia of the 7th cranial nerve), with contiguous involvement of other cranial nerves causing facial weakness and vertigo. However, the relapsing nature and association with

  17. Facial Weakness, Otalgia, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Novel Neurological Syndrome in a Case-Series of 3 Patients With Rheumatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bell palsy occurs in different rheumatic diseases, causes hemifacial weakness, and targets the motor branch of the 7th cranial nerve. Severe, persistent, and refractory otalgia having features of neuropathic pain (ie, burning and allodynic) does not characteristically occur with Bell palsy. Whereas aberrant regeneration of the 7th cranial nerve occurring after a Bell palsy may lead to a variety of clinical findings, hemifacial spasm only rarely occurs. We identified in 3 rheumatic disease patients (2 with Sjögren syndrome, 1 with rheumatoid arthritis) a previously unreported neurological syndrome of facial weakness, otalgia with neuropathic pain features, and hemifacial spasm. We characterized symptoms, examination findings, and response to therapy. All 3 patients experienced vertigo, as well as severe otalgia which persisted after mild facial weakness had completely resolved within 1 to 4 weeks. The allodynic nature of otalgia was striking. Two patients were rendered homebound, as even the barest graze of outdoor breezes caused intolerable ear pain. Patients developed hemifacial spasm either at the time of or within 3 months of facial weakness. Two patients had a polyphasic course, with recurrent episodes of facial weakness and increased otalgia. In all cases, otalgia and hemifacial spasm were unresponsive to neuropathic pain regimens, but responded in 1 case to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. No patients had vesicles or varicella zoster virus in spinal-fluid studies. We have defined a novel neurological syndrome in 3 rheumatic disease patients, characterized by facial weakness, otalgia, and hemifacial spasm. As described in infectious disorders, the combination of otalgia, facial weakness, and 8th cranial nerve deficits suggests damage to the geniculate ganglia (ie, the sensory ganglia of the 7th cranial nerve), with contiguous involvement of other cranial nerves causing facial weakness and vertigo. However, the relapsing nature and association with

  18. Measuring facial expression of emotion.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Karsten

    2015-12-01

    Research into emotions has increased in recent decades, especially on the subject of recognition of emotions. However, studies of the facial expressions of emotion were compromised by technical problems with visible video analysis and electromyography in experimental settings. These have only recently been overcome. There have been new developments in the field of automated computerized facial recognition; allowing real-time identification of facial expression in social environments. This review addresses three approaches to measuring facial expression of emotion and describes their specific contributions to understanding emotion in the healthy population and in persons with mental illness. Despite recent progress, studies on human emotions have been hindered by the lack of consensus on an emotion theory suited to examining the dynamic aspects of emotion and its expression. Studying expression of emotion in patients with mental health conditions for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes will profit from theoretical and methodological progress.

  19. Facial asymmetry: a current review

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The term "asymmetry" is used to make reference to dissimilarity between homologous elements, altering the balance between structures. Facial asymmetry is common in the overall population and is often presented subclinically. Nevertheless, on occasion, significant facial asymmetry results not only in functional, but also esthetic issues. Under these conditions, its etiology should be carefully investigated in order to achieve an adequate treatment plan. Facial asymmetry assessment comprises patient's first interview, extra- as well as intraoral clinical examination, and supplementary imaging examination. Subsequent asymmetry treatment depends on patient's age, the etiology of the condition and on the degree of disharmony, and might include from asymmetrical orthodontic mechanics to orthognathic surgery. Thus, the present study aims at addressing important aspects to be considered by the orthodontist reaching an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan of facial asymmetry, in addition to reporting treatment of some patients carriers of such challenging disharmony. PMID:26691977

  20. Facial Areas and Emotional Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Jerry D.; Ekman, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Provides strong support for the view that there is no one area of the face which best reveals emotion, but that the value of the different facial areas in distinguishing emotions depends upon the emotion being judged. (Author)

  1. Measuring facial expression of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Research into emotions has increased in recent decades, especially on the subject of recognition of emotions. However, studies of the facial expressions of emotion were compromised by technical problems with visible video analysis and electromyography in experimental settings. These have only recently been overcome. There have been new developments in the field of automated computerized facial recognition; allowing real-time identification of facial expression in social environments. This review addresses three approaches to measuring facial expression of emotion and describes their specific contributions to understanding emotion in the healthy population and in persons with mental illness. Despite recent progress, studies on human emotions have been hindered by the lack of consensus on an emotion theory suited to examining the dynamic aspects of emotion and its expression. Studying expression of emotion in patients with mental health conditions for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes will profit from theoretical and methodological progress. PMID:26869846

  2. Treatment of Infected Facial Implants.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Kriti; Cox, Joshua A; Dickey, Ryan M; Gravina, Paula; Echo, Anthony; Izaddoost, Shayan A; Nguyen, Anh H

