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Sample records for facilitates behavioral interaction

  1. Is Empathic Accuracy Enough to Facilitate Responsive Behavior in Dyadic Interaction? Distinguishing Ability From Motivation.

    PubMed

    Winczewski, Lauren A; Bowen, Jeffrey D; Collins, Nancy L

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that interpersonal responsiveness-feeling understood, validated, and cared for by other people-plays a key role in shaping the quality of one's social interactions and relationships. But what enables people to be interpersonally responsive to others? In the current study, we argued that responsiveness requires not only accurate understanding but also compassionate motivation. Specifically, we hypothesized that understanding another person's thoughts and feelings (empathic accuracy) would foster responsive behavior only when paired with benevolent motivation (empathic concern). To test this idea, we asked couples (N = 91) to discuss a personal or relationship stressor; we then assessed empathic accuracy, empathic concern, and responsive behavior. As predicted, when listeners' empathic concern was high, empathic accuracy facilitated responsiveness; but when empathic concern was low, empathic accuracy was unhelpful (and possibly harmful) for responsiveness. These findings provide the first evidence that cognitive and affective forms of empathy work together to facilitate responsive behavior.

  2. Gratitude facilitates behavioral mimicry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lile; Lee, Li Neng; Tong, Eddie Mun Wai

    2015-04-01

    Recent theorists argue that gratitude, besides encouraging social exchange, serves an important function of relationship building. However, there is a lack of research exploring the specific behaviors through which gratitude promotes relationship building. Given that behavioral mimicry serves important affiliative needs, we explored whether gratitude promotes behavioral mimicry. We found that participants who received intentional help later mimicked the behavioral mannerisms of their benefactor. This mimicry tendency was not extended to a nonbenefactor. In contrast, participants who ended up with the same positive outcome, but believed that it was attributable to chance, did not exhibit a reliable level of mimicry. Our results suggest that nonconscious behavioral mimicry might be a subtle but important first step through which gratitude promotes communal relationships.

  3. Verbal and Nonverbal Behavior in Judgments of Facilitative Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seay, Thomas A.; Altekruse, Michael K.

    1979-01-01

    Investigated effects of different verbal counseling styles, nonverbal behaviors, and client sex on facilitative conditions of the counseling relationship. Verbal style included an affective and behavioral interactive communication style. Nonverbal behaviors were eye contact, smiling, head nodding, and trunk lean-forward. Certain nonverbal…

  4. Facilitator control as automatic behavior: A verbal behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Genae A.

    1993-01-01

    Several studies of facilitated communication have demonstrated that the facilitators were controlling and directing the typing, although they appeared to be unaware of doing so. Such results shift the focus of analysis to the facilitator's behavior and raise questions regarding the controlling variables for that behavior. This paper analyzes facilitator behavior as an instance of automatic verbal behavior, from the perspective of Skinner's (1957) book Verbal Behavior. Verbal behavior is automatic when the speaker or writer is not stimulated by the behavior at the time of emission, the behavior is not edited, the products of behavior differ from what the person would produce normally, and the behavior is attributed to an outside source. All of these characteristics appear to be present in facilitator behavior. Other variables seem to account for the thematic content of the typed messages. These variables also are discussed. PMID:22477083

  5. Infant Day Care Facilitates Preschool Social Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compared play, social, and attachment behaviors of 71 preschool children who had entered infant day care at varying ages and received varying amounts of day care. Concluded that continuous infant day care in quality centers appears to facilitate preschool social behavior and does not negatively affect attachment behavior. (NH)

  6. Interaction Patterns and Facilitation of Peer Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Marvin E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Data show that giving information to members of a group is more important in determining the perception by others that the person is facilitating group performance. Asking for information and opinions is more important in actual facilitation of group learning. Social-emotional support becomes important after initial phases of group interaction.…

  7. Facilitating interpersonal interaction and learning online: linking theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, Joan; Curran, Vernon; Allen, Michael; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Ho, Kendall

    2006-01-01

    An earlier study of physicians' perceptions of interactive online learning showed that these were shaped both by program design and quality and the quality and quantity of interpersonal interaction. We explore instructor roles in enhancing online learning through interpersonal interaction and the learning theories that inform these. This was a qualitative study using focus groups and interviews. Using purposive sampling, 50 physicians were recruited based on their experience with interactive online CME and face-to-face CME. Qualitative thematic and interpretive analysis was used. Two facilitation roles appeared key: creating a comfortable learning environment and enhancing the educational value of electronic discussions. Comfort developed gradually, and specific interventions like facilitating introductions and sharing experiences in a friendly, informative manner were helpful. As in facilitating effective small-group learning, instructors' thoughtful use of techniques that facilitated constructive interaction based on learner's needs and practice demands contributed to the educational value of interpersonal interactions. Facilitators require enhanced skills to engage learners in meaningful interaction and to overcome the transactional distance of online learning. The use of learning theories, including behavioral, cognitive, social, humanistic, and constructivist, can strengthen the educational design and facilitation of online programs. Preparation for online facilitation should include instruction in the roles and techniques required and the theories that inform them.

  8. Oxytocin facilitates social approach behavior in women

    PubMed Central

    Preckel, Katrin; Scheele, Dirk; Kendrick, Keith M.; Maier, Wolfgang; Hurlemann, René

    2014-01-01

    In challenging environments including both numerous threats and scarce resources, the survival of an organism depends on its ability to quickly escape from dangers and to seize opportunities to gain rewards. The phylogenetically ancient neurohormonal oxytocin (OXT) system has been shown to influence both approach and avoidance (AA) behavior in men, but evidence for comparable effects in women is still lacking. We thus conducted a series of pharmacological behavioral experiments in a randomized double-blind study involving 76 healthy heterosexual women treated with either OXT (24 IU) or placebo intranasally. In Experiment 1, we tested how OXT influenced the social distance subjects maintained between themselves and either a female or male experimenter. In Experiment 2, we applied a reaction time based AA task. In Experiment 3 we investigated effects on peri-personal space by measuring the lateral attentional bias in a line bisection task. We found that OXT specifically decreased the distance maintained between subjects and the male but not the female experimenter and also accelerated approach toward pleasant social stimuli in the AA task. However, OXT did not influence the size of peri-personal space, suggesting that it does not alter perception of personal space per se, but rather that a social element is necessary for OXT's effects on AA behavior to become evident. Taken together, our results point to an evolutionarily adaptive mechanism by which OXT in women selectively promotes approach behavior in positive social contexts. PMID:24904342

  9. How interpersonal synchrony facilitates early prosocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Laura K

    2017-08-09

    When infants and children affiliate with others, certain cues may direct their social efforts to 'better' social partners. Interpersonal synchrony, or when two or more people move together in time, can be one such cue. In adults, experiencing interpersonal synchrony encourages affiliative behaviors. Recent studies have found that these effects also influence early prosociality-for example, 14-month-olds help a synchronous partner more than an asynchronous partner. These effects on helping are specifically directed to the synchronous movement partner and members of that person's social group. In older children, the prosocial effects of interpersonal synchrony may even cross group divides. How synchrony and other cues for group membership influence early prosociality is a promising avenue for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Online Chemistry Modules: Interaction and Effective Faculty Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slocum, Laura E.; Towns Marcy Hamby; Zielinski, Theresa Julia

    2004-01-01

    Computer supported collaborative learning, cooperative learning combined with electronic communication, physical chemistry online modules, use of discussion boards, its advantages and limitations are experimented and discussed. The most important finding is the example of effective online faculty facilitation and interaction.

  11. Trait divergence and indirect interactions allow facilitation of congeneric species

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Elisa; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Verdú, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant facilitation occurs when the presence of a plant (i.e. a nurse plant) modifies the environment, making it more favourable for the establishment and survival of other species (i.e. facilitated plants), which can germinate and grow nearby. Facilitative associations can be maintained or turned into competition as the facilitated seedling grows. According to the competition-relatedness hypothesis that suggests that closely related species tend to compete more, facilitation turns into competition between phylogenetically close species. However, some examples of facilitation between congeneric species, which are supposed to be closely related species, have been found in nature. Scope In this work, some examples of congeneric facilitation and subsequent coexistence are reviewed and an attempt is made to explain those exceptions to the competition-relatedness hypothesis. Conclusions Two mechanisms are proposed that can switch the facilitation–competition balance: trait divergence and indirect interactions. When traits have diverged within the genus, the niche overlap is reduced and competition relaxed, thus allowing the coexistence of congeneric species. The presence of third interplayers (mycorrhizal fungi, seed dispersers, pollinators or pathogens) participating in the interaction between plants can alleviate the competition or enhance the reproduction and allow the coexistence of species that could not coexist in their absence. PMID:22543178

  12. Nonverbal Behavior in Tutoring Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Robert S.

    This document reports on a series of studies carried out concerning nonverbal behavior in peer tutoring interactions. The first study examined the encoding (enactment) of nonverbal behavior in a tutoring situation. Results clearly indicated that the tutor's nonverbal behavior was affected by the performance of the tutee. The question of whether or…

  13. Imitating the Autistic Child: Facilitating Communicative Gaze Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiegerman, Ellenmorris; Primavera, Louis H.

    1984-01-01

    Three kinds of adult-child interaction that differentially affected changes in gaze behavior of six autistic children (four to six years old) were investigated. The interaction procedure in which the experimenter imitated the autistic child's object and action performances resulted in the greatest change in the frequency and the duration of gaze…

  14. Increasing Positive Interactive Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotcher, Elaine; Doremus, Richard R.

    1973-01-01

    The question examined in this study was as follows: do teachers increase their positive classroom interactive behaviors as a result of training in systematic classroom observation techniques? (Authors/JA)

  15. Increasing Positive Interactive Classroom Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotcher, Elaine; Doremus, Richard R.

    During the spring of 1972 training workshops for 88 elementary and secondary teachers of the Great Neck Public Schools held to examine four hypotheses: 1) workshops in training teachers to observe classroom behavior would significantly increase these same teachers' positive classroom interactive behaviors consisting of teacher, pupil-pupil,…

  16. A New DREADD Facilitates the Multiplexed Chemogenetic Interrogation of Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vardy, Eyal; Robinson, J. Elliott; Li, Chia; Olsen, Reid H. J.; DiBerto, Jeffrey F.; Giguere, Patrick M.; Sassano, Flori M.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Zhu, Hu; Urban, Daniel J.; White, Kate L.; Rittiner, Joseph E.; Crowley, Nicole A.; Pleil, Kristen E.; Mazzone, Christopher M.; Mosier, Philip D.; Song, Juan; Kash, Thomas L.; Malanga, C. J.; Krashes, Michael J.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    DREADDs are chemogenetic tools widely used to remotely control cellular signaling, neuronal activity and behavior. Here we used a structure-based approach to develop a new Gi coupled DREADD using the kappa-opioid receptor as template (KORD) that is activated by the pharmacologically inert ligand salvinorin B (SALB). Activation of virally-expressed KORD in several neuronal contexts robustly attenuated neuronal activity and modified behaviors. Additionally, co-expression of the KORD and the Gq coupled M3-DREADD within the same neuronal population facilitated the sequential and bi-directional remote control of behavior. The availability of DREADDs activated by different ligands provides enhanced opportunities for investigating diverse physiological systems using multiplexed chemogenetic actuators. PMID:25937170

  17. Behavioral facilitation of reproduction in sexual and unisexual whiptail lizards.

    PubMed Central

    Crews, D; Grassman, M; Lindzey, J

    1986-01-01

    All-female, parthenogenetic species afford a unique test of hypotheses regarding the nature and evolution of sexuality. Mating behavior accomplishes the transfer of gametes and stimulates the coordination of reproductive activity of the male and female. Cnemidophorus uniparens, a parthenogenetic species, is believed to have resulted from the hybridization of two extant gonochoristic species, Cnemidophorus inornatus and Cnemidophorus gularis. C. uniparens regularly and reliably perform behaviors identical in form to those performed during mating by male C. inornatus. We have determined experimentally that individuals of the parthenogenetic species demonstrating male-like pseudosexual behavior also share a similarity in function with males of the sexually reproducing species. The number of female C. inornatus ovulating increases, and the latency to ovulation decreases, if a sexually active conspecific male is present. A similar facilitatory effect on ovarian recrudescence occurs in the all-female C. uniparens in the presence of a male-like individual. These results show that behavioral facilitation of ovarian recrudescence is important in sexual and unisexual species. This may represent a potent selection pressure favoring the maintenance of male-typical behaviors, thus accounting for the display of behavioral traits usually associated with males in unisexual species of hybrid origin. PMID:3467325

  18. Predicting facilitators' behaviors during Alzheimer's family support group meetings.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Ann M; Jackson, Christy S

    2012-03-01

    A social ecological model was used to predict facilitators' behaviors observed during Alzheimer's Association sponsored family support group meetings (N = 66). Information about group leaders was obtained via individual telephone interview prior to the observation of their support group by trained raters. Family dementia caregivers (N = 296) provided basic demographic and caregiving-related information at the end of the observed meeting. Caregiver- and group-level variables predicted ratings of observed leader support during support group meetings. The addition of leader characteristics such as years of experience or professional roles did not significantly contribute to the model. This study lends credence to ecological models emphasizing the influence of social context. Recommendations are made for facilitator training and management of Alzheimer's Association sponsored support group meetings.

  19. An experiment on the social facilitation of gambling behavior.

    PubMed

    Rockloff, Matthew Justus; Dyer, Victoria

    2007-03-01

    Research and theory regarding the social facilitation effect generates the expectation that the presence of other gamblers (or co-actors) in a gaming venue is likely to intensify individual gambling behavior and magnify losses. Fifty male and 66 female participants (116 total) played a computer-simulated electronic gaming machine with a fixed winning sequence, followed by an indefinite losing sequence. Measures of the intensity of gambling behavior included the final payout (a direct measure of losses), average bet-size, number of trials played, and the speed of play. Some participants received false feedback from the computer designed to suggest that other gamers in adjacent rooms were playing and sometimes winning at the same game. Persons who received both sight and sound information, including winning bells and instant messages regarding the wins of other (fake) players, placed more bets and lost more money compared to the other conditions with less information.

  20. Facilitating interaction, communication and collaboration in online courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Sara G.; Robin, Bernard R.; Miller, Robert M.

    2000-07-01

    As the Internet evolves into a truly world wide communications medium, the roles of faculty and students at institutions of higher learning are changing. Traditional face-to-face classes are being converted to an online setting, where materials from syllabi to lectures to assignments are available at the click of a mouse. New technological options are challenging and changing the very nature of teaching as faculty migrate from being deliverers of information to facilitators and mentors. Students are also undergoing a transformation from passive recipients to participants in an active learning environment. Interactions are at the heart of this revolution as students and faculty create new methodologies for the online classroom. New types of interactions are emerging between faculty and students, between students and other students and between students and the educational resources they are exploring. As the online teaching and learning environment expands and matures, new social and instructional interactions are replacing the traditional occurrences in face-to-face classrooms. New communication options are also evolving as a critical component of the online classroom. The shift from a synchronous to an asynchronous communication structure has also had a significant impact on the way students and faculty interact. The use of e-mail, listservs and web-based conferencing has given teachers and learners new flexibility and has fostered a climate where learning takes place wherever and whenever it is convenient. HyperGroups, a communication tool that was developed at the University of Houston, allows students and faculty to seamlessly participate in course-related discussions and easily share multimedia resources. This article explores the many issues associated with facilitating interaction, communication and collaboration in online courses.

  1. Barrier and Facilitators of HIV Related Risky Sexual Behavior

    PubMed Central

    SHAHNAZI, Ashkan; FOROUZAN, Ameneh Setareh; NEDJAT, Saharnaz; ASGARI, Soheila; MAJDZADEH, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to identify the determinants of protective behavior in relation to HIV transmission. Since the risk of transmission is higher among those who have extramarital intercourse, the study sample constituted of such people. Methods: We started this study in 2010 and finished it in 2011. Participants were divided into low-risk and high-risk groups. High-risk people included sex workers and those who presented at drop-in centers. Interviewees were 18 men and women in the low-risk group and 12 men and women in the high-risk group. Data were collected through in-depth interviews and were analyzed using the thematic framework method. Results: In both groups, protective behavior was influenced by willingness to protect, intention or decision to protect, and personal, social, and environmental barriers and facilitators. In terms of willingness, behavior was influenced to preserve sexual pleasure by avoiding condoms. In terms of barriers and facilitators, trust in partner, misperceptions, condom inaccessibility, unplanned sex, fear of contracting the disease, partner’s wish, ethical commitments were mentioned by both groups, stigma of condom possession by the low-risk group, and partner’s force was mentioned by the high-risk group. Conclusion: Educational programs need to focus on changing the concept that “condoms reduce sexual pleasure”. In addition, interventional programs to strengthen factors such as self-efficacy, ethical commitments, faithfulness, and correct beliefs such as undue trust in partner, misconception of being safe, unplanned sex, and the stigma of possessing condoms can be very effective in changing high-risk sexual behavior. PMID:26056638

  2. Interactional Psychology and Organizational Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    7 A0-A113 1132 MI1CHIGAN STATE UNIV EAST LANSING DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY F/6 5/10 INTERACTIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHA VIOR. (U) FEB 82 8...j INTERACTIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR Benjamin Schneider Research Report No. 82.1 February 1982 The writing of this paper was...supported in part by the Organizational Effectiveness Research Programs, Psychological Sciences Division, Office of Naval Research under Contract No. N00014

  3. Developmental trajectories of boys' delinquent group membership and facilitation of violent behaviors during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Lacourse, Eric; Nagin, Daniel; Tremblay, Richard E; Vitaro, Frank; Claes, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Being part of a delinquent group has been shown to facilitate the expression of an individual's own delinquent propensities. However, this facilitation effect has not been investigated from a developmental perspective within a population heterogeneity model. Using a semiparametric mixture model with data from the Montreal Longitudinal Experimental Study, this article addresses important issues in the developmental trends of membership to delinquent groups. We explore how the rate of violent behaviors follows delinquent peer group trajectories and investigate a differential facilitation effect of delinquent peers on violence across multiple developmental pathways. Results suggest that 25% of males followed a childhood or an adolescence delinquent group affiliation trajectory. These two groups account far most of the violent acts assessed during adolescence. In addition, the rate of violent behaviors follows these developmental trajectories. Controlling for these delinquent group trajectories, we also found that being involved in a delinquent group at any specific time during adolescence is associated with an increased rate of violent behaviors, and that leaving these groups results in a decrease in violent behaviors. This facilitation effect appears homogeneous over time and across developmental trajectories. Results are discussed from a social interactional perspective.

  4. Suicidal Behavior and Marital Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Alan L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents two cases chosen to draw attention to marital and developmental dynamics of suicidal behavior. Both case vignettes are based on individual interviews with suicidal persons and their spouses during the suicidal person's psychiatric hospitalization, and both include observations of the marital interaction. Case vignettes are followed by…

  5. Enhancing practice improvement by facilitating practitioner interactivity: new roles for providers of continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Parboosingh, I John; Reed, Virginia A; Caldwell Palmer, James; Bernstein, Henry H

    2011-01-01

    Research into networking and interactivity among practitioners is providing new information that has the potential to enhance the effectiveness of practice improvement initiatives. This commentary reviews the evidence that practitioner interactivity can facilitate emergent learning and behavior change that lead to practice improvements. Insights from learning theories provide a framework for understanding emergent learning as the product of interactions between individuals in trusted relationships, such as occurs in communities of practice. This framework helps explain why some groups respond more favorably to improvement initiatives than others. Failure to take advantage of practitioner interactivity may explain in part the disappointingly low mean rates of practice improvement reported in studies of the effectiveness of practice improvement projects. Examples of improvement models in primary care settings that explicitly use relationship building and facilitation techniques to enhance practitioner interactivity are provided. Ingredients of a curriculum to teach relationship building in communities of practice and facilitation skills to enhance learning in small group education sessions are explored. Sufficient evidence exists to support the roles of relationships and interactivity in practice improvement initiatives such that we recommend the development of training programs to teach these skills to CME providers. Copyright © 2011 The Alliance for Continuing Medical Education, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  6. Family-centered collaborative negotiation: a model for facilitating behavior change in primary care.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Diane O; Horner, Sharon D

    2008-04-01

    To describe a parent-child-based model that melds a family-centered interaction approach, Touchpoints, with brief negotiation strategies (an adaptation of motivational interviewing) to address health risks in children. An application of the model for addressing childhood overweight in the primary care setting is presented. Selected research, theoretical, and clinical articles; national recommendations and guidelines; and a clinical case. Lifestyle health behaviors are learned and reinforced within the family; thus, changes to promote child health require family involvement. Interventions that engage parents and support parent-child relationships, while enhancing motivation and the abilities to change behavior, are recommended. Primary care is an appropriate setting for addressing lifestyle health behaviors. A collaborative partnership, rather than a prescriptive manner, is advocated for primary care providers when working to facilitate health-promoting behavior.

  7. Increasing public awareness and facilitating behavior change: Two guiding heuristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maibach, E.

    2016-12-01

    If there is a single aspiration that unifies the professionals who work on the challenges associated with global change, it is likely their desire to see policy makers, business managers and members of the public make decisions that are better informed by the realities of what we know about how to stabilize the climate and prevent needless harm to people and eco-systems. This calls an obvious question: What can we - as scientists and science organizations - to do more effectively promote evidence-based decision-making and actions by important decision-makers? In this talk I will distinguish between two related challenges: more effectively sharing what we know (i.e., improving our communication); and more effectively helping decision-makers take helpful actions (i.e., improving our efforts to facilitate behavior change). Drawing on both theory and empirical evidence in communication science, behavioral science and other related social sciences, I suggest two guiding heurstics - one for each of the two challenges - that will help scientists and science organizations improve the impact of their outreach efforts. To more effectively share what we know, we need "simple clear messages, repeated often, by a variety of trusted sources." To help people convert their good intentions into effective actions, we need to do more to "make the behaviors we are promoting easy, fun and popular." I refer to each of these as "heuristics" in the sense that they organize a relatively large amount of prescriptive information into a relatively easy to use method or process. In this talk, I will unpack each of these heurtistics with the aim of making them practical for all in attendance.

  8. Peer social interaction is facilitated in juvenile rhesus monkeys treated with fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Bulleri, Alicia M

    2016-06-01

    Fluoxetine improves social interactions in children with autism, social anxiety and social phobia. It is not known whether this effect is mediated directly or indirectly by correcting the underlying pathology. Genetics may also influence the drug effect. Polymorphisms of the MAOA (monoamine oxidase A) gene interact with fluoxetine to influence metabolic profiles in juvenile monkeys. Juvenile nonhuman primates provide an appropriate model for studying fluoxetine effects and drug*gene interactions in children. Male rhesus monkeys 1-3 years of age living in permanent social pairs were treated daily with a therapeutic dose of fluoxetine or vehicle (n = 16/group). Both members of each social pair were assigned to the same treatment group. They were observed for social interactions with their familiar cagemate over a 2-year dosing period. Subjects were genotyped for MAOA variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphisms categorized for high or low transcription rates (hi-MAOA, low-MAOA). Fluoxetine-treated animals spent 30% more time in social interaction than vehicle controls. Fluoxetine significantly increased the duration of quiet interactions, the most common type of interaction, and also of immature sexual behavior typical of rhesus in this age group. Specific behaviors affected depended on MAOA genotype of the animal and its social partner. When given fluoxetine, hi-MOAO monkeys had more social invitation and initiation behaviors and low-MAOA subjects with low-MAOA partners had more grooming and an increased frequency of some facial and vocal expressive behaviors. Fluoxetine may facilitate social interaction in children independent of remediation of psychopathology. Common genetic variants may modify this effect.

  9. [Behavioral approach to facilitate appropriate use of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Osamu; Higuchi, Kazuko; Ishii, Noriko; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Taminato, Tomohiko

    2008-11-01

    Many hospitals have infection control education programs to facilitate the appropriate use of antimicrobial agents. Even with these efforts, however, it is not rare to encounter irregular prescriptions. In order to solve this discrepancy between knowledge and actual behavior, we chose an alternative approach to improve the decision making process. Recent advances in information technology have made it possible to not only instantly integrate various bacterial examination results using a computer, but to simultaneously carry out the statistical analyses at a much lower cost. We employed a client-server system to accomplish these tasks in Kagawa University Hospital. By connecting CCD camera-equipped microscopes to the system directly, image uploading has become a single-clicking job. Various microbial examination data were automatically transferred to the system once they became available in analytical devices such as BacT/ALERT 3D, VITEK, and an MIC analyzer. These data were presented to hospital doctors in well-designed web windows without delay. By removing psychological barriers to access laboratory examination data, statistics, and relevant information, more doctors seemed to independently follow scientific processes to choose antimicrobial agents. The daily behavior of hospital doctors has also been influenced by the system, e. g., pasting the microscopic images onto clinical records, or starting Gram staining in their own wards. These subtle but fundamental changes will eventually alter the way they make prescription decisions. The computer system was also useful for the infection control team to monitor and detect nosocomial infections, which has become essential to carry out its daily activities.

  10. Animal behaviour learning environment: software to facilitate learning in canine and feline behavior therapy.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, P D; Della Torre, P K; Evans, D L

    2003-01-01

    Interactive software has been developed on CD-ROM to facilitate learning of problem formulation, diagnostic methodology, and therapeutic options in dog and cat behavior problems. Students working in small groups are presented with a signalment, a case history, and brief description of the problem behavior as perceived by the client. Students then navigate through the case history by asking the client questions from an icon-driven question pad. Animated video responses to the questions are provided. Students are then required to rate the significance of the questions and answers with respect to the development of the unwelcome behavior. Links to online self-assessments and to resource materials about causation and treatment options are provided to assist students in their decision-making process. The activity concludes with a software-generated e-mail submission that includes the recorded history, diagnosis, and recommended treatment for assessment purposes.

  11. Interactions between freshwater snails and tadpoles: competition and facilitation.

    PubMed

    Brönmark, Christer; Rundle, Simon D; Erlandsson, Ann

    1991-06-01

    Freshwater snails and anuran tadpoles have been suggested to have their highest population densities in ponds of intermediate size where abiotic disturbance (e.g. desiccation) is low and large predators absent. Both snails and tadpoles feed on periphytic algae and, thus, there should be a large potential for competitive interactions to occur between these two distantly related taxa. In a field experiment we examined the relative strength of competition between two closely related snail species, Lymnaea stagnalis and L. peregra, and between L. stagnalis and tadpoles of the common frog, Rana temporaria. Snail growth and egg production and tadpole size at and time to metamorphosis were determined. Effects on the common food source, periphyton, were monitored with the aid of artificial substrates. Periphyton dry weight was dramatically reduced in the presence of snails and/or tadpoles. There were no competitive effects on growth or egg production of the two snail species when they were coexisting. Mortality of L. peregra was high (95%) after reproduction, but independent of treatment. Growth of L. stagnalis was reduced only at the highest tadpole densities, whereas egg production was reduced both by intraspecific competition and by competition with tadpoles. Differences in egg production were retained after tadpole metamorphosis. Tadpole larval period increased, weight of metamorphosing frogs decreased and growth rate was reduced as a function of increasing tadpole density. However, contrary to expectation, snails had a positive effect on tadpole larval period, weight and growth rate. Further, in experimental containers without snails there was a dense growth of the filamentous green alga Cladophora sp. We suggest that the facilitative effects of snails on tadpoles are due to an "indirect mutualistic" mechanism, involving competition between food sources of different quality (microalgae and Cladophora sp.) and tadpoles being competitively dominant over snails for the

  12. The Effects of Teacher Facilitation on the Social Interactions of Young Children during Computer Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Cynthia; Higgins, Kyle; Gelfer, Jeff; Hong, Eunsook; Miller, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This group study investigated the impact of teacher facilitation on the social interactions of young children during computer activities. The study compared 18 dyads comprised of children with and without disabilities who received teacher facilitation during computer activities to a group of children who did not receive teacher facilitation. The…

  13. Facilitating Attuned Interactions: Using the FAN Approach to Family Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilkerson, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Erikson Institute's Fussy Baby Network® (FBN) is a national model prevention program known for its approach to family engagement called the FAN (Gilkerson & Gray, 2014; Gilkerson et al., 2012). The FAN is both a conceptual framework and a practical tool to facilitate attunement in helping relationships and promote reflective practice. This…

  14. Inquiry-Based Learning with or without Facilitator Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerasinghe, Thushani Alwis; Ramberg, Robert; Hewagamage, Kamalanath Priyantha

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses findings of a study investigating how students, in four online courses, engaged in inquiry-based learning with and without support from a facilitator. The investigation was conducted by analyzing discussions of the online courses using the community of inquiry model. The results of the study imply that students in online…

  15. Facilitating Attuned Interactions: Using the FAN Approach to Family Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilkerson, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Erikson Institute's Fussy Baby Network® (FBN) is a national model prevention program known for its approach to family engagement called the FAN (Gilkerson & Gray, 2014; Gilkerson et al., 2012). The FAN is both a conceptual framework and a practical tool to facilitate attunement in helping relationships and promote reflective practice. This…

  16. The Contribution of Support Teachers in Facilitating Children's Peer Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillesøy, Siv

    2016-01-01

    In the Nordic countries, policies for children, who require special educational assistance, emphasize that support should be provided within regular preschool settings. As one measure to facilitate these children's participation in preschool activities, support teachers may be appointed. The present study explores how support teachers contribute…

  17. Facilitating Behavior Change With Low-literacy Patient Education Materials

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Wallace, Andrea S.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Delgadillo, Adriana; Bengal, Nikki; Davis, Terry C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe a process for developing low-literacy health education materials that increase knowledge and activate patients toward healthier behaviors. Methods We developed a theoretically informed process for developing educational materials. This process included convening a multidisciplinary creative team, soliciting stakeholder input, identifying key concepts to be communicated, mapping concepts to a behavioral theory, creating a supporting behavioral intervention, designing and refining materials, and assessing efficacy. Results We describe the use of this process to develop a diabetes self-management guide. Conclusions Developing low-literacy health education materials that will activate patients toward healthier behaviors requires attention to factors beyond reading level. PMID:17931139

  18. Enriched Open Field Facilitates Exercise and Social Interaction in 2 Strains of Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Jacob S; Bellinger, Seanceray A; Joshi, Prianca; Kleven, Gale A

    2014-01-01

    Current housing guidelines for laboratory rodents include recommendations for enrichment. Working with guinea pigs, we have developed an open-field enrichment paradigm that provides several aspects of this species’ natural environment. These naturalistic aspects include access to increased space for exploration, access to western timothy (Phleum pratense L.) hay, and grouping as a herd to facilitate social interaction. To determine the immediate effect on behavior from access to the enriched environment, female guinea pigs from 2 strains, IAF Hairless and NIH Hartley, were observed in both standard home cages and an open-field enriched environment. Subjects were housed with cagemates in pairs for the home-cage observation and were grouped as a herd when in the open-field arena. Behaviors were videorecorded for 1 h and then scored. Salivary cortisol levels were measured both prior to and immediately after behavioral observations. Analyses revealed higher levels of activity and social interaction in the open-field arena compared with the home cage, with no significant change in salivary cortisol levels. These results suggest that exposure to the open-field environment provide increased opportunities for exercise and social enrichment. Although additional studies are needed to determine long-term effects on experimental outcomes, the open-field configuration holds promise as a laboratory enrichment paradigm for guinea pigs. PMID:25199089

  19. A Distance Education Classroom Designed to Facilitate Synchronous Learner and Instructor Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Stuart P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a live, synchronous distance delivery technology would facilitate interaction, immediacy, and presence between an instructor and his contiguous and remote classrooms, and whether it would facilitate interaction between the two groups of students. This study researched the opinions of students on…

  20. A Distance Education Classroom Designed to Facilitate Synchronous Learner and Instructor Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Stuart P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a live, synchronous distance delivery technology would facilitate interaction, immediacy, and presence between an instructor and his contiguous and remote classrooms, and whether it would facilitate interaction between the two groups of students. This study researched the opinions of students on…

  1. Nurses as practice change facilitators for healthy behaviors.

    PubMed

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Baumann, Jeanne; Arnold, Anita K; Torres, Trissa

    2008-01-01

    This study used nurses as practice change consultants to help primary care medical practices improve their delivery of health behavior services to patients. Nurse consultants worked with 20 practices from 2 healthcare systems. In each practice, the nurses helped clinicians and staff to develop a practice-specific protocol so that they could identify and intervene with the health behavior of their patients. As a result of the nurse consultant intervention, health behavior delivery was improved. This article describes the specific methods and the lessons learned through this study. We encourage practices to use nurse consultants as one way of improving quality of care.

  2. Understanding Facilitation: A Study of Knowledge, Skills and Behaviors in Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evinger, Leasa Kowalski

    2014-01-01

    Institutions of higher education have recently articulated the value of creating environments where diverse individuals can interact. However, "educators have been challenged to articulate clearly the educational purposes and benefits of diversity" (Gurin, Dey, Hurtado, & Gurin, 2002, p. 330). Intergroup dialogue is one approach that…

  3. Facilitating Trust Engenderment in Secondary School Nurse Interactions with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summach, Anne H. J.

    2011-01-01

    School nurses are involved in a complex framework of interactions with students, other professionals, parents, and administrators. Trust between nurse and student is critical for interaction effectiveness. The goal of this study was to understand through phenomenology the process of engendering trust in school nurse-high school student…

  4. Facilitating Trust Engenderment in Secondary School Nurse Interactions with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summach, Anne H. J.

    2011-01-01

    School nurses are involved in a complex framework of interactions with students, other professionals, parents, and administrators. Trust between nurse and student is critical for interaction effectiveness. The goal of this study was to understand through phenomenology the process of engendering trust in school nurse-high school student…

  5. Facilitative plant interactions and climate simultaneously drive alpine plant diversity.

    PubMed

    Cavieres, Lohengrin A; Brooker, Rob W; Butterfield, Bradley J; Cook, Bradley J; Kikvidze, Zaal; Lortie, Christopher J; Michalet, Richard; Pugnaire, Francisco I; Schöb, Christian; Xiao, Sa; Anthelme, Fabien; Björk, Robert G; Dickinson, Katharine J M; Cranston, Brittany H; Gavilán, Rosario; Gutiérrez-Girón, Alba; Kanka, Robert; Maalouf, Jean-Paul; Mark, Alan F; Noroozi, Jalil; Parajuli, Rabindra; Phoenix, Gareth K; Reid, Anya M; Ridenour, Wendy M; Rixen, Christian; Wipf, Sonja; Zhao, Liang; Escudero, Adrián; Zaitchik, Benjamin F; Lingua, Emanuele; Aschehoug, Erik T; Callaway, Ragan M

    2014-02-01

    Interactions among species determine local-scale diversity, but local interactions are thought to have minor effects at larger scales. However, quantitative comparisons of the importance of biotic interactions relative to other drivers are rarely made at larger scales. Using a data set spanning 78 sites and five continents, we assessed the relative importance of biotic interactions and climate in determining plant diversity in alpine ecosystems dominated by nurse-plant cushion species. Climate variables related with water balance showed the highest correlation with richness at the global scale. Strikingly, although the effect of cushion species on diversity was lower than that of climate, its contribution was still substantial. In particular, cushion species enhanced species richness more in systems with inherently impoverished local diversity. Nurse species appear to act as a 'safety net' sustaining diversity under harsh conditions, demonstrating that climate and species interactions should be integrated when predicting future biodiversity effects of climate change.

  6. Pubertal pair-housing facilitates adult sexual behavior in male rats.

    PubMed

    Molenda-Figueira, Heather A; Bell, Margaret R; De Lorme, Kayla C; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of pubertal testosterone (T) and social housing manipulations on male sexual behavior in adult rats. Prepubertal rats were castrated at 21 days of age (P21) and implanted with either blank or T-releasing pellets. At the onset of puberty, P28, half the rats in each treatment group were either single- or pair-housed with a male of the same hormone condition through P56, at which time pellets were removed and all rats were single-housed. In adulthood (P84), all rats received T replacement and were tested for sexual behavior. Rats pair-housed during adolescence showed more sexual behavior and greater improvement of sexual performance over repeated tests than single-housed rats, regardless of pubertal T status. Pubertal T, however, did facilitate the frequency of anogenital investigation. Thus, in male rats, social interactions during adolescence are more important than exposure to pubertal T in enhancing adult sexual behavior. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Tips for Teachers Selecting Toys to Facilitate Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Cynthia O.; Elmore, Shannon Renee

    2011-01-01

    Toy selection is an important role for early childhood teachers. This research-to-practice article describes what research tells us about how toys can affect the social interactions and communication of young children including those with developmental delays.

  8. Tips for Teachers Selecting Toys to Facilitate Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Cynthia O.; Elmore, Shannon Renee

    2011-01-01

    Toy selection is an important role for early childhood teachers. This research-to-practice article describes what research tells us about how toys can affect the social interactions and communication of young children including those with developmental delays.

  9. Belowground volatiles facilitate interactions between plant roots and soil organisms.

    PubMed

    Wenke, Katrin; Kai, Marco; Piechulla, Birgit

    2010-02-01

    Many interactions between organisms are based on the emission and perception of volatiles. The principle of using volatile metabolites as communication signals for chemo-attractant or repellent for species-specific interactions or mediators for cell-to-cell recognition does not stop at an apparently unsuitable or inappropriate environment. These infochemicals do not only diffuse through the atmosphere to process their actions aboveground, but belowground volatile interactions are similarly complex. This review summarizes various eucaryotes (e.g., plant (roots), invertebrates, fungi) and procaryotes (e.g., rhizobacteria) which are involved in these volatile-mediated interactions. The soil volatiles cannot be neglected anymore, but have to be considered in the future as valuable infochemicals to understand the entire integrity of the ecosystems.

  10. Social Interaction and Repetitive Motor Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftin, Rachel L.; Odom, Samuel L.; Lantz, Johanna F.

    2008-01-01

    Students with autism have difficulty initiating social interactions and may exhibit repetitive motor behavior (e.g., body rocking, hand flapping). Increasing social interaction by teaching new skills may lead to reductions in problem behavior, such as motor stereotypies. Additionally, self-monitoring strategies can increase the maintenance of…

  11. Action plans can interact to hinder or facilitate reach performance.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Lisa R; Wiediger, Matthew D; Taddese, Ezana F

    2015-11-01

    Executing a reach action can be delayed while retaining another action in working memory (WM) if the two action plans partly overlap rather than do not overlap. This delay (partial repetition cost) occurs when reach responses are under cognitive control. In this study, we investigated whether facilitation (a partial repetition benefit) occurs when reach responses are automatic. We also examined whether the hemisphere controlling the limb or selection of the preferred limb (based on a free-reach task) influences reach performance when the actions partly overlap. Left- and right-handers reached to different stimulus locations to the left and right of body midline with their ipsilateral hand while maintaining an action plan in WM that required the same or the different hand. The results showed a partial repetition benefit for spatially compatible reaches to left and right stimulus locations far from the body midline, but not for those near the body midline. Also, no partial repetition cost was found at any of the stimulus-reach locations. This indicates that automatic reach responses that partly overlap with an action plan maintained in WM are not delayed, but instead can be facilitated (partial repetition benefit). The roles of hemisphere and reach-hand preference in action control and the importance of the degree of feature overlap in obtaining a partial repetition benefit (and cost) are discussed.

  12. Gene-environment interaction and suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Roy, Alec; Sarchiopone, Marco; Carli, Vladimir

    2009-07-01

    Studies have increasingly shown that gene-environment interactions are important in psychiatry. Suicidal behavior is a major public health problem. Suicide is generally considered to be a multi-determined act involving various areas of proximal and distal risk. Genetic risk factors are estimated to account for approximately 30% to 40% of the variance in suicidal behavior. In this article, the authors review relevant studies concerning the interaction between the serotonin transporter gene and environmental variables as a model of gene-environment interactions that may have an impact on suicidal behavior. The findings reviewed here suggest that there may be meaningful interactions between distal and proximal suicide risk factors that may amplify the risk of suicidal behavior. Future studies of suicidal behavior should examine both genetic and environmental variables and examine for gene-environment interactions.

  13. Facilitating Behavior Change with Low-Literacy Patient Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Wallace, Andrea S.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Delgadillo, Adriana; Bengal, Nikki; Davis, Terry C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe a process for developing low-literacy health education materials that increase knowledge and activate patients toward healthier behaviors. Methods: We developed a theoretically informed process for developing educational materials. This process included convening a multidisciplinary creative team, soliciting stakeholder…

  14. Facilitating Behavior Change with Low-Literacy Patient Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Wallace, Andrea S.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Delgadillo, Adriana; Bengal, Nikki; Davis, Terry C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe a process for developing low-literacy health education materials that increase knowledge and activate patients toward healthier behaviors. Methods: We developed a theoretically informed process for developing educational materials. This process included convening a multidisciplinary creative team, soliciting stakeholder…

  15. Workplace Financial Education Facilitates Improvement in Personal Financial Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prawitz, Aimee D.; Cohart, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Based on the life-cycle theory of consumption, this quasi-experimental study of 995 employees examined changes in financial behaviors following employee-needs-driven workplace financial education. Repeated-measures ANOVA compared participants and non-participants on perceived financial wellness and savings ratios; main effects indicated that both…

  16. Behavioral Interactions under Noxious Environments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-30

    Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior , 1978...L. D.: Responding in the cat maintained under response-independent electric shock and response-produced electric shock. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior , 1969...1975, 27, 325-340. Kelleher, R. T.: Conditioned reinforcement in second-order schedules. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of

  17. Shared Cognition Facilitated by Teacher Use of Interactive Whiteboard Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redman, Christine; Vincent, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study designed to examine the dialogic processes teachers used to sustain focused discussions, using questioning techniques and Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs). IWBs and their related technologies such as plasma touch screens and projected tablets have passed through several phases of implementation as classroom objects,…

  18. Agent Technologies Designed to Facilitate Interactive Knowledge Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Arthur C.; Jeon, Moongee; Dufty, David

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, interdisciplinary researchers have developed technologies with animated pedagogical agents that interact with the student in language and other communication channels (such as facial expressions and gestures). These pedagogical agents model good learning strategies and coach the students in actively constructing knowledge…

  19. Agent Technologies Designed to Facilitate Interactive Knowledge Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Arthur C.; Jeon, Moongee; Dufty, David

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, interdisciplinary researchers have developed technologies with animated pedagogical agents that interact with the student in language and other communication channels (such as facial expressions and gestures). These pedagogical agents model good learning strategies and coach the students in actively constructing knowledge…

  20. Shared Cognition Facilitated by Teacher Use of Interactive Whiteboard Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redman, Christine; Vincent, John Terence

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine questioning opportunities afforded by interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by highlighting pedagogical decisions enacted by teachers to ensure that they work with the wider affordances of the device. Design/Methodology/Approach: Three primary/elementary teachers participated in a study designed to…

  1. Social inclusion facilitates risky mating behavior in men.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Donald F; Brown, Christina M; Young, Steven G; Bernstein, Michael J; Hugenberg, Kurt

    2011-07-01

    Although past research has reliably established unique effects of social exclusion on human cognition and behavior, the current research focuses on the unique effects of social inclusion. Recent evidence indicates that social inclusion leads to enhanced prioritization of reproductive interests. The current study extends these findings by showing that the pursuit of these inclusion-induced reproductive goals occurs in sex-specific ways. Across three experiments, social inclusion led men, but not women, to endorse riskier, more aggressive mating strategies compared to control and socially excluded participants. Specifically, included men were more likely to endorse sexual aggression (Experiment 1), high-risk mate poaching behaviors (Experiment 2), and high-risk mate retention tactics (Experiment 3). These results demonstrate that the experience of social inclusion can affect sex-differentiated preferences for risky mating strategies.

  2. How Teacher Mediation during Video Viewing Facilitates Literacy Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golos, Debbie B.; Moses, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing support for using media products as early intervention tools for deaf children. Because deaf children are visual learners, products such as interactive DVDs and videos can be an effective supplement in the teaching of ASL and literacy skills to deaf children. While adult mediation during literacy activities has been shown to…

  3. How Teacher Mediation during Video Viewing Facilitates Literacy Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golos, Debbie B.; Moses, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing support for using media products as early intervention tools for deaf children. Because deaf children are visual learners, products such as interactive DVDs and videos can be an effective supplement in the teaching of ASL and literacy skills to deaf children. While adult mediation during literacy activities has been shown to…

  4. Behavioral facilitation: a cognitive model of individual differences in approach motivation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael D; Meier, Brian P; Tamir, Maya; Wilkowski, Benjamin M; Ode, Scott

    2009-02-01

    Approach motivation consists of the active, engaged pursuit of one's goals. The purpose of the present three studies (N = 258) was to examine whether approach motivation could be cognitively modeled, thereby providing process-based insights into personality functioning. Behavioral facilitation was assessed in terms of faster (or facilitated) reaction time with practice. As hypothesized, such tendencies predicted higher levels of approach motivation, higher levels of positive affect, and lower levels of depressive symptoms and did so across cognitive, behavioral, self-reported, and peer-reported outcomes. Tendencies toward behavioral facilitation, on the other hand, did not correlate with self-reported traits (Study 1) and did not predict avoidance motivation or negative affect (all studies). The results indicate a systematic relationship between behavioral facilitation in cognitive tasks and approach motivation in daily life. Results are discussed in terms of the benefits of modeling the cognitive processes hypothesized to underlie individual differences motivation, affect, and depression.

  5. Loss of quinone reductase 2 function selectively facilitates learning behaviors.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Charles-Etienne; Bastianetto, Stephane; Brouillette, Jonathan; Tse, YiuChung; Boutin, Jean A; Delagrange, Philippe; Wong, TakPan; Sarret, Philippe; Quirion, Rémi

    2010-09-22

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with deficits in learning and memory with age as well as in Alzheimer's disease. Using DNA microarray, we demonstrated the overexpression of quinone reductase 2 (QR2) in the hippocampus in two models of learning deficits, namely the aged memory impaired rats and the scopolamine-induced amnesia model. QR2 is a cytosolic flavoprotein that catalyzes the reduction of its substrate and enhances the production of damaging activated quinone and ROS. QR2-like immunostaining is enriched in cerebral structures associated with learning behaviors, such as the hippocampal formation and the temporofrontal cortex of rat, mouse, and human brains. In cultured rat embryonic hippocampal neurons, selective inhibitors of QR2, namely S26695 and S29434, protected against menadione-induced cell death by reversing its proapoptotic action. S26695 (8 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited scopolamine-induced amnesia. Interestingly, adult QR2 knock-out mice demonstrated enhanced learning abilities in various tasks, including Morris water maze, object recognition, and rotarod performance test. Other behaviors related to anxiety (elevated plus maze), depression (forced swim), and schizophrenia (prepulse inhibition) were not affected in QR2-deficient mice. Together, these data suggest a role for QR2 in cognitive behaviors with QR2 inhibitors possibly representing a novel therapeutic strategy toward the treatment of learning deficits especially observed in the aged brain.

  6. Facilitation and Teacher Behaviors: An Analysis of Literacy Teachers' Video-Case Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arya, Poonam; Christ, Tanya; Chiu, Ming Ming

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how peer and professor facilitations are related to teachers' behaviors during video-case discussions. Fourteen inservice teachers produced 1,787 turns of conversation during 12 video-case discussions that were video-recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed with statistical discourse analysis. Professor facilitations (sharing…

  7. Facilitating coping behavior in children prior to dental general anesthesia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Caroline; Hosey, Marie-Therese; McHugh, Siobhan

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the efficacy of two different preparation packages, a paper-based cartoon and an interactive computer, at facilitating coping behavior in children undergoing dental general anesthetic (DGA) tooth extraction. A total of 198 children were allocated randomly to computer, cartoon or control groups. A Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Modified Child Dental Anxiety Scale (MCDAS) were used to compare preoperative anxiety levels between the three study groups. Blinded observers then scored behavior at both anesthesia induction and upon recovery using a VAS for each (0 = coped/no distress and 10 = no coping/high distress). The children's median age was 5 (range 3-10) years, 57% were boys, a median of seven teeth were extracted (range 1-20). Preoperative anxiety was similar for all preparation groups; with 24% of all children categorized 'phobic' using MCDAS. The median induction (coping) VAS level for both the computer and the cartoon groups was '1' (range 0-10), compared with the control group level of '3' (range 0-10). The median recovery (coping) VAS levels were: computer group: 0 (range 0-10), cartoon group: 4 (range 0-10) and control group: 2.5 (range 0-10). The Mann-Whitney U-test showed that the computer group coped significantly better than the control group at induction (P = 0.014) and significantly better than the cartoon group upon recovery (P = 0.016). The statistical power for detecting differences between groups (computer/cartoon versus control) was calculated to be 90%, based on pilot study data. The computer preparation package facilitated coping behavior in children undergoing DGA induction.

  8. The Behavioral Relevance of Multisensory Neural Response Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sperdin, Holger F.; Cappe, Céline; Murray, Micah M.

    2009-01-01

    Sensory information can interact to impact perception and behavior. Foods are appreciated according to their appearance, smell, taste and texture. Athletes and dancers combine visual, auditory, and somatosensory information to coordinate their movements. Under laboratory settings, detection and discrimination are likewise facilitated by multisensory signals. Research over the past several decades has shown that the requisite anatomy exists to support interactions between sensory systems in regions canonically designated as exclusively unisensory in their function and, more recently, that neural response interactions occur within these same regions, including even primary cortices and thalamic nuclei, at early post-stimulus latencies. Here, we review evidence concerning direct links between early, low-level neural response interactions and behavioral measures of multisensory integration. PMID:20582260

  9. Do redundant visual and auditory target variables facilitate control behavior?

    PubMed

    McCord, D M

    1989-08-01

    The compensatory tracking paradigm has been used extensively in pioneering work on Control Theory, a cybernetic model of behavior. In most studies subjects have been asked to control or maintain at a steady state a single variable or aspect of the stimulus display. The present study utilized three groups of subjects, comparing their performance effectiveness in controlling: (1) a visual stimulus (cursor) versus (2) an auditory stimulus (tone) versus (3) a combined, redundant-cue condition employing both cursor and tone. Freshman volunteers responded to a computer display using a joystick controller; their task was to keep stationary a stimulus that was subject to a smoothed, quasirandom disturbance. Contrary to predictions, subjects in the cursor-alone group performed more effectively than subjects in the combined cursor-tone group. While speculative interpretations are offered, further research is needed to clarify these results.

  10. Learning in Alzheimer's disease is facilitated by social interaction.

    PubMed

    Duff, Melissa C; Gallegos, Diana R; Cohen, Neal J; Tranel, Daniel

    2013-12-15

    Seminal work in Gary Van Hoesen's laboratory at Iowa in the early 1980s established that the hallmark neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD; neurofibrillary tangles) had its first foothold in specific parts of the hippocampal formation and entorhinal cortex, effectively isolating the hippocampus from much of its input and output and causing the distinctive impairment of new learning that is the leading early characteristic of the disease (Hyman et al., 1984). The boundaries and conditions of the anterograde memory defect in patients with AD have been a topic of intense research interest ever since (e.g., Graham and Hodges, 1977; Nestor et al., 2006). For example, it has been shown that patients with AD may acquire some new semantic information through methods such as errorless learning, but learning under these conditions is typically slow and inefficient. Drawing on a learning paradigm (a collaborative referencing task) that was previously shown to induce robust and enduring learning in patients with hippocampal amnesia, we investigated whether this task would be effective in promoting new learning in patients with AD. We studied five women with early-stage AD and 10 demographically matched healthy comparison participants, each interacting with a familiar communication partner. AD pairs displayed significant and enduring learning across trials, with increased accuracy and decreased time to complete trials, in a manner indistinguishable from healthy comparison pairs, resulting in efficient and economical communication. The observed learning here most likely draws on neural resources outside the medial temporal lobes. These interactive communication sessions provide a potent learning environment with significant implications for memory intervention. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Spatial vision in insects is facilitated by shaping the dynamics of visual input through behavioral action

    PubMed Central

    Egelhaaf, Martin; Boeddeker, Norbert; Kern, Roland; Kurtz, Rafael; Lindemann, Jens P.

    2012-01-01

    Insects such as flies or bees, with their miniature brains, are able to control highly aerobatic flight maneuvres and to solve spatial vision tasks, such as avoiding collisions with obstacles, landing on objects, or even localizing a previously learnt inconspicuous goal on the basis of environmental cues. With regard to solving such spatial tasks, these insects still outperform man-made autonomous flying systems. To accomplish their extraordinary performance, flies and bees have been shown by their characteristic behavioral actions to actively shape the dynamics of the image flow on their eyes (“optic flow”). The neural processing of information about the spatial layout of the environment is greatly facilitated by segregating the rotational from the translational optic flow component through a saccadic flight and gaze strategy. This active vision strategy thus enables the nervous system to solve apparently complex spatial vision tasks in a particularly efficient and parsimonious way. The key idea of this review is that biological agents, such as flies or bees, acquire at least part of their strength as autonomous systems through active interactions with their environment and not by simply processing passively gained information about the world. These agent-environment interactions lead to adaptive behavior in surroundings of a wide range of complexity. Animals with even tiny brains, such as insects, are capable of performing extraordinarily well in their behavioral contexts by making optimal use of the closed action–perception loop. Model simulations and robotic implementations show that the smart biological mechanisms of motion computation and visually-guided flight control might be helpful to find technical solutions, for example, when designing micro air vehicles carrying a miniaturized, low-weight on-board processor. PMID:23269913

  12. Spatial vision in insects is facilitated by shaping the dynamics of visual input through behavioral action.

    PubMed

    Egelhaaf, Martin; Boeddeker, Norbert; Kern, Roland; Kurtz, Rafael; Lindemann, Jens P

    2012-01-01

    Insects such as flies or bees, with their miniature brains, are able to control highly aerobatic flight maneuvres and to solve spatial vision tasks, such as avoiding collisions with obstacles, landing on objects, or even localizing a previously learnt inconspicuous goal on the basis of environmental cues. With regard to solving such spatial tasks, these insects still outperform man-made autonomous flying systems. To accomplish their extraordinary performance, flies and bees have been shown by their characteristic behavioral actions to actively shape the dynamics of the image flow on their eyes ("optic flow"). The neural processing of information about the spatial layout of the environment is greatly facilitated by segregating the rotational from the translational optic flow component through a saccadic flight and gaze strategy. This active vision strategy thus enables the nervous system to solve apparently complex spatial vision tasks in a particularly efficient and parsimonious way. The key idea of this review is that biological agents, such as flies or bees, acquire at least part of their strength as autonomous systems through active interactions with their environment and not by simply processing passively gained information about the world. These agent-environment interactions lead to adaptive behavior in surroundings of a wide range of complexity. Animals with even tiny brains, such as insects, are capable of performing extraordinarily well in their behavioral contexts by making optimal use of the closed action-perception loop. Model simulations and robotic implementations show that the smart biological mechanisms of motion computation and visually-guided flight control might be helpful to find technical solutions, for example, when designing micro air vehicles carrying a miniaturized, low-weight on-board processor.

  13. A facilitative effect of punishment on unpunished behavior.

    PubMed

    BRETHOWER, D M; REYNOLDS, G S

    1962-04-01

    The key pecking of two pigeons was reinforced on a variable-interval schedule of reinforcement during the presentation of each of two stimuli. In various phases of the experiment, punishment followed every response emitted in the presence of one of the stimuli. In general, when the rate of punished responding changed during the presentation of one stimulus, the rate of unpunished responding during the other stimulus changed in the opposite direction. This sort of change in rate is an example of behavioral contrast. When punishment was introduced, the rate of punished responding decreased and the rate of unpunished responding increased as functions of shock intensity. When the rate of previously punished responding increased after the termination of the shock, the rate of the always unpunished responding decreased. When the procedure correlated with a red key was changed from variable-interval reinforcement and punishment for each response to extinction and no punishment, the rate of reinforced responding during presentations of a green key decreased and then increased while the rate of the previously punished responding during red first increased and then decreased during extinction.

  14. Instructional Practices Facilitating Cross-National Interactions in the Undergraduate Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yefanova, Diana N.; Montgomery, Mary Lynn; Woodruff, Gayle A.; Johnstone, Christopher J.; Kappler, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    We examine pedagogical practices that facilitate international and domestic students' interactions on two campuses of a U.S. public university. Findings highlight the central role of the instructor in supporting student interactions via pair and group work and collaborative assignments that result in increased understanding of class content. The…

  15. Interactions among resource partitioning, sampling effect, and facilitation on the biodiversity effect: a modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Flombaum, Pedro; Sala, Osvaldo E; Rastetter, Edward B

    2014-02-01

    Resource partitioning, facilitation, and sampling effect are the three mechanisms behind the biodiversity effect, which is depicted usually as the effect of plant-species richness on aboveground net primary production. These mechanisms operate simultaneously but their relative importance and interactions are difficult to unravel experimentally. Thus, niche differentiation and facilitation have been lumped together and separated from the sampling effect. Here, we propose three hypotheses about interactions among the three mechanisms and test them using a simulation model. The model simulated water movement through soil and vegetation, and net primary production mimicking the Patagonian steppe. Using the model, we created grass and shrub monocultures and mixtures, controlled root overlap and grass water-use efficiency (WUE) to simulate gradients of biodiversity, resource partitioning and facilitation. The presence of shrubs facilitated grass growth by increasing its WUE and in turn increased the sampling effect, whereas root overlap (resource partitioning) had, on average, no effect on sampling effect. Interestingly, resource partitioning and facilitation interacted so the effect of facilitation on sampling effect decreased as resource partitioning increased. Sampling effect was enhanced by the difference between the two functional groups in their efficiency in using resources. Morphological and physiological differences make one group outperform the other; once these differences were established further differences did not enhance the sampling effect. In addition, grass WUE and root overlap positively influence the biodiversity effect but showed no interactions.

  16. Front interaction induces excitable behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rivas, P.; Matías, M. A.; Colet, P.; Gelens, L.; Walgraef, D.; Gomila, D.

    2017-02-01

    Spatially extended systems can support local transient excitations in which just a part of the system is excited. The mechanisms reported so far are local excitability and excitation of a localized structure. Here we introduce an alternative mechanism based on the coexistence of two homogeneous stable states and spatial coupling. We show the existence of a threshold for perturbations of the homogeneous state. Subthreshold perturbations decay exponentially. Superthreshold perturbations induce the emergence of a long-lived structure formed by two back to back fronts that join the two homogeneous states. While in typical excitability the trajectory follows the remnants of a limit cycle, here reinjection is provided by front interaction, such that fronts slowly approach each other until eventually annihilating. This front-mediated mechanism shows that extended systems with no oscillatory regimes can display excitability.

  17. Facilitating Business to Government Interaction Using a Citizen-Centric Web 2.0 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dais, Alexandros; Nikolaidou, Mara; Anagnostopoulos, Dimosthenis

    Modelling Business to Government (B2G) interaction is considered to be more complex than Citizen to Government (C2G) interaction, since the concept of authorized citizens, representing the Business while interacting with specific governmental organizations should be explored. Novel interaction models should be introduced, transforming the way Governmental services are delivered to Businesses. To this end, we propose a Web 2.0 citizen-centric model facilitating Business to Government interaction by establishing a social network between citizens and public agencies. All kinds of interactions (B2G, G2G) are expressed as C2G interactions establishing the citizen-centric nature of the proposed interaction model. The architecture of a Web 2.0 platform, named MyCCP, based on the suggested interaction model is also presented, along with a case study illustrating business-to-government interaction to indicate the potential of the suggested model.

