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Sample records for facilitative nucleobase transporter

  1. Purine nucleobase transport in human erythrocytes. Reinvestigation with a novel "inhibitor-stop" assay.

    PubMed

    Domin, B A; Mahony, W B; Zimmerman, T P

    1988-07-05

    A novel "inhibitor-stop" method for the determination of initial rates of purine nucleobase transport in human erythrocytes has been developed, based on the addition of seven assay volumes of cold 19 mM papaverine to terminate influx. In view of our finding that the initial velocities of adenine, guanine, and hypoxanthine influx into human erythrocytes were linear for only 4-6 s at 37 degrees C, the present method has been used to reexamine the kinetics of purine nucleobase transport in these cells. Initial influx rates of all three purine nucleobases were shown to be the result of concurrent facilitated and nonfacilitated diffusion. The nonfacilitated influx rates could be estimated either from the linear concentration dependence of nucleobase influx at high concentrations of permeant or from residual influx rates which were not inhibited by the presence of co-permeants. Appropriate corrections for nonfacilitated diffusion were made to the influx rates observed at low nucleobase concentrations. Kinetic analyses indicated that adenine (Km = 13 +/- 1 microM, n = 7), guanine (Km = 37 +/- 2 microM, n = 5), and hypoxanthine (Km = 180 +/- 12 microM, n = 6) were mutually competitive substrates for transport. The Ki values obtained with each nucleobase as an inhibitor of the influx of the other nucleobases were similar to their respective Km values for influx. Furthermore, the transport of the purine nucleobases was not inhibited by nucleosides (uridine, inosine) or by inhibitors of nucleoside transport (6-[(4-nitrobenzyl)thio]-9-beta-D-ribofuranosylpurine, dilazep, dipyridamole). It is concluded that all three purine nucleobases share a common facilitated transport system in human erythrocytes which is functionally distinct from the nucleoside transporter.

  2. Nucleobase and nucleoside transport and integration into plant metabolism.

    PubMed

    Girke, Christopher; Daumann, Manuel; Niopek-Witz, Sandra; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide metabolism is an essential process in all living organisms. Besides newly synthesized nucleotides, the recycling (salvage) of partially degraded nucleotides, i.e., nucleosides and nucleobases serves to keep the homeostasis of the nucleotide pool. Both types of metabolites are substrates of at least six families of transport proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) with a total of 49 members. In the last years several members of such transport proteins have been analyzed allowing to present a more detailed picture of nucleoside and nucleobase transport and the physiological function of these processes. Besides functioning in nucleotide metabolism it turned out that individual members of the before named transporters exhibit the capacity to transport a wide range of different substrates including vitamins and phytohormones. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on nucleobase and nucleoside transport processes in plants and integrate this into nucleotide metabolism in general. Thereby, we will focus on those proteins which have been characterized at the biochemical level.

  3. Nucleobase and nucleoside transport and integration into plant metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Girke, Christopher; Daumann, Manuel; Niopek-Witz, Sandra; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide metabolism is an essential process in all living organisms. Besides newly synthesized nucleotides, the recycling (salvage) of partially degraded nucleotides, i.e., nucleosides and nucleobases serves to keep the homeostasis of the nucleotide pool. Both types of metabolites are substrates of at least six families of transport proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) with a total of 49 members. In the last years several members of such transport proteins have been analyzed allowing to present a more detailed picture of nucleoside and nucleobase transport and the physiological function of these processes. Besides functioning in nucleotide metabolism it turned out that individual members of the before named transporters exhibit the capacity to transport a wide range of different substrates including vitamins and phytohormones. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on nucleobase and nucleoside transport processes in plants and integrate this into nucleotide metabolism in general. Thereby, we will focus on those proteins which have been characterized at the biochemical level. PMID:25250038

  4. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) family of nucleoside and nucleobase transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Young, J D; Yao, S Y M; Sun, L; Cass, C E; Baldwin, S A

    2008-07-01

    1. The human (h) SLC29 family of integral membrane proteins is represented by four members, designated equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) because of the properties of the first-characterized family member, hENT1. They belong to the widely distributed eukaryotic ENT family of equilibrative and concentrative nucleoside/nucleobase transporter proteins. 2. A predicted topology of eleven transmembrane helices has been experimentally confirmed for hENT1. The best-characterized members of the family, hENT1 and hENT2, possess similar broad permeant selectivities for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, but hENT2 also efficiently transports nucleobases. hENT3 has a similar broad permeant selectivity for nucleosides and nucleobases and appears to function in intracellular membranes, including lysosomes. 3. hENT4 is uniquely selective for adenosine, and also transports a variety of organic cations. hENT3 and hENT4 are pH sensitive, and optimally active under acidic conditions. ENTs, including those in parasitic protozoa, function in nucleoside and nucleobase uptake for salvage pathways of nucleotide synthesis and, in humans, are also responsible for the cellular uptake of nucleoside analogues used in the treatment of cancers and viral diseases. 4. By regulating the concentration of adenosine available to cell surface receptors, mammalian ENTs additionally influence physiological processes ranging from cardiovascular activity to neurotransmission.

  5. Identification and Functional Characterization of the First Nucleobase Transporter in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Murata, Tomoaki; Kamigaso, Syunsuke; Yasujima, Tomoya; Maeda, Jun-ya; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Ohta, Kin-ya; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    Nucleobases are important compounds that constitute nucleosides and nucleic acids. Although it has long been suggested that specific transporters are involved in their intestinal absorption and uptake in other tissues, none of their molecular entities have been identified in mammals to date. Here we describe identification of rat Slc23a4 as the first sodium-dependent nucleobase transporter (rSNBT1). The mRNA of rSNBT1 was expressed highly and only in the small intestine. When transiently expressed in HEK293 cells, rSNBT1 could transport uracil most efficiently. The transport of uracil mediated by rSNBT1 was sodium-dependent and saturable with a Michaelis constant of 21.2 μm. Thymine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine were also transported, but adenine was not. It was also suggested by studies of the inhibitory effect on rSNBT1-mediated uracil transport that several nucleobase analogs such as 5-fluorouracil are recognized by rSNBT1, but cytosine and nucleosides are not or only poorly recognized. Furthermore, rSNBT1 fused with green fluorescent protein was mainly localized at the apical membrane, when stably expressed in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. These characteristics of rSNBT1 were almost fully in agreement with those of the carrier-mediated transport system involved in intestinal uracil uptake. Therefore, it is likely that rSNBT1 is its molecular entity or at least in part responsible for that. It was also found that the gene orthologous to the rSNBT1 gene is genetically defective in humans. This may have a biological and evolutional meaning in the transport and metabolism of nucleobases. The present study provides novel insights into the specific transport and metabolism of nucleobases and their analogs for therapeutic use. PMID:20042597

  6. A transition-state interaction shifts nucleobase ionization toward neutrality to facilitate small ribozyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Guo, Man; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Krucinska, Jolanta; Chen, Yuanyuan; Carey, Paul R; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-10-17

    One mechanism by which ribozymes can accelerate biological reactions is by adopting folds that favorably perturb nucleobase ionization. Herein we used Raman crystallography to directly measure pK(a) values for the Ade38 N1 imino group of a hairpin ribozyme in distinct conformational states. A transition-state analogue gave a pK(a) value of 6.27 ± 0.05, which agrees strikingly well with values measured by pH-rate analyses. To identify the chemical attributes that contribute to the shifted pK(a), we determined crystal structures of hairpin ribozyme variants containing single-atom substitutions at the active site and measured their respective Ade38 N1 pK(a) values. This approach led to the identification of a single interaction in the transition-state conformation that elevates the base pK(a) > 0.8 log unit relative to the precatalytic state. The agreement of the microscopic and macroscopic pK(a) values and the accompanying structural analysis supports a mechanism in which Ade38 N1(H)+ functions as a general acid in phosphodiester bond cleavage. Overall the results quantify the contribution of a single electrostatic interaction to base ionization, which has broad relevance for understanding how RNA structure can control chemical reactivity.

  7. A Transition-State Interaction Shifts Nucleobase Ionization Toward Neutrality to Facilitate Small Ribozyme Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Joseph A.; Guo, Man; Jenkins, Jermaine L.; Krucinska, Jolanta; Chen, Yuanyuan; Carey, Paul R.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    One mechanism by which ribozymes can accelerate biological reactions is by adopting folds that favorably perturb nucleobase ionization. Herein we used Raman crystallography to directly measure pKa values for the Ade38 N1-imino group of a hairpin ribozyme in distinct conformational states. A transition-state analogue gave a pKa value of 6.27 ± 0.05, which agrees strikingly well with values measured by pH-rate analyses. To identify the chemical attributes that contribute to the shifted pKa we determined crystal structures of hairpin ribozyme variants containing single-atom substitutions at the active site and measured their respective Ade38 N1 pKa values. This approach led to the identification of a single interaction in the transition-state conformation that elevates the base pKa >0.8 log units relative to the precatalytic state. The agreement of the microscopic and macroscopic pKa values and the accompanying structural analysis support a mechanism in which Ade38 N1(H)+ functions as a general acid in phosphodiester bond cleavage. Overall the results quantify the contribution of a single electrostatic interaction to base ionization, which has broad relevance for understanding how RNA structure can control chemical reactivity. PMID:22989273

  8. SUPERFUND GROUNDWATER ISSUE - FACILITATED TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Regional Superfund Ground Water Forum is a group of ground-water scientists representing EPA's Regional Superfund Offices, organized to exchange up to date information related to ground-water remediation at Superfund sites. Facilitated transport is an issue identified by the ...

  9. Identification of the Substrate Recognition and Transport Pathway in a Eukaryotic Member of the Nucleobase-Ascorbate Transporter (NAT) Family

    PubMed Central

    Kosti, Vasiliki; Lambrinidis, George; Myrianthopoulos, Vassilios; Diallinas, George; Mikros, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Using the crystal structure of the uracil transporter UraA of Escherichia coli, we constructed a 3D model of the Aspergillus nidulans uric acid-xanthine/H+ symporter UapA, which is a prototype member of the Nucleobase-Ascorbate Transporter (NAT) family. The model consists of 14 transmembrane segments (TMSs) divided into a core and a gate domain, the later being distinctly different from that of UraA. By implementing Molecular Mechanics (MM) simulations and quantitative structure-activity relationship (SAR) approaches, we propose a model for the xanthine-UapA complex where the substrate binding site is formed by the polar side chains of residues E356 (TMS8) and Q408 (TMS10) and the backbones of A407 (TMS10) and F155 (TMS3). In addition, our model shows several polar interactions between TMS1-TMS10, TMS1-TMS3, TMS8-TMS10, which seem critical for UapA transport activity. Using extensive docking calculations we identify a cytoplasm-facing substrate trajectory (D360, A363, G411, T416, R417, V463 and A469) connecting the proposed substrate binding site with the cytoplasm, as well as, a possible outward-facing gate leading towards the substrate major binding site. Most importantly, re-evaluation of the plethora of available and analysis of a number of herein constructed UapA mutations strongly supports the UapA structural model. Furthermore, modeling and docking approaches with mammalian NAT homologues provided a molecular rationale on how specificity in this family of carriers might be determined, and further support the importance of selectivity gates acting independently from the major central substrate binding site. PMID:22848666

  10. Structural, Dynamical, and Electronic Transport Properties of Modified DNA Duplexes Containing Size-Expanded Nucleobases

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Orozco, Modesto; Luque, Javier; Sumpter, Bobby G; Blas, Jose; Ordejon, Pablo J; Huertas, Oscar; Tabares, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Among the distinct strategies proposed to expand the genetic alphabet, sizeexpanded nucleobases are promising for the development of modified DNA duplexes with improved biotechnological properties. In particular, duplexes built up by replacing canonical bases with the corresponding benzo-fused counterparts could be valuable as molecular nanowires. In this context, this study reports the results of classical molecular dynamics simulations carried out to examine the structural and dynamical features of size-expanded DNAs, including both hybrid duplexes containing mixed pairs of natural and benzo-fused bases (xDNA) and pure size-expanded (xxDNA) duplexes. Furthermore, the electronic structure of both natural and size-expanded duplexes is examined by means of density functional computations. The results confirm that the structural and flexibility properties of the canonical DNA are globally little affected by the presence of benzo-fused bases. Themost relevant differences are found in the enhanced size of the grooves, and the reduction in the twist. However, the analysis also reveals subtle structural effects related to the nature and sequence of benzo-fused bases in the duplex. On the other hand, electronic structure calculations performed for xxDNAs confirm the reduction in the HOMOLUMO gap predicted from the analysis of the natural bases and their size-expanded counterparts, which suggests that pure size-expanded DNAs can be good conductors. A more complex situation is found for xDNAs, where fluctuations in the electrostatic interaction between base pairs exerts a decisive influence on the modulation of the energy gap.

  11. Proton transfer in nucleobases is mediated by water.

    PubMed

    Khistyaev, Kirill; Golan, Amir; Bravaya, Ksenia B; Orms, Natalie; Krylov, Anna I; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-08-08

    Water plays a central role in chemistry and biology by mediating the interactions between molecules, altering energy levels of solvated species, modifying potential energy profiles along reaction coordinates, and facilitating efficient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton transfer in a model system comprising dry and microhydrated clusters of nucleobases. With mass spectrometry and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton transfer between nucleobases, which is very efficient in dry clusters. Instead, a new pathway opens up in which protonated nucleobases are generated by proton transfer from the ionized water molecule and elimination of a hydroxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the shape of the potential energy profile along the proton transfer coordinate depends strongly on the character of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed; i.e., the proton transfer from water to nucleobases is barrierless when an ionized state localized on water is accessed. The computed energetics of proton transfer is in excellent agreement with the experimental appearance energies. Possible adiabatic passage on the ground electronic state of the ionized system, though energetically accessible at lower energies, is not efficient. Thus, proton transfer is controlled electronically, by the character of the ionized state, rather than statistically, by simple energy considerations.

  12. Characterization of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-nucleobase supramolecular complexes featuring bio-multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsiu-Wen; Lee, Ai-Wei; Huang, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Jem-Kun

    2014-11-07

    In this study we employed poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) as a matrix that we hybridized with five different nucleobase units (adenine, thymine, uracil, guanine, cytosine) to generate PNIPAAm-nucleobase supramolecular complexes (PNSCs) stabilized through bio-multiple hydrogen bonds (BMHBs). These nucleobase units interacted with PNIPAAm through BMHBs of various strengths, leading to competition between the BMHBs and the intramolecular hydrogen bonds (HBs) of PNIPAAm. The changes in morphology, crystalline structure, and thermoresponsive behavior of PNIPAAm were related to the strength of its BMHBs with the nucleobases. The strengths of the BMHBs followed the order guanine > adenine > thymine > cytosine > uracil, as verified through analyses of Fourier transform infrared spectra, lower critical solution temperatures, and inter-association equilibrium constants. The PNSCs also exhibited remarkable improvements in conductivity upon the formation of BMHBs, which facilitated proton transport. The neat PNIPAAm film was an insulator, but it transformed into a semiconductor after hybridizing with the nucleobases. In particular, the resistivity of the PNIPAAm-guanine supramolecular complex decreased to 1.35 × 10(5) ohm cm. The resistivity of the PNIPAAm-cytosine supramolecular complex increased significantly from 5.83 × 10(6) to 3 × 10(8) ohm cm upon increasing the temperature from 40 to 50 °C, suggesting that this material might have applicability in thermo-sensing. The ability to significantly improve the conductivity of hydrogels through such a simple approach involving BMHBs might facilitate their use as novel materials in bioelectronics.

  13. Modeling Facilitated Contaminant Transport by Mobile Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz; Kim, Seunghyun

    1995-01-01

    Introduction of exogenous biocolloids such as genetically engineered bacteria in a bioremediation operation can enhance the transport of contaminants in groundwater by reducing the retardation effects. Because of their colloidal size and favorable surface conditions, bacteria are efficient contaminant carriers. In cases where contaminants have a low mobility in porous media because of their high partition with solid matrix, facilitated contaminant transport by mobile bacteria can create high contaminant fluxes. When metabolically active mobile bacteria are present in a subsurface environment, the system can be treated as consisting of three phases: water phase, bacterial phase, and stationary solid matrix phase. In this work a mathematical model based on mass balance equations is developed to describe the facilitated transport and fate of a contaminant and bacteria in a porous medium. Bacterial partition between the bulk solution and the stationary solid matrix and contaminant partition among three phases are represented by expressions in terms of measurable quantities. Solutions were obtained to provide estimates of contaminant and bacterial concentrations. A dimensional analysis of the transport model was utilized to estimate model parameters from the experimental data and to assess the effect of several parameters on model behavior. The model results matched favorably with experimental data of Jenkins and Lion (1993). The presence of mobile bacteria enhances the contaminant transport. However, bacterial consumption of the contaminant, which serves as a bacterial nutrient, can attenuate the contaminant mobility. The work presented in this paper is the first three-phase model to include the effects of substrate metabolism on the fate of groundwater contaminants.

  14. Proton Transfer in Nucleobases is Mediated by Water

    SciTech Connect

    Khistyaev, Kirill; Golan, Amir; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Orms, Natalie; Krylov, Anna I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-08-08

    Water plays a central role in chemistry and biology by mediating the interactions between molecules, altering energy levels of solvated species, modifying potential energy proles along reaction coordinates, and facilitating ecient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton transfer in a model system comprising dry and microhydrated clusters of nucleobases. With mass spectrometry and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton transfer between nucleobases, which is very ecient in dry clusters. Instead, a new pathway opens up in which protonated nucleo bases are generated by proton transfer from the ionized water molecule and elimination of a hydroxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the shape of the potential energy prole along the proton transfer coordinate depends strongly on the character of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed, i.e., the proton transfer from water to nucleobases is barrierless when an ionized state localized on water is accessed. The computed energetics of proton transfer is in excellent agreement with the experimental appearance energies. Possible adiabatic passage on the ground electronic state of the ionized system, while energetically accessible at lower energies, is not ecient. Thus, proton transfer is controlled electronically, by the character of the ionized state, rather than statistically, by simple energy considerations.

  15. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M Joanne; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members.

  16. Pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity in DNA and RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2016-11-01

    Nucleobase radicals are major products of the reactions between nucleic acids and hydroxyl radical, which is produced via the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. The nucleobase radicals also result from hydration of cation radicals that are produced via the direct effect of ionizing radiation. The role that nucleobase radicals play in strand scission has been investigated indirectly using ionizing radiation to generate them. More recently, the reactivity of nucleobase radicals resulting from formal hydrogen atom or hydroxyl radical addition to pyrimidines has been studied by independently generating the reactive intermediates via UV-photolysis of synthetic precursors. This approach has provided control over where the reactive intermediates are produced within biopolymers and facilitated studying their reactivity. The contributions to our understanding of pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity by this approach are summarized.

  17. Computation Of Facilitated Transport of O2 In Hemoglobin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    Report describes computations of unsteady facilitated transport of oxygen through liquid membrane of hemoglobin. Used here, "facilitated transport" means diffusion of permeant through membrane in which that diffusion enhanced by reversible chemical reaction between permeant and membrane. In this case, reversible reactions between hemoglobin and oxygen.

  18. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Zachara, John M.; McCarthy, John F.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2006-05-31

    This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. We focus on three major thrusts: (1) thermodynamic stability and mobility of colloids formed by reactions of sediments with highly alkaline tank waste solutions, (2) colloid-contaminant interactions, and (3) in-situ colloid mobilization and colloid facilitated contaminant transport occurring in both contaminated and uncontaminated Hanford sediments.

  19. Facilitated transport of copper with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in saturated sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saturated packed column experiments were conducted to investigate the facilitated transport of Cu with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) at different pore water velocities (0.22-2.2 cm min–1), solution pH (6.2-9.0), and fraction of Fe oxide coating on grain surfaces (', 0-0.36). The facilitated tr...

  20. Evidence for rotational contribution to protein-facilitated proton transport.

    PubMed Central

    Gros, G; Lavalette, D; Moll, W; Gros, H; Amand, B; Pochon, F

    1984-01-01

    Two modes of molecular motion of carrier molecules can, in principle, lead to a facilitated transport of a substrate: translational and rotational diffusion. In the present study, which deals with the mechanism of the facilitated diffusion of H+ and O2 in solutions of earthworm hemoglobin, examples for both types of facilitation are presented. Only translational, not rotational, diffusion of earthworm hemoglobin appears to lead to a facilitated O2 flux. In contrast, substantial facilitated H+ fluxes of comparable size arise from rotational diffusion as well as from translational diffusion of this large protein. This is derived from measurements of facilitated H+ and O2 fluxes in earthworm hemoglobin solutions and determinations of the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of earthworm hemoglobin with the help of a theoretical treatment of facilitated diffusion by rotational carrier diffusion. H+ transport by rotational protein diffusion appears to be a case where the often-postulated mechanism of facilitated transport by rotation of a carrier lends itself to experimental verification. Images PMID:6324213

  1. Microhydration of Deprotonated Nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2016-08-01

    Hydration reactions of deprotonated nucleobases (uracil, thymine, 5-fluorouracil,2-thiouracil, cytosine, adenine, and hypoxanthine) produced by electrospray have been experimentally studied in the gas phase at 10 mbar using a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical data, ΔH o , ΔS o , and ΔG o , for the monohydrated systems were determined. The hydration enthalpies were found to be similar for all studied systems and varied between 39.4 and 44.8 kJ/mol. A linear correlation was found between water binding energies in the hydrated complexes and the corresponding acidities of the most acidic site of nucleobases. The structural and energetic aspects of the precursors for the hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data.

  2. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit

    PubMed Central

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2010-01-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.—Takanaga, H., Frommer, W. B. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit. PMID:20354141

  3. Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hong; Han, Kee Sung; Lee, Je Seung; Lee, Albert S; Park, Seo Kyung; Hong, Sung Yun; Lee, Jong-Chan; Mueller, Karl T; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2016-11-01

    A novel ionic mixture of an imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquid containing ethylene-oxide-functionalized phosphite anions is fabricated, which, when doped with lithium salt, self-assembles into a smectic-ordered ionic liquid crystal through Coulombic interactions between the ion species. Interestingly, the smectic order in the ionic-liquid-crystal ionogel facilitates ionic transport.

  4. Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin Hong; Han, Kee Sung; Lee, Je Seung; Lee, Albert S.; Park, Seo Kyung; Hong, Sung Yun; Lee, Jong-Chan; Mueller, Karl T.; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2016-09-08

    We investigated a novel ionic mixture of an imidazolium-based room temperature IL containing ethylene oxide functionalized phosphite anion and a lithium salt that self-assembles into a smectic-ordered IL crystal. The two key features in this work are the unique origin of the smectic order of the ionic mixtures and the facilitated ion transport behavior in the smectic ordered IL crystal. In fact, the IL crystals are self-assembled through Coulombic interactions between ion species, not through the hydrophilic-phobic interactions between charged ion heads and hydrophobic long alkyl pendants or the steric interaction between mesogenic moieties. Furthermore, the smectic order in the IL crystal ionogel facilitates exceptional and remarkable ionic transport. Large ionic conductivity, viscoelastic robustness, and additional electrochemical stability of the IL crystal ionogels provide promising opportunities for future electrochemical applications.