    2016-05-01

    Alloplastic facial implants have a wide range of uses to achieve the appropriate facial contour. A variety of materials such as metals, polymers, ceramics and synthetic injectable fillers are available to the reconstructive and aesthetic surgeon. Besides choosing the right surgical technique and the adequate material, the surgeon must be prepared to treat complications. Infection is an uncommon but serious complication that can cause displeasing consequences for the patient. There are few references in literature regarding treatment and management of facial implant-related infections. This study aims to discuss the role of biofilm in predisposing alloplastic materials to infection, to provide a review of literature, to describe our own institutional experience, and to define a patient care pathway for facial implant-associated infection. PMID:27152100

  3. Olfactory region schwannoma: Excision with preservation of olfaction.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Pravin; Patra, Devi Prasad; Futane, Sameer; Nada, Ritambhara

    2014-07-01

    Olfactory region schwannomas are rare, but when they occur, they commonly arise from the meningeal branches of the trigeminal nerve and may present without involvement of the olfaction. A 24 year old lady presented with hemifacial paraesthesias. Radiology revealed a large olfactory region enhancing lesion. She was operated through a transbasal with olfactory preserving approach. This manuscript highlights the importance of olfactory preservation in such lesions.

  4. Retrospective study of the functional recovery of men compared with that of women with long-term facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Sex is likely to play an important part in reanimation of the face after paralysis, with women being superior in terms of resistance to neural injury and regeneration. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of the sex of the patient on the recovery of facial paralysis after surgical reanimation by comparing the degree of restored movement between men and women with long-standing paralysis that was reanimated by transfer of the hypoglossal nerve or cross-face nerve grafting. Between 1999 and 2010 we operated on 174 patients with facial paralysis. Of these we studied 26 cases (19 women and 7 men) with complete long-standing paralysis reanimated with either cross-face nerve grafting (n=14) or transfer of the hemihypoglossal nerve (n=12). The degree of movement restored was recorded in each case. Statistical analysis showed that in cases with long-standing paralysis women had significantly more movement restored than men for both cross-face nerve grafting (p=0.02) and hypoglossal transposition (p=0.04). We conclude that, after a neural injury, women tend to maintain the viability of the facial musculature longer than men, which suggests that they are more resistant to both denervation and the development of muscular atrophy. Whether this phenomenon can be explained by neural or muscular processes, or both, warrants further studies.

  5. Peripheral facial palsy in children.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Unsal; Cubukçu, Duygu; Yılmaz, Tuba Sevim; Akıncı, Gülçin; Ozcan, Muazzez; Güzel, Orkide

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the types and clinical characteristics of peripheral facial palsy in children. The hospital charts of children diagnosed with peripheral facial palsy were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 81 children (42 female and 39 male) with a mean age of 9.2 ± 4.3 years were included in the study. Causes of facial palsy were 65 (80.2%) idiopathic (Bell palsy) facial palsy, 9 (11.1%) otitis media/mastoiditis, and tumor, trauma, congenital facial palsy, chickenpox, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, enlarged lymph nodes, and familial Mediterranean fever (each 1; 1.2%). Five (6.1%) patients had recurrent attacks. In patients with Bell palsy, female/male and right/left ratios were 36/29 and 35/30, respectively. Of them, 31 (47.7%) had a history of preceding infection. The overall rate of complete recovery was 98.4%. A wide variety of disorders can present with peripheral facial palsy in children. Therefore, careful investigation and differential diagnosis is essential.

  6. Facial transplantation: A concise update

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Pulido, Fernando; Gomez-Cia, Tomas; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Gacto-Sanchez, Purificacion; Hernandez-Guisado, Jose-Maria; Lagares-Borrego, Araceli; Narros-Gimenez, Rocio; Gonzalez-Padilla, Juan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Update on clinical results obtained by the first worldwide facial transplantation teams as well as review of the literature concerning the main surgical, immunological, ethical, and follow-up aspects described on facial transplanted patients. Study design: MEDLINE search of articles published on “face transplantation” until March 2012. Results: Eighteen clinical cases were studied. The mean patient age was 37.5 years, with a higher prevalence of men. Main surgical indication was gunshot injuries (6 patients). All patients had previously undergone multiple conventional surgical reconstructive procedures which had failed. Altogether 8 transplant teams belonging to 4 countries participated. Thirteen partial face transplantations and 5 full face transplantations have been performed. Allografts are varied according to face anatomical components and the amount of skin, muscle, bone, and other tissues included, though all were grafted successfully and remained viable without significant postoperative surgical complications. The patient with the longest follow-up was 5 years. Two patients died 2 and 27 months after transplantation. Conclusions: Clinical experience has demonstrated the feasibility of facial transplantation as a valuable reconstructive option, but it still remains considered as an experimental procedure with unresolved issues to settle down. Results show that from a clinical, technical, and immunological standpoint, facial transplantation has achieved functional, aesthetic, and social rehabilitation in severely facial disfigured patients. Key words:Face transplantation, composite tissue transplantation, face allograft, facial reconstruction, outcomes and complications of face transplantation. PMID:23229268

  7. [Peripheral facial paralysis: the role of physical medicine and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Matos, Catarina