  18. Empathy promotes altruistic behavior in economic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Klimecki, Olga M.; Mayer, Sarah V.; Jusyte, Aiste; Scheeff , Jonathan; Schönenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    What are the determinants of altruism? While economists assume that altruism is mainly driven by fairness norms, social psychologists consider empathy to be a key motivator for altruistic behavior. To unite these two theories, we conducted an experiment in which we compared behavior in a standard economic game that assesses altruism (the so-called Dictator Game) with a Dictator Game in which participants’ behavioral choices were preceded either by an empathy induction or by a control condition without empathy induction. The results of this within-subject manipulation show that the empathy induction substantially increased altruistic behavior. Moreover, the increase in experienced empathy predicted over 40% of the increase in sharing behavior. These data extend standard economic theories that altruism is based on fairness considerations, by showing that empathic feelings can be a key motivator for altruistic behavior in economic interactions. PMID:27578563

  19. Emotional signals in nonverbal interaction: dyadic facilitation and convergence in expressions, appraisals, and feelings.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Martin; Dosmukhambetova, Dina; Nerb, Josef; Manstead, Antony S R

    2012-01-01

    We examined social facilitation and emotional convergence in amusement, sadness, and fear in dynamic interactions. Dyads of friends or strangers jointly watched emotion-eliciting films while they either could or could not communicate nonverbally. We assessed three components of each emotion (expressions, appraisals, and feelings), as well as attention to and social motives toward the co-participant. In Study 1, participants interacted through a mute videoconference. In Study 2, they sat next to each other and either were or were not separated by a partition. Results revealed that facilitation and convergence are not uniform across different emotions and emotion components. Particularly strong supporting patterns emerged for the facilitation of and convergence in smiling. When direct interaction was possible (Study 2), friends showed a general tendency for strong convergence, with the exception of fear-related appraisals. This suggests that underlying processes of emotional contagion and social appraisal are differentially relevant for different emotions.

  20. Temporal variation in facilitator and client behavior during group motivational interviewing sessions

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Jon M.; Hunter, Sarah B.; Benson, Jennifer G.; Cochrum, Linda L.; Rowell, Lauren N.; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for Motivational interviewing (MI) in changing problematic behaviors. Research on the causal chain for MI suggests influence of facilitator speech on client speech. This association has been examined using macro (session-level) and micro (utterance-level) measures; however, effects across sessions have largely been unexplored, particularly with groups. We evaluated a sample of 129 adolescent group MI sessions, using a behavioral coding system and timing information to generate information on facilitator and client speech (CT: change talk) within 5 successive segments (quintiles) of each group session. We hypothesized that facilitator speech (open-ended questions and reflections of CT) would be related to subsequent CT. Repeated measures analysis indicated significant quadratic and cubic trends for facilitator and client speech across quintiles. Across quintiles, cross-lagged panel analysis using a zero-inflated negative binomial model showed minimal evidence of facilitator speech on client CT, but did indicate several effects of client CT on facilitator speech, and of client CT on subsequent client CT. Results suggest that session-level effects of facilitator speech on client speech do not arise from long-duration effects of facilitator speech; instead, we detected effects of facilitator speech on client speech only at the beginning and end of sessions, when open questions respectively suppressed and enhanced client expressions of CT. Findings suggest that clinicians must remain vigilant to client CT throughout the group session, reinforcing it when it arises spontaneously and selectively employing open-ended questions to elicit it when it does not, particularly towards the end of the session. PMID:26415055

  1. Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault: College Women's Risk Perception and Behavioral Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Emily; Wright, Margaret O'Dougherty; Birchmeier, Zachary

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated relationships among prior victimization, risk perceptions, and behavioral choices in responding to drug-facilitated sexual assault in a college party where alcohol is available. Participants and Methods: From fall 2003 to spring 2004, over 400 female undergraduates rated risk perception following an acquaintance…

  2. Development and Pilot Evaluation of an Internet-Facilitated Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Maternal Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheeber, Lisa B.; Seeley, John R.; Feil, Edward G.; Davis, Betsy; Sorensen, Erik; Kosty, Derek B.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Develop and pilot an Internet-facilitated cognitive-behavioral treatment intervention for depression, tailored to economically disadvantaged mothers of young children. Method: Mothers (N = 70) of children enrolled in Head Start, who reported elevated levels of depressive symptoms, were randomized to either the 8-session,…

  3. The use and abuse of prescription medication to facilitate or enhance sexual behavior among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Apodaca, T R; Moser, N C

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents naturally experience an increased interest in sexual behavior, but they usually lack much experience. Thus, any prescription medication that holds the potential to ease or facilitate sexual matters holds a unique allure. Widespread cultural awareness of medications to treat erectile dysfunction (ED) has combined with a recent trend toward increased adolescent prescription drug abuse to create unique challenges for industry, clinicians, and researchers.

  4. Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault: College Women's Risk Perception and Behavioral Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Emily; Wright, Margaret O'Dougherty; Birchmeier, Zachary

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated relationships among prior victimization, risk perceptions, and behavioral choices in responding to drug-facilitated sexual assault in a college party where alcohol is available. Participants and Methods: From fall 2003 to spring 2004, over 400 female undergraduates rated risk perception following an acquaintance…

  5. Facilitators and Inhibitors of Health-promoting Behaviors: The Experience of Iranian Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Baheiraei, Azam; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Charandabi, Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is scant information on the facilitators and inhibitors of health-promoting behaviors among reproductive-aged Iranian women. This study aims to explore the experience of factors influencing health-promoting behaviors among Iranian women of reproductive age from a qualitative perspective. Methods: This study was performed in Tehran in 2011, over about 8 months. Qualitative methods, specifically in-depth interviews, were used to gather data on 15 women of reproductive age. Data continued to be collected until introduction of new information ceased. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by conventional content analysis. Results: The reported factors were categorized into four main groups and 12 subgroups: (1) personal barriers (lack of time, school or work duties, lack of preparation or motivation, physical disability); (2) socio-environmental barriers (family responsibilities, environmental pressures, high-costs and financial pressures); (3) personal facilitators (personal interest and motivation, experience of disease); and (4) socio-environmental facilitators (family and social support networks, encouraging and motivating environment, media, and public education). Conclusions: In these women's experience, factors influencing health-promoting behaviors were either facilitators or inhibitors; most were inhibitors. The findings of this study show that, in addition to personal factors, the pursuit of health-promoting behaviors is affected by socio-environmental factors. These results will be useful in designing interventions and plans for women's health promotion that focus on the improvement of their environment and the modification of social factors. PMID:24049620

  6. Development and Pilot Evaluation of an Internet-Facilitated Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Maternal Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheeber, Lisa B.; Seeley, John R.; Feil, Edward G.; Davis, Betsy; Sorensen, Erik; Kosty, Derek B.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Develop and pilot an Internet-facilitated cognitive-behavioral treatment intervention for depression, tailored to economically disadvantaged mothers of young children. Method: Mothers (N = 70) of children enrolled in Head Start, who reported elevated levels of depressive symptoms, were randomized to either the 8-session,…

  7. Eliciting behavior change in a US sexual violence and intimate partner violence prevention program through utilization of Freire and discussion facilitation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Atiba; Lewy, Robin; Ricardo, Francine; Dovydaitis, Tiffany; Hunter, Amber; Mitchell, Ashley; Loe, Claire; Kugel, Candace

    2010-09-01

    Designed by Migrant Clinicians Network, the Hombres Unidos Contra La Violencia Familiar (Men United Against Family Violence) Project used facilitated discussion groups as the method to encourage self-reflection and behavior change. Male participants were not taught to rectify any past sexual or intimate partner violence (SV/IPV) 'tendencies', rather the discussion facilitation allowed them to reflect on the SV/IPV that was present in their lives and in the Hispanic community. Subsequently, the sessions and self-reflection, coupled with the discussions with other participating males, empowered several participants to have further interactions about SV/IPV with individuals in their community. The discussions led participants to realize that SV/IPV existed in their community, but that there were males within their community that wanted to change. The Hombres Unidos Contra La Violencia Familiar project demonstrated that behavior change does not need to be actively persuaded, but that self-reflection, which elicits behavior change, can be achieved through facilitated discussion and by permitting the facilitators to become participants. By creating sessions that allow participants to construct their own understanding of the perceived problem while reflecting on their past behavior, true behavior change that is initiated by the participant can be achieved. Through discussion facilitation, a targeted and structured behavior change intervention can assist participants in realizing that their past actions were damaging to themselves and their community, while aiding the participant in employing self-initiated responses, learned within the discussions, to alter their behaviors.

  8. Eliciting behavior change in a US sexual violence and intimate partner violence prevention program through utilization of Freire and discussion facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Atiba; Lewy, Robin; Ricardo, Francine; Dovydaitis, Tiffany; Hunter, Amber; Mitchell, Ashley; Loe, Claire; Kugel, Candace

    2010-01-01

    Designed by Migrant Clinicians Network, the Hombres Unidos Contra La Violencia Familiar (Men United Against Family Violence) Project used facilitated discussion groups as the method to encourage self-reflection and behavior change. Male participants were not taught to rectify any past sexual or intimate partner violence (SV/IPV) ‘tendencies’, rather the discussion facilitation allowed them to reflect on the SV/IPV that was present in their lives and in the Hispanic community. Subsequently, the sessions and self-reflection, coupled with the discussions with other participating males, empowered several participants to have further interactions about SV/IPV with individuals in their community. The discussions led participants to realize that SV/IPV existed in their community, but that there were males within their community that wanted to change. The Hombres Unidos Contra La Violencia Familiar project demonstrated that behavior change does not need to be actively persuaded, but that self-reflection, which elicits behavior change, can be achieved through facilitated discussion and by permitting the facilitators to become participants. By creating sessions that allow participants to construct their own understanding of the perceived problem while reflecting on their past behavior, true behavior change that is initiated by the participant can be achieved. Through discussion facilitation, a targeted and structured behavior change intervention can assist participants in realizing that their past actions were damaging to themselves and their community, while aiding the participant in employing self-initiated responses, learned within the discussions, to alter their behaviors. PMID:20427371

  9. Powerful Behavioral Interactions Between Methamphetamine and Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Smith, Monique L.; Guaderrama, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    Use of drugs of abuse in combination is common among recreational users and addicts. The combination of a psychomotor stimulant with an opiate, known as a ‘speedball’, reportedly produces greater effects than either drug alone and has been responsible for numerous deaths. Historically, the most popular speedball combination is that of cocaine and heroin. However, with the growing popularity of methamphetamine in recent years, there has been increased use of this drug in combination with other drugs of abuse, including opiates. Despite this, relatively little research has examined interactions between methamphetamine and opiates. In the current research, behavioral interactions between methamphetamine and the prototypical opiate, morphine, were examined across a variety of dose combinations in Sprague-Dawley rats. The combination of methamphetamine and morphine produced stimulation of behavior that was dramatically higher than either drug alone; however, the magnitude of the interaction was dependent on the dose of the drugs and the specific behaviors examined. The results demonstrate complex behavioral interactions between these drugs, but are consistent with the idea that this combination is used because it produces a greater effect than either drug alone. PMID:21549146

  10. Facilitating Peer Interaction--Support to Children with Down Syndrome in Mainstream Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolva, Anne-Stine; Gustavsson, Anders; Borell, Lena; Hemmingsson, Helena

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the support provided by class staff in order to facilitate social participation of pupils with Down syndrome and peers in regular classes, and how they experience the interaction between the pupils. Data were collected through field observations of six pupils with Down syndrome in their class in mainstream schools, their six…

  11. Tablet Technology to Facilitate Improved Interaction and Communication with Students Studying Mathematics at a Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galligan, Linda; Hobohm, Carola; Loch, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Teaching and learning of mathematics is challenging when lecturer and students are separated geographically. While student engagement and interaction with the course, with other students and with the lecturer is vital to mathematics learning, it is difficult to facilitate this electronically, because of the nature of mathematics. With tablet…

  12. Learning to Facilitate Highly Interactive Literary Discussions to Engage Students as Thinkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosaen, Cheryl L.; Meyer, Amber; Strachan, Stephanie; Meier, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Helping novices learn to facilitate interactive whole-class discussions is an important "high-leverage practice" for becoming an effective teacher due to its strong potential to increase students' learning opportunities. A semester-long classroom-based assignment in a senior-level elementary literacy methods course supported preservice…

  13. You Should Know Better: Can Self-Affirmation Facilitate Information-Seeking Behavior and Interpersonal Discussion?

    PubMed

    Demetriades, Stefanie Z; Walter, Nathan

    2016-11-01

    This study explores whether self-affirmation has the capacity not merely to reduce the perceived threat associated with health-related information but also to facilitate interpersonal discussion and affect health information-seeking behavior. The context for the study is the ongoing California drought, which serves as suitable context to examine the intersection of self-affirmation and information-seeking behavior because it involves a threatening message (the destructive consequences of the drought) and highlights discrepancies between actual (water waste) and prosocial (water conservation) behavior. Results of a month-long longitudinal panel study demonstrate significant effects of self-affirmation on interpersonal discussion, information seeking, knowledge, and water-conserving behavior across time. Implications for theorizing longer term effects of self-affirmation and practical implications for promoting behavioral change through the enhancement of knowledge and self-esteem are considered.

  14. Conscious thought is for facilitating social and cultural interactions: how mental simulations serve the animal-culture interface.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Roy F; Masicampo, E J

    2010-07-01

    Five empirically based critiques have undermined the standard assumption that conscious thought is primarily for input (obtaining information from the natural environment) or output (the direct control of action). Instead, we propose that conscious thought is for internal processing, to facilitate downstream interaction with the social and cultural environment. Human consciousness enables the construction of meaningful, sequential thought, as in sentences and narratives, logical reasoning, counting and quantification, causal understanding, narratives, and the simulation of events (including nonpresent ones). Conscious thought sequences resemble short films that the brain makes for itself, thereby enabling different parts of brain and mind to share information. The production of conscious thoughts is closely linked to the production of speech because the human mind evolved to facilitate social communication and information sharing, as culture became humankind's biological strategy. The influence of conscious thought on behavior can be vitally helpful but is mostly indirect. Conscious simulation processes are useful for understanding the perspectives of social interaction partners, for exploring options in complex decisions, for replaying past events (both literally and counterfactually) so as to learn, and for facilitating participation in culture in other ways.

  15. PIPINO: A Software Package to Facilitate the Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions from Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Schildbach, Stefan; Blumert, Conny; Horn, Friedemann; von Bergen, Martin; Labudde, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of most proteins is regulated by protein-protein interactions. Hence, the comprehensive characterization of the interactome is the next milestone on the path to understand the biochemistry of the cell. A powerful method to detect protein-protein interactions is a combination of coimmunoprecipitation or affinity purification with quantitative mass spectrometry. Nevertheless, both methods tend to precipitate a high number of background proteins due to nonspecific interactions. To address this challenge the software Protein-Protein-Interaction-Optimizer (PIPINO) was developed to perform an automated data analysis, to facilitate the selection of bona fide binding partners, and to compare the dynamic of interaction networks. In this study we investigated the STAT1 interaction network and its activation dependent dynamics. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was applied to analyze the STAT1 interactome after streptavidin pull-down of biotagged STAT1 from human embryonic kidney 293T cells with and without activation. Starting from more than 2,000 captured proteins 30 potential STAT1 interaction partners were extracted. Interestingly, more than 50% of these were already reported or predicted to bind STAT1. Furthermore, 16 proteins were found to affect the binding behavior depending on STAT1 phosphorylation such as STAT3 or the importin subunits alpha 1 and alpha 6. PMID:26966684

  16. Fleshing out facilitation - reframing interaction networks beyond top-down versus bottom-up.

    PubMed

    Watson, David M

    2016-08-01

    803 I. 803 II. 804 III. 804 IV. 805 V. 805 VI. 806 References 807 SUMMARY: Rather than direct plant-plant interactions, research on the community-scale influence of mistletoes reveals hitherto unappreciated roles of animals in mediating facilitation. Lacking roots and reliant upon animal vectors, mistletoes represent model systems with which to understand mechanisms underlying interaction networks. In addition to direct effects on nutrient dynamics via enriched litter-fall, mistletoes are visited by pollinators, seed dispersers and natural enemies, complementing increased heterogeneity in nutrient returns reallocated from infected hosts with increased external inputs. These amplified bottom-up effects are coupled with top-down influences of insectivores attracted to infected hosts and stands by increased availability of favoured prey. Simultaneously influencing nutrient dynamics and plant-plant interactions from below and above, visiting animals help explain variation in the context dependence of facilitation. © 2016 The Author. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Facilitating Grant Proposal Writing in Health Behaviors for University Faculty: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Stein, L. A. R.; Clair, M.; Lebeau, R.; Prochaska, J. O.; Rossi, J. S.; Swift, J.

    2015-01-01

    Grant proposal writing in the behavioral sciences is important for fiscal reasons and scientific reasons at many universities. This report describes a grant proposal–writing seminar series provided to University faculty (N = 20) and explores factors facilitating and impeding writing. Summary statistics are provided for quantitative data. Free responses were sorted by independent raters into meaningful categories. As a consequence of the training, 45% planned to submit within 18 months; 80% of grant proposals targeted NIH. At 1-year follow-up, 40% actually submitted grants. Factors impeding grant proposal writing included competing professional demands; factors facilitating writing included regularly scheduled feedback on written proposal sections and access to expert collaborators. Obtaining grants generates financial resources, facilitates training experiences, and vastly contributes to the growth and dissemination of the knowledge base in an area. PMID:21444921

  18. Does feeding behavior facilitate trophic niche partitioning in two sympatric sucker species from the American Southwest?

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Matthew W; Gibb, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    We examined two sympatric desert fishes, Sonora suckers (Catostomus insignis) and desert suckers (Pantosteus clarkii), and asked, does feeding behavior facilitate trophic niche partitioning? To answer this question, we conducted laboratory-based feeding trials to determine whether morphology alone facilitates the diet separation between the relatively unspecialized, omnivorous Sonora sucker and the more morphologically specialized, algivorous desert sucker or whether behavioral differences accompany morphological specialization. We predicted that (1) algivorous desert suckers would maximize contact between jaws and substrate and produce a large mouth-gape to facilitate scraping attached food-material; (2) omnivorous Sonora suckers would be more effective suction feeders when consuming unattached food items from the benthos; and (3) because they are anatomically specialized for scraping, desert suckers could not alter their feeding behavior when presented with different prey types, whereas relatively unspecialized Sonora suckers could vary behavior with prey type. We found that both species maximized jaw contact when feeding on benthic-attached food, although desert suckers produced a greater gape area. We also found that Sonora suckers were more effective suction feeders when feeding on benthic-unattached prey. Counter to our initial predictions, both species altered key aspects of feeding behavior in response to different prey types/locations. It appears that both sucker species can function as generalist feeders to exploit a variety of prey types within their natural habitat; indeed, this behavioral versatility may allow desert and Sonora suckers to respond to the cyclic environmental changes that are characteristic of the aquatic habitats of the American Southwest.

  19. Oxidative modification of caspase-9 facilitates its activation via disulfide-mediated interaction with Apaf-1.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yong; Xiang, Binggang; Yang, Jie; Sun, Xuxu; Wang, Yumei; Cang, Hui; Yi, Jing

    2009-04-01

    Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to regulate apoptosis. Activation of caspase-9, the initial caspase in the mitochondrial apoptotic cascade, is closely associated with ROS, but it is unclear whether ROS regulate caspase-9 via direct oxidative modification. The present study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which ROS mediate caspase-9 activation. Our results show that the cellular oxidative state facilitates caspase-9 activation. Hydrogen peroxide treatment causes the activation of caspase-9 and apoptosis, and promotes an interaction between caspase-9 and apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) via disulfide formation. In addition, in an in vitro mitochondria-free system, the thiol-oxidant diamide promotes auto-cleavage of caspase-9 and the caspase-9/Apaf-1 interaction by facilitating the formation of disulfide-linked complexes. Finally, a point mutation at C403 of caspase-9 impairs both H(2)O(2)-promoted caspase-9 activation and interaction with Apaf-1 through the abolition of disulfide formation. The association between cytochrome c and the C403S mutant is significantly weaker than that between cytochrome c and wild-type caspase-9, indicating that oxidative modification of caspase-9 contributes to apoptosome formation under oxidative stress. Taken together, oxidative modification of caspase-9 by ROS can mediate its interaction with Apaf-1, and can thus promote its auto-cleavage and activation. This mechanism may facilitate apoptosome formation and caspase-9 activation under oxidative stress.

  20. Above- and belowground biotic interactions facilitate relocation of plants into cooler environments.

    PubMed

    Spasojevic, Marko J; Harrison, Susan; Day, Howard W; Southard, Randal J

    2014-06-01

    One important but largely unanswered question about floristic responses to climate change is how interactions such as competition, facilitation and plant-soil feedbacks will influence the ability of species to track shifting climates. In a rugged and moisture-limited region that has recently warmed by 2° (Siskiyou Mountains, OR, USA), we planted three species into cooler aspects and elevations than those they currently inhabit, with and without removal of neighbouring plants, and tracked them over 2 years. Two species had higher success in cooler topographic locations, and this success was enhanced by neighbouring plants, which appeared to modulate minimum growing season temperatures. One species' success was also facilitated by the higher soil organic matter found in cooler sites. These results are a novel experimental demonstration of two important factors that may buffer climate change impacts on plants: rugged topography and plant-plant facilitation.

  1. A Bayesian statistical analysis of behavioral facilitation associated with deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Anne C; Shah, Sudhin A; Hudson, Andrew E; Purpura, Keith P; Victor, Jonathan D; Brown, Emery N; Schiff, Nicholas D

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for Parkinson’s Disease and is being investigated as a treatment for chronic depression, obsessive compulsive disorder and for facilitating functional recovery of patients in minimally conscious states following brain injury. For all of these applications, quantitative assessments of the behavioral effects of DBS are crucial to determine whether the therapy is effective and, if so, how stimulation parameters can be optimized. Behavioral analyses for DBS are challenging because subject performance is typically assessed from only a small set of discrete measurements made on a discrete rating scale, the time course of DBS effects is unknown, and between-subject differences are often large. We demonstrate how Bayesian state-space methods can be used to characterize the relationship between DBS and behavior comparing our approach with logistic regression in two experiments: the effects of DBS on attention of a macaque monkey performing a reaction-time task, and the effects of DBS on motor behavior of a human patient in a minimally conscious state. The state-space analysis can assess the magnitude of DBS behavioral facilitation (positive or negative) at specific time points and has important implications for developing principled strategies to optimize DBS paradigms. PMID:19576932

  2. Positive interactions between desert granivores: localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Facilitation, when one species enhances the environment or performance of another species, can be highly localized in space. While facilitation in plant communities has been intensely studied, the role of facilitation in shaping animal communities is less well understood. In the Chihuahuan Desert, both kangaroo rats and harvester ants depend on the abundant seeds of annual plants. Kangaroo rats, however, are hypothesized to facilitate harvester ants through soil disturbance and selective seed predation rather than competing with them. I used a spatially explicit approach to examine whether a positive or negative interaction exists between banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) mounds and rough harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus) colonies. The presence of a scale-dependent interaction between mounds and colonies was tested by comparing fitted spatial point process models with and without interspecific effects. Also, the effect of proximity to a mound on colony mortality and spatial patterns of surviving colonies was examined. The spatial pattern of kangaroo rat mounds and harvester ant colonies was consistent with a positive interspecific interaction at small scales (<10 m). Mortality risk of vulnerable, recently founded harvester ant colonies was lower when located close to a kangaroo rat mound and proximity to a mound partly predicted the spatial pattern of surviving colonies. My findings support localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats, likely mediated through ecosystem engineering and foraging effects on plant cover and composition. The scale-dependent effect of kangaroo rats on abiotic and biotic factors appears to result in greater founding and survivorship of young colonies near mounds. These results suggest that soil disturbance and foraging by rodents can have subtle impacts on the distribution and demography of other species.

  3. Conference on multicellular and interactive behavior of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This document provides abstracts for oral presentations at an American Society of Microbiology Conference on Multicellular and interactive behavior of bacteria. Sessions included: Cell to Cell interactions and exchange of genetic material; symbiotic interactions; multicellular aspects of pathogenesis; multicellular motility; developmental interactions; metabolic interactions; interactions in biofilms and surface colonization; pattern formation and colonial interactions.

  4. Chronic Inhibition of Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Facilitates Behavioral Responses to Cocaine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Liles, Larry Cameron; Iuvone, Paul Michael; Weinshenker, David

    2012-01-01

    The anti-alcoholism medication, disulfiram (Antabuse), decreases cocaine use in humans regardless of concurrent alcohol consumption and facilitates cocaine sensitization in rats, but the functional targets are unknown. Disulfiram inhibits dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), the enzyme that converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic neurons. The goal of this study was to test the effects of chronic genetic or pharmacological DBH inhibition on behavioral responses to cocaine using DBH knockout (Dbh −/−) mice, disulfiram, and the selective DBH inhibitor, nepicastat. Locomotor activity was measured in control (Dbh +/−) and Dbh −/− mice during a 5 day regimen of saline+saline, disulfiram+saline, nepicastat+saline, saline+cocaine, disulfiram+cocaine, or nepicastat+cocaine. After a 10 day withdrawal period, all groups were administered cocaine, and locomotor activity and stereotypy were measured. Drug-naïve Dbh −/− mice were hypersensitive to cocaine-induced locomotion and resembled cocaine-sensitized Dbh +/− mice. Chronic disulfiram administration facilitated cocaine-induced locomotion in some mice and induced stereotypy in others during the development of sensitization, while cocaine-induced stereotypy was evident in all nepicastat-treated mice. Cocaine-induced stereotypy was profoundly increased in the disulfiram+cocaine, nepicastat+cocaine, and nepicastat+saline groups upon cocaine challenge after withdrawal in Dbh +/− mice. Disulfiram or nepicastat treatment had no effect on behavioral responses to cocaine in Dbh −/− mice. These results demonstrate that chronic DBH inhibition facilitates behavioral responses to cocaine, although different methods of inhibition (genetic vs. non-selective inhibitor vs. selective inhibitor) enhance qualitatively different cocaine-induced behaviors. PMID:23209785

  5. Family-Based Behavioral Treatment for Childhood Obesity: Caretaker-Reported Barriers and Facilitators

    PubMed Central

    Staiano, Amanda E.; Marker, Arwen M.; Comeaux, James; Frelier, Johannah M.; Hsia, Daniel S.; Broyles, Stephanie T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Family-based behavioral treatments are effective ways to promote children's weight management through healthy eating and exercise. However, programs typically have high attrition and low attendance. The aim of this study was to obtain in-depth caregiver input on barriers and facilitators to participate in a family-based, behavioral childhood obesity treatment program. Methods: Three focus groups were facilitated among 21 parents/guardians at 2 school-based health centers and 1 federally qualified health center. Audio recordings were transcribed and uploaded into NVivo software to assist in thematic coding. Results: Focus group participants were females aged 18-57 years, of whom 71% were black, and 81% were not married. Participants listed numerous barriers: lack of time, frustration from prior unsuccessful weight-loss attempts, and the perceived cost of healthy foods and exercise options. Facilitators included a convenient location, a supportive weight-loss program leader, and rewards for the child's progress. Conclusion: Future interventions should incorporate caregivers' perspectives to develop sustainable, feasible strategies for the treatment of childhood obesity. PMID:28331454

  6. The potential role of postsynaptic phospholipase C activity in synaptic facilitation and behavioral sensitization in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Daniel; Condro, Michael C; Pearce, Kaycey; Glanzman, David L

    2008-07-01

    Previous findings indicate that synaptic facilitation, a cellular mechanism underlying sensitization of the siphon withdrawal response (SWR) in Aplysia, depends on a cascade of postsynaptic events, including activation of inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptors and release of Ca2+ from postsynaptic intracellular stores. These findings suggest that phospholipase C (PLC), the enzyme that catalyzes IP3 formation, may play an important role in postsynaptic signaling during facilitation and learning in Aplysia. Using the PLC inhibitor U73122, we found that PLC activity is required for synaptic facilitation following a 10-min treatment with 5-HT, as measured at 20 min after 5-HT washout. Prior work has indicated that facilitation at this time is supported primarily by postsynaptic processes. To determine whether postsynaptic PLC activity is involved in 5-HT-mediated facilitatory actions, we examined the effect of U73122 on enhancement of the response of motor neurons isolated in cell culture to glutamate, the sensory neuron transmitter. A 10-min application of 5-HT induced persistent (>40 min) enhancement of glutamate-evoked potentials (Glu-EPs) recorded from isolated motor neurons, and this enhancement was blocked by U73122. Finally, we showed that injecting U73122 into intact animals before behavioral training impaired intermediate-term sensitization, indicating that PLC activity contributes to this form of nonassociative learning.

  7. Excitotoxic lesions of the nucleus paragigantocellularis facilitate male sexual behavior but attenuate female sexual behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Normandin, Joseph J.; Murphy, Anne Z.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known regarding the descending inhibitory control of genital reflexes such as ejaculation and vaginal contractions. The brainstem nucleus paragigantocellularis (nPGi) projects bilaterally to the lumbosacral motoneuron pools that innervate the genital musculature of both male and female rats. Electrolytic nPGi lesions facilitate ejaculation in males, leading to the hypothesis that the nPGi is the source of descending inhibition to genital reflexes. However, the function of the nPGi in female sexual behavior remains to be elucidated. To this end, male and female rats received bilateral excitotoxic fiber-sparing lesions of the nPGi, and sexual behavior and sexual behavior-induced Fos expression were examined. In males, nPGi lesions facilitated copulation, supporting the hypothesis that the nPGi, and not fibers-of-passage, is the source of descending inhibition of genital reflexes in male rats. nPGi lesions in males did not alter sexual behavior-induced Fos expression in any brain region examined. nPGi-lesioned females spent significantly less time mating with stimulus males and had significantly longer ejaculation-return latencies compared to baseline. These results did not significantly differ from control females, but this trend warranted further analysis of the reinforcing value of sexual behavior. Both lesioned and non-lesioned females formed a conditioned place preference (CPP) for artificial vaginocervical stimulation (aVCS). However, post-reinforcement, nPGi-lesioned females did not differ in the percentage of time in spent in the non-reinforced chamber versus the reinforced chamber, suggesting a weakened CPP for aVCS. nPGi lesions in females reduced sexual behavior-induced Fos expression throughout the hypothalamus and amygdala. Taken together, these results suggest that while nPGi lesions in males facilitate copulation, such lesions in females attenuate several aspects of sexual behavior resulting in a reduction in the rewarding value of copulation

  8. Excitotoxic lesions of the nucleus paragigantocellularis facilitate male sexual behavior but attenuate female sexual behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Normandin, J J; Murphy, A Z

    2011-02-23

    Little is known regarding the descending inhibitory control of genital reflexes such as ejaculation and vaginal contractions. The brainstem nucleus paragigantocellularis (nPGi) projects bilaterally to the lumbosacral motoneuron pools that innervate the genital musculature of both male and female rats. Electrolytic nPGi lesions facilitate ejaculation in males, leading to the hypothesis that the nPGi is the source of descending inhibition to genital reflexes. However, the function of the nPGi in female sexual behavior remains to be elucidated. To this end, male and female rats received bilateral excitotoxic fiber-sparing lesions of the nPGi, and sexual behavior and sexual behavior-induced Fos expression were examined. In males, nPGi lesions facilitated copulation, supporting the hypothesis that the nPGi, and not fibers-of-passage, is the source of descending inhibition of genital reflexes in male rats. nPGi lesions in males did not alter sexual behavior-induced Fos expression in any brain region examined. nPGi-lesioned females spent significantly less time mating with stimulus males and had significantly longer ejaculation-return latencies compared to baseline. These results did not significantly differ from control females, but this trend warranted further analysis of the reinforcing value of sexual behavior. Both lesioned and non-lesioned females formed a conditioned place preference (CPP) for artificial vaginocervical stimulation (aVCS). However, post-reinforcement, nPGi-lesioned females did not differ in the percentage of time spent in the non-reinforced chamber versus the reinforced chamber, suggesting a weakened CPP for aVCS. nPGi lesions in females reduced sexual behavior-induced Fos expression throughout the hypothalamus and amygdala. Taken together, these results suggest that while nPGi lesions in males facilitate copulation, such lesions in females attenuate several aspects of sexual behavior resulting in a reduction in the rewarding value of copulation

  9. Facilitating behavioral learning and habit change in voice therapy--theoretic premises and practical strategies.

    PubMed

    Iwarsson, Jenny

    2015-12-01

    A typical goal of voice therapy is a behavioral change in the patient's everyday speech. The SLP's plan for voice therapy should therefore optimally include strategies for automatization. The aim of the present study was to identify and describe factors that promote behavioral learning and habit change in voice behavior and have the potential to affect patient compliance and thus therapy outcome. Research literature from the areas of motor and behavioral learning, habit formation, and habit change was consulted. Also, specific elements from personal experience of clinical voice therapy are described and discussed from a learning theory perspective. Nine factors that seem to be relevant to facilitate behavioral learning and habit change in voice therapy are presented, together with related practical strategies and theoretical underpinnings. These are: 1) Cue-altering; 2) Attention exercises; 3) Repetition; 4) Cognitive activation; 5) Negative practice; 6) Inhibition through interruption; 7) Decomposing complex behavior; 8) The 'each time-every time' principle; and 9) Successive implementation of automaticity.

  10. 7 alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone facilitates sexual behavior in the male Syrian hamster.

    PubMed

    Wood, R I; Bean, A R; Sundaram, K; Kumar, N; Bardin, C W

    1996-06-01

    Steroid hormones from the testes promote attraction to estrous females and facilitate copulation in the male Syrian hamster. We compared the ability of testosterone (T) and MENT, a potent synthetic androgen that does not undergo 5 alpha-reduction, to maintain sexual behavior in castrated males. Steroid treatment was initiated immediately after castration at three levels by means of Alzet osmotic pumps in sexually experienced adult male hamsters. Daily doses were 5, 25, or 100 micrograms T and 1, 5, or 25 micrograms MENT (n = 5/group). Additional castrated males (n = 5) remained untreated. Sexual behavior was recorded during two 10-min tests before, and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after orchidectomy. MENT and T maintained equivalent levels of behavior at each corresponding dose of androgen (high, medium, or low). The low dose of T or MENT failed to sustain mating behavior. Eight weeks after castration, males receiving the high and medium doses of androgens continued to express intromissions and ejaculations at gonadally intact levels. However, only males receiving the high dose showed anogenital investigation at the same level as intact males. From these data, we conclude that MENT sustains mating behavior in the male hamster, and that chemoinvestigatory behavior requires higher levels of androgens than those necessary for copulation.

  11. Interaction Mindsets, Interactional Behaviors, and L2 Development: An Affective-Social-Cognitive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Masatoshi

    2017-01-01

    This classroom-based study explored links among second language (L2) learners' interaction mindsets, interactional behaviors, and L2 development in the context of peer interaction. While peer interaction research has revealed that certain interactional behaviors (e.g., receiving corrective feedback and engaging in collaborative interaction) assist…

  12. The chameleon effect: the perception-behavior link and social interaction.

    PubMed

    Chartrand, T L; Bargh, J A

    1999-06-01

    The chameleon effect refers to nonconscious mimicry of the postures, mannerisms, facial expressions, and other behaviors of one's interaction partners, such that one's behavior passively and unintentionally changes to match that of others in one's current social environment. The authors suggest that the mechanism involved is the perception-behavior link, the recently documented finding (e.g., J. A. Bargh, M. Chen, & L. Burrows, 1996) that the mere perception of another's behavior automatically increases the likelihood of engaging in that behavior oneself. Experiment 1 showed that the motor behavior of participants unintentionally matched that of strangers with whom they worked on a task. Experiment 2 had confederates mimic the posture and movements of participants and showed that mimicry facilitates the smoothness of interactions and increases liking between interaction partners. Experiment 3 showed that dispositionally empathic individuals exhibit the chameleon effect to a greater extent than do other people.

  13. Interactions of Transportation and Telecommunications Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dholakia, N.; Mundorf, N.; Dholakia, R. R.; Xiao, J. J.

    2002-05-01

    This project was designed as a social science complement to the engineering studies supported by the University of Rhode Island (URI) Transportation Center (URITC). The project developed a behavioral knowledge base about the actual and intended transport and telecommunications behaviors of transportation users, with a particular focus on southern Rhode Island. Background studies, drawing from literature on telecommuting and travel behavior, led to the development of a generalized framework to understand the transport-telecom interactions. In particular, we developed working papers dealing with transport aspects of e-retailing and distance education. In the empirical part of this project, two major field studies were completed. The first of these was a survey of URI students, probing their car travel, carpool, bus use, and Internet use behaviors. The students were surveyed first by telephone, selected randomly from a list obtained from the Register's office. A total of 220 students responded to the telephone survey. Characteristics of the telephone survey respondents are shown in Appendix B. This was supplemented by an in-class survey of 107 students conveniently selected from the courses taught by the research faculty. This supplementary questionnaire probed the students more deeply regarding their motivations for transportation and technology use issues. The second major field study was a mail survey of southern Rhode Island residents. In this survey, we not only investigated actual travel and transport behaviors but also measured attitudes towards the environment and alternative transport and telecommuting solutions. At the time of writing this report, about 850 individuals had responded to our mail questionnaire. Characteristics of the resident sample are described in Appendix B. The results have laid the groundwork for our second year project where we plan to study the impact of specific interventions on transportation and telecommuting attitudes and intentions.

  14. Uses of self-regulation to facilitate and restrain addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Roy F; Vonasch, Andrew J

    2015-05-01

    We apply self-regulation theory to understand addictive behavior. Self-regulation and volition depend on a limited resource, and when that resource has been depleted, self-regulation becomes prone to fail. Moving beyond traditional models that have emphasized the relevance of self-regulation to quitting addiction, we propose that self-regulation is used both to facilitate and resist addictive behaviors. Self-regulation is often needed to overcome initial aversion to drugs and alcohol, as well as to maintain addictive usage patterns despite situational obstacles (e.g., illegality, erratic availability, family disapproval). Sustaining addiction also requires preventing use from spiraling out of control and interfering with other aspects of life. More generally, the automaticity and irresistibility of addictive responses may have been overrated, as indicated by how addictive behaviors respond rationally to incentives and other concerns. Self-regulation does facilitate quitting, and relapse may be especially likely when self-regulatory capabilities are depleted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. State of the evidence regarding behavior change theories and strategies in nutrition counseling to facilitate health and food behavior change.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Joanne M; Reeves, Rebecca S; Keim, Kathryn S; Laquatra, Ida; Kellogg, Molly; Jortberg, Bonnie; Clark, Nicole A

    2010-06-01

    Behavior change theories and models, validated within the field of dietetics, offer systematic explanations for nutrition-related behavior change. They are integral to the nutrition care process, guiding nutrition assessment, intervention, and outcome evaluation. The American Dietetic Association Evidence Analysis Library Nutrition Counseling Workgroup conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature related to behavior change theories and strategies used in nutrition counseling. Two hundred fourteen articles were reviewed between July 2007 and March 2008, and 87 studies met the inclusion criteria. The workgroup systematically evaluated these articles and formulated conclusion statements and grades based upon the available evidence. Strong evidence exists to support the use of a combination of behavioral theory and cognitive behavioral theory, the foundation for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), in facilitating modification of targeted dietary habits, weight, and cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors. Evidence is particularly strong in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving intensive, intermediate-duration (6 to 12 months) CBT, and long-term (>12 months duration) CBT targeting prevention or delay in onset of type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Few studies have assessed the application of the transtheoretical model on nutrition-related behavior change. Little research was available documenting the effectiveness of nutrition counseling utilizing social cognitive theory. Motivational interviewing was shown to be a highly effective counseling strategy, particularly when combined with CBT. Strong evidence substantiates the effectiveness of self-monitoring and meal replacements and/or structured meal plans. Compelling evidence exists to demonstrate that financial reward strategies are not effective. Goal setting, problem solving, and social support are effective strategies, but additional research is needed in more diverse populations. Routine documentation

  16. Utilizing Teaching Interactions to Facilitate Social Skills in the Natural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassardjian, Alyne; Taubman, Mitchell; Rudrud, Eric; Leaf, Justin B.; Edwards, Andrew; McEachin, John; Leaf, Ron; Schulze, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder often display deficits in social skills. While research has shown behavioral interventions to be effective in teaching and/or increasing a variety of appropriate social skills, limited research has shown generalization of these skills to the natural setting. The Teaching Interaction procedure…

  17. Utilizing Teaching Interactions to Facilitate Social Skills in the Natural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassardjian, Alyne; Taubman, Mitchell; Rudrud, Eric; Leaf, Justin B.; Edwards, Andrew; McEachin, John; Leaf, Ron; Schulze, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder often display deficits in social skills. While research has shown behavioral interventions to be effective in teaching and/or increasing a variety of appropriate social skills, limited research has shown generalization of these skills to the natural setting. The Teaching Interaction procedure…

  18. Can language acquisition be facilitated in cochlear implanted children? Comparison of cognitive and behavioral psychologists' viewpoints.

    PubMed

    Monshizadeh, Leila; Vameghi, Roshanak; Yadegari, Fariba; Sajedi, Firoozeh; Hashemi, Seyed Basir

    2016-11-08

    To study how language acquisition can be facilitated for cochlear implanted children based on cognitive and behavioral psychology viewpoints? To accomplish this objective, literature related to behaviorist and cognitive psychology prospects about language acquisition were studied and some relevant books as well as Medline, Cochrane Library, Google scholar, ISI web of knowledge and Scopus databases were searched. Among 25 articles that were selected, only 11 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Based on the inclusion criteria, review articles, expert opinion studies, non-experimental and experimental studies that clearly focused on behavioral and cognitive factors affecting language acquisition in children were selected. Finally, the selected articles were appraised according to guidelines of appraisal of medical studies. Due to the importance of the cochlear implanted child's language performance, the comparison of behaviorist and cognitive psychology points of view in child language acquisition was done. Since each theoretical basis, has its own positive effects on language, and since the two are not in opposition to one another, it can be said that a set of behavioral and cognitive factors might facilitate the process of language acquisition in children. Behavioral psychologists believe that repetition, as well as immediate reinforcement of child's language behavior help him easily acquire the language during a language intervention program, while cognitive psychologists emphasize on the relationship between information processing, memory improvement through repetitively using words along with "associated" pictures and objects, motor development and language acquisition. It is recommended to use a combined approach based on both theoretical frameworks while planning a language intervention program.

  19. Can language acquisition be facilitated in cochlear implanted children? Comparison of cognitive and behavioral psychologists’ viewpoints

    PubMed Central

    Monshizadeh, Leila; Vameghi, Roshanak; Yadegari, Fariba; Sajedi, Firoozeh; Hashemi, Seyed Basir

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study how language acquisition can be facilitated for cochlear implanted children based on cognitive and behavioral psychology viewpoints? METHODS To accomplish this objective, literature related to behaviorist and cognitive psychology prospects about language acquisition were studied and some relevant books as well as Medline, Cochrane Library, Google scholar, ISI web of knowledge and Scopus databases were searched. Among 25 articles that were selected, only 11 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Based on the inclusion criteria, review articles, expert opinion studies, non-experimental and experimental studies that clearly focused on behavioral and cognitive factors affecting language acquisition in children were selected. Finally, the selected articles were appraised according to guidelines of appraisal of medical studies. RESULTS Due to the importance of the cochlear implanted child’s language performance, the comparison of behaviorist and cognitive psychology points of view in child language acquisition was done. Since each theoretical basis, has its own positive effects on language, and since the two are not in opposition to one another, it can be said that a set of behavioral and cognitive factors might facilitate the process of language acquisition in children. Behavioral psychologists believe that repetition, as well as immediate reinforcement of child’s language behavior help him easily acquire the language during a language intervention program, while cognitive psychologists emphasize on the relationship between information processing, memory improvement through repetitively using words along with “associated” pictures and objects, motor development and language acquisition. CONCLUSION It is recommended to use a combined approach based on both theoretical frameworks while planning a language intervention program. PMID:27872829

  20. Self-assembled monolayer facilitates epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mimicking odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Muni, Tanvi; Mrksich, Milan; George, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Cell-cell interactions are vital for embryonic organ development and normal function of differentiated cells and tissues. In this study we have developed a self-assembled monolayer-based co-culture system to study tooth morphogenesis. Specifically, we designed a 2-D microenvironment present in the dental tissue by creating a well-structured, laterally organized epithelial and mesenchymal cell co-culture system by patterning the cell-attachment substrate. Chemical modifications were used to develop tunable surface patterns to facilitate epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mimicking the developing tooth. Such a design promoted interactions between monolayer's of the 2 cell types and provided signaling cues that resulted in cellular differentiation and mineralized matrix formation. Gene expression analysis showed that these co-cultures mimicked in-vivo conditions than monolayer cultures of a single cell type.

  1. Trajectories of Positive and Negative Behavior during Participation in Equine Facilitated Learning Program for Horse-Novice Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendry, Patricia; Roeter, Stephanie; Smith, Annelise; Jacobson, Sue; Erdman, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    To explore the efficacy of equine programming to support positive behavioral development of horse-novice youth, researchers examined trajectories of behavioral change of 5-8th grade students as they participate in an equine facilitated learning program. Behaviors were rated and analyzed to examine group trajectories of change. Results indicated…

  2. Trajectories of Positive and Negative Behavior during Participation in Equine Facilitated Learning Program for Horse-Novice Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendry, Patricia; Roeter, Stephanie; Smith, Annelise; Jacobson, Sue; Erdman, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    To explore the efficacy of equine programming to support positive behavioral development of horse-novice youth, researchers examined trajectories of behavioral change of 5-8th grade students as they participate in an equine facilitated learning program. Behaviors were rated and analyzed to examine group trajectories of change. Results indicated…

  3. Emotional enhancement of memory via amygdala-driven facilitation of rhinal interactions.

    PubMed

    Paz, Rony; Pelletier, Joe Guillaume; Bauer, Elizabeth P; Paré, Denis

    2006-10-01

    Emotions generally facilitate memory, an effect mediated by the basolateral amygdala (BLA). To study the underlying mechanisms, we recorded BLA, perirhinal and entorhinal neurons during an appetitive trace-conditioning task. We focused on the rhinal cortices because they constitute the interface between the hippocampus, a mediator of memory consolidation, and the neocortex, the storage site of declarative memories. We found that, after unexpected rewards, BLA activity increased impulse transmission from perirhinal to entorhinal neurons and that this effect decayed as the association between conditioned stimuli and rewards was learned. At this late phase of learning, the BLA effect occurred when the animals were anticipating the reward. By enhancing the processing of sensory cues, the BLA-mediated facilitation of rhinal interactions may explain how the amygdala promotes memory formation in emotional conditions.

  4. Aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform with simplified medium exchange process for facilitating cell-surface interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyeonjun; Park, Sung Jea; Han, Seon Jin; Lim, Jiwon; Kim, Dong Sung

    2016-02-01

    Establishing fundamentals for regulating cell behavior with engineered physical environments, such as topography and stiffness, requires a large number of cell culture experiments. However, cell culture experiments in cell-surface interaction studies are generally labor-intensive and time-consuming due to many experimental tasks, such as multiple fabrication processes in sample preparation and repetitive medium exchange in cell culture. In this work, a novel aquatic flower-inspired cell culture platform (AFIP) is presented. AFIP aims to facilitate the experiments on the cell-surface interaction studies, especially the medium exchange process. AFIP was devised to capture and dispense cell culture medium based on interactions between an elastic polymer substrate and a liquid medium. Thus, the medium exchange can be performed easily and without the need of other instruments, such as a vacuum suction and pipette. An appropriate design window of AFIP, based on scaling analysis, was identified to provide a criterion for achieving stability in medium exchange as well as various surface characteristics of the petal substrates. The developed AFIP, with physically engineered petal substrates, was also verified to exchange medium reliably and repeatedly. A closed structure capturing the medium was sustained stably during cell culture experiments. NIH3T3 proliferation results also demonstrated that AFIP can be applied to the cell-surface interaction studies as an alternative to the conventional method.

  5. The facilitation of social-emotional understanding and social interaction in high-functioning children with autism: intervention outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bauminger, Nirit

    2002-08-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 7-month cognitive behavioral intervention for the facilitation of the social-emotional understanding and social interaction of 15 high-functioning children (8 to 17 years old) with autism. Intervention focused on teaching interpersonal problem solving, affective knowledge, and social interaction. Preintervention and postintervention measures included observations of social interaction, measures of problem solving and of emotion understanding, and teacher-rated social skills. Results demonstrated progress in three areas of intervention. Children were more likely to initiate positive social interaction with peers after treatment; in particular, they improved eye contact and their ability to share experiences with peers and to show interest in peers. In problem solving after treatment, children provided more relevant solutions and fewer nonsocial solutions to different social situations. In emotional knowledge, after treatment, children provided more examples of complex emotions, supplied more specific rather then general examples, and included an audience more often in the different emotions. Children also obtained higher teacher-rated social skills scores in assertion and cooperation after treatment. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of the effectiveness of the current model of intervention for high-functioning children with autism.

  6. Attitude toward the out-patient cardiac rehabilitation program and facilitators for maintenance of exercise behavior.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eliza M L; Zhong, Xue Bing; Sit, Janet W H; Chair, Sek Ying; Leung, Doris Y P; Leung, Carmen; Leung, K C

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the attitudes of Chinese patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) toward the outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (OCRP), as well as their exercise behavior, intention, maintenance and related factors. A qualitative descriptive study design was used, and 22 CHD patients were recruited in Hong Kong in 2014. In-depth interviews and content analyses were conducted. The tripartite model of attitudes was adopted as research framework. Two themes were identified: (1) informant attitude (perception, affection, and practice) toward the OCRP and (2) Exercise Behavior - intention, maintenance and its related factors. Most informants showed positive perception and affection regarding the outpatient rehabilitation program, leading to regular practice of exercise in the program and at home. Peer, group dynamic, social support and Chinese culture influences on exercise behavior may serve as major facilitators to maintain exercise behavior. Positive attitude toward the OCRP enhanced the participation rate, whereas peer and social support from the family and workplace were useful to improve the maintenance of exercise behavior. Overall, this study provides insights into strategic planning for the OCRP and continual support for CHD patients in the community.

  7. Self-organization of intertidal snails facilitates evolution of aggregation behavior.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Richard; Davies, Mark S; Williams, Gray A

    2008-01-01

    Many intertidal snails form aggregations during emersion to minimize desiccation stress. Here we investigate possible mechanisms for the evolution of such behavior. Two behavioral traits (following of mucus trails, and crevice occupation), which both provide selective advantages to individuals that possess the traits over individuals that do not, result in self-organization of aggregations in crevices in the rock surface. We suggest that the existence of self-organizing aggregations provides a mechanism by which aggregation behavior can evolve. The inclusion of an explicitly coded third behavior, aggregation, in a simulated population produces patterns statistically similar to those found on real rocky shores. Allowing these three behaviors to evolve using an evolutionary algorithm, however, results in aggregation behavior being selected against on shores with high crevice density. The inclusion of broadcast spawning dispersal mechanisms in the simulation, however, results in aggregation behavior evolving as predicted on shores with both high crevice density and low crevice density (evolving in crevices first, and then both in crevices and on flat rock), indicating the importance of environmental interactions in understanding evolutionary processes. We propose that self-organization can be an important factor in the evolution of group behaviors.

  8. Addictions Counselors' Credibility: The Impact of Interactional Style, Recovery Status, and Nonverbal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toriello, Paul J.; Strohmer, Douglas C.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of addictions counselors' interactional style (confrontational vs. motivational), recovery status (recovering vs. nonrecovering), and nonverbal behavior (facilitative vs. neutral) on 116 clients' perceptions of addictions counselor credibility was examined in a fully crossed factorial design. Significant results were found, and…

  9. Improving adolescent social competence and behavior: a randomized trial of an 11-week equine facilitated learning prevention program.

    PubMed

    Pendry, Patricia; Carr, Alexa M; Smith, Annelise N; Roeter, Stephanie M

    2014-08-01

    There is growing evidence that promoting social competence in youth is an effective strategy to prevent mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders in adulthood. Research suggests that programs delivered in collaboration with schools are particularly effective when they target social and emotional skill building, utilize an interactive instructional style, provide opportunities for youth participation and self-direction, and include explicit attempts to enhance youth social competence. A relatively new but popular approach that incorporates these characteristics is human animal interaction, which can be implemented in educational settings. We report the results from a randomized clinical trial examining the effects of an 11-week equine facilitated learning (EFL) program on the social competence and behavior of 5th-8th grade children. Children (N = 131) were recruited through referral by school counselors and school-based recruitment and then screened for low social competence. Researchers randomly assigned children to an experimental (n = 53) or waitlisted control group (n = 60). Children in the experimental group participated in an 11-week EFL program consisting of once-weekly, 90-min sessions of individual and team-focused activities, whereas children in the control group served as a wait-listed control and participated 16 weeks later. Parents of children in both groups rated child social competence at pretest and posttest. Three independent raters observed and reported children's positive and negative behavior using a validated checklist during each weekly session. Results indicated that program participation had a moderate treatment effect (d = .55) on social competence (p = .02) that was independent of pretest levels, age, gender, and referral status. Results showed that higher levels of program attendance predicted children's trajectories of observed positive (β = .500; p = .003) and negative behavior (β = -.062; p < .001) over the 11-week program.

  10. Is work keeping us from acting healthy? How workplace barriers and facilitators impact nutrition and exercise behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Joseph J; Moore, J Taylor; Alexander, Katherine

    2016-11-27

    The purpose of this study was to identify common barriers and facilitators to healthy nutrition and exercise behaviors in the workplace and examine their relationships to those actual daily health behaviors. We utilized a concurrent embedded mixed methods approach to collect data from 93 participants over the span of four days. Participants reported 2.80 nutrition and 3.28 exercise barriers on average over the 4 days, while reporting 2.93 nutrition and 1.98 exercise facilitators in the same timeframe. Results indicated that workload and temptations around the office prevented nutritious eating; exercise behaviors were frequently hindered by workload. The most commonly mentioned eating facilitator was proper planning, while having time to exercise facilitated physical activity. Furthermore, the number of barriers reported negatively related to their respective health behaviors (i.e., more nutrition barriers translated to poorer nutrition habits) and facilitators were positively related to them, both overall and more so on the specific day they were reported. The implications of these finding show the importance of barriers/facilitators in the workplace and aid in the creation of more targeted health promotion that could increase positive employee health behaviors by eliminating common barriers and enhancing facilitators.

  11. Can Haptics Facilitate Interaction with an In-Vehicle Multifunctional Interface?

    PubMed

    Rydstrom, A; Brostrom, R; Bengtsson, P

    2009-01-01

    A driving simulator study was conducted to investigate whether interaction with an in-vehicle multifunctional interface maneuvered by a rotary control can be improved if assisting haptics is provided. Two conditions were compared in the study, one in which neutral haptics was provided through the rotary control and another in which enhanced haptics was provided. Participants drove on a curved rural road while performing tasks such as list scrolling, radio tuning, address and number entry, and sound settings adjustments. When enhanced haptics was provided, the radio tuning was faster and fewer glances to the display were required, and the sound settings adjustments were completed with a reduced duration of the glances. However, improvements are needed for the other tasks. Enhanced haptics seems to facilitate interaction with functions in which the sensations can be incorporated in an intuitive way.

  12. Experience of Adult Facilitators in a Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Program for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami; Xue, Xinrong; Xu, Xinhao; Kim, Namju; Lee, Sungwoong

    2015-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored and described the experiences and perceptions of adult facilitators who facilitated virtual-reality-based social interaction for children with autism. Extensive data were collected from iterative, in-depth interviews; online activities observation; and video analysis. Four salient themes emerged through the…

  13. Experience of Adult Facilitators in a Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Program for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami; Xue, Xinrong; Xu, Xinhao; Kim, Namju; Lee, Sungwoong

    2015-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored and described the experiences and perceptions of adult facilitators who facilitated virtual-reality-based social interaction for children with autism. Extensive data were collected from iterative, in-depth interviews; online activities observation; and video analysis. Four salient themes emerged through the…

  14. Do Handheld Devices Facilitate Face-to-Face Collaboration? Handheld Devices with Large Shared Display Groupware to Facilitate Group Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Kao, L.-C.

    2007-01-01

    One-to-one computing environments change and improve classroom dynamics as individual students can bring handheld devices fitted with wireless communication capabilities into the classrooms. However, the screens of handheld devices, being designed for individual-user mobile application, limit promotion of interaction among groups of learners. This…

  15. Channel-facilitated molecular transport: The role of strength and spatial distribution of interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppulury, Karthik; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular transport across channels and pores is critically important for multiple natural and industrial processes. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques have allowed researchers to probe translocation through nanopores with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of channel-facilitated molecular transport is still not complete. We present a theoretical approach that investigates the role of molecular interactions in the transport through channels. It is based on the discrete-state stochastic analysis that provides a fully analytical description of this complex process. It is found that a spatial distribution of the interactions strongly influences the translocation dynamics. We predict that there is the optimal distribution that leads to the maximal flux through the channel. It is also argued that the channel transport depends on the strength of the molecule-pore interactions, on the shape of interaction potentials and on the relative contributions of entrance and diffusion processes in the system. These observations are discussed using simple physical-chemical arguments.

  16. Facilitating participatory multilevel decision-making by using interactive mental maps.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Constanze; Glaser, Stephanie; Vencatesan, Jayshree; Schliermann-Kraus, Elke; Drescher, Axel; Glaser, Rüdiger

    2008-11-01

    Participation of citizens in political, economic or social decisions is increasingly recognized as a precondition to foster sustainable development processes. Since spatial information is often important during planning and decision making, participatory mapping gains in popularity. However, little attention has been paid to the fact that information must be presented in a useful way to reach city planners and policy makers. Above all, the importance of visualisation tools to support collaboration, analytical reasoning, problem solving and decision-making in analysing and planning processes has been underestimated. In this paper, we describe how an interactive mental map tool has been developed in a highly interdisciplinary disaster management project in Chennai, India. We moved from a hand drawn mental maps approach to an interactive mental map tool. This was achieved by merging socio-economic and geospatial data on infrastructure, local perceptions, coping and adaptation strategies with remote sensing data and modern technology of map making. This newly developed interactive mapping tool allowed for insights into different locally-constructed realities and facilitated the communication of results to the wider public and respective policy makers. It proved to be useful in visualising information and promoting participatory decision-making processes. We argue that the tool bears potential also for health research projects. The interactive mental map can be used to spatially and temporally assess key health themes such as availability of, and accessibility to, existing health care services, breeding sites of disease vectors, collection and storage of water, waste disposal, location of public toilets or defecation sites.

  17. Mothers' and Caregivers' Interactive and Teaching Behavior with Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Pnina S.; Feldman, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Interactive behavior of 90 Israeli toddlers was observed with mothers and caregivers in one-on-one free play interactions. Children were examined with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, and adults completed self-report measures. Observations were coded for both the quality of adult-child interactive behavior and for the quality of adults'…

  18. Mechanism of Calcium Current Modulation Underlying Presynaptic Facilitation and Behavioral Sensitization in Aplysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Marc; Kandel, Eric R.

    1980-11-01

    Behavioral sensitization of the gill-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia is caused by presynaptic facilitation at the synapses of the mechanoreceptor sensory neurons of the reflex onto the motor neurons and interneurons. The presynaptic facilitation has been shown to be simulated by serotonin (the putative presynaptic facilitatory transmitter) and by cyclic AMP and to be accompanied by an increase in the Ca2+ current of sensory neuron cell bodies exposed to tetraethylammonium. This increase in the Ca2+ current could result from either a direct action on the Ca2+ channel or an action on an opposing K+ current. Here we report voltage clamp experiments which indicate that the increase in Ca2+ current associated with presynaptic facilitation results from a decrease in a K+ current. Stimulation of the connective (the pathway that mediates sensitization) or application of serotonin causes a decrease in a voltage-sensitive, steady-state outward current measured under voltage clamp as well as an increase in the transient net inward and a decrease in the transient outward currents elicited by brief depolarizing command steps. The reversal potential of the steady-state synaptic current is sensitive to extracellular K+ concentration, and both the steady-state synaptic current and the changes in the transient currents are blocked by K+ current blocking agents and by washout of K+. These results suggest that serotonin and the natural transmitter released by connective stimulation act to decrease a voltage-sensitive K+ current. The decrease in K+ current prolongs the action potential, and this in turn increases the duration of the inward Ca2+ current and thereby enhances transmitter release.