  5. Liquid transport facilitated by channels in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wilking, James N; Zaburdaev, Vasily; De Volder, Michael; Losick, Richard; Brenner, Michael P; Weitz, David A

    2013-01-15

    Many bacteria on earth exist in surface-attached communities known as biofilms. These films are responsible for manifold problems, including hospital-acquired infections and biofouling, but they can also be beneficial. Biofilm growth depends on the transport of nutrients and waste, for which diffusion is thought to be the main source of transport. However, diffusion is ineffective for transport over large distances and thus should limit growth. Nevertheless, biofilms can grow to be very large. Here we report the presence of a remarkable network of well-defined channels that form in wild-type Bacillus subtilis biofilms and provide a system for enhanced transport. We observe that these channels have high permeability to liquid flow and facilitate the transport of liquid through the biofilm. In addition, we find that spatial variations in evaporative flux from the surface of these biofilms provide a driving force for the flow of liquid in the channels. These channels offer a remarkably simple system for liquid transport, and their discovery provides insight into the physiology and growth of biofilms.

  6. Liquid transport facilitated by channels in Bacillus subtilis biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Wilking, James N.; Zaburdaev, Vasily; De Volder, Michael; Losick, Richard; Brenner, Michael P.; Weitz, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria on earth exist in surface-attached communities known as biofilms. These films are responsible for manifold problems, including hospital-acquired infections and biofouling, but they can also be beneficial. Biofilm growth depends on the transport of nutrients and waste, for which diffusion is thought to be the main source of transport. However, diffusion is ineffective for transport over large distances and thus should limit growth. Nevertheless, biofilms can grow to be very large. Here we report the presence of a remarkable network of well-defined channels that form in wild-type Bacillus subtilis biofilms and provide a system for enhanced transport. We observe that these channels have high permeability to liquid flow and facilitate the transport of liquid through the biofilm. In addition, we find that spatial variations in evaporative flux from the surface of these biofilms provide a driving force for the flow of liquid in the channels. These channels offer a remarkably simple system for liquid transport, and their discovery provides insight into the physiology and growth of biofilms. PMID:23271809

  7. COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH THE VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus

    2003-09-14

    Contaminants have leaked into the vadose zone at the USDOE Hanford reservation. It is important to understand the fate and transport of these contaminants to design remediation strategies and long-term waste management plans at the Hanford reservation. Colloids may play an important role in fate and transport of strongly sorbing contaminants, such as Cs or Pu. This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. The specific objectives addressed are: (1) Determine the structure, composition, and surface charge characteristics of colloidal particles formed under conditions similar to those occurring during leakage of waste typical of Hanford tank supernatants into soils and sediments surrounding the tanks. (2) Characterize the mutual interactions between colloids, contaminant, and soil matrix in batch experiments under various ionic strength and pH conditions. We will investigate the nature of the solid-liquid interactions and the kinetics of the reactions. (3) Evaluate mobility of colloids through soil under different degrees of water saturation and solution chemistry (ionic strength and pH). (4) Determine the potential of colloids to act as carriers to transport the contaminant through the vadose zone and verify the results through comparison with field samples collected under leaking tanks. (5) Improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for implementation into reactive chemical transport models. This project was in part supported by an NSF-IGERT grant to Washington State University. The IGERT grant provided funding for graduate student research and education, and two graduate students were involved in the EMSP project. The IGERT program also supported undergraduate internships. The project is part of a larger EMSP program to study fate and transport of contaminants under leaking Hanford waste tanks. The project has

  8. Integration of a 'proton antenna' facilitates transport activity of the monocarboxylate transporter MCT4.

    PubMed

    Noor, Sina Ibne; Pouyssegur, Jacques; Deitmer, Joachim W; Becker, Holger M

    2017-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate the proton-coupled transport of high-energy metabolites like lactate and pyruvate and are expressed in nearly every mammalian tissue. We have shown previously that transport activity of MCT4 is enhanced by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), which has been suggested to function as a 'proton antenna' for the transporter. In the present study, we tested whether creation of an endogenous proton antenna by introduction of a cluster of histidine residues into the C-terminal tail of MCT4 (MCT4-6xHis) could facilitate MCT4 transport activity when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results show that integration of six histidines into the C-terminal tail does indeed increase transport activity of MCT4 to the same extent as did coexpression of MCT4-WT with CAII. Transport activity of MCT4-6xHis could be further enhanced by coexpression with extracellular CAIV, but not with intracellular CAII. Injection of an antibody against the histidine cluster into MCT4-expressing oocytes decreased transport activity of MCT4-6xHis, while leaving activity of MCT4-WT unaltered. Taken together, these findings suggest that transport activity of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 can be facilitated by integration of an endogenous proton antenna into the transporter's C-terminal tail.

  9. Evaluation of bacteria-facilitated cadmium transport in gravel columns using the HYDRUS colloid-facilitated solute transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Liping; Å Imå¯Nek, Jirka

    2006-12-01

    The colloid-facilitated solute transport model, based on HYDRUS-1D, was evaluated using the column experimental data of Pang et al. (2005) for cadmium (Cd) transport facilitated by B. subtilis spores or E. coli in saturated coarse alluvial gravels. We simulated Cd transport involving convection, dispersion, kinetic adsorption/desorption to/from the aquifer media and to/from mobile/immobile bacteria, and kinetic attachment/detachment of the bacteria to/from the aquifer media. To reduce the number of parameters to be optimized, we independently estimated Cd sorption/desorption rates to mobile bacteria from a batch study. The model described the collected experimental data reasonably well. Extensive sensitivity analysis to various reaction parameters was carried out to obtain an understanding of the relative importance of individual model parameters on model predictions. Our modeling results suggest that the rates of Cd sorption or desorption differ not only between different bacterial species but also between unattached and deposited bacteria. The results of the sensitivity analysis indicated that the Cd sorption rate to unattached bacteria had a significantly greater impact on the model results than its sorption rate to deposited bacteria. For the experimental system investigated here, model results were most sensitive to parameters describing interactions between Cd-aquifer media, bacteria-aquifer media, and Cd-mobile bacteria, and they were less sensitive to interactions between Cd-immobile bacteria and desorption rate from mobile bacteria.

  10. Golgi localized barley MTP8 proteins facilitate Mn transport.

    PubMed

    Pedas, Pai; Schiller Stokholm, Michaela; Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Ladegård, Anne Hald; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod; Husted, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Many metabolic processes in plants are regulated by manganese (Mn) but limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms controlling cellular Mn homeostasis. In this study, a yeast assay was used to isolate and characterize two genes, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2, which encode membrane-bound proteins belonging to the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family in the cereal species barley (Hordeum vulgare). Transient expression in onion epidermal cells showed that MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 proteins fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are localized to Golgi. When heterologously expressed in yeast, MTP8.1 and MTP8.2 were found to be Mn transporters catalysing Mn efflux in a similar manner as the Golgi localized endogenous yeast protein Pmr1p. The level of MTP8.1 transcripts in barley roots increased with external Mn supply ranging from deficiency to toxicity, while MTP8.2 transcripts decreased under the same conditions, indicating non-overlapping functions for the two genes. In barley leaves, the expression of both MTP8 genes declined in response to toxic Mn additions to the roots suggesting a role in ensuring proper delivery of Mn to Golgi. Based on the above we suggest that barley MTP8 proteins are involved in Mn loading to the Golgi apparatus and play a role in Mn homeostasis by delivering Mn to Mn-dependent enzymes and/or by facilitating Mn efflux via secretory vesicles. This study highlights the importance of MTP transporters in Mn homeostasis and is the first report of Golgi localized Mn2+ transport proteins in a monocot plant species.

  11. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport: a regulatory perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, W. L.; Pickett, D. A.; Codell, R. B.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    What hydrogeologic-geochemical-microbial conditions and processes affect migration of radionuclides sorbed onto microparticles or native colloid-sized radionuclide particles? The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for protecting public health, safety, and the environment at numerous nuclear facilities including a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site. To fulfill these obligations, NRC needs to understand the mechanisms controlling radionuclide release and transport and their importance to performance. The current focus of NRC staff reviews and technical interactions dealing with colloid-facilitated transport relates to the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. NRC staff performed bounding calculations to quantify radionuclide releases available for ground-water transport to potential receptors from a Yucca Mountain repository. Preliminary analyses suggest insignificant doses of plutonium and americium colloids could be derived from spent nuclear fuel. Using surface complexation models, NRC staff found that colloids can potentially lower actinide retardation factors by up to several orders of magnitude. Performance assessment calculations, in which colloidal transport of plutonium and americium was simulated by assuming no sorption or matrix diffusion, indicated no effect of colloids on human dose within the 10,000 year compliance period due largely to long waste-package lifetimes. NRC staff have identified information gaps and developed technical agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure sufficient information will be presented in any potential future Yucca Mountain license application. DOE has agreed to identify which radionuclides could be transported via colloids, incorporate uncertainties in colloid formation, release and transport parameters, and conceptual models, and address the applicability of field data using synthetic microspheres as colloid analogs. NRC is currently

  12. Colloid facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutsch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2015-04-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the internationally agreed-upon, long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. Eventually, corrosion of the waste canisters may lead to leakage of their hazardous contents, and the radionuclides can ultimately make their way into groundwater and pose a threat to the biosphere. Engineered bentonite barriers placed around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their storage location to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles eroding from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. In addition, the presence of organic matter in groundwater has been shown to additionally facilitate the uptake of radionuclides by the clay colloids. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of radionuclides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative of the Negev desert, Israel. Lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute to actinides for research on radionuclide transportation due to their similar chemical behavior. In this study, the migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide). Tracer solutions containing known concentrations of Ce, bentonite colloids, humic acid and bromide were prepared in a matrix solution containing salt concentrations representative of that of the average rain water found in the Negev. These solutions were then injected into a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Samples were analyzed for Ce and Br using ICP-MS, and colloid concentrations were determined using spectrophotographic analysis. Breakthrough curves comparing the rates of transportation of each tracer were obtained, allowing for comparison of

  13. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Plutonium in Fractured Volcanic Tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersting, A. B.; Zhao, P.; Walensky, J. R.; Roberts, S. K.; Johnson, M. R.; Zavarin, M.; Ramon, E. C.

    2004-12-01

    The transport of low-solubility radionuclides in a colloidal- or colloidal bound state is frequently suspected or observed. Groundwater contaminated with radionuclides associated with underground nuclear tests was collected from several different well locations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In each case, the low-levels of plutonium detected in the groundwater were overwhelmingly (>95percent) associated with the colloidal and not the dissolved fraction of the groundwater. The colloidal fractions consisted of secondary minerals such as clays and zeolites. To better understand the mechanisms controlling the potential colloidal transport of plutonium, colloid-facilitated fracture flow laboratory experiments are being conducted. Pseudocolloids consisting of Pu(IV) sorbed to clinoptilolite were combined with a radionuclide solution cocktail consisting of Np, U, Cs, Sr, Sm and 3H and Re (analog to Tc) tracers in NTS-type synthetic groundwater (4.5mM NaHCO3-). The cocktail was injected into a smooth fracture in a volcanic tuff rock core from the NTS and the effluent analyzed. Autoradiography and secondary ion mass spectrometry will be used to understand the mineral -colloid-radionuclide interactions in the fracture volcanic tuff.

  14. In vitro synthesis of a Major Facilitator Transporter for specific active transport across Droplet Interface Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Heather E.; Harris, Nicola J.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-01-01

    Nature encapsulates reactions within membrane-bound compartments, affording sequential and spatial control over biochemical reactions. Droplet Interface Bilayers are evolving into a valuable platform to mimic this key biological feature in artificial systems. A major issue is manipulating flow across synthetic bilayers. Droplet Interface Bilayers must be functionalised, with seminal work using membrane-inserting toxins, ion channels and pumps illustrating the potential. Specific transport of biomolecules, and notably transport against a concentration gradient, across these bilayers has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we successfully incorporate the archetypal Major Facilitator Superfamily transporter, lactose permease, into Droplet Interface Bilayers and demonstrate both passive and active, uphill transport. This paves the way for controllable transport of sugars, metabolites and other essential biomolecular substrates of this ubiquitous transporter superfamily in DIB networks. Furthermore, cell-free synthesis of lactose permease during DIB formation also results in active transport across the interface bilayer. This adds a specific disaccharide transporter to the small list of integral membrane proteins that can be synthesised via in vitro transcription/translation for applications of DIB-based artificial cell systems. The introduction of a means to promote specific transport of molecules across Droplet Interface Bilayers against a concentration gradient gives a new facet to droplet networks. PMID:27996025

  15. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of ribosomes in a eukaryotic system: Is there a facilitated transport process

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna-Gupta, A.; Ware, V.C. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors have examined the kinetics of the process by which ribosomes are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm using Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected into the germinal vesicle with radiolabeled ribosomes or ribosomal subunits from X. laevis, Tetrahymena thermophila, or Escherichia coli. Microinjected eukaryotic mature ribosomes are redistributed into the oocyte cytoplasm by an apparent carrier-mediated transport process that exhibits saturation kinetics as increasing amounts of ribosomes are injected. T. thermophila ribosomes are competent to traverse the Xenopus nuclear envelope, suggesting that the basic mechanism underlying ribosome transport is evolutionarily conserved. Microinjected E. coli ribosomes are not transported in this system, indicating that prokaryotic ribosomes lack the signals required for transport. Surprisingly, coinjected small (40S) and large (60S) subunits from T. thermophila are transported significantly faster than individual subunits. These observations support a facilitated transport model for the translocation of ribosomal subunits as separate units across the nuclear envelope whereby the transport rate of 60S or 40S subunits is enhanced by the presence of the partner subunit. Although the basic features of the transport mechanism have been preserved through evolution, other aspects of the process may be mediated through species-specific interactions. They hypothesize that a species-specific nuclear 40S-60S subunit association may expedite the transport of individual subunits across the nuclear envelope.

  16. Methanotrophic bacteria and facilitated transport of pollutants in aquifer material

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, M.B.; Chen, Jyh-Herng; Kadner, D.J.; Lion, L.W. )

    1994-10-01

    In-situ stimulation of methanotrophic bacteria has been considered for aquifer remediation. Experimental results indicate that both colloidal suspensions containing methanotrophic cells and the soluble extracellular polymers produced by methanotrophic cells have the potential to enhance the transport and removal of other environmental contaminants such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metals in aquifer material. Three methanotrophic bacteria were used in the experiments: Methylomonas albus BG8, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, and Methylocystis parvus OBBP. The distribution coefficients for Cd with extraceullular polymers were of the same order as that obtained with the aquifer sand, indicating polymers from the methanotrophic bacteria could act to increase the transport of Cd in a porous medium. Polymer from BG8 significantly reduced the apparent distribution coefficient for Cd with an aquifer sand. [[sup 14]C]phenanthrene also sorbed to extracellular polymer and to washed, suspended methanotrophic cells. The exopolymer of BG8 and OBBP significantly reduced the apparent distribution coefficient (K[sub d]) for phenanthrene with aquifer sand. The distribution coefficients for phenanthrene with the methanotrophic cells were an order of magnitude greater than those previously reported for other heterotrophic bacteria. Cells of the methanotrophs also significantly reduced the apparent K[sub d] for phenanthrene with an aquifer sand. The three strains of methanotrophs displayed mobility in a column of packed sand, and strain OBBP reduced the retardation coefficient of phenanthrene with an aquifer sand by 27%. These data indicate that both extracellular polymer and mobile cells of methanotrophic bacteria display a capacity to facilitate the mobility of pollutant metals and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in aquifer material. 48 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Extraterrestrial Nucleobases in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Z.; Botta, O.; Fogel, M.; Sephton, M.; Glavin, D.; Watson, J.; Dworkin, J.; Schwartz, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    Nucleobases in Carbonaceous Chondrites Z. Martins (1), O. Botta (2), M. L. Fogel (3), M. A. Sephton (4), D. P. Glavin (2), J. S. Watson (5), J. P. Dworkin (2), A. W. Schwartz (6) and P. Ehrenfreund (1,6). (1) Astrobiology Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden, The Netherlands, (2) NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Goddard Center for Astrobiology, Greenbelt, MD, USA, (3) GL, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington DC, USA, (4) Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Department of Earth Science and Engineering, South Kensington Campus, Imperial College, London, UK, (5) Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK, (6) Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. E-mail: z.martins@chem.leidenuniv.nl/Phone:+31715274440 Nucleobases are crucial compounds in terrestrial biochemistry, because they are key components of DNA and RNA. Carbonaceous meteorites have been analyzed for nucleobases by different research groups [1-5]. However, significant quantitative and qualitative differences were observed, leading to the controversial about the origin of these nucleobases. In order to establish the origin of these compounds in carbonaceous chondrites and to assess the plausibility of their exogenous delivery to the early Earth, we have performed formic acid extraction of samples of the Murchison meteorite [6], followed by an extensive purification procedure, analysis and quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV absorption detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our results were qualitatively consistent with previous results [3, 4], but showed significant quantitative differences. Compound specific carbon isotope values were obtained, using gas chromatography-combustion- isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A soil sample collected in the proximity of the Murchison meteorite fall site was subjected to the same extraction, purification and analysis procedure

  18. Functionalized Solid Electrodes for Electrochemical Biosensing of Purine Nucleobases and Their Analogues: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vimal Kumar; Jelen, Frantisek; Trnkova, Libuse

    2015-01-01

    Interest in electrochemical analysis of purine nucleobases and few other important purine derivatives has been growing rapidly. Over the period of the past decade, the design of electrochemical biosensors has been focused on achieving high sensitivity and efficiency. The range of existing electrochemical methods with carbon electrode displays the highest rate in the development of biosensors. Moreover, modification of electrode surfaces based on nanomaterials is frequently used due to their extraordinary conductivity and surface to volume ratio. Different strategies for modifying electrode surfaces facilitate electron transport between the electrode surface and biomolecules, including DNA, oligonucleotides and their components. This review aims to summarize recent developments in the electrochemical analysis of purine derivatives, as well as discuss different applications. PMID:25594595

  19. Genetic and molecular characterization reveals a unique nucleobase cation symporter 1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mourad, George S; Tippmann-Crosby, Julie; Hunt, Kevin A; Gicheru, Yvonne; Bade, Kaely; Mansfield, Tyler A; Schultes, Neil P

    2012-05-07

    Locus At5g03555 encodes a nucleobase cation symporter 1 (AtNCS1) in the Arabidopsis genome. Arabidopsis insertion mutants, AtNcs1-1 and AtNcs1-3, were used for in planta toxic nucleobase analog growth studies and radio-labeled nucleobase uptake assays to characterize solute transport specificities. These results correlate with similar growth and uptake studies of AtNCS1 expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both in planta and heterologous expression studies in yeast revealed a unique solute transport profile for AtNCS1 in moving adenine, guanine and uracil. This is in stark contrast to the canonical transport profiles determined for the well-characterized S. cerevisiae NCS1 proteins FUR4 (uracil transport) or FCY2 (adenine, guanine, and cytosine transport).

  20. SWEET17, a facilitative transporter, mediates fructose transport across the tonoplast of Arabidopsis roots and leaves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Woei-Jiun; Nagy, Reka; Chen, Hsin-Yi; Pfrunder, Stefanie; Yu, Ya-Chi; Santelia, Diana; Frommer, Wolf B; Martinoia, Enrico

    2014-02-01

    Fructose (Fru) is a major storage form of sugars found in vacuoles, yet the molecular regulation of vacuolar Fru transport is poorly studied. Although SWEET17 (for SUGARS WILL EVENTUALLY BE EXPORTED TRANSPORTERS17) has been characterized as a vacuolar Fru exporter in leaves, its expression in leaves is low. Here, RNA analysis and SWEET17-β-glucuronidase/-GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN fusions expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) reveal that SWEET17 is highly expressed in the cortex of roots and localizes to the tonoplast of root cells. Expression of SWEET17 in roots was inducible by Fru and darkness, treatments that activate accumulation and release of vacuolar Fru, respectively. Mutation and ectopic expression of SWEET17 led to increased and decreased root growth in the presence of Fru, respectively. Overexpression of SWEET17 specifically reduced the Fru content in leaves by 80% during cold stress. These results intimate that SWEET17 functions as a Fru-specific uniporter on the root tonoplast. Vacuoles overexpressing SWEET17 showed increased [14C]Fru uptake compared with the wild type. SWEET17-mediated Fru uptake was insensitive to ATP or treatment with NH4Cl or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone, indicating that SWEET17 functions as an energy-independent facilitative carrier. The Arabidopsis genome contains a close paralog of SWEET17 in clade IV, SWEET16. The predominant expression of SWEET16 in root vacuoles and reduced root growth of mutants under Fru excess indicate that SWEET16 also functions as a vacuolar transporter in roots. We propose that in addition to a role in leaves, SWEET17 plays a key role in facilitating bidirectional Fru transport across the tonoplast of roots in response to metabolic demand to maintain cytosolic Fru homeostasis.

  1. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Saiers

    2012-09-20

    The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

  2. Plasmodesmata: intercellular tunnels facilitating transport of macromolecules in plants.

    PubMed

    Kragler, Friedrich

    2013-04-01

    In plants, intercellular structures named plasmodesmata (PD) form a continuous cytoplasmic network between neighboring cells. PD pores provide channels for intercellular symplasmic (cell-to-cell) transport throughout most tissues of the plant body. Cell-defining proteins, such as transcription factors, and regulatory non-coding sequences, such as short interfering RNA, micro RNA, protein-encoding messenger RNAs, viroids, and viral RNA/DNA genomes move via PD channels to adjacent cells. PD-mediated intercellular transport of macromolecules is a regulated process depending on the tissue, developmental stage, and nature of the transported macromolecule. In this review, PD channels and their similarity to tunneling nanotubes present in animals are highlighted. In addition, homeodomain protein movement and cellular components regulating transport are discussed.

  3. Understanding transport by the major facilitator superfamily (MFS): structures pave the way.

    PubMed

    Quistgaard, Esben M; Löw, Christian; Guettou, Fatma; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-02-01

    Members of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of transport proteins are essential for the movement of a wide range of substrates across biomembranes. As this transport requires a series of conformational changes, structures of MFS transporters captured in different conformational states are needed to decipher the transport mechanism. Recently, a large number of MFS transporter structures have been determined, which has provided us with an unprecedented opportunity to understand general aspects of the transport mechanism. We propose an updated model for the conformational cycle of MFS transporters, the 'clamp-and-switch model', and discuss the role of so-called 'gating residues' and the substrate in modulating these conformational changes.