    2011-12-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis (PFP) is a consequence of the peripheral neuronal lesion of the facial nerve (FN). It can be either primary (Bell`s Palsy) or secondary. The classical clinical presentation typically involves both stages of the hemiface. However, there may be other symptoms (ex. xerophthalmia, hyperacusis, phonation and deglutition changes) that one should recall. Clinical evaluation includes rigorous muscle tonus and sensibility search in the FN territory. Some useful instruments allow better objectivity in the patients' evaluation (House-Brackmann System, Facial Grading System, Functional Evaluation). There are clear referral criteria to Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Treatment of Bell`s Palsy may include pharmacotherapy, neuromuscular training (NMT), physical methods and surgery. In the NMT field the several treatment techniques are systematized. Therapeutic strategies should be problem-oriented and adjusted to the patient's symptoms and signs. Physical methods are reviewed. In about 15-20 % of patients permanent sequelae subside after 3 months of evolution. PFP is commonly a multidisciplinary condition. Therefore, it is important to review strategies that Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation may offer.

  8. Short-term restoration of facial sensory loss by motor cortex stimulation in peripheral post-traumatic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Denys; Bruneto, Jean Louis; El Fakir, Hasna; Paquis, Philippe; Lanteri-Minet, Michel

    2009-06-01

    We report a case in which motor cortex stimulation (MCS) improved neuropathic facial pain due to peripheral nerve injury and restored tactile and thermal sensory loss. A 66-year-old man developed intractable trigeminal neuropathic pain after trauma of the supraorbital branch of the Vth nerve, associated with tactile and thermal sensory loss in the painful area. MCS was performed using neuronavigation and transdural electric stimulation to localize the upper facial area on the motor cortex. One month after surgery, pain was decreased from 80/100 to 20/100 on visual analogic scale, and sensory discrimination improved in the painful area. Two months after surgery, quantitative sensory testing confirmed the normalization of thermal detection thresholds. This case showed that MCS could restore tactile and thermal sensory loss, resulting from peripheral nerve injury. Although the mechanisms leading to this effect remain unclear, this observation enhanced the hypothesis that MCS acts through modulation of the sensory processing.

  9. Facial reconstruction – anatomical art or artistic anatomy?

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Facial reconstruction is employed in the context of forensic investigation and for creating three-dimensional portraits of people from the past, from ancient Egyptian mummies and bog bodies to digital animations of J. S. Bach. This paper considers a facial reconstruction method (commonly known as the Manchester method) associated with the depiction and identification of the deceased from skeletal remains. Issues of artistic licence and scientific rigour, in relation to soft tissue reconstruction, anatomical variation and skeletal assessment, are discussed. The need for artistic interpretation is greatest where only skeletal material is available, particularly for the morphology of the ears and mouth, and with the skin for an ageing adult. The greatest accuracy is possible when information is available from preserved soft tissue, from a portrait, or from a pathological condition or healed injury. PMID:20447245

  10. Re-examination of the topographical localization of facial nucleus in the pig.

    PubMed

    Calka, J; Zalecki, M; Wasowicz, K; Bukowski, R; Lakomy, M

    2006-06-01

    Previous publications have provided different descriptions of the topographical organization of the facial nucleus of the pig. Since swine is used in biomedical research due to its embryological, anatomical and physiological similarities to human, we have reinvestigated the anatomical organization of the facial nucleus with application of fluorescent retrograde tracer Fast Blue, antibody to choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase histochemistry. Our findings demonstrate that in the porcine medulla facial motoneurons constitute a large cellular group occupying the ventro-lateral medulla. The neuronal group is interposed rostro-caudally between the superior and inferior olive, and located ventro-medially to the spinal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve. The present results clarify the anatomical description of this important brain stem nucleus in the pig. PMID:16374607

  11. Effects of facial hard tissue surgery on facial aesthetics: changes in facial content and frames.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2012-11-01

    Aesthetic units of the face can be divided into facial content (FC; eyes, nose, lips, and mouth), anterior facial frame (AFF; a contour line from the trichion, the temporal line of the frontal bone, the lateral orbital rim, the most lateral line of the anterior part of the zygomatic body, the anterior border of the masseter muscle, to the inferior border of the chin), and posterior facial frame (PFF; a contour line from the hairline, the zygomatic arch, to the ramus and gonial angle area of the mandible). The size and shape of each FC and the balance and proportion between FCs create a unique appearance for each person. The facial form can be determined through the combination of AFF and PFF. In the Asian population, clinicians frequently encounter problems of FC (eg, acute nasolabial angle, protrusive and everted lips, nonconsonant lip line, or lip canting), AFF (eg, midface hypoplasia, protrusive and asymmetric chin, vertical deficiency/excess of the anterior maxilla and symphysis, or prominent zygoma), and PFF (eg, square mandibular angle). These problems can be efficiently and effectively corrected through the combination of hard tissue surgery such as anterior segmental osteotomy, genioplasty, mandibular angle reduction, malarplasty, and orthognathic surgery. Therefore, the purposes of this article were to introduce the concepts of FC, AFF, and PFF, and to explain the effects of facial hard tissue surgery on facial aesthetics.