  19. Vital places: Facilitators of behavioral and social health mechanisms in low-income neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Walton, E

    2015-01-01

    Starkly unequal built and social environments among urban neighborhoods are part of the explanation for health disparities in the United States. This study is a qualitative investigation of the ways that residents of a low-income neighborhood in Madison, WI, use and interpret nearby neighborhood places. Specifically, I ask how and why certain places may facilitate beneficial behavioral and social mechanisms that impact health. I develop the organizing concept of “vital places”: nearby destinations that are important to and frequently-used by neighborhood residents, and that have theoretical relevance to health. I argue that conceiving of certain places as vital integrates our understanding of the essential components of places that are beneficial to health, while also allowing policy-makers to be creative about the ways they intervene to improve the life chances of residents in disadvantaged neighborhoods. I synthesize the findings into the characteristics of three types of vital places. First, I find that a convenient, comprehensive, and affordable food source can facilitate a healthy diet. An attractive, accessible, and safe recreational facility can support greater physical and social activity. Finally, shared, casual, focused social spaces provide opportunities to create and sustain supportive social ties. This study adds depth and complexity to the ways we conceptualize health-relevant community assets and provides insight into revitalization strategies for distressed low-income housing. PMID:25313992

  20. Social facilitation of exploratory foraging behavior in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella).

    PubMed

    Dindo, Marietta; Whiten, Andrew; de Waal, Frans B M

    2009-05-01

    Much of the research on animal social learning focuses on complex cognitive functions such as imitation and emulation. When compelling evidence for such processes is not forthcoming, simpler processes are often assumed but rarely directly tested for. In this study we address the phenomenon of social facilitation, whereby the presence of a feeding conspecific is hypothesized to affect the motivation and behavior of the subject, elevating the likelihood of exploration and discovery in relation to the task at hand. Using a novel foraging task, sufficiently challenging that only just over half the subjects successfully gained food from it, we compared the performance of capuchin monkeys working either alone, or in a "social" condition where an actively feeding conspecific was in an adjacent chamber. Although similar numbers of subjects in these conditions were eventually successful during the 20 trials presented, the latency to successful solution of the task was over three times faster for monkeys in the social condition. The minority of monkeys that failed to learn (9/23) were then exposed to a proficient model. Only those older than 5 years provided evidence of learning from this. Accordingly, we obtained evidence for the social facilitation the study was designed to test for, and limited supplementary evidence for social learning in the older individuals who had not learned individually. These results are discussed in relation to other recent evidence for social learning in monkeys. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Interactive Rhythmic Cue Facilitates Gait Relearning in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Uchitomi, Hirotaka; Ota, Leo; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Orimo, Satoshi; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    To develop a method for cooperative human gait training, we investigated whether interactive rhythmic cues could improve the gait performance of Parkinson's disease patients. The interactive rhythmic cues ware generated based on the mutual entrainment between the patient's gait rhythms and the cue rhythms input to the patient while the patient walked. Previously, we found that the dynamic characteristics of stride interval fluctuation in Parkinson's disease patients were improved to a healthy 1/f fluctuation level using interactive rhythmic cues and that this effect was maintained in the short term. However, two problems remained in our previous study. First, it was not clear whether the key factor underpinning the effect was the mutual entrainment between the gait rhythms and the cue rhythms or the rhythmic cue fluctuation itself. Second, it was not clear whether or not the gait restoration was maintained longitudinally and was relearned after repeating the cue-based gait training. Thus, the present study clarified these issues using 32 patients who participated in a four-day experimental program. The patients were assigned randomly to one of four experimental groups with the following rhythmic cues: (a) interactive rhythmic cue, (b) fixed tempo cue, (c) 1/f fluctuating tempo cue, and (d) no cue. It has been reported that the 1/f fluctuation of stride interval in healthy gait is absent in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, we used this dynamic characteristic as an evaluation index to analyze gait relearning in the four different conditions. We observed a significant effect in condition (a) that the gait fluctuation of the patients gradually returned to a healthy 1/f fluctuation level, whereas this did not occur in the other conditions. This result suggests that the mutual entrainment can facilitate gait relearning effectively. It is expected that interactive rhythmic cues will be widely applicable in the fields of rehabilitation and assistive technology

  2. Habitat-mediated facilitation and counteracting ecosystem engineering interactively influence ecosystem responses to disturbance.

    PubMed

    Eklöf, Johan S; van der Heide, Tjisse; Donadi, Serena; van der Zee, Els M; O'Hara, Robert; Eriksson, Britas Klemens

    2011-01-01

    stabilization). Meanwhile, the counteracting ecosystem engineering (lugworm bioturbation) reduced that threshold size. Therefore, scale-dependent interactions between habitat-mediated facilitation, competition and disturbance seem to maintain the spatial two-state mosaic in this ecosystem.

  3. Habitat-Mediated Facilitation and Counteracting Ecosystem Engineering Interactively Influence Ecosystem Responses to Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Eklöf, Johan S.; van der Heide, Tjisse; Donadi, Serena; van der Zee, Els M.; O'Hara, Robert; Eriksson, Britas Klemens

    2011-01-01

    stabilization). Meanwhile, the counteracting ecosystem engineering (lugworm bioturbation) reduced that threshold size. Therefore, scale-dependent interactions between habitat-mediated facilitation, competition and disturbance seem to maintain the spatial two-state mosaic in this ecosystem. PMID:21829719

  4. The Holistic, Interactive and Persuasive Model to Facilitate Self-care of Patients with Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Lombard, Miguel; Jipsion, Armando; Vejarano, Rafael; Camargo, Ismael; Álvarez, Humberto; Mora, Elena Villalba; Menasalva Ruíz, Ernestina

    The patient, in his multiple facets of citizen and user of services of health, needs to acquire during, and later in his majority of age, favorable conditions of health to accentuate his quality of life and it is the responsibility of the health organizations to initiate the process of support for that patient during the process of mature life. The provision of services of health and the relation doctor-patient are undergoing important changes in the entire world, forced to a large extent by the indefensibility of the system itself. Nevertheless decision making requires previous information and, what more the necessity itself of being informed requires having a “culture” of health that generates pro activity and the capacity of searching for instruments that facilitate the awareness of the suffering and the self-care of the same. Therefore it is necessary to put into effect a ICT model (hiPAPD) that has the objective of causing Interaction, Motivation and Persuasion towards the surroundings of the diabetic Patient facilitating his self-care. As a result the patient himself individually manages his services through devices and AmI Systems (Ambient Intelligent).

  5. Aggressive and foraging behavioral interactions among ruffe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Kostich, Melissa J.

    2000-01-01

    The ruffe, Gymnocephalus cernuus, is a nonindigenous percid in the Great Lakes. Ruffe are aggressive benthivores and forage over soft substrates. Laboratory studies in pools (100 cm in diameter, 15 cm water depth) were conducted to determine whether fish density (low = 2, medium = 4, high = 6 ruffe per pool) changed foraging and aggressive behaviors with a limited food supply of chironomid larvae. All fish densities demonstrated a hierarchy based on aggressive interactions, but ruffe were most aggressive at low and high fish densities. Time spent in foraging was lowest at the low fish density. The best forager at the low fish density was the most aggressive individual, but the second most aggressive fish at the medium and high fish density was the best forager and also the one chased most frequently. A medium fish density offered the best energetic benefits to ruffe by providing the lowest ratio of time spent in aggression to that spent foraging. Based on our results, ruffe should grow best at an intermediate density. With high ruffe densities, we would also expect disparity in size as the more aggressive fish are able to garner a disproportionate amount of the resources. Alternatively, as the Great Lakes are a fairly open system, ruffe could migrate out of one area to colonize another as populations exceed optimal densities.

  6. Yeast Deubiquitinase Ubp3 Interacts with the 26 S Proteasome to Facilitate Rad4 Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Peng; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) function in a variety of cellular processes by removing ubiquitin moieties from substrates, but their role in DNA repair has not been elucidated. Yeast Rad4-Rad23 heterodimer is responsible for recognizing DNA damage in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Rad4 binds to UV damage directly while Rad23 stabilizes Rad4 from proteasomal degradation. Here, we show that disruption of yeast deubiquitinase UBP3 leads to enhanced UV resistance, increased repair of UV damage and Rad4 levels in rad23Δ cells, and elevated Rad4 stability. A catalytically inactive Ubp3 (Ubp3-C469A), however, is unable to affect NER or Rad4. Consistent with its role in down-regulating Rad4, Ubp3 physically interacts with Rad4 and the proteasome, both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that Ubp3 associates with the proteasome to facilitate Rad4 degradation and thus suppresses NER. PMID:20876584

  7. TIA-1 and TIAR interact with 5'-UTR of enterovirus 71 genome and facilitate viral replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Huanru; Li, Yixuan; Jin, Yu; Chu, Ying; Su, Airong; Wu, Zhiwei

    2015-10-16

    Enterovirus 71 is one of the major causative pathogens of HFMD in children. Upon infection, the viral RNA is translated in an IRES-dependent manner and requires several host factors for effective replication. Here, we found that T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA-1), and TIA-1 related protein (TIAR) were translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm after EV71 infection and localized to the sites of viral replication. We found that TIA-1 and TIAR can facilitate EV71 replication by enhancing the viral genome synthesis in host cells. We demonstrated that both proteins bound to the stem-loop I of 5'-UTR of viral genome and improved the stability of viral genomic RNA. Our results suggest that TIA-1 and TIAR are two new host factors that interact with 5-UTR of EV71 genome and positively regulate viral replication.

  8. Neuropeptide S interacts with the basolateral amygdala noradrenergic system in facilitating object recognition memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Han, Ren-Wen; Xu, Hong-Jiao; Zhang, Rui-San; Wang, Pei; Chang, Min; Peng, Ya-Li; Deng, Ke-Yu; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The noradrenergic activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) was reported to be involved in the regulation of object recognition memory. As the BLA expresses high density of receptors for Neuropeptide S (NPS), we investigated whether the BLA is involved in mediating NPS's effects on object recognition memory consolidation and whether such effects require noradrenergic activity. Intracerebroventricular infusion of NPS (1nmol) post training facilitated 24-h memory in a mouse novel object recognition task. The memory-enhancing effect of NPS could be blocked by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol. Furthermore, post-training intra-BLA infusions of NPS (0.5nmol/side) improved 24-h memory for objects, which was impaired by co-administration of propranolol (0.5μg/side). Taken together, these results indicate that NPS interacts with the BLA noradrenergic system in improving object recognition memory during consolidation.

  9. Do mesothelin/MUC16 interactions facilitate adenocarcinoma metastases to intracranial meningiomas?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mahlon D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas have been shown to express mesothelin, a high affinity binding site for MUC16, a transmembrane protein on adenocarcinoma cells. The mechanisms underlying adenocarcinoma metastases to meningiomas may provide insight into tumor-to-tumor metastases and adenocarcinoma metastases to leptomeningeal cells. Methods: Two meningiomas containing metastases from adenocarcinomas were identified and evaluated immunohistochemically for the expression and localization of mesothelin and MUC16. Results: Both meningiomas show extensive mesothelin immunoreactivity, and the adenocarcinomas metastatic to the meningiomas show mesothelin and MUC16 immunoreactivity at the interface with meningioma. Conclusions: Interactions between MUC16 and/or mesothelin on the cell membrane of adenocarcinoma cells with mesothelin on meningioma cells may facilitate adenocarcinoma metastases to meningiomas and possibly the leptomeninges. PMID:28144481

  10. Time delay can facilitate coherence in self-driven interacting-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongzheng; Lin, Wei; Erban, Radek

    2014-12-01

    Directional switching in a self-propelled particle model with delayed interactions is investigated. It is shown that the average switching time is an increasing function of time delay. The presented results are applied to studying collective animal behavior. It is argued that self-propelled particle models with time delays can explain the state-dependent diffusion coefficient measured in experiments with locust groups. The theory is further generalized to heterogeneous groups where each individual can respond to its environment with a different time delay.

  11. Supporting implementation of evidence-based behavioral interventions: the role of data liquidity in facilitating translational behavioral medicine.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, Amy P; Wheeler, Jane L; Courtney, Paul K; Keefe, Francis J

    2011-03-01

    The advancement of translational behavioral medicine will require that we discover new methods of managing large volumes of data from disparate sources such as disease surveillance systems, public health systems, and health information systems containing patient-centered data informed by behavioral and social sciences. The term "liquidity," when applied to data, refers to its availability and free flow throughout human/computer interactions. In seeking to achieve liquidity, the focus is not on creating a single, comprehensive database or set of coordinated datasets, nor is it solely on developing the electronic health record as the "one-stop shopping" source of health-related data. Rather, attention is on ensuring the availability of secure data through the various methods of collecting and storing data currently existent or under development-so that these components of the health information infrastructure together support a liquid data system. The value of accessible, interoperable, high-volume, reliable, secure, and contextually appropriate data is becoming apparent in many areas of the healthcare system, and health information liquidity is currently viewed as an important component of a patient-centered healthcare system. The translation from research interventions to behavioral and psychosocial indicators challenges the designers of healthcare systems to include this new set of data in the correct context. With the intention of advancing translational behavioral medicine at the local level, "on the ground" in the clinical office and research institution, this commentary discusses data liquidity from the patient's and clinician's perspective, requirements for a liquid healthcare data system, and the ways in which data liquidity can support translational behavioral medicine.

  12. BioEve Search: A Novel Framework to Facilitate Interactive Literature Search

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Toufeeq; Davulcu, Hasan; Tikves, Sukru; Nair, Radhika; Zhao, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    Background. Recent advances in computational and biological methods in last two decades have remarkably changed the scale of biomedical research and with it began the unprecedented growth in both the production of biomedical data and amount of published literature discussing it. An automated extraction system coupled with a cognitive search and navigation service over these document collections would not only save time and effort, but also pave the way to discover hitherto unknown information implicitly conveyed in the texts. Results. We developed a novel framework (named “BioEve”) that seamlessly integrates Faceted Search (Information Retrieval) with Information Extraction module to provide an interactive search experience for the researchers in life sciences. It enables guided step-by-step search query refinement, by suggesting concepts and entities (like genes, drugs, and diseases) to quickly filter and modify search direction, and thereby facilitating an enriched paradigm where user can discover related concepts and keywords to search while information seeking. Conclusions. The BioEve Search framework makes it easier to enable scalable interactive search over large collection of textual articles and to discover knowledge hidden in thousands of biomedical literature articles with ease. PMID:22693501

  13. BAR Domain-Containing FAM92 Proteins Interact with Chibby1 To Facilitate Ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng-Qian; Chen, Xingwang; Fisher, Cody; Siller, Saul S.; Zelikman, Klara; Kuriyama, Ryoko

    2016-01-01

    Chibby1 (Cby1) is a small, conserved coiled-coil protein that localizes to centrioles/basal bodies and plays a crucial role in the formation and function of cilia. During early stages of ciliogenesis, Cby1 is required for the efficient recruitment of small vesicles at the distal end of centrioles to facilitate basal body docking to the plasma membrane. Here, we identified family with sequence similarity 92, member A (FAM92A) and FAM92B, which harbor predicted lipid-binding BAR domains, as novel Cby1-interacting partners using tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry. We found that in cultured cell lines, FAM92A colocalizes with Cby1 at the centrioles/basal bodies of primary cilia, while FAM92B is undetectable. In airway multiciliated cells, both FAM92A and -92B colocalize with Cby1 at the base of cilia. Notably, the centriolar localization of FAM92A and -92B depends largely on Cby1. Knockdown of FAM92A in RPE1 cells impairs ciliogenesis. Consistent with the membrane-remodeling properties of BAR domains, FAM92A and -92B in cooperation with Cby1 induce deformed membrane-like structures containing the small GTPase Rab8 in cultured cells. Our results therefore suggest that FAM92 proteins interact with Cby1 to promote ciliogenesis via regulation of membrane-remodeling processes. PMID:27528616

  14. HSPD1 interacts with IRF3 to facilitate interferon-beta induction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan; Pan, Shan; Zhao, Jianqing; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Pingan; Fu, Lei; Xu, Xinlin; Jin, Meilin; Zhang, Anding

    2014-01-01

    The production of IFN- I (IFN-α/β) is one of the earliest and most important host-protective responses. Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is a critical transcriptional factor in the IFN-β signaling pathway. Although significant progress has been achieved in the regulation of IRF3, the process may be more complicated than previously considered. In the present study, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60, HSPD1) was identified as a novel IRF3-interacting protein. Overexpression of HSPD1 facilitated the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3 and enhanced IFN-β induction induced by SeV infection. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous HSPD1 significantly inhibited the signaling pathway. Furthermore, HSPD1 enhanced activation of the IFN-β promoter mediated by RIG-I, MDA-5, MAVS, TBK1 and IKKε but not IRF3/5D, a mock phosphorylated form of IRF3. The present study indicated that HSPD1 interacted with IRF3 and it contributed to the induction of IFN-β.

  15. TRF2 and lamin A/C interact to facilitate the functional organization of chromosome ends

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ashley M.; Danielsen, Jannie M. Rendtlew; Lucas, Catherine A.; Rice, Ellen L.; Scalzo, David; Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Robert D.; Smith, Erica D.; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Kosak, Steven T.

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres protect the ends of linear genomes, and the gradual loss of telomeres is associated with cellular ageing. Telomere protection involves the insertion of the 3′ overhang facilitated by telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) into telomeric DNA, forming t-loops. We present evidence suggesting that t-loops can also form at interstitial telomeric sequences in a TRF2-dependent manner, forming an interstitial t-loop (ITL). We demonstrate that TRF2 association with interstitial telomeric sequences is stabilized by co-localization with A-type lamins (lamin A/C). We also find that lamin A/C interacts with TRF2 and that reduction in levels of lamin A/C or mutations in LMNA that cause an autosomal dominant premature ageing disorder—Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS)—lead to reduced ITL formation and telomere loss. We propose that cellular and organismal ageing are intertwined through the effects of the interaction between TRF2 and lamin A/C on chromosome structure. PMID:25399868

  16. Interaction of DDP with bovine serum albumin facilitates formation of the protein dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belaya, I.; Chikhirzhina, E.; Polyanichko, A.

    2017-07-01

    Interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with cis- and trans- isomers of diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (DDP) was studied using electrophoretic analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The application of FTIR spectroscopy allowed us to study the DDP/BSA complexes in D2O solutions using protein concentrations close to the physiological level (30 mg/ml) with platinum to BSA molar ratios in the range of 1:1 to 150:1. Under these conditions we have observed formation of relatively weak non-covalent intermolecular protein complexes, which dominated over the BSA-Pt-BSA crosslinks. Analysis of the IR spectra in the region of amide I‧ band revealed that the fraction of the α-helical regions in the protein decreases from ∼65% to approximately 55% and 48% in the complexes with cis- and trans-DDP respectively, while the amount of extended β-structures increases from ∼15 to 20% in BSA to 20-30% in its complexes with cis-DDP and up to 35-40% in trans-DDP/BSA complexes. Based on the data obtained we conclude that multiple intermolecular interactions take place in the solution facilitated by the changes in the BSA secondary structure, induced by DDP binding.

  17. Biological interactions both facilitate and resist climate-related functional change in temperate reef communities.

    PubMed

    Bates, Amanda E; Stuart-Smith, Rick D; Barrett, Neville S; Edgar, Graham J

    2017-06-14

    Shifts in the abundance and location of species are restructuring life on the Earth, presenting the need to build resilience into our natural systems. Here, we tested if protection from fishing promotes community resilience in temperate reef communities undergoing rapid warming in Tasmania. Regardless of protection status, we detected a signature of warming in the brown macroalgae, invertebrates and fishes, through increases in the local richness and abundance of warm-affinity species. Even so, responses in protected communities diverged from exploited communities. At the local scale, the number of cool-affinity fishes and canopy-forming algal species increased following protection, even though the observation window fell within a period of warming. At the same time, exploited communities gained turf algal and sessile invertebrate species. We further found that the recovery of predator populations following protection leads to marked declines in mobile invertebrates-this trend could be incorrectly attributed to warming without contextual data quantifying community change across trophic levels. By comparing long-term change in exploited and protected reefs, we empirically demonstrate the role of biological interactions in both facilitating and resisting climate-related biodiversity change. We further highlight the potential for trophic interactions to alter the progression of both range expansions and contractions. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Social interaction facilitates word learning in preverbal infants: Word-object mapping and word segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hakuno, Yoko; Omori, Takahide; Yamamoto, Jun-Ichi; Minagawa, Yasuyo

    2017-08-01

    In natural settings, infants learn spoken language with the aid of a caregiver who explicitly provides social signals. Although previous studies have demonstrated that young infants are sensitive to these signals that facilitate language development, the impact of real-life interactions on early word segmentation and word-object mapping remains elusive. We tested whether infants aged 5-6 months and 9-10 months could segment a word from continuous speech and acquire a word-object relation in an ecologically valid setting. In Experiment 1, infants were exposed to a live tutor, while in Experiment 2, another group of infants were exposed to a televised tutor. Results indicate that both younger and older infants were capable of segmenting a word and learning a word-object association only when the stimuli were derived from a live tutor in a natural manner, suggesting that real-life interaction enhances the learning of spoken words in preverbal infants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Design of a graphical and interactive interface for facilitating access to drug contraindications, cautions for use, interactions and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Venot, Alain; Bar-Hen, Avner; Ouvrard, Patrick; Duclos, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Background Drug iatrogeny is important but could be decreased if contraindications, cautions for use, drug interactions and adverse effects of drugs described in drug monographs were taken into account. However, the physician's time is limited during consultations, and this information is often not consulted. We describe here the design of "Mister VCM", a graphical interface based on the VCM graphical language, facilitating access to drug monographs. We also provide an assessment of the usability of this interface. Methods The "Mister VCM" interface was designed by dividing the screen into two parts: a graphical interactive one including VCM icons and synthetizing drug properties, a textual one presenting on demand drug monograph excerpts. The interface was evaluated over 11 volunteer general practitioners, trained in the use of "Mister VCM". They were asked to answer clinical questions related to fictitious randomly generated drug monographs, using a textual interface or "Mister VCM". When answering the questions, correctness of the responses and response time were recorded. Results "Mister VCM" is an interactive interface that displays VCM icons organized around an anatomical diagram of the human body with additional mental, etiological and physiological areas. Textual excerpts of the drug monograph can be displayed by clicking on the VCM icons. The interface can explicitly represent information implicit in the drug monograph, such as the absence of a given contraindication. Physicians made fewer errors with "Mister VCM" than with text (factor of 1.7; p = 0.034) and responded to questions 2.2 times faster (p < 0.001). The time gain with "Mister VCM" was greater for long monographs and questions with implicit replies. Conclusion "Mister VCM" seems to be a promising interface for accessing drug monographs. Similar interfaces could be developed for other medical domains, such as electronic patient records. PMID:18518945

  20. Design of a graphical and interactive interface for facilitating access to drug contraindications, cautions for use, interactions and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Venot, Alain; Bar-Hen, Avner; Ouvrard, Patrick; Duclos, Catherine

    2008-06-02

    Drug iatrogeny is important but could be decreased if contraindications, cautions for use, drug interactions and adverse effects of drugs described in drug monographs were taken into account. However, the physician's time is limited during consultations, and this information is often not consulted. We describe here the design of "Mister VCM", a graphical interface based on the VCM graphical language, facilitating access to drug monographs. We also provide an assessment of the usability of this interface. The "Mister VCM" interface was designed by dividing the screen into two parts: a graphical interactive one including VCM icons and synthetizing drug properties, a textual one presenting on demand drug monograph excerpts. The interface was evaluated over 11 volunteer general practitioners, trained in the use of "Mister VCM". They were asked to answer clinical questions related to fictitious randomly generated drug monographs, using a textual interface or "Mister VCM". When answering the questions, correctness of the responses and response time were recorded. "Mister VCM" is an interactive interface that displays VCM icons organized around an anatomical diagram of the human body with additional mental, etiological and physiological areas. Textual excerpts of the drug monograph can be displayed by clicking on the VCM icons. The interface can explicitly represent information implicit in the drug monograph, such as the absence of a given contraindication. Physicians made fewer errors with "Mister VCM" than with text (factor of 1.7; p = 0.034) and responded to questions 2.2 times faster (p < 0.001). The time gain with "Mister VCM" was greater for long monographs and questions with implicit replies. "Mister VCM" seems to be a promising interface for accessing drug monographs. Similar interfaces could be developed for other medical domains, such as electronic patient records.

  1. Facilitation and Dominance in a Schooling Predator: Foraging Behavior of Florida Pompano, Trachinotus carolinus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Presumably an individual’s risk of predation is reduced by group membership and this ‘safety in numbers’ concept has been readily applied to investigations of schooling prey; however, foraging in groups may also be beneficial. We tested the hypothesis that, when feeding in groups, foraging of a coastal fish (Florida Pompano, Trachinotus carolinus) on a benthic prey source would be facilitated (i.e. fish feeding in groups will consume more prey items). Although this question has been addressed for other fish species, it has not been previously addressed for Florida Pompano, a fish known to exhibit schooling behavior and that is used for aquaculture, where understanding the feeding ecology is important for healthy and efficient grow-out. In this experiment, juvenile Florida Pompano were offered a fixed number of coquina clams (Donax spp.) for one hour either in a group or as individuals. The following day they were tested in the opposite configuration. Fish in groups achieved greater consumption (average of 26 clams consumed by the entire group) than the individuals comprising the group (average of 14 clams consumed [sum of clams consumed by all individuals of the group]). Fish in groups also had fewer unsuccessful foraging attempts (2.75 compared to 4.75 hr-1) and tended to have a shorter latency until the first feeding activity. Our results suggest fish in groups were more comfortable feeding and more successful in their feeding attempts. Interestingly, the consumption benefit of group foraging was not shared by all – not all fish within a group consumed equal numbers of clams. Taken together, the results support our hypothesis that foraging in a group provides facilitation, but the short-term benefits are not equally shared by all individuals. PMID:26068114

  2. Facilitation and Dominance in a Schooling Predator: Foraging Behavior of Florida Pompano, Trachinotus carolinus.

    PubMed

    Schrandt, Meagan N; Powers, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Presumably an individual's risk of predation is reduced by group membership and this 'safety in numbers' concept has been readily applied to investigations of schooling prey; however, foraging in groups may also be beneficial. We tested the hypothesis that, when feeding in groups, foraging of a coastal fish (Florida Pompano, Trachinotus carolinus) on a benthic prey source would be facilitated (i.e. fish feeding in groups will consume more prey items). Although this question has been addressed for other fish species, it has not been previously addressed for Florida Pompano, a fish known to exhibit schooling behavior and that is used for aquaculture, where understanding the feeding ecology is important for healthy and efficient grow-out. In this experiment, juvenile Florida Pompano were offered a fixed number of coquina clams (Donax spp.) for one hour either in a group or as individuals. The following day they were tested in the opposite configuration. Fish in groups achieved greater consumption (average of 26 clams consumed by the entire group) than the individuals comprising the group (average of 14 clams consumed [sum of clams consumed by all individuals of the group]). Fish in groups also had fewer unsuccessful foraging attempts (2.75 compared to 4.75 hr(-1)) and tended to have a shorter latency until the first feeding activity. Our results suggest fish in groups were more comfortable feeding and more successful in their feeding attempts. Interestingly, the consumption benefit of group foraging was not shared by all--not all fish within a group consumed equal numbers of clams. Taken together, the results support our hypothesis that foraging in a group provides facilitation, but the short-term benefits are not equally shared by all individuals.

  3. Catching fire? Social interactions, beliefs, and wildfire risk mitigation behaviors

    Treesearch

    Katherine Dickinson; Hannah Brenkert-Smith; Patricia Champ; Nicholas Flores

    2015-01-01

    Social interactions are widely recognized as a potential influence on risk-related behaviors. We present a mediation model in which social interactions (classified as formal/informal and generic-fire-specific) are associated with beliefs about wildfire risk and mitigation options, which in turn shape wildfire mitigation behaviors. We test this model using survey data...

  4. Evolutionary Diversification of Prey and Predator Species Facilitated by Asymmetric Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zu, Jian; Wang, Jinliang; Huang, Gang

    We investigate the influence of asymmetric interactions on coevolutionary dynamics of a predator-prey system by using the theory of adaptive dynamics. We assume that the defense ability of prey and the attack ability of predators all can adaptively evolve, either caused by phenotypic plasticity or by behavioral choice, but there are certain costs in terms of their growth rate or death rate. The coevolutionary model is constructed from a deterministic approximation of random mutation-selection process. To sum up, if prey's trade-off curve is globally weakly concave, then five outcomes of coevolution are demonstrated, which depend on the intensity and shape of asymmetric predator-prey interactions and predator's trade-off shape. Firstly, we find that if there is a weakly decelerating cost and a weakly accelerating benefit for predator species, then evolutionary branching in the predator species may occur, but after branching further coevolution may lead to extinction of the predator species with a larger trait value. However, if there is a weakly accelerating cost and a weakly accelerating benefit for predator species, then evolutionary branching in the predator species is also possible and after branching the dimorphic predator can evolutionarily stably coexist with a monomorphic prey species. Secondly, if the asymmetric interactions become a little strong, then prey and predators will evolve to an evolutionarily stable equilibrium, at which they can stably coexist on a long-term timescale of evolution. Thirdly, if there is a weakly accelerating cost and a relatively strongly accelerating benefit for prey species, then evolutionary branching in the prey species is possible and the finally coevolutionary outcome contains a dimorphic prey and a monomorphic predator species. Fourthly, if the asymmetric interactions become more stronger, then predator-prey coevolution may lead to cycles in both traits and equilibrium population densities. The Red Queen dynamic is a

  5. Evolutionary Diversification of Prey and Predator Species Facilitated by Asymmetric Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Jian; Wang, Jinliang; Huang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the influence of asymmetric interactions on coevolutionary dynamics of a predator-prey system by using the theory of adaptive dynamics. We assume that the defense ability of prey and the attack ability of predators all can adaptively evolve, either caused by phenotypic plasticity or by behavioral choice, but there are certain costs in terms of their growth rate or death rate. The coevolutionary model is constructed from a deterministic approximation of random mutation-selection process. To sum up, if prey’s trade-off curve is globally weakly concave, then five outcomes of coevolution are demonstrated, which depend on the intensity and shape of asymmetric predator-prey interactions and predator’s trade-off shape. Firstly, we find that if there is a weakly decelerating cost and a weakly accelerating benefit for predator species, then evolutionary branching in the predator species may occur, but after branching further coevolution may lead to extinction of the predator species with a larger trait value. However, if there is a weakly accelerating cost and a weakly accelerating benefit for predator species, then evolutionary branching in the predator species is also possible and after branching the dimorphic predator can evolutionarily stably coexist with a monomorphic prey species. Secondly, if the asymmetric interactions become a little strong, then prey and predators will evolve to an evolutionarily stable equilibrium, at which they can stably coexist on a long-term timescale of evolution. Thirdly, if there is a weakly accelerating cost and a relatively strongly accelerating benefit for prey species, then evolutionary branching in the prey species is possible and the finally coevolutionary outcome contains a dimorphic prey and a monomorphic predator species. Fourthly, if the asymmetric interactions become more stronger, then predator-prey coevolution may lead to cycles in both traits and equilibrium population densities. The Red Queen dynamic is a

  6. Do Parentese Prosody and Fathers' Involvement in Interacting Facilitate Social Interaction in Infants Who Later Develop Autism?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David; Cassel, Raquel S.; Saint-Georges, Catherine; Mahdhaoui, Ammar; Laznik, Marie-Christine; Apicella, Fabio; Muratori, Pietro; Maestro, Sandra; Muratori, Filippo; Chetouani, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether development of autism impacts the interactive process between an infant and his/her parents remains an unexplored issue. Methodology and Principal Findings Using computational analysis taking into account synchronic behaviors and emotional prosody (parentese), we assessed the course of infants' responses to parents' type of speech in home movies from typically developing (TD) infants and infants who will subsequently develop autism aged less than 18 months. Our findings indicate: that parentese was significantly associated with infant responses to parental vocalizations involving orientation towards other people and with infant receptive behaviours; that parents of infants developing autism displayed more intense solicitations that were rich in parentese; that fathers of infants developing autism spoke to their infants more than fathers of TD infants; and that fathers' vocalizations were significantly associated with intersubjective responses and active behaviours in infants who subsequently developed autism. Conclusion The parents of infants who will later develop autism change their interactive pattern of behaviour by both increasing parentese and father's involvement in interacting with infants; both are significantly associated with infant's social responses. We stress the possible therapeutic implications of these findings and its implication for Dean Falk's theory regarding pre-linguistic evolution in early hominins. PMID:23650498

  7. A qualitative study of social facilitators and barriers to health behavior change among persons with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Aschbrenner, Kelly; Carpenter-Song, Elizabeth; Mueser, Kim; Kinney, Allison; Pratt, Sarah; Bartels, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    This qualitative focus group study was conducted to explore social facilitators and barriers to health behavior change in persons with serious mental illness engaged in a healthy lifestyle intervention. Six focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 30 clients stratified by "high" and "low" achievers in the program based on clinically significant weight loss or significant increase in fitness. Thematic analysis of focus group discussions revealed that emotional, practical, and mutual support from family members and significant others were social facilitators to health behavior change, while unhealthy social environments was a barrier. Participants in the "high" achiever group reported more mutual support for health behavior change than participants in the "low" achiever group. Results highlight the need for researchers and clinicians to consider the potential role of family and significant others as health supporters for persons with mental illness who could encourage healthy behavior in the social environment.

  8. Reciprocal behavioral plasticity and behavioral types during predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    McGhee, Katie E; Pintor, Lauren M; Bell, Alison M

    2013-12-01

    How predators and prey interact has important consequences for population dynamics and community stability. Here we explored how predator-prey interactions are simultaneously affected by reciprocal behavioral plasticity (i.e., plasticity in prey defenses countered by plasticity in predator offenses and vice versa) and consistent individual behavioral variation (i.e., behavioral types) within both predator and prey populations. We assessed the behavior of a predator species (northern pike) and a prey species (three-spined stickleback) during one-on-one encounters. We also measured additional behavioral and morphological traits in each species. Using structural equation modeling, we found that reciprocal behavioral plasticity as well as predator and prey behavioral types influenced how individuals behaved during an interaction. Thus, the progression and ultimate outcome of predator-prey interactions depend on both the dynamic behavioral feedback occurring during the encounter and the underlying behavioral type of each participant. We also examined whether predator behavioral type is underlain by differences in metabolism and organ size. We provide some of the first evidence that behavioral type is related to resting metabolic rate and size of a sensory organ (the eyes). Understanding the extent to which reciprocal behavioral plasticity and intraspecific behavioral variation influence the outcome of species interactions could provide insight into the maintenance of behavioral variation as well as community dynamics.

  9. Reciprocal Behavioral Plasticity and Behavioral Types during Predator-Prey Interactions

    PubMed Central

    McGhee, Katie E.; Pintor, Lauren M.; Bell, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    How predators and prey interact has important consequences for population dynamics and community stability. Here we explored how predator-prey interactions are simultaneously affected by reciprocal behavioral plasticity (i.e., plasticity in prey defenses countered by plasticity in predator offenses and vice versa) and consistent individual behavioral variation (i.e., behavioral types) within both predator and prey populations. We assessed the behavior of a predator species (northern pike) and a prey species (three-spined stickleback) during one-on-one encounters. We also measured additional behavioral and morphological traits in each species. Using structural equation modeling, we found that reciprocal behavioral plasticity as well as predator and prey behavioral types influenced how individuals behaved during an interaction. Thus, the progression and ultimate outcome of predator-prey interactions depend on both the dynamic behavioral feedback occurring during the encounter and the underlying behavioral type of each participant. We also examined whether predator behavioral type is underlain by differences in metabolism and organ size. We provide some of the first evidence that behavioral type is related to resting metabolic rate and size of a sensory organ (the eyes). Understanding the extent to which reciprocal behavioral plasticity and intraspecific behavioral variation influence the outcome of species interactions could provide insight into the maintenance of behavioral variation as well as community dynamics. PMID:24231533

  10. Specific potassium ion interactions facilitate homocysteine binding to betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Mládková, Jana; Hladílková, Jana; Diamond, Carrie E; Tryon, Katherine; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Garrow, Timothy A; Jungwirth, Pavel; Koutmos, Markos; Jiráček, Jiří

    2014-10-01

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent methyltransferase that uses betaine as the methyl donor for the remethylation of homocysteine to form methionine. This reaction supports S-adenosylmethionine biosynthesis, which is required for hundreds of methylation reactions in humans. Herein we report that BHMT is activated by potassium ions with an apparent K(M) for K⁺ of about 100 µM. The presence of potassium ions lowers the apparent K(M) of the enzyme for homocysteine, but it does not affect the apparent K(M) for betaine or the apparent k(cat) for either substrate. We employed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to theoretically predict and protein crystallography to experimentally localize the binding site(s) for potassium ion(s). Simulations predicted that K⁺ ion would interact with residues Asp26 and/or Glu159. Our crystal structure of BHMT bound to homocysteine confirms these sites of interaction and reveals further contacts between K⁺ ion and BHMT residues Gly27, Gln72, Gln247, and Gly298. The potassium binding residues in BHMT partially overlap with the previously identified DGG (Asp26-Gly27-Gly28) fingerprint in the Pfam 02574 group of methyltransferases. Subsequent biochemical characterization of several site-specific BHMT mutants confirmed the results obtained by the MD simulations and crystallographic data. Together, the data herein indicate that the role of potassium ions in BHMT is structural and that potassium ion facilitates the specific binding of homocysteine to the active site of the enzyme.

  11. Interactions of bullfrog tadpole predators and an insecticide: Predation release and facilitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Semlitsch, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a contaminant on a community may not be easily predicted, given that complex changes in food resources and predator-prey dynamics may result. The objectives of our study were to determine the interactive effects of the insecticide carbaryl and predators on body size, development, survival, and activity of tadpoles of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). We conducted the study in cattle tank mesocosm ponds exposed to 0, 3.5, or 7.0 mg/l carbaryl, and no predators or two red-spotted newts (Notophthalmus viridescens), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), or crayfish (Orconectes sp.). Carbaryl negatively affected predator survival by eliminating crayfish from all ponds, and by eliminating bluegill sunfish from ponds exposed to the highest concentration of carbaryl; carbaryl exposure did not effect survival of red-spotted newts. Because crayfish were eliminated by carbaryl, bullfrogs were released from predation and survival was near that of predator controls at low concentrations of carbaryl exposure. High concentrations of carbaryl reduced tadpole survival regardless of whether predators survived carbaryl exposure or not. Presence of crayfish and newts reduced tadpole survival, while bluegill sunfish appeared to facilitate bullfrog tadpole survival. Presence of carbaryl stimulated bullfrog tadpole mass and development. Our study demonstrates that the presence of a contaminant stress can alter community regulation by releasing prey from predators that are vulnerable to contaminants in some exposure scenarios.

  12. Protein arginine methylation facilitates KCNQ channel-PIP2 interaction leading to seizure suppression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ji; Jeong, Myong-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Ran; Jung, Chang-Yun; Lee, Seul-Yi; Kim, Hanna; Koh, Jewoo; Vuong, Tuan Anh; Jung, Seungmoon; Yang, Hyunwoo; Park, Su-Kyung; Choi, Dahee; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, KyeongJin; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Park, Joo Min; Jeon, Daejong; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Ho, Won-Kyung; Kang, Jong-Sun; Kim, Seong-Tae; Cho, Hana

    2016-01-01

    KCNQ channels are critical determinants of neuronal excitability, thus emerging as a novel target of anti-epileptic drugs. To date, the mechanisms of KCNQ channel modulation have been mostly characterized to be inhibitory via Gq-coupled receptors, Ca2+/CaM, and protein kinase C. Here we demonstrate that methylation of KCNQ by protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (Prmt1) positively regulates KCNQ channel activity, thereby preventing neuronal hyperexcitability. Prmt1+/- mice exhibit epileptic seizures. Methylation of KCNQ2 channels at 4 arginine residues by Prmt1 enhances PIP2 binding, and Prmt1 depletion lowers PIP2 affinity of KCNQ2 channels and thereby the channel activities. Consistently, exogenous PIP2 addition to Prmt1+/- neurons restores KCNQ currents and neuronal excitability to the WT level. Collectively, we propose that Prmt1-dependent facilitation of KCNQ-PIP2 interaction underlies the positive regulation of KCNQ activity by arginine methylation, which may serve as a key target for prevention of neuronal hyperexcitability and seizures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17159.001 PMID:27466704

  13. Imbalance in chemical space: How to facilitate the identification of protein-protein interaction inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuenemann, Mélaine A.; Labbé, Céline M.; Cerdan, Adrien H.; Sperandio, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play vital roles in life and provide new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. In this large data analysis, 3,300 inhibitors of PPIs (iPPIs) were compared to 17 reference datasets of collectively ~566,000 compounds (including natural compounds, existing drugs, active compounds on conventional targets, etc.) using a chemoinformatics approach. Using this procedure, we showed that comparable classes of PPI targets can be formed using either the similarity of their ligands or the shared properties of their binding cavities, constituting a proof-of-concept that not only can binding pockets be used to group PPI targets, but that these pockets certainly condition the properties of their corresponding ligands. These results demonstrate that matching regions in both chemical space and target space can be found. Such identified classes of targets could lead to the design of PPI-class-specific chemical libraries and therefore facilitate the development of iPPIs to the stage of drug candidates.

  14. Covariance in species diversity and facilitation among non-interactive parasite taxa: all against the host.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, B R; Mouillot, D; Khokhlova, I S; Shenbrot, G I; Poulin, R

    2005-10-01

    Different parasite taxa exploit different host resources and are often unlikely to interact directly. It is unclear, however, whether the diversity of any given parasite taxon is indirectly influenced by that of other parasite taxa on the same host. Some components of host immune defences may operate simultaneously against all kinds of parasites, whereas investment by the host in specific defences against one type of parasite may come at the expense of defence against other parasites. We investigated the relationships between the species diversity of 4 higher taxa of ectoparasites (fleas, sucking lice, mesostigmatid mites, and ixodid ticks), and between the species richness of ectoparasites and endoparasitic helminths, across different species of rodent hosts. Our analyses used 2 measures of species diversity, species richness and taxonomic distinctness, and controlled for the potentially confounding effects of sampling effort and phylogenetic relationships among host species. We found positive pairwise correlations between the species richness of fleas, mites and ticks; however, there was no association between species richness of any of these 3 groups and that of lice. We also found a strong positive relationship between the taxonomic distinctness of ecto- and endoparasite assemblages across host species. These results suggest the existence of a process of apparent facilitation among unrelated taxa in the organization of parasite communities. We propose explanations based on host immune responses, involving acquired cross-resistance to infection and interspecific variation in immunocompetence among hosts, to account for these patterns.

  15. Multitrophic interaction facilitates parasite-host relationship between an invasive beetle and the honey bee.

    PubMed

    Torto, Baldwyn; Boucias, Drion G; Arbogast, Richard T; Tumlinson, James H; Teal, Peter E A

    2007-05-15

    Colony defense by honey bees, Apis mellifera, is associated with stinging and mass attack, fueled by the release of alarm pheromones. Thus, alarm pheromones are critically important to survival of honey bee colonies. Here we report that in the parasitic relationship between the European honey bee and the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida, the honey bee's alarm pheromones serve a negative function because they are potent attractants for the beetle. Furthermore, we discovered that the beetles from both Africa and the United States vector a strain of Kodamaea ohmeri yeast, which produces these same honey bee alarm pheromones when grown on pollen in hives. The beetle is not a pest of African honey bees because African bees have evolved effective methods to mitigate beetle infestation. However, European honey bees, faced with disease and pest management stresses different from those experienced by African bees, are unable to effectively inhibit beetle infestation. Therefore, the environment of the European honey bee colony provides optimal conditions to promote the unique bee-beetle-yeast-pollen multitrophic interaction that facilitates effective infestation of hives at the expense of the European honey bee.

  16. Description of nonspecific DNA-protein interaction and facilitated diffusion with a dynamical model.

    PubMed

    Florescu, Ana-Maria; Joyeux, Marc

    2009-01-07

    We propose a dynamical model for nonspecific DNA-protein interaction, which is based on the "bead-spring" model previously developed by other groups, and investigate its properties using Brownian dynamics simulations. We show that the model successfully reproduces some of the observed properties of real systems and predictions of kinetic models. For example, sampling of the DNA sequence by the protein proceeds via a succession of three-dimensional motion in the solvent, one-dimensional sliding along the sequence, short hops between neighboring sites, and intersegmental transfers. Moreover, facilitated diffusion takes place in a certain range of values of the protein effective charge, that is, the combination of one-dimensional sliding and three-dimensional motion leads to faster DNA sampling than pure three-dimensional motion. At last, the number of base pairs visited during a sliding event is comparable to the values deduced from single-molecule experiments. We also point out and discuss some discrepancies between the predictions of this model and some recent experimental results as well as some hypotheses and predictions of kinetic models.

  17. Facilitating help-seeking through student interactions in a WebCT online graduate study program.

    PubMed

    Melrose, Sherri

    2006-09-01

    This article discusses a qualitative research project that revealed how online health-care practitioners in a graduate studies program believe their primary source of help is other students in their class. The project was framed from a constructivist theoretical perspective and an action research approach. The participants were clinicians, such as advanced nurse practitioners, who graduated from a Master of Nursing or Master of Health Studies program offered exclusively through a WebCT online environment. The data sources included a program satisfaction survey, focus groups, and 10 individual audiotape-recorded and transcribed interviews. The data were collected over a 2 year period, analyzed for themes by two researchers, and confirmed with the participants through ongoing member-checking. The following four strategies to facilitate help-seeking interactions among online graduate study learners are presented: award marks for participation, encourage thoughtful, well-crafted introductions, create a coffee lounge, small group forums and private email within the course environment, and identify non-contributing students.

  18. Interactions between males guppies facilitates the transmission of the monogenean ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli.

    PubMed

    Richards, E L; van Oosterhout, C; Cable, J

    2012-12-01

    In a previous study we found that female guppies shoaled more than males and that there was greater transmission of the ectoparasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli between females. Here, to test for a possible sex bias in parasite transmission, we conducted a similar experiment on single sex shoals of male and female guppies, observing host behaviour before and after the introduction of an infected shoal mate. The initial parasite burden was considerably lower in the present experiment (30 worms versus >100 worms previously) and we used a different stock of ornamental guppies (Green Cobra variety versus a Tuxedo hybrid previously). Contrary to our previous finding, males aggregated significantly more than females. Males performed 'sigmoid' displays towards each other, a courtship behaviour that is more generally directed towards females. Due to the high rate of male-male interactions, parasite transmission was 10 times higher between males than between females. Furthermore, shoaling intensity was highest for the most parasitised fish indicating that these infected fish were not avoided by non-parasitised conspecifics. These studies show that certain social behaviours including shoaling and courtship displays, appear to facilitate the transmission of gyrodactylid parasites.

  19. Multitrophic interaction facilitates parasite–host relationship between an invasive beetle and the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Torto, Baldwyn; Boucias, Drion G.; Arbogast, Richard T.; Tumlinson, James H.; Teal, Peter E. A.

    2007-01-01

    Colony defense by honey bees, Apis mellifera, is associated with stinging and mass attack, fueled by the release of alarm pheromones. Thus, alarm pheromones are critically important to survival of honey bee colonies. Here we report that in the parasitic relationship between the European honey bee and the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida, the honey bee's alarm pheromones serve a negative function because they are potent attractants for the beetle. Furthermore, we discovered that the beetles from both Africa and the United States vector a strain of Kodamaea ohmeri yeast, which produces these same honey bee alarm pheromones when grown on pollen in hives. The beetle is not a pest of African honey bees because African bees have evolved effective methods to mitigate beetle infestation. However, European honey bees, faced with disease and pest management stresses different from those experienced by African bees, are unable to effectively inhibit beetle infestation. Therefore, the environment of the European honey bee colony provides optimal conditions to promote the unique bee–beetle–yeast–pollen multitrophic interaction that facilitates effective infestation of hives at the expense of the European honey bee. PMID:17483478

  20. Behavioral Entropy in Human-Robot Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Department 2 Erwin R. Boer Consulting Brigham Young University San Diego, CA, USA Provo, UT, USA ABSTRACT The ability to quickly and accurately measure...AND ADDRESS(ES) Brigham Young University,Computer Science Department,33361 Talmage Building,Provo,UT,84602 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER...in- teraction. To paraphrase Wiener, people work to re- duce entropy so skilled behavior minimizes entropy. This manifests itself in human behavior

  1. Interactive, open source, travel time scenario modelling: tools to facilitate participation in health service access analysis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Rohan; Lassa, Jonatan

    2017-04-18

    Modelling travel time to services has become a common public health tool for planning service provision but the usefulness of these analyses is constrained by the availability of accurate input data and limitations inherent in the assumptions and parameterisation. This is particularly an issue in the developing world where access to basic data is limited and travel is often complex and multi-modal. Improving the accuracy and relevance in this context requires greater accessibility to, and flexibility in, travel time modelling tools to facilitate the incorporation of local knowledge and the rapid exploration of multiple travel scenarios. The aim of this work was to develop simple open source, adaptable, interactive travel time modelling tools to allow greater access to and participation in service access analysis. Described are three interconnected applications designed to reduce some of the barriers to the more wide-spread use of GIS analysis of service access and allow for complex spatial and temporal variations in service availability. These applications are an open source GIS tool-kit and two geo-simulation models. The development of these tools was guided by health service issues from a developing world context but they present a general approach to enabling greater access to and flexibility in health access modelling. The tools demonstrate a method that substantially simplifies the process for conducting travel time assessments and demonstrate a dynamic, interactive approach in an open source GIS format. In addition this paper provides examples from empirical experience where these tools have informed better policy and planning. Travel and health service access is complex and cannot be reduced to a few static modeled outputs. The approaches described in this paper use a unique set of tools to explore this complexity, promote discussion and build understanding with the goal of producing better planning outcomes. The accessible, flexible, interactive and

  2. Post-Exposure Sleep Deprivation Facilitates Correctly Timed Interactions Between Glucocorticoid and Adrenergic Systems, which Attenuate Traumatic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shlomi; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Matar, Michael A; Kaplan, Zeev; Zohar, Joseph; Cohen, Hagit

    2012-01-01

    compared with exposed-SD animals. Intentional prevention of sleep in the early aftermath of stress exposure may well be beneficial in attenuating traumatic stress-related sequelae. Post-exposure SD may disrupt the consolidation of aversive or fearful memories by facilitating correctly timed interactions between glucocorticoid and adrenergic systems. PMID:22713910

  3. Post-exposure sleep deprivation facilitates correctly timed interactions between glucocorticoid and adrenergic systems, which attenuate traumatic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Shlomi; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Matar, Michael A; Kaplan, Zeev; Zohar, Joseph; Cohen, Hagit

    2012-10-01

    compared with exposed-SD animals. Intentional prevention of sleep in the early aftermath of stress exposure may well be beneficial in attenuating traumatic stress-related sequelae. Post-exposure SD may disrupt the consolidation of aversive or fearful memories by facilitating correctly timed interactions between glucocorticoid and adrenergic systems.

  4. Messages from moms: barriers to and facilitators of behavior change in a lead poisoning preventive education project.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Catherine M; Lee, Patricia A; Olkon, Ruth; Pirie, Phyllis L

    2007-12-01

    Qualitative focus group data from participants of an intensive, culture-specific, lead poisoning preventive education research project were analyzed to assess success of communication strategies, and, specifically, to identify barriers to and facilitators of adopting behavior changes encouraged in the project. Effectiveness of education in preventing lead poisoning is addressed elsewhere. Education focused on housecleaning, hygiene, water, and nutrition. Ninety-five participants (89% of 107 eligible) of six ethnicities agreed to participate in focus groups. Seventy-eight (82%) actually attended. Barriers to behavior change included the effort required or unpleasantness of a prevention strategy, presentation of familiar information, denial of the problem, busyness, perceived lack of control, lack of social support, cultural traditions, and misunderstandings. Requiring one-time behavior changes; teaching simple, easy strategies; making less appealing tasks fun; demonstrating concepts; and presenting novel material that piques interest were features of the education that facilitated behavior change. Factors internal to the participant, such as love of the child or cultural practices, also served to motivate the participant to change behavior or to facilitate adoption of a prevention strategy. We offer recommendations to assist others in designing effective health education and risk communication prevention or intervention programs.

  5. An Interactive Macrophage Signal Transduction Map Facilitates Comparative Analyses of High-Throughput Data.

    PubMed

    Wentker, Pia; Eberhardt, Martin; Dreyer, Florian S; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Cantone, Martina; Griss, Kathrin; Schmeck, Bernd; Vera, Julio

    2017-03-01

    Macrophages (Mϕs) are key players in the coordination of the lifesaving or detrimental immune response against infections. The mechanistic understanding of the functional modulation of Mϕs by pathogens and pharmaceutical interventions at the signal transduction level is still far from complete. The complexity of pathways and their cross-talk benefits from holistic computational approaches. In the present study, we reconstructed a comprehensive, validated, and annotated map of signal transduction pathways in inflammatory Mϕs based on the current literature. In a second step, we selectively expanded this curated map with database knowledge. We provide both versions to the scientific community via a Web platform that is designed to facilitate exploration and analysis of high-throughput data. The platform comes preloaded with logarithmic fold changes from 44 data sets on Mϕ stimulation. We exploited three of these data sets-human primary Mϕs infected with the common lung pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, or Mycobacterium tuberculosis-in a case study to show how our map can be customized with expression data to pinpoint regulated subnetworks and druggable molecules. From the three infection scenarios, we extracted a regulatory core of 41 factors, including TNF, CCL5, CXCL10, IL-18, and IL-12 p40, and identified 140 drugs targeting 16 of them. Our approach promotes a comprehensive systems biology strategy for the exploitation of high-throughput data in the context of Mϕ signal transduction. In conclusion, we provide a set of tools to help scientists unravel details of Mϕ signaling. The interactive version of our Mϕ signal transduction map is accessible online at https://vcells.net/macrophage. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Using Ebonics and Bilingual Code Switching To Facilitate Clarification Interactions in Communication Classrooms and Multicultural Public Speaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Norma Landa

    This paper presents materials used in a "short course" on using Ebonics and bilingual code switching to facilitate clarification interactions in communication classrooms and multicultural public speaking. After beginning with a detailed agenda for the two-and-a-half hour short course, the paper presents seven speech communication…

  7. Conscious Thought Is for Facilitating Social and Cultural Interactions: How Mental Simulations Serve the Animal-Culture Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Roy F.; Masicampo, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Five empirically based critiques have undermined the standard assumption that conscious thought is primarily for input (obtaining information from the natural environment) or output (the direct control of action). Instead, we propose that conscious thought is for internal processing, to facilitate downstream interaction with the social and…

  8. The Sound and the Vision: Developments in Interactive Distance Education Facilitated by Satellite Broadcast in NSW and the NT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towers, Lorraine; Hutchinson, Amy

    2008-01-01

    How has the new interactive distance education system facilitated by satellite technology been utilised and incorporated by teachers and learners? Has it changed the ways teachers deliver education to remote students? What have been the implications for the curriculum delivered via distance education? How has it affected the ways learners interact…

  9. Conscious Thought Is for Facilitating Social and Cultural Interactions: How Mental Simulations Serve the Animal-Culture Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Roy F.; Masicampo, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Five empirically based critiques have undermined the standard assumption that conscious thought is primarily for input (obtaining information from the natural environment) or output (the direct control of action). Instead, we propose that conscious thought is for internal processing, to facilitate downstream interaction with the social and…

  10. The Sound and the Vision: Developments in Interactive Distance Education Facilitated by Satellite Broadcast in NSW and the NT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towers, Lorraine; Hutchinson, Amy

    2008-01-01

    How has the new interactive distance education system facilitated by satellite technology been utilised and incorporated by teachers and learners? Has it changed the ways teachers deliver education to remote students? What have been the implications for the curriculum delivered via distance education? How has it affected the ways learners interact…

  11. Analysis of the interaction between experimental and applied behavior analysis.

    PubMed

    Virues-Ortega, Javier; Hurtado-Parrado, Camilo; Cox, Alison D; Pear, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    To study the influences between basic and applied research in behavior analysis, we analyzed the coauthorship interactions of authors who published in JABA and JEAB from 1980 to 2010. We paid particular attention to authors who published in both JABA and JEAB (dual authors) as potential agents of cross-field interactions. We present a comprehensive analysis of dual authors' coauthorship interactions using social networks methodology and key word analysis. The number of dual authors more than doubled (26 to 67) and their productivity tripled (7% to 26% of JABA and JEAB articles) between 1980 and 2010. Dual authors stood out in terms of number of collaborators, number of publications, and ability to interact with multiple groups within the field. The steady increase in JEAB and JABA interactions through coauthors and the increasing range of topics covered by dual authors provide a basis for optimism regarding the progressive integration of basic and applied behavior analysis. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  12. Infants' Behavioral and Physiological Profile and Mother-Infant Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Raquel; Figueiredo, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to (a) identify and profile groups of infants according to their behavioral and physiological characteristics, considering their neurobehavioral organization, social withdrawal behavior, and endocrine reactivity to stress, and to (b) analyze group differences in the quality of mother-infant interaction. Ninety-seven 8-week-old…

  13. Predispositions towards Verbal Behavior in Task Oriented Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arntson, Paul H.; And Others

    The two studies of predisposition toward verbal behavior (PVB) reported in this paper examined the behavior of interactants who have dissimilar verbal predispositions in task-oriented discussions. In the first study, 20 groups of three members each were given an interpersonal task that involved reaching a consensus. In the second study, 17 pairs…

  14. Infants' Behavioral and Physiological Profile and Mother-Infant Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Raquel; Figueiredo, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to (a) identify and profile groups of infants according to their behavioral and physiological characteristics, considering their neurobehavioral organization, social withdrawal behavior, and endocrine reactivity to stress, and to (b) analyze group differences in the quality of mother-infant interaction. Ninety-seven 8-week-old…

  15. Genetics of Interactive Behavior in Silver Foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ronald M; Temnykh, Svetlana V; Johnson, Jennifer L; Kharlamova, Anastasiya V; Vladimirova, Anastasiya V; Gulevich, Rimma G; Shepeleva, Darya V; Oskina, Irina N; Acland, Gregory M; Rönnegård, Lars; Trut, Lyudmila N; Carlborg, Örjan; Kukekova, Anna V

    2017-01-01

    Individuals involved in a social interaction exhibit different behavioral traits that, in combination, form the individual's behavioral responses. Selectively bred strains of silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes) demonstrate markedly different behaviors in their response to humans. To identify the genetic basis of these behavioral differences we constructed a large F2 population including 537 individuals by cross-breeding tame and aggressive fox strains. 98 fox behavioral traits were recorded during social interaction with a human experimenter in a standard four-step test. Patterns of fox behaviors during the test were evaluated using principal component (PC) analysis. Genetic mapping identified eight unique significant and suggestive QTL. Mapping results for the PC phenotypes from different test steps showed little overlap suggesting that different QTL are involved in regulation of behaviors exhibited in different behavioral contexts. Many individual behavioral traits mapped to the same genomic regions as PC phenotypes. This provides additional information about specific behaviors regulated by these loci. Further, three pairs of epistatic loci were also identified for PC phenotypes suggesting more complex genetic architecture of the behavioral differences between the two strains than what has previously been observed.