  4. Computation of the unsteady facilitated transport of oxygen in hemoglobin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1990-01-01

    The transport of a reacting permeant diffusing through a thin membrane is extended to more realistic dissociation models. A new nonlinear analysis of the reaction-diffusion equations, using implicit finite-difference methods and direct block solvers, is used to study the limits of linearized and equilibrium theories. Computed curves of molecular oxygen permeating through hemoglobin solution are used to illustrate higher-order reaction models, the effect of concentration boundary layers at the membrane interfaces, and the transient buildup of oxygen flux.

  5. Spectroscopy of Isolated Prebiotic Nucleobases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svadlenak, Nathan; Callahan, Michael P.; Ligare, Marshall; Gulian, Lisa; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Nachtigallova, Dana; Hobza, Pavel; deVries, Mattanjah

    2011-01-01

    We use multiphoton ionization and double resonance spectroscopy to study the excited state dynamics of biologically relevant molecules as well as prebiotic nucleobases, isolated in the gas phase. Molecules that are biologically relevant to life today tend to exhibit short excited state lifetimes compared to similar but non-biologically relevant analogs. The mechanism is internal conversion, which may help protect the biologically active molecules from UV damage. This process is governed by conical intersections that depend very strongly on molecular structure. Therefore we have studied purines and pyrimidines with systematic variations of structure, including substitutions, tautomeric forms, and cluster structures that represent different base pair binding motifs. These structural variations also include possible alternate base pairs that may shed light on prebiotic chemistry. With this in mind we have begun to probe the ultrafast dynamics of molecules that exhibit very short excited states and search for evidence of internal conversions.

  6. Bubble-Facilitated VOC Transport from LNAPL Smear Zones and Its Potential Effect on Vapor Intrusion.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Nicole C; Mumford, Kevin G

    2017-02-10

    Most conceptual and mathematical models of soil vapor intrusion assume that the transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a source toward a building is limited by diffusion through the soil gas. Under conditions where advection occurs, transport rates are higher and can lead to higher indoor air concentrations. Advection-dominated conditions can be created by gas bubble flow in the saturated zone. A series of laboratory column experiments were conducted to measure mass flux due to bubble-facilitated VOC transport from light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) smear zones. Smear zones that contained both LNAPL residual and trapped gas, as well as those that contained only LNAPL residual, were investigated. Results showed that the VOC mass flux due to bubble-facilitated transport was orders-of-magnitude higher than under diffusion-limited conditions. Results also showed that the mass flux due to bubble-facilitated transport was intermittent, and increased with an increased supply of dissolved gases.

  7. Transport by Collective Flagellar Beating Facilitates Evolutionary Transitions to Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Martin; Powers, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    A central problem underlying the evolution from single cells to multicellular organisms is the relationship between metabolic requirements and environmental metabolite exchange with increasing size. For organisms that form spherical colonies such as the volvocalean green algae, there is a bottleneck if diffusion alone governs nutrient uptake as they increase in size, for the diffusive flux is linear in the radius while the requirements of surface somatic cells grow quadratically. Using Volvox as a model organism, we examine experimentally and theoretically the role that advection of fluid by surface flagella plays in enhancing nutrient uptake. We show that the fluid flow driven by the coordinated beating of those flagella produces a boundary layer in the concentration of a diffusing solute which renders the metabolite exchange rate quadratic in the colony radius. This bypasses the diffusive bottleneck, facilitating evolutionary transitions to multicellularity which may be driven by other environmental factors. These results suggest that flagella may have evolved not only for motility, but also to enhance metabolite exchange.

  8. Numerical modeling of colloid facilitated virus transport in porus media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzourakis, Vasileios E.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2013-04-01

    A conceptual mathematical model was developed to describethe simultaneous transport (cotransport) of viruses and colloids in three-dimensional, water saturated, homogeneous porous media with uniform flow. The model accounts for the migration of individual virus and colloid particles as well as viruses attached onto colloids. Viruses can be suspended in the aqueous phase, attached onto suspended colloids and the solid matrix, and attached onto colloids previously attached on the solid matrix. Colloids can be suspended in the aqueous phase or attached on the solid matrix. Viruses in all four phases (suspended in the aqueous phase, attached onto suspended colloid particles, attached onto the solid matrix, and attached onto colloids previously attached on the solid matrix) may undergo inactivation with different inactivation coefficients. The governing coupled partial differential equations were solved numerically by employing finite difference methods, which were implemented explicitly or implicitly so that both stability and accuracy factors were satisfied. Furthermore, available experimental data were used to test the newly developed cotransport model. The model was shown to simulate quite accurately the available experimental data.

  9. Proton-coupled sugar transport in the prototypical major facilitator superfamily protein XylE.

    PubMed

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Park, Min-Sun; Iadanza, Matthew G; Zheng, Hongjin; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-08-04

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is the largest collection of structurally related membrane proteins that transport a wide array of substrates. The proton-coupled sugar transporter XylE is the first member of the MFS that has been structurally characterized in multiple transporting conformations, including both the outward and inward-facing states. Here we report the crystal structure of XylE in a new inward-facing open conformation, allowing us to visualize the rocker-switch movement of the N-domain against the C-domain during the transport cycle. Using molecular dynamics simulation, and functional transport assays, we describe the movement of XylE that facilitates sugar translocation across a lipid membrane and identify the likely candidate proton-coupling residues as the conserved Asp27 and Arg133. This study addresses the structural basis for proton-coupled substrate transport and release mechanism for the sugar porter family of proteins.

  10. Distribution of Nucleobases in CM and CR Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, M. P.; Stern, J. C.; Glavin, D. P.; Whelley, K. E.; Martin, M. G.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2010-04-01

    We have developed an analytical method to target nucleobases in meteorites using HPLC with UV detection and tandem mass spectrometry. The distribution of nucleobases appears to correlate with the degree of aqueous alteration in these meteorites.

  11. Decreased Salinity and Actinide Mobility: Colloid-Facilitated Transport or pH Change?

    PubMed

    Haliena, Brian; Zheng, Hangping; Melson, Nathan; Kaplan, Daniel I; Barnett, Mark O

    2016-01-19

    Colloids have been implicated in influencing the transport of actinides and other adsorbed contaminants in the subsurface, significantly increasing their mobility. Such colloid-facilitated transport can be induced by changes in groundwater chemistry that occur, for example, when high ionic strength contaminant plumes are displaced by infiltrating rainwater. We studied the transport and mobility of Th(IV), as an analogue for Pu(IV) and other tetravalent actinides [An(IV)], in saturated columns packed with a natural heterogeneous subsurface sandy sediment. As expected, decreases in ionic strength both promoted the mobilization of natural colloids and enhanced the transport of previously adsorbed Th(IV). However, colloid-facilitated transport played only a minor role in enhancing the transport of Th(IV). Instead, the enhanced transport of Th(IV) was primarily due to the pH-dependent desorption of Th(IV) caused by the change in ionic strength. In contrast, the adsorption of Th(IV) had a marked impact on the surface charge of the sandy sediment, significantly affecting the mobility of the colloids. In the absence of Th(IV), changes in ionic strength were ineffective at releasing colloids while in the presence of Th(IV), decreases in ionic strength liberated significant concentrations of colloids. Therefore, under the conditions of our experiments which mimicked acidic, high ionic strength groundwater contaminant plumes, Th(IV) had a much greater effect on colloid transport than colloids had on Th(IV) transport.

  12. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Hexachloroplatinate-Nucleobase Complexes: Nucleobase Excited State Decay Observed via Delayed Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ~1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 2- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 2-∙thymine and PtCl6 2-∙adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes [Sen et al, J. Phys. Chem. B, 119, 11626, 2015]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 2-∙nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes, is attributed to onephoton excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a timescale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  13. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Low-Solubility Radionuclides: A Field, Experimental, and Modeling Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kersting, A B; Reimus, P W; Abdel-Fattah, A; Allen, P G; Anghel, I; Benedict, F C; Esser, B K; Lu, N; Kung, K S; Nelson, J; Neu, M P; Reilly, S D; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Ware, S D; Warren, RG; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2003-02-01

    For the last several years, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) program has funded a series of studies carried out by scientists to investigate the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of low-solubility radionuclides in groundwater, specifically plutonium (Pu). Although the studies were carried out independently, the overarching goals of these studies has been to determine if colloids in groundwater at the NTS can and will transport low-solubility radionuclides such as Pu, define the geochemical mechanisms under which this may or may not occur, determine the hydrologic parameters that may or may not enhance transport through fractures and provide recommendations for incorporating this information into future modeling efforts. The initial motivation for this work came from the observation in 1997 and 1998 by scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that low levels of Pu originally from the Benham underground nuclear test were detected in groundwater from two different aquifers collected from wells 1.3 km downgradient (Kersting et al., 1999). Greater than 90% of the Pu and other radionuclides were associated with the naturally occurring colloidal fraction (< 1 micron particles) in the groundwater. The colloids consisted mainly of zeolite (mordenite, clinoptilolite/heulandite), clays (illite, smectite) and cristobalite (SiO{sub 2}). These minerals were also identified as alteration mineral components in the host rock aquifer, a rhyolitic tuff. The observation that Pu can and has migrated in the subsurface at the NTS has forced a rethinking of our basic assumptions regarding the mechanical and geochemical transport pathways of low-solubility radionuclides. If colloid-facilitated transport is the primary mechanism for transporting low-solubility radionuclides in the subsurface, then current transport models based solely on solubility arguments and retardation estimates may underestimate the flux and

  14. Arabidopsis WAT1 is a vacuolar auxin transport facilitator required for auxin homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ranocha, Philippe; Dima, Oana; Nagy, Réka; Felten, Judith; Corratgé-Faillie, Claire; Novák, Ondřej; Morreel, Kris; Lacombe, Benoît; Martinez, Yves; Pfrunder, Stephanie; Jin, Xu; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thibaud, Jean-Baptiste; Ljung, Karin; Fischer, Urs; Martinoia, Enrico; Boerjan, Wout; Goffner, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA) has a crucial role in plant development. Its spatiotemporal distribution is controlled by a combination of biosynthetic, metabolic and transport mechanisms. Four families of auxin transporters have been identified that mediate transport across the plasma or endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Here we report the discovery and the functional characterization of the first vacuolar auxin transporter. We demonstrate that WALLS ARE THIN1 (WAT1), a plant-specific protein that dictates secondary cell wall thickness of wood fibres, facilitates auxin export from isolated Arabidopsis vacuoles in yeast and in Xenopus oocytes. We unambiguously identify IAA and related metabolites in isolated Arabidopsis vacuoles, suggesting a key role for the vacuole in intracellular auxin homoeostasis. Moreover, local auxin application onto wat1 mutant stems restores fibre cell wall thickness. Our study provides new insight into the complexity of auxin transport in plants and a means to dissect auxin function during fibre differentiation.

  15. Arabidopsis WAT1 is a vacuolar auxin transport facilitator required for auxin homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ranocha, Philippe; Dima, Oana; Nagy, Réka; Felten, Judith; Corratgé-Faillie, Claire; Novák, Ondřej; Morreel, Kris; Lacombe, Benoît; Martinez, Yves; Pfrunder, Stephanie; Jin, Xu; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thibaud, Jean-Baptiste; Ljung, Karin; Fischer, Urs; Martinoia, Enrico; Boerjan, Wout; Goffner, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA) has a crucial role in plant development. Its spatiotemporal distribution is controlled by a combination of biosynthetic, metabolic and transport mechanisms. Four families of auxin transporters have been identified that mediate transport across the plasma or endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Here we report the discovery and the functional characterization of the first vacuolar auxin transporter. We demonstrate that WALLS ARE THIN1 (WAT1), a plant-specific protein that dictates secondary cell wall thickness of wood fibres, facilitates auxin export from isolated Arabidopsis vacuoles in yeast and in Xenopus oocytes. We unambiguously identify IAA and related metabolites in isolated Arabidopsis vacuoles, suggesting a key role for the vacuole in intracellular auxin homoeostasis. Moreover, local auxin application onto wat1 mutant stems restores fibre cell wall thickness. Our study provides new insight into the complexity of auxin transport in plants and a means to dissect auxin function during fibre differentiation. PMID:24129639

  16. The multidrug transporters belonging to major facilitator superfamily in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Edda; Arrigo, Patrizio; Bellinzoni, Marco; Silva, Pedro A. E.; Martín, Carlos; Aínsa, José A.; Guglierame, Paola; Riccardi, Giovanna

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance play an important role in the insurgence of tuberculosis. Detailed knowledge of the molecular basis of drug recognition and transport by multidrug transport systems is required for the development of new antibiotics that are not extruded or of inhibitors that block the multidrug transporter and allow traditional antibiotics to be effective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have undertaken the inventory of the drug transporters subfamily, included in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), encoded by the complete genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). These proteins were identified on the basis of their characteristic stretches of amino acids and transmembrane segments (TMS) number. CONCLUSIONS: Genome analysis and searches of homology between the identified transporters and proteins characterized in other organisms revealed 16 open reading frames encoding putative drug efflux pumps belonging to MFS. In the case of two of them, we also have demonstrated that they function as drug efflux proteins. PMID:12520088

  17. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Certain contaminants may travel faster through soils when they are sorbed to subsurface colloidal particles. Indeed, subsurface colloids may act as carriers of some contaminants accelerating their translocation through the soil into the water table. This phenomenon is known as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. It plays a significant role in contaminant transport in soils and has been recognized as a source of groundwater contamination. From a mechanistic point of view, the attachment/detachment of the colloidal particles from the soil matrix or from the air-water interface and the straining process may modify the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Šimůnek et al. (2006) developed a model that can simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media. The model is based on the solution of a modified advection-dispersion equation that accounts for several processes, namely: straining, exclusion and attachement/detachement kinetics of colloids through the soil matrix. The solutions of these governing, partial differential equations are obtained using a standard Galerkin-type, linear finite element scheme, implemented in the HYDRUS-2D/3D software (Šimůnek et al., 2012). Modeling colloid transport through the soil and the interaction of colloids with the soil matrix and other contaminants is complex and requires the characterization of many model parameters. In practice, it is very difficult to assess actual transport parameter values, so they are often calibrated. However, before calibration, one needs to know which parameters have the greatest impact on output variables. This kind of information can be obtained through a sensitivity analysis of the model. The main objective of this work is to perform local and global sensitivity analyses of the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport module of HYDRUS. Sensitivity analysis was performed in two steps: (i) we applied a screening method based on Morris' elementary

  18. Carbonaceous meteorites contain a wide range of extraterrestrial nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Michael P; Smith, Karen E; Cleaves, H James; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C; Glavin, Daniel P; House, Christopher H; Dworkin, Jason P

    2011-08-23

    All terrestrial organisms depend on nucleic acids (RNA and DNA), which use pyrimidine and purine nucleobases to encode genetic information. Carbon-rich meteorites may have been important sources of organic compounds required for the emergence of life on the early Earth; however, the origin and formation of nucleobases in meteorites has been debated for over 50 y. So far, the few nucleobases reported in meteorites are biologically common and lacked the structural diversity typical of other indigenous meteoritic organics. Here, we investigated the abundance and distribution of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs in formic acid extracts of 12 different meteorites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Murchison and Lonewolf Nunataks 94102 meteorites contained a diverse suite of nucleobases, which included three unusual and terrestrially rare nucleobase analogs: purine, 2,6-diaminopurine, and 6,8-diaminopurine. In a parallel experiment, we found an identical suite of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs generated in reactions of ammonium cyanide. Additionally, these nucleobase analogs were not detected above our parts-per-billion detection limits in any of the procedural blanks, control samples, a terrestrial soil sample, and an Antarctic ice sample. Our results demonstrate that the purines detected in meteorites are consistent with products of ammonium cyanide chemistry, which provides a plausible mechanism for their synthesis in the asteroid parent bodies, and strongly supports an extraterrestrial origin. The discovery of new nucleobase analogs in meteorites also expands the prebiotic molecular inventory available for constructing the first genetic molecules.

  19. FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER: PART II. COLLOIDAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project consisted of both field and laboratory components. Field studies evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganicgeochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Research at three different metal-contaminated sit...

  20. Biology of the major facilitative folate transporters SLC19A1 and SLC46A1.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhanjun; Matherly, Larry H

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the biology of the major facilitative membrane folate transporters, the reduced folate carrier (RFC), and the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). Folates are essential vitamins, and folate deficiency contributes to a variety of heath disorders. RFC is ubiquitously expressed and is the major folate transporter in mammalian cells and tissues. PCFT mediates intestinal absorption of dietary folates. Clinically relevant antifolates such as methotrexate (MTX) are transported by RFC, and the loss of RFC transport is an important mechanism of MTX resistance. PCFT is abundantly expressed in human tumors and is active under pH conditions associated with the tumor microenvironment. Pemetrexed (PMX) is an excellent substrate for PCFT as well as for RFC. Novel tumor-targeted antifolates related to PMX with selective membrane transport by PCFT over RFC are being developed. The molecular picture of RFC and PCFT continues to evolve relating to membrane topology, N-glycosylation, energetics, and identification of structurally and functionally important domains and amino acids. The molecular bases for MTX resistance associated with loss of RFC function, and for the rare autosomal recessive condition, hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM), attributable to mutant PCFT, have been established. From structural homologies to the bacterial transporters GlpT and LacY, homology models were developed for RFC and PCFT, enabling new mechanistic insights and experimentally testable hypotheses. RFC and PCFT exist as homo-oligomers, and evidence suggests that homo-oligomerization of RFC and PCFT monomeric proteins may be important for intracellular trafficking and/or transport function. Better understanding of the structure and function of RFC and PCFT should facilitate the rational development of new therapeutic strategies for cancer as well as for HFM.

  1. Facilitated transport of dioxins in soil following unintentional release of pesticide-surfactant formulations.

    PubMed

    Grant, Sharon; Mortimer, Munro; Stevenson, Gavin; Malcolm, Don; Gaus, Caroline

    2011-01-15

    Colloids such as surfactant micelles can act as transport facilitators for highly lipophilic, generally immobile contaminants in soil. Following a fire at a pesticide facility, this study investigated vertical and lateral migration of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in heterogeneous soil beneath bunded ponds, where contaminated wastewater containing high surfactant loads was stored until remediation. Initially, surface and subsurface soil was obtained during excavation, and subsequently intact cores to 5.7 m were collected. ΣPCDD/F concentrations were elevated in the wastewater (15-81 ng/L) and correspondingly in pond surface soils (6.1-61 ng/g). Maximum ΣPCDD/F concentrations were, however, observed at 2-2.5 m depth (68-130 ng/g), far below their expected mobility range based on physicochemical properties. Congener specific analysis further indicated that PCDD/F mobility was reversed, with the least water-soluble congener migrating to the greatest extent. The presence of higher chlorinated PCDD/Fs throughout a core collected in the direction of groundwater flow indicated subsequent lateral transport. These results provide field evidence for rapid vertical migration (2.4 m in <4 months) of highly lipophilic PCDD/Fs and suggest surfactant facilitated transport as the dominant transport mechanism. Quantification and evaluation of such fundamental changes in contaminant transport and fate in the presence of surfactants is required to identify areas at risk of groundwater contamination.

  2. Synthetic ion transporters can induce apoptosis by facilitating chloride anion transport into cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Sung-Kyun; Kim, Sung Kuk; Share, Andrew; Lynch, Vincent M.; Park, Jinhong; Namkung, Wan; van Rossom, Wim; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Shin, Injae

    2014-10-01

    Anion transporters based on small molecules have received attention as therapeutic agents because of their potential to disrupt cellular ion homeostasis. However, a direct correlation between a change in cellular chloride anion concentration and cytotoxicity has not been established for synthetic ion carriers. Here we show that two pyridine diamide-strapped calix[4]pyrroles induce coupled chloride anion and sodium cation transport in both liposomal models and cells, and promote cell death by increasing intracellular chloride and sodium ion concentrations. Removing either ion from the extracellular media or blocking natural sodium channels with amiloride prevents this effect. Cell experiments show that the ion transporters induce the sodium chloride influx, which leads to an increased concentration of reactive oxygen species, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria and apoptosis via caspase activation. However, they do not activate the caspase-independent apoptotic pathway associated with the apoptosis-inducing factor. Ion transporters, therefore, represent an attractive approach for regulating cellular processes that are normally controlled tightly by homeostasis.

  3. Synthetic ion transporters can induce apoptosis by facilitating chloride anion transport into cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sung-Kyun; Kim, Sung Kuk; Share, Andrew; Lynch, Vincent M; Park, Jinhong; Namkung, Wan; Van Rossom, Wim; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A; Sessler, Jonathan L; Shin, Injae

    2014-10-01

    Anion transporters based on small molecules have received attention as therapeutic agents because of their potential to disrupt cellular ion homeostasis. However, a direct correlation between a change in cellular chloride anion concentration and cytotoxicity has not been established for synthetic ion carriers. Here we show that two pyridine diamide-strapped calix[4]pyrroles induce coupled chloride anion and sodium cation transport in both liposomal models and cells, and promote cell death by increasing intracellular chloride and sodium ion concentrations. Removing either ion from the extracellular media or blocking natural sodium channels with amiloride prevents this effect. Cell experiments show that the ion transporters induce the sodium chloride influx, which leads to an increased concentration of reactive oxygen species, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria and apoptosis via caspase activation. However, they do not activate the caspase-independent apoptotic pathway associated with the apoptosis-inducing factor. Ion transporters, therefore, represent an attractive approach for regulating cellular processes that are normally controlled tightly by homeostasis.

  4. Transportation Facilitation Education Program: A Handbook for Transportation and Distribution. Part III. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Coll. of Business Administration.