  12. Facial animation in patients with Moebius and Moebius-like syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, B; Copelli, C; Ferrari, S; Ferri, A; Sesenna, E

    2010-11-01

    Moebius syndrome, a rare congenital disorder of varying severity, involves multiple cranial nerves and is characterised predominantly by bilateral or unilateral paralysis of the facial and abducens nerves. Facial paralysis causes inability to smile and bilabial incompetence with speech difficulties, oral incompetence, problems with eating and drinking, including pocketing of food in the cheek and dribbling, as well as severe drooling. Other relevant clinical findings are incomplete eye closure and convergent strabismus. The authors report on 48 patients with Moebius and Moebius-like syndromes seen from 2003 to September 2007 (23 males and 25 females, mean age 13.9 years). In 20 cases a reinnervated gracilis transplant was performed to re-animate the impaired sides of the face. In this series, all free-muscle transplantations survived the transfer, and no flap was lost. In 19 patients complete reinnervation of the muscle was observed with an excellent or good facial symmetry at rest in all patients and whilst smiling in 87% of cases. In conclusion, according to the literature, the gracilis muscle free transfer can be considered a safe and reliable technique for facial reanimation with good aesthetic and functional results.

  13. [Lifting procedures in cosmetic facial surgery].

    PubMed

    Jansma, J; Schepers, R H; Vissink, A

    2014-10-01

    A prominent characteristic of the aging face is the descent of skin and subcutaneous tissues. In order to reduce this and create a more youthful appearance, several lifting procedures can be employed. In the forehead and eyebrow region the transblepharoplastic brow lift, the direct brow lift, the temporal brow lift, the coronal brow lift and the endoscopic brow lift can be distinguished. For the mid-face, the facelift is known to be an effective treatment for aging characteristics. Classic facelifts can be divided into the one layer-, two layer- and the deep plane facelift. Nowadays the minimal access cranial suspension lift is popular. The lifting capacity of this lift may be less, but the risk of complications is lower and the result is often more natural. A neck lift improves the chin-neck angle and a submental liposuction/lipectomy can contribute to this. Complications in lifting procedures are rare. Hematoma is the most frequent complication. Skin necrosis of the wound edges and laceration of the end branches of the facial nerve can also occur. There is a tendency towards minimally invasive procedures with smaller risk of complications and shorter recovery periods.

  14. Management of the eye in facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Sohrab, Mahsa; Abugo, Usiwoma; Grant, Michael; Merbs, Shannath

    2015-04-01

    Facial nerve palsy, whether the cause is idiopathic, or following such insults as surgery, trauma, or malignancy, places the health of the ocular surface at risk. Reduced or absent orbicularis oculi function results in lagophthalmos and exposure of the cornea, which is exacerbated by eyelid malposition. Management of the exposure keratopathy is paramount to prevent corneal breakdown, scarring, and permanent vision loss. Significant exposure keratopathy can be complicated by loss of corneal sensation, leading to a neurotrophic corneal ulcer. Initial management consists of artificial tear drops and ointment for corneal lubrication and strategies to address the lagophthalmos. Once the condition of the ocular surface has been stabilized, a variety of surgical treatment options are available depending on the severity and persistence of eyelid and ocular findings. The most common surgical options include temporary or permanent tarsorrhaphy for lagophthalmos, upper eyelid weight placement for retraction, and lateral canthoplasty with or without a middle lamellar spacer for lower eyelid retraction. External eyelid loading is a good option in patients who are poor surgical candidates or who have a known temporary palsy of short duration. The goal of all such procedures must be protection of the ocular surface through optimization of eyelid position.

  15. Clinical and Radiographic Factors Predicting Hearing Preservation Rates in Large Vestibular Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Daniel; Westerberg, Brian D; Dong, Charles; Akagami, Ryojo

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Postoperative hearing preservation rates for patients with large vestibular schwannomas range from 0 to 43%. The clinical and radiographic factors predicting hearing preservation in smaller vestibular schwannomas are well described; however, their importance in larger tumors is unclear. We investigated factors predicting hearing preservation in large vestibular schwannomas. Design Retrospective review. Setting Quaternary care academic center. Participants A total of 85 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannomas > 3 cm underwent retrosigmoid resections. Main Outcomes Measures Preoperative and postoperative serviceable hearing rates. Methods Clinical and radiographic data including preoperative and postoperative audiograms, preoperative symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging features, and postoperative facial weakness were analyzed. Results Hearing was preserved in 41% of patients (17 of 42) with preoperative serviceable hearing. Hypertension and diabetes increased the likelihood of preoperative hearing loss. Preoperative tinnitus predicted a lower likelihood of hearing preservation. No radiographic factors predicted hearing preservation; however, larger tumor size, smaller fourth ventricular width, and the presence of a cerebrospinal fluid cleft surrounding the tumor predicted postoperative facial weakness. Conclusion Systemic comorbidities may influence hearing loss preoperatively in patients with large vestibular schwannomas. The absence of tinnitus may reflect hearing reserve and propensity for hearing preservation. Preoperative radiographic features did not predict hearing preservation despite some associations with postoperative facial weakness. PMID:27175312