  16. RUNX3 interacts with MYCN and facilitates protein degradation in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, F; Gao, W; Yokochi, T; Suenaga, Y; Ando, K; Ohira, M; Nakamura, Y; Nakagawara, A

    2014-05-15

    RUNX3, a runt-related transcription factor, has a crucial role in dorsal root ganglion neurogenesis. Recent studies have suggested that RUNX3 acts as a tumor suppressor in stomach, colon and breast cancer. However, the biological role of RUNX3 in neuroblastoma remains elusive. Here we report that high levels of RUNX3 expression contribute to the favorable outcome in patients with neuroblastoma, whereas low levels of RUNX3 expression result in poor outcome. Array-based analysis suggested that the allelic loss at chromosome 1p36 is one of the reasons why expression of RUNX3 is downregulated in advanced neuroblastomas. Interestingly, the several patients survived from neuroblastoma with both high mRNA expressions of MYCN and RUNX3, suggesting that RUNX3 high expression might overcome the aggressive behavior of MYCN. Exogenous expression of RUNX3 strongly inhibits cell proliferation and migration in neuroblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, RUNX3 reduces the stability of MYCN protein in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell lines, and this RUNX3-mediated MYCN degradation may depend on the physical interaction between RUNX3 and MYCN. Thus, our findings provide a tumor-suppressing mechanism by which RUNX3 inhibits the MYCN activity in neuroblastoma.

  17. Aerobic exercise training facilitates the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Gaudlitz, Katharina; Plag, Jens; Dimeo, Fernando; Ströhle, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Physical activity has been discussed as a therapeutic alternative or add-on for the treatment of anxiety disorders. We studied whether aerobic exercise compared to physical activity with low impact can improve the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in patients with panic disorder (PD) with/without agoraphobia. Forty-seven patients received group CBT treatment over 1 month, which was augmented with an 8-week protocol of either aerobic exercise (three times/week, 30 min, 70% VO(2) max; n = 24) or a training program including exercises with very low intensity (n = 23) in a randomized controlled double-blind design. The primary outcome measure was the total score on the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (Ham-A). A 2 × 3 analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with baseline value as a covariate was conducted for data analysis. Time × group interaction for the Ham-A revealed a significant effect (P = .047, η(2) p = .072), which represented the significant group difference at a 7-month follow-up. For the other clinical outcome measures no statistical significance emerged, although improvement was more sustained in the exercise group. For patients with PD, regular aerobic exercise adds an additional benefit to CBT. This supports previous results and provides evidence about the intensity of exercise that needs to be performed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Human-Computer Interactions and Decision Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Narang A. Cohill J. Pittman J. Elkerton M. Revesman R. Fainter C. Rieger L. Folley J. Schurick M. Hakkinen A. Siochi D. Johnson T. Spine C. Ku M. Sti...W., Yunten, T., , Johnson , D. H. DMS: A comprehensive system for managing human- computer dialogue. In Proceedings of Human Factors in Computer...interactive system. Wel! known software metrics are used in this analysis. 3. The Dialogue Author a. Reports Johnson , D. H., Hartson, H. R. The role

  19. Pharmacist-Patient Interactions in Terms of "Appropriate Behaviors"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sause, Robert B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A methodology currently being used to teach "appropriate behaviors" to senior pharmacy students involves having the student assume the role of the pharmacist in a simulated pharmacist-patient interaction. The interactions are video-taped for later class analysis. (LBH)

  20. Affective Behavior and Nonverbal Interaction in Collaborative Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peña, Adriana; Rangel, Nora; Muñoz, Mirna; Mejia, Jezreel; Lara, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    While a person's internal state might not be easily inferred through an automatic computer system, within a group, people express themselves through their interaction with others. The group members' interaction can be then helpful to understand, to certain extent, its members' affective behavior in any case toward the task at hand. In this…

  1. Affective Behavior and Nonverbal Interaction in Collaborative Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peña, Adriana; Rangel, Nora; Muñoz, Mirna; Mejia, Jezreel; Lara, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    While a person's internal state might not be easily inferred through an automatic computer system, within a group, people express themselves through their interaction with others. The group members' interaction can be then helpful to understand, to certain extent, its members' affective behavior in any case toward the task at hand. In this…

  2. Gaze behavior to faces during dyadic interaction.

    PubMed

    Hessels, Roy S; Cornelissen, Tim H W; Hooge, Ignace T C; Kemner, Chantal

    2017-09-01

    A long-standing hypothesis is that humans have a bias for fixating the eye region in the faces of others. Most studies have tested this hypothesis with static images or videos of faces, yet recent studies suggest that the use of such "nonresponsive" stimuli might overlook an influence of social context. The present study addressed whether the bias for fixating the eye region in faces would persist in a situation that allowed for social interaction. In Experiment 1, we demonstrate a setup in which a duo could engage in social interaction while their eye movements were recorded. Here, we show that there is a bias for fixating the eye region of a partner that is physically present. Moreover, we report that the time 1 partner in a duo spends looking at the eyes is a good predictor of how long the other partner looks at the eyes. In Experiment 2, we investigate whether participants attune to the level of eye contact instigated by a partner by having a confederate pose as one of the partners. The confederate was subsequently instructed to either fixate the eyes of the observer or scan the entire face. Gaze behaviour of the confederate did not affect gaze behaviour of the observers. We conclude that there is a bias to fixate the eyes when partners can engage in social interaction. In addition, the amount of time spent looking at the eyes is duo-dependent, but not easily manipulated by instructing the gaze behaviour of 1 partner. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. A Framework to Describe, Analyze and Generate Interactive Motor Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Jarrassé, Nathanaël; Charalambous, Themistoklis; Burdet, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    While motor interaction between a robot and a human, or between humans, has important implications for society as well as promising applications, little research has been devoted to its investigation. In particular, it is important to understand the different ways two agents can interact and generate suitable interactive behaviors. Towards this end, this paper introduces a framework for the description and implementation of interactive behaviors of two agents performing a joint motor task. A taxonomy of interactive behaviors is introduced, which can classify tasks and cost functions that represent the way each agent interacts. The role of an agent interacting during a motor task can be directly explained from the cost function this agent is minimizing and the task constraints. The novel framework is used to interpret and classify previous works on human-robot motor interaction. Its implementation power is demonstrated by simulating representative interactions of two humans. It also enables us to interpret and explain the role distribution and switching between roles when performing joint motor tasks. PMID:23226231

  4. A framework to describe, analyze and generate interactive motor behaviors.

    PubMed

    Jarrassé, Nathanaël; Charalambous, Themistoklis; Burdet, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    While motor interaction between a robot and a human, or between humans, has important implications for society as well as promising applications, little research has been devoted to its investigation. In particular, it is important to understand the different ways two agents can interact and generate suitable interactive behaviors. Towards this end, this paper introduces a framework for the description and implementation of interactive behaviors of two agents performing a joint motor task. A taxonomy of interactive behaviors is introduced, which can classify tasks and cost functions that represent the way each agent interacts. The role of an agent interacting during a motor task can be directly explained from the cost function this agent is minimizing and the task constraints. The novel framework is used to interpret and classify previous works on human-robot motor interaction. Its implementation power is demonstrated by simulating representative interactions of two humans. It also enables us to interpret and explain the role distribution and switching between roles when performing joint motor tasks.

  5. Ingestion of amniotic fluid enhances the facilitative effect of VTA morphine on the onset of maternal behavior in virgin rats.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anne; Hoey, Robert F; Daigler, Lindsey B; Thompson, Alexis C; Kristal, Mark B

    2009-03-19

    Previous research has shown that injection of morphine into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) facilitates the onset of maternal behavior in virgin female rats, and injection of the opioid antagonist naltrexone into the VTA disrupts the onset of maternal behavior in parturient rats. Placentophagia -- ingestion of placenta and amniotic fluid, usually at parturition -- modifies central opioid processes. Ingestion of the active substance in placenta and amniotic fluid, Placental Opioid-Enhancing Factor (POEF), enhances the hypoalgesic effect of centrally administered morphine, and more specifically, enhances delta- and kappa-opioid-receptor-mediated hypoalgesia and attenuates mu-opioid-receptor-mediated hypoalgesia. POEF (in placenta or amniotic fluid) ingestion does not, by itself, produce hypoalgesia. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that ingestion of amniotic fluid enhances the facilitative effect of opioid activity (unilateral morphine injection) in the VTA on the rate of onset of maternal behavior. Virgin female Long-Evans rats were given one intra-VTA injection of morphine sulfate (0.0, 0.01, or 0.03 microg, in saline) and an orogastric infusion of 0.25 ml amniotic fluid or saline once each day of the first three days of the 10-day testing period. Subjects were continuously exposed to foster pups that were replaced every 12 h; replacement of pups was followed by a 15-min observation period. Maternal behavior latency was determined by the first of two consecutive tests wherein the subject displayed pup retrieval, pup licking in the nest, and crouching over all foster pups, during the 15-min observation. We confirmed the previous finding that the VTA injection, alone, of 0.03 microg morphine shortened the latency to show maternal behavior and that 0.0 microg and 0.01 microg morphine did not. Ingestion of amniotic fluid (and therefore POEF) facilitated the onset of maternal behavior in rats receiving an intra-VTA microinjection of an otherwise

  6. Integrating knowledge across domains to advance the science of health behavior: overcoming challenges and facilitating success.

    PubMed

    Klein, William M P; Grenen, Emily G; O'Connell, Mary; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Hall, Kara L; Taber, Jennifer M; Vogel, Amanda L

    2017-03-01

    Health behaviors often co-occur and have common determinants at multiple levels (e.g., individual, relational, environmental). Nevertheless, research programs often examine single health behaviors without a systematic attempt to integrate knowledge across behaviors. This paper highlights the significant potential of cross-cutting behavioral research to advance our understanding of the mechanisms and causal factors that shape health behaviors. It also offers suggestions for how researchers could develop more effective interventions. We highlight barriers to such an integrative science along with potential steps that can be taken to address these barriers. With a more nuanced understanding of health behavior, redundancies in research can be minimized, and a stronger evidence base for the development of health behavior interventions can be realized.

  7. Activation of prefrontal cortical parvalbumin interneurons facilitates extinction of reward-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Sparta, Dennis R; Hovelsø, Nanna; Mason, Alex O; Kantak, Pranish A; Ung, Randall L; Decot, Heather K; Stuber, Garret D

    2014-03-05

    Forming and breaking associations between emotionally salient environmental stimuli and rewarding or aversive outcomes is an essential component of learned adaptive behavior. Importantly, when cue-reward contingencies degrade, animals must exhibit behavioral flexibility to extinguish prior learned associations. Understanding the specific neural circuit mechanisms that operate during the formation and extinction of conditioned behaviors is critical because dysregulation of these neural processes is hypothesized to underlie many of the maladaptive and pathological behaviors observed in various neuropsychiatric disorders in humans. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) participates in the behavioral adaptations seen in both appetitive and aversive-cue-mediated responding, but the precise cell types and circuit mechanisms sufficient for driving these complex behavioral states remain largely unspecified. Here, we recorded and manipulated the activity of parvalbumin-positive fast spiking interneurons (PV+ FSIs) in the prelimbic area (PrL) of the mPFC in mice. In vivo photostimulation of PV+ FSIs resulted in a net inhibition of PrL neurons, providing a circuit blueprint for behavioral manipulations. Photostimulation of mPFC PV+ cells did not alter anticipatory or consummatory licking behavior during reinforced training sessions. However, optical activation of these inhibitory interneurons to cues associated with reward significantly accelerated the extinction of behavior during non-reinforced test sessions. These data suggest that suppression of excitatory mPFC networks via increased activity of PV+ FSIs may enhance reward-related behavioral flexibility.

  8. Order of arrival shifts endophyte-pathogen interactions in bean from resistance induction to disease facilitation.

    PubMed

    Adame-Álvarez, Rosa-María; Mendiola-Soto, Jaime; Heil, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Endophytic fungi colonize plants without causing symptoms of disease and can enhance the resistance of their host to pathogens. We cultivated 53 fungal strains from wild lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and investigated their effects on pathogens using in vitro assays and experiments in planta. Most strains were annotated as Rhizopus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Cochliobolus, and Artomyces spp. by the sequence of their 18S rRNA gene. In vitro confrontation assays between endophytes and three pathogens (the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and Enterobacter sp. strain FCB1, and the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) revealed strong and mainly symmetric reciprocal effects: endophyte and pathogen either mutually inhibited (mainly Enterobacter FCB1 and Colletotrichum) or facilitated (P. syringae) the growth of each other. In planta, the endophytes had a strong inhibitory effect on P. syringae when they colonized the plant before the bacterium, whereas infection was facilitated when P. syringae colonized the plant before the endophyte. Infection with Enterobacter FCB1 was facilitated when the bacterium colonized the plant before or on the same day with the endophyte, but not when the endophyte was present before the bacterium. The order of arrival determines whether fungal endophytes enhance plant resistance to bacterial pathogens or facilitate disease. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Facilitating Spatial Perspective Taking through Animation: Evidence from an Aptitude-Treatment-Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munzer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the facilitating function of animations for spatial perspective taking. The task demanded to estimate directions to memorized objects in a spatial scene from an imagined position and orientation within the scene. Static pictures which required imagined reorientation of the self were compared to animations showing the…

  10. Comparison of kinetic and dynamical models of DNA-protein interaction and facilitated diffusion.

    PubMed

    Florescu, Ana-Maria; Joyeux, Marc

    2010-09-16

    It has long been asserted that proteins such as transcription factors may locate their target in DNA sequences at rates that surpass by several orders of magnitude the three-dimensional diffusion limit thanks to facilitated diffusion, that is, the combination of one-dimensional (sliding along the DNA) and three-dimensional diffusion. This claim has been supported throughout the years by several mass action kinetic models, while the dynamical model we proposed recently (J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 015103) suggests that acceleration of targeting due to facilitated diffusion cannot be large. In order to solve this apparent contradiction, we performed additional simulations to compare the results obtained with our model to those obtained with the kinetic model of Klenin et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 96, 018104). We show in this paper that the two models actually support each other and agree in predicting a low efficiency for facilitated diffusion. Extrapolation of these results to real systems even indicates that facilitated diffusion necessarily slows down the targeting process compared to three-dimensional diffusion.

  11. Facilitating Spatial Perspective Taking through Animation: Evidence from an Aptitude-Treatment-Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munzer, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the facilitating function of animations for spatial perspective taking. The task demanded to estimate directions to memorized objects in a spatial scene from an imagined position and orientation within the scene. Static pictures which required imagined reorientation of the self were compared to animations showing the…

  12. A Study of Facilitative Leadership Behavior and Its Role in the Success of Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toremen, Fatih

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, more progressive approaches regarding the leadership roles of principals have been put forward. Most of those approaches are deeply important as they stress the certain roles of the administration such as cultural leadership and transformative leadership. Supportive of those styles, facilitative leadership puts important…

  13. Leptin facilitates lordosis behavior through GnRH-1 and progestin receptors in estrogen-primed rats.

    PubMed

    García-Juárez, Marcos; Beyer, Carlos; Soto-Sánchez, Alfonso; Domínguez-Ordoñez, Raymundo; Gómora-Arrati, Porfirio; Lima-Hernández, Francisco Javier; Eguibar, José R; Etgen, Anne M; González-Flores, Oscar

    2011-02-01

    Dose response curves for leptin facilitation of estrous behavior (lordosis and proceptivity) were made by infusing the peptide into the lateral ventricle (icv) of ovariectomized (ovx), ad libitum-fed rats injected 40h previously with 5μg of estradiol benzoate. Leptin doses of 1 and 3μg produced significant lordosis quotient at 60min post-injection, with maximal lordosis being displayed at 120min. Yet the intensity of lordosis was weak, and a high incidence of rejection behaviors was found. Moreover, leptin did not induce significant proceptive behaviors at any dose. The leptin doses of 1 and 3μg were selected for determining whether antide, a GnRH-1 receptor antagonist, or the progestin receptor antagonist RU486 could modify the lordosis response to leptin. Icv injection of either antide or RU486 1h before leptin significantly depressed leptin facilitation of lordosis. The results suggest that leptin stimulates lordosis by releasing GnRH, which in turn activates GnRH-1 and progestin receptors. The physiological role of leptin in the control of estrous behavior remains to be determined. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Teachers Working Together: How to Communicate, Collaborate, and Facilitate Positive Behavior in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chan; Weiss, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of a school wide positive behavior intervention and support (PBIS) framework is well established as a beneficial model for the majority of students taught in general education classrooms (e.g., Bradshaw, Mitchell, & Leaf, 2010). Some students, whether at-risk for or school-identified with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) or other…

  15. Facilitating Inclusion by Reducing Problem Behaviors for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von der Embse, Nathaniel; Brown, Alisha; Fortain, Jillian

    2011-01-01

    Recent legislation has increased the emphasis on including students with disabilities in the general education classroom. However, students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibit a wide range of behaviors that make inclusion difficult. To date, there has been little research to identify best practices in reducing problem behavior and…

  16. Facilitating Inclusion by Reducing Problem Behaviors for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von der Embse, Nathaniel; Brown, Alisha; Fortain, Jillian

    2011-01-01

    Recent legislation has increased the emphasis on including students with disabilities in the general education classroom. However, students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibit a wide range of behaviors that make inclusion difficult. To date, there has been little research to identify best practices in reducing problem behavior and…

  17. Teachers Working Together: How to Communicate, Collaborate, and Facilitate Positive Behavior in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chan; Weiss, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of a school wide positive behavior intervention and support (PBIS) framework is well established as a beneficial model for the majority of students taught in general education classrooms (e.g., Bradshaw, Mitchell, & Leaf, 2010). Some students, whether at-risk for or school-identified with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) or other…

  18. Interactions between ecosystem engineers: A native species indirectly facilitates a non-native one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueiro, María Cruz; Schwindt, Evangelina; Mendez, María Martha (Pitu); Bortolus, Alejandro

    2013-08-01

    The positive impact that native species have on the survival, persistence and/or range-expansion of invasive species, is receiving increasing attention from ecologists and land managers trying to better understand and predict future invasions worldwide. Ecosystem engineers are among the best-known model organisms for such studies. The austral cordgrass Spartina densiflora is an ecosystem engineer native to South America coast, where it colonizes rocky shores that were recently successfully invaded by the acorn barnacle Balanus glandula. We conducted a field experiment combining living Spartina transplants and artificial model plants in order to address the following questions: Does the native ecosystem engineer S. densiflora facilitate the invasion of rocky shores by B. glandula? If so, how much of this facilitation is caused by its physical structure alone? We found that S. densiflora had a positive effect on the invasive barnacle by trapping among its stems, the mussels, shells and gravels where B. glandula settles. Dislodged mussels, cobbles, and small shells covered and agglutinated by living barnacles were retained within the aboveground structures of S. densiflora while the control plots (without living or artificial plant structures) remained mostly bare throughout the experiment, showing how plant structures speed the colonization process. Moreover, transplanting living Spartina and artificial Spartina models led to a maximum increase in the area covered by barnacles of more than 1700% relative to the unvegetated control plots. Our study clearly shows how a native ecosystem engineers can enhance the success of invasive species and facilitate their local spread.

  19. Searching for hormonal facilitators: Are vasotocin and mesotocin involved in parental care behaviors in poison frogs?

    PubMed

    Schulte, Lisa M; Summers, Kyle

    2017-05-15

    Although the involvement of peptide hormones in parental care behaviors is well investigated in vertebrates, in amphibians the physiological basis of parental care is largely unknown. This is all the more surprising as parental care behaviors in these tetrapods are remarkably diverse. The poison frog Ranitomeya imitator performs biparental care, including clutch guarding, tadpole transportation and nutrient provisioning. Here we tested whether the nonapeptides arginine-vasotocin (AVT) and mesotocin (MT) are involved in clutch guarding and tadpole transportation in these frogs. In ex-sito experiments we injected males and females after clutch deposition and before tadpole transport with AVT and MT, respectively, as well as their antagonist or a control. We measured two types of egg caring behavior (intense and general care) and compared the success rate of tadpole transportation after treatments. Surprisingly we found that AVT did not trigger, but decreased intense egg care behaviors in males and females. However, there was a trend for general care behavior to increase, which might explain the adverse effect regarding intense care. MT did not have an effect on egg caring behaviors, but after administration of this hormone males were less likely to transport their offspring later on. Our results indicate that AVT might be partly involved in egg caring behaviors in R. imitator, while MT does not appear to play any role in behaviors prior to tadpole transportation in males. This implies that other hormones, such as steroids or prolactin are likely to be important for early parental care behaviors in poison frogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Barriers and Facilitators of Healthy Diet and Exercise Among Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: Implications for Behavioral Interventions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yelena P; Yi, Jaehee; McClellan, Jessica; Kim, Jonghee; Tian, Tian; Grahmann, Bridget; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Holton, Avery; Wright, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    This study uses qualitative methods to identify barriers to and facilitators of exercise and healthy eating among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors (survivors currently aged 18-39 years and diagnosed with cancer anytime in their lives), as reported by survivors and their primary supporters. Survivors (M(age) = 27.6 years, SD = 6.6 years) had completed active cancer therapy. Survivors and supporters (i.e., nominated by survivors as someone who was a main source of support) attended separate focus group sessions (five survivor focus groups, five supporter focus groups) and were asked to complete a self-reported questionnaire assessing demographic and cancer history and engagement in exercise and healthy eating. In total, 25 survivors and 19 supporters participated. The three overarching themes identified were barriers to exercise and healthy eating (e.g., lack of resources, negative thoughts and feelings, negative social and environmental influences), facilitators of exercise and healthy eating (e.g., cognitive motivators, tools for health behavior implementation, social relationships), and intervention implications (e.g., informational needs, desire for social support). AYA cancer survivors and their supporters identified barriers to and facilitators of healthy lifestyle behaviors, which should be considered when designing interventions to improve the long-term health of survivors.

  1. Barriers and Facilitators of Healthy Diet and Exercise Among Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: Implications for Behavioral Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jaehee; McClellan, Jessica; Kim, Jonghee; Tian, Tian; Grahmann, Bridget; Kirchhoff, Anne C.; Holton, Avery; Wright, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study uses qualitative methods to identify barriers to and facilitators of exercise and healthy eating among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors (survivors currently aged 18–39 years and diagnosed with cancer anytime in their lives), as reported by survivors and their primary supporters. Methods: Survivors (Mage = 27.6 years, SD = 6.6 years) had completed active cancer therapy. Survivors and supporters (i.e., nominated by survivors as someone who was a main source of support) attended separate focus group sessions (five survivor focus groups, five supporter focus groups) and were asked to complete a self-reported questionnaire assessing demographic and cancer history and engagement in exercise and healthy eating. Results: In total, 25 survivors and 19 supporters participated. The three overarching themes identified were barriers to exercise and healthy eating (e.g., lack of resources, negative thoughts and feelings, negative social and environmental influences), facilitators of exercise and healthy eating (e.g., cognitive motivators, tools for health behavior implementation, social relationships), and intervention implications (e.g., informational needs, desire for social support). Conclusion: AYA cancer survivors and their supporters identified barriers to and facilitators of healthy lifestyle behaviors, which should be considered when designing interventions to improve the long-term health of survivors. PMID:26697268

  2. The Benefits of Sensorimotor Knowledge: Body-Object Interaction Facilitates Semantic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siakaluk, Paul D.; Pexman, Penny M.; Sears, Christopher R.; Wilson, Kim; Locheed, Keri; Owen, William J.

    2008-01-01

    This article examined the effects of body-object interaction (BOI) on semantic processing. BOI measures perceptions of the ease with which a human body can physically interact with a word's referent. In Experiment 1, BOI effects were examined in 2 semantic categorization tasks (SCT) in which participants decided if words are easily imageable.…

  3. When the Macro Facilitates the Micro: A Study of Regimentation and Emergence in Spoken Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warriner, Doris S.

    2012-01-01

    In moments of "dispersion, diaspora, and reterritorialization" (Amy Shuman 2006), the personal, the interactional, and the improvised (the "micro") cannot be separated analytically from circulating ideologies, institutional norms, or cultural flows (the "macro"). With a focus on the emergence of identities within social interaction, specifically…

  4. The Benefits of Sensorimotor Knowledge: Body-Object Interaction Facilitates Semantic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siakaluk, Paul D.; Pexman, Penny M.; Sears, Christopher R.; Wilson, Kim; Locheed, Keri; Owen, William J.

    2008-01-01

    This article examined the effects of body-object interaction (BOI) on semantic processing. BOI measures perceptions of the ease with which a human body can physically interact with a word's referent. In Experiment 1, BOI effects were examined in 2 semantic categorization tasks (SCT) in which participants decided if words are easily imageable.…

  5. When the Macro Facilitates the Micro: A Study of Regimentation and Emergence in Spoken Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warriner, Doris S.

    2012-01-01

    In moments of "dispersion, diaspora, and reterritorialization" (Amy Shuman 2006), the personal, the interactional, and the improvised (the "micro") cannot be separated analytically from circulating ideologies, institutional norms, or cultural flows (the "macro"). With a focus on the emergence of identities within social interaction, specifically…

  6. Potential job facilitation benefits of "water cooler" conversations: the importance of social interactions in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Lin, Iris Y; Kwantes, Catherine T

    2015-01-01

    This study looked at the extent to which personality and cultural factors predicted participants' perceptions of the importance private interactions played in the workplace. The 134 participants read a vignette (where a new employee socially interacted at low or high levels with co-workers) and completed the Big Five Inventory, Social Axioms Survey, and questions concerning expected workplace experiences. Results indicated employees who engaged in high levels of private interaction with co-workers were expected to be better liked, to receive better performance evaluations, were more likely to receive co-worker assistance, and were thought to be more likely chosen for future projects. However, the personality and social axiom variables studied did not significantly interact with social interaction to influence expectations of workplace outcomes.

  7. Interactive Behaviors of Ethnic Minority Mothers and their Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Jada L.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Landerman, Lawrence R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the interactive behaviors of American Indian mothers and their premature infants with those of African American mothers and their premature infants. Design Descriptive, comparative study. Setting Three neonatal intensive care units and two pediatric clinics in the southeast. Participants Seventy-seven mother-infant dyads: 17 American Indian mother-infant dyads and 60 African American mother-infant dyads. Methods Videotapes of mother-infant interactions and the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) were used to assess the interactions of the mothers and their premature infants at six months corrected age. Results American Indian mothers looked more, gestured more, and were more often the primary caregivers to their infants than the African American mothers. American Indian infants expressed more positive affect and gestured more to their mothers, whereas African American infants engaged in more non-negative vocalization toward their mothers. African American mothers scored higher on the HOME subscales of provision of appropriate play materials and parental involvement with the infant. American Indian mothers scored higher on the opportunities for variety in daily living subscale. Conclusion Although many of the interactive behaviors of American Indian and African American mother-infant dyads were similar, some differences did occur. Clinicians need to be aware of the cultural differences in mother-infant interactions. To optimize child developmental outcomes, nurses need to support mothers in their continuation or adoption of positive interactive behaviors. PMID:23682698

  8. Interactive behaviors of ethnic minority mothers and their premature infants.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jada L; Holditch-Davis, Diane; Landerman, Lawrence R

    2013-01-01

    To compare the interactive behaviors of American Indian mothers and their premature infants with those of African American mothers and their premature infants. Descriptive, comparative study. Three neonatal intensive care units and two pediatric clinics in the southeast. Seventy-seven mother/infant dyads: 17 American Indian mother/infant dyads and 60 African American mother/infant dyads. Videotapes of mother/infant interactions and the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) were used to assess the interactions of the mothers and their premature infants at 6 months corrected age. American Indian mothers looked more, gestured more, and were more often the primary caregivers to their infants than the African American mothers. American Indian infants expressed more positive affect and gestured more to their mothers, whereas African American infants engaged in more non-negative vocalization toward their mothers. African American mothers scored higher on the HOME subscales of provision of appropriate play materials and parental involvement with the infant. American Indian mothers scored higher on the opportunities for variety in daily living subscale. Although many of the interactive behaviors of American Indian and African American mother/infant dyads were similar, some differences did occur. Clinicians need to be aware of the cultural differences in mother/infant interactions. To optimize child developmental outcomes, nurses need to support mothers in their continuation or adoption of positive interactive behaviors. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  9. From facilitation to competition: temperature-driven shift in dominant plant interactions affects population dynamics in seminatural grasslands.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Siri L; Töpper, Joachim P; Skarpaas, Olav; Vandvik, Vigdis; Klanderud, Kari

    2016-05-01

    Biotic interactions are often ignored in assessments of climate change impacts. However, climate-related changes in species interactions, often mediated through increased dominance of certain species or functional groups, may have important implications for how species respond to climate warming and altered precipitation patterns. We examined how a dominant plant functional group affected the population dynamics of four co-occurring forb species by experimentally removing graminoids in seminatural grasslands. Specifically, we explored how the interaction between dominants and subordinates varied with climate by replicating the removal experiment across a climate grid consisting of 12 field sites spanning broad-scale temperature and precipitation gradients in southern Norway. Biotic interactions affected population growth rates of all study species, and the net outcome of interactions between dominants and subordinates switched from facilitation to competition with increasing temperature along the temperature gradient. The impacts of competitive interactions on subordinates in the warmer sites could primarily be attributed to reduced plant survival. Whereas the response to dominant removal varied with temperature, there was no overall effect of precipitation on the balance between competition and facilitation. Our findings suggest that global warming may increase the relative importance of competitive interactions in seminatural grasslands across a wide range of precipitation levels, thereby favouring highly competitive dominant species over subordinate species. As a result, seminatural grasslands may become increasingly dependent on disturbance (i.e. traditional management such as grazing and mowing) to maintain viable populations of subordinate species and thereby biodiversity under future climates. Our study highlights the importance of population-level studies replicated under different climatic conditions for understanding the underlying mechanisms of climate

  10. Factors Which Facilitate or Impede Interpersonal Interactions and Relationships after Spinal Cord Injury: A Scoping Review with Suggestions for Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Schuurs, Sarita; Power, Bettina; Harestad, Yvonne; Kuipers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonal interactions and relationships can influence an individual's perceptions of health and quality of life in the presence of disability. In the case of people with spinal cord injury (SCI), positive interpersonal interactions and relationships have been shown to contribute to resilience and adaptability. Understanding factors which facilitate or impede the development and maintenance of relationships after SCI may form the basis for proactive relationship support for people with SCI. To gain a broad insight into these factors, a scoping review was undertaken. Databases were searched for English language studies published between 2000 and 2015 that informed the review question. Sixty-two (62) studies were identified. Thematic analysis was conducted on data extracted from the studies and 51 factors which may facilitate relationships and 38 factors which may impede relationships after SCI were noted. The majority of factors could be categorized as environmental or personal according to the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The facilitating factors included partner and social support, reciprocity in relationships, and presenting oneself positively. Impeding factors included physical environmental barriers, real and perceived social biases, and poor self-image. Factors identified may inform the provision of supportive, holistic rehabilitation for people with SCI. PMID:28127471

  11. Factors Which Facilitate or Impede Interpersonal Interactions and Relationships after Spinal Cord Injury: A Scoping Review with Suggestions for Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Amsters, Delena; Schuurs, Sarita; Pershouse, Kiley; Power, Bettina; Harestad, Yvonne; Kendall, Melissa; Kuipers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonal interactions and relationships can influence an individual's perceptions of health and quality of life in the presence of disability. In the case of people with spinal cord injury (SCI), positive interpersonal interactions and relationships have been shown to contribute to resilience and adaptability. Understanding factors which facilitate or impede the development and maintenance of relationships after SCI may form the basis for proactive relationship support for people with SCI. To gain a broad insight into these factors, a scoping review was undertaken. Databases were searched for English language studies published between 2000 and 2015 that informed the review question. Sixty-two (62) studies were identified. Thematic analysis was conducted on data extracted from the studies and 51 factors which may facilitate relationships and 38 factors which may impede relationships after SCI were noted. The majority of factors could be categorized as environmental or personal according to the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The facilitating factors included partner and social support, reciprocity in relationships, and presenting oneself positively. Impeding factors included physical environmental barriers, real and perceived social biases, and poor self-image. Factors identified may inform the provision of supportive, holistic rehabilitation for people with SCI.

  12. Head Motion Modeling for Human Behavior Analysis in Dyadic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Georgiou, Panayiotis; Baucom, Brian; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of head motion in human interaction, notably of its role in conveying interlocutors’ behavioral characteristics. Head motion is physically complex and carries rich information; current modeling approaches based on visual signals, however, are still limited in their ability to adequately capture these important properties. Guided by the methodology of kinesics, we propose a data driven approach to identify typical head motion patterns. The approach follows the steps of first segmenting motion events, then parametrically representing the motion by linear predictive features, and finally generalizing the motion types using Gaussian mixture models. The proposed approach is experimentally validated using video recordings of communication sessions from real couples involved in a couples therapy study. In particular we use the head motion model to classify binarized expert judgments of the interactants’ specific behavioral characteristics where entrainment in head motion is hypothesized to play a role: Acceptance, Blame, Positive, and Negative behavior. We achieve accuracies in the range of 60% to 70% for the various experimental settings and conditions. In addition, we describe a measure of motion similarity between the interaction partners based on the proposed model. We show that the relative change of head motion similarity during the interaction significantly correlates with the expert judgments of the interactants’ behavioral characteristics. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed head motion model, and underscore the promise of analyzing human behavioral characteristics through signal processing methods. PMID:26557047

  13. Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2007-01-01

    This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

  14. Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction Behavior on the Seafloor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    34 - .. .-- -- , ,.,m .-- l I ,li m~ii, ; li. ,m,, l l ~ l l l ~i- Forword DyA~mic Soil-Structure Interaction (S-SI) behavior on the sea floor describes the...using Fast Fourier and profile C has all strengths increased by 3-1/3. The Transform methods. The second advantage of the pro- actual water depth at

  15. Ebola virus VP24 interacts with NP to facilitate nucleocapsid assembly and genome packaging.

    PubMed

    Banadyga, Logan; Hoenen, Thomas; Ambroggio, Xavier; Dunham, Eric; Groseth, Allison; Ebihara, Hideki

    2017-08-09

    Ebola virus causes devastating hemorrhagic fever outbreaks for which no approved therapeutic exists. The viral nucleocapsid, which is minimally composed of the proteins NP, VP35, and VP24, represents an attractive target for drug development; however, the molecular determinants that govern the interactions and functions of these three proteins are still unknown. Through a series of mutational analyses, in combination with biochemical and bioinformatics approaches, we identified a region on VP24 that was critical for its interaction with NP. Importantly, we demonstrated that the interaction between VP24 and NP was required for both nucleocapsid assembly and genome packaging. Not only does this study underscore the critical role that these proteins play in the viral replication cycle, but it also identifies a key interaction interface on VP24 that may serve as a novel target for antiviral therapeutic intervention.

  16. A profile of the behavioral changes produced by facilitation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Davis, C M; Moskovitz, B; Nguyen, M A; Tran, B B; Arai, A; Lynch, G; Granger, R

    1997-09-01

    A newly developed group of benzoylpiperidine drugs that enhance AMPA-receptor-gated currents ("ampakines") has been shown to improve memory encoding in rats across a variety of experimental paradigms. The present experiments were intended to i) provide a partial profile of the behavioral changes produced by ampakines, ii) test if two ampakines (BDP-12 and BDP-20) that differ significantly in their effects on AMPA receptor kinetics produce similar behavioral profiles, and iii) determine if physiological potency is reflected in behavioral potency. BDP-20 reduced two measures of exploratory activity in aged rats but increased speed of performance in a radial maze; the drug also caused substantially improved retention of spatial information. These results are similar to those obtained with BDP-12, an analog that differs from BDP-20 in its effects on ligand binding to the AMPA receptor and on the physiological responses of the receptors to glutamate. BDP-20 was approximately ten-fold more potent in behavioral effects than BDP-12, which agrees with the relative potencies of the two drugs as assessed with excised patches and excitatory synaptic responses. These findings indicate that ampakines, though differing in their effects on AMPA-receptor-mediated responses, have similar effects at the behavioral level.

  17. Pollinator Behavior Mediates Negative Interactions between Two Congeneric Invasive Plant Species.

    PubMed

    Yang, Suann; Ferrari, Matthew J; Shea, Katriona

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneously flowering plant species may indirectly interact with each other by influencing the quantity of pollinator visitation and/or the quality of pollen that is transferred. These effects on pollination may depend on how pollinators respond to floral resources at multiple levels. In this study, we demonstrate pollinator-mediated negative interactions between two invasive plants, Carduus acanthoides and Carduus nutans. Using constructed arrays of the two species, alone and in mixture, we quantified pollinator visitation at the patch and individual plant levels and measured seed production. We found that co-occurrence of our species led to a shift in pollinator services at both levels. Greater interference occurred when arrays were small and spacings between neighboring plants were large. A spatially explicit movement model suggests that pollinator foraging behavior, which mediates the interactions between plants, was driven by floral display size rather than species identity per se. Pollinator behavior significantly reduced the proportion of seed set for both species relative to that in single-species arrays. Overall, the dependence of pollinator behavior on patch size, spacing between plants, and patch composition can lead to pollinator-mediated plant interactions that range from facilitative to competitive.

  18. Spatio-temporal interactions facilitate large carnivore sympatry across a resource gradient.

    PubMed

    Karanth, K Ullas; Srivathsa, Arjun; Vasudev, Divya; Puri, Mahi; Parameshwaran, Ravishankar; Kumar, N Samba

    2017-02-08

    Species within a guild vary their use of time, space and resources, thereby enabling sympatry. As intra-guild competition intensifies, such behavioural adaptations may become prominent. We assessed mechanisms of facilitating sympatry among dhole (Cuon alpinus), leopard (Panthera pardus) and tiger (Panthera tigris) in tropical forests of India using camera-trap surveys. We examined population-level temporal, spatial and spatio-temporal segregation among them across four reserves representing a gradient of carnivore and prey densities. Temporal and spatial overlaps were higher at lower prey densities. Combined spatio-temporal overlap was minimal, possibly due to chance. We found fine-scale avoidance behaviours at one high-density reserve. Our results suggest that: (i) patterns of spatial, temporal and spatio-temporal segregation in sympatric carnivores do not necessarily mirror each other; (ii) carnivores are likely to adopt temporal, spatial, and spatio-temporal segregation as alternative mechanisms to facilitate sympatry; and (iii) carnivores show adaptability across a gradient of resource availability, a driver of inter-species competition. We discuss behavioural mechanisms that permit carnivores to co-occupy rather than dominate functional niches, and adaptations to varying intensities of competition that are likely to shape structure and dynamics of carnivore guilds.

  19. HMGB1 interacts with XPA to facilitate the processing of DNA interstrand crosslinks in human cells.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M

    2016-02-18

    Many effective agents used in cancer chemotherapy cause DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), which covalently link both strands of the double helix together resulting in cytotoxicity. ICLs are thought to be processed by proteins from a variety of DNA repair pathways; however, a clear understanding of ICL recognition and repair processing in human cells is lacking. Previously, we found that the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein bound to triplex-directed psoralen ICLs (TFO-ICLs) in vitro, cooperatively with NER damage recognition proteins, promoted removal of UVC-induced lesions and facilitated error-free repair of TFO-ICLs in mouse fibroblasts. Here, we demonstrate that HMGB1 recognizes TFO-ICLs in human cells, and its depletion increases ICL-induced mutagenesis in human cells without altering the mutation spectra. In contrast, HMGB1 depletion in XPA-deficient human cells significantly altered the ICL-induced mutation spectrum from predominantly T→A to T→G transversions. Moreover, the recruitment of XPA and HMGB1 to the ICLs is co-dependent. Finally, we show that HMGB1 specifically introduces negative supercoils in ICL-containing plasmids in HeLa cell extracts. Taken together, our data suggest that in human cells, HMGB1 functions in association with XPA on ICLs and facilitates the formation of a favorable architectural environment for ICL repair processing. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. HMGB1 interacts with XPA to facilitate the processing of DNA interstrand crosslinks in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Many effective agents used in cancer chemotherapy cause DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), which covalently link both strands of the double helix together resulting in cytotoxicity. ICLs are thought to be processed by proteins from a variety of DNA repair pathways; however, a clear understanding of ICL recognition and repair processing in human cells is lacking. Previously, we found that the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein bound to triplex-directed psoralen ICLs (TFO-ICLs) in vitro, cooperatively with NER damage recognition proteins, promoted removal of UVC-induced lesions and facilitated error-free repair of TFO-ICLs in mouse fibroblasts. Here, we demonstrate that HMGB1 recognizes TFO-ICLs in human cells, and its depletion increases ICL-induced mutagenesis in human cells without altering the mutation spectra. In contrast, HMGB1 depletion in XPA-deficient human cells significantly altered the ICL-induced mutation spectrum from predominantly T→A to T→G transversions. Moreover, the recruitment of XPA and HMGB1 to the ICLs is co-dependent. Finally, we show that HMGB1 specifically introduces negative supercoils in ICL-containing plasmids in HeLa cell extracts. Taken together, our data suggest that in human cells, HMGB1 functions in association with XPA on ICLs and facilitates the formation of a favorable architectural environment for ICL repair processing. PMID:26578599

  1. Completing the implicit association test reduces positive intergroup interaction behavior.

    PubMed

    Vorauer, Jacquie D

    2012-10-01

    It is frequently suggested that increasing awareness of intergroup bias and limited control over biased responses can improve intergroup interaction behavior. Some uses of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) epitomize this approach to improving intergroup relations. However, if completing the IAT enhances caution and inhibition, reduces self-efficacy, or primes categorical thinking, the test may instead have negative effects. Two experiments demonstrated that when White individuals completed a race-relevant IAT prior to an intergroup interaction (as compared with when they did not), their interaction partner left the exchange feeling less positively regarded. No such effect was evident when White individuals completed a race-irrelevant IAT (Study 1) or an explicit prejudice measure (Study 2) before the exchange, or when their interaction partner was White (Study 1). Mediation analyses (Study 2) suggested that White participants who completed the IAT communicated less positive regard because they adopted a cautious approach to the interaction, limiting their self-disclosure.

  2. Effects of Website Interactivity on Online Retail Shopping Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Hafizul

    Motivations to engage in retail online shopping can include both utilitarian and hedonic shopping dimensions. To cater to these consumers, online retailers can create a cognitively and esthetically rich shopping environment, through sophisticated levels of interactive web utilities and features, offering not only utilitarian benefits and attributes but also providing hedonic benefits of enjoyment. Since the effect of interactive websites has proven to stimulate online consumer’s perceptions, this study presumes that websites with multimedia rich interactive utilities and features can influence online consumers’ shopping motivations and entice them to modify or even transform their original shopping predispositions by providing them with attractive and enhanced interactive features and controls, thus generating a positive attitude towards products and services offered by the retailer. This study seeks to explore the effects of Web interactivity on online consumer behavior through an attitudinal model of technology acceptance.

  3. Interaction of hexa-His tag with acidic amino acids results in facilitated refolding of halophilic nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Ida, Keiko; Tatsuda, Shuhei; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2011-11-01

    We have previously reported that amino-terminal extension sequence containing hexa-His facilitated refolding and assembly of hexameric nucleoside diphosphate kinase from extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum (NDK). In this study, we made various mutations in both the tag sequence and within NDK molecule. SerNDK, in which hexa-His was replaced with hexa-Ser, showed no facilitated folding. In addition, HisD58GD63G, in which both Asp58 and Asp63 in NDK were replaced with Gly, also showed no refolding enhancement. These results suggest that hexa-His in His-tag interact cooperatively with either Asp58 or Asp63 or both. Furthermore, G114D mutant, which formed a dimer in low salt solution, was strongly stabilized by His-tag to form a stable hexamer.

  4. Core exercises elevate trunk stability to facilitate skilled motor behavior of the upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yuki; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Kelepecz, Dolly; Nakajima, Masaaki

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of core exercises on upper extremity function relative to skilled motor behavior and postural sway. We examined the effects of core exercises on the skilled motor behavior and postural sway of 40 healthy students who were assigned randomly to the core exercise group or the control group. Independent variable is extent of exposure to core exercise and dependent variables are skilled motor behavior and postural sway. A Purdue pegboard which measures skilled motor behavior and a stabilometer which measures postural sway were used to evaluate the influence of core exercises. Pre-intervention and post-intervention skilled motor behavior and postural sway were compared between the core exercise group and control group using the Wilcoxon rank sum test; a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Also, we investigated the application of core exercises in a clinical setting for one patient with cerebral vascular disease. The post intervention skilled motor behavior (p = 0.04) and postural sway, LNG (p = 0.05), LNG/TIME (p = 0.04) and X LNG (p = 0.02) were significantly higher in the core exercise group than control group. In the case report, there were good results; function of the upper extremity improved after doing the exercises. There were positive changes in some daily living activities. Core exercises are likely to enhance trunk stabilization to improve upper extremity function. It is possible for core exercises to be adapted for patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi-Character Physical and Behavioral Interactions Controller.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Joris; Bouyarmane, Karim; Kheddar, Abderrahmane

    2016-03-14

    We extend the quadratic program (QP)-based task-space character control approach - initially intended for individual character animation - to multiple characters interacting among each other or with mobile/articulated elements of the environment. The interactions between the characters can be either physical interactions, such as contacts that can be established or broken at will between them and for which the forces are subjected to Newton's third law, or behavioral interactions, such as collision avoidance and cooperation that naturally emerge to achieve collaborative tasks from high-level specifications. We take a systematic approach integrating all the equations of motions of the characters, objects, and articulated environment parts in a single QP formulation in order to embrace and solve the most general instance of the problem, where independent individual character controllers would fail to account for the inherent coupling of their respective motions through those physical and behavioral interactions. Various types of motions/behaviors are controlled with only the one single formulation that we propose, and some examples of the original motions the framework allows are presented in the accompanying video.

  6. Some preliminary evidence of the social facilitation of mounting behavior in a juvenile bull asian elephant (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Rees, Paul A

    2004-01-01

    This study recorded sexual behavior within a captive herd of 8 Asian elephants for approximately 230 hr on 50 days over a period of 10 months. The study observed a single adult and a single juvenile bull mounting cows more than 160 times. When the juvenile bull was between 4 years, 2 months and 4 years, 8 months old, he exhibited mounting behavior only on days when adult mounting occurred. Adult mounting always occurred first. Beyond the age of 4 years, 8 months, the juvenile bull exhibited spontaneous mounting behavior in the absence of adult mounting. This suggests that mounting behavior may develop because of social facilitation. Determining the significance of the presence of sexually active adults in the normal development of sexual behavior in juveniles will require further studies. Encouraging the establishment of larger captive herds containing adults and calves of both sexes-if their presence is important-would improve the welfare of elephants in zoos and increase their potential conservation value.

  7. Barriers and Facilitators to Deaf Trauma Survivors' Help-Seeking Behavior: Lessons for Behavioral Clinical Trials Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Melissa L.; Wolf Craig, Kelly S.; Ziedonis, Douglas M.

    2017-01-01

    Deaf individuals experience significant obstacles to participating in behavioral health research when careful consideration is not given to accessibility during the design of study methodology. To inform such considerations, we conducted an exploratory secondary analysis of a mixed-methods study that originally explored 16 Deaf trauma survivors'…

  8. Mutation-induced protein interaction kinetics changes affect apoptotic network dynamic properties and facilitate oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linjie; Sun, Tanlin; Pei, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Qi

    2015-07-28

    It has been a consensus in cancer research that cancer is a disease caused primarily by genomic alterations, especially somatic mutations. However, the mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we used the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as a case study and performed a systematic analysis of integrating pathway dynamics with protein interaction kinetics to quantitatively investigate the causal molecular mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis. A mathematical model of the regulatory network was constructed to establish the functional role of dynamic bifurcation in the apoptotic process. The oncogenic mutation enrichment of each of the protein functional domains involved was found strongly correlated with the parameter sensitivity of the bifurcation point. We further dissected the causal mechanism underlying this correlation by evaluating the mutational influence on protein interaction kinetics using molecular dynamics simulation. We analyzed 29 matched mutant-wild-type and 16 matched SNP--wild-type protein systems. We found that the binding kinetics changes reflected by the changes of free energy changes induced by protein interaction mutations, which induce variations in the sensitive parameters of the bifurcation point, were a major cause of apoptosis pathway dysfunction, and mutations involved in sensitive interaction domains show high oncogenic potential. Our analysis provided a molecular basis for connecting protein mutations, protein interaction kinetics, network dynamics properties, and physiological function of a regulatory network. These insights provide a framework for coupling mutation genotype to tumorigenesis phenotype and help elucidate the logic of cancer initiation.

  9. Expressing and Amplifying Positive Emotions Facilitate Goal Attainment in Workplace Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elena; Tschan, Franziska; Messerli, Laurence; Semmer, Norbert K.

    2013-01-01

    Expressing emotions has social functions; it provides information, affects social interactions, and shapes relationships with others. Expressing positive emotions could be a strategic tool for improving goal attainment during social interactions at work. Such effects have been found in research on social contagion, impression management, and emotion work. However, expressing emotions one does not feel entails the risk of being perceived as inauthentic. This risk may well be worth taking when the emotions felt are negative, as expressing negative emotions usually has negative effects. When experiencing positive emotions, however, expressing them authentically promises benefits, and the advantage of amplifying them is not so obvious. We postulated that expressing, and amplifying, positive emotions would foster goal attainment in social interactions at work, particularly when dealing with superiors. Analyses are based on 494 interactions involving the pursuit of a goal by 113 employes. Multilevel analyses, including polynomial analyses, show that authentic display of positive emotions supported goal attainment throughout. However, amplifying felt positive emotions promoted goal attainment only in interactions with superiors, but not with colleagues. Results are discussed with regard to the importance of hierarchy for detecting, and interpreting, signs of strategic display of positive emotions. PMID:23675358

  10. Mutation-induced protein interaction kinetics changes affect apoptotic network dynamic properties and facilitate oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linjie; Sun, Tanlin; Pei, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    It has been a consensus in cancer research that cancer is a disease caused primarily by genomic alterations, especially somatic mutations. However, the mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we used the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as a case study and performed a systematic analysis of integrating pathway dynamics with protein interaction kinetics to quantitatively investigate the causal molecular mechanism of mutation-induced oncogenesis. A mathematical model of the regulatory network was constructed to establish the functional role of dynamic bifurcation in the apoptotic process. The oncogenic mutation enrichment of each of the protein functional domains involved was found strongly correlated with the parameter sensitivity of the bifurcation point. We further dissected the causal mechanism underlying this correlation by evaluating the mutational influence on protein interaction kinetics using molecular dynamics simulation. We analyzed 29 matched mutant–wild-type and 16 matched SNP—wild-type protein systems. We found that the binding kinetics changes reflected by the changes of free energy changes induced by protein interaction mutations, which induce variations in the sensitive parameters of the bifurcation point, were a major cause of apoptosis pathway dysfunction, and mutations involved in sensitive interaction domains show high oncogenic potential. Our analysis provided a molecular basis for connecting protein mutations, protein interaction kinetics, network dynamics properties, and physiological function of a regulatory network. These insights provide a framework for coupling mutation genotype to tumorigenesis phenotype and help elucidate the logic of cancer initiation. PMID:26170328

  11. Clitoral stimulation modulates appetitive sexual behavior and facilitates reproduction in rats.

    PubMed

    Cibrian-Llanderal, Tamara; Tecamachaltzi-Silvaran, Miriam; Triana-Del Rio, Rodrigo; Pfaus, James G; Manzo, Jorge; Coria-Avila, Genaro A

    2010-05-11

    In rats, sexual reward, appetitive sexual behaviors and reproduction are modulated by the amount and rate of vaginocervical stimulation. Here the effect of clitoral stimulation (CLS) on proceptivity was assessed. In Exp 1, ovariectomized, hormone-primed Wistar females formed three groups: G1 (1 CLS every second), G2 (1 CLS every 5s) and G3 (no CLS). Precopulatory CLS consisted of 5cycles of 1min of stimulation with the tip of a cotton swab connected to a vibrator device, followed by 1-2min of rest. CLS increased proceptive behavior in G1 compared to G2, but not compared to G3. In Exp 2, gonadally-intact rats in late proestrous received CLS prior to copulation. No differences in sexual behavior were detected between the groups, but CLS enhanced reproduction in females that received >9 intromissions. 28, 66 and 10% of females became pregnant in G1, G2, and G3, respectively. These data indicate that precopulatory CLS affects proceptive behaviors depending on the pattern and rhythm of stimulation in hormone-primed females. In virgin rats that have received sufficient vagino cervical stimulation CLS also increases fertility.

  12. An Adolescent Nutrition Learning Model to Facilitate Behavior Change in Overweight Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Kimberly J.; Ramsay, Samantha A.; Holyoke, Laura B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the process by which adolescents learn about nutrition is necessary for developing tailored education that leads to sustainable behavior change. Teens aged 15-17 participating in an obesity prevention program were interviewed. From the data, three themes emerged and informed development of an adolescent nutrition learning model. The…

  13. An Adolescent Nutrition Learning Model to Facilitate Behavior Change in Overweight Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Kimberly J.; Ramsay, Samantha A.; Holyoke, Laura B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the process by which adolescents learn about nutrition is necessary for developing tailored education that leads to sustainable behavior change. Teens aged 15-17 participating in an obesity prevention program were interviewed. From the data, three themes emerged and informed development of an adolescent nutrition learning model. The…

  14. What Expert Teachers Think: A Look at Principal Leadership Behaviors That Facilitate Exemplary Classroom Instructional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Janet; Babo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to rank order 21 leadership behaviors originally identified by the work of Waters, Marzano & McNulty (2003) and the impact they have on teacher instructional practice using questionnaire responses provided by past recipients of the National Teacher of the Year award at the state level (n=178) in order to expand…

  15. Partners in Health: A Conceptual Framework for the Role of Community Health Workers in Facilitating Patients' Adoption of Healthy Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Van Devanter, Nancy; Islam, Nadia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-01-01

    We formulated a conceptual framework that begins to answer the national call to improve health care access, delivery, and quality by explaining the processes through which community health workers (CHWs) facilitate patients’ adoption of healthy behaviors. In September 2011 to January 2012, we conducted a qualitative study that triangulated multiple data sources: 26 in-depth interviews, training documents, and patient charts. CHWs served as partners in health to immigrant Filipinos with hypertension, leveraging their cultural congruence with intervention participants, employing interpersonal communication techniques to build trust and rapport, providing social support, and assisting with health behavior change. To drive the field forward, this work can be expanded with framework testing that may influence future CHW training and interventions. PMID:25790405

  16. Hippocampal-Prefrontal Interactions in Cognition, Behavior and Psychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Torfi; Duvarci, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) have long been known to play a central role in various behavioral and cognitive functions. More recently, electrophysiological and functional imaging studies have begun to examine how interactions between the two structures contribute to behavior during various tasks. At the same time, it has become clear that hippocampal-prefrontal interactions are disrupted in psychiatric disease and may contribute to their pathophysiology. These impairments have most frequently been observed in schizophrenia, a disease that has long been associated with hippocampal and prefrontal dysfunction. Studies in animal models of the illness have also begun to relate disruptions in hippocampal-prefrontal interactions to the various risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms of the illness. The goal of this review is to summarize what is known about the role of hippocampal-prefrontal interactions in normal brain function and compare how these interactions are disrupted in schizophrenia patients and animal models of the disease. Outstanding questions for future research on the role of hippocampal-prefrontal interactions in both healthy brain function and disease states are also discussed. PMID:26858612

  17. PIP2 regulates psychostimulant behaviors through its interaction with a membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Peter J; Belovich, Andrea N; Khelashvili, George; Saunders, Christine; Erreger, Kevin; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sitte, Harald H; Weinstein, Harel; Matthies, Heinrich J G; Galli, Aurelio

    2014-07-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) regulates the function of ion channels and transporters. Here, we demonstrate that PIP2 directly binds the human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT), a key regulator of DA homeostasis and a target of the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH). This binding occurs through electrostatic interactions with positively charged hDAT N-terminal residues and is shown to facilitate AMPH-induced, DAT-mediated DA efflux and the psychomotor properties of AMPH. Substitution of these residues with uncharged amino acids reduces hDAT-PIP2 interactions and AMPH-induced DA efflux without altering the hDAT physiological function of DA uptake. We evaluated the significance of this interaction in vivo using locomotion as a behavioral assay in Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of mutated hDAT with reduced PIP2 interaction in Drosophila DA neurons impairs AMPH-induced locomotion without altering basal locomotion. We present what is to our knowledge the first demonstration of how PIP2 interactions with a membrane protein can regulate the behaviors of complex organisms.

  18. Inhibiting Glycine Transporter-1 Facilitates Cocaine-Cue Extinction and Attenuates Reacquisition of Cocaine-Seeking Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Nic Dhonnchadha, Bríd Á; Pinard, Emmanuel; Alberati, Daniela; Wettstein, Joseph G.; Spealman, Roger D.; Kantak, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Combining extinction training with cognitive-enhancing pharmacotherapy represents a novel strategy for improving the efficacy of exposure therapy for drug relapse prevention. We investigated if the selective glycine transporter-1 (GlyT-1) inhibitor RO4543338 could facilitate extinction of cocaine-conditioned responses and attenuate reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior. Methods Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.3 mg/kg), which was associated with a 2-sec light cue under a second-order schedule of i.v. drug injection. Rats received vehicle, 30 or 45 mg/kg of RO4543338 prior to three 1-hr extinction-training sessions spaced at weekly intervals. Responses were extinguished by substituting saline for cocaine while maintaining response-contingent cue presentations. Reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior during self-administration sessions began one week after the last extinction session. Control experiments were conducted under conditions that precluded explicit extinction of cocaine-conditioned responses. Results Compared to vehicle, 30 and 45 mg/kg RO4543338 significantly decreased responding early in extinction training and during subsequent reacquisition sessions. The latter effect persisted for at least five sessions. In control studies, reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior was not altered when RO4543338 was administered either prior to weekly self-administration control sessions or prior to weekly control sessions in which cocaine and cues were omitted and the levers retracted. Conclusions As the GlyT-1 inhibitor facilitated cocaine-cue extinction learning and attenuated subsequent reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior, this class of compounds may have utility as a pharmacological adjunct to cocaine-cue exposure therapy in addicts. PMID:21992874

  19. Training Teaching Staff to Facilitate Spontaneous Communication in Children with Autism: Adult Interactive Style Intervention (AISI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossyvaki, Lila; Jones, Glenys; Guldberg, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the way adults interact with children with autism can have a great impact on their spontaneous communication. However, to date, few studies have focused on modifying adults' behaviour and even fewer have been conducted in school settings which actively involve teaching staff in designing the intervention.…

  20. Plant competition, facilitation, and other overstory-understory interactions in longleaf pine ecosystems.

    SciTech Connect

    Imm, Donald; Blake, John I

    2006-07-01

    The Longleaf Pine Ecosystem - Ecology, Silviculture, and Restoration. Shibu Jose, Eric J. Jokela, and Deborah L. Miller, (eds.) Springer Series on Environmental Management. Springer Science and Business Media publisher. Box 10.2 Pp 330-333. An insert on overstory-understory interactions in longleaf pine ecosystems.

  1. Training Paraprofessionals to Facilitate Social Interactions between Children with Autism and Their Typically Developing Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Eileen Klein; Matos, Rosy

    2013-01-01

    To support children with autism in inclusive classrooms, schools are increasingly utilizing paraprofessionals. However, research suggests that paraprofessionals often lack sufficient training and may inadvertently hinder the social interactions between children with disabilities and their peers. This study used a multiple baseline across…

  2. Facilitating Grounded Online Interactions in Video-Case-Based Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Galvis, Alvaro

    2004-01-01

    The use of interactive video cases for teacher professional development is an emergent medium inspired by case study methods used extensively in law, management, and medicine, and by the advent of multimedia technology available to support online discussions. This paper focuses on Web-based "grounded" discussions--in which the participants base…

  3. Using Clickers to Facilitate Interactive Engagement Activities in a Lecture Room for Improved Performance by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Hofman, Adriaan; Naidoo, Ari; Winnips, Koos

    2014-01-01

    What impact can interactive engagement (IE) activities using clickers have on students' motivation and academic performance during lectures as compared to attending traditional types of lectures? This article positions the research on IE within the comprehensive model of educational effectiveness and Gagné's instructional events model. For the…

  4. Interfering and Resolving: How Tabletop Interaction Facilitates Co-Construction of Argumentative Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcao, Taciana Pontual; Price, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Tangible technologies and shared interfaces create new paradigms for mediating collaboration through dynamic, synchronous environments, where action is as important as speech for participating and contributing to the activity. However, interaction with shared interfaces has been shown to be inherently susceptible to peer interference, potentially…

  5. CO2 Enrichment and Warming Interact to Facilitate Invasion of a Semi-Arid Grassland

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although a variety of global changes have been shown to influence plant invasions, interactive effects of different changes have rarely been studied. We examined effects of CO2 enrichment and warming on the ability of the invasive forb Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian toadflax) to invade semi-arid mixed...