    The handbook accents the nature of transportation and related domestic and international business activities. Its objective is to provide basic information for the newcomer to the field. Chapters 2 and 3 describe assistance available from public and private agencies, as well as regulatory requirements for foreign traders and a resume of the…

  5. The effect of myoglobin-facilitated oxygen transport on the basal metabolism of papillary muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, D S

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model of oxygen diffusion into cylindrical papillary muscles is presented. The model partitions total oxygen flux into its simple and myoglobin-facilitated components. The model includes variable sigmoidal, exponential, or hyperbolic functions relating oxygen partial pressure to both fractional myoglobin saturation and rate of oxygen consumption. The behavior of the model was explored for a variety of saturation- and consumption-concentration relations. Facilitation of oxygen transport by myoglobin was considerable as indexed both by the elevation of oxygen partial pressure on the longitudinal axis of the muscle and by the fraction of total oxygen flux at the muscle center contributed by oxymyoglobin. Despite its facilitation of oxygen flux at the muscle center, myoglobin made only a negligible contribution to the total oxygen consumption averaged over the muscle cross-section. Hence the presence of myoglobin fails to explain either the experimentally determined basal metabolism-muscle radius relation or the stretch effect observed in isolated papillary muscle. PMID:3607211

  6. The major facilitator superfamily transporter ZIFL2 modulates cesium and potassium homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Remy, Estelle; Cabrito, Tânia R; Batista, Rita A; Teixeira, Miguel C; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Duque, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Potassium (K(+)) is an essential mineral nutrient for plant growth and development, with numerous membrane transporters and channels having been implicated in the maintenance and regulation of its homeostasis. The cation cesium (Cs(+)) is toxic for plants but shares similar chemical properties to the K(+) ion and hence competes with its transport. Here, we report that K(+) and Cs(+) homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana also requires the action of ZIFL2 (Zinc-Induced Facilitator-Like 2), a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) of membrane transporters. We show that the Arabidopsis ZIFL2 is a functional transporter able to mediate K(+) and Cs(+) influx when heterologously expressed in yeast. Promoter-reporter, reverse transcription-PCR and fluorescent protein fusion experiments indicate that the predominant ZIFL2.1 isoform is targeted to the plasma membrane of endodermal and pericyle root cells. ZIFL2 loss of function and overexpression exacerbate and alleviate plant sensitivity, respectively, upon Cs(+) and excess K(+) supply, also influencing Cs(+) whole-plant partitioning. We propose that the activity of this Arabidopsis MFS carrier promotes cellular K(+) efflux in the root, thereby restricting Cs(+)/K(+) xylem loading and subsequent root to shoot translocation under conditions of Cs(+) or high K(+) external supply.

  7. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Dessent, Caroline E. H. E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ thymine and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to

  8. Facilitated transport ceramic membranes for high-temperature gas cleanup. Final report, February 1990--April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, R.; Minford, E.; Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.; Hart, B.A.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of developing high temperature, high pressure, facilitated transport ceramic membranes to control gaseous contaminants in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. Meeting this objective requires that the contaminant gas H{sub 2}S be removed from an IGCC gas mixture without a substantial loss of the other gaseous components, specifically H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. As described above this requires consideration of other, nonconventional types of membranes. The solution evaluated in this program involved the use of facilitated transport membranes consisting of molten mixtures of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salts immobilized in a microporous ceramic support. To accomplish this objective, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Golden Technologies Company Inc., and Research Triangle Institute worked together to develop and test high temperature facilitated membranes for the removal of H{sub 2}S from IGCC gas mixtures. Three basic experimental activities were pursued: (1) evaluation of the H{sub 2}S chemistry of a variety of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salt mixtures; (2) development of microporous ceramic materials which were chemically and physically compatible with molten carbonate salt mixtures under IGCC conditions and which could function as a host to support a molten carbonate mixture and; (3) fabrication of molten carbonate/ceramic immobilized liquid membranes and evaluation of these membranes under conditions approximating those found in the intended application. Results of these activities are presented.

  9. A facilitative urea transporter is localized in the renal collecting tubule of the dogfish Triakis scyllia.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Susumu; Katoh, Fumi; Kaneko, Toyoji; Takei, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    Reabsorption of filtered urea by the kidney tubule is essential for retaining high levels of urea in body fluids of marine elasmobranchs. To elucidate the mechanisms of urea reabsorption, we examined the distribution of a facilitative urea transporter (UT) in the kidney of the dogfish Triakis scyllia. We isolated a cDNA encoding a UT that is homologous to the facilitative UT cloned from another dogfish species, Squalus acanthias. The Triakis UT mRNA is abundantly expressed in the kidney, while low levels of expression were detected in the brain and liver. In the dogfish kidney, each nephron makes four turns and traverses repeatedly between bundle zone and sinus zone. In the bundle zone, the resulting five tubular segments are arranged in a countercurrent loop fashion. Immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies raised against the cloned UT revealed that, among the nephron segments, the UT is expressed exclusively in the final segment of the bundle zone, i.e. in the collecting tubule of the Triakis kidney. In contrast to the limited localization of UT, the transport enzyme Na+/K+-ATPase is distributed in the basolateral membrane of numerous tubular segments both in the sinus zone and the bundle zone. However, in the collecting tubule, Na+/K+-ATPase immunoreactivity was not detected. The present study suggests that the collecting tubule is responsible for the reabsorption of urea in the marine elasmobranch kidney. Other countercurrent segments may contribute to production of a driving force for facilitative diffusion of urea through the UT.

  10. Carbonaceous Meteorites Contain a Wide Range of Extraterrestrial Nucleobases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen E.; Cleaves, H. James, II; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; House, Christopher H.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    All terrestrial organisms depend on nucleic acids (RNA and DNA), which use pyrimidine and purine nucleobases to encode genetic information. Carbon-rich meteorites may have been important sources of organic compounds required for the emergence of life on the early Earth; however, the origin and formation of nuc1eobases in meteorites has been debated for over 50 y. So far, the few nuc1eobases reported in meteorites are biologically common and lacked the structural diversity typical of other indigenous meteoritic organics. Here, we investigated the abundance and distribution of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs in formic acid extracts of 12 different meteorites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Murchison and Lonewolf Nunataks 94102 meteorites contained a diverse suite of nucleobases, which included three unusual and terrestrially rare nucleobase analogs; purine, 2,6-diminopurine, and 6,8-diaminopurine. In a parallel experiment, we found an identical suite of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs generated in reactions of ammonium cyanide. Additionally, these nucleobase analoge were not detected above our parts-per-billion detection limits in any of the procedural blanks, control samples, a terrestrial soil sample, and an Antarctic ice sample. Our results demonstrate that the purines detected in meteorites are consistent with products of ammonium cyanide chemistry, which provides a plausible mechanism for their synthesis in the asteroid parent bodies, and strongly supports an extraterrestrial origin. The discovery of new nucleobase analogs in meteorites also expands the prebiotic molecular inventory available for constructing the first genetic molecules.

  11. Protonation of Glu135 Facilitates the Outward-to-Inward Structural Transition of Fucose Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yufeng; Ke, Meng; Gong, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters typically need to alternatingly sample the outward-facing and inward-facing conformations, in order to transport the substrate across membrane. To understand the mechanism, in this work, we focused on one MFS member, the L-fucose/H+ symporter (FucP), whose crystal structure exhibits an outward-open conformation. Previous experiments imply several residues critical to the substrate/proton binding and structural transition of FucP, among which Glu135, located in the periplasm-accessible vestibule, is supposed as being involved in both proton translocation and conformational change of the protein. Here, the structural transition of FucP in presence of substrate was investigated using molecular-dynamics simulations. By combining the equilibrium and accelerated simulations as well as thermodynamic calculations, not only was the large-scale conformational change from the outward-facing to inward-facing state directly observed, but also the free energy change during the structural transition was calculated. The simulations confirm the critical role of Glu135, whose protonation facilitates the outward-to-inward structural transition both by energetically favoring the inward-facing conformation in thermodynamics and by reducing the free energy barrier along the reaction pathway in kinetics. Our results may help the mechanistic studies of both FucP and other MFS transporters. PMID:26244736

  12. Facilitation of axon regeneration by enhancing mitochondrial transport and rescuing energy deficits

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Panpan; Lin, Mei-Yao; Chen, Yanmin

    2016-01-01

    Although neuronal regeneration is a highly energy-demanding process, axonal mitochondrial transport progressively declines with maturation. Mature neurons typically fail to regenerate after injury, thus raising a fundamental question as to whether mitochondrial transport is necessary to meet enhanced metabolic requirements during regeneration. Here, we reveal that reduced mitochondrial motility and energy deficits in injured axons are intrinsic mechanisms controlling regrowth in mature neurons. Axotomy induces acute mitochondrial depolarization and ATP depletion in injured axons. Thus, mature neuron-associated increases in mitochondria-anchoring protein syntaphilin (SNPH) and decreases in mitochondrial transport cause local energy deficits. Strikingly, enhancing mitochondrial transport via genetic manipulation facilitates regenerative capacity by replenishing healthy mitochondria in injured axons, thereby rescuing energy deficits. An in vivo sciatic nerve crush study further shows that enhanced mitochondrial transport in snph knockout mice accelerates axon regeneration. Understanding deficits in mitochondrial trafficking and energy supply in injured axons of mature neurons benefits development of new strategies to stimulate axon regeneration. PMID:27268498

  13. Human transporters, PEPT1/2, facilitate melatonin transportation into mitochondria of cancer cells: an implication of the therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaokui; Wang, Chao; Yu, Zhenlong; Peng, Yulin; Wang, Shumei; Feng, Shengnan; Zhang, Shouji; Tian, Xiangge; Sun, Chengpeng; Liu, Kexin; Deng, Sa; Ma, Xiaochi

    2017-01-18

    Melatonin is present in virtually all organisms from bacteria to mammals, and it exhibits a broad spectrum of biological functions, including synchronization of circadian rhythms and oncostatic activity. Several functions of melatonin are mediated by its membrane receptors but others are receptor-independent. For the latter, melatonin is required to penetrate membrane and enters intracellular compartments. However, the mechanism by which melatonin enters cells remains debatable. In the current study, it was identified that melatonin and its sulfation metabolites were the substrates of oligopeptide transporter (PEPT) 1/2 and organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, respectively. The docking analysis showed that the binding of melatonin to PEPT1/2 was attributed to their low binding energy and suitable binding conformation in which melatonin was embedded in the active site of PEPT1/2 and fitted well with the cavity in three-dimensional space. PEPT1/2 transporters play a pivotal role in melatonin uptake in cells. Melatonin's membrane transportation via PEPT1/2 renders its oncostatic effect in malignant cells. For the first time, PEPT1/2 were identified to localize in the mitochondrial membrane of human cancer cell lines of PC3 and U118. PEPT1/2 facilitated the transportation of melatonin into mitochondria. Melatonin accumulation in mitochondria induced apoptosis of PC3 and U118 cells. Thus, PEPT1/2 can potentially be used as a cancer cell-targeted melatonin delivery system to improve the therapeutic effects of melatonin in cancer treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Channel-facilitated molecular transport: The role of strength and spatial distribution of interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppulury, Karthik; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular transport across channels and pores is critically important for multiple natural and industrial processes. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques have allowed researchers to probe translocation through nanopores with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of channel-facilitated molecular transport is still not complete. We present a theoretical approach that investigates the role of molecular interactions in the transport through channels. It is based on the discrete-state stochastic analysis that provides a fully analytical description of this complex process. It is found that a spatial distribution of the interactions strongly influences the translocation dynamics. We predict that there is the optimal distribution that leads to the maximal flux through the channel. It is also argued that the channel transport depends on the strength of the molecule-pore interactions, on the shape of interaction potentials and on the relative contributions of entrance and diffusion processes in the system. These observations are discussed using simple physical-chemical arguments.

  15. Cytoplasmic transport of ribosomal subunits microinjected into the Xenopus laevis oocyte nucleus: a generalized, facilitated process

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    To study the biochemistry of ribonucleoprotein export from the nucleus, we characterized an in vivo assay in which the cytoplasmic appearance of radiolabeled ribosomal subunits was monitored after their microinjection into Xenopus oocyte nuclei. Denaturing gel electrophoresis and sucrose density gradient sedimentation demonstrated that injected subunits were transported intact. Consistent with the usual subcellular distribution of ribosomes, transport was unidirectional, as subunits injected into the cytoplasm did not enter the nucleus. Transport displayed properties characteristic of a facilitated, energy-dependent process; the rate of export was saturable and transport was completely inhibited either by lowering the temperature or by depleting nuclei of ATP; the effect of lowered temperature was completely reversible. Transport of injected subunits was likely a process associated with the nuclear pore complex, since export was also inhibited by prior or simultaneous injection of wheat germ agglutinin, a lectin known to inhibit active nuclear transport by binding to N-acetyl glucosamine-containing glycoproteins present in the NPC (Hart, G. W., R. S. Haltiwanger, G. D. Holt, and W. G. Kelly. 1989. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 58:841-874). Although GlcNAc modified proteins exist on both the nuclear and cytoplasmic sides of the nuclear pore complex, ribosomal subunit export was inhibited only when wheat germ agglutinin was injected into the nucleus. Finally, we found that ribosomal subunits from yeast and Escherichia coli were efficiently exported from Xenopus oocyte nuclei, suggesting that export of some RNP complexes may be directed by a collective biochemical property rather than by specific macromolecular primary sequences or structures. PMID:2211825

  16. Intrinsic and Carrier Colloid-facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Tran, E. L.; Klein-BenDavid, O.; Teutsch, N.

    2015-12-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. However, some radionuclides might be released from these repositories into the subsurface as a result of leakage, which ultimately make their way into groundwater. Engineered bentonite barriers around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their source to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles ("carrier" colloids) originating from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. As lanthanides are generally accepted to have the same chemical behaviors as their more toxic actinide counterparts, lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute for research on radionuclide transportation. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of lanthanides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative the Negev desert, Israel. The migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide) using a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Results suggest that mobility of Ce as a solute is negligible. In experiments conducted without bentonite colloids, the 1% of the Ce that was recovered migrated as "intrinsic" colloids in the form of carbonate precipitates. However, the total recovery of the Ce increased to 9% when it was injected into the core in the presence of bentonite colloids and 13% when both bentonite and precipitate colloids were injected. This indicates that lanthanides are essentially immobile in chalk as a solute but may be mobile as carbonate precipitates. Bentonite colloids, however, markedly increase the mobility of lanthanides through fractured chalk matrices.

  17. Solanaceae XIPs are plasma membrane aquaporins that facilitate the transport of many uncharged substrates.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Bienert, Manuela Désirée; Jahn, Thomas Paul; Boutry, Marc; Chaumont, François

    2011-04-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) transport water and uncharged solutes across membranes in all kingdoms of life. Recently, an uncharacterized MIP subfamily was identified in the genomes of plants and fungi and named X Intrinsic Proteins (XIPs). Here, we describe the genetic features, localization, expression, and functions of a group of Solanaceae XIPs. XIP cDNA and gDNA were cloned from tobacco, potato, tomato, and morning glory. A conserved sequence motif in the first intron of Solanaceae XIPs initiates an RNA-processing mechanism that results in two splice variants (α and β). When transiently or stably expressed in tobacco plants, yellow fluorescent protein-tagged NtXIP1;1α and NtXIP1;1β were both localized in the plasma membrane. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing NtXIP1;1-promoter-GUS constructs and RT-PCR studies showed that NtXIP1;1 was expressed in all organs. The NtXIP1;1 promoter was mainly active in cell layers facing the environment in all above-ground tissues. Heterologous expression of Solanaceae XIPs in Xenopus laevis oocytes and various Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants demonstrated that these isoforms facilitate the transport of bulky solutes, such as glycerol, urea, and boric acid. In contrast, permeability for water was undetectable. These data suggest that XIPs function in the transport of uncharged solutes across the cell plasma membrane in specific plant tissues, including at the interface between the environment and external cell layers.

  18. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar; Haque, Abdul; De Zorzi, Rita; Mirza, Osman; Walz, Thomas; Rahman, Moazur

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874 conferred resistance to at least ten of the tested antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, gentamycin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, ethidium bromide, and acriflavine, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which were drugs of choice to treat S. Typhi infections. Cell-based functional studies using ethidium bromide and acriflavine showed that STY4874 functions as a H(+)-dependent exporter. These results suggest that STY4874 may be an important drug target, which can now be tested by studying the susceptibility of a STY4874-deficient S. Typhi strain to antimicrobials.

  19. Colloid-facilitated transport of cesium in vadose-zone sediments: the importance of flow transients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Saiers, James E

    2010-10-01

    Colloid-sized particles are commonly detected in vadose-zone pore waters and are capable of binding chemicals with sorptive affinities for geologic materials. Published research demonstrates that colloids are capable of facilitating the transport of sorptive contaminants under conditions of steady pore water flow, when volumetric moisture content and pore water velocity are constant. Less is known about the role of colloids in governing contaminant mobility under transient-flow conditions, which are characteristic of natural vadose-zone environments. The objective of this study is to elucidate the influences of flow transients on the mobilization and transport of in situ colloids and colloid-associated contaminants. We conducted column experiments in which the mobilization of in situ colloids and (137)Cs was induced by transients associated with the drainage and imbibition of (137)Cs contaminated-sediments. Our results demonstrate that substantial quantities of in situ colloids and colloid-associated (137)Cs are mobilized as volumetric moisture content declines during porous-medium drainage and as volumetric moisture content increases during porous-medium imbibition. We also find that the colloid-effect on (137)Cs transport is sensitive to changes in pore water ionic strength. That is, the quantities of colloids mobilized and the capacity of the these colloids to bind (137)Cs decrease with increasing ionic strength, leading to a decrease of the mass of (137)Cs eluted from the columns during porous-medium drainage and imbibition.

  20. Colloid-facilitated transport of cesium in variably saturated Hanford sediments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Lichtner, Peter C

    2005-05-15

    Radioactive 137Cs has leaked from underground waste tanks into the vadose zone at the Hanford Reservation in south-central Washington State. There is concern that 137Cs, currently located in the vadose zone, can reach the groundwater. In this study, we investigated whether, and to what extent, colloidal particles can facilitate the transport of 137Cs at Hanford. We used colloidal materials isolated from Hanford sediments. Transport experiments were conducted under variably saturated, steady-state flow conditions in repacked, 20 cm long Hanford sediment columns, with effective water saturations ranging from 0.2 to 1.0. Cesium, pre-associated with colloids, was stripped off during transport through the sediments. The higher the flow rates, the less Cs was stripped off, indicating in part that Cs desorption from carrying colloids was a residence-time-dependent process. Depending on the flow rate, up to 70% of the initially sorbed Cs desorbed from colloidal carriers and was captured in the stationary sediments. Less Cs was stripped off colloids under unsaturated than under saturated flow conditions at similar flow rates. This phenomenon was likely due to the reduced availability of sorption sites for Cs on the sediments as the water content decreased and water flow was divided between mobile and immobile regions.

  1. Do anthropogenic transports facilitate stored-product pest moth dispersal? A molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Ryne, Camilla; Bensch, Staffan

    2008-02-01

    Stored-product moths cause large economic damage in food processing industries and storage facilities. Control of indoor pests is currently dealt with locally, and control strategies seldom include different mills or cooperative industries in joint efforts to reduce infestations. In colder climates where conditions hinder flight dispersal of stored-product moths, we hypothesize that human transport between mills will facilitate dispersal. Albeit considered intuitive, this hypothesis has so far never been tested. Male moths from three mills (populations) in southern Sweden and Denmark were collected and by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) pair-wise F(st) values were calculated. Cluster (population) origins of the genotypes were computed by using a model-based method, structure. The results suggest that known transportation of flour between two mills generate genetically more similar populations of the economically important stored-product moth, Ephestia kuehniella (Zell.) (Lepidoptera; Pyralidae), compared to the third mill, with another distribution area, but situated geographically in between the other mills. The structure model placed the sampled genotypes to belong to either two or five original populations, with a higher probability of two original populations. The third mill was consistently different from the other two mills independent of the models' calculated number of populations. Although the study was restricted to three mills and one transportation route, it highlights the possibility that transportation of food products promotes genetic mixing (i.e. dispersal) of insect pest populations. Including cooperating mills in control (or monitor) strategy schemes against stored-product pest insects would therefore be a more effective action, rather than to treat each mill separately.

  2. Do anthropogenic transports facilitate stored-product pest moth dispersal? A molecular approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryne, Camilla; Bensch, Staffan

    2008-02-01

    Stored-product moths cause large economic damage in food processing industries and storage facilities. Control of indoor pests is currently dealt with locally, and control strategies seldom include different mills or cooperative industries in joint efforts to reduce infestations. In colder climates where conditions hinder flight dispersal of stored-product moths, we hypothesize that human transport between mills will facilitate dispersal. Albeit considered intuitive, this hypothesis has so far never been tested. Male moths from three mills (populations) in southern Sweden and Denmark were collected and by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) pair-wise F st values were calculated. Cluster (population) origins of the genotypes were computed by using a model-based method, structure. The results suggest that known transportation of flour between two mills generate genetically more similar populations of the economically important stored-product moth, Ephestia kuehniella (Zell.) (Lepidoptera; Pyralidae), compared to the third mill, with another distribution area, but situated geographically in between the other mills. The structure model placed the sampled genotypes to belong to either two or five original populations, with a higher probability of two original populations. The third mill was consistently different from the other two mills independent of the models’ calculated number of populations. Although the study was restricted to three mills and one transportation route, it highlights the possibility that transportation of food products promotes genetic mixing (i.e. dispersal) of insect pest populations. Including cooperating mills in control (or monitor) strategy schemes against stored-product pest insects would therefore be a more effective action, rather than to treat each mill separately.

  3. Colloid facilitated transport in fractured rock : parameter estimation and comparison with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, H. S.; Wolfsberg, A. V.

    2002-01-01

    Many contaminants in groundwater strongly interact with the immobile porous matrix, which retards their movement relative to groundwater flow. Colloidal particles, which are often present in groundwater, have a relatively small size and large specific surface area which makes it possible for them to also adsorb pollutants. The sorption of tracers to colloids may enhance their mobility in groundwater, relative to the case where colloids are not present. A class of pollutants for which colloid-facilitated transport may be of particular significance are radioactive isotopes. A major reason for why geologic repositories are considered suitable for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel is the strong affinity of many radionuclides to adsorb onto the porous matrix. Therefore, radionuclides accidentally released, would be contained in the geological media by adsorption or filtration until sufficient decay takes place. However, the presence of colloids may enhance radionuclide mobility in the groundwater, and reduce the efficiency of geologic media to act as a natural barrier.

  4. Facilitated transport of carbon dioxide through supported liquid membranes of aqueous amine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Teramoto, Masaaki; Nakai, Katsuya; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Huang, Q.; Watari, Takashi; Matsuyama, Hideto

    1996-02-01

    A series of experiments on the facilitated transport of CO{sub 2} through supported liquid membranes containing monoethanolamine (MEA) and diethanolamine (DEA) was performed. The feed gas was a mixture of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, and the CO{sub 2} partial pressure p{sub CO{sub 2},F} was in the range from 0.05 to 0.97 atm. Compared to the MEA membranes, the DEA membranes showed a little higher permeation rate of CO{sub 2} since the equilibrium constant of the reaction between CO{sub 2} and MEA is too large for CO{sub 2} to be released to the receiving phase rapidly. When p{sub CO{sub 2},F} and the MEA concentration were 0.05 atm and 4 mol/dm{sup 3}, respectively, the separation factor {alpha}(CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}) was about 2,000. It was found that if the membrane thickness multiplied by the square root of the tortuosity factor of the microporous support membrane is used as the effective pore length, the experimentally observed permeation rates of CO{sub 2} can be satisfactorily simulated by the theory of facilitated transport of CO{sub 2} through aqueous amine membranes. A method for estimating the solubilities of CO{sub 2} in the membrane solutions from the permeation rates of CH{sub 4} was also proposed. It was also found that permeation rates of CO{sub 2} through aqueous DEA membranes reported by Guha et al. were quantitatively explained by the proposed theory.