  16. RYR1 mutations cause ophthalmoplegia, facial weakness, and malignant hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Shaaban, Sherin; Ramos-Platt, Leigh; Gilles, Floyd H.; Chan, Wai-Man; Andrews, Caroline; De Girolami, Umberto; Demer, Joseph; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the genetic cause of congenital ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, facial paralysis and mild hypotonia segregating in two pedigrees diagnosed with atypical Moebius syndrome or congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM). Methods Homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were conducted to identify causative mutations in affected family members. Histories, physical examinations, and clinical data were reviewed. Results Missense mutations resulting in two homozygous RYR1 amino acid substitutions (E989G and R3772W) and two compound heterozygous RYR1 substitutions (H283R and R3772W) were identified in a consanguineous and a non-consanguineous pedigree, respectively. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed marked hypoplasia of extraocular muscles and intraorbital cranial nerves. Skeletal muscle biopsies revealed non-specific myopathic changes. Clinically, the patients’ ophthalmoplegia and facial weakness were far more significant than their hypotonia and limb weakness, and were accompanied by an unrecognized susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia. Conclusions Affected children presenting with severe congenital ophthalmoplegia and facial weakness in the setting of only mild skeletal myopathy harbored recessive mutations in RYR1, encoding the ryanodine receptor 1, and were susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. While ophthalmoplegia occurs rarely in RYR1-related myopathies, these children were atypical because they lacked significant weakness, respiratory insufficiency, or scoliosis. Clinical relevance RYR1-associated myopathies should be included in the differential diagnosis of congenital ophthalmoplegia and facial weakness, even without clinical skeletal myopathy. These patients should also be considered susceptible to malignant hyperthermia, a life-threatening anesthetic complication avoidable if anticipated pre-surgically. PMID:24091937

  17. Standardization of surgical techniques used in facial bone contouring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Sung

    2015-12-01

    Since the introduction of facial bone contouring surgery for cosmetic purposes, various surgical methods have been used to improve the aesthetics of facial contours. In general, by standardizing the surgical techniques, it is possible to decrease complication rates and achieve more predictable surgical outcomes, thereby increasing patient satisfaction. The technical strategies used by the author to standardize facial bone contouring procedures are introduced here. The author uses various pre-manufactured surgical tools and hardware for facial bone contouring. During a reduction malarplasty or genioplasty procedure, double-bladed reciprocating saws and pre-bent titanium plates customized for the zygomatic body, arch and chin are used. Various guarded oscillating saws are used for mandibular angloplasty. The use of double-bladed saws and pre-bent plates to perform reduction malarplasty reduces the chances of post-operative asymmetry or under- or overcorrection of the zygoma contours due to technical faults. Inferior alveolar nerve injury and post-operative jawline asymmetry or irregularity can be reduced by using a guarded saw during mandibular angloplasty. For genioplasty, final placement of the chin in accordance with preoperative quantitative analysis can be easily performed with pre-bent plates, and a double-bladed saw allows more procedural accuracy during osteotomies. Efforts by the surgeon to avoid unintentional faults are key to achieving satisfactory results and reducing the incidence of complications. The surgical techniques described in this study in conjunction with various in-house surgical tools and modified hardware can be used to standardize techniques to achieve aesthetically gratifying outcomes.

  18. Standardization of surgical techniques used in facial bone contouring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Sung

    2015-12-01

    Since the introduction of facial bone contouring surgery for cosmetic purposes, various surgical methods have been used to improve the aesthetics of facial contours. In general, by standardizing the surgical techniques, it is possible to decrease complication rates and achieve more predictable surgical outcomes, thereby increasing patient satisfaction. The technical strategies used by the author to standardize facial bone contouring procedures are introduced here. The author uses various pre-manufactured surgical tools and hardware for facial bone contouring. During a reduction malarplasty or genioplasty procedure, double-bladed reciprocating saws and pre-bent titanium plates customized for the zygomatic body, arch and chin are used. Various guarded oscillating saws are used for mandibular angloplasty. The use of double-bladed saws and pre-bent plates to perform reduction malarplasty reduces the chances of post-operative asymmetry or under- or overcorrection of the zygoma contours due to technical faults. Inferior alveolar nerve injury and post-operative jawline asymmetry or irregularity can be reduced by using a guarded saw during mandibular angloplasty. For genioplasty, final placement of the chin in accordance with preoperative quantitative analysis can be easily performed with pre-bent plates, and a double-bladed saw allows more procedural accuracy during osteotomies. Efforts by the surgeon to avoid unintentional faults are key to achieving satisfactory results and reducing the incidence of complications. The surgical techniques described in this study in conjunction with various in-house surgical tools and modified hardware can be used to standardize techniques to achieve aesthetically gratifying outcomes. PMID:26346781