  6. Training Teaching Staff to Facilitate Spontaneous Communication in Children with Autism: Adult Interactive Style Intervention (AISI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossyvaki, Lila; Jones, Glenys; Guldberg, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the way adults interact with children with autism can have a great impact on their spontaneous communication. However, to date, few studies have focused on modifying adults' behaviour and even fewer have been conducted in school settings which actively involve teaching staff in designing the intervention.…

  7. Interfering and Resolving: How Tabletop Interaction Facilitates Co-Construction of Argumentative Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcao, Taciana Pontual; Price, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Tangible technologies and shared interfaces create new paradigms for mediating collaboration through dynamic, synchronous environments, where action is as important as speech for participating and contributing to the activity. However, interaction with shared interfaces has been shown to be inherently susceptible to peer interference, potentially…

  8. Case-Based Behavior Recognition to Facilitate Planning in Unmanned Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    effectiveness of the given plan. We describe an initial implementation of a CBBR prototype in the context of a goal reasoning agent designed for UAV control...effectiveness of the given plan. We describe an initial implementation of a CBBR prototype in the context of a goal reasoning agent designed for UAV...Z39-18 We hypothesize that behavior recognition is more effective than plan recognition in domains where information is scarce. We designed our CBBR

  9. Decoupling Actions from Consequences: Dorsal Hippocampal Lesions Facilitate Instrumental Performance, but Impair Behavioral Flexibility in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Sebastian; Schwarting, Rainer K. W.

    2016-01-01

    The present study is part of a series of experiments, where we analyze why and how damage of the rat’s dorsal hippocampus (dHC) can enhance performance in a sequential reaction time task (SRTT). In this task, sequences of distinct visual stimulus presentations are food-rewarded in a fixed-ratio-13-schedule. Our previous study (Busse and Schwarting, 2016) had shown that rats with lesions of the dHC show substantially shorter session times and post-reinforcement pauses (PRPs) than controls, which allows for more practice when daily training is kept constant. Since sequential behavior is based on instrumental performance, a sequential benefit might be secondary to that. In order to test this hypothesis in the present study, we performed two experiments, where pseudorandom rather than sequential stimulus presentation was used in rats with excitotoxic dorsal hippocampal lesions. Again, we found enhanced performance in the lesion-group in terms of shorter session times and PRPs. During the sessions we found that the lesion-group spent less time with non-instrumental behavior (i.e., grooming, sniffing, and rearing) after prolonged instrumental training. Also, such rats showed moderate evidence for an extinction impairment under devalued food reward conditions and significant deficits in a response-outcome (R-O)-discrimination task in comparison to a control-group. These findings suggest that facilitatory effects on instrumental performance after dorsal hippocampal lesions may be primarily a result of complex behavioral changes, i.e., reductions of behavioral flexibility and/or alterations in motivation, which then result in enhanced instrumental learning. PMID:27375453

  10. Social facilitation of fur rubbing behavior in white-faced capuchins.

    PubMed

    Meunier, H; Petit, O; Deneubourg, J-L

    2008-02-01

    In their natural environment, capuchins select certain plants, containing secondary compounds with bactericide, insecticide or fungicide properties, to rub their pelage energetically (i.e. fur rubbing). Fur rubbing can be performed in solitary, or collectively in subgroups of variable size and composition, and most of the time fur rubbing happens in synchrony with other group members. The aim of this study is to understand the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon, and, more particularly, to determine the processes involved in its synchronization. For this purpose, we designed a set of experiments where white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) were presented with onions (Allium cepa) that they use to fur rub. We conducted a detailed kinetic study of fur rubbing behavior to determine if its synchronization is the consequence of simultaneous responses of different individuals to the same stimulus or if, on the contrary, there is a real collective phenomenon where individuals respond to conspecific behavior. Our results reveal that fur rubbing is a collective behavior with a mimetic underlying mechanism. If fur rubbing with onions (a plant with antifungal and repellent properties) allows capuchins to treat their fur against parasites or pathogens, its synchronization would optimize the treatment by acting as a group barrier to ectoparasite propagation. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. The behavioral and cognitive effects of two benzodiazepines associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Sheila M; Strong, Mary Jane; Janicak, Philip G; Negrusz, Adam

    2002-09-01

    Recently, sexual assaults have included the use of benzodiazepines to impair the victim. Our aim was to examine the physiological, cognitive, and behavioral effects of flunitrazepam (FN) and clonazepam (CLO). In the first study, ten healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of 2 mg of FN. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), behavioral reports and staff observations were then collected. In the second study, ten healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of 3 mg of CLO. Vital signs, performance on the MMSE and Digit Symbol Substitution Test, and behavioral changes were examined. FN significantly decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure 4 h post drug ingestion with diastolic remaining low at 6 h. CLO was associated with changes in temperature and decreased systolic pressure. FN affected memory and attention 4 h following ingestion. CLO affected memory and attention throughout the study (6 h), and psychomotor performance was decreased 2 h post ingestion. In both studies, subjects were disinhibited and did not perceive their own impairment.

  12. Virtual Partner Interaction (VPI): Exploring Novel Behaviors via Coordination Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, J. A. Scott; de Guzman, Gonzalo C.; Reveley, Colin; Tognoli, Emmanuelle

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by the dynamic clamp of cellular neuroscience, this paper introduces VPI—Virtual Partner Interaction—a coupled dynamical system for studying real time interaction between a human and a machine. In this proof of concept study, human subjects coordinate hand movements with a virtual partner, an avatar of a hand whose movements are driven by a computerized version of the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB) equations that have been shown to govern basic forms of human coordination. As a surrogate system for human social coordination, VPI allows one to examine regions of the parameter space not typically explored during live interactions. A number of novel behaviors never previously observed are uncovered and accounted for. Having its basis in an empirically derived theory of human coordination, VPI offers a principled approach to human-machine interaction and opens up new ways to understand how humans interact with human-like machines including identification of underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:19492044

  13. Dynamically Coupled Oscillators: Cooperative Behavior via Dynamical Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aonishi, Toru; Okada, Masato

    2003-06-01

    We propose a theoretical framework for studying the cooperative behavior of dynamically coupled oscillators (DCOs) that possess dynamical interactions. Then, to clarify synchronization phenomena in networks of interneurons which possess inhibitory interactions, we propose a DCO model with dynamics of interactions that tend to cause 180^\\circ phase lags. Employing the approach developed here, we demonstrate that although our model displays synchronization at high frequencies, it does not exhibit synchronization at low frequencies because this dynamical interaction does not cause a phase lag sufficiently large to cancel the effect of the inhibition. We interpret the disappearance of synchronization in our model with decreasing frequency as describing the breakdown of synchronization in the interneuron network of the CA1 area below the critical frequency of 20 Hz.

  14. PACSIN1, a Tau-interacting protein, regulates axonal elongation and branching by facilitating microtubule instability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Lv, Kaosheng; Li, Zenglong; Yu, Albert C H; Chen, Jianguo; Teng, Junlin

    2012-11-16

    Tau is a major member of the neuronal microtubule-associated proteins. It promotes tubulin assembly and stabilizes axonal microtubules. Previous studies have demonstrated that Tau forms cross-bridges between microtubules, with some particles located on cross-bridges, suggesting that some proteins interact with Tau and might be involved in regulating Tau-related microtubule dynamics. This study reports that PACSIN1 interacts with Tau in axon. PACSIN1 blockade results in impaired axonal elongation and a higher number of primary axonal branches in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons, which is induced by increasing the binding ability of Tau to microtubules. In PACSIN1-blocked dorsal root ganglia neurons, a greater amount of Tau is inclined to accumulate in the central domain of growth cones, and it promotes the stability of the microtubule network. Taken together, these results suggest that PACSIN1 is an important Tau binding partner in regulating microtubule dynamics and forming axonal plasticity.

  15. Interaction of Zwitterionic Penicillins with the OmpF Channel Facilitates Their Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Danelon, Christophe; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Winterhalter, Mathias; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2006-01-01

    To study translocation of β-lactam antibiotics of different size and charge across the outer bacterial membrane, we combine an analysis of ion currents through single trimeric outer membrane protein F (OmpF) porins in planar lipid bilayers with molecular dynamics simulations. Because the size of penicillin molecules is close to the size of the narrowest part of the OmpF pore, penicillins occlude the pore during their translocation. Favorably interacting penicillins cause time-resolvable transient blockages of the small-ion current through the channel and thereby provide information about their dynamics within the pore. Analyzing these random fluctuations, we find that ampicillin and amoxicillin have a relatively high affinity for OmpF. In contrast, no or only a weak interaction is detected for carbenicillin, azlocillin, and piperacillin. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest a possible pathway of these drugs through the OmpF channel and rationalize our experimental findings. For zwitterionic ampicillin and amoxicillin, we identify a region of binding sites near the narrowest part of the channel pore. Interactions with these sites partially compensate for the entropic cost of drug confinement by the channel. Whereas azlocillin and piperacillin are clearly too big to pass through the channel constriction, dianionic carbenicillin does not find an efficient binding region in the constriction zone. Carbenicillin's favorable interactions are limited to the extracellular vestibule. These observations confirm our earlier suggestion that a set of high-affinity sites at the narrowest part of the OmpF channel improves a drug's ability to cross the membrane via the pore. PMID:16339889

  16. Prediction of Intra-Species Protein-Protein Interactions in Enteropathogens Facilitating Systems Biology Study

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Ranjan Kumar; Jana, Tanmoy; Das, Santasabuj; Saha, Sudipto

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions in Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been studied extensively using high throughput methods such as tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid method. This can in turn be used to understand the mechanisms of bacterial cellular processes. However, experimental characterization of such huge amount of interactions data is not available for other important enteropathogens. Here, we propose a support vector machine (SVM)-based prediction model using the known PPIs data of E. coli that can be used to predict PPIs in other enteropathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella Typhi, Shigella flexneri and Yersinia entrocolitica. Different features such as domain-domain association (DDA), network topology, and sequence information were used in developing the SVM model. The proposed model using DDA, degree and amino acid composition features has achieved an accuracy of 82% and 62% on 5-fold cross validation and blind E. coli datasets, respectively. The predicted interactions were validated by Gene Ontology (GO) semantic similarity measure and String PPIs database (experimental PPIs only). Finally, we have developed a user-friendly webserver named EnPPIpred to predict intra-species PPIs in enteropathogens, which will be of great help for the experimental biologists. The webserver EnPPIpred is freely available at http://bicresources.jcbose.ac.in/ssaha4/EnPPIpred/. PMID:26717407

  17. Prediction of Intra-Species Protein-Protein Interactions in Enteropathogens Facilitating Systems Biology Study.

    PubMed

    Barman, Ranjan Kumar; Jana, Tanmoy; Das, Santasabuj; Saha, Sudipto

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions in Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been studied extensively using high throughput methods such as tandem affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid method. This can in turn be used to understand the mechanisms of bacterial cellular processes. However, experimental characterization of such huge amount of interactions data is not available for other important enteropathogens. Here, we propose a support vector machine (SVM)-based prediction model using the known PPIs data of E. coli that can be used to predict PPIs in other enteropathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella Typhi, Shigella flexneri and Yersinia entrocolitica. Different features such as domain-domain association (DDA), network topology, and sequence information were used in developing the SVM model. The proposed model using DDA, degree and amino acid composition features has achieved an accuracy of 82% and 62% on 5-fold cross validation and blind E. coli datasets, respectively. The predicted interactions were validated by Gene Ontology (GO) semantic similarity measure and String PPIs database (experimental PPIs only). Finally, we have developed a user-friendly webserver named EnPPIpred to predict intra-species PPIs in enteropathogens, which will be of great help for the experimental biologists. The webserver EnPPIpred is freely available at http://bicresources.jcbose.ac.in/ssaha4/EnPPIpred/.

  18. Claudin-2 Promotes Breast Cancer Liver Metastasis by Facilitating Tumor Cell Interactions with Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Dupuy, Fanny; Dong, Zhifeng; Monast, Anie; Annis, Matthew G.; Spicer, Jonathan; Ferri, Lorenzo E.; Omeroglu, Atilla; Basik, Mark; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified claudin-2 as a functional mediator of breast cancer liver metastasis. We now confirm that claudin-2 levels are elevated in liver metastases, but not in skin metastases, compared to levels in their matched primary tumors in patients with breast cancer. Moreover, claudin-2 is specifically expressed in liver-metastatic breast cancer cells compared to populations derived from bone or lung metastases. The increased liver tropism exhibited by claudin-2-expressing breast cancer cells requires claudin-2-mediated interactions between breast cancer cells and primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the reduction of the claudin-2 expression level, either in cancer cells or in primary hepatocytes, diminishes these heterotypic cell-cell interactions. Finally, we demonstrate that the first claudin-2 extracellular loop is essential for mediating tumor cell-hepatocyte interactions and the ability of breast cancer cells to form liver metastases in vivo. Thus, during breast cancer liver metastasis, claudin-2 shifts from acting within tight-junctional complexes to functioning as an adhesion molecule between breast cancer cells and hepatocytes. PMID:22645303

  19. Protease inhibitor homologues from mamba venoms: facilitation of acetylcholine release and interactions with prejunctional blocking toxins.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A L; Karlsson, E

    1982-09-01

    1 Five polypeptides, which were isolated from elapid snake venoms and which are structurally related to protease inhibitors, were tested for action on isolated biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparations of the chick. 2 Dendrotoxin from the Eastern green mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps) and toxins K and I from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) increased to indirect stimulation without affecting responses to exogenous acetylcholine, carbachol of KCl. 3 The two other protease inhibitor homologues, HHV-II from Ringhals cobra (Hemachatus haemachatus) and NNV-II from Cape cobra (Naja nivea) did not increase responses to nerve stimulation. Trypsin inhibitor from bovine pancreas also had no facilitatory effects on neuromuscular transmission. 4 The facilitatory toxins from mamba venoms interacted with the prejunctional blocking toxins, beta-bungarotoxin, crotoxin and notexin, but not with taipoxin. The blocking effects of beta-bungarotoxin were reduced by pretreatment with the mamba toxins, whereas the blocking actions of crotoxin and notexin were enhanced. 5 The results indicate that protease inhibitor homologues from mamba venoms form a new class of neurotoxin, which acts to increase the release of acetylcholine in response to motor nerve stimulation. 6 From the interaction studies it is concluded that the facilitatory toxins bind to motor nerve terminals at sites related to those occupied by the prejunctional blocking toxins. However, differences in interactions with individual toxins suggest that there must be several related binding sites on the nerve terminals.

  20. Claudin-2 promotes breast cancer liver metastasis by facilitating tumor cell interactions with hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Dupuy, Fanny; Dong, Zhifeng; Monast, Anie; Annis, Matthew G; Spicer, Jonathan; Ferri, Lorenzo E; Omeroglu, Atilla; Basik, Mark; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark; Siegel, Peter M

    2012-08-01

    We previously identified claudin-2 as a functional mediator of breast cancer liver metastasis. We now confirm that claudin-2 levels are elevated in liver metastases, but not in skin metastases, compared to levels in their matched primary tumors in patients with breast cancer. Moreover, claudin-2 is specifically expressed in liver-metastatic breast cancer cells compared to populations derived from bone or lung metastases. The increased liver tropism exhibited by claudin-2-expressing breast cancer cells requires claudin-2-mediated interactions between breast cancer cells and primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the reduction of the claudin-2 expression level, either in cancer cells or in primary hepatocytes, diminishes these heterotypic cell-cell interactions. Finally, we demonstrate that the first claudin-2 extracellular loop is essential for mediating tumor cell-hepatocyte interactions and the ability of breast cancer cells to form liver metastases in vivo. Thus, during breast cancer liver metastasis, claudin-2 shifts from acting within tight-junctional complexes to functioning as an adhesion molecule between breast cancer cells and hepatocytes.

  1. Cooperative and competitive interactions facilitate stereo computations in macaque primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Samonds, Jason M; Potetz, Brian R; Lee, Tai Sing

    2009-12-16

    Inferring depth from binocular disparities is a difficult problem for the visual system because local features in the left- and right-eye images must be matched correctly to solve this "stereo correspondence problem." Cortical architecture and computational studies suggest that lateral interactions among neurons could help resolve local uncertainty about disparity encoded in individual neurons by incorporating contextual constraints. We found that correlated activity among pairs of neurons in primary visual cortex depended both on disparity-tuning relationships and the stimuli displayed within the receptive fields of the neurons. Nearby pairs of neurons with distinct disparity tuning exhibited a decrease in spike correlation at competing disparities soon after response onset. Distant neuronal pairs of similar disparity tuning exhibited an increase in spike correlation at mutually preferred disparities. The observed correlated activity and response dynamics suggests that local competitive and distant cooperative interactions improve disparity tuning of individual neurons over time. Such interactions could represent a neural substrate for the principal constraints underlying cooperative stereo algorithms.

  2. How parental dietary behavior and food parenting practices affect children's dietary behavior. Interacting sources of influence?

    PubMed

    Larsen, Junilla K; Hermans, Roel C J; Sleddens, Ester F C; Engels, Rutger C M E; Fisher, Jennifer O; Kremers, Stef P J

    2015-06-01

    Until now, the literatures on the effects of food parenting practices and parents' own dietary behavior on children's dietary behavior have largely been independent from one another. Integrating findings across these areas could provide insight on simultaneous and interacting influences on children's food intake. In this narrative review, we provide a conceptual model that bridges the gap between both literatures and consists of three main hypotheses. First, parental dietary behavior and food parenting practices are important interactive sources of influence on children's dietary behavior and Body Mass Index (BMI). Second, parental influences are importantly mediated by changes in the child's home food environment. Third, parenting context (i.e., parenting styles and differential parental treatment) moderates effects of food parenting practices, whereas child characteristics (i.e., temperament and appetitive traits) mainly moderate effects of the home food environment. Future studies testing (parts of) this conceptual model are needed to inform effective parent-child overweight preventive interventions.

  3. Interpersonal behaviors and socioemotional interaction of medical students in a virtual clinical encounter

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The virtual clinical encounter (VCE) may function as an important support for medical students in or prior to clinical practice to train and ease communication and socioemotional interactions with patients. Few studies have however focused on the dynamics of interpersonal behaviors in clinical interviewing with a virtual patient (VP) and the affective responses evoked by such a learning experience. The study was designed to investigate the dynamics and congruence of interpersonal behaviors and socioemotional interaction exhibited during the learning experience in a VCE, and to evaluate which interaction design characteristics contribute most to the behavioral and affective engagement in medical students. Methods Thirty medical students (sixth semester) participated voluntarily in an exploratory observational study with a highly interactive VP case based on a trustworthy VP encounter with a natural and realistic dialogue interface. Students worked collaboratively in pairs. They were videotaped for further behavioral analysis and self-reported (in both a survey and an interview) their personal opinions, perceptions and attitudes about the VCE. A mixed methods approach was applied. Results All participants demonstrated an adequate, respectful and relevant clinical case management and to obtain psychosocial history. The collaborative workspace played its role and led to dynamic and engaged discussions fostering thus shared understanding. The results suggest that the VCE studied was perceived as a meaningful, intrinsically motivational and activating learning environment, and was found to socially and emotionally engage learners. We also found that VCEs have the potential to support the development of relevant and congruent interpersonal communication skills in trainees. Conclusions By taking advantage of socioemotional interaction, VCEs promote not only critical reflection skills or strategy-selection skills, but also to develop listening and nonverbal

  4. Dorsal Hippocampal Regulation of Memory Reconsolidation Processes that Facilitate Drug Context-induced Cocaine-seeking Behavior in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Donna R.; Bell, Guinevere H.; Lasseter, Heather C.; Xie, Xiaou; Traina, Stephanie A.; Fuchs, Rita A.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to a cocaine-paired context increases the propensity for relapse in cocaine users and prompts cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. According to the reconsolidation hypothesis, upon context re-exposure, established cocaine-related associations are retrieved and can become labile. These associations must undergo reconsolidation into long-term memory to effect enduring stimulus control. The dorsal hippocampus (DH), dorsolateral caudate-putamen, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex are critical for the expression of context-induced cocaine seeking, and these brain regions may also play a role in the reconsolidation of cocaine-related memories that promote this behavior. To test this hypothesis, rats were trained to press a lever for un-signaled cocaine infusions (0.2 mg/infusion, IV) in a distinct environmental context (cocaine-paired context), followed by extinction training in a different context (extinction context). Rats were then re-exposed to the cocaine-paired context for 15 min in order to reactivate cocaine-related memories or received comparable exposure to a novel unpaired context. Immediately thereafter, rats received bilateral microinfusions of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin, or vehicle into one of the above brain regions. After additional extinction training in the extinction context, reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior (i.e., non-reinforced lever presses) was assessed in the cocaine-paired context. Tetrodotoxin, but not anisomycin, administered into the DH inhibited drug context-induced cocaine-seeking behavior in a memory reactivation-dependent manner. Other manipulations failed to alter this behavior. These findings suggest that the DH facilitates the reconsolidation of associative memories that maintain context-induced cocaine-seeking behavior, but it is not the site of anisomycin-sensitive memory re-stabilization per se. PMID:19712098

  5. Interactions between Nef and AIP1 proliferate multivesicular bodies and facilitate egress of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luciana J; Chen, Nan; Lopes, Adriana; Aguiar, Renato S; Tanuri, Amilcar; Plemenitas, Ana; Peterlin, B Matija

    2006-01-01

    Background Nef is an accessory protein of primate lentiviruses, HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV. Besides removing CD4 and MHC class I from the surface and activating cellular signaling cascades, Nef also binds GagPol during late stages of the viral replicative cycle. In this report, we investigated further the ability of Nef to facilitate the replication of HIV-1. Results To this end, first the release of new viral particles was much lower in the absence of Nef in a T cell line. Since the same results were obtained in the absence of the viral envelope using pseudo-typed viruses, this phenomenon was independent of CD4 and enhanced infectivity. Next, we found that Nef not only possesses a consensus motif for but also binds AIP1 in vitro and in vivo. AIP1 is the critical intermediate in the formation of multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which play an important role in the budding and release of viruses from infected cells. Indeed, Nef proliferated MVBs in cells, but only when its AIP1-binding site was intact. Finally, these functions of Nef were reproduced in primary macrophages, where the wild type but not mutant Nef proteins led to increased release of new viral particles from infected cells. Conclusion We conclude that by binding GagPol and AIP1, Nef not only proliferates MVBs but also contributes to the egress of viral particles from infected cells. PMID:16764724

  6. OGG1-DNA interactions facilitate NF-κB binding to DNA targets

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lang; Hao, Wenjing; Zheng, Xu; Zeng, Xianlu; Ahmed Abbasi, Adeel; Boldogh, Istvan; Ba, Xueqing

    2017-01-01

    DNA repair protein counteracting oxidative promoter lesions may modulate gene expression. Oxidative DNA bases modified by reactive oxygen species (ROS), primarily as 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxoG), which is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair (BER) pathway. Because cellular response to oxidative challenge is accompanied by DNA damage repair, we tested whether the repair by OGG1 is compatible with transcription factor binding and gene expression. We performed electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) using wild-type sequence deriving from Cxcl2 gene promoter and the same sequence bearing a single synthetic 8-oxoG at defined 5′ or 3′ guanine in runs of guanines to mimic oxidative effects. We showed that DNA occupancy of NF-κB present in nuclear extracts from tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) exposed cells is OGG1 and 8-oxoG position dependent, importantly, OGG1 counteracting 8-oxoG outside consensus motif had a profound influence on purified NF-κB binding to DNA. Furthermore, OGG1 is essential for NF-κB dependent gene expression, prior to 8-oxoG excised from DNA. These observations imply that pre-excision step(s) during OGG1 initiated BER evoked by ROS facilitates NF-κB DNA occupancy and gene expression. PMID:28266569

  7. Modeling emotion and behavior in animated personas to facilitate human behavior change: the case of the HEART-SENSE game.

    PubMed

    Silverman, B G; Holmes, J; Kimmel, S; Branas, C; Ivins, D; Weaver, R; Chen, Y

    2001-09-01

    The goal of this research is to determine whether a computer based training game (HEART-SENSE) can improve recognition of heart attack symptoms and shift behavioral issues so as to reduce pre-hospitalization delay in seeking treatment. Since treatment delay correlates with adverse outcomes, this research could reduce myocardial infarction mortality and morbidity. In Phase I we created and evaluated a prototype virtual village in which users encounter and help convince synthetic personas to deal appropriately with a variety of heart attack scenarios and delay issues. Innovations made here are: (1) a design for a generic simulator package for promoting health behavior shifts, and (2) algorithms for animated pedagogical agents to reason about how their emotional state ties to patient condition and user progress. Initial results show that users of the game exhibit a significant shift in intention to call 9-1-1 and avoid delay, that multi-media versions of the game foster vividness and memory retention as well as a better understanding of both symptoms and of the need to manage time during a heart attack event. Also, results provide insight into areas where emotive pedagogical agents help and hinder user performance. Finally, we conclude with next steps that will help improve the game and the field of pedagogical agents and tools for simulated worlds for healthcare education and promotion.

  8. On the role of the plasmodial cytoskeleton in facilitating intelligent behavior in slime mold Physarum polycephalum

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew; Jones, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The plasmodium of slime mold Physarum polycephalum behaves as an amorphous reaction-diffusion computing substrate and is capable of apparently ‘intelligent’ behavior. But how does intelligence emerge in an acellular organism? Through a range of laboratory experiments, we visualize the plasmodial cytoskeleton—a ubiquitous cellular protein scaffold whose functions are manifold and essential to life—and discuss its putative role as a network for transducing, transmitting and structuring data streams within the plasmodium. Through a range of computer modeling techniques, we demonstrate how emergent behavior, and hence computational intelligence, may occur in cytoskeletal communications networks. Specifically, we model the topology of both the actin and tubulin cytoskeletal networks and discuss how computation may occur therein. Furthermore, we present bespoke cellular automata and particle swarm models for the computational process within the cytoskeleton and observe the incidence of emergent patterns in both. Our work grants unique insight into the origins of natural intelligence; the results presented here are therefore readily transferable to the fields of natural computation, cell biology and biomedical science. We conclude by discussing how our results may alter our biological, computational and philosophical understanding of intelligence and consciousness. PMID:26478782

  9. On the role of the plasmodial cytoskeleton in facilitating intelligent behavior in slime mold Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew; Jones, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The plasmodium of slime mold Physarum polycephalum behaves as an amorphous reaction-diffusion computing substrate and is capable of apparently 'intelligent' behavior. But how does intelligence emerge in an acellular organism? Through a range of laboratory experiments, we visualize the plasmodial cytoskeleton-a ubiquitous cellular protein scaffold whose functions are manifold and essential to life-and discuss its putative role as a network for transducing, transmitting and structuring data streams within the plasmodium. Through a range of computer modeling techniques, we demonstrate how emergent behavior, and hence computational intelligence, may occur in cytoskeletal communications networks. Specifically, we model the topology of both the actin and tubulin cytoskeletal networks and discuss how computation may occur therein. Furthermore, we present bespoke cellular automata and particle swarm models for the computational process within the cytoskeleton and observe the incidence of emergent patterns in both. Our work grants unique insight into the origins of natural intelligence; the results presented here are therefore readily transferable to the fields of natural computation, cell biology and biomedical science. We conclude by discussing how our results may alter our biological, computational and philosophical understanding of intelligence and consciousness.

  10. Musicianship facilitates the processing of Western music chords--an ERP and behavioral study.

    PubMed

    Virtala, P; Huotilainen, M; Partanen, E; Tervaniemi, M

    2014-08-01

    The present study addressed the effects of musicianship on neural and behavioral discrimination of Western music chords. In abstract oddball paradigms, minor chords and inverted major chords were presented in the context of major chords to musician and non-musician participants in a passive listening task (with EEG recordings) and in an active discrimination task. Both sinusoidal sounds and harmonically rich piano sounds were used. Musicians outperformed non-musicians in the discrimination task. Change-related mismatch negativity (MMN) was evoked to minor and inverted major chords in musicians only, and N1 amplitude was larger in musicians than non-musicians. While MMN was absent in non-musicians, both groups showed decreased N1 in response to minor compared to major chords. The results indicate that processing of complex musical stimuli is enhanced in musicians both behaviorally and neurally, but that major-minor chord categorization is present to some extent also in the absence of music training. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Barriers and facilitators of adolescent behavioral health in primary care: Perceptions of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Bitar, George W; Springer, Paul; Gee, Robert; Graff, Chad; Schydlower, Manuel

    2009-12-01

    Several major policy reports describe the central role of primary care in improving the delivery of behavioral health care services to children and adolescents. Although primary care providers are uniquely positioned to provide these services, numerous obstacles hinder the integration of these services, including time, clinic management and organization issues, training, and resources. Although many of these obstacles have been described in the literature, few studies have investigated these issues from the first-person perspective of front-line providers. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to provide an in-depth description of primary care providers' attitudes and perceptions of adolescent behavioral health care across a diversity of primary care settings (i.e., Federally Qualified Health Center [FQHC], FQHC-Look Alike, school-based, military). Sixteen focus groups were conducted at 5 primary care clinics. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the focus group data. Obstacles to integration are presented as well as strategies to overcome these challenges, using training and education, working groups, and community collaboratives.

  12. How intergenerational interaction affects attitude-behavior inconsistency.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Takuya; Nakamaru, Mayuko

    2014-04-07

    Social norms play an important role in maintaining social order, but at the same time, they can act as a constraint that compels people to take specific actions which run contrary to their attitudes. This paper treats the latter case: we investigate conditions in which attitude-behavior inconsistency persists, constructing mathematical models combining evolutionary games and cultural transmissions. In particular, we focus on the effect of intergenerational interactions. Our models show that both information about others' attitude (e.g., through social surveys) and the combination of intra- and inter-generational interactions are key factors to generate the situation where all people adopt the same behavior but different people have different attitudes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. BLOC-1 Interacts with BLOC-2 and the AP-3 Complex to Facilitate Protein Trafficking on Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Di Pietro, Santiago M.; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M.; Tenza, Danièle; Setty, Subba R.G.; Marks, Michael S.; Raposo, Graça

    2006-01-01

    The adaptor protein (AP)-3 complex is a component of the cellular machinery that controls protein sorting from endosomes to lysosomes and specialized related organelles such as melanosomes. Mutations in an AP-3 subunit underlie a form of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS), a disorder characterized by abnormalities in lysosome-related organelles. HPS in humans can also be caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of three complexes of unclear function, named biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex (BLOC)-1, -2, and -3. Here, we report that BLOC-1 interacts physically and functionally with AP-3 to facilitate the trafficking of a known AP-3 cargo, CD63, and of tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), a melanosomal membrane protein previously thought to traffic only independently of AP-3. BLOC-1 also interacts with BLOC-2 to facilitate Tyrp1 trafficking by a mechanism apparently independent of AP-3 function. Both BLOC-1 and -2 localize mainly to early endosome-associated tubules as determined by immunoelectron microscopy. These findings support the idea that BLOC-1 and -2 represent hitherto unknown components of the endosomal protein trafficking machinery. PMID:16837549

  14. BLOC-1 interacts with BLOC-2 and the AP-3 complex to facilitate protein trafficking on endosomes.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Santiago M; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Tenza, Danièle; Setty, Subba R G; Marks, Michael S; Raposo, Graça; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C

    2006-09-01

    The adaptor protein (AP)-3 complex is a component of the cellular machinery that controls protein sorting from endosomes to lysosomes and specialized related organelles such as melanosomes. Mutations in an AP-3 subunit underlie a form of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS), a disorder characterized by abnormalities in lysosome-related organelles. HPS in humans can also be caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of three complexes of unclear function, named biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex (BLOC)-1, -2, and -3. Here, we report that BLOC-1 interacts physically and functionally with AP-3 to facilitate the trafficking of a known AP-3 cargo, CD63, and of tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), a melanosomal membrane protein previously thought to traffic only independently of AP-3. BLOC-1 also interacts with BLOC-2 to facilitate Tyrp1 trafficking by a mechanism apparently independent of AP-3 function. Both BLOC-1 and -2 localize mainly to early endosome-associated tubules as determined by immunoelectron microscopy. These findings support the idea that BLOC-1 and -2 represent hitherto unknown components of the endosomal protein trafficking machinery.

  15. Uniaxial negative thermal expansion facilitated by weak host-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Engel, Emile R; Smith, Vincent J; Bezuidenhout, Charl X; Barbour, Leonard J

    2014-04-25

    A nitromethane solvate of 18-crown-6 was investigated by means of variable-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction in response to a report of abnormal unit cell contraction. Exceptionally large positive thermal expansion in two axial directions and negative thermal expansion along the third was confirmed. The underlying mechanism relies exclusively on weak electrostatic interactions to yield a linear thermal expansion coefficient of -129 × 10(-6) K(-1), the largest negative value yet observed for an organic inclusion compound.

  16. Compulsory citizenship behavior and organizational citizenship behavior: the role of organizational identification and perceived interactional justice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongdan; Peng, Zhenglong; Chen, Hsiu-Kuei

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the psychological mechanism underlying the relationship between compulsory citizenship behavior (CCB) and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) by developing a moderated mediation model. The model focuses on the mediating role of organizational identification and the moderating role of interactional justice in influencing the mediation. Using a time-lagged research design, the authors collected two waves of data from 388 supervisor-subordinate dyads in 67 teams to test the moderated mediation model. Results revealed that CCB negatively influenced OCB via impairing organizational identification. Moreover, interactional justice moderated the strength of the indirect effect of CCB on OCB (through organizational identification), such that the mediated relationship was stronger under low interactional justice than under high interactional justice.

  17. Dopamine and oxytocin interactions underlying behaviors: potential contributions to behavioral disorders.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Tracey A; Douglas, Alison J

    2010-06-01

    Dopamine is an important neuromodulator that exerts widespread effects on the central nervous system (CNS) function. Disruption in dopaminergic neurotransmission can have profound effects on mood and behavior and as such is known to be implicated in various neuropsychiatric behavioral disorders including autism and depression. The subsequent effects on other neurocircuitries due to dysregulated dopamine function have yet to be fully explored. Due to the marked social deficits observed in psychiatric patients, the neuropeptide, oxytocin is emerging as one particular neural substrate that may be influenced by the altered dopamine levels subserving neuropathologic-related behavioral diseases. Oxytocin has a substantial role in social attachment, affiliation and sexual behavior. More recently, it has emerged that disturbances in peripheral and central oxytocin levels have been detected in some patients with dopamine-dependent disorders. Thus, oxytocin is proposed to be a key neural substrate that interacts with central dopamine systems. In addition to psychosocial improvement, oxytocin has recently been implicated in mediating mesolimbic dopamine pathways during drug addiction and withdrawal. This bi-directional role of dopamine has also been implicated during some components of sexual behavior. This review will discuss evidence for the existence dopamine/oxytocin positive interaction in social behavioral paradigms and associated disorders such as sexual dysfunction, autism, addiction, anorexia/bulimia, and depression. Preliminary findings suggest that whilst further rigorous testing has to be conducted to establish a dopamine/oxytocin link in human disorders, animal models seem to indicate the existence of broad and integrated brain circuits where dopamine and oxytocin interactions at least in part mediate socio-affiliative behaviors. A profound disruption to these pathways is likely to underpin associated behavioral disorders. Central oxytocin pathways may serve as a

  18. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R.; Hartnett, Andrew T.; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion. PMID:25825752

  19. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R; Hartnett, Andrew T; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D

    2015-04-14

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion.

  20. A Transition-State Interaction Shifts Nucleobase Ionization Toward Neutrality to Facilitate Small Ribozyme Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Joseph A.; Guo, Man; Jenkins, Jermaine L.; Krucinska, Jolanta; Chen, Yuanyuan; Carey, Paul R.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    One mechanism by which ribozymes can accelerate biological reactions is by adopting folds that favorably perturb nucleobase ionization. Herein we used Raman crystallography to directly measure pKa values for the Ade38 N1-imino group of a hairpin ribozyme in distinct conformational states. A transition-state analogue gave a pKa value of 6.27 ± 0.05, which agrees strikingly well with values measured by pH-rate analyses. To identify the chemical attributes that contribute to the shifted pKa we determined crystal structures of hairpin ribozyme variants containing single-atom substitutions at the active site and measured their respective Ade38 N1 pKa values. This approach led to the identification of a single interaction in the transition-state conformation that elevates the base pKa >0.8 log units relative to the precatalytic state. The agreement of the microscopic and macroscopic pKa values and the accompanying structural analysis support a mechanism in which Ade38 N1(H)+ functions as a general acid in phosphodiester bond cleavage. Overall the results quantify the contribution of a single electrostatic interaction to base ionization, which has broad relevance for understanding how RNA structure can control chemical reactivity. PMID:22989273

  1. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake.

    PubMed

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J S

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson's disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity.

  2. A transition-state interaction shifts nucleobase ionization toward neutrality to facilitate small ribozyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Guo, Man; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Krucinska, Jolanta; Chen, Yuanyuan; Carey, Paul R; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-10-17

    One mechanism by which ribozymes can accelerate biological reactions is by adopting folds that favorably perturb nucleobase ionization. Herein we used Raman crystallography to directly measure pK(a) values for the Ade38 N1 imino group of a hairpin ribozyme in distinct conformational states. A transition-state analogue gave a pK(a) value of 6.27 ± 0.05, which agrees strikingly well with values measured by pH-rate analyses. To identify the chemical attributes that contribute to the shifted pK(a), we determined crystal structures of hairpin ribozyme variants containing single-atom substitutions at the active site and measured their respective Ade38 N1 pK(a) values. This approach led to the identification of a single interaction in the transition-state conformation that elevates the base pK(a) > 0.8 log unit relative to the precatalytic state. The agreement of the microscopic and macroscopic pK(a) values and the accompanying structural analysis supports a mechanism in which Ade38 N1(H)+ functions as a general acid in phosphodiester bond cleavage. Overall the results quantify the contribution of a single electrostatic interaction to base ionization, which has broad relevance for understanding how RNA structure can control chemical reactivity.

  3. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity. PMID:26305376

  4. Emotional reaction facilitates the brain and behavioral impact of graphic cigarette warning labels in smokers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An-Li; Lowen, Steven B; Romer, Daniel; Giorno, Mario; Langleben, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    Background Warning labels on cigarette packages are an important venue for information about the hazards of smoking. The 2009 US Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act mandated replacing the current text-only labels with graphic warning labels. However, labels proposed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were challenged in court by the tobacco companies, who argued successfully that the proposed labels needlessly encroached on their right to free speech, in part because they included images of high emotional salience that indiscriminately frightened rather than informed consumers. Methods We used functional MRI to examine the effects of graphic warning labels' emotional salience on smokers' brain activity and cognition. Twenty-four smokers viewed a random sequence of blocks of graphic warning labels that have been rated high or low on an ‘emotional reaction’ scale in previous research. Results We found that labels rated high on emotional reaction were better remembered, associated with reduction in the urge to smoke, and produced greater brain response in the amygdala, hippocampi, inferior frontal gyri and the insulae. Conclusions Recognition memory and craving are, respectively, correlates of effectiveness of addiction related public health communications and interventions, and amygdala activation facilitates the encoding of emotional memories. Thus, our results suggest that emotional reaction to graphic warning labels contributes to their public health impact and may be an integral part of the neural mechanisms underlying their effectiveness. Given the urgency of the debate about the constitutional risks and public health benefits of graphic warning labels, these preliminary findings warrant consideration while longitudinal clinical studies are underway PMID:25564288

  5. Complexity multiscale asynchrony measure and behavior for interacting financial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Niu, Hongli

    2016-08-01

    A stochastic financial price process is proposed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamical system, in an attempt to study the nonlinear behaviors of real asset markets. The viruses spreading process in a finite-range multitype system is used to imitate the interacting behaviors of diverse investment attitudes in a financial market, and the empirical research on descriptive statistics and autocorrelation behaviors of return time series is performed for different values of propagation rates. Then the multiscale entropy analysis is adopted to study several different shuffled return series, including the original return series, the corresponding reversal series, the random shuffled series, the volatility shuffled series and the Zipf-type shuffled series. Furthermore, we propose and compare the multiscale cross-sample entropy and its modification algorithm called composite multiscale cross-sample entropy. We apply them to study the asynchrony of pairs of time series under different time scales.

  6. The Dynamic Reactance Interaction - How Vested Interests Affect People's Experience, Behavior, and Cognition in Social Interactions.

    PubMed

    Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner's freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor-client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor) or a patient (client). In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N = 82) we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N = 207) further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: they revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically.

  7. Descriptive and injunctive social norms' interactive role in gambling behavior.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Matthew K; Goodie, Adam S

    2014-06-01

    Social norms have a fundamental impact on behavior, yet little research has examined social norms regarding gambling and no research has examined possible interaction effects. The current study examined the interaction between perceived approval of gambling by others (i.e., injunctive norms) and perceived prevalence of gambling by others (i.e., descriptive norms) on the respondent's gambling frequency and problems, in a sample of relatively frequent gamblers. The current study examined 2 distinct reference groups: 1 close in proximity (i.e., family and friends) and 1 distally located (i.e., other students). The sample consisted of 252 undergraduates who gambled at least twice a month. Two interactions were observed on gambling frequency based on the proximity of the reference groups; however, only descriptive norms significantly predicted gambling problems. When the reference group was closer in proximity, the positive relationship between perceptions of family and friends' gambling frequency and the individual's own gambling was stronger for individuals who believed that their friends and family members highly approved of gambling. When the reference group was distally located, differences in respondents' gambling frequency emerged only in contexts in which they perceived other students to gamble infrequently. Specifically, when respondents perceived that other students gambled infrequently and disapproved of gambling, respondents gambled the most frequently. The results suggest that individuals are influenced by their perceptions of others' attitudes and behaviors, regardless of proximity, and that these perceptions of others' behavior are strongly associated with gambling problems.

  8. External gills and adaptive embryo behavior facilitate synchronous development and hatching plasticity under respiratory constraint.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Jessica R; Warkentin, Karen M

    2008-11-01

    Plasticity in hatching timing allows embryos to balance egg- and larval-stage risks, and depends on the ability of hatching-competent embryos to continue developing in the egg. Hypoxia can slow development, kill embryos and induce premature hatching. For terrestrial eggs of red-eyed treefrogs, the embryonic period can extend approximately 50% longer than development to hatching competence, and development is synchronous across perivitelline oxygen levels (PO2) ranging from 0.5-16.5 kPa. Embryos maintain large external gills until hatching, then gills regress rapidly. We assessed the respiratory value of external gills using gill manipulations and closed-system respirometry. Embryos without external gills were oxygen limited in air and hatched at an external PO2 of 17 kPa, whereas embryos with gills regulated their metabolism and remained in the egg at substantially lower PO2. By contrast, tadpoles gained no respiratory benefit from external gills. We videotaped behavior and manipulated embryos to test if they position gills near the air-exposed portion of the egg surface, where PO2 is highest. Active embryos remained stationary for minutes in gills-at-surface positions. After manipulations and spontaneous movements that positioned gills in the O2-poor region of the egg, however, they returned their gills to the air-exposed surface within seconds. Even neural tube stage embryos, capable only of ciliary rotation, positioned their developing head in the region of highest PO2. Such behavior may be critical both to delay hatching after hatching competence and to obtain sufficient oxygen for normal, synchronous development at earlier stages.

  9. Assembly of nanoions via electrostatic interactions: ion-like behavior of charged noble metal nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiaofeng; Luo, Zhentao; Yuan, Xun; Yu, Yue; Zhang, Chao; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang

    2014-01-24

    The assembly of ultrasmall metal nanoclusters (NCs) is of interest to both basic and applied research as it facilitates the determination of cluster structures and the customization of cluster physicochemical properties. Here we present a facile and general approach to assemble noble metal NCs by selectively inducing electrostatic interactions between negatively-charged metal NCs and divalent cations. The charged metal NCs, which have well-defined sizes, charges and structures; and behave similarly to multivalent anions, can be considered as nanoions. These nanoions exhibit step-like assembly behavior when interacting with the counter cations - assembly only occurs when the solubility product (Ksp) between the carboxylate ions on the NC surface and the divalent cations is exceeded. The assembly here is distinctively different from the random aggregation of colloidal particles by counter ions. The nanoions would assemble into fractal-like monodisperse spherical particles with a high order of regularity that mimic the assembly of ionic crystals.

  10. Spatial structure favors cooperative behavior in the snowdrift game with multiple interactive dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qi; Li, Aming; Wang, Long

    2017-02-01

    Spatial reciprocity is generally regarded as a positive rule facilitating the evolution of cooperation. However, a few recent studies show that, in the snowdrift game, spatial structure still could be detrimental to cooperation. Here we propose a model of multiple interactive dynamics, where each individual can cooperate and defect simultaneously against different neighbors. We realize individuals' multiple interactions simply by endowing them with strategies relevant to probabilities, and every one decides to cooperate or defect with a probability. With multiple interactive dynamics, the cooperation level in square lattices is higher than that in the well-mixed case for a wide range of cost-to-benefit ratio r, implying that spatial structure favors cooperative behavior in the snowdrift game. Moreover, in square lattices, the most favorable strategy follows a simple relation of r, which confers theoretically the average evolutionary frequency of cooperative behavior. We further extend our study to various homogeneous and heterogeneous networks, which demonstrates the robustness of our results. Here multiple interactive dynamics stabilizes the positive role of spatial structure on the evolution of cooperation and individuals' distinct reactions to different neighbors can be a new line in understanding the emergence of cooperation.

  11. Beam-wave interaction behavior of a 35 GHz metal PBG cavity gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2014-09-01

    The RF behavior of a 35 GHz photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating in TE041-like mode has been presented to demonstrate its single mode operation capability. In this PBG cavity gyrotron, the conventional tapered cylindrical cavity is replaced by a metal PBG cavity as its RF interaction structure. The beam-wave interaction behavior has been explored using time dependent multimode nonlinear analysis as well as through 3D PIC simulation. Metal PBG cavity is treated here similar to that of a conventional cylindrical cavity for the desired mode confinement. The applied DC magnetic field profile has been considered uniform along the PBG cavity length both in analysis as well as in simulation. Electrons energy and phase along the interaction length of the PBG cavity facilitates bunching mechanism as well as energy transfer phenomena from the electron beam to the RF field. The RF output power for the TE041-like design mode as well as nearby competing modes have been estimated and found above to 100 kW in TE041-like mode with ˜15% efficiency. Results obtained from the analysis and the PIC simulation are found in agreement within 8% variation, and also it supports the single mode operation, as the PBG cavity does not switch into other parasitic modes in considerably large range of varying DC magnetic field, contrary to the conventional cylindrical cavity interaction structure.

  12. Beam-wave interaction behavior of a 35 GHz metal PBG cavity gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2014-09-15

    The RF behavior of a 35 GHz photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating in TE{sub 041}-like mode has been presented to demonstrate its single mode operation capability. In this PBG cavity gyrotron, the conventional tapered cylindrical cavity is replaced by a metal PBG cavity as its RF interaction structure. The beam-wave interaction behavior has been explored using time dependent multimode nonlinear analysis as well as through 3D PIC simulation. Metal PBG cavity is treated here similar to that of a conventional cylindrical cavity for the desired mode confinement. The applied DC magnetic field profile has been considered uniform along the PBG cavity length both in analysis as well as in simulation. Electrons energy and phase along the interaction length of the PBG cavity facilitates bunching mechanism as well as energy transfer phenomena from the electron beam to the RF field. The RF output power for the TE{sub 041}-like design mode as well as nearby competing modes have been estimated and found above to 100 kW in TE{sub 041}-like mode with ∼15% efficiency. Results obtained from the analysis and the PIC simulation are found in agreement within 8% variation, and also it supports the single mode operation, as the PBG cavity does not switch into other parasitic modes in considerably large range of varying DC magnetic field, contrary to the conventional cylindrical cavity interaction structure.

  13. Facilitating guest transport in clathrate hydrates by tuning guest-host interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Udachin, Konstantin A.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A.

    2015-02-21

    The understanding and eventual control of guest molecule transport in gas hydrates is of central importance for the efficient synthesis and processing of these materials for applications in the storage, separation, and sequestration of gases and natural gas production. Previously, some links have been established between dynamics of the host water molecules and guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions, but direct observation of transport in the form of cage-to-cage guest diffusion is still lacking. Recent calculations have suggested that pairs of different guest molecules in neighboring cages can affect guest-host hydrogen bonding and, therefore, defect injection and water lattice motions. We have chosen two sets of hydrate guest pairs, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-CO{sub 2} and isobutane-CO{sub 2}, that are predicted to enhance or to diminish guest–host hydrogen bonding interactions as compared to those in pure CO{sub 2} hydrate and we have studied guest dynamics in each using {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. In addition, we have obtained the crystal structure of the THF-CO{sub 2} sII hydrate using the combined single crystal X-ray diffraction and {sup 13}C NMR powder pattern data and have performed molecular dynamics-simulation of the CO{sub 2} dynamics. The NMR powder line shape studies confirm the enhanced and delayed dynamics for the THF and isobutane containing hydrates, respectively, as compared to those in the CO{sub 2} hydrate. In addition, from line shape studies and 2D exchange spectroscopy NMR, we observe cage-to-cage exchange of CO{sub 2} molecules in the THF-CO{sub 2} hydrate, but not in the other hydrates studied. We conclude that the relatively rapid intercage guest dynamics are the result of synergistic guest A–host water–guest B interactions, thus allowing tuning of the guest transport properties in the hydrates by choice of the appropriate guest molecules. Our experimental value for inter-cage hopping is slower by a factor of 10

  14. Facilitating guest transport in clathrate hydrates by tuning guest-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Moudrakovski, Igor L; Udachin, Konstantin A; Alavi, Saman; Ratcliffe, Christopher I; Ripmeester, John A

    2015-02-21

    The understanding and eventual control of guest molecule transport in gas hydrates is of central importance for the efficient synthesis and processing of these materials for applications in the storage, separation, and sequestration of gases and natural gas production. Previously, some links have been established between dynamics of the host water molecules and guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions, but direct observation of transport in the form of cage-to-cage guest diffusion is still lacking. Recent calculations have suggested that pairs of different guest molecules in neighboring cages can affect guest-host hydrogen bonding and, therefore, defect injection and water lattice motions. We have chosen two sets of hydrate guest pairs, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-CO2 and isobutane-CO2, that are predicted to enhance or to diminish guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions as compared to those in pure CO2 hydrate and we have studied guest dynamics in each using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. In addition, we have obtained the crystal structure of the THF-CO2 sII hydrate using the combined single crystal X-ray diffraction and (13)C NMR powder pattern data and have performed molecular dynamics-simulation of the CO2 dynamics. The NMR powder line shape studies confirm the enhanced and delayed dynamics for the THF and isobutane containing hydrates, respectively, as compared to those in the CO2 hydrate. In addition, from line shape studies and 2D exchange spectroscopy NMR, we observe cage-to-cage exchange of CO2 molecules in the THF-CO2 hydrate, but not in the other hydrates studied. We conclude that the relatively rapid intercage guest dynamics are the result of synergistic guest A-host water-guest B interactions, thus allowing tuning of the guest transport properties in the hydrates by choice of the appropriate guest molecules. Our experimental value for inter-cage hopping is slower by a factor of 10(6) than a published calculated value.

  15. APP and APLP2 interact with the synaptic release machinery and facilitate transmitter release at hippocampal synapses

    PubMed Central

    Fanutza, Tomas; Del Prete, Dolores; Ford, Michael J; Castillo, Pablo E; D’Adamio, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP), whose mutations cause familial Alzheimer’s disease, interacts with the synaptic release machinery, suggesting a role in neurotransmission. Here we mapped this interaction to the NH2-terminal region of the APP intracellular domain. A peptide encompassing this binding domain -named JCasp- is naturally produced by a γ-secretase/caspase double-cut of APP. JCasp interferes with the APP-presynaptic proteins interaction and, if linked to a cell-penetrating peptide, reduces glutamate release in acute hippocampal slices from wild-type but not APP deficient mice, indicating that JCasp inhibits APP function.The APP-like protein-2 (APLP2) also binds the synaptic release machinery. Deletion of APP and APLP2 produces synaptic deficits similar to those caused by JCasp. Our data support the notion that APP and APLP2 facilitate transmitter release, likely through the interaction with the neurotransmitter release machinery. Given the link of APP to Alzheimer’s disease, alterations of this synaptic role of APP could contribute to dementia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09743.001 PMID:26551565

  16. Nephrocystins and MKS proteins interact with IFT particle and facilitate transport of selected ciliary cargos.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengtian; Malicki, Jarema

    2011-05-20

    Cilia are required for the development and function of many organs. Efficient transport of protein cargo along ciliary axoneme is necessary to sustain these processes. Despite its importance, the mode of interaction between the intraflagellar ciliary transport (IFT) mechanism and its cargo proteins remains poorly understood. Our studies demonstrate that IFT particle components, and a Meckel-Gruber syndrome 1 (MKS1)-related, B9 domain protein, B9d2, bind each other and contribute to the ciliary localization of Inversin (Nephrocystin 2). B9d2, Inversin, and Nephrocystin 5 support, in turn, the transport of a cargo protein, Opsin, but not another photoreceptor ciliary transmembrane protein, Peripherin. Interestingly, the components of this mechanism also contribute to the formation of planar cell polarity in mechanosensory epithelia. These studies reveal a molecular mechanism that mediates the transport of selected ciliary cargos and is of fundamental importance for the differentiation and survival of sensory cells.

  17. Facilitating Mitochondrial Calcium Uptake Improves Activation-Induced Cerebral Blood Flow and Behavior after mTBI

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Madhuvika; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Kannurpatti, Sridhar S.

    2016-01-01

    Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) leads to secondary neuronal loss via excitotoxic mechanisms, including mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. However, in the surviving cellular population, mitochondrial Ca2+ influx, and oxidative metabolism are diminished leading to suboptimal neuronal circuit activity and poor prognosis. Hence we tested the impact of boosting neuronal electrical activity and oxidative metabolism by facilitating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in a rat model of mTBI. In developing rats (P25-P26) sustaining an mTBI, we demonstrate post-traumatic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the sensorimotor cortex in response to whisker stimulation compared to sham using functional Laser Doppler Imaging (fLDI) at adulthood (P67-P73). Compared to sham, whisker stimulation-evoked positive CBF responses decreased while negative CBF responses increased in the mTBI animals. The spatiotemporal CBF changes representing underlying neuronal activity suggested profound changes to neurovascular activity after mTBI. Behavioral assessment of the same cohort of animals prior to fLDI showed that mTBI resulted in persistent contralateral sensorimotor behavioral deficit along with ipsilateral neuronal loss compared to sham. Treating mTBI rats with Kaempferol, a dietary flavonol compound that enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, eliminated the inter-hemispheric asymmetry in the whisker stimulation-induced positive CBF responses and the ipsilateral negative CBF responses otherwise observed in the untreated and vehicle-treated mTBI animals in adulthood. Kaempferol also improved somatosensory behavioral measures compared to untreated and vehicle treated mTBI animals without augmenting post-injury neuronal loss. The results indicate that reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in the surviving populations affect post-traumatic neural activation leading to persistent behavioral deficits. Improvement in sensorimotor behavior and spatiotemporal neurovascular activity following kaempferol

  18. Learning in Alzheimer’s Disease Is Facilitated by Social Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Melissa C.; Gallegos, Diana R.; Cohen, Neal J.; Tranel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Seminal work in Gary Van Hoesen’s laboratory at Iowa in the early 1980s established that the hallmark neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD; neurofibrillary tangles) had its first foothold in specific parts of the hippocampal formation and entorhinal cortex, effectively isolating the hippocampus from much of its input and output and causing the distinctive impairment of new learning that is the leading early characteristic of the disease (Hyman et al., 1984). The boundaries and conditions of the anterograde memory defect in patients with AD have been a topic of intense research interest ever since (e.g., Graham and Hodges, 1977; Nestor et al., 2006). For example, it has been shown that patients with AD may acquire some new semantic information through methods such as errorless learning, but learning under these conditions is typically slow and inefficient. Drawing on a learning paradigm (a collaborative referencing task) that was previously shown to induce robust and enduring learning in patients with hippocampal amnesia, we investigated whether this task would be effective in promoting new learning in patients with AD. We studied five women with early-stage AD and 10 demographically matched healthy comparison participants, each interacting with a familiar communication partner. AD pairs displayed significant and enduring learning across trials, with increased accuracy and decreased time to complete trials, in a manner indistinguishable from healthy comparison pairs, resulting in efficient and economical communication. The observed learning here most likely draws on neural resources outside the medial temporal lobes. These interactive communication sessions provide a potent learning environment with significant implications for memory intervention. PMID:23881834

  19. Membrane nanotubes facilitate long-distance interactions between natural killer cells and target cells

    PubMed Central

    Chauveau, Anne; Aucher, Anne; Eissmann, Philipp; Vivier, Eric; Davis, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane nanotubes are membranous tethers that physically link cell bodies over long distances. Here, we present evidence that nanotubes allow human natural killer (NK) cells to interact functionally with target cells over long distances. Nanotubes were formed when NK cells contacted target cells and moved apart. The frequency of nanotube formation was dependent on the number of receptor/ligand interactions and increased on NK cell activation. Most importantly, NK cell nanotubes contained a submicron scale junction where proteins accumulated, including DAP10, the signaling adaptor that associates with the activating receptor NKG2D, and MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA), a cognate ligand for NKG2D, as occurs at close intercellular synapses between NK cells and target cells. Quantitative live-cell fluorescence imaging suggested that MICA accumulated at small nanotube synapses in sufficient numbers to trigger cell activation. In addition, tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and Vav-1 accumulated at such junctions. Functionally, nanotubes could aid the lysis of distant target cells either directly or by moving target cells along the nanotube path into close contact for lysis via a conventional immune synapse. Target cells moving along the nanotube path were commonly polarized such that their uropods faced the direction of movement. This is the opposite polarization than for normal cell migration, implying that nanotubes can specifically drive target cell movement. Finally, target cells that remained connected to an NK cell by a nanotube were frequently lysed, whereas removing the nanotube using a micromanipulator reduced lysis of these target cells. PMID:20212116

  20. Stem cell-paved biobridges facilitate stem transplant and host brain cell interactions for stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Kelsey; Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S; Acosta, Sandra A; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V; Tajiri, Naoki

    2015-10-14

    Distinguished by an infarct core encased within a penumbra, stroke remains a primary source of mortality within the United States. While our scientific knowledge regarding the pathology of stroke continues to improve, clinical treatment options for patients suffering from stroke are extremely limited. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the sole FDA-approved drug proven to be helpful following stroke. However, due to the need to administer the drug within 4.5h of stroke onset its usefulness is constrained to less than 5% of all patients suffering from ischemic stroke. One experimental therapy for the treatment of stroke involves the utilization of stem cells. Stem cell transplantation has been linked to therapeutic benefit by means of cell replacement and release of growth factors; however the precise means by which this is accomplished has not yet been clearly delineated. Using a traumatic brain injury model, we recently demonstrated the ability of transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to form a biobridge connecting the area of injury to the neurogenic niche within the brain. We hypothesize that MSCs may also have the capacity to create a similar biobridge following stroke; thereby forming a conduit between the neurogenic niche and the stroke core and peri-infarct area. We propose that this biobridge could assist and promote interaction of host brain cells with transplanted stem cells and offer more opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of stem cell therapy in stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Polaronic behavior and electron-phonon interaction in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnarsson, Olle

    2005-03-01

    Photoemission and neutron scattering indicate a substantial electron-phonon coupling in high-Tc cuprates. To address the associated anomalous softening of a half-breathing Cu-O bond-stretching phonon, we derive a t-J model with electron-phonon coupling.^1 Using input parameters from band structure calculations and solving the model by exact diagonalization, we obtain a good description of the phonon softening.^1 We study the interplay of the electron-phonon and Coulomb interactions for a (weakly) doped Mott-Hubbard insulator. Using sum-rules, we find that that the effect of the electron-phonon interaction on the phonon self-energy is strongly suppressed, while there is no corresponding suppression for the electron self-energy or the phonon-induced carrier-carrier interaction.^2 Photoemission suggests polaronic behavior in undoped cuprates. Calculating the electron-phonon interaction in a shell model of an undoped cuprate, we find sufficiently strong coupling to give polaronic behavior. Using an adiabatic approximation, we discuss the dispersion and width of the corresponding phonon side-band. ^1O. Rösch and O. Gunnarsson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 146403 (2004); ^2O. Rösch and O. Gunnarsson, Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press), cond-mat/0407064.