  5. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cations in an Unsaturated Fractured Soil Under Transient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Joseph

    2015-01-31

    Rainfall experiments were conducted using intact soil cores and an instrumented soil pedon to examine the effect of physical heterogeneity and rainfall characteristics on the mobilization of colloids, organic matter, cesium, and strontium in a fractured soil. To measure the spatial variability of infiltration of colloids and contaminants, samples were collected through a 19-port grid placed below the soil core in laboratory study and in 27 samplers at multiple depths in the soil pedon in the field study. Cesium and strontium were applied to the soil cores and the soil pedon prior to mobilization experiments. Rainwater solutions of multiple ionic strengths and organic matter concentrations were applied to the soil cores and soil pedon to mobilize in situ colloids, cesium, and strontium. The mobilization of colloids and metal cations occurred through preferential flow paths in the soil cores. Compared to steady rainfall, greater amounts of colloids were mobilized during rainfall interrupted by pauses, which indicates that the supply of colloids to be mobilized was replenished during the pauses. A maximum in the amount of mobilized colloids were mobilized during a rainfall following a pause of 2.5 d. Pauses of shorter or longer duration resulted in less colloid mobilization. Freeze-thaw cycles, a transient condition in winter, enhanced colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium in the soil cores. The exchange of solutes between the soil matrix and macropores caused a hysteretic mobilization of colloids, cesium, and strontium during changes in ionic strength. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of cesium and strontium was important at low ionic strength in fractures where slow flow allowed greater exchange of flow between the fractures and the surrounding matrix. The release of cesium and strontium by cation exchange occurred at high ionic strength in fractures where there is a little exchange of pore water with the surrounding matrix

  6. Atrazine adsorption and colloid-facilitated transport through the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sprague, L.A.; Herman, J.S.; Hornberger, G.M.; Mills, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    One explanation for unexpectedly widespread ground water contamination from atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) may be the occurence of colloid-facilitated transport, whereby the dissolved herbicide becomes adsorbed to mobile colloids that migrate through preferential flow-paths in the soil zone and into the ground water. The objectives of this study were to determine the extent of adsorpton of atrazine to bulk soil and to soil colloids and to determine the extent of colloid-facilitated transport of atrazine at a field site in Virginia during simulated rainfall events. Equilibrium batch adsorption experiments were performed over a concentration range of 0.05 to 10.0 mg atrazine L-1 on bulk soil samples and on colloidal suspensions of 75 mg L-1, a concentration comparable with those observed at the field site. Linear partition coefficients ranged from 0.496 to 2.48 L kg-1 for the bulk soil and from 70.8 to 832 L kg-1 for the soil colloids. In the field, gravity lysimeters were insured at a depth of 25 cm below the surface of six 0.25-m2 undisturbed plots. Mass recovery of surface-applied atrazine in the lysimeters was not significantly affected by rainfall rate and was, on average, 2.7% for plots receiving 25 mm h-1 simulated rainfall and 3.6% for plots receiving 50 mm h-1 simulated rainfall. Of the total atrazine collected in the lysimeters, the fraction that was colloid-associated ranged from 4.9 to 30% (mean of 15%), indicating that a measurable portion of mobile atrazine is transported via association with colloids.One explanation for unexpectedly widespread ground water contamination from atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) may be the occurrence of colloid-facilitated transport, whereby the dissolved herbicide becomes adsorbed to mobile colloids that migrate through preferential flow-paths in the soil zone and into the ground water. The objectives of this study were to determine the extent of adsorption of

  7. Facilitated transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by humic substances in saturated porous media under acidic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruichang; Zhang, Haibo; Tu, Chen; Hu, Xuefeng; Li, Lianzhen; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The transport behavior of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs, 30 nm in diameter) was studied in well-defined porous media composed of clean quartz sand over a range of solution chemistry under acidic conditions. Transport of TiO2 NPs was dramatically enhanced by humic substances (HS) at acidic pH (4.0, 5.0 and 6.0), even at a low HS concentration of 0.5 mg L-1. Facilitated transport of TiO2 NPs was likely attributable to the increased stability of TiO2 NPs and repulsive interaction between TiO2 NPs and quartz sands due to the adsorbed HS. The mobility of TiO2 NPs was also increased with increasing pH from 4.0 to 6.0. Although transport of TiO2 NPs was insensitive to low ionic strength, it was significantly inhibited by high concentrations of NaCl and CaCl2. In addition, calculated Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energy indicated that high energy barriers were responsible for the high mobility of TiO2 NPs, while the secondary energy minimum could play an important role in the retention of TiO2 NPs at 100 mmol L-1 NaCl. Straining and gravitational settlement of larger TiO2 NPs aggregates at 1 mg L-1 HS, pH 5.0, and 2 mmol L-1 CaCl2 could be responsible for the significant retention even in the presence of high energy barriers. Moreover, more favorable interaction between approaching TiO2 NPs and TiO2 NPs that had been already deposited on the collector resulted in a ripening-shape breakthrough curve at 2 mmol L-1 CaCl2. Overall, a combination of mechanisms including DLVO-type force, straining, and physical filtration was involved in the retention of TiO2 NPs over the range of solution chemistry examined in this study.

  8. Silver- and gold-mediated nucleobase bonding.

    PubMed

    Acioli, Paulo H; Srinivas, Sudha

    2014-08-01

    We report the results of a density functional theory investigation of the bonding of nucleobases mediated by silver and gold atoms in the gas phase. Our calculations use the Becke exchange and Perdew-Wang correlation functional (BPW91) combined with the Stuttgart effective core potentials to represent the valence electrons of gold, silver, and platinum, and the all-electron DGTZVP basis set for C, H, N, and O. This combination was chosen based on tests on the metal atoms and tautomers of adenine, cytosine, and guanine. To establish a benchmark to understand the metal-mediated bonding, we calculated the binding energy of each of the base pairs in their canonical forms. Our calculations show rather strong bonds between the Watson-Crick base pairs when compared with typical values for N-H-N and N-H-O hydrogen bonds. The neutral metal atoms tend to bond near the nitrogen atoms. The effect of the metal atoms on the bonding of nucleobases differs depending on whether or not the metal atoms bond to one of the hydrogen-bonding sites. When the silver or gold atoms bond to a non-hydrogen-bonding site, the effect is a slight enhancement of the cytosine-guanine bonding, but there is almost no effect on the adenine-thymine pairing. The metal atoms can block one of the hydrogen-bonding sites, thus preventing the normal cytosine-guanine and adenine-thymine pairings. We also find that both silver and gold can bond to consecutive guanines in a similar fashion to platinum, albeit with a significantly lower binding energy.

  9. Modeling of facilitated transport of phenylalanine by emulsion liquid membranes with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as a carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Liu, D.

    1998-12-01

    A mathematical model is developed in this paper to simulate the facilitated transport of phenylalanine (Phe) in emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems with di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as a carrier. The model takes into account the mass transfer in both the external aqueous phase and the organic membrane phase interfacial reaction as well as membrane breakage during agitation. The model is tested by comparing theoretical predications with experimental results using Phe extraction by ELM processes. It is found that the model is valid for simulating the facilitated transport of Phe with ELM under various experimental conditions.

  10. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Thomas E; Hresko, Richard C; Hruz, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    The insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 is of fundamental importance for maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Despite intensive effort, the ability to express and purify sufficient quantities of structurally and functionally intact protein for biophysical analysis has previously been exceedingly difficult. We report here the development of novel methods to express, purify, and functionally reconstitute GLUT4 into detergent micelles and proteoliposomes. Rat GLUT4 containing FLAG and His tags at the amino and carboxy termini, respectively, was engineered and stably transfected into HEK-293 cells. Overexpression in suspension culture yielded over 1.5 mg of protein per liter of culture. Systematic screening of detergent solubilized GLUT4-GFP fusion protein via fluorescent-detection size exclusion chromatography identified lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (LMNG) as highly effective for isolating monomeric GLUT4 micelles. Preservation of structural integrity and ligand binding was demonstrated via quenching of tryptophan fluorescence and competition of ATB-BMPA photolabeling by cytochalasin B. GLUT4 was reconstituted into lipid nanodiscs and proper folding was confirmed. Reconstitution of purified GLUT4 with amphipol A8-35 stabilized the transporter at elevated temperatures for extended periods of time. Functional activity of purified GLUT4 was confirmed by reconstitution of LMNG-purified GLUT4 into proteoliposomes and measurement of saturable uptake of D-glucose over L-glucose. Taken together, these data validate the development of an efficient means to generate milligram quantities of stable and functionally intact GLUT4 that is suitable for a wide array of biochemical and biophysical analyses.

  11. Protist-facilitated transport of soil bacteria in an artificial soil micromodel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, R. L.; Cousens, V.; Gage, D. J.; Shor, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Soil bacteria within the rhizosphere benefit plants by protecting roots from pathogens, producing growth factors, and improving nutrient availability. These effects can greatly improve overall plant health and increase crop yield, but as roots grow out from the tips they quickly outpace their bacterial partners. Some soil bacteria are motile and can chemotact towards root tips, but bacterial mobility in unsaturated soils is limited to interconnected hydrated pores. Mobility is further reduced by the tendency of soil bacteria to form biofilms. The introduction of protists to the rhizosphere has been shown to benefit plants, purportedly by selective grazing on harmful bacteria or release of nutrients otherwise sequestered in bacteria. We propose that an additional benefit to the presence of protists is the facilitated transport of beneficial bacteria along root systems. Using microfluidic devices designed to imitate narrow, fluid-filled channels in soil, we have shown that the distribution of bacteria through micro-channels is accelerated in the presence of protists. Furthermore, we have observed that even with predation effects, the bacteria remain viable and continue to reproduce for the duration of our experiments. These results expand upon our understanding of complex bio-physical interactions in the rhizosphere system, and may have important implications for agricultural practices.

  12. Role of LiBF4 in Ionic Liquid Membranes for Facilitated CO2 Transport.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeji; Hong, Gil Hwan; Kang, Sang Wook

    2016-03-01

    The ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM BF4)/LiBF4 electrolyte was prepared for highly selective facilitated CO2 transport membranes. When LiBF4 was incorporated into BMIM BF4, synergy effects by free Li+ ion and imidazolium cations is expected to enhance the separation performance for CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4. The free state of BF4- ions in BMIM BF4/LiBF4 solutions was investigated by FT-Raman spectroscopy. For the coordination of LiBF4 with BMIMBF4, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was utilized. Electrolyte membranes consisting of BMIM BF4 and LiBF4 showed selectivities of 8.40 and 8.25 for CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4, respectively. Neat BMIM BF4 membrane showed selectivities of 5.0 and 4.8, respectively. Enhanced separation performance was attributed to increased free Li+ and abundant free imidazolium cations.

  13. Carbon dioxide capture using a CO{sub 2}-selective facilitated transport membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Zou, J.; Ho, W.S.W.

    2008-02-15

    A novel CO{sub 2}-selective membrane with the facilitated transport mechanism has been synthesized to capture CO{sub 2} from the industrial gas mixtures, including flue gas. Both mobile and fixed amine carriers were incorporated into the cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) during the membrane synthesis. The membrane showed desirable CO{sub 2} permeability (with a suitable effective thickness) and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity up to 170{sup o} C. In the CO{sub 2} capture experiments from a gas mixture with N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, a permeate CO{sub 2} dry concentration of {gt}98% was obtained, using steam as the sweep gas. The effects of the feed flow rate and the sweep:feed molar ratio on the membrane separation performance were investigated. A one-dimensional isothermal model was established to examine the performance of a hollow-fiber membrane module composed of the described CO{sub 2}-selective membrane. The modeling results show that a CO{sub 2} recovery of {gt}95% and a permeate CO{sub 2} dry concentration of {gt}98% are achievable from a 1000 standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM) (or 21.06 mol/s) flue gas stream with a 2 ft (0.61 m) hollow-fiber module that contained 980 000 fibers.

  14. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Facilitates the Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Docosahexaenoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Owada, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yui; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-12-07

    The brain has a limited ability to synthesize the essential polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from its omega-3 fatty acid precursors. Therefore, to maintain brain concentrations of this PUFA at physiological levels, plasma-derived DHA must be transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). While DHA is able to partition into the luminal membrane of brain endothelial cells, its low aqueous solubility likely limits its cytosolic transfer to the abluminal membrane, necessitating the requirement of an intracellular carrier protein to facilitate trafficking of this PUFA across the BBB. As the intracellular carrier protein fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) is expressed at the human BBB, the current study assessed the putative role of FABP5 in the brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of DHA in vitro and in vivo, respectively. hFAPB5 was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli C41(DE3) cells and the binding affinity of DHA to hFABP5 assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry. The impact of FABP5 siRNA on uptake of (14)C-DHA into immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cells was assessed. An in situ transcardiac perfusion method was optimized in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently used to compare the BBB influx rate (Kin) of (14)C-DHA between FABP5-deficient (FABP5(-/-)) and wild-type (FABP5(+/+)) C57BL/6 mice. DHA bound to hFABP5 with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 155 ± 8 nM (mean ± SEM). FABP5 siRNA transfection decreased hCMEC/D3 mRNA and protein expression of FABP5 by 53.2 ± 5.5% and 44.8 ± 13.7%, respectively, which was associated with a 14.1 ± 2.7% reduction in (14)C-DHA cellular uptake. By using optimized conditions for the in situ transcardiac perfusion (a 1 min preperfusion (10 mL/min) followed by perfusion of (14)C-DHA (1 min)), the Kin of (14)C-DHA was 0.04 ± 0.01 mL/g/s. Relative to FABP5(+/+) mice, the Kin of (14)C-DHA decreased 36.7 ± 12.4% in FABP5(-/-) mice

  15. Facilitated transport of Cu with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in saturated sand: Effects of solution ionic strength and composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Column experiments were conducted to investigate the facilitated transport of Cu in association with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) in water-saturated quartz sand at different solution concentrations of NaCl (0 to 100 mM) or CaCl2 (0.1 to 1.0 mM). The experimental breakthrough curves and retent...

  16. Role of Desorption Kinetics and Porous Medium Heterogeneity in Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cesium and Strontium: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Ryan, J. N.

    2008-12-01

    The presence of mobile colloids (particles between 1 nm and 1 μm in size) in natural soil and groundwater systems has been well established. Colloids generally have a high sorptive capacity resulting from their high surface area to mass ratio, which makes them effective sorbents of low solubility, strongly sorbing contaminants. Mobile colloids that sorb contaminants can increase the apparent solubility and rate of transport of the contaminants when desorption from the colloids is slow relative to the rate of flow. This process is known as colloid-facilitated transport (CFT). The additional transport of contaminants associated with mobile colloids should be accounted for to accurately predict transport rates of strongly-sorbing contaminants in the environment. Some examples of contaminants that have the potential for CFT are hydrophobic pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), actinide cations (e.g., Th, U, Pu, Am), and many metals (e.g, Pb, Cu, Hg). Many low solubility contaminants that have the potential for CFT are also harmful or toxic to humans, underscoring the importance of accurate modeling techniques to protect water sources from contamination. Contaminated Department of Energy (DOE) sites have been particularly valuable research opportunities for studying the transport of radionuclides in the natural environment. The DOE has conducted energy and weapons research and development in thirty-one states and Puerto Rico and has introduced many toxic and radioactive chemicals into surface waters, soils, and groundwater. Field experiments on DOE sites including the Nevada Test Site, the Hanford 200 Area tank farm, Rocky Flats CO, and Oak Ridge TN, have confirmed that metals and radionuclides have moved further than expected due to colloid-facilitated transport. The major goal of this research project is to identify and quantify the effects of sorption kinetics on colloid- facilitated transport in unsaturated porous media. This information will be used

  17. Evidence for expression of the facilitated glucose transporter in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, D B; Takano, M; Gattoni-Celli, S; Chen, C C; Isselbacher, K J

    1988-01-01

    The eukaryotic facilitated glucose transporter (GT) is expressed by many cell types, with the notable exception of hepatocytes; however, GT is expressed by several hepatoma cell lines, including the well-differentiated lines Fao, Hep3B, and HepG2. We report on studies carried out to determine the aspect(s) of the transformed phenotype that might be responsible for activating GT expression. Using RNA blot analysis with probes derived from rat GT cDNA, we found that GT was expressed by rat hepatocytes under two conditions (i) in vitro, when isolated hepatocytes were placed in cell culture, and (ii) in vivo, when rats were subjected to starvation for greater than or equal to 2 days. However, GT expression was not an obligatory feature of hepatomas, since two primary hepatocellular carcinomas did not express any GT mRNA. GT expression in hepatocytes was reduced by addition of dimethyl sulfoxide or sodium butyrate to the culture medium. Since these reagents are known to promote differentiation in some cell culture systems, their effect on hepatocytes may be to maintain the GT repression normally observed in vivo. Inclusion or exclusion in the culture medium of several other agents that enhance hepatocyte viability (serum, insulin, corticosteroids, epidermal growth factor, or triiodothyronine) did not affect GT expression. It is unclear whether the two conditions that led to GT expression in hepatocytes are related by a common signaling mechanism. Possibly, both cases involve a "stress" response: in vivo, a normal physiological response to starvation; in vitro, a response to a major alteration in the cellular environment. Images PMID:3194405

  18. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  19. Microbially Produced Organic Matter and Its Role in Facilitating Pu Transport in the Deep Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. C.; Tinnacher, R. M.; Zavarin, M.; Kersting, A. B.; Czerwinski, K.; Moser, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    Microorganisms have the potential to affect the fate and mobility of actinides in the deep vadose zone (DVZ) by metabolism (direct oxidation/reduction and changes to ecosystem redox potential), production of colloids and ligands, or by sorption (biofilms). The role of microbial communities in colloid-facilitated Pu transport is currently under investigation at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Our experimental objective is to obtain both qualitative and quantitative data on the in situ role of biological organic material (DOM, POC, and EPS) on the (de)sorption of Pu at environmentally relevant concentrations. Groundwater samples were collected through vertical ventilation holes from a flooded post-test tunnel at the (NTS), where SSU rRNA gene libraries revealed a range of potential microbial physiotypes. Microbial enrichments were set up with the aim of isolating numerically significant representatives of major relevant physiotypes (e.g. aerobic heterotrophs, Mn/Fe reducers, EPS producers). NTS isolates, a well-characterized Shewanella sp.(str. CN-32), and an EPS-mutant of this strain were screened for their reactivity with Pu(IV). Organisms with both high and low (relative) Kd’s were used in sorption and cell lysis experiments. Viability experiments were conducted for all isolates in NaCl or NaCl/NaHCO3 solutions (I=0.01) for pH = 3, 5, 7, and 9. Products from cell lysis were filtered (0.22 um) or dialyzed (MW cutoff = 20,000 kD). These fractions were normalized by TOC and equilibrated with Pu to determine if Pu sorbs more strongly to either viable cells, EPS, cell membranes, or cell exudates. In our experiments, Pu(IV) sorbed most strongly to cells or cell fractions with EPS (expolysaccharide, the major biofilm component). However, cell fractions and exudates, which may become mobile when released from lysed or senescing cells, also strongly sorbed to Pu(IV). Therefore, changes in groundwater chemistry (e.g., pH or ionic strength) may have both direct chemical

  20. MATE transporters facilitate vacuolar uptake of epicatechin 3'-O-glucoside for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Dixon, Richard A

    2009-08-01

    Expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana MYB transcription factor TRANSPARENT TESTA 2 (TT2) in Medicago trunculata hairy roots induces both proanthocyanidin accumulation and the ATP-dependent vacuolar/vesicular uptake of epicatechin 3'-O-glucoside; neither process is active in control roots that do, however, possess anthocyanidin 3-O-glucoside vacuolar uptake activity. A vacuolar membrane-localized multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter, Medicago MATE1, was identified at the molecular level and shown to preferentially transport epicatechin 3'-O-glucoside. Genetic evidence has implicated TT12, a tonoplastic MATE transporter from Arabidopsis, in the transport of precursors for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in the seed coat. However, although Arabidopsis TT12 facilitates the transport of cyanidin 3-O-glucoside into membrane vesicles when expressed in yeast, there is no evidence that cyanidin 3-O-glucoside is converted to proanthocyanidins after transport into the vacuole. Here, we show that Arabidopsis TT12, like Medicago MATE1, functions to transport epicatechin 3'-O-glucoside as a precursor for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis, and Medicago MATE1 complements the seed proanthocyanidin phenotype of the Arabidopsis tt12 mutant both quantitatively and qualitatively. On the basis of biochemical properties, tissue-specific expression pattern, and genetic loss-of-function analysis, we conclude that MATE1 is an essential membrane transporter for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in the Medicago seed coat. Implications of these findings for the assembly of oligomeric proanthocyanidins are discussed.

  1. Facilitated Anion Transport Induces Hyperpolarization of the Cell Membrane That Triggers Differentiation and Cell Death in Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Hernando, Elsa; Calabuig-Fariñas, Silvia; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Knöpfel, Thomas; García-Valverde, María; Rodilla, Ananda M; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Farràs, Rosa; Ciruela, Francisco; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    Facilitated anion transport potentially represents a powerful tool to modulate various cellular functions. However, research into the biological effects of small molecule anionophores is still at an early stage. Here we have used two potent anionophore molecules inspired in the structure of marine metabolites tambjamines to gain insight into the effect induced by these compounds at the cellular level. We show how active anionophores, capable of facilitating the transmembrane transport of chloride and bicarbonate in model phospholipid liposomes, induce acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of plasma cell membranes. We demonstrate how this combined effect can be used against cancer stem cells (CSCs). Hyperpolarization of cell membrane induces cell differentiation and loss of stemness of CSCs leading to effective elimination of this cancer cell subpopulation.

  2. Facile thiol-ene thermal crosslinking reaction facilitated hole-transporting layer for highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhong'an; Zhu, Zonglong; Chueh, Chu -Chen; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K. -Y.

    2016-08-08

    A crosslinked organic hole-transporting layer (HTL) is developed to realize highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells via a facile thiol-ene thermal reaction. This crosslinked HTL not only facilitates hole extraction from perovskites, but also functions as an effective protective barrier. Lastly, a high-performance (power conversion efficiency: 18.3%) device is demonstrated to show respectable photo and thermal stability without encapsulation.