  19. Cortical control of facial expression.

    PubMed

    Müri, René M

    2016-06-01

    The present Review deals with the motor control of facial expressions in humans. Facial expressions are a central part of human communication. Emotional face expressions have a crucial role in human nonverbal behavior, allowing a rapid transfer of information between individuals. Facial expressions can be either voluntarily or emotionally controlled. Recent studies in nonhuman primates and humans have revealed that the motor control of facial expressions has a distributed neural representation. At least five cortical regions on the medial and lateral aspects of each hemisphere are involved: the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area on the medial wall, and the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex. The results of studies in humans and nonhuman primates suggest that the innervation of the face is bilaterally controlled for the upper part and mainly contralaterally controlled for the lower part. Furthermore, the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area are essential for the voluntary control of facial expressions. In contrast, the cingulate cortical areas are important for emotional expression, because they receive input from different structures of the limbic system. PMID:26418049

  20. Compound facial expressions of emotion.

    PubMed

    Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M

    2014-04-15

    Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories--happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another.

  1. Compound facial expressions of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another. PMID:24706770

  2. Formax Preserved Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Philip

    1978-01-01

    A quick, simple method for preserving bird specimens using borax and a formalin solution is described. Procedures for injecting and mounting the specimens are given along with certain restrictions on preserving specimens. (MA)

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Greater Auricular Nerve Block as Sole Anesthetic for Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Michael K; Wilson, Colin A; Grose, Brian W; Ranganathan, Pavithra; Howell, Stephen M; Ellison, Matthew B

    2016-04-26

    A greater auricular nerve (GAN) block was used as the sole anesthetic for facial surgery in an 80-year-old male patient with multiple comorbidities which would have made general anesthesia challenging. The GAN provides sensation to the ear, mastoid process, parotid gland, and angle of the mandible. In addition to anesthesia for operating room surgery, the GAN block can be used for outpatient or emergency department procedures without the need for a separate anesthesia team. Although this nerve block has been performed using landmark-based techniques, the ultrasound-guided version offers several potential advantages. These advantages include increased reliability of the nerve block, as well as prevention of inadvertent vascular puncture or blockade of the phrenic nerve, brachial plexus, or deep cervical plexus. The increasing access to ultrasound technology for medical care providers outside the operating room makes this ultrasound guided block an increasingly viable alternative. PMID:27478586

  4. [Malignant lymphoma in a perineural spreading along trigeminal nerve, which developed as trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Mano, Tomoo; Matsuo, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Arakawa, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    A rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia is malignant lymphoma which spread along the trigeminal nerve. We report a 79-year-old male presented with 4-month history of neuralgic pain in right cheek. He was diagnosed as classical trigeminal neuralgia. It had improved through medication of carbamazepine. Four months later, the dull pain unlike neuralgia complicated on the right cheeks, it was ineffective with the medication. Furthermore, diplopia and facial palsy as the other cranial nerve symptoms appeared. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed contrast-enhanced mass lesion extend both external pterygoid muscle and brainstem through the swelling trigeminal nerve. The patient was pathological diagnosed of diffuse large B cell lymphoma by biopsy. Malignant lymphoma should be considered in the different diagnosis of cases with a minimal single cranial nerve symptom.

  5. Overview of facial paralysis: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Thuy-Anh N; Limb, Charles J

    2008-05-01

    Facial paralysis represents the end result of a wide array of disorders and heterogeneous etiologies, including congenital, traumatic, infectious, neoplastic, and metabolic causes. Thus, facial palsy has a diverse range of presentations, from transient unilateral paresis to devastating permanent bilateral paralysis. Although not life-threatening, facial paralysis remains relatively common and can have truly severe effects on one's quality of life, with important ramifications in terms of psychological impact and physiologic burden. Prognosis and outcomes for patients with facial paralysis are highly dependent on the etiologic nature of the weakness as well as the treatment offered to the patient. Facial plastic surgeons are often asked to manage the sequelae of long-standing facial paralysis. It is important, however, for any practitioner who assists this population to have a sophisticated understanding of the common etiologies and initial management of facial paralysis. This article reviews the more common causes of facial paralysis and discusses relevant early treatment strategies.

  6. Facial feedback effects on impression formation.

    PubMed

    Ohira, H; Kurono, K

    1993-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine effects of facial expressions upon social cognitive processes in which the impression of another person is formed. In each experiment, 30 female college students were induced to display or conceal their facial reactions to a hypothetical target person whose behaviors were mildly hostile (Exp. 1) or mildly friendly (Exp. 2), or their facial expressions were not manipulated. Displaying the facial expressions shifted the impression into the congruent directions with hedonic values corresponding to the facial expressions. Concealing the facial expressions, however, did not influence impression formation. Also, the positive-negative asymmetry was observed in the facial feedback effects, that is, the negative facial expression had a stronger effect on social cognition than the positive one. PMID:8170774

  7. Facial coloration tracks changes in women's estradiol.

    PubMed

    Jones, Benedict C; Hahn, Amanda C; Fisher, Claire I; Wincenciak, Joanna; Kandrik, Michal; Roberts, S Craig; Little, Anthony C; DeBruine, Lisa M