  2. Interactions of excitatory and inhibitory feedback topologies in facilitating pattern separation and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jane X; Zochowski, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Within the brain, the interplay between connectivity patterns of neurons and their spatiotemporal dynamics is believed to be intricately linked to the bases of behavior, such as the process of storing, consolidating, and retrieving memory traces. Memory is believed to be stored in the synaptic patterns of anatomical circuitry in the form of increased connectivity densities within subpopulations of neurons. At the same time, memory recall is thought to correspond to activation of discrete areas of the brain corresponding to those memories. Such regional subpopulations can selectively activate during memory recall or retrieval, signifying the process of accessing a single memory or concept. It has been shown previously that recovery of single memory activity patterns is mediated by global neuromodulation signifying transition into different cognitive states such as sleep or awake exploration. We examine how underlying topology can affect memory awake activation and sleep reactivation when such memories share increasing proportions of neurons. The results show that while single memory activation is diminished with increased overlap, pattern separation can be recovered by offsetting excitatory associations between two memories with targeted and heterogeneous inhibitory feedback. Such findings point to the importance of excitatory-to-inhibitory current balance at both the global and local levels in the context of memory retrieval and replay, and highlight the role of network topology in memory management processes.

  3. Facilitated acquisition of standard but not long delay classical eyeblink conditioning in behaviorally inhibited adolescents.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, M D; VanMeenen, K M; Servatius, R J

    2015-02-01

    Adolescence is a key age in the development of anxiety disorders. The present study assessed the relationship between behavioral inhibition, a risk factor for anxiety typified by avoidance, and acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response. 168 healthy high school students (mean age 15.7 years, 54% female) were given a battery of self-report measures including the Adult Measure of Behavioural Inhibition (AMBI). The study compared acquisition of three experimental training conditions. Two groups were given paired CS-US training: standard delay of 500-ms or long delay of 1000-ms with CS overlapping and co-terminating with a 50-ms airpuff US. A third group received unpaired training of 1000-ms CS and 50-ms airpuff US. Inhibited individuals showed greater acquisition of the conditioned eyeblink response in the 500-ms CS condition, but not in the paired 1000-ms condition. No differences in spontaneous blinks or reactivity to the stimulus were evident in the 1000-ms unpaired CS condition. Results support a relationship between associative learning and anxiety vulnerability that may be mediated by cerebellar functioning in inhibited individuals.

  4. Musical experience facilitates lexical tone processing among Mandarin speakers: Behavioral and neural evidence.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Xiong, Wen; Zhang, Yu-Xuan; Dong, Qi; Nan, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Music and speech share many sound attributes. Pitch, as the percept of fundamental frequency, often occupies the center of researchers' attention in studies on the relationship between music and speech. One widely held assumption is that music experience may confer an advantage in speech tone processing. The cross-domain effects of musical training on non-tonal language speakers' linguistic pitch processing have been relatively well established. However, it remains unclear whether musical experience improves the processing of lexical tone for native tone language speakers who actually use lexical tones in their daily communication. Using a passive oddball paradigm, the present study revealed that among Mandarin speakers, musicians demonstrated enlarged electrical responses to lexical tone changes as reflected by the increased mismatch negativity (MMN) amplitudes, as well as faster behavioral discrimination performance compared with age- and IQ-matched nonmusicians. The current results suggest that in spite of the preexisting long-term experience with lexical tones in both musicians and nonmusicians, musical experience can still modulate the cortical plasticity of linguistic tone processing and is associated with enhanced neural processing of speech tones. Our current results thus provide the first electrophysiological evidence supporting the notion that pitch expertise in the music domain may indeed be transferable to the speech domain even for native tone language speakers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Neocortical Delta Rhythm Facilitates Reciprocal Interlaminar Interactions via Nested Theta Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Carracedo, Lucy M.; Kjeldsen, Henrik; Cunnington, Leonie; Jenkins, Alastair; Schofield, Ian; Cunningham, Mark O.; Davies, Ceri H.; Traub, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    Delta oscillations (1–4 Hz) associate with deep sleep and are implicated in memory consolidation and replay of cortical responses elicited during wake states. A potent local generator has been characterized in thalamus, and local generators in neocortex have been suggested. Here we demonstrate that isolated rat neocortex generates delta rhythms in conditions mimicking the neuromodulatory state during deep sleep (low cholinergic and dopaminergic tone). The rhythm originated in an NMDA receptor-driven network of intrinsic bursting (IB) neurons in layer 5, activating a source of GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition. In contrast, regular spiking (RS) neurons in layer 5 generated theta-frequency outputs. In layer 2/3 principal cells, outputs from IB cells associated with IPSPs, whereas those from layer 5 RS neurons related to nested bursts of theta-frequency EPSPs. Both interlaminar spike and field correlations revealed a sequence of events whereby sparse spiking in layer 2/3 was partially reflected back from layer 5 on each delta period. We suggest that these reciprocal, interlaminar interactions may represent a “Helmholtz machine”-like process to control synaptic rescaling during deep sleep. PMID:23804097

  6. The Golgi protein ACBD3 facilitates Enterovirus 71 replication by interacting with 3A

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Ma, Yijie; Qi, Jianli; Wu, Chao; Xiao, Yan; Zhou, Zhuo; He, Bin; Wang, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a human pathogen that causes hand, foot, mouth disease and neurological complications. Although EV71, as well as other enteroviruses, initiates a remodeling of intracellular membrane for genomic replication, the regulatory mechanism remains elusive. By screening human cDNA library, we uncover that the Golgi resident protein acyl-coenzyme A binding domain-containing 3 (ACBD3) serves as a target of the 3A protein of EV71. This interaction occurs in cells expressing 3A or infected with EV71. Genetic inhibition or deletion of ACBD3 drastically impairs viral RNA replication and plaque formation. Such defects are corrected upon restoration of ACBD3. In infected cells, EV71 3A redirects ACBD3, to the replication sites. I44A or H54Y substitution in 3A interrupts the binding to ACBD3. As such, viral replication is impeded. These results reveal a mechanism of EV71 replication that involves host ACBD3 for viral replication. PMID:28303920

  7. Collectively Facilitated Behavior of the Neonate Caterpillars of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Terrence D.; Wolfin, Michael; Young, Ryan; Meyer, Katelyn; Fabozzi, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The behavioral biology of the first instar larva of Cactoblastis cactorum was studied from the time of eclosion until the colony penetrated and initiated excavation of the host plant. Hatching from an egg stick was asynchronous, requiring 20 h for the entire cohort to eclose at 50%–70% RH and significantly longer at a lower range of RHs. On eclosion, neonates aggregated in an arena at the base of their egg stick and did not attempt to excavate the cladode until an average of 25 caterpillars had collected, approximately 15 h after the onset of egg hatch. Typically only a single entrance hole was formed, limiting the active process of excavating to one or a few individuals at-a-time until the host was fully penetrated and enlarged internally. Olfactometer tests showed that the neonates are strongly attracted to volatile chemicals released when caterpillars chewed into the cladode, accounting for the strong fidelity of the whole cohort to the initial site of penetration. In one instance, the caterpillars were observed to deal with an explosive release of mucilage by imbibing the liquid until the flooded zone was drained and the caterpillars could reenter the plant through the original entrance hole. Once inside the cladode, marked individuals adopted a regular cycle of defecating at the surface at a mean interval of approximately 10 min when followed for 35 successive cycles. Blanket spraying cladodes with a mandibular gland extract prior to hatching led to the independent dispersal of neonates and a failure to form an arena. When the cladode was impenetrable at the site of eclosion, the active cohort of unfed neonates set off together in search of a new site, marking and following a persistent trail that allowed late-to-eclose caterpillars to join their departed siblings. The adaptive significance of these observations is discussed in the context of the life history of the caterpillar. PMID:27809231

  8. Collectively Facilitated Behavior of the Neonate Caterpillars of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Terrence D; Wolfin, Michael; Young, Ryan; Meyer, Katelyn; Fabozzi, Elizabeth

    2016-10-31

    The behavioral biology of the first instar larva of Cactoblastis cactorum was studied from the time of eclosion until the colony penetrated and initiated excavation of the host plant. Hatching from an egg stick was asynchronous, requiring 20 h for the entire cohort to eclose at 50%-70% RH and significantly longer at a lower range of RHs. On eclosion, neonates aggregated in an arena at the base of their egg stick and did not attempt to excavate the cladode until an average of 25 caterpillars had collected, approximately 15 h after the onset of egg hatch. Typically only a single entrance hole was formed, limiting the active process of excavating to one or a few individuals at-a-time until the host was fully penetrated and enlarged internally. Olfactometer tests showed that the neonates are strongly attracted to volatile chemicals released when caterpillars chewed into the cladode, accounting for the strong fidelity of the whole cohort to the initial site of penetration. In one instance, the caterpillars were observed to deal with an explosive release of mucilage by imbibing the liquid until the flooded zone was drained and the caterpillars could reenter the plant through the original entrance hole. Once inside the cladode, marked individuals adopted a regular cycle of defecating at the surface at a mean interval of approximately 10 min when followed for 35 successive cycles. Blanket spraying cladodes with a mandibular gland extract prior to hatching led to the independent dispersal of neonates and a failure to form an arena. When the cladode was impenetrable at the site of eclosion, the active cohort of unfed neonates set off together in search of a new site, marking and following a persistent trail that allowed late-to-eclose caterpillars to join their departed siblings. The adaptive significance of these observations is discussed in the context of the life history of the caterpillar.

  9. Anxiety-mediated facilitation of behavioral inhibition: Threat processing and defensive reactivity during a go/no-go task.

    PubMed

    Grillon, Christian; Robinson, Oliver J; Krimsky, Marissa; O'Connell, Katherine; Alvarez, Gabriella; Ernst, Monique

    2017-03-01

    Anxiety can be broken down into multiple facets including behavioral components, such as defensive reactivity, and cognitive components, such as distracting anxious thoughts. In a previous study, we showed that anticipation of unpredictable shocks facilitated response inhibition to infrequent no-go trials during a go/no-go task. The present study extends this work to examine the distinct contribution of defensive reactivity, measures with fear-potentiated startle, and anxious thought, assessed with thought probes, on go and no-go performance. Consistent with our prior findings, shock anticipation facilitated response inhibition (i.e., reduced errors of commission) on the no-go trials. Regression analyses showed that (a) no-go accuracy was positively associated with fear-potentiated startle and negatively associated with threat-related/task-unrelated thoughts and (b) go accuracy correlated negatively with fear-potentiated startle. Thus, while the present findings confirm the influence of anxiety on response inhibition, they also show that such influence reflects the balance between the positive effect of defensive reactivity and the negative effect of distracting anxious thoughts. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Mom-net: Evaluation of an internet-facilitated cognitive behavioral intervention for low-income depressed mothers.

    PubMed

    Sheeber, Lisa B; Feil, Edward G; Seeley, John R; Leve, Craig; Gau, Jeff M; Davis, Betsy; Sorensen, Erik; Allan, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Evaluate an Internet-facilitated cognitive-behavioral treatment intervention for depression, tailored to economically disadvantaged mothers of young children. Economically disadvantaged mothers (N = 266) of preschool aged children, who reported elevated levels of depressive symptoms, were randomized to either the 8-session, Internet-facilitated intervention (Mom-Net) or to Motivational Interviewing and Referral to Services (MIRS). Outcomes were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9; Spitzer et al., 1999), the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition-Text Revised (DSM-IV-TR) Axis I Disorders (SCID; First, Spitzer, Gibbon, & Williams, 2002), and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS; Hamilton, 1960). Relative to participants in the MIRS condition, participants in Mom-Net demonstrated significantly greater reduction in depression as indexed by self-report questionnaire (primary outcome), interviewer-rated symptoms, and diagnostic outcomes. Results suggest that the Mom-Net intervention is effective as a remotely delivered intervention for economically disadvantaged mothers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Functional interactions guiding adaptive processing of behavioral significance.

    PubMed

    Diekhof, Esther Kristina; Falkai, Peter; Gruber, Oliver

    2009-10-01

    The ability to quickly decide on the nature of unexpected environmental changes is vital for adaptive behavior. Converging evidence suggests that the orbitofrontal cortex plays an important role in the rapid assignment of motivational significance and goal relevance to environmental stimuli. However, its putative role as a central part of a network involved in the prioritization of attentional selection, particulary when significant environmental changes occur unexpectedly or outside of attentional focus, remains to be established. Therefore, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging with a subsequent psychophysiological interaction analysis to reveal the functional connectivity of the right posterior orbitofrontal cortex (pOFC) in a context, in which subjects had to adjust goal-directed behavior to behaviorally relevant events presented outside of the current attentional focus. As expected, an increased functional interaction between pOFC and regions involved in the modulation of selective attention (pulvinar nucleus and inferior parietal lobule) and processing of "bottom-up" salience (substantia nigra) could be observed when unattended, but significant changes were relevant for behavior. Moreover, a positive correlation between level of accuracy and an increased functional connectivity between pOFC and extrastriate cortex suggested that a motivationally-triggered signal from pOFC may have increased visual processing of the relevant but currently unattended stimulus attribute. These data provide evidence that the interplay between the pOFC and these regions underlies a mechanism by which organisms rapidly achieve voluntary control of attentional resources to deal with behaviorally significant changes that occur outside of current attentional focus.

  12. Plasma gelsolin facilitates interaction between β2 glycoprotein I and α5β1 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Bohgaki, Miyuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Kondo, Takeshi; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Horita, Tetsuya; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Okumura, Fumihiko; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Koike, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by thrombosis and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) that directly recognizes plasma β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI). Tissue factor (TF), the major initiator of the extrinsic coagulation system, is induced on monocytes by aPL in vitro, explaining in part the pathophysiology in APS. We previously reported that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway plays an important role in aPL-induced TF expression on monocytes. In this study, we identified plasma gelsolin as a protein associated with β2GPI by using immunoaffinity chromatography and mass spectrometric analysis. An in vivo binding assay showed that endogenous β2GPI interacts with plasma gelsolin, which binds to integrin a5β1 through fibronectin. The tethering of β2GPI to monoclonal anti-β2GPI autoantibody on the cell surface was enhanced in the presence of plasma gelsolin. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that p38 MAPK protein was phosphorylated by monoclonal anti-β2GPI antibody treatment, and its phosphorylation was attenuated in the presence of anti-integrin a5β1 antibody. Furthermore, focal adhesion kinase, a downstream molecule of the fibronectin-integrin signalling pathway, was phosphorylated by anti-β2GPI antibody treatment. These results indicate that molecules including gelsolin and integrin are involved in the anti-β2GPI antibody-induced MAPK pathway on monocytes and that integrin is a possible therapeutic target to modify a prothrombotic state in patients with APS. PMID:19840195

  13. An Interactive network of long non-coding RNAs facilitates the Drosophila sex determination decision

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Brett B.; Olcese, Ursula; Cabrera, Janel R.; Horabin, Jamila I.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis in several eukaryotes shows a surprising number of transcripts which do not encode conventional messenger RNAs. Once considered noise, these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) appear capable of controlling gene expression by various means. We find Drosophila sex determination, specifically the master-switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl), is regulated by long ncRNAs (>200 nt). The lncRNAs influence the dose sensitive establishment promoter of Sxl, SxlPe, which must be activated to specify female sex. They are primarily from two regions, R1 and R2, upstream of SxlPeand show a dynamic developmental profile. Of the four lncRNA strands only one, R2 antisense, has its peak coincident with SxlPe transcription, suggesting it may promote activation. Indeed, its expression is regulated by the X chromosome counting genes, whose dose determines whether SxlPe is transcribed. Transgenic lines which ectopically express each of the lncRNAs show they can act in trans, impacting the process of sex determination but also altering the levels of the other lncRNAs. Generally, expression of R1 is negative whereas R2 is positive to females. This ectopic expression also results in a change in the local chromatin marks, affecting the timing and strength of SxlPe transcription. The chromatin marks are those deposited by the Polycomb and Trithorax groups of chromatin modifying proteins, which we find bind to the lncRNAs. We suggest the increasing numbers of non-coding transcripts being identified are a harbinger of interacting networks similar to the one we describe. PMID:24954180

  14. Evolution of metabolic divergence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during long-term infection facilitates a proto-cooperative interspecies interaction

    PubMed Central

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Hossein Khademi, Seyed Mohammad; Krogh Johansen, Helle; Ingmer, Hanne; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Jelsbak, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The effect of polymicrobial interactions on pathogen physiology and how it can act either to limit pathogen colonization or to potentiate pathogen expansion and virulence are not well understood. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are opportunistic pathogens commonly found together in polymicrobial human infections. However, we have previously shown that the interactions between these two bacterial species are strain dependent. Whereas P. aeruginosa PAO1, a commonly used laboratory strain, effectively suppressed S. aureus growth, we observed a commensal-like interaction between the human host-adapted strain, DK2-P2M24-2003, and S. aureus. In this study, characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectral (MS) molecular networking revealed a significant metabolic divergence between P. aeruginosa PAO1 and DK2-P2M24-2003, which comprised several virulence factors and signaling 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline (HAQ) molecules. Strikingly, a further modulation of the HAQ profile was observed in DK2-P2M24-2003 during interaction with S. aureus, resulting in an area with thickened colony morphology at the P. aeruginosa–S. aureus interface. In addition, we found an HAQ-mediated protection of S. aureus by DK2-P2M24-2003 from the killing effect of tobramycin. Our findings suggest a model where the metabolic divergence manifested in human host-adapted P. aeruginosa is further modulated during interaction with S. aureus and facilitate a proto-cooperative P. aeruginosa–S. aureus relationship. PMID:26684729

  15. Nonverbal behavior of vendors in customer-vendor interaction.

    PubMed

    Amsbary, J H; Powell, L

    2007-04-01

    Two research questions were posed on the homophily theory of customer-vendor interactions: (a) do vendors show any nonverbal preference for Euro-American or African-American customers?; (b) do vendors demonstrate any nonverbal preference for customers with which they share racial homophily? The results supported the homophily theory for Euro-American customers in that there were significant interaction effects by race in facial expression (F = 5.33, p < .05), amount of speaking (F = 6.76, p < .01), tone of voice (F = 7.62, p < .01), and touching (F = 4.57, p < .05). Vendor behavior varied when the customer was Euro-American, with Euro-American vendors smiling more frequently (M = 4.05) than African-American vendors (M = 3.69), speaking more frequently (M = 3.57) than African-American vendors (M = 3.09), using a more friendly tone of voice (M = 3.59, and engaging in more touching behaviors (M = 1.81) than African-American vendors (M = 1.48). There was no significant difference in the behavior of Euro-American and African-American vendors when the customer was African-American.

  16. Intrusion of granitic magma into the continental crust facilitated by magma pulsing and dike-diapir interactions: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenrong; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Paterson, Scott

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a 2-D thermomechanical modeling study of intrusion of granitic magma into the continental crust to explore the roles of multiple pulsing and dike-diapir interactions in the presence of visco-elasto-plastic rheology. Multiple pulsing is simulated by replenishing source regions with new pulses of magma at a certain temporal frequency. Parameterized "pseudo-dike zones" above magma pulses are included. Simulation results show that both diking and pulsing are crucial factors facilitating the magma ascent and emplacement. Multiple pulses keep the magmatic system from freezing and facilitate the initiation of pseudo-dike zones, which in turn heat the host rock roof, lower its viscosity, and create pathways for later ascending pulses of magma. Without diking, magma cannot penetrate the highly viscous upper crust. Without multiple pulsing, a single magma body solidifies quickly and it cannot ascent over a long distance. Our results shed light on the incremental growth of magma chambers, recycling of continental crust, and evolution of a continental arc such as the Sierra Nevada arc in California.

  17. Fluid Behavior and Fluid-Solid Interactions in Nanoporous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Although shale oil/gas production in the US has increased exponentially, the low energy recovery is a daunting problem needed to be solved for its sustainability and continued growth, especially in light of the recent oil/gas price decline. This is apparently related to the small porosity (a few to a few hundred nm) and low permeability (10-16-10-20 m2) of tight shale formations. The fundamental question lies in the anomalous behavior of fluids in nanopores due to confinement effects, which, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we combined experimental characterization and observations, particularly using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), with pore-scale modeling using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), to examine the fluid behavior and fluid-solid interactions in nanopores at reservoir conditions. Experimentally, we characterized the compositions and microstructures of a shale sample from Wolfcamp, Texas, using a variety of analytical techniques. Our analyses reveal that the shale sample is made of organic-matter (OM)-lean and OM-rich layers that exhibit different chemical and mineral compositions, and microstructural characteristics. Using the hydrostatic pressure system and gas-mixing setup we developed, in-situ SANS measurements were conducted at pressures up to 20 kpsi on shale samples imbibed with water or water-methane solutions. The obtained results indicate that capillary effect plays a significant role in fluid-nanopore interactions and the associated changes in nanopore structures vary with pore size and pressure. Computationally, we performed LBM modeling to simulate the flow behavior of methane in kerogen nanoporous structure. The correction factor, which is the ratio of apparent permeability to intrinsic permeability, was calculated. Our results show that the correction factor is always greater than one (non-continuum/non-Darcy effects) and increases with decreasing nanopore size, intrinsic permeability and pressure. Hence, the

  18. Biological Structures, Interactions, Function and Behavior: Research Opportunities for Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concepcion, Gisela P.

    2008-06-01

    Studies on marine biomolecules at the Marine Natural Products Laboratory (MNPL) and studies on biomedically relevant proteins at the Virtual Laboratory of Biomolecular Structures (VIRLS) of the University of the Philippines Marine Science Institute (UPMSI) are presented. These serve to illustrate some underlying principles of biological structures, interactions, function and behavior, and also to draw out some unresolved questions in biology of possible interest to non-biologists. The Biological Structures course offered at UPMSI, which aims to introduce underlying biological principles to non-biology majors and to promote trans-disciplinary research efforts, is also presented.

  19. Gene × Environment Interactions: From Molecular Mechanisms to Behavior.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, Thorhildur; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2017-01-03

    Gene-by-environment interactions (G×Es) can provide important biological insights into psychiatric disorders and may consequently have direct clinical implications. In this review, we begin with an overview of the major challenges G×E studies have faced (e.g., difficulties replicating findings and high false discovery rates). In light of these challenges, this review focuses on describing examples in which we might begin to understand G×Es on the molecular, cellular, circuit, and behavioral level and link this interaction to altered risk for the development of psychiatric disorders. We also describe recent studies that utilize a polygenic approach to examine G×Es. Finally, we discuss how gaining a deeper understanding of G×Es may translate into a therapeutic practice with more targeted treatments.

  20. Novel behavioral indicator of explicit awareness reveals temporal course of frontoparietal neural network facilitation during motor learning.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Regan R; Gayle, Jordan O; Wheaton, Lewis A

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in sequential motor learning have been observed in many patient populations. Having an understanding of the individual neural progression associated with sequential learning in healthy individuals may provide valuable insights for effective interventions with these patients. Due to individual variability in motor skill acquisition, the temporal course of such learning will be vary, suggesting a need for a more individualized approach. Knowing when a subject becomes aware of movement patterns may provide a marker with which to identify each individual's learning time course. To avoid interfering with the incidental nature of discovery during learning, such an indicator requires an indirect, behaviorally-based approach. In Part I, our study aimed to identify a reliable behavioral indicator predictive of the presence of incidental explicit awareness in a sequential motor learning task. Part II, utilized the predictive indicator and EEG to provide neural validation of perceptual processing changes temporally correlated with the indicator. Results of Part I provide a reliable predictive indicator for the timing of explicit awareness development. Results from Part II demonstrates strong classification reliability, as well as a significant neural correlation with behavior for subjects developing awareness (EXP), not observed with subjects without awareness (NOEXP). Additionally, a temporal correlation of peak activation between neural regions was noted over frontoparietal regions, suggesting that the incidental discovery of motor patterns may involve a facilitative network during awareness development. The proposed indicator provides a tool in which to further examine potential impacts of awareness associated with incidental, or exploratory, motor learning, while the individual nature of the indicator provides a tool for monitoring progress in rehabilitative, exploratory motor learning paradigms.

  1. The eClassroom used as a Teacher's Training Laboratory to Measure the Impact of Group Facilitation on Attending, Participation, Interaction, and Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobel, Mia; Swedburg, Randy; Neubauer, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Data from the log files of a synchronous, online classroom designed for experiential learning focused on interpersonal communication were analyzed to determine the impact of effective group facilitation on attentiveness, interaction, involvement, and participation. The data demonstrate a social network of interactions and suggest that people…

  2. Development of mother-infant interaction in tickling play: The relationship between infants' ticklishness and social behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Konomi; Negayama, Koichi

    2017-09-18

    This study examined the development of mother-infant tickling interaction and the relationship between infants' ticklishness and social behaviors including infants' looking at mothers' face, mothers' narrative tickling, and mothers' laughter. Twenty-two Japanese infants aged 5 months (n=10, five girls) and 7 months (n=12, four girls) and their mothers were videotaped. Results revealed that the mothers' narrative tickling was more frequent at 7 than at 5 months and the infants' strong ticklishness showed the same tendency. The infants' strong ticklishness was linked with the occurrence of other social behaviors. In conclusion, infants' ticklishness was heavily connected with social behaviors. The mode of the tickling interaction at 7 months was different from that at 5 months especially in the increase of mother's narrative tickling. A possible function of such mother's narrative tickling to facilitate infant active communication at a higher cognitive level including anticipation, was discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relocation of active site carboxylates in major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP reveals plasticity in proton interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Asha V.; Singh, Himansha; Raturi, Sagar; Neuberger, Arthur; Tong, Zhen; Ding, Ning; Agboh, Kelvin; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of polyspecific membrane transporters is one important mechanism by which cells can obtain resistance to structurally different antibiotics and cytotoxic agents. These transporters reduce intracellular drug concentrations to subtoxic levels by mediating drug efflux across the cell envelope. The major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis catalyses drug efflux in a membrane potential and chemical proton gradient-dependent fashion. To enable the interaction with protons and cationic substrates, LmrP contains catalytic carboxyl residues on the surface of a large interior chamber that is formed by transmembrane helices. These residues co-localise together with polar and aromatic residues, and are predicted to be present in two clusters. To investigate the functional role of the catalytic carboxylates, we generated mutant proteins catalysing membrane potential-independent dye efflux by removing one of the carboxyl residues in Cluster 1. We then relocated this carboxyl residue to six positions on the surface of the interior chamber, and tested for restoration of wildtype energetics. The reinsertion at positions towards Cluster 2 reinstated the membrane potential dependence of dye efflux. Our data uncover a remarkable plasticity in proton interactions in LmrP, which is a consequence of the flexibility in the location of key residues that are responsible for proton/multidrug antiport. PMID:27917857

  4. Stress-induced enhancement of fear conditioning and sensitization facilitates extinction-resistant and habituation-resistant fear behaviors in a novel animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Corley, Michael J; Caruso, Michael J; Takahashi, Lorey K

    2012-01-18

    -like behavior continued to be observed. In summary, our animal model provides novel information on the effects of different intensities of footshock stress, auditory-predator odor fear conditioning, and their interactions on facilitating either extinction-resistant or habituation-resistant fear-related behavior. These results lay the foundation for exciting new investigations of the hallmarks of PTSD that include the stress-induced formation and persistence of traumatic memories and sensitized fear.

  5. Implementing IWRM: Delivering data and models with interactive dashboards and cyberinfrastructure to facilitate natural resource conflict resolution and valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, S. A.; Figueroa B, E.

    2016-12-01

    Sound science and adequate models of systems are necessary for environmental decisions, yet frequently it is insufficient. This study documents the outcome of a co-design effort that was convened initially to explore the potential role that technology may have in supporting multi-stakeholder deliberation about sustainability transitions for a region. The project aims to create science-based deliberation among diverse stakeholders about water-energy-mineral use and choices in the Atacama Desert region of Chile. An interactive dashboard that pairs stakeholder preferences, concept maps with natural resource valuation models seeks to visualize useful information. The ultimate goal is to improve levels of understanding and open possibilities for collaborative problem solving by engaging industry, academics, and indigenous communities in a long- term participatory modeling process. Collaborative discussions build technical knowledge and bridge across sectors that are often at odds over management of earth resources. The project began in the shadow of marked conflict and tensions among participants. Methodologically, tensions have been reduced by combining social process with information delivery that leverages interactive touch screen applications. Models and information act as boundary objects among participants and the tenets of a conflict resolution process called sustained dialogue provide guidance for facilitating the group sessions. Early results indicate that the gesture-enabled touch screens are useful for establishing an accessible environment for deliberation because subject matter experts and laypeople can interact with information with equal ease. Social process has been critical for bridging scales, managing group expectations and relationships, and addressing differences in epistemological and cultural perspectives. Recent incorporation of economic and resource valuation highlights new aspects and alternative views of tradeoffs and potential impacts.

  6. Control over Silica Particle Growth and Particle–Biomolecule Interactions Facilitates Silica Encapsulation of Mammalian Cells with Thickness Control

    DOE PAGES

    Johnston, Robert K.; Harper, Jason C.; Tartis, Michaelann S.

    2017-07-13

    Over the past 20 years, many strategies utilizing sol–gel chemistry to integrate biological cells into silica-based materials have been reported. One such strategy, Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition, shows promise as an efficient encapsulation technique due to the ability to vary the silica encapsulation morphology obtained by this process through variation of SG-CViL reaction conditions. In this report, we develop SG-CViL as a tunable, multi-purpose silica encapsulation strategy by investigating the mechanisms governing both silica particle generation and subsequent interaction with phospholipid assemblies (liposomes and living cells). Using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurements, linear and exponential silica particlemore » growth dynamics were observed which were dependent on deposition buffer ion constituents and ion concentration. Silica particle growth followed a cluster–cluster growth mechanism at acidic pH, and a monomer-cluster growth mechanism at neutral to basic pH. Increasing silica sol aging temperature resulted in higher rates of particle growth and larger particles. DLS measurements employing PEG-coated liposomes and cationic liposomes, serving as model phospholipid assemblies, revealed that electrostatic interactions promote more stable liposome–silica interactions than hydrogen bonding and facilitate silica coating on suspension cells. However, continued silica reactivity leads to aggregation of silica-coated suspension cells, revealing the need for cell isolation to tune deposited silica thickness. As a result, utilizing these mechanistic study insights, silica was deposited onto adherent HeLa cells under biocompatible conditions with micrometer-scale control over silica thickness, minimal cell manipulation steps, and retained cell viability over several days.« less

  7. Behavioral and biological interactions with small groups in confined microsocieties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Joseph V.

    1986-01-01

    Research on small group performance in confined microsocieties was focused upon the development of principles and procedures relevant to the selection and training of space mission personnel, upon the investigation of behavioral programming, preventive monitoring and corrective procedures to enhance space mission performance effectiveness, and upon the evaluation of behavioral and physiological countermeasures to the potentially disruptive effects of unfamiliar and stressful environments. An experimental microsociety environment was designed and developed for continuous residence of human volunteers over extended time periods. Studies were then undertaken to analyze experimentally: (1) conditions that sustain group cohesion and productivity and that prevent social fragmentation and performance deterioration, (2) motivational effects performance requirements, and (3) behavioral and physiological effects resulting from changes in group size and composition. The results show that both individual and group productivity can be enhanced under such conditions by the direct application of contingency management principles to designated high-value tasks. Similarly, group cohesiveness can be promoted and individual social isolation and/or alienation prevented by the application of contingency management principles to social interaction segments of the program.

  8. Causal interactions in attention networks predict behavioral performance.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaotong; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun; Ding, Mingzhou

    2012-01-25

    Lesion and functional brain imaging studies have suggested that there are two anatomically nonoverlapping attention networks. The dorsal frontoparietal network controls goal-oriented top-down deployment of attention; the ventral frontoparietal network mediates stimulus-driven bottom-up attentional reorienting. The interaction between the two networks and its functional significance has been considered in the past but no direct test has been carried out. We addressed this problem by recording fMRI data from human subjects performing a trial-by-trial cued visual spatial attention task in which the subject had to respond to target stimuli in the attended hemifield and ignore all stimuli in the unattended hemifield. Correlating Granger causal influences between regions of interest with behavioral performance, we report two main results. First, stronger Granger causal influences from the dorsal attention network (DAN) to the ventral attention network (VAN), i.e., DAN→VAN, are generally associated with enhanced performance, with right intraparietal sulcus (IPS), left IPS, and right frontal eye field being the main sources of behavior-enhancing influences. Second, stronger Granger causal influences from VAN to DAN, i.e., VAN→DAN, are generally associated with degraded performance, with right temporal-parietal junction being the main sources of behavior-degrading influences. These results support the hypothesis that signals from DAN to VAN suppress and filter out unimportant distracter information, whereas signals from VAN to DAN break the attentional set maintained by the dorsal attention network to enable attentional reorienting.

  9. Patchiness and co-existence of indigenous and invasive mussels at small spatial scales: the interaction of facilitation and competition.

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Johan; McQuaid, Christopher D; Sköld, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that two species with similar requirements will fail to show long-term co-existence in situations where shared resources are limiting, especially at spatial scales that are small relative to the size of the organisms. Two species of intertidal mussels, the indigenous Perna perna and the invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis, form mixed beds on the south coast of South Africa in a situation that has been stable for several generations of these species, even though these populations are often limited by the availability of space. We examined the spatial structure of these species where they co-exist at small spatial scales in the absence of apparent environmental heterogeneity at two sites, testing: whether conspecific aggregation of mussels can occur (using spatial Monte-Carlo tests); the degree of patchiness (using Korcak B patchiness exponent), and whether there was a relationship between percent cover and patchiness. We found that under certain circumstances there is non-random conspecific aggregation, but that in other circumstances there may be random distribution (i.e. the two species are mixed), so that spatial patterns are context-dependent. The relative cover of the species differed between sites, and within each site, the species with higher cover showed low Korcak B values (indicating low patchiness, i.e. the existence of fewer, larger patches), while the less abundant species showed the reverse, i.e. high patchiness. This relationship did not hold for either species within sites. We conclude that co-existence between these mussels is possible, even at small spatial scales because each species is an ecological engineer and, while they have been shown to compete for space, this is preceded by initial facilitation. We suggest that a patchy pattern of co-existence is possible because of a balance between direct (competitive) and indirect (facilitative) interactions.

  10. Behavioral Hypervolumes of Predator Groups and Predator-Predator Interactions Shape Prey Survival Rates and Selection on Prey Behavior.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Jonathan N; Howell, Kimberly A; Gladney, Shaniqua J; Yang, Yusan; Lichtenstein, James L L; Spicer, Michelle Elise; Echeverri, Sebastian A; Pinter-Wollman, Noa

    2017-03-01

    Predator-prey interactions often vary on the basis of the traits of the individual predators and prey involved. Here we examine whether the multidimensional behavioral diversity of predator groups shapes prey mortality rates and selection on prey behavior. We ran individual sea stars (Pisaster ochraceus) through three behavioral assays to characterize individuals' behavioral phenotype along three axes. We then created groups that varied in the volume of behavioral space that they occupied. We further manipulated the ability of predators to interact with one another physically via the addition of barriers. Prey snails (Chlorostome funebralis) were also run through an assay to evaluate their predator avoidance behavior before their use in mesocosm experiments. We then subjected pools of prey to predator groups and recorded the number of prey consumed and their behavioral phenotypes. We found that predator-predator interactions changed survival selection on prey traits: when predators were prevented from interacting, more fearful snails had higher survival rates, whereas prey fearfulness had no effect on survival when predators were free to interact. We also found that groups of predators that occupied a larger volume in behavioral trait space consumed 35% more prey snails than homogeneous predator groups. Finally, we found that behavioral hypervolumes were better predictors of prey survival rates than single behavioral traits or other multivariate statistics (i.e., principal component analysis). Taken together, predator-predator interactions and multidimensional behavioral diversity determine prey survival rates and selection on prey traits in this system.

  11. Individual behavior and pairwise interactions between microswimmers in anisotropic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-01-01

    A motile bacterium swims by generating flow in its surrounding liquid. Anisotropy of the suspending liquid significantly modifies the swimming dynamics and corresponding flow signatures of an individual bacterium and impacts collective behavior. We study the interactions between swimming bacteria in an anisotropic environment exemplified by lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal. Our analysis reveals a significant localization of the bacteria-induced flow along a line coaxial with the bacterial body, which is due to strong viscosity anisotropy of the liquid crystal. Despite the fact that the average viscosity of the liquid crystal is two to three orders of magnitude higher than the viscosity of pure water, the speed of bacteria in the liquid crystal is of the same order of magnitude as in water. We show that bacteria can transport a cargo (a fluorescent particle) along a predetermined trajectory defined by the direction of molecular orientation of the liquid crystal. We demonstrate that while the hydrodynamic interaction between flagella of two close-by bacteria is negligible, the observed convergence of the swimming speeds as well as flagella waves' phase velocities may occur due to viscoelastic interaction between the bacterial bodies.

  12. Individual behavior and pairwise interactions between microswimmers in anisotropic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-01-01

    A motile bacterium swims by generating flow in its surrounding liquid. Anisotropy of the suspending liquid significantly modifies the swimming dynamics and corresponding flow signatures of an individual bacterium and impacts collective behavior. We study the interactions between swimming bacteria in an anisotropic environment exemplified by lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal. Our analysis reveals a significant localization of the bacteria-induced flow along a line coaxial with the bacterial body, which is due to strong viscosity anisotropy of the liquid crystal. Despite the fact that the average viscosity of the liquid crystal is two to three orders of magnitude higher than the viscosity of pure water, the speed of bacteria in the liquid crystal is of the same order of magnitude as in water. We show that bacteria can transport a cargo (a fluorescent particle) along a predetermined trajectory defined by the direction of molecular orientation of the liquid crystal. We demonstrate that while the hydrodynamic interaction between flagella of two close-by bacteria is negligible, the observed convergence of the swimming speeds as well as flagella waves' phase velocities may occur due to viscoelastic interaction between the bacterial bodies

  13. Interactions between behaviorally relevant rhythms and synaptic plasticity alter coding in the piriform cortex

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Nathaniel N.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how neural and behavioral timescales interact to influence cortical activity and stimulus coding is an important issue in sensory neuroscience. In air-breathing animals, voluntary changes in respiratory frequency alter the temporal patterning olfactory input. In the olfactory bulb, these behavioral timescales are reflected in the temporal properties of mitral/tufted (M/T) cell spike trains. As the odor information contained in these spike trains is relayed from the bulb to the cortex, interactions between presynaptic spike timing and short-term synaptic plasticity dictate how stimulus features are represented in cortical spike trains. Here we demonstrate how the timescales associated with respiratory frequency, spike timing and short-term synaptic plasticity interact to shape cortical responses. Specifically, we quantified the timescales of short-term synaptic facilitation and depression at excitatory synapses between bulbar M/T cells and cortical neurons in slices of mouse olfactory cortex. We then used these results to generate simulated M/T population synaptic currents that were injected into real cortical neurons. M/T population inputs were modulated at frequencies consistent with passive respiration or active sniffing. We show how the differential recruitment of short-term plasticity at breathing versus sniffing frequencies alters cortical spike responses. For inputs at sniffing frequencies, cortical neurons linearly encoded increases in presynaptic firing rates with increased phase locked, firing rates. In contrast, at passive breathing frequencies, cortical responses saturated with changes in presynaptic rate. Our results suggest that changes in respiratory behavior can gate the transfer of stimulus information between the olfactory bulb and cortex. PMID:22553016

  14. CACTI: Free, Open-Source Software for the Sequential Coding of Behavioral Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Lisa H.; Hallgren, Kevin A.; Houck, Jon M.; Moyers, Theresa B.

    2012-01-01

    The sequential analysis of client and clinician speech in psychotherapy sessions can help to identify and characterize potential mechanisms of treatment and behavior change. Previous studies required coding systems that were time-consuming, expensive, and error-prone. Existing software can be expensive and inflexible, and furthermore, no single package allows for pre-parsing, sequential coding, and assignment of global ratings. We developed a free, open-source, and adaptable program to meet these needs: The CASAA Application for Coding Treatment Interactions (CACTI). Without transcripts, CACTI facilitates the real-time sequential coding of behavioral interactions using WAV-format audio files. Most elements of the interface are user-modifiable through a simple XML file, and can be further adapted using Java through the terms of the GNU Public License. Coding with this software yields interrater reliabilities comparable to previous methods, but at greatly reduced time and expense. CACTI is a flexible research tool that can simplify psychotherapy process research, and has the potential to contribute to the improvement of treatment content and delivery. PMID:22815713

  15. CACTI: free, open-source software for the sequential coding of behavioral interactions.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Lisa H; Hallgren, Kevin A; Houck, Jon M; Moyers, Theresa B

    2012-01-01

    The sequential analysis of client and clinician speech in psychotherapy sessions can help to identify and characterize potential mechanisms of treatment and behavior change. Previous studies required coding systems that were time-consuming, expensive, and error-prone. Existing software can be expensive and inflexible, and furthermore, no single package allows for pre-parsing, sequential coding, and assignment of global ratings. We developed a free, open-source, and adaptable program to meet these needs: The CASAA Application for Coding Treatment Interactions (CACTI). Without transcripts, CACTI facilitates the real-time sequential coding of behavioral interactions using WAV-format audio files. Most elements of the interface are user-modifiable through a simple XML file, and can be further adapted using Java through the terms of the GNU Public License. Coding with this software yields interrater reliabilities comparable to previous methods, but at greatly reduced time and expense. CACTI is a flexible research tool that can simplify psychotherapy process research, and has the potential to contribute to the improvement of treatment content and delivery.

  16. Activation of AMPA receptor in the infralimbic cortex facilitates extinction and attenuates the heroin-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weisheng; Wang, Yiqi; Sun, Anna; Zhou, Linyi; Xu, Wenjin; Zhu, Huaqiang; Zhuang, Dingding; Lai, Miaojun; Zhang, Fuqiang; Zhou, Wenhua; Liu, Huifen

    2016-01-26

    Infralimbic cortex (IL) is proposed to suppress cocaine seeking after extinction, but whether the IL regulates the extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior is unknown. To address this issue, the male SD rats were trained to self-administer heroin under a FR1 schedule for consecutive 14 days, then the rats underwent 7 daily 2h extinction session in the operant chamber. The activation of IL by microinjection PEPA, an allosteric AMPA receptor potentiator into IL before each of extinction session facilitated the extinction responding after heroin self-administration, but did not alter the locomotor activity in an open field testing environment. Other rats were first trained under a FR1 schedule for heroin self-administration for 14 days, followed by 14 days of extinction training, and reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by cues was measured for 2h. Intra-IL microinjecting of PEPA at 15min prior to test inhibited the reinstatement of heroin-seeking induced by cues. Moreover, the expression of GluR1 in the IL and NAc remarkably increased after treatment with PEPA during the reinstatement. These finding suggested that activation of glutamatergic projection from IL to NAc shell may be involved in the extinction and reinstatement of heroin-seeking.

  17. Predicting Children's Interactions with Unfamiliar Peers: Contributions of Parent-Child Interaction Style and Child Individual Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrillo, Sonia; And Others

    This study examined children's play interaction styles with unfamiliar peers; used mother-child and father-child dyadic qualities independently to predict children's social behavior; determined the relationship between children's individual behaviors and peer dyadic characteristics; and compared mother-child and father-child interactions on both…

  18. Relations between Children's Levels of Responsiveness and Resistance, Maternal Interaction Behaviors, and Children's Social Behaviors with Peers in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Daniela; Neitzel, Carin

    2017-01-01

    Children's peer relationships have their origins in family relationships. The present study focuses on the relative importance of children's levels of responsiveness and/or resistance during mother-child interactions and tests a model of the direct and indirect relations between mother interaction behaviors and children's social behaviors with…

  19. Relations between Children's Levels of Responsiveness and Resistance, Maternal Interaction Behaviors, and Children's Social Behaviors with Peers in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Daniela; Neitzel, Carin

    2017-01-01

    Children's peer relationships have their origins in family relationships. The present study focuses on the relative importance of children's levels of responsiveness and/or resistance during mother-child interactions and tests a model of the direct and indirect relations between mother interaction behaviors and children's social behaviors with…

  20. Understanding the role of the OneLove campaign in facilitating drivers of social and behavioral change in southern Africa: a qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jana, Michael; Letsela, Lebohang; Scheepers, Esca; Weiner, Renay

    2015-01-01

    In the wake of the HIV and AIDS pandemic, health communication has played an important role in social and behavior change in HIV prevention and treatment efforts. Despite this significant role, it is not always clear how health communication influences individuals and communities to facilitate social and behavior change. Guided predominantly by Lewin's theory of change in the context of complexity thinking, and supported by qualitative evidence from Soul City Institute's midterm evaluation of the OneLove multimedia campaign in 9 southern African countries, this article illustrates how carefully designed health edutainment communication materials facilitate drivers of social and behavior change. Thus, researched and theory-based health communication aimed at behavior and social change remains an important pillar in HIV prevention and treatment, where personal and social agency remain key.

  1. Quantum and classical behavior in interacting bosonic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2016-11-21

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that in fact the classical theory can describe the quantum behavior in the high occupancy regime, even when interactions are large. The connection is that the expectation values of quantum operators in a single quantum micro-state are approximated by a corresponding classical ensemble average over many classical micro-states. Furthermore, by the ergodic theorem, a classical ensemble average of local fields with statistical translation invariance is the spatial average of a single micro-state. So the correlation functions of the quantum and classical field theories of a single micro-state approximately agree at high occupancy, even in interacting systems. Furthermore, both quantum and classical field theories can thermalize, when appropriate coarse graining is introduced, with the classical case requiring a cutoff on low occupancy UV modes. We discuss applications of our results.

  2. Quantum and classical behavior in interacting bosonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2016-11-01

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that in fact the classical theory can describe the quantum behavior in the high occupancy regime, even when interactions are large. The connection is that the expectation values of quantum operators in a single quantum micro-state are approximated by a corresponding classical ensemble average over many classical micro-states. Furthermore, by the ergodic theorem, a classical ensemble average of local fields with statistical translation invariance is the spatial average of a single micro-state. So the correlation functions of the quantum and classical field theories of a single micro-state approximately agree at high occupancy, even in interacting systems. Furthermore, both quantum and classical field theories can thermalize, when appropriate coarse graining is introduced, with the classical case requiring a cutoff on low occupancy UV modes. We discuss applications of our results.

  3. Interactions of norepinephrine and galanin in the central amygdala and lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis modulate the behavioral response to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Morilak, David A; Cecchi, Marco; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2003-06-27

    Many aspects of drug abuse and addiction share neurobiological substrates with the modulatory processes underlying the response and adaptation to acute stress. In particular, the ascending noradrenergic system has been implicated in facilitating the response to stress, and in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking behavior. Thus, to better understand the link between stress and addictive behaviors, it would be informative to understand better the modulatory function of the ascending noradrenergic system, and its interaction with other neurotransmitters with which it is closely associated or co-localized, such as the neuropeptide galanin. In this paper, we review a series of studies investigating the functional interactions of norepinephrine and galanin in modulating the behavioral response to acute stress in two components of the extended amygdala, the central nucleus of the amygdala and the lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. We showed that norepinephrine facilitates behavioral reactivity to stress on the elevated plus-maze and social interaction tests. However, when stress-induced activation of the noradrenergic system was enhanced by blocking inhibitory adrenergic autoreceptors, galanin release was recruited in the central amygdala, acting to attenuate the behavioral response to stress. By contrast, stress-induced galanin release in the lateral bed nucleus appeared to be independent of enhanced noradrenergic activation, and unlike the central amygdala, both galanin and norepinephrine facilitated behavioral stress reactivity in the bed nucleus. The different modes of interaction and differential region- and response-specificity of galanin and norepinephrine suggest that a complex neural circuit interconnecting these two regions is involved in the modulatory effects of norepinephrine and galanin on the behavioral response to stress. Such complexity may allow for flexibility and plasticity in stress adaptation, and may also contribute to behavioral

  4. Nucleotide binding interactions modulate dNTP selectivity and facilitate 8-oxo-dGTP incorporation by DNA polymerase lambda

    PubMed Central

    Burak, Matthew J.; Guja, Kip E.; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    8-Oxo-7,8,-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP) is a major product of oxidative damage in the nucleotide pool. It is capable of mispairing with adenosine (dA), resulting in futile, mutagenic cycles of base excision repair. Therefore, it is critical that DNA polymerases discriminate against 8-oxo-dGTP at the insertion step. Because of its roles in oxidative DNA damage repair and non-homologous end joining, DNA polymerase lambda (Pol λ) may frequently encounter 8-oxo-dGTP. Here, we have studied the mechanisms of 8-oxo-dGMP incorporation and discrimination by Pol λ. We have solved high resolution crystal structures showing how Pol λ accommodates 8-oxo-dGTP in its active site. The structures indicate that when mispaired with dA, the oxidized nucleotide assumes the mutagenic syn-conformation, and is stabilized by multiple interactions. Steady-state kinetics reveal that two residues lining the dNTP binding pocket, Ala510 and Asn513, play differential roles in dNTP selectivity. Specifically, Ala510 and Asn513 facilitate incorporation of 8-oxo-dGMP opposite dA and dC, respectively. These residues also modulate the balance between purine and pyrimidine incorporation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms controlling 8-oxo-dGMP incorporation in Pol λ and on the importance of interactions with the incoming dNTP to determine selectivity in family X DNA polymerases. PMID:26220180

  5. Facilitating and Inhibiting Factors of Sexual Behavior among Migrants in Transition from Mexico to the United States.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Ordoñez, Jesús Alejandro; Benavides-Torres, Raquel A; Zapata-Garibay, Rogelio; Onofre-Rodríguez, Dora Julia; Márquez-Vega, María Aracely; Zamora-Carmona, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the border region of Mexico due to the flow of migrants under desperate conditions, encouraging casual and unprotected sex. Since this has become a binational public health problem, it is important to understand the factors that predict these sexual behaviors. The aim of the current study was to investigate the facilitators and inhibitors of transition in the sexual behavior of migrants from two border regions on the Mexico-United States (US) border. This was a predictive and cross-sectional study. A sample of 256 migrants in shelters for migrants on the border between Mexico and US were selected through systematic random sampling. Predictor variables investigated for effect on the safe sexual behavior (SSB) of the migrant were reasons for having sex; sexual attitudes; sexual machismo; knowledge about HIV; access to health services; and social discrimination. The sample was predominantly male (89.5%), with 46.1% reporting being single. The average age was 33.38 years (SD = 9.73) and the average number of years of education reported was 8.05 (SD = 3.37). A permissive sexual attitude and sexual machismo both correlated with condom use (rs = 0.130, p < 0.01 and rs = -0.174, p < 0.01, respectively). Regression analysis showed that a permissive sexual attitude decreased the practice of safe sex (β = 0.17, t = 4.16, p < 0.001), as did sexual machismo (β = -0.28, t = -4.83, p < 0.001) and HIV knowledge (β = -0.11, t = -2.62, p = 0.006). It was found that access to health services did not influence the SSB of migrants, as suggested by the literature. However, a permissive sexual attitude, sexual machismo, and HIV knowledge were all variables capable of predicting SSB. It is recommended that the study is extended to study migrant populations from other parts of the border, as well

  6. Phase Behavior and Interactions of the Membrane-Protein Bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Koltover, I.; Raedler, J.O.; Salditt, T.; Safinya, C.R.; Rothschild, K.J.

    1999-04-01

    We present a synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of melting in stacks of two-dimensional crystalline arrays of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. Two distinct regimes have been found as a function of the intermembrane distance d . In the {open_quotes}coupled{close_quotes} regime for d{lt}250 {Angstrom} the temperature (T{sub m}) of the melting transition decreases with increasing d , demonstrating the effect of the repulsive membrane interactions on the intramembrane protein ordering. For d{gt}250 {Angstrom} a {open_quotes}decoupled{close_quotes} regime is found with higher T{sup *}{sub m} independent of d . Below T{sup *}{sub m} a solid-liquid-solid reentrant behavior is observed as d is increased. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Intracerebellar behavioral interactions between nicotine, cotinine and ethanol in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, M.S.; Li, C. )

    1992-02-26

    Using ethanol-induced motor incoordination as the test response as evaluated by rotorod, possible behavioral interactions between ethanol and (-)-nicotine in the cerebellum, one of the key motor area, were investigated. (-)-Nicotine, 5, 1.25, 0.625 ng/100nL intracerebellarly significantly attenuated motor incoordination due to ethanol in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, (-)-cotinine, a major metabolite of nicotine, 5, 2.5, and 1.25 ng/100nL, significantly but less marked compared to (-)-nicotine attenuated ethanol-induced motor incoordination. The highest, 5 ng/100nL, dose of (-)-nicotine or (-)-cotinine followed by saline instead of ethanol did not alter normal motor coordination. The attenuation of ethanol-induced motor incoordination by (-)-nicotine and (-)- cotinine was blocked by intracerebellar hexamethonium 1 ug/100nL, a purported nicotinic cholinergic antagonist. The data obtained strongly suggest participation of cerebellar nicotinic cholinergic receptor in the ethanol-induced motor incoordination.

  8. GANP interacts with APOBEC3G and facilitates its encapsidation into the virions to reduce HIV-1 infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Eid, Mohammed Mansour Abbas; Shimoda, Mayuko; Ikeda, Terumasa; Koito, Atsushi; Pham, Phuong; Goodman, Myron F.; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA-dependent deoxycytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) is a potent restrictive factor against HIV-1 virus lacking viral-encoded infectivity factor (Vif) in CD4+ T cells. A3G antiretroviral activity requires its encapsulation into HIV-1 virions. Here we show that germinal center-associated nuclear protein (GANP) is induced in activated CD4+ T cells and physically interacts with A3G. Overexpression of GANP augments the A3G encapsidation into the virion-like particles and ΔVif HIV-1 virions. GANP is encapsidated in HIV-1 virion and modulates A3G packaging into the cores together with cellular RNAs including 7SL RNA, and with unspliced HIV-1 genomic RNA. GANP upregulation leads to a significant increase in A3G-catalyzed G→A hypermutation in the viral genome and suppression of HIV-1 infectivity in a single-round viral infection assay. Conversely, GANP knockdown caused a marked increase in HIV-1 infectivity in a multiple rounds infection assay. The data suggest that GANP is a cellular factor that facilitates A3G encapsidation into HIV-1 virions to inhibit the viral infectivity. PMID:24198285

  9. Asialoglycoprotein receptor facilitates infection of PLC/PRF/5 cells by HEV through interaction with ORF2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Tian, Yabin; Wen, Zhiheng; Zhang, Feng; Qi, Ying; Huang, Weijin; Zhang, Heqiu; Wang, Youchun

    2016-12-01

    Although the biological and epidemiological features of hepatitis E virus (HEV) have been studied extensively in recent years, the mechanism by which HEV infects cells is still poorly understood. In this study, coimmunoprecipitation, pull-down, and ELISA were used to show that the HEV ORF2 protein interacts directly with the ectodomain of both ASGR1 and ASGR2. Susceptibility to HEV correlated positively with the expression level of surface asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) in cell lines. ASGPR-directed small interfering RNA (siRNA) in HEV-infected PLC/PRF/5 cells had no significant effect on HEV release, suggesting that ASGPR mainly regulates the viral binding and entry steps. Both the purified ASGPR ectodomain and anti-ASGPR antibodies disturbed the binding of HEV to PLC/PRF/5 cells. The classic ASGPR ligands asialofetuin, asialoganglioside, and fibronectin competitively inhibited the binding of HEV to hepatocytes in the presence of calcium. HeLa cell lines stably expressing ASGPR displayed increased HEV-binding capacity, whereas ASGPR-knockout PLC/PRF/5 cell lines had lower HEV-binding capacity. Thus, our study demonstrates that ASGPR is involved in and facilitates HEV infection by binding to ORF2. J. Med. Virol. 88:2186-2195, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Developing a service user facilitated, interactive case study--a reflective and evaluative account of a teaching method.

    PubMed

    Ward, Lisa J; Padgett, Kath

    2012-02-01

    This article describes the development and ongoing evaluation of a method of service user facilitated case study in health and social care education in a U.K. University. An action research approach (Norton 2009) has been used in which the aim of the work is to improve personal practice with the aim of enhancing the student experience. The paper is written from the perspective of the service user with support from an academic colleague. The paper describes how a narrative monologue, over time is developed into an interactive case study. In draws upon literature from service user involvement, case study and pedagogic action research. The research group are health and social care students both under and post-graduates. Analysis is via a session evaluation form. Thematic analysis draws out key themes. Firstly that first person accounts have a reasonance and interest with students. Secondly that the built in thinking time helps students to develop their reflection and critical thinking skills. Furthermore a theme emerges on how the technique supports students with their future careers. Finally the author reflects on how the approach enables the development of teaching practice and enhanced student learning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence of horizontal transfer of non-autonomous Lep1 Helitrons facilitated by host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuezhu; Gao, Jingkun; Li, Fei; Wang, Jianjun

    2014-05-30

    Horizontal transfer (HT) of transposable elements has been recognized to be a major force driving genomic variation and biological innovation of eukaryotic organisms. However, the mechanisms of HT in eukaryotes remain poorly appreciated. The non-autonomous Helitron family, Lep1, has been found to be widespread in lepidopteran species, and showed little interspecific sequence similarity of acquired sequences at 3' end, which makes Lep1 a good candidate for the study of HT. In this study, we describe the Lep1-like elements in multiple non-lepidopteran species, including two aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Aphis gossypii, two parasitoid wasps, Cotesia vestalis, and Copidosoma floridanum, one beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, as well as two bracoviruses in parasitoid wasps, and one intracellular microsporidia parasite, Nosema bombycis. The patchy distribution and high sequence similarity of Lep1-like elements among distantly related lineages as well as incongruence of Lep1-like elements and host phylogeny suggest the occurrence of HT. Remarkably, the acquired sequences of both NbLep1 from N. bombycis and CfLep1 from C. floridanum showed over 90% identity with their lepidopteran host Lep1. Thus, our study provides evidence of HT facilitated by host-parasite interactions. Furthermore, in the context of these data, we discuss the putative directions and vectors of HT of Lep1 Helitrons.