  3. Recognition of DNA sequencing through binding of nucleobases to graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, Valentina

    Graphene is one of the most promising materials in nanotechnology. Its large surface to volume ratio, high conductivity and electron mobility at room temperature are outstanding properties for use in DNA sensors. For this study, we used Density Functional Theory (DFT), ?with and without the inclusion of van der Waals (vdW) interactions, ?to investigate the adsorption of nucleobases (cytosine, guanine, adenine, thymine, and uracil) on pristine graphene and graphene with defects (Divacancy and Stone-Wales). We investigated the performance of two types of vdW-DF functional (optB86b-vdW and rPW86-vdW), as well as the PBE functional, and their description of the adsorption geometry and electronic structure of the nucleobase-graphene systems.The inclusion of defects results in an increase in binding energy, closer adsorption of the molecule to graphene and greater buckling in both the graphene structure and nucleobase.

  4. Nucleobases Undergo Dynamic Rearrangements during RNA Tertiary Folding.

    PubMed

    Welty, Robb; Hall, Kathleen B

    2016-11-06

    The tertiary structure of the GTPase center (GAC) of 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) as seen in cocrystals is extremely compact. It is stabilized by long-range hydrogen bonds and nucleobase stacking and by a triloop that forms within its three-way junction. Its folding pathway from secondary structure to tertiary structure has not been previously observed, but it was shown to require Mg(2+) ions in equilibrium experiments. The fluorescent nucleotide 2-aminopurine was substituted at selected sites within the 60-nt GAC. Fluorescence intensity changes upon addition of MgCl2 were monitored over a time-course from 1ms to 100s as the RNA folds. The folding pathway is revealed here to be hierarchical through several intermediates. Observation of the nucleobases during folding provides a new perspective on the process and the pathway, revealing the dynamics of nucleobase conformational exchange during the folding transitions.

  5. Identification of an Axonal Kinesin-3 Motor for Fast Anterograde Vesicle Transport that Facilitates Retrograde Transport of Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Barkus, Rosemarie V.; Klyachko, Olga; Horiuchi, Dai; Dickson, Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    A screen for genes required in Drosophila eye development identified an UNC-104/Kif1 related kinesin-3 microtubule motor. Analysis of mutants suggested that Drosophila Unc-104 has neuronal functions that are distinct from those of the classic anterograde axonal motor, kinesin-1. In particular, unc-104 mutations did not cause the distal paralysis and focal axonal swellings characteristic of kinesin-1 (Khc) mutations. However, like Khc mutations, unc-104 mutations caused motoneuron terminal atrophy. The distributions and transport behaviors of green fluorescent protein-tagged organelles in motor axons indicate that Unc-104 is a major contributor to the anterograde fast transport of neuropeptide-filled vesicles, that it also contributes to anterograde transport of synaptotagmin-bearing vesicles, and that it contributes little or nothing to anterograde transport of mitochondria, which are transported primarily by Khc. Remarkably, unc-104 mutations inhibited retrograde runs by neurosecretory vesicles but not by the other two organelles. This suggests that Unc-104, a member of an anterograde kinesin subfamily, contributes to an organelle-specific dynein-driven retrograde transport mechanism. PMID:17989365

  6. Two major facilitator superfamily sugar transporters from Trichoderma reesei and their roles in induction of cellulase biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weixin; Kou, Yanbo; Xu, Jintao; Cao, Yanli; Zhao, Guolei; Shao, Jing; Wang, Hai; Wang, Zhixing; Bao, Xiaoming; Chen, Guanjun; Liu, Weifeng

    2013-11-15

    Proper perception of the extracellular insoluble cellulose is key to initiating the rapid synthesis of cellulases by cellulolytic Trichoderma reesei. Uptake of soluble oligosaccharides derived from cellulose hydrolysis represents a potential point of control in the induced cascade. In this study, we identified a major facilitator superfamily sugar transporter Stp1 capable of transporting cellobiose by reconstructing a cellobiose assimilation system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The absence of Stp1 in T. reesei resulted in differential cellulolytic response to Avicel versus cellobiose. Transcriptional profiling revealed a different expression profile in the Δstp1 strain from that of wild-type strain in response to Avicel and demonstrated that Stp1 somehow repressed induction of the bulk of major cellulase and hemicellulose genes. Two other putative major facilitator superfamily sugar transporters were, however, up-regulated in the profiling. Deletion of one of them identified Crt1 that was required for growth and enzymatic activity on cellulose or lactose, but was not required for growth or hemicellulase activity on xylan. The essential role of Crt1 in cellulase induction did not seem to rely on its transporting activity because the overall uptake of cellobiose or sophorose by T. reesei was not compromised in the absence of Crt1. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologs of Crt1 exist in the genomes of many filamentous ascomycete fungi capable of degrading cellulose. These data thus shed new light on the mechanism by which T. reesei senses and transmits the cellulose signal and offers potential strategies for strain improvement.

  7. Zero-tension lysimeters: An improved design to monitor colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.L.; Scharf, R.L.; Shang, C.

    1995-04-24

    There is increasing evidence that mobile colloids facilitate the long-distance transport of contaminants. The mobility of fine particles and macromolecules has been linked to the movement of actinides, organic contaminants, and heavy metals through soil. Direct evidence for colloid mobility includes the presence of humic materials in deep aquifers as well as coatings of accumulated clay, organic matter, or sesquioxides on particle or aggregate surfaces in subsoil horizons of many soils. The potential for colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants from hazardous-waste sites requires adequate monitoring before, during, and after in-situ remediation treatments. Zero-tension lysimeters (ZTLs) are especially appropriate for sampling water as it moves through saturated soil, although some unsaturated flow events may be sampled as well. Because no ceramic barrier or fiberglass wick is involved to maintain tension on the water (as is the case with other lysimeters), particles suspended in the water as well as dissolved species may be sampled with ZTLs. In this report, a ZTL design is proposed that is more suitable for monitoring colloid-facilitated contaminant migration. The improved design consists of a cylinder made of polycarbonate or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) that is placed below undisturbed soil material. In many soils, a hydraulically powered tube may be used to extract an undisturbed core of soil before placement of the lysimeter. In those cases, the design has significant advantages over conventional designs with respect to simplicity and speed of installation. Therefore, it will allow colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants to be monitored at more locations at a given site.

  8. Connective Auxin Transport in the Shoot Facilitates Communication between Shoot Apices

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Tom; Hines, Geneviève; van Rongen, Martin; Sawchuk, Megan G.; Scarpella, Enrico; Ljung, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The bulk polar movement of the plant signaling molecule auxin through the stem is a long-recognized but poorly understood phenomenon. Here we show that the highly polar, high conductance polar auxin transport stream (PATS) is only part of a multimodal auxin transport network in the stem. The dynamics of auxin movement through stems are inconsistent with a single polar transport regime and instead suggest widespread low conductance, less polar auxin transport in the stem, which we term connective auxin transport (CAT). The bidirectional movement of auxin between the PATS and the surrounding tissues, mediated by CAT, can explain the complex auxin transport kinetics we observe. We show that the auxin efflux carriers PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7 are major contributors to this auxin transport connectivity and that their activity is important for communication between shoot apices in the regulation of shoot branching. We propose that the PATS provides a long-range, consolidated stream of information throughout the plant, while CAT acts locally, allowing tissues to modulate and be modulated by information in the PATS. PMID:27119525

  9. Connective Auxin Transport in the Shoot Facilitates Communication between Shoot Apices.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Tom; Hines, Geneviève; van Rongen, Martin; Waldie, Tanya; Sawchuk, Megan G; Scarpella, Enrico; Ljung, Karin; Leyser, Ottoline

    2016-04-01

    The bulk polar movement of the plant signaling molecule auxin through the stem is a long-recognized but poorly understood phenomenon. Here we show that the highly polar, high conductance polar auxin transport stream (PATS) is only part of a multimodal auxin transport network in the stem. The dynamics of auxin movement through stems are inconsistent with a single polar transport regime and instead suggest widespread low conductance, less polar auxin transport in the stem, which we term connective auxin transport (CAT). The bidirectional movement of auxin between the PATS and the surrounding tissues, mediated by CAT, can explain the complex auxin transport kinetics we observe. We show that the auxin efflux carriers PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7 are major contributors to this auxin transport connectivity and that their activity is important for communication between shoot apices in the regulation of shoot branching. We propose that the PATS provides a long-range, consolidated stream of information throughout the plant, while CAT acts locally, allowing tissues to modulate and be modulated by information in the PATS.

  10. The solute specificity profiles of nucleobase cation symporter 1 (NCS1) from Zea mays and Setaria viridis illustrate functional flexibility.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Micah; Schein, Jessica; Hunt, Kevin A; Nalam, Vamsi; Mourad, George S; Schultes, Neil P

    2016-03-01

    The solute specificity profiles (transport and binding) for the nucleobase cation symporter 1 (NCS1) proteins, from the closely related C4 grasses Zea mays and Setaria viridis, differ from that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii NCS1. Solute specificity profiles for NCS1 from Z. mays (ZmNCS1) and S. viridis (SvNCS1) were determined through heterologous complementation studies in NCS1-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The four Viridiplantae NCS1 proteins transport the purines adenine and guanine, but unlike the dicot and algal NCS1, grass NCS1 proteins fail to transport the pyrimidine uracil. Despite the high level of amino acid sequence similarity, ZmNCS1 and SvNCS1 display distinct solute transport and recognition profiles. SvNCS1 transports adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, cytosine, and allantoin and competitively binds xanthine and uric acid. ZmNCS1 transports adenine, guanine, and cytosine and competitively binds, 5-fluorocytosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid. The differences in grass NCS1 profiles are due to a limited number of amino acid alterations. These amino acid residues do not correspond to amino acids essential for overall solute and cation binding or solute transport, as previously identified in bacterial and fungal NCS1, but rather may represent residues involved in subtle solute discrimination. The data presented here reveal that within Viridiplantae, NCS1 proteins transport a broad range of nucleobase compounds and that the solute specificity profile varies with species.

  11. The Effect of a Simulated Macropore on the Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cesium and Strontium: Experiment and Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Ryan, J. N.; Saiers, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    The sorption of contaminants to mobile colloids has been shown to increase the transport of the contaminants in a process known as colloid-facilitated transport. Many laboratory experiments and computer model simulations have shown that enhanced transport can occur when a contaminant strongly associates with mobile colloids and release kinetics are slow relative to the rate of flow. Knowing when colloid-facilitated transport will affect field-scale situations and risk assessment decisions has been difficult. The three parts of our research were (1) conduct a set of isotherms and breakthrough curves for a well-characterized system (illite colloids, homogeneous quartz sand, saturated and unsaturated conditions), (2) conduct breakthrough experiments with the addition of a central macropore and, (3) model the results to identify and quantify the effects of desorption kinetics and unsaturated conditions on colloid-facilitated transport with a macropore. Breakthrough experiments used a 12.7 cm diameter and 33.5 cm long column packed with cleaned and sieved quartz sand. The homogeneous experiments used sand with a median grain size of 0.325 mm. For macropore experiments, a 2 cm diameter tube of 1.6 mm sand (about 5× the size of the matrix sand) was packed in the center of the column. A rainfall simulator was suspended over the column and a relative saturation of 1.0, 0.80, or 0.33 was established. Three moisture sensors and three tensiometers monitored the flow conditions. Effluent was collected with a peristaltic pump and a fraction collector and measured for total and dissolved ions, pH, and colloid concentration. Cesium and strontium were used as model contaminants because they are common contaminants found on Department of Energy sites in the United States and because they have contrasting sorption kinetics with illite. A previously developed model for saturated colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium was extended to accommodate unsaturated conditions

  12. Nephrocystins and MKS proteins interact with IFT particle and facilitate transport of selected ciliary cargos.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengtian; Malicki, Jarema

    2011-05-20

    Cilia are required for the development and function of many organs. Efficient transport of protein cargo along ciliary axoneme is necessary to sustain these processes. Despite its importance, the mode of interaction between the intraflagellar ciliary transport (IFT) mechanism and its cargo proteins remains poorly understood. Our studies demonstrate that IFT particle components, and a Meckel-Gruber syndrome 1 (MKS1)-related, B9 domain protein, B9d2, bind each other and contribute to the ciliary localization of Inversin (Nephrocystin 2). B9d2, Inversin, and Nephrocystin 5 support, in turn, the transport of a cargo protein, Opsin, but not another photoreceptor ciliary transmembrane protein, Peripherin. Interestingly, the components of this mechanism also contribute to the formation of planar cell polarity in mechanosensory epithelia. These studies reveal a molecular mechanism that mediates the transport of selected ciliary cargos and is of fundamental importance for the differentiation and survival of sensory cells.

  13. COLLOIDAL-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUND WATER: PART I. SAMPLING CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigations at Pinal Creek, Arizona, evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganic geochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Sampling variables included pump type and flow rate, collection under air or nitrogen,...

  14. Structural basis of transport function in major facilitator superfamily protein from Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nitika; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    Trichothecenes are the sesquiterpenes secreted by Trichoderma spp. residing in the rhizosphere. These compounds have been reported to act as plant growth promoters and bio-control agents. The structural knowledge for the transporter proteins of their efflux remained limited. In this study, three-dimensional structure of Thmfs1 protein, a trichothecene transporter from Trichoderma harzianum, was homology modelled and further Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were used to decipher its mechanism. Fourteen transmembrane helices of Thmfs1 protein are observed contributing to an inward-open conformation. The transport channel and ligand binding sites in Thmfs1 are identified based on heuristic, iterative algorithm and structural alignment with homologous proteins. MD simulations were performed to reveal the differential structural behaviour occurring in the ligand free and ligand bound forms. We found that two discrete trichothecene binding sites are located on either side of the central transport tunnel running from the cytoplasmic side to the extracellular side across the Thmfs1 protein. Detailed analysis of the MD trajectories showed an alternative access mechanism between N and C-terminal domains contributing to its function. These results also demonstrate that the transport of trichodermin occurs via hopping mechanism in which the substrate molecule jumps from one binding site to another lining the transport tunnel.

  15. Functional Determinants of Metal Ion Transport and Selectivity in Paralogous Cation Diffusion Facilitator Transporters CzcD and MntE in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Julia E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) are a large family of divalent metal transporters that collectively possess broad metal specificity and contribute to intracellular metal homeostasis and virulence in bacterial pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae expresses two homologous CDF efflux transporters, MntE and CzcD. Cells lacking mntE or czcD are sensitive to manganese (Mn) or zinc (Zn) toxicity, respectively, and specifically accumulate Mn or Zn, respectively, thus suggesting that MntE selectively transports Mn, while CzcD transports Zn. Here, we probe the origin of this metal specificity using a phenotypic growth analysis of pneumococcal variants. Structural homology to Escherichia coli YiiP predicts that both MntE and CzcD are dimeric and each protomer harbors four pairs of conserved metal-binding sites, termed the A site, the B site, and the C1/C2 binuclear site. We find that single amino acid mutations within both the transmembrane domain A site and the B site in both CDFs result in a cellular metal sensitivity similar to that of the corresponding null mutants. However, multiple mutations in the predicted cytoplasmic C1/C2 cluster of MntE have no impact on cellular Mn resistance, in contrast to the analogous substitutions in CzcD, which do have on impact on cellular Zn resistance. Deletion of the MntE-specific C-terminal tail, present only in Mn-specific bacterial CDFs, resulted in only a modest growth phenotype. Further analysis of MntE-CzcD functional chimeric transporters showed that Asn and Asp in the ND-DD A-site motif of MntE and the most N-terminal His in the HD-HD site A of CzcD (the specified amino acids are underlined) play key roles in transporter metal selectivity. IMPORTANCE Cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) proteins are divalent metal ion transporters that are conserved in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans and that play important roles in cellular physiology, from metal homeostasis and resistance to type I diabetes in vertebrates

  16. Single Nucleobase Identification Using Biophysical Signatures from Nanoelectronic Quantum Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Korshoj, Lee E; Afsari, Sepideh; Khan, Sajida; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-03-01

    Nanoelectronic DNA sequencing can provide an important alternative to sequencing-by-synthesis by reducing sample preparation time, cost, and complexity as a high-throughput next-generation technique with accurate single-molecule identification. However, sample noise and signature overlap continue to prevent high-resolution and accurate sequencing results. Probing the molecular orbitals of chemically distinct DNA nucleobases offers a path for facile sequence identification, but molecular entropy (from nucleotide conformations) makes such identification difficult when relying only on the energies of lowest-unoccupied and highest-occupied molecular orbitals (LUMO and HOMO). Here, nine biophysical parameters are developed to better characterize molecular orbitals of individual nucleobases, intended for single-molecule DNA sequencing using quantum tunneling of charges. For this analysis, theoretical models for quantum tunneling are combined with transition voltage spectroscopy to obtain measurable parameters unique to the molecule within an electronic junction. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy is then used to measure these nine biophysical parameters for DNA nucleotides, and a modified machine learning algorithm identified nucleobases. The new parameters significantly improve base calling over merely using LUMO and HOMO frontier orbital energies. Furthermore, high accuracies for identifying DNA nucleobases were observed at different pH conditions. These results have significant implications for developing a robust and accurate high-throughput nanoelectronic DNA sequencing technique.

  17. The Renaissance of Metal-Pyrimidine Nucleobase Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Bernhard; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J

    2016-08-16

    The significance of metal ions for the function and properties of DNA and RNA, long seen primarily under biological aspects and medicinal uses, has recently gained a renewed momentum. This is a consequence of the advent of novel applications in the fields of materials science, biotechnology, and analytical sensor chemistry that relate to the designed incorporation of transition metal ions into nucleic acid base pairs. Ag(+) and Hg(2+) ions, binding to pyrimidine (pym) nucleobases, represent major players in this development. Interestingly, these metal ions were the ones that some 60 years ago started the field! At the same time, the mentioned metal ions had demonstrated a "special relationship" with the pym nucleobases cytosine, thymine, and uracil! Parallel work conducted with oligonucleotides and model nucleobases fostered numerous significant details of these interactions, in particular when X-ray crystallography was involved, correcting earlier views occasionally. Our own activities during the past three to four decades have focused on, among others, the coordination chemistry of transition and main-group metal ions with pym model nucleobases, with an emphasis on Pt(II) and Pd(II). It has always been our goal to deduce, if possible, the potential relevance of our findings for biological processes. It is interesting to put our data, in particular for trans-a2Pt(II) (a = NH3 or amine), into perspective with those of other metal ions, notably Ag(+) and Hg(2+). Irrespective of major differences in kinetics and lability/inertness between d(8) and d(10) metal ions, there is also a lot of similarity in structural aspects as a result of the preferred linear coordination geometry of these species. Moreover, the apparent clustering of metal ions to the pym nucleobases, which is presumably essential for the formation of nanoclusters on oligonucleotide scaffolds, is impressively reflected in model systems, as are reasons for inter-nucleobase cross-links containing more

  18. Ghrelin Facilitates GLUT2-, SGLT1- and SGLT2-mediated Intestinal Glucose Transport in Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Ramesh, Naresh; Delgado, María Jesús; Valenciano, Ana Isabel; Unniappan, Suraj

    2017-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is an important biological process that involves a variety of regulatory mechanisms. This study aimed to determine whether ghrelin, a multifunctional gut-brain hormone, modulates intestinal glucose transport in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Three intestinal glucose transporters, the facilitative glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and the sodium/glucose co-transporters 1 (SGLT1) and 2 (SGLT2), were studied. Immunostaining of intestinal sections found colocalization of ghrelin and GLUT2 and SGLT2 in mucosal cells. Some cells containing GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 coexpressed the ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Intraperitoneal glucose administration led to a significant increase in serum ghrelin levels, as well as an upregulation of intestinal preproghrelin, ghrelin O-acyltransferase and ghs-r1 expression. In vivo and in vitro ghrelin treatment caused a concentration- and time-dependent modulation (mainly stimulatory) of GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2. These effects were abolished by the GHS-R1a antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 and the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, suggesting that ghrelin actions on glucose transporters are mediated by GHS-R1a via the PLC/PKC signaling pathway. Finally, ghrelin stimulated the translocation of GLUT2 into the plasma membrane of goldfish primary intestinal cells. Overall, data reported here indicate an important role for ghrelin in the modulation of glucoregulatory machinery and glucose homeostasis in fish. PMID:28338019

  19. Ghrelin Facilitates GLUT2-, SGLT1- and SGLT2-mediated Intestinal Glucose Transport in Goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Ramesh, Naresh; Delgado, María Jesús; Valenciano, Ana Isabel; Unniappan, Suraj

    2017-03-24

    Glucose homeostasis is an important biological process that involves a variety of regulatory mechanisms. This study aimed to determine whether ghrelin, a multifunctional gut-brain hormone, modulates intestinal glucose transport in goldfish (Carassius auratus). Three intestinal glucose transporters, the facilitative glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and the sodium/glucose co-transporters 1 (SGLT1) and 2 (SGLT2), were studied. Immunostaining of intestinal sections found colocalization of ghrelin and GLUT2 and SGLT2 in mucosal cells. Some cells containing GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 coexpressed the ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Intraperitoneal glucose administration led to a significant increase in serum ghrelin levels, as well as an upregulation of intestinal preproghrelin, ghrelin O-acyltransferase and ghs-r1 expression. In vivo and in vitro ghrelin treatment caused a concentration- and time-dependent modulation (mainly stimulatory) of GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2. These effects were abolished by the GHS-R1a antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 and the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, suggesting that ghrelin actions on glucose transporters are mediated by GHS-R1a via the PLC/PKC signaling pathway. Finally, ghrelin stimulated the translocation of GLUT2 into the plasma membrane of goldfish primary intestinal cells. Overall, data reported here indicate an important role for ghrelin in the modulation of glucoregulatory machinery and glucose homeostasis in fish.

  20. Proteome scale census of major facilitator superfamily transporters in Trichoderma reesei using protein sequence and structure based classification enhanced ranking.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nitika; Kumari, Indu; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been acknowledged as potent bio-control agents against microbial pathogens and also as plant growth promoters. Various secondary metabolites are attributed for these beneficial activities. Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) includes the large proportion of efflux-pumps which are linked with membrane transport of these secondary metabolites. We have carried out a proteome-wide identification of MFS transporters using protein sequence and structure based hierarchical method in Trichoderma reesei. 448 proteins out of 9115 were detected to carry transmembrane helices. MFS specific intragenic gene duplication and its context with transport function have been presented. Finally, using homology based techniques, domains and motifs of MFS families have been identified and utilized to classify them. From query dataset of 448 transmembrane proteins, 148 proteins are identified as potential MFS transporters. Sugar porter, drug: H(+) antiporter-1, monocarboxylate porter and anion: cation symporter emerged as major MFS families with 51, 35, 17 and 11 members respectively. Representative protein tertiary structures of these families are homology modeled for structure-function analysis. This study may help to understand the molecular basis of secretion and transport of agriculturally valuable secondary metabolites produced by these bio-control fungal agents which may be exploited in future for enhancing its biotechnological applications in eco-friendly sustainable development.