    2015-06-01

    Red facial coloration is an important social cue in many primate species, including humans. In such species, the vasodilatory effects of estradiol may cause red facial coloration to change systematically during females' ovarian cycle. Although increased red facial coloration during estrus has been observed in female mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), evidence linking primate facial color changes directly to changes in measured estradiol is lacking. Addressing this issue, we used a longitudinal design to demonstrate that red facial coloration tracks within-subject changes in women's estradiol, but not within-subject changes in women's progesterone or estradiol-to-progesterone ratio. Moreover, the relationship between estradiol and facial redness was observed in two independent samples of women (N = 50 and N = 65). Our results suggest that changes in facial coloration may provide cues of women's fertility and present the first evidence for a direct link between estradiol and female facial redness in a primate species. PMID:25796069

  8. Nanostructured Guidance for Peripheral Nerve Injuries: A Review with a Perspective in the Oral and Maxillofacial Area

    PubMed Central

    Sivolella, Stefano; Brunello, Giulia; Ferrarese, Nadia; Puppa, Alessandro Della; D’Avella, Domenico; Bressan, Eriberto; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Injury to peripheral nerves can occur as a result of various surgical procedures, including oral and maxillofacial surgery. In the case of nerve transaction, the gold standard treatment is the end-to-end reconnection of the two nerve stumps. When it cannot be performed, the actual strategies consist of the positioning of a nerve graft between the two stumps. Guided nerve regeneration using nano-structured scaffolds is a promising strategy to promote axon regeneration. Biodegradable electrospun conduits composed of aligned nanofibers is a new class of devices used to improve neurite extension and axon outgrowth. Self assembled peptide nanofibrous scaffolds (SAPNSs) demonstrated promising results in animal models for central nervous system injuries, and, more recently, for peripheral nerve injury. Aims of this work are (1) to review electrospun and self-assembled nanofibrous scaffolds use in vitro and in vivo for peripheral nerve regeneration; and (2) its application in peripheral nerve injuries treatment. The review focused on nanofibrous scaffolds with a diameter of less than approximately 250 nm. The conjugation in a nano scale of a natural bioactive factor with a resorbable synthetic or natural material may represent the best compromise providing both biological and mechanical cues for guided nerve regeneration. Injured peripheral nerves, such as trigeminal and facial, may benefit from these treatments. PMID:24562333

  9. Facial skin care products and cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2014-01-01

    Facial skin care products and cosmetics can both aid or incite facial dermatoses. Properly selected skin care can create an environment for barrier repair aiding in the re-establishment of a healing biofilm and diminution of facial redness; however, skin care products that aggressively remove intercellular lipids or cause irritation must be eliminated before the red face will resolve. Cosmetics are an additive variable either aiding or challenging facial skin health.

  10. Dermal fillers for facial soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Dastoor, Sarosh F; Misch, Carl E; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, patients are demanding not only enhancement to their dental (micro) esthetics, but also their overall facial (macro) esthetics. Soft tissue augmentation via dermal filling agents may be used to correct facial defects such as wrinkles caused by age, gravity, and trauma; thin lips; asymmetrical facial appearances; buccal fold depressions; and others. This article will review the pathogenesis of facial wrinkles, history, techniques, materials, complications, and clinical controversies regarding dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation.

  11. Peripheral nerve response to injury.

    PubMed

    Steed, Martin B

    2011-03-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons caring for patients who have sustained a nerve injury to a branch of the peripheral trigeminal nerve must possess a basic understanding of the response of the peripheral nerves to trauma. The series of events that subsequently take place are largely dependent on the injury type and severity. Regeneration of the peripheral nerve is possible in many instances and future manipulation of the regenerative microenvironment will lead to advances in the management of these difficult injuries.

  12. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  13. Optic Nerve Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the occipital lobe (the part of the brain that interprets vision) like a cable wire. What is optic nerve ... nystagmus. In older patients, peripheral vision and color vision assessment ... around the brain and spinal cord (hydrocephalus) may prevent further optic ...

  14. Muscles of facial expression in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes): descriptive, comparative and phylogenetic contexts

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Anne M; Waller, Bridget M; Parr, Lisa A; Bonar, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Facial expressions are a critical mode of non-vocal communication for many mammals, particularly non-human primates. Although chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have an elaborate repertoire of facial signals, little is known about the facial expression (i.e. mimetic) musculature underlying these movements, especially when compared with some other catarrhines. Here we present a detailed description of the facial muscles of the chimpanzee, framed in comparative and phylogenetic contexts, through the dissection of preserved faces using a novel approach. The arrangement and appearance of muscles were noted and compared with previous studies of chimpanzees and with prosimians, cercopithecoids and humans. The results showed 23 mimetic muscles in P. troglodytes, including a thin sphincter colli muscle, reported previously only in adult prosimians, a bi-layered zygomaticus major muscle and a distinct risorius muscle. The presence of these muscles in such definition supports previous studies that describe an elaborate and highly graded facial communication system in this species that remains qualitatively different from that reported for other non-human primate species. In addition, there are minimal anatomical differences between chimpanzees and humans, contrary to conclusions from previous studies. These results amplify the importance of understanding facial musculature in primate taxa, which may hold great taxonomic value. PMID:16441560

  15. Facial hair policy in a respirator program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, P.R. )

    1989-10-01

    In this paper the prohibition against facial hair for respirator users is explored. Reasons for the prohibition are given, along with suggestions for establishing or reviewing a policy. Recommendations are given for properly wording a facial hair policy, and the issue of facial hair on female workers is also addressed.