  12. Requirement of Phospholipase C and Protein Kinase C in Cholecystokinin-mediated Facilitation of NMDA Channel Function and Anxiety-like Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhaoyang; Jaiswal, Manoj; Deng, Pan-Yue; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Shin, Hee-Sup; Porter, James E.; Lei, Saobo

    2011-01-01

    Whereas cholecystokinin (CCK) has long been known to exert anxiogenic effects in both animal anxiety models and humans, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are ill-defined. CCK interacts with CCK-1 and CCK-2 receptors resulting in up-regulation of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC). However, the roles of PLC and PKC in CCK-mediated anxiogenic effects have not been determined. We have shown previously that CCK facilitates glutamate release in the hippocampus especially at the synapses formed by the perforant path and dentate gyrus granule cells via activations of PLC and PKC. Here we further demonstrated that CCK enhanced NMDA receptor function in dentate gyrus granule cells via activation of PLC and PKC pathway. At the single-channel level, CCK increased NMDA single-channel open probability and mean open time, reduced the mean close time and had no effects on the conductance of NMDA channels. Because elevation of glutamatergic functions results in anxiety, we explored the roles of PLC and PKC in CCK-induced anxiogenic actions using the Vogel Conflict Test (VCT). Our results from both pharmacological approach and knockout mice demonstrated that microinjection of CCK into the dentate gyrus concentration-dependently increased anxiety-like behavior via activation of PLC and PKC. Our results provide a novel unidentified signaling mechanism whereby CCK increases anxiety. PMID:22072552

  13. Modes Interactions Due to Launcher Dynamic Behavior Variations During Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucaud, Simon; Gonidou, Luc-Olivier; Daniel, Jerome; Escudero, Luis

    2014-06-01

    Due to propellant consumption, mass and stiffness properties of a launcher are varying in a very wide range in a relatively short time. Consequently, dynamic behavior and first bending modes of the launcher are varying during the flight. This time evolutions can lead to modes interactions with potential impacts on launcher control. The prediction of modal behavior for all instants requires a strong effort of modelling and high computing cost using a classical finite element modelling (FEM) approach. An alternative method with relatively low computational costs has been developed in order to cover a large number of time instants. The approach considers a reference modal basis at a given time as a starting point and then derives the whole flight modal properties using mass and stiffness variations only.This paper intends to present the method and its applications. In a first step, the theoretical aspect of the method is described and results are shown in comparison with FEM results. The method reveals its ability to catch modal interactions occurring in-between reference time instants. Secondly, the method is coupled to a parametric tool in order to estimate the impact of payloads or supporting structures characteristics on launcher excitabilities. Finally, outputs are presented as three-dimensional maps representing launcher excitabilities with respect to time and frequency for a "cloud" of payloads. Results are presented for the next evolution of ARIANE 5 - so called A5ME version. The method gives an overview of the mechanical and piloting excitabilities of the A5ME launcher for a wide flight domain. This is a very powerful tool for estimating the validity of other dimensioning methodologies and the associated margins.

  14. Object grouping based on real-world regularities facilitates perception by reducing competitive interactions in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Daniel; Stein, Timo; Peelen, Marius V

    2014-07-29

    In virtually every real-life situation humans are confronted with complex and cluttered visual environments that contain a multitude of objects. Because of the limited capacity of the visual system, objects compete for neural representation and cognitive processing resources. Previous work has shown that such attentional competition is partly object based, such that competition among elements is reduced when these elements perceptually group into an object based on low-level cues. Here, using functional MRI (fMRI) and behavioral measures, we show that the attentional benefit of grouping extends to higher-level grouping based on the relative position of objects as experienced in the real world. An fMRI study designed to measure competitive interactions among objects in human visual cortex revealed reduced neural competition between objects when these were presented in commonly experienced configurations, such as a lamp above a table, relative to the same objects presented in other configurations. In behavioral visual search studies, we then related this reduced neural competition to improved target detection when distracter objects were shown in regular configurations. Control studies showed that low-level grouping could not account for these results. We interpret these findings as reflecting the grouping of objects based on higher-level spatial-relational knowledge acquired through a lifetime of seeing objects in specific configurations. This interobject grouping effectively reduces the number of objects that compete for representation and thereby contributes to the efficiency of real-world perception.

  15. Barriers and facilitators of evidence-based practice in pediatric behavioral sleep care: qualitative analysis of the perspectives of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Katelynn E; Coulombe, J Aimée; Corkum, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral sleep problems are highly prevalent among young and school-aged children. Despite strong evidence for effective interventions, few children receive evidence-based care. In this study, 124 Canadian health professionals answered open-ended questions regarding barriers and facilitators of their provision of evidence-based behavioral sleep-related care, and responses were analyzed for content. Responses represented issues at an individual practice level, as well as broader systemic issues. The most frequently reported barrier and facilitator related to knowledge, training, and education. Other barriers included lack of time and institutional support, and facilitators included supportive sleep attitudes and beliefs. This study may inform the design of education programs for health professionals, and provides support for broader systems-level initiatives targeted at increasing evidence-based practice.

  16. Nonverbal behavior during face-to-face social interaction in schizophrenia: a review.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Mary; Healey, Patrick G T; McCabe, Rosemarie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia display social cognitive deficits. However, little is known about patients' nonverbal communication during their social encounters with others. This review identified 17 studies investigating nonverbal communication in patients' unscripted face-to-face interactions, addressing a) nonverbal differences between patients and others, b) nonverbal behavior of the patients' partners, c) the association between nonverbal behavior and symptoms, and d) the association between nonverbal behavior and social outcomes. Patients displayed fewer nonverbal behaviors inviting interaction, with negative symptoms exacerbating this pattern. Positive symptoms were associated with heightened nonverbal behavior. Patients' partners changed their own nonverbal behavior in response to the patient. Reduced prosocial behaviors, inviting interaction, were associated with poorer social outcomes. The evidence suggests that patients' nonverbal behavior, during face-to-face interaction, is influenced by patients symptoms and impacts the success of their social interactions.

  17. Eye regression in blind Astyanax cavefish may facilitate the evolution of an adaptive behavior and its sensory receptors.

    PubMed

    Borowsky, Richard

    2013-07-11

    The forces driving the evolutionary loss or simplification of traits such as vision and pigmentation in cave animals are still debated. Three alternative hypotheses are direct selection against the trait, genetic drift, and indirect selection due to antagonistic pleiotropy. Recent work establishes that Astyanax cavefish exhibit vibration attraction behavior (VAB), a presumed behavioral adaptation to finding food in the dark not exhibited by surface fish. Genetic analysis revealed two regions in the genome with quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both VAB and eye size. These observations were interpreted as genetic evidence that selection for VAB indirectly drove eye regression through antagonistic pleiotropy and, further, that this is a general mechanism to account for regressive evolution. These conclusions are unsupported by the data; the analysis fails to establish pleiotropy and ignores the numerous other QTL that map to, and potentially interact, in the same regions. It is likely that all three forces drive evolutionary change. We will be able to distinguish among them in individual cases only when we have identified the causative alleles and characterized their effects.

  18. The Turn the Tables Technique (T[cube]): A Program Activity to Provide Group Facilitators Insight into Teen Sexual Behaviors and Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sclafane, Jamie Heather; Merves, Marni Loiacono; Rivera, Angelic; Long, Laura; Wilson, Ken; Bauman, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    The Turn the Tables Technique (T[cube]) is an activity designed to provide group facilitators who lead HIV/STI prevention and sexual health promotion programs with detailed and current information on teenagers' sexual behaviors and beliefs. This information can be used throughout a program to tailor content. Included is a detailed lesson plan of…

  19. The Turn the Tables Technique (T[cube]): A Program Activity to Provide Group Facilitators Insight into Teen Sexual Behaviors and Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sclafane, Jamie Heather; Merves, Marni Loiacono; Rivera, Angelic; Long, Laura; Wilson, Ken; Bauman, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    The Turn the Tables Technique (T[cube]) is an activity designed to provide group facilitators who lead HIV/STI prevention and sexual health promotion programs with detailed and current information on teenagers' sexual behaviors and beliefs. This information can be used throughout a program to tailor content. Included is a detailed lesson plan of…

  20. Interpersonal behaviors and complementarity in interactions between teachers and kindergartners with a variety of externalizing and internalizing behaviors.

    PubMed

    Roorda, Debora L; Koomen, Helma M Y; Spilt, Jantine L; Thijs, Jochem T; Oort, Frans J

    2013-02-01

    The present study investigated whether the complementarity principle (mutual interactive behaviors are opposite on control and similar on affiliation) applies to teacher-child interactions within the kindergarten classroom. Furthermore, it was examined whether interactive behaviors and complementarity depended on children's externalizing and internalizing behaviors, interaction time, and interaction frequency. A total of 48 teachers and 179 selected kindergartners with a variety of externalizing and internalizing behaviors were observed in a small group task setting in the natural ecology of the classroom. Teachers' and children's interactive behaviors were rated by independent observers. Teachers reported about children's externalizing and internalizing behaviors. Multilevel analyses indicated that both teachers and children reacted complementarily on the control dimension but not on the affiliation dimension. Teachers showed more control and more affiliation toward children with higher levels of internalizing behavior. In addition, teachers displayed less affiliation toward children with higher levels of externalizing behavior, whereas those children did not show less affiliation themselves. Teachers' and children's complementarity tendencies on control were weaker if children had higher levels of externalizing behavior.

  1. Attributions about, and Instructions on How To Treat, Their Neonates as Determinants of Mothers' Interaction Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Gewirtz, Jacob L.

    Two experiments explored the influence of neonate characteristics on maternal behavior. Experiment 1 investigated the influence of maternal attribution to the neonate of certain behavioral characteristics on maternal behavior in interaction. After videotaped mother-neonate pair interaction, neonates were removed for a nominal examination. Mothers…

  2. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Complex Material Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    Complex material behavior is represented by a single equation of product form to account for interaction among the various factors. The factors are selected by the physics of the problem and the environment that the model is to represent. For example, different factors will be required for each to represent temperature, moisture, erosion, corrosion, etc. It is important that the equation represent the physics of the behavior in its entirety accurately. The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the external launch tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points - the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation, the data used were obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated. The problem lies in how to represent the divot weight with a single equation. A unique solution to this problem is a multi-factor equation of product form. Each factor is of the following form (1 xi/xf)ei, where xi is the initial value, usually at ambient conditions, xf the final value, and ei the exponent that makes the curve represented unimodal that meets the initial and final values. The exponents are either evaluated by test data or by technical judgment. A minor disadvantage may be the selection of exponents in the absence of any empirical data. This form has been used successfully in describing the foam ejected in simulated space environmental conditions. Seven factors were required

  3. Behavioral interactions across various aircraft types - Results of systematic observations of line operations and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clothier, Cathy C.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA/UT Line/LOS checklist is designed to capture critical components of crew interaction. The behaviors deemed critical to flight crew interaction include briefings, communications, inquiry, assertion/advocacy, and decisions communicated and acknowledged. Data shows significant behavioral interaction differences as a function of aircraft type, indicating that crew size and technology level were at least partly driving that difference.

  4. Behavioral and neural interaction between spatial inhibition of return and the Simon effect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Fuentes, Luis J.; Vivas, Ana B.; Chen, Qi

    2013-01-01

    It has been well documented that the anatomically independent attention networks in the human brain interact functionally to achieve goal-directed behaviors. By combining spatial inhibition of return (IOR) which implicates the orienting network with some executive function tasks (e.g., the Stroop and the flanker tasks) which implicate the executive network, researchers consistently found that the interference effects are significantly reduced at cued compared to uncued locations, indicating the functional interaction between the two attention networks. However, a unique, but consistent effect is observed when spatial IOR is combined with the Simon effect: the Simon effect is significantly larger at the cued than uncued locations. To investigate the neural substrates underlying this phenomenon, we orthogonally combined the spatial IOR with the Simon effect in the present event-related fMRI study. Our behavioral data replicated previous results by showing larger Simon effect at the cued location. At the neural level, we found shared spatial representation system between spatial IOR and the Simon effect in bilateral posterior parietal cortex (PPC); spatial IOR specifically activated bilateral superior parietal cortex while the Simon effect specifically activated bilateral middle frontal cortex. Moreover, left precentral gyrus was involved in the neural interaction between spatial IOR and the Simon effect by showing significantly higher neural activity in the “Cued_Congruent” condition. Taken together, our results suggest that due to the shared spatial representation system in the PPC, responses were significantly facilitated when spatial IOR and the Simon effect relied on the same spatial representations, i.e., in the “Cued_Congruent” condition. Correspondingly, the sensorimotor system was significantly involved in the “Cued_Congruent” condition to fasten the responses, which indirectly resulted in the enhanced Simon effect at the cued location. PMID

  5. Hsp90 prevents interaction between CHIP and HERG proteins to facilitate maturation of wild-type and mutant HERG proteins.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Chisato; Li, Peili; Kurata, Yasutaka; Hoshikawa, Yoshiko; Morikawa, Kumi; Maharani, Nani; Higaki, Katsumi; Sasano, Tetsuro; Notsu, Tomomi; Ishido, Yuko; Miake, Junichiro; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Shirayoshi, Yasuaki; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Nakai, Akira; Murata, Shigeo; Yoshida, Akio; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Hiraoka, Masayasu; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2013-12-01

    We examined the role of Hsp90 in expression and maturation of wild-type (WT) and mutant ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) proteins by using Hsp90 inhibitors, geldanamycin (GA) and radicicol, and Hsp90 overexpression. The proteins were expressed in HEK293 cells or collected from HL-1 mouse cardiomyocytes, and analysed by western blotting, immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. GA and radicicol suppressed maturation of HERG-FLAG proteins and increased their immature forms. Co-expression of Hsp90 counteracted the effects of Hsp90 inhibitors and suppressed ubiquitination of HERG proteins. Overexpressed Hsp90 also inhibited the binding of endogenous C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) to HERG-FLAG proteins. Hsp90-induced increase of functional HERG proteins was verified by their increased expression on the cell surface and enhanced HERG channel currents. CHIP overexpression decreased both mature and immature forms of HERG-FLAG proteins in cells treated with GA. Hsp90 facilitated maturation of endogenous ERG proteins, whereas CHIP decreased both forms of ERG proteins in HL-1 cells. Mutant HERG proteins harbouring disease-causing missense mutations were mainly in the immature form and had a higher binding capacity to CHIP than the WT; Hsp90 overexpression suppressed this association. Overexpressed Hsp90 increased the mature form of HERG(1122fs/147) proteins, reduced its ubiquitinated form, increased its immunoreactivity in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the plasma membrane, and increased the mutant-mediated membrane current. CHIP overexpression decreased the immature form of HERG(1122fs/147) proteins. Enhancement of HERG protein expression through Hsp90 inhibition of CHIP binding might be a novel therapeutic strategy for long QT syndrome 2 caused by trafficking abnormalities of HERG proteins.

  6. An Interactive Web Tool for Facilitating Shared Decision-Making in Dementia-Care Networks: A Field Study.

    PubMed

    Span, Marijke; Smits, Carolien; Jukema, Jan; Groen-van de Ven, Leontine; Janssen, Ruud; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Eefsting, Jan; Hettinga, Marike

    2015-01-01

    An interactive web tool has been developed for facilitating shared decision-making in dementia-care networks. The DecideGuide provides a chat function for easier communication between network members, a deciding together function for step-by-step decision-making, and an individual opinion function for eight dementia-related life domains. The aim of this study was to gain insight in the user friendliness of the DecideGuide, user acceptance and satisfaction, and participants' opinion of the DecideGuide for making decisions. A 5-month field study included four dementia-care networks (19 participants in total). The data derived from structured interviews, observations, and information that participants logged in the DecideGuide. Structured interviews took place at the start, middle, and end of the field study with people with dementia, informal caregivers, and case managers. Four observations of case managers' home visits focused on members' responses and use of the tool. (1) The user friendliness of the chat and individual opinion functions was adequate for case managers and most informal caregivers. Older participants, with or without dementia, had some difficulties using a tablet and the DecideGuide. The deciding together function does not yet provide adequate instructions for all. The user interface needs simplification. (2) User acceptance and satisfaction: everybody liked the chat's easy communication, handling difficult issues for discussion, and the option of individual opinions. (3) The DecideGuide helped participants structure their thoughts. They felt more involved and shared more information about daily issues than they had done previously. Participants found the DecideGuide valuable in decision-making. The chat function seems powerful in helping members engage with one another constructively. Such engagement is a prerequisite for making shared decisions. Regardless of participants' use of the tool, they saw the DecideGuide's added value.

  7. Barriers and Facilitators to Exercise Participation in People with Hip and/or Knee Osteoarthritis: Synthesis of the Literature Using Behavior Change Theory.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Fiona; Bennell, Kim L; French, Simon D; Nicolson, Philippa J A; Klaasman, Remco N; Holden, Melanie A; Atkins, Lou; Hinman, Rana S

    2016-05-01

    Exercise is recommended for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). Patient initiation of, and adherence to, exercise is key to the success of managing symptoms. This study aimed to (1) identify modifiable barriers and facilitators to participation in intentional exercise in hip and/or knee OA, and (2) synthesize findings using behavior change theory. A scoping review with systematic searches was conducted through March 2015. Two reviewers screened studies for eligibility. Barriers and facilitators were extracted and synthesized according to the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) by two independent reviewers. Twenty-three studies (total of 4633 participants) were included. The greatest number of unique barriers and facilitators mapped to the Environmental Context and Resources domain. Many barriers were related to Beliefs about Consequences and Beliefs about Capabilities, whereas many facilitators were related to Reinforcement. Clinicians should take a proactive role in facilitating exercise uptake and adherence, rather than trusting patients to independently overcome barriers to exercise. Strategies that may be useful include a personalized approach to exercise prescription, considering environmental context and available resources, personalized education about beneficial consequences of exercise and reassurance about exercise capability, and use of reinforcement strategies. Future research should investigate the effectiveness of behavior change interventions that specifically target these factors.

  8. Barriers, facilitators, and benefits of implementation of dialectical behavior therapy in routine care: results from a national program evaluation survey in the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Landes, Sara J; Rodriguez, Allison L; Smith, Brandy N; Matthieu, Monica M; Trent, Lindsay R; Kemp, Janet; Thompson, Caitlin

    2017-02-06

    National implementation of evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides important lessons on the barriers and facilitators to implementation in a large healthcare system. Little is known about barriers and facilitators to the implementation of a complex EBP for emotional and behavioral dysregulation-dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT). The purpose of this study was to understand VHA clinicians' experiences with barriers, facilitators, and benefits from implementing DBT into routine care. This national program evaluation survey measured site characteristics of VHA sites (N = 59) that had implemented DBT. DBT was most often implemented in general mental health outpatient clinics. While 42% of sites offered all four modes of DBT, skills group was the most frequently implemented mode. Fifty-nine percent of sites offered phone coaching in any form, yet only 11% of those offered it all the time. Providers were often provided little to no time to support implementation of DBT. Barriers that were difficult to overcome were related to phone coaching outside of business hours. Facilitators to implementation included staff interest and expertise. Perceived benefits included increased hope and functioning for clients, greater self-efficacy and compassion for providers, and ability to treat unique symptoms for clinics. There was considerable variability in the capacity to address implementation barriers among sites implementing DBT in VHA routine care. Mental health policy makers should note the barriers and facilitators reported here, with specific attention to phone coaching barriers.

  9. Taurine and ethanol interactions: behavioral effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Brett C.; Lamb, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Taurine is an abundant amino acid in the brain that shares pharmacological effects and similar potency with ethanol. Recently, taurine-containing beverages have been reported to enhance the euphoric effects of ethanol, though the extent of this effect and the role of taurine remain speculative. The present study was designed to explore interactions between taurine and ethanol on several behaviors including locomotion, ataxia, and loss of righting. Two strains of mice, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice, were used to examine potential strain differences. In the first experiment, effects of various doses of taurine (0.3–3.0 g/kg), ethanol (1.0–4.2 g/kg), or taurine in combination with ethanol were assessed in a within-subjects design. Although taurine did not appear to alter effects of ethanol on any measure in either strain, the development of tolerance to locomotor effects and sensitization to ataxic effects of ethanol in DBA/2J mice complicated interpretation of these results. In a second experiment, drug-naïve mice were assigned to one of four treatment groups: saline + saline, saline + ethanol (1.78 g/kg), taurine (1.78 g/kg) + saline, or ethanol + taurine. In this experiment, taurine pretreatment significantly attenuated the locomotor-stimulating effect of ethanol in both strains (but to a greater extent in C57BL/6J mice) and appeared to reduce the ataxic effects of ethanol in C57BL/6J mice. In conclusion, the interaction between taurine and ethanol is subtle. Further, results are inconsistent with the notion that taurine plays a major role in the locomotor, ataxic, or loss of righting effects of ethanol. PMID:17961547

  10. Social interaction with a cagemate in pain facilitates subsequent spinal nociception via activation of the medial prefrontal cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Lu, Yun-Fei; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Yan; Sun, Wei; He, Ting; Chen, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Chen, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Empathy for the pain experience of others can lead to the activation of pain-related brain areas and can even induce aberrant responses to pain in human observers. Recent evidence shows this high-level emotional and cognitive process also exists in lower animals; however, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unknown. In the present study we found that, after social interaction with a rat that had received subcutaneous injection of bee venom (BV), only the cagemate observer (CO) but not the noncagemate observer (NCO) showed bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity and an enhanced paw flinch reflex following BV injection. Moreover, neuronal activities labeled by c-Fos immunoreactivity in the spinal dorsal horn of CO rats were also significantly increased relative to the control 1 hour after BV injection. A stress-related response can be excluded because serum corticosterone concentration following social interaction with demonstrator rats in pain was not changed in CO rats relative to NCO and isolated control rats. Anxiety can also be excluded because anxiety-like behaviors could be seen in both the CO and NCO rats tested in the open-field test. Finally, bilateral lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex eliminated the enhancement of the BV-induced paw flinch reflex in CO rats, but bilateral lesions of either the amygdala or the entorhinal cortex failed. Together, we have provided another line of evidence for the existence of familiarity-dependent empathy for pain in rats and have demonstrated that the medial prefrontal cortex plays a critical role in processing the empathy-related enhancement of spinal nociception.

  11. Emotional valence and context of social influences on drug abuse-related behavior in animal models of social stress and prosocial interaction

    PubMed Central

    Neisewander, J.L.; Peartree, N.A.; Pentkowski, N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Social factors are important determinants of drug dependence and relapse. Objectives We reviewed preclinical literature examining the role of social experiences from early life through the development of drug dependence and relapse, emphasizing two aspects of these experiences: 1) whether the social interaction is appetitive or aversive and 2) whether the social interaction occurs within or outside of the drug-taking context. Methods The models reviewed include neonatal care, isolation, social defeat, chronic subordination, and prosocial interactions. We review results from these models in regard to effects on self-administration and conditioned place preference established with alcohol, psychostimulants, and opiates. Results We suggest that in general, when the interactions occur outside of the drug-taking context, prosocial interactions are protective against drug abuse-related behaviors whereas social stressors facilitate these behaviors. By contrast, positive or negative social interactions occurring within the drug-taking context may interact with other risk factors to enhance or inhibit these behaviors. Conclusions Despite differences in the nature and complexity of human social behavior compared to other species, the evolving animal literature provides useful models for understanding social influences on drug abuse-related behavior that will allow for research on the behavioral and biological mechanisms involved. The models have contributed to understanding social influences on initiation and maintenance of drug use, but more research is needed to understand social influences on drug relapse. PMID:22955569

  12. Collective behavior of interacting locally synchronized oscillations in neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalili, Mahdi

    2012-10-01

    Local circuits in the cortex and hippocampus are endowed with resonant, oscillatory firing properties which underlie oscillations in various frequency ranges (e.g. gamma range) frequently observed in the local field potentials, and in electroencephalography. Synchronized oscillations are thought to play important roles in information binding in the brain. This paper addresses the collective behavior of interacting locally synchronized oscillations in realistic neural networks. A network of five neurons is proposed in order to produce locally synchronized oscillations. The neuron models are Hindmarsh-Rose type with electrical and/or chemical couplings. We construct large-scale models using networks of such units which capture the essential features of the dynamics of cells and their connectivity patterns. The profile of the spike synchronization is then investigated considering different model parameters such as strength and ratio of excitatory/inhibitory connections. We also show that transmission time-delay might enhance the spike synchrony. The influence of spike-timing-dependence-plasticity is also studies on the spike synchronization.

  13. Human motion behavior while interacting with an industrial robot.

    PubMed

    Bortot, Dino; Ding, Hao; Antonopolous, Alexandros; Bengler, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Human workers and industrial robots both have specific strengths within industrial production. Advantageously they complement each other perfectly, which leads to the development of human-robot interaction (HRI) applications. Bringing humans and robots together in the same workspace may lead to potential collisions. The avoidance of such is a central safety requirement. It can be realized with sundry sensor systems, all of them decelerating the robot when the distance to the human decreases alarmingly and applying the emergency stop, when the distance becomes too small. As a consequence, the efficiency of the overall systems suffers, because the robot has high idle times. Optimized path planning algorithms have to be developed to avoid that. The following study investigates human motion behavior in the proximity of an industrial robot. Three different kinds of encounters between the two entities under three robot speed levels are prompted. A motion tracking system is used to capture the motions. Results show, that humans keep an average distance of about 0,5m to the robot, when the encounter occurs. Approximation of the workbenches is influenced by the robot in ten of 15 cases. Furthermore, an increase of participants' walking velocity with higher robot velocities is observed.

  14. Behavioral interactions of penned red and arctic foxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudzinski, D.R.; Graves, H.B.; Sargeant, A.B.; Storm, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Expansion of the geographical distribution of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) into the far north tundra region may lead to competition between arctic (Alopex lagopus) and red foxes for space and resources. Behavioral interactions between red and arctic foxes were evaluated during 9 trials conducted in a 4.05-ha enclosure near Woodworth, North Dakota. Each trial consisted of introducing a male-female pair of arctic foxes into the enclosure and allowing them to acclimate for approximately a week before releasing a female red fox into the enclosure, followed by her mate a few days later. In 8 of 9 trials, red foxes were dominant over arctic foxes during encounters. Activity of the arctic foxes decreased upon addition of red foxes. Arctic foxes tried unsuccessfully to defend preferred den, resting, and feeding areas. Even though the outcome of competition between red and arctic foxes in the Arctic is uncertain, the more aggressive red fox can dominate arctic foxes in direct competition for den sites and other limited resources.

  15. Opioid-dopamine interaction in planaria: a behavioral study.

    PubMed

    Passarelli, F; Merante, A; Pontieri, F E; Margotta, V; Venturini, G; Palladini, G

    1999-09-01

    The behavioral response of planaria to the exposure to selective opioid agonists was studied. The mu agonist [d-ala2, N-methyl-Phe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) and the 6 agonist [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE) failed to alter motor activity at all doses tested. Low doses of the selective kappa agonist (+/-)-trans-U-50-trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N[2-(1-pyrrodinyl)-cyclohexyl]benzene acetamide methasulphonate (U50, 488) and bremazocine-HCl increased motor activity leading to C-like position (CLP) and screw-like hyperkinesia (SLH). These changes were identical to those seen previously with the exposure to D2 or D1 dopamine receptor agonists, respectively. Higher doses of kappa agonists produced the enhancement of CLP and SLH together with robust snake-like movements (SLM). This latter response, that was typical of stimulation of kappa opioid receptors, was blocked by co-exposure to naloxone or the selective kappa antagonist Nor-binaltorphimine (Nor-BNI). Finally, co-exposure to sulpiride or SH-23390 respectively blocked the CLP or SLH response produced by U50,488 or bremazocine. Our data indicate the presence of kappa opioid receptors in planaria and suggest the functional interaction between the opioid and dopamine system in this simple animal model.

  16. Measuring Staff Behavior towards Clients with ID and Challenging Behavior: Further Psychometric Evaluation of the Staff-Client Interactive Behavior Inventory (SCIBI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willems, Arno P. A. M.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Hendriks, Lex H. C.; Bosman, Anna M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the Staff-Client Interactive Behavior Inventory (SCIBI) was developed, measuring both interpersonal and intrapersonal staff behavior in response to challenging behavior in clients with ID. The aim of the two studies presented here was first to confirm the factor structure and internal consistency of the SCIBI and second to demonstrate…

  17. Pleasurable Behavior in Marital Interaction: An Observational Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Elizabeth A.; Price, M. Gail

    1980-01-01

    All couples demonstrated parity in pleasurable behavior exchange rates. High-adjustment couples reported increased marital happiness following self-monitoring of pleasurable events. Low-adjustment spouses underestimated pleasurable behavior rates by approximately 50%. (Author)

  18. Preschool children's observed disruptive behavior: variations across sex, interactional context, and disruptive psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Gray, Sarah A O; Carter, Alice S; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in disruptive behavior and sensitivity to social context are documented, but the intersection between them is rarely examined empirically. This report focuses on sex differences in observed disruptive behavior across interactional contexts and diagnostic status. Preschoolers (n = 327) were classified as nondisruptive (51%), clinically at risk (26%), and disruptive (23%) using parent and teacher reports on developmentally validated measures of disruptive behavior and impairment. Observed disruptive behavior was measured with the Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule, a developmentally sensitive observational paradigm characterizing variation in preschoolers' disruptive behavior across two interactional contexts (parent and examiner). Repeated measures analyses of variance revealed a three-way interaction of child sex by diagnostic status by interactional context (F = 9.81, p < .001). Disruptive boys were the only subgroup whose behavior was not sensitive to interactional context: They displayed comparable levels of disruptive behavior with parents and examiners. In contrast, disruptive girls demonstrated the strongest context effect of any group. Specifically, with the examiner, disruptive girls' behavior was comparable to nondisruptive boys (though still more elevated than nondisruptive girls). However, in interactions with their mothers, disruptive girls displayed the highest rates of disruptive behavior of any subgroup in any context, although the difference between disruptive boys and disruptive girls in this context was not statistically significant. Findings suggest the importance of sex-specific conceptualizations of disruptive behavior in young children that take patterns across social contexts into account.

  19. Using Structural Analysis To Facilitate Treatment of Aggression and Noncompliance in a Young Child At-Risk for Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Blair, Kwang-Sun

    1997-01-01

    A study examined the use of structural analysis as part of an assessment-based intervention of a 4-year-old boy whose noncompliance and aggressive behavior put him at risk for behavioral disorders and expulsion from his childcare center. The intervention was found to reduce immediately the noncompliance and aggressive behavior. (Author/CR)

  20. Facilitation of sexual behavior in French-Alpine goats treated with intravaginal progesterone-releasing devices and estradiol during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons.

    PubMed

    Billings, H J; Katz, L S

    1999-08-01

    The effectiveness of administering progesterone (P4) using controlled intravaginal drug release (CIDR) devices on estradiol (E2)-induced sexual behaviors was examined in ovariectomized (ovx) French-Alpine goats during the fall and spring. Estradiol-induced attractivity and receptivity were facilitated during the spring when P4-filled CIDR devices were removed 24 or 48 h before injection of 30 microg of E2. During the fall, attractivity was also facilitated by CIDR removal 24 h prior to E2 injection, whereas E2-induced receptivity was unaffected by removal of the CIDR at this interval. Concentrations of P4 in circulation during the 3 d of treatment with a CIDR were similar to those during the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle in intact goats. Treatment with P4-filled CIDR for 3 d, followed by injection with 30 microg of E2 24 h after removal, was determined to be a useful model for inducing sexual behavior in a physiologically relevant manner, and it may also be an effective means for facilitating estrus detection due to the high frequency of display of sexual behavior during a predictable time period following steroid treatment.

  1. Observation of interactive behavior increases corticospinal excitability in humans: A transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Mori, Hirotaka; Kushiro, Keisuke; Uehara, Shintaro

    2015-11-01

    In humans, observation of others' behaviors increases corticospinal excitability (CSE), which is interpreted in the contexts of motor resonance and the "mirror neuron system" (MNS). It has been suggested that observation of another individual's behavior manifests an embodied simulation of his/her mental state through the MNS. Thus, the MNS may involve understanding others' intentions of behaviors, thoughts, and emotions (i.e., social cognition), and may therefore exhibit a greater response when observing human-interactive behaviors that require a more varied and complex understanding of others. In the present study, transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied to the primary motor cortex of participants observing human-interactive behaviors between two individuals (c.f. one person reaching toward an object in another person's hand) and non-interactive individual behavior (c.f. one person reaching toward an object on a dish). We carefully controlled the kinematics of behaviors in these two conditions to exclude potential effects of MNS activity changes associated with kinematic differences between visual stimuli. Notably, motor evoked potentials, that reflect CSE, from the first dorsal interosseous muscle exhibited greater amplitude when the participants observed interactive behaviors than when they observed non-interactive behavior. These results provide neurophysiological evidence that the MNS is activated to a greater degree during observation of human-interactive behaviors that contain additional information about the individuals' mental states, supporting the view that the MNS plays a critical role in social cognition in humans.

  2. An interaction-embedded HMM framework for human behavior understanding: with nursing environments as examples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chin-De; Chung, Yi-Nung; Julia Chung, Pau-Choo

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents an interaction-embedded hidden Markov model (IE-HMM) framework for automatically detecting and classifying individual human behaviors and group interactions. The proposed framework comprises a switch control (SC) module, an individual duration HMM (IDHMM) module, and an interaction-coupled duration HMM (ICDHMM) module. By analyzing the relative distances between the various participants in each scene, and monitoring the duration for which these distances are maintained, the SC module assigns each participant to an individual behavior unit (comprising a single participant) or an interaction behavior unit (comprising two or more participants). The individual behavior units are passed to the IDHMM module, which classifies the corresponding human behavior in accordance with the pose, motion, and duration information using duration HMM (DHMM). Similarly, the interaction behavior units are dispatched to the ICDHMM module, where the corresponding interaction mode is classified using an integrated scheme comprising multiple coupled-duration HMM (CDHMM), in which each state has an embedded coupled HMM (CHMM). The validity of the IE-HMM framework is confirmed by analyzing the human actions and interactions observed in a nursing home environment. The results confirm that the atomic behavior unit concept embedded in the SC module enables the IE-HMM framework to recognize multiple concurrent actions and interactions within a single scene. Overall, it is shown that the proposed framework has a recognition performance of 100% when applied to the analysis of individual human actions and 95% when applied to that of group interactions.

  3. Small Groups in Programmed Environments: Behavioral and Biological Interactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    H.H., Emurian, C.S., and Brady, J.V. Effects of a pairing contingency on behavior in a three-person programmed environment. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior , 1978...person environment. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior , 1976, 25(3), 293-302. Emurian, H.H., Brady, J.V., Ray, R.L., Meyerhoff, J.L., and

  4. Evaluating the effects of pollinator-mediated interactions using pollen transfer networks: evidence of widespread facilitation in south Andean plant communities.

    PubMed

    Tur, C; Sáez, A; Traveset, A; Aizen, M A

    2016-05-01

    Information about the relative importance of competitive or facilitative pollinator-mediated interactions in a multi-species context is limited. We studied interspecific pollen transfer (IPT) networks to evaluate quantity and quality effects of pollinator sharing among plant species on three high-Andean communities at 1600, 1800 and 2000 m a.s.l. To estimate the sign of the effects (positive, neutral or negative), the relation between conspecific and heterospecific pollen deposited on stigmas was analysed with GLMMs. Network analyses showed that communities were characterised by the presence of pollen hub-donors and receptors. We inferred that facilitative and neutral pollinator-mediated interactions among plants prevailed over competition. Thus, the benefits from pollinator sharing seem to outweigh the costs (i.e. heterospecific deposition and conspecific pollen loss). The largest proportion of facilitated species was found at the highest elevation community, suggesting that under unfavourable conditions for the pollination service and at lower plant densities facilitation can be more common.

  5. Evaluating Treatments for Functionally Equivalent Problem Behavior Maintained by Adult Compliance with Mands during Interactive Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Jonathan D.; Bednar, Mary K.; Willse, Lena V.; Goetzel, Amanda L.; Concepcion, Anthony; Pincus, Shari M.; Hardesty, Samantha L.; Bowman, Lynn G.

    2017-01-01

    A primary goal of behavioral interventions is to reduce dangerous or inappropriate behavior and to generalize treatment effects across various settings. However, there is a lack of research evaluating generalization of treatment effects while individuals with functionally equivalent problem behavior interact with each other. For the current study,…

  6. Parental Behaviors during Family Interactions Predict Changes in Depression and Anxiety Symptoms during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Orli S.; Dudgeon, Paul; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Yap, Marie B. H.; Simmons, Julian G.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective, longitudinal relations between parental behaviors observed during parent-adolescent interactions, and the development of depression and anxiety symptoms in a community-based sample of 194 adolescents. Positive and negative parental behaviors were examined, with negative behaviors operationalized to…

  7. Parental Behaviors during Family Interactions Predict Changes in Depression and Anxiety Symptoms during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Orli S.; Dudgeon, Paul; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Yap, Marie B. H.; Simmons, Julian G.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective, longitudinal relations between parental behaviors observed during parent-adolescent interactions, and the development of depression and anxiety symptoms in a community-based sample of 194 adolescents. Positive and negative parental behaviors were examined, with negative behaviors operationalized to…

  8. Incorporating Collaborative, Interactive Experiences into a Technology-Facilitated Professional Learning Network for Pre-Service Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Seamus; Redman, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the utilisation of a technology-facilitated professional learning network (PLN) for pre-service teachers, centred on chemical demonstrations. The network provided direct experiences designed to extend their pedagogical content knowledge on demonstrations in Chemistry teaching. It provided scaffolded opportunities to…

  9. How Do Principals' Behaviors Facilitate or Inhibit the Development of a Culturally Relevant Learning Community?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Gwendolyn Julia

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the question: "How do principals facilitate or inhibit the development of a culturally responsive learning environment?" A second question asked, "What is the principal's role in developing a culturally relevant learning community?" The criteria for purposely…

  10. Oh, Behave! Behavior as an Interaction between Genes & the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigel, Emily G.; DeNieu, Michael; Gall, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    This lesson is designed to teach students that behavior is a trait shaped by both genes and the environment. Students will read a scientific paper, discuss and generate predictions based on the ideas and data therein, and model the relationships between genes, the environment, and behavior. The lesson is targeted to meet the educational goals of…

  11. Behavior State Matching during Interactions of Preadolescent Friends versus Acquaintances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Studied pairs of preadolescents who were close friends and pairs who were acquaintances. Coherence in friends' behavior states and in acquaintances' vocal activity suggested that friends more often shared the same behavior state and acquaintances more often paid attention to turn-taking signals. (GLR)

  12. Oh, Behave! Behavior as an Interaction between Genes & the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigel, Emily G.; DeNieu, Michael; Gall, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    This lesson is designed to teach students that behavior is a trait shaped by both genes and the environment. Students will read a scientific paper, discuss and generate predictions based on the ideas and data therein, and model the relationships between genes, the environment, and behavior. The lesson is targeted to meet the educational goals of…

  13. Theory of Gas Injection: Interaction of Phase Behavior and Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindoruk, B.

    2015-12-01

    The theory of gas injection processes is a central element required to understand how components move and partition in the reservoir as one fluid is displacing another (i.e., gas is displacing oil). There is significant amount of work done in the area of interaction of phase-behavior and flow in multiphase flow conditions. We would like to present how the theory of gas injection is used in the industry to understand/design reservoir processes in various ways. The tools that are developed for the theory of gas injection originates from the fractional flow theory, as the first solution proposed by Buckley-Leveret in 1940's, for water displacing oil in porous media. After 1960's more and more complex/coupled equations were solved using the initial concept(s) developed by Buckley-Leverett, and then Welge et al. and others. However, the systematic use of the fractional flow theory for coupled set of equations that involves phase relationships (EOS) and phase appearance and disappearance was mainly due to the theory developed by Helfferich in early 80's (in petroleum literature) using method of characteristics primarily for gas injection process and later on by the systematic work done by Orr and his co-researchers during the last two decades. In this talk, we will present various cases that use and extend the theory developed by Helfferich and others (Orr et al., Lake et al. etc.). The review of various injection systems reveals that displacement in porous media has commonalities that can be represented with a unified theory for a class of problems originating from the theory of gas injection (which is in a way generalized Buckley-Leverett problem). The outcome of these solutions can be used for (and are not limited to): 1) Benchmark solutions for reservoir simulators (to quantify numerical dispersion, test numerical algorithms) 2) Streamline simulators 3) Design of laboratory experiments and their use (to invert the results) 4) Conceptual learning and to investigate

  14. Aspects of elephant behavior, ecology, and interactions with humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Caitlin Elizabeth

    This dissertation is comprised of two chapters relating to the acoustic behavior of elephants, their surrounding ecology and interactions with humans. The first chapter investigates the seismic aspects of Asian elephant (Elephus maximus) acoustic communication. The second chapter is comprised of a synthesis of two separate studies conducted on the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) in Namibia, both in Etosha National Park and the Caprivi region. The two studies were combined and published in Biological Conservation as one large study on aspects of the economic and social impacts of elephant/human conflict and experiments conducted to reduce conflict. In chapter one, seismic and acoustic data were recorded simultaneously from Asian elephants during periods of vocalizations and locomotion. Acoustic and seismic signals from rumbles were highly correlated at near and far distances and were in phase near the elephant and were out of phase at an increased distance from the elephant. Data analyses indicated that elephant generated signals associated with rumbles and "foot stomps" propagated at different velocities in the two media, the acoustic signals traveling at 309 m/s and the seismic signals at 248--264 m/s. Both types of signals had predominant frequencies in the range of 20 Hz. Seismic signal amplitudes considerably above background noise were recorded at 40 m from the generating elephants for both the rumble and the stomp. Seismic propagation models suggest that seismic waveforms from vocalizations are potentially detectable by instruments at distances of up to 16 km, and up to 32 km for locomotion generated signals. Thus, if detectable by elephants, these seismic signals could be useful for long distance communication. In chapter two, the economic impact of elephants, Loxodonta africana , and predators, particularly lions, Panthera leo, on rural agriculturists in the Kwando region of the East Caprivi, Namibia was assessed from the years 1991 to 1995. Elephants

  15. MATERNAL MENTAL HEALTH MODERATES THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN OXYTOCIN AND INTERACTIVE BEHAVIOR.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Simcha; Hayton, Barbara; Gold, Ian; Feeley, Nancy; Carter, C Sue; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    2015-01-01

    Mothers with mood or anxiety disorders exhibit less optimal interactive behavior. The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has been linked to more optimal interactive behaviors in mothers without mental illness, and it may play a particularly beneficial role in mothers with mood or anxiety disorders given its antidepressant and anxiolytic functions. We compared the relationship between OT and interactive behavior in mothers with and without mental health problems. Participants included 20 women diagnosed with postpartum mood or anxiety disorders (clinical sample) and 90 women with low levels of depression and anxiety during pregnancy and postpartum (community sample). At 2 months' postpartum, blood was drawn to assess maternal OT levels, and mother-infant interaction was coded for maternal sensitivity, intrusiveness, remoteness, and depressiveness. Clinical mothers exhibited less sensitive, more intrusive, and more depressive interactive behaviors than did community mothers. The groups did not differ in OT levels. Mothers with higher OT levels were less intrusive with their infants. Higher OT levels were associated with less depressive interactive behavior only in clinical mothers. OT was associated with positive interactive behaviors in both groups. In clinical mothers, the calming and soothing effects of OT may promote more relaxed, energetic, and infant-focused interactive behaviors.

  16. The importance of genotype-by-age interactions for the development of repeatable behavior and correlated behaviors over lifetime

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Behaviors are highly plastic and one aspect of this plasticity is behavioral changes over age. The presence of age-related plasticity in behavior opens up the possibility of between-individual variation in age-related plasticity (Individual-Age interaction, IxA) and genotype-age interaction (GxA). We outline the available approaches for quantifying GxA. We underline that knowledge of GxA for behaviors is an important step in reaching and understanding of the evolution of plasticity in behavior over lifetime. In particular, the heritability (repeatability) and/or the rank order of behavior across individuals are predicted to change across ages in presence of GxA. We draw on the theory of reaction norms to illustrate that GxA, when present, is likely to lead to developmental changes in the magnitude and possibly sign of the genetic correlation between behaviors (behavioral syndrome). We present an overview of the literature on changes in the ranking of individuals’ behavior across ages, and in the correlation between behaviors. Although all studies were carried out on the phenotypic level, they overall suggest clear scope for increased study of GxA as a process explaining age-related plasticity in behaviors. Lastly, we throughout emphasize that many of the approaches and underlying theory of GxA is applicable to the study of IxA, which is informative as it presents the upper limit of GxA, but is also a more attainable target of study in many systems. Empirical work aimed at understanding IxA and GxA in behavior is needed in order to understand whether patterns predicted by theory on plasticity indeed occur for age-related plasticity of behavior. PMID:26816518

  17. Performance in intercultural interactions at work: cross-cultural differences in response to behavioral mirroring.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Burks, Jeffrey; Bartel, Caroline A; Blount, Sally

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how performance in intercultural workplace interactions can be compromised even in the absence of overt prejudice. The authors show that individuals respond differently to nonverbal behavioral mirroring cues exhibited in workplace interactions, depending on their cultural group membership. In a field study with experienced managers, U.S. Anglos and U.S. Latinos interacted with a confederate who, unbeknownst to the participant, engaged (or not) in behavioral mirroring. Results show that the level of the confederate's mirroring differentially affected Latinos' state anxiety, but not Anglos' state anxiety, as well as actual performance in the interaction. Two additional laboratory experiments provide further evidence of the interactive relationship of behavioral mirroring and cultural group membership on evaluations of workplace interactions. Implications for intercultural interactions and research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. On their best behavior: how animal behavior can help determine the combined effects of species interactions and climate change.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Jason P; Barton, Brandon T

    2013-09-01

    The increasingly appreciated link between climate change and species interactions has the potential to help us understand and predict how organisms respond to a changing environment. As this connection grows, it becomes even more important to appreciate the mechanisms that create and control the combined effect of these factors. However, we believe one such important set of mechanisms comes from species' behavior and the subsequent trait-mediated interactions, as opposed to the more often studied density-mediated effects. Behavioral mechanisms are already well appreciated for mitigating the separate effects of the environment and species interactions. Thus, they could be at the forefront for understanding the combined effects. In this review, we (1) show some of the known behaviors that influence the individual and combined effects of climate change and species interactions; (2) conceptualize general ways behavior may mediate these combined effects; and (3) illustrate the potential importance of including behavior in our current tools for predicting climate change effects. In doing so, we hope to promote more research on behavior and other mechanistic factors that may increase our ability to accurately predict climate change effects. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. The role of oxytocin in mothers' theory of mind and interactive behavior during the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Anna L; Gold, Ian; Feeley, Nancy; Hayton, Barbara; Carter, C Sue; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    2014-10-01

    The present longitudinal study examined the relations between plasma oxytocin, theory of mind, and maternal interactive behavior during the perinatal period. A community sample of women was assessed at 12-14 weeks gestation, 32-34 weeks gestation, and 7-9 weeks postpartum. Oxytocin during late pregnancy was significantly positively correlated with a measure of theory of mind, and predicted theory of mind ability after controlling for parity, maternal education, prenatal psychosocial risk, and general anxiety, measured during the first trimester. Theory of mind was associated with less remote and less depressive maternal interactive behavior. Oxytocin, across all time points, was not directly related to maternal interactive behavior. However, there was a significant indirect effect of oxytocin during late pregnancy on depressive maternal behavior via theory of mind ability. These preliminary findings suggest that changes in the oxytocinergic system during the perinatal period may contribute to the awareness of social cues, which in turn plays a role in maternal interactive behavior.

  20. Action-potential duration and the modulation of transmitter release from the sensory neurons of Aplysia in presynaptic facilitation and behavioral sensitization.

    PubMed

    Hochner, B; Klein, M; Schacher, S; Kandel, E R

    1986-11-01

    Presynaptic facilitation of transmitter release from Aplysia sensory neurons is an important contributor to behavioral sensitization of the gill and siphon withdrawal reflex. The enhanced release is accompanied by reduction of the serotonin-sensitive S current in the sensory neurons and a consequent increase in duration of the presynaptic action potential (ranging from 10% to 30%). We find that changes of similar magnitude in the duration of depolarizing voltage-clamp steps in sensory neurons in intact abdominal ganglia yield increases in synaptic potentials of 45-120%. In dissociated cell culture, these changes lead to increases of 25-60% in the synaptic potential. Prolongation of presynaptic depolarization using voltage clamp or prolongation of the duration of the action potential by K(+)-channel blockers leads to prolongation of the time-to-peak of the synaptic potentials; similar changes in time-to-peak occur during presynaptic facilitation. The time-to-peak is not changed by homosynaptic depression or by changing the Ca(2+) concentration, procedures that alter release without changing the duration of the action potential. Preventing the spike from broadening by voltage clamping the presynaptic neuron substantially reduces or blocks the facilitation. These results suggest that broadening of the action potential during facilitation is a causal factor in the enhancement of transmitter release.

  1. "What Should I Draw? I'll Draw You!": Facilitating Interaction and Learning Opportunities in Intergenerational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heydon, Rachel; Daly, Bridget

    2008-01-01

    Intergenerational (IG) programming creates a means for meaningful and relevant experiences and interactions between participants. Focusing on child participants and art programming, this article describes an accordion book project. Vignettes highlight some of the project's learning opportunities and interactions for elders and young children.

  2. "What Should I Draw? I'll Draw You!": Facilitating Interaction and Learning Opportunities in Intergenerational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heydon, Rachel; Daly, Bridget

    2008-01-01

    Intergenerational (IG) programming creates a means for meaningful and relevant experiences and interactions between participants. Focusing on child participants and art programming, this article describes an accordion book project. Vignettes highlight some of the project's learning opportunities and interactions for elders and young children.

  3. A Cognitive Model of How Interactive Multimedia Authoring Facilitates Conceptual Understanding of Object-Oriented Programming in Novices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuen, Timothy; Liu, Min

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of how interactive multimedia authoring (IMA) affect novices' cognition in object-oriented programming. This model was generated through an empirical study of first year computer science students at the university level being engaged in interactive multimedia authoring of a role-playing game. Clinical…

  4. A Cognitive Model of How Interactive Multimedia Authoring Facilitates Conceptual Understanding of Object-Oriented Programming in Novices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuen, Timothy; Liu, Min

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of how interactive multimedia authoring (IMA) affect novices' cognition in object-oriented programming. This model was generated through an empirical study of first year computer science students at the university level being engaged in interactive multimedia authoring of a role-playing game. Clinical…

  5. A Technical Assistance Framework to Facilitate the Delivery of Integrated Behavioral Health Services in Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs).

    PubMed

    Chaple, Michael; Sacks, Stanley; Randell, Joan; Kang, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    An implementation approach, featuring direct, onsite technical assistance is described, and findings from a pilot study assessing the capability of Federally Qualified Health Centers to provide integrated behavioral health services are presented. Investigators used the Behavioral Health Integration in Medical Care (BHIMC) index to measure integration at baseline and follow-up at four FQHCs in New Jersey. Results indicate that the average baseline capability score of 1.95 increased to 2.44 at follow-up, almost one-half point on the five-point BHIMC index. This pilot project demonstrates that co-occurring capability can be assessed, and system-wide technical assistance can be delivered to assist FQHCs in integrating behavioral health services. Future research should test technical assistance as an implementation strategy to promote the integration of medical care and behavioral health treatment on a wider scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Jekyll and Hyde of emotional intelligence: emotion-regulation knowledge facilitates both prosocial and interpersonally deviant behavior.

    PubMed

    Côté, Stéphane; Decelles, Katherine A; McCarthy, Julie M; Van Kleef, Gerben A; Hideg, Ivona

    2011-08-01

    Does emotional intelligence promote behavior that strictly benefits the greater good, or can it also advance interpersonal deviance? In the investigation reported here, we tested the possibility that a core facet of emotional intelligence--emotion-regulation knowledge--can promote both prosocial and interpersonally deviant behavior. Drawing from research on how the effective regulation of emotion promotes goal achievement, we predicted that emotion-regulation knowledge would strengthen the effects of other-oriented and self-oriented personality traits on prosocial behavior and interpersonal deviance, respectively. Two studies supported our predictions. Among individuals with higher emotion-regulation knowledge, moral identity exhibited a stronger positive association with prosocial behavior in a social dilemma (Study 1), and Machiavellianism exhibited a stronger positive association with interpersonal deviance in the workplace (Study 2). Thus, emotion-regulation knowledge has a positive side and a dark side.

  7. Paternal Retrieval Behavior Regulated by Brain Estrogen Synthetase (Aromatase) in Mouse Sires that Engage in Communicative Interactions with Pairmates.

    PubMed

    Akther, Shirin; Huang, Zhiqi; Liang, Mingkun; Zhong, Jing; Fakhrul, Azam A K M; Yuhi, Teruko; Lopatina, Olga; Salmina, Alla B; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Higashida, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Matsuo, Mie; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Parental behaviors involve complex social recognition and memory processes and interactive behavior with children that can greatly facilitate healthy human family life. Fathers play a substantial role in child care in a small but significant number of mammals, including humans. However, the brain mechanism that controls male parental behavior is much less understood than that controlling female parental behavior. Fathers of non-monogamous laboratory ICR mice are an interesting model for examining the factors that influence paternal responsiveness because sires can exhibit maternal-like parental care (retrieval of pups) when separated from their pups along with their pairmates because of olfactory and auditory signals from the dams. Here we tested whether paternal behavior is related to femininity by the aromatization of testosterone. For this purpose, we measured the immunoreactivity of aromatase [cytochrome P450 family 19 (CYP19)], which synthesizes estrogen from androgen, in nine brain regions of the sire. We observed higher levels of aromatase expression in these areas of the sire brain when they engaged in communicative interactions with dams in separate cages. Interestingly, the number of nuclei with aromatase immunoreactivity in sires left together with maternal mates in the home cage after pup-removing was significantly larger than that in sires housed with a whole family. The capacity of sires to retrieve pups was increased following a period of 5 days spent with the pups as a whole family after parturition, whereas the acquisition of this ability was suppressed in sires treated daily with an aromatase inhibitor. The results demonstrate that the dam significantly stimulates aromatase in the male brain and that the presence of the pups has an inhibitory effect on this increase. These results also suggest that brain aromatization regulates the initiation, development, and maintenance of paternal behavior in the ICR male mice.

  8. Paternal Retrieval Behavior Regulated by Brain Estrogen Synthetase (Aromatase) in Mouse Sires that Engage in Communicative Interactions with Pairmates

    PubMed Central

    Akther, Shirin; Huang, Zhiqi; Liang, Mingkun; Zhong, Jing; Fakhrul, Azam A. K. M.; Yuhi, Teruko; Lopatina, Olga; Salmina, Alla B.; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Higashida, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Matsuo, Mie; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Parental behaviors involve complex social recognition and memory processes and interactive behavior with children that can greatly facilitate healthy human family life. Fathers play a substantial role in child care in a small but significant number of mammals, including humans. However, the brain mechanism that controls male parental behavior is much less understood than that controlling female parental behavior. Fathers of non-monogamous laboratory ICR mice are an interesting model for examining the factors that influence paternal responsiveness because sires can exhibit maternal-like parental care (retrieval of pups) when separated from their pups along with their pairmates because of olfactory and auditory signals from the dams. Here we tested whether paternal behavior is related to femininity by the aromatization of testosterone. For this purpose, we measured the immunoreactivity of aromatase [cytochrome P450 family 19 (CYP19)], which synthesizes estrogen from androgen, in nine brain regions of the sire. We observed higher levels of aromatase expression in these areas of the sire brain when they engaged in communicative interactions with dams in separate cages. Interestingly, the number of nuclei with aromatase immunoreactivity in sires left together with maternal mates in the home cage after pup-removing was significantly larger than that in sires housed with a whole family. The capacity of sires to retrieve pups was increased following a period of 5 days spent with the pups as a whole family after parturition, whereas the acquisition of this ability was suppressed in sires treated daily with an aromatase inhibitor. The results demonstrate that the dam significantly stimulates aromatase in the male brain and that the presence of the pups has an inhibitory effect on this increase. These results also suggest that brain aromatization regulates the initiation, development, and maintenance of paternal behavior in the ICR male mice. PMID:26696812

  9. Programmatic effects of a large-scale multiple-micronutrient supplementation trial in Indonesia: using community facilitators as intermediaries for behavior change.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Anita V; Asrilla, Zaitu; Kadha, Josephine K; Sebayang, Susy; Apriatni, Mandri; Sulastri, Ari; Sunarsih, Euis; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2009-06-01

    micronutrients (RR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.72; p = .8568). Systematic enhancements to the quality of implementation of SUMMIT led to significant increases in use of SBAs at delivery, resulting in a 30% reduction in early infant mortality independent of the impact of micronutrient supplementation. Therefore, if women were to consume multiple micronutrients on a regular basis and were to use a SBA at delivery, the risk of early infant mortality could be reduced by nearly 50%. The impacts of community facilitators in effecting changes in women's health behaviors are notable and are applicable to other health programs. Enhancements to program implementation should be driven by evidence, be accountable to the communities the program serves, and be evaluated on the basis of measurable gains in health for women and children.

  10. Neuroligin1 drives synaptic and behavioral maturation through intracellular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Jennifer L.; Haeger, Paola A.; Constable, John R. L.; Arias, Renee J.; McCallum, Raluca; Kyweriga, Michael; Davis, Lawrence; Schnell, Eric; Wehr, Michael; Castillo, Pablo E.; Washbourne, Philip

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies suggest that the intracellular C-terminus of Neuroligin1 (NL1) could play a central role in the maturation of excitatory synapses. However, it is unknown how this activity affects synapses in vivo, and whether it may impact the development of complex behaviors. To determine how NL1 influences the state of glutamatergic synapses in vivo, we compared the synaptic and behavioral phenotypes of mice overexpressing a full length version of NL1 (NL1FL) with mice overexpressing a version missing part of the intracellular domain (NL1ΔC). We show that overexpression of full length NL1 yielded an increase in the proportion of synapses with mature characteristics and impaired learning and flexibility. In contrast, the overexpression of NL1ΔC increased the number of excitatory postsynaptic structures and led to enhanced flexibility in mnemonic and social behaviors. Transient overexpression of NL1FL revealed that elevated levels are not necessary to maintain synaptic and behavioral states altered earlier in development. In contrast, overexpression of NL1FL in the fully mature adult was able to impair normal learning behavior after one month of expression. These results provide the first evidence that NL1 significantly impacts key developmental processes that permanently shape circuit function and behavior, as well as the function of fully developed neural circuits. Overall, these manipulations of NL1 function illuminate the significance of NL1 intracellular signaling in vivo, and enhance our understanding of the factors that gate the maturation of glutamatergic synapses and complex behavior. This has significant implications for our ability to address disorders such as ASD. PMID:23719805

  11. CHD3 facilitates vRNP nuclear export by interacting with NES1 of influenza A virus NS2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Liu, Xiaokun; Zhang, Anding; Zhou, Hongbo; Liu, Ziduo; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin

    2015-03-01

    NS2 from influenza A virus mediates Crm1-dependent vRNP nuclear export through interaction with Crm1. However, even though the nuclear export signal 1 (NES1) of NS2 does not play a requisite role in NS2-Crm1 interaction, there is no doubt that NES1 is crucial for vRNP nuclear export. While the mechanism of the NES1 is still unclear, it is speculated that certain host partners might mediate the NES1 function through their interaction with NES1. In the present study, chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 3 (CHD3) was identified as a novel host nuclear protein for locating NS2 and Crm1 on dense chromatin for NS2 and Crm1-dependent vRNP nuclear export. CHD3 was confirmed to interact with NES1 in NS2, and a disruption to this interaction by mutation in NES1 significantly delayed viral vRNPs export and viral propagation. Further, the knockdown of CHD3 would affect the propagation of the wild-type virus but not the mutant with the weakened NS2-CHD3 interaction. Therefore, this study demonstrates that NES1 is required for maximal binding of NS2 to CHD3, and that the NS2-CHD3 interaction on the dense chromatin contributed to the NS2-mediated vRNP nuclear export.