  1. New HYDRUS Modules for Simulating Preferential Flow, Colloid-Facilitated Contaminant Transport, and Various Biogeochemical Processes in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunek, J.; Sejna, M.; Jacques, D.; Langergraber, G.; Bradford, S. A.; van Genuchten, M. Th.

    2012-04-01

    We have dramatically expanded the capabilities of the HYDRUS (2D/3D) software package by developing new modules to account for processes not available in the standard HYDRUS version. These new modules include the DualPerm, C-Hitch, HP2/3, Wetland, and Unsatchem modules. The dual-permeability modeling approach of Gerke and van Genuchten [1993] simulating preferential flow and transport is implemented into the DualPerm module. Colloid transport and colloid-facilitated solute transport, the latter often observed for many contaminants, such as heavy metals, radionuclides, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and explosives [Šimůnek et al., 2006] are implemented into the C-Hitch module. HP2 and HP3 are the two and three-dimensional alternatives of the HP1 module, currently available with HYDRUS-1D [Jacques and Šimůnek, 2005], that couple HYDRUS flow and transport routines with the generic geochemical model PHREEQC of Parkhurst and Appelo [1999]. The Wetland module includes two alternative approaches (CW2D of Langergraber and Šimůnek [2005] and CWM1 of Langergraber et al. [2009]) for modeling aerobic, anaerobic, and anoxic biogeochemical processes in natural and constructed wetlands. Finally, the Unsatchem module simulates the transport and reactions of major ions in a soil profile. Brief descriptions and an application of each module will be presented. Except for HP3, all modules simulate flow and transport processes in two-dimensional transport domains. All modules are fully supported by the HYDRUS graphical user interface. Further development of these modules, as well as of several other new modules (such as Overland), is still envisioned. Continued feedback from the research community is encouraged.

  2. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Facilitating Active Learning of Concepts in Transport Phenomena: Experiment with a Subliming Solid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utgikar, Vivek P.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment based on the sublimation of a solid was introduced in the undergraduate Transport Phenomena course. The experiment required the students to devise their own apparatus and measurement techniques. The theoretical basis, assignment of the experiment, experimental results, and student/instructor observations are described in this paper.…

  3. An Active Learning Exercise to Facilitate Understanding of Nephron Function: Anatomy and Physiology of Renal Transporters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal transport is a central mechanism underlying electrolyte homeostasis, acid base balance and other essential functions of the kidneys in human physiology. Thus, knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the nephron is essential for the understanding of kidney function in health and disease. However, students find this content difficult to…

  4. Toxin-Mediated Paracellular Transport of Antitoxin Antibodies Facilitates Protection against Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z.; Chen, X.; Hernandez, L. D.; Lipari, P.; Flattery, A.; Chen, S.-C.; Kramer, S.; Polishook, J. D.; Racine, F.; Cape, H.; Kelly, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    The exotoxins TcdA and TcdB are the major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile. Circulating neutralizing antitoxin antibodies are protective in C. difficile infection (CDI), as demonstrated, in part, by the protective effects of actoxumab and bezlotoxumab, which bind to and neutralize TcdA and TcdB, respectively. The question of how systemic IgG antibodies neutralize toxins in the gut lumen remains unresolved, although it has been suggested that the Fc receptor FcRn may be involved in active antibody transport across the gut epithelium. In this study, we demonstrated that genetic ablation of FcRn and excess irrelevant human IgG have no impact on actoxumab-bezlotoxumab-mediated protection in murine and hamster models of CDI, suggesting that Fc-dependent transport of antibodies across the gut wall is not required for efficacy. Tissue distribution studies in hamsters suggest, rather, that the transport of antibodies depends on toxin-induced damage to the gut lining. In an in vitro two-dimensional culture system that mimics the architecture of the intestinal mucosal epithelium, toxins on the apical side of epithelial cell monolayers are neutralized by basolateral antibodies, and antibody transport across the cell layer is dramatically increased upon addition of toxin to the apical side. Similar data were obtained with F(ab′)2 fragments, which lack an Fc domain, consistent with FcRn-independent paracellular, rather than transcellular, transport of antibodies. Kinetic studies show that initial damage caused by apical toxin is required for efficient neutralization by basolateral antibodies. These data may represent a general mechanism of humoral response-mediated protection against enteric pathogens. PMID:25385797

  5. Mucolipin 1 positively regulates TLR7 responses in dendritic cells by facilitating RNA transportation to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobing; Saitoh, Shin-Ichiroh; Shibata, Takuma; Tanimura, Natsuko; Fukui, Ryutaro; Miyake, Kensuke

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR9 sense microbial single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) and ssDNA in endolysosomes. Nucleic acid (NA)-sensing in endolysosomes is thought to be important for avoiding TLR7/9 responses to self-derived NAs. Aberrant self-derived NA transportation to endolysosomes predisposes to autoimmune diseases. To restrict NA-sensing in endolysosomes, TLR7/9 trafficking is tightly controlled by a multiple transmembrane protein Unc93B1. In contrast to TLR7/9 trafficking, little is known about a mechanism underlying NA transportation. We here show that Mucolipin 1 (Mcoln1), a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel gene family, has an important role in ssRNA trafficking into lysosomes. Mcoln1(-/-) dendritic cells (DCs) showed impaired TLR7 responses to ssRNA. A mucolipin agonist specifically enhanced TLR7 responses to ssRNAs. The channel activity of Mcoln1 is activated by a phospholipid phosphatidylinositol (3,5) bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2), which is generated by a class III lipid kinase PIKfyve. A PIKfyve inhibitor completely inhibited TLR7 responses to ssRNA in DCs. Confocal analyses showed that ssRNA transportation to lysosomes in DCs was impaired by PIKfyve inhibitor as well as by the lack of Mcoln1. Transportation of TLR9 ligands was also impaired by the PIKfyve inhibitor. These results demonstrate that the PtdIns(3,5)P2-Mcoln1 axis has an important role in ssRNA transportation into lysosomes in DCs.

  6. Isolation and functional analysis of Thmfs1, the first major facilitator superfamily transporter from the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mu; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wei Min

    2012-10-01

    A novel major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter gene, Thmfs1, was isolated from Trichoderma harzianum (T. harzianum). A Thmfs1 over-expressing mutant displayed enhanced antifungal activity and fungicide tolerance, while the Thmfs1 disruption mutant showed the opposite trend. Trichodermin production in Thmfs1 disruption group (185 mg l(-1)) was decreased by less than 17 % compared to the parental strain, suggesting that Thmfs1 is not mainly responsible for trichodermin secretion. Real-time PCR showed that Thmfs1 transcript level could be induced by a certain range of trichodermin concentrations, while expression of Tri5, encoding a trichodiene synthase, was strongly inhibited under these conditions. To our knowledge, Thmfs1 is the first MFS transporter gene identified in T. harzianum.

  7. T tubules and surface membranes provide equally effective pathways of carbonic anhydrase-facilitated lactic acid transport in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hallerdei, Janine; Scheibe, Renate J; Parkkila, Seppo; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William S; Gros, Gerolf; Wetzel, Petra; Endeward, Volker

    2010-12-13

    We have studied lactic acid transport in the fast mouse extensor digitorum longus muscles (EDL) by intracellular and cell surface pH microelectrodes. The role of membrane-bound carbonic anhydrases (CA) of EDL in lactic acid transport was investigated by measuring lactate flux in muscles from wildtype, CAIV-, CAIX- and CAXIV-single ko, CAIV-CAXIV double ko and CAIV-CAIX-CAXIV-triple ko mice. This was complemented by immunocytochemical studies of the subcellular localization of CAIV, CAIX and CAXIV in mouse EDL. We find that CAXIV and CAIX single ko EDL exhibit markedly but not maximally reduced lactate fluxes, whereas triple ko and double ko EDL show maximal or near-maximal inhibition of CA-dependent lactate flux. Interpretation of the flux measurements in the light of the immunocytochemical results leads to the following conclusions. CAXIV, which is homogeneously distributed across the surface membrane of EDL fibers, facilitates lactic acid transport across this membrane. CAIX, which is associated only with T tubular membranes, facilitates lactic acid transport across the T tubule membrane. The removal of lactic acid from the lumen of T tubuli towards the interstitial space involves a CO2-HCO3- diffusional shuttle that is maintained cooperatively by CAIX within the T tubule and, besides CAXIV, by the CAIV, which is strategically located at the opening of the T tubules. The data suggest that about half the CA-dependent muscular lactate flux occurs across the surface membrane, while the other half occurs across the membranes of the T tubuli.

  8. Tunneling holes in microparticles to facilitate the transport of lithium ions for high volumetric density batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Ng, K Y Simon; Deng, Da

    2015-09-14

    Microscale materials generally have a higher tap density than that of random nanoparticles. Therefore, microparticles have been attracting much attention for application as high volumetric density electrodes for lithium ion batteries. However, microparticles have much longer electrolyte diffusion and Li-ion migration length and less accessibility to the electrolyte than that of nanoparticles. Therefore, it will be interesting to tunnel-holes in the high volumetric density microparticles to facilitate the reversible storage of lithium ions. Here, tunnel-like holes were generated in microparticles to dramatically increase the accessibility of the active materials to facilitate the lithium ion transfer. A plausible formation mechanism to explain the generation of tunnel-like holes was proposed based on time-course experiments and intensive characterization. Impressively, the as-prepared microbeads with tunnels demonstrated dramatically improved performance compared to the solid microbeads without tunnels in lithium ion storage. The microparticles with tunnels could achieve comparable electrochemical performances to those nanoparticles reported in the literature, suggesting that microparticles, properly tuned, could be promising candidates as negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries and worthy of further studies. We also directly measured the volumetric density of the microparticles. We would like to highlight that a superior volumetric capacity of 514 mA h cm(-3) has been achieved. We hope to promote more frequent use of the unit mA h cm(-3) in addition to the conventional unit mA h g(-1) in the battery community.

  9. [Hopping and superexchange mechanisms of charge transport to DNA].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Sultanov, V B

    2003-01-01

    A theory for charge transport in nucleobase sequences was constructed in which the hole migration proceeds via hopping between guanines. Each hop over the adenine-thymine (A-T) bridge connecting neighboring guanines occurs by means of the superexchange mechanism. The experimental data and theoretical results for various types of nucleobase sequences are compared.

  10. Communication: Photoactivation of nucleobase bound platinum{sup II} metal complexes: Probing the influence of the nucleobase

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Dessent, Caroline E. H.

    2014-12-28

    We present UV laser action spectra (220-300 nm) of isolated nucleobase-bound Pt{sup II}(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} complexes, i.e., Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−}⋅M, where M = uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. These metal complex-nucleobase clusters represent model systems for identifying the fundamental photophysical and photochemical processes occurring in photodynamic platinum (II) drug therapies that target DNA. This is the first study to explore the specific role of the nucleobase in the photophysics of the aggregate complex. Each of the complexes studied displays a broadly similar absorption spectra, with a strong λ{sub max} ∼ 4.7 eV absorption band (nucleobase localized chromophore) and a subsequent increase in the absorption intensity towards higher spectral-energy (Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} localized chromophore). However, strikingly different band widths are observed across the series of complexes, decreasing in the order Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−}⋅Thymine > Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−}⋅Uracil > Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−}⋅Adenine > Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−}⋅Cytosine. Changes in the bandwidth of the ∼4.7 eV band are accompanied by distinctive changes in the photofragment product ions observed following photoexcitation, with the narrower-bandwidth complexes showing a greater propensity to decay via electron detachment decay. We discuss these observations in the context of the distinctive nucleobase-dependent excited state lifetimes.

  11. Three tapasin docking sites in TAP cooperate to facilitate transporter stabilization and heterodimerization

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Abrahimi, Parwiz; Mitchell, Susan M.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates peptide antigens into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for loading onto major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. MHC class I acquires its peptide cargo in the peptide loading complex (PLC), an oligomeric complex that the chaperone tapasin organizes by bridging TAP to MHC class I and recruiting accessory molecules such as ERp57 and calreticulin. Three tapasin binding sites on TAP have been described, two of which are located in the N-terminal domains (N domains) of TAP1 and TAP2. The third binding site is present in the core transmembrane domain (coreTMD) of TAP1 and is only used by the unassembled subunits. Tapasin is required to promote TAP stability, but through which binding site(s) it is acting is unknown. In particular the role of tapasin binding to the coreTMD of TAP1 single chains is mysterious as this interaction is lost upon TAP2 association. In this study, we map the respective binding site in TAP1 to the polar face of the amphipathic transmembrane helix TM9 and identify key residues that are essential to establish the interaction. We find that this interaction is dispensable for the peptide transport function but essential to achieve full stability of human TAP1. The interaction is also required for proper heterodimerization of the transporter. Based on similar results obtained using TAP mutants lacking tapasin binding to either N domain, we conclude that all three tapasin-binding sites in TAP cooperate to achieve high transporter stability and efficient heterodimerization. PMID:24501197

  12. Structural basis for the facilitative diffusion mechanism by SemiSWEET transporter

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yongchan; Nishizawa, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Keitaro; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    SWEET family proteins mediate sugar transport across biological membranes and play crucial roles in plants and animals. The SWEETs and their bacterial homologues, the SemiSWEETs, are related to the PQ-loop family, which is characterized by highly conserved proline and glutamine residues (PQ-loop motif). Although the structures of the bacterial SemiSWEETs were recently reported, the conformational transition and the significance of the conserved motif in the transport cycle have remained elusive. Here we report crystal structures of SemiSWEET from Escherichia coli, in the both inward-open and outward-open states. A structural comparison revealed that SemiSWEET undergoes an intramolecular conformational change in each protomer. The conserved PQ-loop motif serves as a molecular hinge that enables the ‘binder clip-like’ motion of SemiSWEET. The present work provides the framework for understanding the overall transport cycles of SWEET and PQ-loop family proteins. PMID:25598322

  13. Chemical factors influencing colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, Sujoy B.; Dzombak, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of colloids on the transport of two strongly sorbing solutesa hydrophobic organic compound, phenanthrene, and a metal ion, Ni2+were studied in sand-packed laboratory columns under different pH and ionic strength conditions. Two types of column experiments were performed as follows:  (i) sorption/mobilization experiments where the contaminant was first sorbed in the column under conditions where no colloids were released and mobilized under conditions where colloids were released as a result of ionic strength reduction in the influent; and (ii) transport experiments where the contaminant, dissolved or sorbed on colloids, was injected into columns packed with a strongly sorbing porous medium. In the first type of experiment, contaminant mobilization was significant only when all releasable colloids were flushed from the column. In all other cases, although high colloid particle concentrations were encountered, there was no marked effect on total contaminant concentrations. In the second type of experiment, colloid deposition efficiencies were shown to control the enhancement of transport. The deposition efficiency was a function of the pH (for a high organic content sand) and of the contaminant concentration (for a charged species such as Ni2+).

  14. Content variations of triterpenic acid, nucleoside, nucleobase, and sugar in jujube (Ziziphus jujuba) fruit during ripening.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng; Duan, Jin-Ao; Qian, Dawei; Tang, Yuping; Wu, Dawei; Su, Shulan; Wang, Hanqing; Zhao, Yunan

    2015-01-15

    Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba) fruit is widely consumed as food and traditional Chinese medicine in Asian countries due to its potential effects for human health. To facilitate selection of the maturity stage providing optimum health benefits, jujube fruits were analysed at six stages of growth (S1-6) for triterpenic acids, nucleosides, nucleobases, and sugars by UHPLC-MS/MS or HPLC-ELSD methods. The content levels of most triterpenic acids and sugars increased with ripening, and reached the highest at S5 and S6, respectively. The accumulation of the cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP) was mainly in the later stage of ripening (S5-6). Therefore, if taking triterpenic acids as the major quality indicator, S5 should be the ideal time to harvest jujube fruit, and the full ripen stage (S6) maybe the best choice when taking sugars and cyclic nucleotides as the most important components.

  15. Bacillus cereus efflux protein BC3310 – a multidrug transporter of the unknown major facilitator family, UMF-2

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Jasmin K.; Hassan, Karl; Vörös, Aniko; Simm, Roger; Saidijam, Massoud; Bettaney, Kim E.; Bechthold, Andreas; Paulsen, Ian T.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic classification divides the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) into 82 families, including 25 families that are comprised of transporters with no characterized functions. This study describes functional data for BC3310 from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, a member of the “unknown major facilitator family-2” (UMF-2). BC3310 was shown to be a multidrug efflux pump conferring resistance to ethidium bromide, SDS and silver nitrate when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α ΔacrAB. A conserved aspartate residue (D105) in putative transmembrane helix 4 was identified, which was essential for the energy dependent ethidium bromide efflux by BC3310. Transport proteins of the MFS comprise specific sequence motifs. Sequence analysis of UMF-2 proteins revealed that they carry a variant of the MFS motif A, which may be used as a marker to distinguish easily between this family and other MFS proteins. Genes orthologous to bc3310 are highly conserved within the B. cereus group of organisms and thus belong to the core genome, suggesting an important conserved functional role in the normal physiology of these bacteria. PMID:26528249

  16. Effects of oil dispersants on settling of marine sediment particles and particle-facilitated distribution and transport of oil components.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhengqing; Fu, Jie; Liu, Wen; Fu, Kunming; O'Reilly, S E; Zhao, Dongye

    2017-01-15

    This work investigated effects of three model oil dispersants (Corexit EC9527A, Corexit EC9500A and SPC1000) on settling of fine sediment particles and particle-facilitated distribution and transport of oil components in sediment-seawater systems. All three dispersants enhanced settling of sediment particles. The nonionic surfactants (Tween 80 and Tween 85) play key roles in promoting particle aggregation. Yet, the effects varied with environmental factors (pH, salinity, DOM, and temperature). Strongest dispersant effect was observed at neutral or alkaline pH and in salinity range of 0-3.5wt%. The presence of water accommodated oil and dispersed oil accelerated settling of the particles. Total petroleum hydrocarbons in the sediment phase were increased from 6.9% to 90.1% in the presence of Corexit EC9527A, and from 11.4% to 86.7% for PAHs. The information is useful for understanding roles of oil dispersants in formation of oil-sediment aggregates and in sediment-facilitated transport of oil and PAHs in marine eco-systems.

  17. Tunneling holes in microparticles to facilitate the transport of lithium ions for high volumetric density batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Ng, K. Y. Simon; Deng, Da

    2015-08-01

    Microscale materials generally have a higher tap density than that of random nanoparticles. Therefore, microparticles have been attracting much attention for application as high volumetric density electrodes for lithium ion batteries. However, microparticles have much longer electrolyte diffusion and Li-ion migration length and less accessibility to the electrolyte than that of nanoparticles. Therefore, it will be interesting to tunnel-holes in the high volumetric density microparticles to facilitate the reversible storage of lithium ions. Here, tunnel-like holes were generated in microparticles to dramatically increase the accessibility of the active materials to facilitate the lithium ion transfer. A plausible formation mechanism to explain the generation of tunnel-like holes was proposed based on time-course experiments and intensive characterization. Impressively, the as-prepared microbeads with tunnels demonstrated dramatically improved performance compared to the solid microbeads without tunnels in lithium ion storage. The microparticles with tunnels could achieve comparable electrochemical performances to those nanoparticles reported in the literature, suggesting that microparticles, properly tuned, could be promising candidates as negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries and worthy of further studies. We also directly measured the volumetric density of the microparticles. We would like to highlight that a superior volumetric capacity of 514 mA h cm-3 has been achieved. We hope to promote more frequent use of the unit mA h cm-3 in addition to the conventional unit mA h g-1 in the battery community.Microscale materials generally have a higher tap density than that of random nanoparticles. Therefore, microparticles have been attracting much attention for application as high volumetric density electrodes for lithium ion batteries. However, microparticles have much longer electrolyte diffusion and Li-ion migration length and less accessibility to the

  18. Diffusion or bulk flow: how plasmodesmata facilitate pre-phloem transport of assimilates.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Assimilates synthesized in the mesophyll of mature leaves move along the pre-phloem transport pathway to the bundle sheath of the minor veins from which they are loaded into the phloem. The present review discusses the most probable driving force(s) for the pre-phloem pathway, diffusion down the concentration gradient or bulk flow along a pressure gradient. The driving force seems to depend on the mode of phloem loading. In a majority of plant species phloem loading is a thermodynamically active process, involving the activity of membrane transporters in the sieve-element companion cell complex. Since assimilate movement includes an apoplasmic step, this mode is called apoplasmic loading. Well established is also the polymer-trap loading mode, where the phloem-transport sugars are raffinose-family oligomers in herbaceous plants. Also this mode depends on the investment of energy, here for sugar oligomerization, and leads to a high sugar accumulation in the phloem, even though the phloem is not symplasmically isolated, but well coupled by plasmodesmata (PD). Hence the mode polymer-trap mode is also designated active symplasmic loading. For woody angiosperms and gymnosperms an alternate loading mode is currently matter of discussion, called passive symplasmic loading. Based on the limited material available, this review compares the different loading modes and suggests that diffusion is the driving force in apoplasmic loaders, while bulk flow plays an increasing role in plants having a continuous symplasmic pathway from mesophyll to sieve elements. Crucial for the driving force is the question where water enters the pre-phloem pathway. Surprisingly, the role of PD in water movement has not been addressed so far appropriately. Modeling of assimilate and water fluxes indicates that in symplasmic loaders a considerable part of water flux happens through the PD between bundle sheath and phloem.