  16. Facial Specialty. Teacher Edition. Cosmetology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication is one of a series of curriculum guides designed to direct and support instruction in vocational cosmetology programs in the State of Oklahoma. It contains seven units for the facial specialty: identifying enemies of the skin, using aromatherapy on the skin, giving facials without the aid of machines, giving facials with the aid…

  17. Calcium hydroxylapatite for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Alexander; Cohen, Joel L; Goldberg, David J

    2006-09-01

    Porous calcium hydroxylapatite has been used in otolaryngology, dentistry and radiology for many years. Currently, calcium hydroxylapatite is gaining popularity for facial esthetics in the form of the product Radiesse (San Mateo, CA). Although Radiesse is not yet approved in the United States for cosmetic use, it is being used off-label by an increasing number of dermatologists and plastic surgeons for facial soft-tissue augmentation. Preliminary clinical and histologic studies have shown safety, efficacy and durability in various esthetic applications including the nasolabial folds and HIV lipoatrophy.

  18. Bilateral common peroneal nerve injury after pediatric cardiothoracic surgery: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Setty, G.; Saleem, R.; Harijan, P.; Khan, A.; Hussain, N.

    2014-01-01

    Nerve injuries after thoracic and cardiovascular surgery have been reported but generally concern the brachial plexus, phrenic nerve, recurrent laryngeal, and facial nerve. Common peroneal nerve injury (CPNI) following cardiopulmonary bypass has been reported in adults (4); however bilateral injury is extremely uncommon. Age, low body weight, co-morbidities such as peripheral arteriosclerotic disease, diabetes mellitus, and arrhythmias were associated with CPNI following cardiothoracic surgery in adults. Common peroneal nerve injury (CPNI) following cardiopulmonary by-pass has been reported in adults; however, bilateral injury is extremely uncommon. The superficial course of CPN makes it vulnerable to traction or compression. We report a 5-year-old girl manifesting with bilateral CPNI following prolonged cardiopulmonary by-pass. To the best of our knowledge, she is the first pediatric patient presenting with bilateral CPNI following cardiothoracic surgery and cardiopulmonary by-pass. PMID:25624938

  19. Lip Forces and Chewing Efficiency in Children with Peripheral Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Aranka; Cristea, Alexandru; Dudescu, Cristian M; Hurubeanu, Lucia; Vâjâean, Cosmin; Albu, Silviu; Câmpian, Radu S

    2015-08-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis is accompanied by facial motor disorders and also, by oral dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the lip forces and chewing efficiency in a group of children with peripheral facial paralysis. The degree of peripheral facial paralysis in the study group (n 11) was assessed using the House-Brackmann scale. The control group consisted of 21 children without facial nerve impairment. To assess lip forces, acrylic vestibular plates of three sizes were used: large (LVP), medium (MVP) and small (SVP). The lip force was recorded with a force transducer coupled with the data acquisition system. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated by the ability to mix two differently colored chewing gums. The images were processed with Adobe Photoshop CS3 (Delaware Corporation, San Jose, California, United States) and the number of pixels was quantified with the Image J software (DHHS/NIH/NIMH/RSB, Maryland, United States). For statistical analysis, the following statistical analysis were used: Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression analysis, multiple logistic regression analysis, and optimal cutoff values for muscular dysfunction. There were statistically significant differences between lip forces in the following three groups: p=0.01 (LVP), p=0.01 (MVP), and p=0.008 (SVP). The cutoff values of lip forces in the study group were as follows: 7.08 N (LVP), 4.89 N (MVP), and 4.24 N (SVP). There were no statistically significant differences between the masticatory efficiency in the two groups (p=0.25). Lip forces were dependent on the degree of peripheral facial paralysis and age, but not on gender. In peripheral facial paralysis in children, a significant decrease of lip forces, but not masticatory efficiency, occurs.

  20. Facial Paralysis Secondary to Extensive Perineural Spread of Adenocarcinoma of the Parotid Gland Identified by PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Achong, Dwight M; Zloty, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Brain MRI in an 82-year-old man with presumed Bell's palsy revealed a clinically unsuspected right parotid gland mass but no other acute findings. Biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Staging F-FDG PET/CT revealed an FDG-avid parotid mass, abnormal FDG uptake along the course of the facial nerve from mass to skull base, and multiple FDG-avid right level II neck lymph nodes and hepatic metastases. The PET/CT findings and prolonged clinical course suggest that diffuse perineural spread of tumor from a smoldering parotid neoplasm, and not idiopathic Bell's palsy, was responsible for the patient's facial paralysis. PMID:26825200