  12. Compliments and purchasing behavior in telephone sales interactions.

    PubMed

    Dunyon, Josh; Gossling, Valerie; Willden, Sarah; Seiter, John S

    2010-02-01

    A fitness equipment salesperson sold more add-on merchandise and earned a higher commission when complimenting customers (47 men, 41 women) than when not complimenting them during telephone interactions. Compliments did not increase the sales of fitness equipment, however.

  13. A behavioral biometric system based on human-computer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, Hugo; Fred, Ana

    2004-08-01

    In this paper we describe a new behavioural biometric technique based on human computer interaction. We developed a system that captures the user interaction via a pointing device, and uses this behavioural information to verify the identity of an individual. Using statistical pattern recognition techniques, we developed a sequential classifier that processes user interaction, according to which the user identity is considered genuine if a predefined accuracy level is achieved, and the user is classified as an impostor otherwise. Two statistical models for the features were tested, namely Parzen density estimation and a unimodal distribution. The system was tested with different numbers of users in order to evaluate the scalability of the proposal. Experimental results show that the normal user interaction with the computer via a pointing device entails behavioural information with discriminating power, that can be explored for identity authentication.

  14. A bromodomain–DNA interaction facilitates acetylation-dependent bivalent nucleosome recognition by the BET protein BRDT

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas C. R.; Simon, Bernd; Rybin, Vladimir; Grötsch, Helga; Curtet, Sandrine; Khochbin, Saadi; Carlomagno, Teresa; Müller, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Bromodomains are critical components of many chromatin modifying/remodelling proteins and are emerging therapeutic targets, yet how they interact with nucleosomes, rather than acetylated peptides, remains unclear. Using BRDT as a model, we characterized how the BET family of bromodomains interacts with site-specifically acetylated nucleosomes. Here we report that BRDT interacts with nucleosomes through its first (BD1), but not second (BD2) bromodomain, and that acetylated histone recognition by BD1 is complemented by a bromodomain–DNA interaction. Simultaneous DNA and histone recognition enhances BRDT's nucleosome binding affinity and specificity, and its ability to localize to acetylated chromatin in cells. Conservation of DNA binding in bromodomains of BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4, indicates that bivalent nucleosome recognition is a key feature of these bromodomains and possibly others. Our results elucidate the molecular mechanism of BRDT association with nucleosomes and identify structural features of the BET bromodomains that may be targeted for therapeutic inhibition. PMID:27991587

  15. Unpacking Links between Fathers' Antisocial Behaviors and Children's Behavior Problems: Direct, Indirect, and Interactive Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Rebekah Levine; Carrano, Jennifer; Lewin-Bizan, Selva

    2011-01-01

    Building upon previous evidence for the intergenerational transmission of antisocial behaviors, this research assessed and compared three models seeking to explain links between fathers' antisocial behaviors and children's behavior problems. A representative sample of children from low-income families (N = 261) was followed from age 3 through age…

  16. Unpacking Links between Fathers' Antisocial Behaviors and Children's Behavior Problems: Direct, Indirect, and Interactive Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Rebekah Levine; Carrano, Jennifer; Lewin-Bizan, Selva

    2011-01-01

    Building upon previous evidence for the intergenerational transmission of antisocial behaviors, this research assessed and compared three models seeking to explain links between fathers' antisocial behaviors and children's behavior problems. A representative sample of children from low-income families (N = 261) was followed from age 3 through age…

  17. Do empowerment strategies facilitate knowledge and behavioral change? The impact of family health advocacy on health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baffour, Tiffany D; Chonody, Jill M

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of a Family Health Advocacy (FHA) intervention on 46 African American women ages 13 to 35 living in a rural southern community. FHA utilizes empowerment strategies to provide education and social support to reduce risk factors for poor pregnancy outcomes. Use of a paired t test demonstrated a statistically significant difference between pretest and posttest scores in the acquisition of knowledge of safer sex practices, alcohol consumption, early prenatal care, maternal infection, and nutrition. Behavioral change was not realized in the areas of nutrition or behaviors that cause risk of maternal infection. Social workers can influence behavioral change for at-risk populations by addressing microlevel barriers such as education and resources and macrolevel barriers such as advocacy for expanded health and social services.

  18. Beetle (Coleoptera: Scirtidae) facilitation of larval mosquito growth in tree hole habitats is linked to multitrophic microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten; Kaufman, Michael G; Walker, Edward D

    2011-10-01

    Container-breeding mosquitoes, such as Aedes triseriatus, ingest biofilms and filter water column microorganisms directly to obtain the bulk of their nutrition. Scirtid beetles often co-occur with A. triseriatus and may facilitate the production of mosquito adults under low-resource conditions. Using molecular genetic techniques and quantitative assays, we observed changes in the dynamics and composition of bacterial and fungal communities present on leaf detritus and in the water column when scirtid beetles co-occur with A. triseriatus. Data from terminal restriction fragment polymorphism analysis indicated scirtid presence alters the structure of fungal communities in the water column but not leaf-associated fungal communities. Similar changes in leaf and water bacterial communities occurred in response to mosquito presence. In addition, we observed increased processing of leaf detritus, higher leaf-associated enzyme activity, higher bacterial productivity, and higher leaf-associated fungal biomass when scirtid beetles were present. Such shifts suggest beetle feeding facilitates mosquito production indirectly through the microbial community rather than directly through an increase in available fine particulate organic matter.

  19. Interactions between parasites of the cockle Austrovenus stutchburyi: hitch-hikers, resident-cleaners, and habitat-facilitators.

    PubMed

    Leung, T L F; Poulin, R

    2007-02-01

    The patterns of association between parasites within a particular host are determined by a number of factors. One of these factors is whether or not infection by one parasite influences the probability of acquiring other parasite species. This study investigates the pattern of association between various parasites of the New Zealand cockle Austrovenus stutchburyi. Hundreds of cockles were collected from one locality within Otago Harbour, New Zealand and examined for trematode metacercariae and other symbionts. Two interspecific associations emerged from the study. First, the presence of the myicolid copepod Pseudomyicola spinosus was positively associated with higher infection intensity by echinostomes. The side-effect of the copepod's activities within the cockle is suggested as the proximate mechanism that facilitates infection by echinostome cercariae, leading to a greater rate of accumulation of metacercariae in cockles harbouring the copepod. Second, a positive association was also found between infection intensity of the metacercariae of foot-encysting echinostomes and that of gymnophallid metacercariae. This supports earlier findings and suggests that the gymnophallid is a hitch-hiker parasite because, in addition to the pattern of positive association, it (a) shares the same transmission route as the echinostomes, and (b) unlike the echinostomes, it is not capable of increasing the host's susceptibility to avian predation. Thus, both active hitch-hiking and incidental facilitation lead to non-random infection patterns in this parasite community.

  20. Genetically-modified R-ω-transaminase: purification and self-assembly facilitating interaction with substrate droplets.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qian; Fu, Yaqi; Peng, Yixiao; Liu, Wei; Feng, Wei

    2016-03-01

    An easy-to-operate method of using R-ω-transaminase has been developed by fusing it to an elastin-like polypeptide and forming a complex with D-amino acid oxidase. R-ω-Transaminase (R-ω-TA) was fused to an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) through genetic engineering of the enzyme. The enzyme was purified through reversible phase transition. For the single-enzyme system, in the reaction media, ELP-R-ω-TA self-assembled and formed enzyme clusters of micrometer size, and the substrate, (R)-1-phenylethylamine, also formed droplets of micrometer size. Intimate contact of the enzyme clusters and the substrate droplets provided a microenvironment of high substrate concentration close to the enzyme, facilitating the diffusion of substrate molecules into the active sites. For the two-enzyme system, ELP-R-ω-TA and ELP-fusion D-amino acid oxidase assembled to form two-enzyme complexes, forming clusters with a size much larger size than that of single enzymes. The efficiency of the combined enzymes for producing the product was 99.6 %. The two-enzyme complexes significantly improved the catalytic efficiency. Potentially, the two enzymes forming complex clusters can facilitate the immobilization of the two enzymes together through non covalent methods by entrapping in porous supports.

  1. A Web-Based Lifestyle Medicine Curriculum: Facilitating Education About Lifestyle Medicine, Behavioral Change, and Health Care Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Frates, Elizabeth Pegg; Xiao, Ryan C; Sannidhi, Deepa; McBride, Yasamina; McCargo, Tracie; Stern, Theodore A

    2017-09-11

    Lifestyle medicine is the science and application of healthy lifestyles as interventions for the prevention and treatment of disease, and has gained significant momentum as a specialty in recent years. College is a critical time for maintenance and acquisition of healthy habits. Longer-term, more intensive web-based and in-person lifestyle medicine interventions can have a positive effect. Students who are exposed to components of lifestyle medicine in their education have improvements in their health behaviors. A semester-long undergraduate course focused on lifestyle medicine can be a useful intervention to help adopt and sustain healthy habits. To describe a novel, evidence based curriculum for a course teaching the concepts of Lifestyle Medicine based on a web-based course offered at the Harvard Extension School. The course was delivered in a web-based format. The Lifestyle Medicine course used evidence based principles to guide students toward a "coach approach" to behavior change, increasing their self-efficacy regarding various lifestyle-related preventive behaviors. Students are made to understand the cultural trends and national guidelines that have shaped lifestyle medicine recommendations relating to behaviors. They are encouraged to engage in behavior change. Course topics include physical activity, nutrition, addiction, sleep, stress, and lifestyle coaching and counseling. The course addressed all of the American College of Preventive Medicine/American College of Lifestyle Medicine competencies save for the competency of office systems and technologies to support lifestyle medicine counseling. The course was well-received, earning a ranking of 4.9/5 at the school. A novel, semester-long course on Lifestyle Medicine at the Harvard Extension School is described. Student evaluations suggest the course was well-received. Further research is needed to evaluate whether such a course empowers students to adopt behavior changes.

  2. Kloss gibbon (Hylobates klossii) behavior facilitates the avoidance of human predation in the Peleonan forest, Siberut Island, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Helen M; Judge, Debra S

    2015-03-01

    Kloss gibbons (Hylobates klossii) are endemic to the Mentawai Islands in Indonesia and have been subject to human predation for more than 2000 years in the absence of any other significant predators. We investigate the behavior of Kloss gibbons that may be attributed to avoiding human predation. We observed Kloss gibbons in the Peleonan forest in the north of Siberut Island, the northernmost of the Mentawai island chain, over 18 months in 2007 and 2008, and collected data on their singing behavior, the number of individuals present during different conditions and their responses to humans. We examine behaviors that may reduce the risk of predation by humans during singing (the most conspicuous gibbon behavior), daily non-singing activities and encounters with humans. The individual risk of being stalked by hunters is reduced by singing in same-sex choruses and the risk of successful capture by hunters during singing is reduced by singing less often during daylight hours and by leaving the location of male pre-dawn singing before full light (reducing the visual signal to hunters). Groups in the Peleonan also fission during non-singing daily activity and rarely engage in play or grooming, enhancing the crypticity of their monochromatic black pelage in the canopy. We also observed a coordinated response to the presence of humans, wherein one adult individual acted as a "decoy" by approaching and distracting human observers, while other group members fled silently in multiple directions. "Decoy" behavior occurred on 31% of 96 encounters with unhabituated Kloss gibbons that detected our presence. "Decoy" individuals may put themselves at risk to increase the survival of related immatures (and adult females with infants) who have a greater risk of predation. We argue that, in combination, these behaviors are an evolved response to a long history of predation by humans. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Dynamic Reactance Interaction – How Vested Interests Affect People’s Experience, Behavior, and Cognition in Social Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner’s freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor–client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor) or a patient (client). In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N = 82) we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N = 207) further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: they revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically. PMID:26640444

  4. Facilitation of extinction and re-extinction of operant behavior in mice by chlordiazepoxide and D-cycloserine.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Julian C; Norwood, Kelly

    2013-05-01

    The aim was to compare operant extinction with re-extinction following re-acquisition and to investigate neuropharmacological mechanisms through administration of drugs potentiating GABAergic or glutamatergic systems. Groups of C57Bl/6 mice were trained to lever press for food on a fixed ratio schedule, then extinguished with or without pre-session chlordiazepoxide or post-session d-cycloserine administration (15mg/kg in each case), then retrained to lever press for food, then re-extinguished with or without pre-session chlordiazepoxide or post-session d-cycloserine. Under vehicle injections, extinction and re-extinction curves were indistinguishable, but drug treatments showed that there was less resistance to extinction in the re-extinction phase. Chlordiazepoxide facilitated extinction and re-extinction, with an earlier effect during re-extinction. d-Cycloserine also facilitated extinction and re-extinction, with some evidence of an earlier effect during re-extinction. These results replicate and extend earlier findings with operant extinction, but differ from some previous reports of d-cycloserine on re-extinction of Pavlovian conditioned fear. Implications for accounts of the similarities and differences between neural mechanisms of extinction following either Pavlovian or operant conditioning, and applications of these findings, are discussed.

  5. A Dyadic Interactive Approach to the Study of Leader Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    Eighty male college students assigned roles as supervisors and workers performed experimental tasks in a study focused on (1) the degree of leader ... follower compatibility, (2) Vertical Dyad Linkage (VDL) versus the Average Leadership Style (ALS) analysis of leader behavior, and (3) the general

  6. Motivational Control of Impulsive Behavior Interacts with Choice Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanno, Takayuki; Kurashima, Ryo; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Impulsive behavior has been investigated through choice between a smaller/immediate reinforcer and a larger/delayed reinforcer, or through performance on a differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) schedule. In the present study, we investigated a methodological divergence between these two procedures: in the former procedure, delay is a…

  7. Motivational Control of Impulsive Behavior Interacts with Choice Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanno, Takayuki; Kurashima, Ryo; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Impulsive behavior has been investigated through choice between a smaller/immediate reinforcer and a larger/delayed reinforcer, or through performance on a differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) schedule. In the present study, we investigated a methodological divergence between these two procedures: in the former procedure, delay is a…

  8. Origins of antisocial behavior. Negative reinforcement and affect dysregulation of behavior as socialization mechanisms in family interaction.

    PubMed

    Snyder, J; Schrepferman, L; St Peter, C

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical models specifying the contribution of two social-familial mechanisms, negative reinforcement and affect dysregulation, to the development of child antisocial behavior were tested using a sample of 57 8- to 13-year-old boys referred for treatment of conduct problems. Negative reinforcement of boys' aggressive behavior and boys' affect dysregulation were found to covary with the boys' irritability toward parents and siblings and were reliable predictors of a composite measure of child antisocial behavior, defined by out-of-home placement, arrests, and school discipline incidents 2 years later. Reinforcement of aggression and affect dysregulation during family interaction may play complementary roles in the development of antisocial behavior by fostering the use of coercive means of dealing with social conflict. The findings are discussed in terms of research strategies for identifying social mechanisms contributing to child psychopathology and of implications for modification of current family interventions targeting child antisocial behavior.

  9. Effects of family interaction on the child's behavior in single-parent or reconstructed families.

    PubMed

    Taanila, Anja; Laitinen, Elina; Moilanen, Irma; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the family interaction on children's behavior were studied in single-parent or reconstructed families (N = 63) in a white population in Finland. The focus was on the spousal and the parent-child interaction. Teachers assessed children's behavior and parents were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed qualitatively using the grounded-theory method. The boundary ambiguity theory developed by Pauline Boss was used to examine the interaction in the families. About two fifths of the parents reported that their spousal interaction was good, family boundaries were clear, and the children were taken care of together. Another two fifths interacted only because of the child and family boundaries were ambiguous. In 14 families the involvement of the noncustodial parent was both physically and psychologically low. The physically close but psychologically distant parent-child interaction seemed to affect the child's behavior detrimentally, whereas children with physically and psychologically close interaction with their parents showed less behavioral problems. The children with behavioral problems were more likely to have problems with both parents. They were also more likely to have a stepparent with whom they had conflicts. In conclusion, a good interaction between the parents and clarified family boundaries protect children's mental health after their parents' divorce or separation.

  10. Long-term effect of social interactions on behavioral plasticity and lifetime mating success.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang S; Brooks, Robert C

    2014-03-01

    Behavioral traits often change over an individual's lifetime. Experience, physiological senescence, and age-dependent differences in optimal behavior can, in theory, all cause longitudinal behavioral changes. Yet most studies of behavioral plasticity and selection on behavior focus on short-term population-level responses to social factors such as conspecific density or sex ratio. Longer-term effects of social interactions on individual behavior have rarely been tested. Here we tested these effects by exposing male water striders (Hemiptera: Gerridae) to two different social conditions throughout their lifetime; we call these the nonsocial and social treatments. We then measured each male's lifetime mating success and individual behavioral plasticity by observing four different behaviors (exploring a novel environment, dispersal ability, sex-recognition sensitivity, and tendency to remount a resistant female after being dislodged) every 2 weeks. The social environment influenced individual variation in behavioral plasticity as well as population-level behavioral plasticity. Moreover, when we calculated linear selection gradients of individual behavioral traits and their plasticities on lifetime mating success, male remounting tendency and individual plasticity in exploration ability were likely to be the most important factors explaining variation in male lifetime mating success. In conclusion, the variation in social interactions throughout an individual's lifetime contributes to the individual variation in behavioral plasticity, which can significantly affect a male's lifetime fitness.

  11. From the External to the Internal: Behavior Clarifications Facilitate Theory of Mind (ToM) Development in Chinese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yanchun; Wang, Yijie; Luo, Rufan; Su, Yanjie

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated how Chinese children develop theory of mind (ToM) in a language environment with limited mental state talk that is rich in behavior discourse. In Study 1, 60 mothers shared a wordless storybook with their 3-4-year-olds. The children completed two false-belief tasks and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised at…

  12. From the External to the Internal: Behavior Clarifications Facilitate Theory of Mind (ToM) Development in Chinese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yanchun; Wang, Yijie; Luo, Rufan; Su, Yanjie

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated how Chinese children develop theory of mind (ToM) in a language environment with limited mental state talk that is rich in behavior discourse. In Study 1, 60 mothers shared a wordless storybook with their 3-4-year-olds. The children completed two false-belief tasks and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised at…

  13. Is the interaction between Retama sphaerocarpa and its understorey herbaceous vegetation always reciprocally positive? Competition?facilitation shift during Retama establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espigares, Tíscar; López-Pintor, Antonio; Rey Benayas, José M.

    2004-10-01

    Retama sphaerocarpa is a Mediterranean shrub that when adult, facilitates the establishment of herbaceous plants under its canopy. We test the hypothesis that during the establishment of R. sphaerocarpa seedlings, the interaction with the herbaceous plants is negative. We carried out a greenhouse experiment in which seedlings of R. sphaerocarpa were grown under different conditions of competition with herbs, watering and date of emergence. Measurements of seedling mortality, biomass and growth were taken during the first growing season. We found a significant relationship between R. sphaerocarpa seedling mortality and competition in early spring, presumably due to higher water demand of herbaceous plants. Generally, presence of herbaceous species, lower availability of water and late emergence had negative effects on biomass and growth of Retama seedlings. Additional water compensated for the negative effects of competition, except on leaves and cladodes of Retama seedlings, suggesting that other resources, such as light, could be the subject of competition. In contrast, Retama seedlings exerted a positive influence on the herbaceous plants by increasing their survival and biomass, probably as a consequence of the high availability of nutrients provided by the Rhizobia nodules in the roots of Retama seedlings. We concluded that, at the regeneration stage of the shrub, the interaction between the herbaceous vegetation and the shrub is negative for the shrub and positive for the herbs. This suggests a shift from competition to facilitation with age of Retama, as reciprocal positive interactions have been described between herbaceous plants and adult individuals of the shrub.

  14. An interactive web-based learning unit to facilitate and improve intrapartum nursing care of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Gerdprasert, Sailom; Pruksacheva, Tassanee; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

    2011-07-01

    First clinical exposures are stressful situations for nursing students, especially, when practicing on the labour ward. The purpose of this study was to develop intrapartum nursing care web-based learning to facilitate students' acquisition of conceptual knowledge and performance skills. This web-based learning unit integrated the 5E-model and information technology with the lecture content. Eighty four nursing students were recruited in the study. The control group received traditional teaching, while the experimental group was supplemented with the web-based learning unit on intrapartum nursing care. The results showed that the students in the experimental group had significant higher scores in conceptual knowledge and performance skill. The students also had significant lower scores in ignorance - related stress when compared to those of the control group. The students supplemented with the web-based course showed a strong positive attitude toward the new learning method.

  15. Effect of stochastic gating on channel-facilitated transport of non-interacting and strongly repelling solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2017-08-01

    Ligand- or voltage-driven stochastic gating—the structural rearrangements by which the channel switches between its open and closed states—is a fundamental property of biological membrane channels. Gating underlies the channel's ability to respond to different stimuli and, therefore, to be functionally regulated by the changing environment. The accepted understanding of the gating effect on the solute flux through the channel is that the mean flux is the product of the flux through the open channel and the probability of finding the channel in the open state. Here, using a diffusion model of channel-facilitated transport, we show that this is true only when the gating is much slower than the dynamics of solute translocation through the channel. If this condition breaks, the mean flux could differ from this simple estimate by orders of magnitude.

  16. Teaching Literacy in Primary Schools Using an Interactive Whole-Class Technology: Facilitating Student-to-Student Whole-Class Dialogic Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Damian

    2012-01-01

    Much of the research conducted on the use of interactive whole-class technologies in primary school classroom focuses on teacher-to-student interactions. This paper, drawing on a social theory of learning, reports on a qualitative case study undertaken with two primary school classes in one school in New South Wales, Australia where the…

  17. Child ADHD and ODD behavior interacts with parent ADHD symptoms to worsen parenting and interparental communication.

    PubMed

    Wymbs, Brian T; Wymbs, Frances A; Dawson, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults increases risk of parenting difficulties and interparental discord. However, little is known about whether disruptive child behavior and adult ADHD operate additively or synergistically to predict parenting and interparental relationship quality. As part of a larger study, 90 parent couples were randomly assigned to interact with a 9-12 year-old confederate child exhibiting either ADHD/ODD-like behavior or typical behavior. Before these interactions, parents reported their own ADHD symptoms. Afterwards, parents reported on their partner's parenting and interparental communication behavior. Observers coded the parenting and communication behavior of both partners during the tasks. Child ADHD/ODD-like behavior was found to predict less positive and more negative parenting and communication reported by partners and observers beyond adult ADHD symptoms and other covariates. Elevated adult ADHD symptoms only uniquely increased risk of observer-coded negative parenting. Child and adult ADHD behavior interacted synergistically to predict partner-reported negative parenting and interparental communication, such that parents reporting greater ADHD symptoms-especially inattentiveness-were rated by their partners as parenting and communicating more negatively when managing child ADHD/ODD-like behavior than parents with fewer ADHD symptoms or those managing typical child behavior. Child and adult ADHD behavior did not interact to predict observer-coded parenting or interparental communication, and patterns did not differ for mothers or fathers. Our results underscore the potential risk of parents with elevated ADHD symptoms parenting and communicating negatively, at least as perceived by their partners, during interactions with children exhibiting ADHD/ODD behavior.

  18. Analysis of Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Children Highlights the Role of Genotype × Environment Interaction.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Dylan; Middeldorp, Christel; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-01-01

    This study tested for Genotype × Environment (G × E) interaction on behavioral and emotional problems in children using new methods that do not require identification of candidate genes or environments, can distinguish between interaction with shared and unique environment, and are insensitive to scale effects. Parental ratings of problem behavior from 14,755 twin pairs (5.3 years, SD = 0.22) indicated G × E interaction on emotional liability, social isolation, aggression, attention problems, dependency, anxiety, and physical coordination. Environmental influences increased in children who were genetically more predisposed to problem behavior, with ~20% of the variance due to G × E interaction (8% for anxiety to 37% for attention problems). Ignoring G × E interaction does not greatly bias heritability estimates, but it does offer a comprehensive model of the etiology for childhood problems. © 2015 The Authors. Child Development © 2015 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  19. Mother-Child Interaction: Links Between Mother and Child Frontal EEG Asymmetry and Negative Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Atzaba-Poria, Naama; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Ann-Bell, Martha

    2017-01-01

    It is well accepted that parent-child interactions are bidirectional by nature, yet not much is known about the psychophysiological activity underlying these interactions. We examined, during a parent-child interaction, how a child’s negativity statistically predicted maternal frontal EEG asymmetry and how a mother’s negativity statistically predicted child frontal EEG asymmetry. Thirty-four mother-child dyads participated in the study. Maternal and child behavior and physiology were measured during a puzzle task. Results indicated that mothers whose children exhibited more challenging behaviors during the dyadic interaction displayed more right (relative to left) asymmetry, as did children whose mothers were high in negativity during the interaction. These findings suggest that mothers and children react to each other’s signals, not only behaviorally but also physiologically. PMID:27354097

  20. Dopamine D1 Receptor Signaling in the Medial Preoptic Area Facilitates Experience-induced Enhancement of Mating Behavior in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    McHenry, Jenna A.; Bell, Genevieve A.; Parrish, Bradley P.; Hull, Elaine M.

    2012-01-01

    The medial preoptic area (MPOA) is an integral site for male sexual behavior. Dopamine is released in the MPOA before and during copulation and facilitates male rat sexual behavior. Repeated sexual experience and noncopulatory exposures to an estrous female facilitate subsequent copulation. However, the neurobiological mechanisms that mediate such enhancement remain unclear. Here, we examined the role of dopamine D1 receptors in the MPOA in experience-induced enhancement of male sexual behavior in rats. In Experiment 1, microinjections of the D1 antagonist SCH-23390 into the MPOA before each of 7 daily 30-min noncopulatory exposures to a receptive female impaired copulation on a drug-free test on day 8, compared to vehicle-treated female-exposed animals. Copulatory performance in drug-treated animals was similar to vehicle-treated males that had not been pre-exposed to females. This effect was site specific. There were no group differences in locomotor activity in an open field on the copulation test day. In Experiment 2, a separate cohort of animals was used to examine phosphorylation of dopamine-and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) in the MPOA of animals with acute and/or chronic sexual experience. DARPP-32 is a downstream marker of D1 receptor signaling and substrate of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Western immunoblot analysis revealed that p-DARPP-32 expression was greatest in the MPOA of males that received both acute and chronic sexual experience, compared to all other mated conditions and naïve controls. These data suggest that D1 receptors in the MPOA contribute to experience-induced enhancement of male sexual behavior, perhaps through a PKA regulated mechanism. PMID:22708956

  1. Cooperative Weblog Learning in Higher Education: Its Facilitating Effects on Social Interaction, Time Lag, and Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Tien-Chi; Huang, Yueh-Min; Yu, Fu-Yun

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of using weblog technologies to support cooperative learning in higher education. The study focused on the effects of features embedded in weblogs on social interactions, time lags, and cognitive loads. A quasi-experimental control-group research design was adopted. The participants were 115 undergraduates who were…

  2. Facilitating Integration of Electron Beam Lithography Devices with Interactive Videodisc, Computer-Based Simulation and Job Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Der Linn, Robert Christopher

    A needs assessment of the Grumman E-Beam Systems Group identified the requirement for additional skill mastery for the engineers who assemble, integrate, and maintain devices used to manufacture integrated circuits. Further analysis of the tasks involved led to the decision to develop interactive videodisc, computer-based job aids to enable…

  3. Human HMGB1 directly facilitates interactions between nucleotide excision repair proteins on triplex-directed psoralen interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Lange, Sabine S; Reddy, Madhava C; Vasquez, Karen M

    2009-07-04

    Psoralen is a chemotherapeutic agent that acts by producing DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), which are especially cytotoxic and mutagenic because their complex chemical nature makes them difficult to repair. Proteins from multiple repair pathways, including nucleotide excision repair (NER), are involved in their removal in mammalian cells, but the exact nature of their repair is poorly understood. We have shown previously that HMGB1, a protein involved in chromatin structure, transcriptional regulation, and inflammation, can bind cooperatively to triplex-directed psoralen ICLs with RPA, and that mammalian cells lacking HMGB1 are hypersensitive to psoralen ICLs. However, whether this effect is mediated by a role for HMGB1 in DNA damage recognition is still unknown. Given HMGB1's ability to bind to damaged DNA and its interaction with the RPA protein, we hypothesized that HMGB1 works together with the NER damage recognition proteins to aid in the removal of ICLs. We show here that HMGB1 is capable of binding to triplex-directed psoralen ICLs with the dedicated NER damage recognition complex XPC-RAD23B, as well as XPA-RPA, and that they form a higher-order complex on these lesions. In addition, we demonstrate that HMGB1 interacts with XPC-RAD23B and XPA in the absence of DNA. These findings directly demonstrate interactions between HMGB1 and the NER damage recognition proteins, and suggest that HMGB1 may affect ICL repair by enhancing the interactions between NER damage recognition factors.

  4. Cooperative Weblog Learning in Higher Education: Its Facilitating Effects on Social Interaction, Time Lag, and Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Tien-Chi; Huang, Yueh-Min; Yu, Fu-Yun

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of using weblog technologies to support cooperative learning in higher education. The study focused on the effects of features embedded in weblogs on social interactions, time lags, and cognitive loads. A quasi-experimental control-group research design was adopted. The participants were 115 undergraduates who were…

  5. Factors Facilitating Verbal Interaction in Group Work in a Ninth-Grade Content-Based ESL Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcan, Sumru

    This case study investigated factors that increased verbal interaction for students in group work in a ninth grade, content-based, English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) class. Out of 11 tasks assigned to the students during the semester, four language-based and four genre-based tasks were analyzed. At the end of the study, the nature of verbal…

  6. NEURAL NETWORK INTERACTIONS AND INGESTIVE BEHAVIOR CONTROL DURING ANOREXIA

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Alan G.; Salter, Dawna S.; Neuner, Christina M.

    2007-01-01

    Many models have been proposed over the years to explain how motivated feeding behavior is controlled. One of the most compelling is based on the original concepts of Eliot Stellar whereby sets of interosensory and exterosensory inputs converge on a hypothalamic control network that can either stimulate or inhibit feeding. These inputs arise from information originating in the blood, the viscera, and the telencephalon. In this manner the relative strengths of the hypothalamic stimulatory and inhibitory networks at a particular time dictates how an animal feeds. Anorexia occurs when the balance within the networks consistently favors the restraint of feeding. This article discusses experimental evidence supporting a model whereby the increases in plasma osmolality that result from drinking hypertonic saline activate pathways projecting to neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). These neurons constitute the hypothalamic controller for ingestive behavior, and receive a set of afferent inputs from regions of the brain that process sensory information that is critical for different aspects of feeding. Important sets of inputs arise in the arcuate nucleus, the hindbrain, and in the telencephalon. Anorexia is generated in dehydrated animals by way of osmosensitive projections to the behavior control neurons in the PVH and LHA, rather than by actions on their afferent inputs. PMID:17531275

  7. Compulsive sexual behavior: Prefrontal and limbic volume and interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Casper; Morris, Laurel S.; Kvamme, Timo L.; Hall, Paula; Birchard, Thaddeus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Compulsive sexual behaviors (CSB) are relatively common and associated with significant personal and social dysfunction. The underlying neurobiology is still poorly understood. The present study examines brain volumes and resting state functional connectivity in CSB compared with matched healthy volunteers (HV). Methods Structural MRI (MPRAGE) data were collected in 92 subjects (23 CSB males and 69 age‐matched male HV) and analyzed using voxel‐based morphometry. Resting state functional MRI data using multi‐echo planar sequence and independent components analysis (ME‐ICA) were collected in 68 subjects (23 CSB subjects and 45 age‐matched HV). Results CSB subjects showed greater left amygdala gray matter volumes (small volume corrected, Bonferroni adjusted P < 0.01) and reduced resting state functional connectivity between the left amygdala seed and bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (whole brain, cluster corrected FWE P < 0.05) compared with HV. Conclusions CSB is associated with elevated volumes in limbic regions relevant to motivational salience and emotion processing, and impaired functional connectivity between prefrontal control regulatory and limbic regions. Future studies should aim to assess longitudinal measures to investigate whether these findings are risk factors that predate the onset of the behaviors or are consequences of the behaviors. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1182–1190, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27787929

  8. Gut Microbiome and Behavior: Focus on Neuroimmune Interactions.

    PubMed

    Foster, J A

    2016-01-01

    As neuroscientists, psychologists, and psychiatrists are starting to appreciate the importance of the gut microbiota to mental health, it is critical to determine the mechanisms of microbiota to brain communication and thereby provide a better understanding of the aspects that may be modifiable with proper intervention in individuals with mental illness. Microbiota-brain communication is emerging as an important factor in brain development and function. Further, immune dysfunction is clearly established to play a role in mental illness. Investigators in the field have established expertise in studying the microbiota, the immune system, brain, and behavior and are poised to contribute significant novel findings to our understanding of microbiota-immune-brain communication in mental illness. This chapter provides a review of the literature related to the influence of microbiota-immune-brain communication to behavior. This research has a clear translational relevance for mental health, contributing to extant findings that indicate a role for the microbiome in brain development and behavior. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Environmental Enrichments for a Group of Captive Macaws: Low Interaction Does Not Mean Low Behavioral Changes.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Jéssica; Maia, Caroline Marques; Santos, Eliana Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment has been widely used to improve conditions for nonhuman animals in captivity. However, there is no consensus about the best way to evaluate the success of enrichments. This study evaluated whether the proportion of time spent interacting with enrichments indicated the proportion of overall behavioral changes. Six environmental enrichments were introduced in succession to 16 captive macaws, and interaction of the animals with them as well as the behaviors of the group were recorded before and during the enrichments. All of the enrichments affected the proportions of time spent in different behaviors. Macaws interacted more with certain items (hibiscus and food tree) than with others (a toy or swings and stairs), but introduction of the enrichments that invoked the least interaction caused as many behavioral changes as those that invoked the most. Moreover, feeding behavior was only affected by the enrichment that invoked the least interaction, a change not detected by a general analysis of enrichment effects. In conclusion, little interaction with enrichment does not mean little change in behavior, and the effects of enrichments are more complex than previously considered.

  10. Assessment of Social Behavior in Children with Autism: The Development of the Behavioral Assessment of Social Interactions in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Jennifer M.; Callahan, Emily H.; Romanczyk, Raymond G.

    2011-01-01

    There are a limited number of assessments available to examine social skills deficits in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). The Behavioral Assessment of Social Interactions in Young Children (BASYC) was developed as a direct assessment of social deficits in young children with ASD relative to children without ASD. The BASYC is a…

  11. Maternal ADHD: Parent-Child Interactions and Relations with Child Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisser, Alison R.; Eyberg, Sheila M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how ADHD symptoms in mothers of children with ADHD relate to their behavior during parent-child interactions and to their children's disruptive behavior. Findings indicated that mothers' retrospective self-ratings of ADHD symptoms were related to their present negativity during parent-led play. Mothers' self-ratings of current…

  12. A Dyadic Interactive Approach to the Study of Leader Behavior. Technical Report 506.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujii, Donald S.

    The interactive effects of leader characteristics, follower characteristics, and the task situation on leader behavior were assessed. Focuses of the investigation were the degree of leader-follower compatibility, Vertical Dyad Linkage (VDL) versus the Average Leadership Style analysis of leader behavior, and the general problem of assessing leader…

  13. Interactions of Team Mental Models and Monitoring Behaviors Predict Team Performance in Simulated Anesthesia Inductions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burtscher, Michael J.; Kolbe, Michaela; Wacker, Johannes; Manser, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated how two team mental model properties (similarity vs. accuracy) and two forms of monitoring behavior (team vs. systems) interacted to predict team performance in anesthesia. In particular, we were interested in whether the relationship between monitoring behavior and team performance was moderated by team…

  14. Preschool Children's Observed Disruptive Behavior: Variations across Sex, Interactional Context, and Disruptive Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Sarah A. O.; Carter, Alice S.; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in disruptive behavior and sensitivity to social context are documented, but the intersection between them is rarely examined empirically. This report focuses on sex differences in observed disruptive behavior across interactional contexts and diagnostic status. Preschoolers (n = 327) were classified as nondisruptive (51%),…

  15. Interactions of Team Mental Models and Monitoring Behaviors Predict Team Performance in Simulated Anesthesia Inductions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burtscher, Michael J.; Kolbe, Michaela; Wacker, Johannes; Manser, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated how two team mental model properties (similarity vs. accuracy) and two forms of monitoring behavior (team vs. systems) interacted to predict team performance in anesthesia. In particular, we were interested in whether the relationship between monitoring behavior and team performance was moderated by team…

  16. Preschool Children's Observed Disruptive Behavior: Variations across Sex, Interactional Context, and Disruptive Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Sarah A. O.; Carter, Alice S.; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Hill, Carri; Danis, Barbara; Keenan, Kate; Wakschlag, Lauren S.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in disruptive behavior and sensitivity to social context are documented, but the intersection between them is rarely examined empirically. This report focuses on sex differences in observed disruptive behavior across interactional contexts and diagnostic status. Preschoolers (n = 327) were classified as nondisruptive (51%),…

  17. Interactive Effects of Student Temperament and Instruction Method on Classroom Behavior and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orth, Lauren C.; Martin, Roy P.

    1994-01-01

    Examined effects of student temperament, instructional method (computer versus teacher), and interaction between 2 on observed off-task behavior and problem-solving performance among 78 kindergarten students. Found that students with highest Task Orientation exhibited almost no off-task behaviors with either method, whereas students with lowest…

  18. Play Behaviors and Social Interactions of a Child Who Is Blind: In Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, Marie

    2006-01-01

    This case study describes the play behaviors and social interactions of a preschool-age girl who is blind and has no additional disabilities. The data obtained from the assessment protocol indicated that although the participant was developmentally at or above age level in most domains, she demonstrated limited play behaviors and compromised…

  19. The Effect of Naturalistic Behavior Strategies on the Quality of Social Interactions for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Susan Marie

    2012-01-01

    Autism is primarily a social disorder and deficits in social-orienting may be responsible for the failure of children with autism to initiate critical social behaviors. The purpose of this research was to improve the quality of social interactions of children with autism by implementing naturalistic behavior strategies intervention utilizing a…

  20. The Effect of Naturalistic Behavior Strategies on the Quality of Social Interactions for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Susan Marie

    2012-01-01

    Autism is primarily a social disorder and deficits in social-orienting may be responsible for the failure of children with autism to initiate critical social behaviors. The purpose of this research was to improve the quality of social interactions of children with autism by implementing naturalistic behavior strategies intervention utilizing a…

  1. Mouse Social Interaction Test (MoST): a quantitative computer automated analysis of behavior.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Restif, Christophe; O'Rourke, Joseph R; Lam, Chiu Yin; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    Rodents are the most commonly used preclinical model of human disease assessing the mechanism(s) involved as well as the role of genetics, epigenetics, and pharmacotherapy on this disease as well as identifying vulnerability factors and risk assessment for disease critical in the development of improved treatment strategies. Unfortunately, the majority of rodent preclinical studies utilize single housed approaches where animals are either entirely housed and tested in solitary environments or group housed but tested in solitary environments. This approach, however, ignores the important contribution of social interaction and social behavior. Social interaction in rodents is found to be a major criterion for the ethological validity of rodent species-specific behavioral characteristics (Zurn et al. 2007; Analysis 2011). It is also well established that there is significant and growing number of reports, which illustrates the important role of social environment and social interaction in all diseases, with particularly significance in all neuropsychiatric diseases. Thus, it is imperative that research studies be able to add large-scale evaluations of social interaction and behavior in mice and benefit from automated tracking of behaviors and measurements by removing user bias and by quantifying aspects of behaviors that cannot be assessed by a human observer. Single mouse setups have been used routinely, but cannot be easily extended to multiple-animal studies where social behavior is key, e.g., autism, depression, anxiety, substance and non-substance addictive disorders, aggression, sexual behavior, or parenting. While recent efforts are focusing on multiple-animal tracking alone, a significant limitation remains the lack of insightful measures of social interactions. We present a novel, non-invasive single camera-based automated tracking method described as Mouse Social Test (MoST) and set of measures designed for estimating the interactions of multiple mice at the

  2. The High-Capacity Specific Fructose Facilitator ZrFfz1 Is Essential for the Fructophilic Behavior of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii CBS 732T

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Sara; Prista, Catarina; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C.; Sychrová, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a fructophilic yeast that consumes fructose preferably to glucose. This behavior seems to be related to sugar uptake. In this study, we constructed Z. rouxii single-, double-, and triple-deletion mutants in the UL4 strain background (a ura3 strain derived from CBS 732T) by deleting the genes encoding the specific fructose facilitator Z. rouxii Ffz1 (ZrFfz1), the fructose/glucose facilitator ZrFfz2, and/or the fructose symporter ZrFsy1. We analyzed the effects on the growth phenotype, on kinetic parameters of fructose and glucose uptake, and on sugar consumption profiles. No growth phenotype was observed on fructose or glucose upon deletion of FFZ genes. Deletion of ZrFFZ1 drastically reduced fructose transport capacity, increased glucose transport capacity, and eliminated the fructophilic character, while deletion of ZrFFZ2 had almost no effect. The strain in which both FFZ genes were deleted presented even higher consumption of glucose than strain Zrffz1Δ, probably due to a reduced repressing effect of fructose. This study confirms the molecular basis of the Z. rouxii fructophilic character, demonstrating that ZrFfz1 is essential for Z. rouxii fructophilic behavior. The gene is a good candidate to improve the fructose fermentation performance of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. PMID:25172765

  3. The high-capacity specific fructose facilitator ZrFfz1 is essential for the fructophilic behavior of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii CBS 732T.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Maria José; Cabral, Sara; Prista, Catarina; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C; Sychrová, Hana

    2014-11-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a fructophilic yeast that consumes fructose preferably to glucose. This behavior seems to be related to sugar uptake. In this study, we constructed Z. rouxii single-, double-, and triple-deletion mutants in the UL4 strain background (a ura3 strain derived from CBS 732(T)) by deleting the genes encoding the specific fructose facilitator Z. rouxii Ffz1 (ZrFfz1), the fructose/glucose facilitator ZrFfz2, and/or the fructose symporter ZrFsy1. We analyzed the effects on the growth phenotype, on kinetic parameters of fructose and glucose uptake, and on sugar consumption profiles. No growth phenotype was observed on fructose or glucose upon deletion of FFZ genes. Deletion of ZrFFZ1 drastically reduced fructose transport capacity, increased glucose transport capacity, and eliminated the fructophilic character, while deletion of ZrFFZ2 had almost no effect. The strain in which both FFZ genes were deleted presented even higher consumption of glucose than strain Zrffz1Δ, probably due to a reduced repressing effect of fructose. This study confirms the molecular basis of the Z. rouxii fructophilic character, demonstrating that ZrFfz1 is essential for Z. rouxii fructophilic behavior. The gene is a good candidate to improve the fructose fermentation performance of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Facilitation of sexual behavior in ovariectomized rats by estradiol and testosterone: A preclinical model of androgen effects on female sexual desire.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sherri Lee; Ismail, Nafissa; Pfaus, James G

    2017-05-01

    In the United States and Canada, there are no approved treatments for hypoactive sexual desire disorder in postmenopausal women. Testosterone improves female sexual desire in naturally- and surgically-menopausal women maintained on estrogen replacement therapy, and long-term safety data from randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials has yielded promising results. However, the mechanisms associated with its efficacy are not known, and could be addressed using preclinical rodent models; yet there is no systematic evaluation of the effects of estradiol and testosterone on female rat sexual behavior. The aim of these studies was to assess whether testosterone propionate (TP) facilitates sexual behaviors, particularly appetitive sexual behaviors, in Long-Evans and Wistar ovariectomized (OVX) rats primed with estradiol benzoate (EB). In Experiment 1, Long-Evans OVX rats were treated with Oil (O), 10μg EB+O, O+200μg TP, 10μg EB+500μg progesterone (P), or 10μg EB+200μg TP. In Experiment 2a, Wistar OVX rats were treated with varying doses of EB (2.5, 5, or 10μg) 48h prior, and TP (0, 200, or 400μg) 4h prior to testing in a Latin-Square design. A subset of animals was used in Experiment 2b and treated sequentially with EB (0, 2.5, 5, or 10μg) followed by TP (0, 200, or 400μg, in a Latin-Square design) 48h prior to sexual behavior testing. All tests occurred in the bilevel pacing chamber. Frequencies of female appetitive (hops/darts, solicitations, level changes) and consummatory (lordosis quotient and magnitude) sexual behaviors as well as the number of defensive behaviors towards males were scored. Number of mounts, intromissions and ejaculations from males were also scored. In EB-primed OVX Long-Evans rats, 200μg TP administered 4h prior to testing facilitated hops/darts and lordosis ratings beyond EB alone, and to levels equivalent to EB+P. In contrast, that regimen was not successful in EB-primed OVX Wistar rats. When EB and TP were co-administered 48h

  5. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Complex Material Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2008-01-01

    The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the launch external tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation, the data used was obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated.

  6. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Complex Material Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2008-01-01

    The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the launch external tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points, the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation the data used was obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated.

  7. CAHOST: An Excel Workbook for Facilitating the Johnson-Neyman Technique for Two-Way Interactions in Multiple Regression.

    PubMed

    Carden, Stephen W; Holtzman, Nicholas S; Strube, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    When using multiple regression, researchers frequently wish to explore how the relationship between two variables is moderated by another variable; this is termed an interaction. Historically, two approaches have been used to probe interactions: the pick-a-point approach and the Johnson-Neyman (JN) technique. The pick-a-point approach has limitations that can be avoided using the JN technique. Currently, the software available for implementing the JN technique and creating corresponding figures lacks several desirable features-most notably, ease of use and figure quality. To fill this gap in the literature, we offer a free Microsoft Excel 2013 workbook, CAHOST (a concatenation of the first two letters of the authors' last names), that allows the user to seamlessly create publication-ready figures of the results of the JN technique.

  8. Personal vulnerability and work-home interaction: the effect of job performance-based self-esteem on work/home conflict and facilitation.

    PubMed

    Innstrand, Siw Tone; Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Espnes, Geir Arild; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw; Falkum, Erik

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the longitudinal relationship between job performance-based self-esteem (JPB-SE) and work-home interaction (WHI) in terms of the direction of the interaction (work-to-home vs. home-to-work) and the effect (conflict vs. facilitation). A sample of 3,475 respondents from eight different occupational groups (lawyers, physicians, nurses, teachers, church ministers, bus drivers, and people working in advertising and information technology) supplied data at two points of time with a two-year time interval. The two-wave, cross-lagged structural equations modeling (SEM) analysis demonstrated reciprocal relationships between these variables, i.e., job performance-based self-esteem may act as a precursor as well as an outcome of work-home interaction. The strongest association was between job performance-based self-esteem and work-to-home conflict. Previous research on work-home interaction has mainly focused on situational factors. This longitudinal study expands the work-home literature by demonstrating how individual vulnerability (job performance-based self-esteem) contributes to the explanation of work-home interactions.

  9. Spiroplasma eriocheiris Adhesin-Like Protein (ALP) Interacts with Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Domain Proteins to Facilitate Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Libo; Liu, Yuhan; Gao, Qi; Xu, Xuechuan; Ning, Mingxiao; Bi, Jingxiu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Min; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Meng, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is a novel pathogen found in recent years, causing the tremor disease (TD) of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis. Like Spiroplasma mirum, S. eriocheiris infects the newborn mouse (adult mice are not infected) and can cause cataract. Adhesion-related protein is an important protein involved in the interaction between pathogen and host. In this study, the Adhesin-like Protein (ALP) of S. eriocheiris was detected on its outer membrane by using immune electron microscopy, and was found to be involved in the bacterium's infection of mouse embryo fibroblasts (3T6-Swiss albino). Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that ALP interacts with a diverse group of mouse proteins. The interactions between recombinant partial fibulin7 (FBLN7; including two epidermal growth factor [EGF] domains) and ALP were confirmed by Far-western blotting and colocalization. We synthetized the domains of FBLN7 [EGF domain: amino acids 136–172 and complement control protein (CCP) domain: 81–134 amino acids], and demonstrated that only EGF domain of FBLN7 can interact with ALP. Because the EGF domain has high degree of similarity to EGF, it can activate the downstream EGFR signaling pathway, in key site amino acids. The EGFR pathway in 3T6 cells was restrained after rALP stimulation resulting from competitive binding of ALP to EGF. The unborn mouse, newborn mouse, and the adult mouse with cataract have a small amount of expressed FBLN7; however, none was detected in the brain and very little expression was seen in the eye of normal adult mice. In short, ALP as a S. eriocheiris surface protein, is critical for infection and further supports the role of ALP in S. eriocheiris infection by competitive effection of the EGF/EGFR axis of the target cells. PMID:28184355

  10. Does low serum 25 OH vitamin D interact with very strenuous physical activity, facilitating development of rhabdomyolysis?

    PubMed

    Conrad, Brandon N; Glueck, Charles J

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D plays an important and increasingly understood role in muscle health and performance. Vitamin D exhibits a nuclear receptor for transcription interaction and a transmembrane receptor, giving it genomic and non-genomic interactions. Vitamin D receptors have been described that affect muscle function. Vitamin D has also been correlated with muscle performance. Beyond its role in normal muscle function, vitamin D deficiency can interact with statins to produce myalgia-myositis, which can be reversed by normalizing serum vitamin D [7,13]. Exertional rhabdomyolysis may occur in diverse settings including marathons, ice skating, bicycling and swimming. Our hypothesis is that subjects with pre-existing low serum 25OHD are selected out for exertional rhabdomyolysis during strenuous activities. We review exercise induced severe rhabdomyolysis in association with heat stroke with subsequent disseminated intravascular coagulation in a thin, athletic, dark skinned, conditioned young man, occurring in the setting of a 5K race, subsequently found to have severe 25 OH vitamin D deficiency (6 ng/ml, laboratory lower normal limit>30 ng/ml). We suggest that when very low vitamin D is documented, it be normalized before major prolonged exertion. We hypothesize that normalization of vitamin D before heavy exertion could perhaps prevent the severe muscle damage events and sequelae as was the case for this patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Using the iPad to facilitate interaction between preschool children who use AAC and their peers.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Michelle C S; Light, Janice

    2016-09-01

    Social interaction is one of the key components of education, yet children with complex communication needs often face social isolation in the classroom, rarely interacting with same-age peers. This study investigated the impact of the provision of an iPad(®) (1) with an AAC app with visual scene displays and a dyadic turn taking training on the number of communicative turns taken by children with complex communication needs in interaction with same-age peers. Two preschool children with complex communication needs and six peers without disabilities participated in this research. A single-subject, multiple probe across partners design with one replication was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention on the frequency of communicative turns expressed by the children with complex communication needs. Parents, teachers, speech-language pathologists, and the children participated in social validation measures. As a result of intervention, Participant 1 showed immediate gains in the frequency of symbolic communicative turns after the first training session across all three partners (average gains of 30-46 symbolic communicative turns per 10-min session across peer partners). Participant 2 showed some initial gains, but they were not maintained over time (average gains of 11-24 turns across partners). Classroom implications and future research directions are discussed.

  12. Protein Interaction between Ameloblastin and Proteasome Subunit α Type 3 Can Facilitate Redistribution of Ameloblastin Domains within Forming Enamel.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shuhui; White, Shane N; Paine, Michael L; Snead, Malcolm L

    2015-08-21

    Enamel is a bioceramic tissue composed of thousands of hydroxyapatite crystallites aligned in parallel within boundaries fabricated by a single ameloblast cell. Enamel is the hardest tissue in the vertebrate body; however, it starts development as a self-organizing assembly of matrix proteins that control crystallite habit. Here, we examine ameloblastin, a protein that is initially distributed uniformly across the cell boundary but redistributes to the lateral margins of the extracellular matrix following secretion thus producing cell-defined boundaries within the matrix and the mineral phase. The yeast two-hybrid assay identified that proteasome subunit α type 3 (Psma3) interacts with ameloblastin. Confocal microscopy confirmed Psma3 co-distribution with ameloblastin at the ameloblast secretory end piece. Co-immunoprecipitation assay of mouse ameloblast cell lysates with either ameloblastin or Psma3 antibody identified each reciprocal protein partner. Protein engineering demonstrated that only the ameloblastin C terminus interacts with Psma3. We show that 20S proteasome digestion of ameloblastin in vitro generates an N-terminal cleavage fragment consistent with the in vivo pattern of ameloblastin distribution. These findings suggest a novel pathway participating in control of protein distribution within the extracellular space that serves to regulate the protein-mineral interactions essential to biomineralization.

  13. Protein Interaction between Ameloblastin and Proteasome Subunit α Type 3 Can Facilitate Redistribution of Ameloblastin Domains within Forming Enamel*

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Shuhui; White, Shane N.; Paine, Michael L.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2015-01-01

    Enamel is a bioceramic tissue composed of thousands of hydroxyapatite crystallites aligned in parallel within boundaries fabricated by a single ameloblast cell. Enamel is the hardest tissue in the vertebrate body; however, it starts development as a self-organizing assembly of matrix proteins that control crystallite habit. Here, we examine ameloblastin, a protein that is initially distributed uniformly across the cell boundary but redistributes to the lateral margins of the extracellular matrix following secretion thus producing cell-defined boundaries within the matrix and the mineral phase. The yeast two-hybrid assay identified that proteasome subunit α type 3 (Psma3) interacts with ameloblastin. Confocal microscopy confirmed Psma3 co-distribution with ameloblastin at the ameloblast secretory end piece. Co-immunoprecipitation assay of mouse ameloblast cell lysates with either ameloblastin or Psma3 antibody identified each reciprocal protein partner. Protein engineering demonstrated that only the ameloblastin C terminus interacts with Psma3. We show that 20S proteasome digestion of ameloblastin in vitro generates an N-terminal cleavage fragment consistent with the in vivo pattern of ameloblastin distribution. These findings suggest a novel pathway participating in control of protein distribution within the extracellular space that serves to regulate the protein-mineral interactions essential to biomineralization. PMID:26070558

  14. [A Method for Protein Photo-cross-linking in Living Cells Facilitating Analysis of Physiological Interactions of Proteins].

    PubMed

    Hino, Nobumasa

    2015-01-01

    In living cells, most proteins form complexes with other proteins to exert their functions. Since protein functions are regulated in response to changes in the cellular environment, the components of the complexes can vary; therefore, proteins often interact in a weak and transient manner. To capture such labile protein interactions, we have developed a method for photo-cross-linking of proteins directly interacting in mammalian cells; this method involves expansion of the genetic code and site-specific incorporation of photoreactive amino acids into proteins. Upon cross-linking, protein complexes are stabilized by a covalent bond and can be readily isolated from cell extracts without the problems usually associated with simple affinity purification methods such as co-immunoprecipitation. Photo-cross-linkers have another benefit: they react exclusively with molecules within a range defined by the linker length. This property becomes useful for determining the binding interface of two proteins because the linkers can be introduced in a site-directed manner with our method. In this review, we first describe the expansion of the genetic code of mammalian cells for the incorporation of non-natural amino acids into proteins. Then, we introduce our recent applications and developments of the cross-linking method: identification of intracellular binding partners of the signaling protein growth factor receptor binding protein 2; analysis of the binding between membrane proteins on the cell surface; and a novel photoreactive amino acid that enables wide-ranging photo-cross-linking.

  15. An entropy-based analysis of lane changing behavior: An interactive approach.

    PubMed

    Kosun, Caglar; Ozdemir, Serhan

    2017-05-19

    As a novelty, this article proposes the nonadditive entropy framework for the description of driver behaviors during lane changing. The authors also state that this entropy framework governs the lane changing behavior in traffic flow in accordance with the long-range vehicular interactions and traffic safety. The nonadditive entropy framework is the new generalized theory of thermostatistical mechanics. Vehicular interactions during lane changing are considered within this framework. The interactive approach for the lane changing behavior of the drivers is presented in the traffic flow scenarios presented in the article. According to the traffic flow scenarios, 4 categories of traffic flow and driver behaviors are obtained. Through the scenarios, comparative analyses of nonadditive and additive entropy domains are also provided. Two quadrants of the categories belong to the nonadditive entropy; the rest are involved in the additive entropy domain. Driving behaviors are extracted and the scenarios depict that nonadditivity matches safe driving well, whereas additivity corresponds to unsafe driving. Furthermore, the cooperative traffic system is considered in nonadditivity where the long-range interactions are present. However, the uncooperative traffic system falls into the additivity domain. The analyses also state that there would be possible traffic flow transitions among the quadrants. This article shows that lane changing behavior could be generalized as nonadditive, with additivity as a special case, based on the given traffic conditions. The nearest and close neighbor models are well within the conventional additive entropy framework. In this article, both the long-range vehicular interactions and safe driving behavior in traffic are handled in the nonadditive entropy domain. It is also inferred that the Tsallis entropy region would correspond to mandatory lane changing behavior, whereas additive and either the extensive or nonextensive entropy region would

  16. Contingencies in Mother-Child Teaching Interactions and Behavioral Regulation and Dysregulation in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunkenheimer, Erika S.; Kemp, Christine J.; Albrecht, Erin C.

    2013-01-01

    Predictable patterns in early parent-child interactions may help lay the foundation for how children learn to self-regulate. The present study examined contingencies between maternal teaching and directives and child compliance in mother-child problem-solving interactions at age 3.5 and whether they predicted children's behavioral regulation and…

  17. Self-Injurious Behavior in Rett Syndrome: Interactions between Features of Rett Syndrome and Operant Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; And Others

    1993-01-01

    In this case study, interactions were examined between features of Rett syndrome and operant conditioning as determinants of self-injurious behavior (SIB). Analysis suggested different functions for two forms of SIB: automatic reinforcement by sensory stimulation and escape from social interactions. Features of Rett syndrome tended to maximize the…

  18. Self-Injurious Behavior in Rett Syndrome: Interactions between Features of Rett Syndrome and Operant Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; And Others

    1993-01-01

    In this case study, interactions were examined between features of Rett syndrome and operant conditioning as determinants of self-injurious behavior (SIB). Analysis suggested different functions for two forms of SIB: automatic reinforcement by sensory stimulation and escape from social interactions. Features of Rett syndrome tended to maximize the…

  19. Contingencies in Mother-Child Teaching Interactions and Behavioral Regulation and Dysregulation in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunkenheimer, Erika S.; Kemp, Christine J.; Albrecht, Erin C.

    2013-01-01

    Predictable patterns in early parent-child interactions may help lay the foundation for how children learn to self-regulate. The present study examined contingencies between maternal teaching and directives and child compliance in mother-child problem-solving interactions at age 3.5 and whether they predicted children's behavioral regulation and…

  20. N-terminal α-helix-independent membrane interactions facilitate adenovirus protein VI induction of membrane tubule formation

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Oana; Wiethoff, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus disrupts endosomal membranes during cell entry. The membrane lytic capsid protein VI (pVI) facilitates entry by fragmenting membranes. Although an N-terminal amphipathic α-helix (VI-Φ) possesses similar membrane affinity as pVI, truncated protein lacking VI-Φ, (VIΔ54) still possesses moderate membrane affinity. We demonstrate that incorporation of nickel-NTA lipids in membranes enhances increases the membrane affinity and the membrane lytic activity of VIΔ54. We also demonstrate that 3 predicted pVI α-helices within residues 54–114 associate with membranes, sitting roughly parallel to the membrane surface. His-tagged VIΔ54 is capable of fragmenting membranes similar to pVI and the VI-Φ peptide. Interestingly, neither VI-Φ nor His-tagged VIΔ54 can induce tubule formation in giant lipid vesicles as observed for pVI. These data suggest cooperativity between the amphipathic α-helix and residues in VIΔ54 to induce positive membrane curvature and tubule formation. These results provide additional details regarding the mechanism of nonenveloped virus membrane penetration. PMID:20869737