  19. Nitrate facilitates cadmium uptake, transport and accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pengjie; Yin, Yong-Gen; Ishikawa, Satoru; Suzui, Nobuo; Kawachi, Naoki; Fujimaki, Shu; Igura, Masato; Yuan, Cheng; Huang, Jiexue; Li, Zhu; Makino, Tomoyuki; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter; Wu, Longhua

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate whether and how the nitrogen form (nitrate (NO3 (-)) versus ammonium (NH4 (+))) influences cadmium (Cd) uptake and translocation and subsequent Cd phytoextraction by the hyperaccumulator species Sedum plumbizincicola. Plants were grown hydroponically with N supplied as either NO3 (-) or NH4 (+). Short-term (36 h) Cd uptake and translocation were determined innovatively and quantitatively using a positron-emitting (107)Cd tracer and positron-emitting tracer imaging system. The results show that the rates of Cd uptake by roots and transport to the shoots in the NO3 (-) treatment were more rapid than in the NH4 (+) treatment. After uptake for 36 h, 5.6 (0.056 μM) and 29.0 % (0.290 μM) of total Cd in the solution was non-absorbable in the NO3 (-) and NH4 (+) treatments, respectively. The local velocity of Cd transport was approximately 1.5-fold higher in roots (3.30 cm h(-1)) and 3.7-fold higher in shoots (10.10 cm h(-1)) of NO3 (-)- than NH4 (+)-fed plants. Autoradiographic analysis of (109)Cd reveals that NO3 (-) nutrition enhanced Cd transportation from the main stem to branches and young leaves. Moreover, NO3 (-) treatment increased Cd, Ca and K concentrations but inhibited Fe and P in the xylem sap. In a 21-day hydroponic culture, shoot biomass and Cd concentration were 1.51 and 2.63 times higher in NO3 (-)- than in NH4 (+)-fed plants. We conclude that compared with NH4 (+), NO3 (-) promoted the major steps in the transport route followed by Cd from solution to shoots in S. plumbizincicola, namely its uptake by roots, xylem loading, root-to-shoot translocation in the xylem and uploading to the leaves. S. plumbizincicola prefers NO3 (-) nutrition to NH4 (+) for Cd phytoextraction.

  20. Cloning, expression, and localization of a chloride-facilitated, cocaine-sensitive serotonin transporter from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Demchyshyn, L L; Pristupa, Z B; Sugamori, K S; Barker, E L; Blakely, R D; Wolfgang, W J; Forte, M A; Niznik, H B

    1994-05-24

    We report here on the isolation and characterization of a serotonin (5HT) transporter from Drosophila melanogaster. A 3.1-kb complementary DNA clone (dSERT) was found to encode a protein of 622 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of approximately 69 kDa and a putative transmembrane topology characteristic of cloned members of the mammalian Na+/Cl- neurotransmitter cotransporter gene family. dSERT displays highest overall amino acid sequence identity with the mammalian 5HT (51%), norepinephrine (47%), and dopamine (47%) transporters and shares with all transporters 104 absolutely conserved amino acid residues. Upon transient expression in HeLa cells, dSERT exhibited saturable, high-affinity, and sodium-dependent [3H]5HT uptake with estimated Km and Vmax values of approximately 500 nM and 5.2 x 10(-18) mol per cell per min, respectively. In marked contrast to the human SERT (hSERT), 5HT-mediated transport by dSERT was not absolutely dependent on extracellular Cl-, while the sodium-dependent uptake of 5HT was facilitated by increased extracellular Cl- concentrations. dSERT displays a pharmacological profile and rank order of potency consistent with, but not identical to, mammalian 5HT transporters. Comparison of the affinities of various compounds for the inhibition of 5HT transport by both dSERT and hSERT revealed that antidepressants were 3- to 300-fold less potent on dSERT than on hSERT, while mazindol displayed approximately 30-fold greater potency for dSERT. Both cocaine and RTI-55 inhibited 5HT uptake by dSERT with estimated inhibition constants of approximately 500 nM, while high concentrations (> 10 microM) of dopamine, norepinephrine, octopamine, tyramine, and histamine failed to inhibit transport. In situ hybridization reveals the selective expression of dSERT mRNA to specific cell bodies in the ventral ganglion of the embryonic and larval Drosophila nervous system with a distribution pattern virtually identical to that of 5HT

  1. Facilitating guest transport in clathrate hydrates by tuning guest-host interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Udachin, Konstantin A.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A.

    2015-02-21

    The understanding and eventual control of guest molecule transport in gas hydrates is of central importance for the efficient synthesis and processing of these materials for applications in the storage, separation, and sequestration of gases and natural gas production. Previously, some links have been established between dynamics of the host water molecules and guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions, but direct observation of transport in the form of cage-to-cage guest diffusion is still lacking. Recent calculations have suggested that pairs of different guest molecules in neighboring cages can affect guest-host hydrogen bonding and, therefore, defect injection and water lattice motions. We have chosen two sets of hydrate guest pairs, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-CO{sub 2} and isobutane-CO{sub 2}, that are predicted to enhance or to diminish guest–host hydrogen bonding interactions as compared to those in pure CO{sub 2} hydrate and we have studied guest dynamics in each using {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. In addition, we have obtained the crystal structure of the THF-CO{sub 2} sII hydrate using the combined single crystal X-ray diffraction and {sup 13}C NMR powder pattern data and have performed molecular dynamics-simulation of the CO{sub 2} dynamics. The NMR powder line shape studies confirm the enhanced and delayed dynamics for the THF and isobutane containing hydrates, respectively, as compared to those in the CO{sub 2} hydrate. In addition, from line shape studies and 2D exchange spectroscopy NMR, we observe cage-to-cage exchange of CO{sub 2} molecules in the THF-CO{sub 2} hydrate, but not in the other hydrates studied. We conclude that the relatively rapid intercage guest dynamics are the result of synergistic guest A–host water–guest B interactions, thus allowing tuning of the guest transport properties in the hydrates by choice of the appropriate guest molecules. Our experimental value for inter-cage hopping is slower by a factor of 10

  2. Facilitating guest transport in clathrate hydrates by tuning guest-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Moudrakovski, Igor L; Udachin, Konstantin A; Alavi, Saman; Ratcliffe, Christopher I; Ripmeester, John A

    2015-02-21

    The understanding and eventual control of guest molecule transport in gas hydrates is of central importance for the efficient synthesis and processing of these materials for applications in the storage, separation, and sequestration of gases and natural gas production. Previously, some links have been established between dynamics of the host water molecules and guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions, but direct observation of transport in the form of cage-to-cage guest diffusion is still lacking. Recent calculations have suggested that pairs of different guest molecules in neighboring cages can affect guest-host hydrogen bonding and, therefore, defect injection and water lattice motions. We have chosen two sets of hydrate guest pairs, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-CO2 and isobutane-CO2, that are predicted to enhance or to diminish guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions as compared to those in pure CO2 hydrate and we have studied guest dynamics in each using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. In addition, we have obtained the crystal structure of the THF-CO2 sII hydrate using the combined single crystal X-ray diffraction and (13)C NMR powder pattern data and have performed molecular dynamics-simulation of the CO2 dynamics. The NMR powder line shape studies confirm the enhanced and delayed dynamics for the THF and isobutane containing hydrates, respectively, as compared to those in the CO2 hydrate. In addition, from line shape studies and 2D exchange spectroscopy NMR, we observe cage-to-cage exchange of CO2 molecules in the THF-CO2 hydrate, but not in the other hydrates studied. We conclude that the relatively rapid intercage guest dynamics are the result of synergistic guest A-host water-guest B interactions, thus allowing tuning of the guest transport properties in the hydrates by choice of the appropriate guest molecules. Our experimental value for inter-cage hopping is slower by a factor of 10(6) than a published calculated value.

  3. Facilitation of Drug Transport across the Blood–Brain Barrier with Ultrasound and Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Meairs, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Medical treatment options for central nervous system (CNS) diseases are limited due to the inability of most therapeutic agents to penetrate the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Although a variety of approaches have been investigated to open the BBB for facilitation of drug delivery, none has achieved clinical applicability. Mounting evidence suggests that ultrasound in combination with microbubbles might be useful for delivery of drugs to the brain through transient opening of the BBB. This technique offers a unique non-invasive avenue to deliver a wide range of drugs to the brain and promises to provide treatments for CNS disorders with the advantage of being able to target specific brain regions without unnecessary drug exposure. If this method could be applied for a range of different drugs, new CNS therapeutic strategies could emerge at an accelerated pace that is not currently possible in the field of drug discovery and development. This article reviews both the merits and potential risks of this new approach. It assesses methods used to verify disruption of the BBB with MRI and examines the results of studies aimed at elucidating the mechanisms of opening the BBB with ultrasound and microbubbles. Possible interactions of this novel delivery method with brain disease, as well as safety aspects of BBB disruption with ultrasound and microbubbles are addressed. Initial translational research for treatment of brain tumors and Alzheimer’s disease is presented. PMID:26404357

  4. The major facilitator superfamily transporter Knq1p modulates boron homeostasis in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Svrbicka, Alexandra; Toth Hervay, Nora; Gbelska, Yvetta

    2016-03-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for living cells, yet its excess causes toxicity. To date, the mechanisms of boron toxicity are poorly understood. Recently, the ScATR1 gene has been identified encoding the main boron efflux pump in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we analyzed the ScATR1 ortholog in Kluyveromyces lactis--the KNQ1 gene, to understand whether it participates in boron stress tolerance. We found that the KNQ1 gene, encoding a permease belonging to the major facilitator superfamily, is required for K. lactis boron tolerance. Deletion of the KNQ1 gene led to boron sensitivity and its overexpression increased K. lactis boron tolerance. The KNQ1 expression was induced by boron and the intracellular boron concentration was controlled by Knq1p. The KNQ1 promoter contains two putative binding motifs for the AP-1-like transcription factor KlYap1p playing a central role in oxidative stress defense. Our results indicate that the induction of the KNQ1 expression requires the presence of KlYap1p and that Knq1p like its ortholog ScAtr1p in S. cerevisiae functions as a boron efflux pump providing boron resistance in K. lactis.

  5. The role of organic complexants and microparticulates in the facilitated transport of radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Schilk, A.J.; Robertson, D.E.; Abel, K.H.; Thomas, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    This progress report describes the results of ongoing radiological and geochemical investigations of the mechanisms of radionuclide transport in groundwater at two low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites within the waste management area of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), Ontario, Canada. These sites, the Chemical Pit liquid disposal facility and the Waste Management Area C solid LLW disposal site, have provided valuable 30- to 40-year-old field locations for characterizing the migration of radionuclides and evaluating a number of recent site performance objectives for LLW disposal facilities. This information will aid the NRC and other federal, state, and local regulators, as well as LLW disposal site developers and waste generators, in maximizing the effectiveness of existing or projected LLW disposal facilities for isolating radionuclides from the general public and thereby improving the health and safety aspects of LLW disposal.

  6. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns.

    PubMed

    Crançon, P; Pili, E; Charlet, L

    2010-04-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podzolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the <50 microm mixed humic and clayey coatings in the first 40 cm i.e. in the E horizon. Column experiments of uranium transport under various conditions were run using isotopic spiking. After 100 pore volumes elution, 60% of the total input uranium is retained in the first 2 cm of the column. Retardation factor of uranium on E horizon material ranges from 1300 (column) to 3000 (batch). In parallel to this slow uranium migration, we experimentally observed a fast elution related to humic colloids of about 1-5% of the total-uranium input, transferred at the mean porewater velocity through the soil column. In order to understand the effect of rain events, ionic strength of the input solution was sharply changed. Humic colloids are retarded when ionic strength increases, while a major mobilization of humic colloids and colloid-borne uranium occurs as ionic strength decreases. Isotopic spiking shows that both (238)U initially present in the soil column and (233)U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source.

  7. Specific aquaporins facilitate Nox-produced hydrogen peroxide transport through plasma membrane in leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Zambonin, Laura; Fiorentini, Diana; Rizzo, Benedetta; Caliceti, Cristiana; Landi, Laura; Hrelia, Silvana; Prata, Cecilia

    2014-04-01

    In the last decade, the generation and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly hydrogen peroxide, in cell signalling transduction pathways have been intensively studied, and it is now clear that an increase of ROS level affects cellular growth and proliferation pathways related to cancer development. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been long thought to permeate biological membranes by simple diffusion since recent evidence challenged this notion disclosing the role of aquaporin water channels (AQP) in mediating H2O2 transport across plasma membranes. We previously demonstrated that NAD(P)H oxidase (Nox)-generated ROS sustain glucose uptake and cellular proliferation in leukaemia cells. The aim of this study was to assess whether specific AQP isoforms can channel Nox-produced H2O2 across the plasma membrane of leukaemia cells affecting downstream pathways linked to cell proliferation. In this work, we demonstrate that AQP inhibition caused a decrease in intracellular ROS accumulation in leukaemia cells both when H2O2 was produced by Nox enzymes and when it was exogenously added. Furthermore, AQP8 overexpression or silencing resulted to modulate VEGF capacity of triggering an H2O2 intracellular level increase or decrease, respectively. Finally, we report that AQP8 is capable of increasing H2O2-induced phosphorylation of both PI3K and p38 MAPK and that AQP8 expression affected positively cell proliferation. Taken together, the results here reported indicate that AQP8 is able to modulate H2O2 transport through the plasma membrane affecting redox signalling linked to leukaemia cell proliferation.

  8. Relocation of active site carboxylates in major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP reveals plasticity in proton interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Asha V.; Singh, Himansha; Raturi, Sagar; Neuberger, Arthur; Tong, Zhen; Ding, Ning; Agboh, Kelvin; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of polyspecific membrane transporters is one important mechanism by which cells can obtain resistance to structurally different antibiotics and cytotoxic agents. These transporters reduce intracellular drug concentrations to subtoxic levels by mediating drug efflux across the cell envelope. The major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis catalyses drug efflux in a membrane potential and chemical proton gradient-dependent fashion. To enable the interaction with protons and cationic substrates, LmrP contains catalytic carboxyl residues on the surface of a large interior chamber that is formed by transmembrane helices. These residues co-localise together with polar and aromatic residues, and are predicted to be present in two clusters. To investigate the functional role of the catalytic carboxylates, we generated mutant proteins catalysing membrane potential-independent dye efflux by removing one of the carboxyl residues in Cluster 1. We then relocated this carboxyl residue to six positions on the surface of the interior chamber, and tested for restoration of wildtype energetics. The reinsertion at positions towards Cluster 2 reinstated the membrane potential dependence of dye efflux. Our data uncover a remarkable plasticity in proton interactions in LmrP, which is a consequence of the flexibility in the location of key residues that are responsible for proton/multidrug antiport. PMID:27917857

  9. Particle-facilitated lead and arsenic transport in abandoned mine sites soil influenced by simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Shaoping, Hu; Xincai, Chen; Jiyan, Shi; Yingxu, Chen; Qi, Lin

    2008-05-01

    The role of acid rain in affecting Pb and As transport from mine tailings was investigated by pumping simulated acid rain at a infiltration rate of 10.2 cm/h through soil columns. Simulated acid rain with pH of 3.0, 4.5 and 5.6 were used as leaching solutions. Results showed that 86.9-95.9% of Pb and 90-91.8% of As eluted from the columns were adsorbed by particles in the leachates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that particles released from the columns were mainly composed of flocculated aggregates and plate or rod shaped discrete grains. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) showed that these particles were predominantly silicate minerals. Results from our experiments demonstrated that when rapid infiltration conditions or a rainstorm exist, particle-facilitated transport of contaminants is likely to the dominant metal transport pathway influenced by acid rain.

  10. Role of a major facilitator superfamily transporter in adaptation capacity of Penicillium funiculosum under extreme acidic stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoxue; Chen, Jinyin; Xu, Houjuan; Li, Duochuan

    2014-08-01

    Fungal species present in extreme low pH environments are expected to have adapted for tolerance to high H(+) concentrations. However, their adaptability mechanism is unclear. In this study, we isolated an acid-tolerant strain of Penicillium funiculosum, which can grow actively at pH 1.0 and thrived in pH 0.6. A major facilitator superfamily transporter (PfMFS) was isolated from an acid-sensitive random insertional mutant (M4) of the fungus. It encodes a putative protein of 551 residues and contains 14 transmembrane-spanning segments. A targeted mutant (M7) carrying an inactivated copy of PfMFS showed an obvious reduction of growth compared with the wild type (WT) and complementation of M7 with PfMFS restored the wild-type level of growth at pH 1.0. Further data showed that the wild-type showed higher intracellular pH than M7 in response to pH 1. Subcellular localization showed that PfMFS was a cell membrane protein. Homology modeling showed structural similarity with an MFS transporter EmrD from Escherichiacoli. These results demonstrate that the PfMFS transporter is involved in the acid resistance and intracellular pH homeostasis of P. funiculosum.

  11. Local piezoresponse and polarization switching in nucleobase thymine microcrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bdikin, Igor; Heredia, Alejandro; Neumayer, Sabine M.; Bystrov, Vladimir S.; Gracio, José; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Kholkin, Andrei L.

    2015-08-01

    Thymine (2-oxy-4-oxy-5 methyl pyrimidine) is one of the four nucleobases of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). In the DNA molecule, thymine binds to adenine via two hydrogen bonds, thus stabilizing the nucleic acid structure and is involved in pairing and replication. Here, we show that synthetic thymine microcrystals grown from the solution exhibit local piezoelectricity and apparent ferroelectricity, as evidenced by nanoscale electromechanical measurements via Piezoresponse Force Microscopy. Our experimental results demonstrate significant electromechanical activity and polarization switchability of thymine, thus opening a pathway for piezoelectric and ferroelectric-based applications of thymine and, perhaps, of other DNA nucleobase materials. The results are supported by molecular modeling of polarization switching under an external electric field.

  12. Replacing the Nucleobases in DNA with Designer Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    electrophiles or especially strong nucleophiles, and they generally do not change protonation near neutral pH. They offer (to the first approximation) only four...DNA bases can impart important biological activity, such as replacing the methyl group of thymine with fluorine , or the oxygen of guanine with sulfur...nucleobases that lack hydrogen- bonding functionality. The design involves replacing oxygen with fluorine and nitrogen with carbon, and keeping aromaticity

  13. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake.

    PubMed

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J S

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson's disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity.

  14. Facilitated strontium transport by remobilization of strontium-containing secondary precipitates in Hanford Site subsurface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2013-03-15

    Significantly enhanced immobilization of radionuclides (such as (90)Sr and (137)Cs) due to adsorption and coprecipitation with neo-formed colloid-sized secondary precipitates has been reported at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. However, the stability of these secondary precipitates containing radionuclides in the subsurface under changeable field conditions is not clear. Here, the authors tested the remobilization possibility of Sr-containing secondary precipitates (nitrate-cancrinite) in the subsurface using saturated column experiments under different geochemical and flow conditions. The columns were packed with quartz sand that contained secondary precipitates (nitrate-cancrinite containing Sr), and leached using colloid-free solutions under different flow rates, varying pH, and ionic strength conditions. The results indicate remobilization of the neo-formed secondary precipitates could be possible given a change of pH of ionic strength and flow rate conditions. The remobility of the neo-formed precipitates increased with the rise in the leaching solution flow rate and pH (in a range of pH 4-11), as well as with decreasing solution ionic strength. The increased mobility of Sr-containing secondary precipitates with changing background conditions can be a potential source for additional radionuclide transport in Hanford Site subsurface environments.

  15. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity. PMID:26305376

  16. Colloidal-facilitated transport of inorganic contaminants in ground water: part 1, sampling considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puls, Robert W.; Eychaner, James H.; Powell, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    Investigations at Pinal Creek, Arizona, evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganic geochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Sampling variables included pump type and flow rate, collection under air or nitrogen, and filter pore diameter. During well purging and sample collection, suspended particle size and number as well as dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, pH, and redox potential were monitored. Laboratory analyses of both unfiltered samples and the filtrates were performed by inductively coupled argon plasma, atomic absorption with graphite furnace, and ion chromatography. Scanning electron microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray was also used for analysis of filter particulates. Suspended particle counts consistently required approximately twice as long as the other field-monitored indicators to stabilize. High-flow-rate pumps entrained normally nonmobile particles. Difference in elemental concentrations using different filter-pore sizes were generally not large with only two wells having differences greater than 10 percent in most wells. Similar differences (>10%) were observed for some wells when samples were collected under nitrogen rather than in air. Fe2+/Fe3+ ratios for air-collected samples were smaller than for samples collected under a nitrogen atmosphere, reflecting sampling-induced oxidation.

  17. Facilitated Strontium Transport by Remobilization of Strontium-Containing Secondary Precipitates in Hanford Site Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2013-03-15

    Significantly enhanced immobilization of radionuclides (such as 90Sr and 137Cs) due to adsorption and coprecipitation with neo-formed colloid-sized secondary precipitates has been reported at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site. However, the stability of these secondary precipitates containing radionuclides in the subsurface under changeable field conditions is not clear. Here, the authors tested the remobilization possibility of Sr containing secondary precipitates (nitrate-cancrinite) in the subsurface using saturated column experiments under different geochemical and flow conditions. The columns were packed with quartz sand that contained secondary precipitates (nitrate-cancrinite containing Sr), and leached using colloid-free solutions under different flow rates, varying pH, and ionic strength conditions. The results indicate remobilization of the neo-formed secondary precipitates could be possible given a change of background conditions. The remobility of the neo formed precipitates increased with the rise in the leaching solution flow rate and pH (in a range of pH 4 to 11), as well as with decreasing solution ionic strength. The increased mobility of Sr-containing secondary precipitates with changing background conditions can be a potential source for additional radionuclide transport in Hanford Site subsurface environments.

  18. Colloid facilitated transport of humic substances in soil: laboratory experiment and modeling calculation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Marina; Moiseenko, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    An understanding of ability to predict the fate and transport of colloids in soil systems are of great importance in many environmental and industrial applications. Especially, in the case study sizes and zeta potentials of lignin and humus components (as a parameter reflecting the mobility and tread of organic substances). The objects of investigation were water extracts of gleepodzolic soil of European territory of Russia and Western Siberia, as well as humus substances extracted from this soil. In this study, evaluation of size, molecular weight distribution and zeta potential were used to predict the mobility of the organic component fractions of the soil. Fractionation was performed using multistage filtration plant (100 Da) and measuring physic-chemical parameters measured with the Malvern Zetasizer Nano ZSP. Significant differences in the distribution of organic matter on the molecular weight, charge (sign) of the zeta potential and the size of the sample of European Russia in comparison with samples of Western Siberia have been found. Also, laboratory studies have demonstrated of any differences in physicochemical parameters as infrared spectra, ultraviolet spectra, complexing ability of samples of the same soil type but different areas of Russia. The results can be used in the prediction of the migration ability of fractions humus substances and their stability at change physic-chemical conditions (the coefficient of mobility of the organic components by calculated in MathCad). This work was supported by the grant № 14-17-00460 RSF from 07.11.2014

  19. Transport of surfactant-facilitated multiwalled carbon nanotube suspensions in columns packed with sized soil particles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinying; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2014-09-01

    Transport of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in soil/sediment matrixes can regulate their potential eco-effects and has been however rarely studied. Herein, column experiments were conducted to investigate mobility of CNT suspensions stabilized by dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid sodium salt (SDBS), octyl-phenol-ethoxylate (TX-100) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) in four soil samples with certain particle sizes. Humic acid was extracted from a soil sample and was coated on quartz sands to explore the effect of soil organic matter (SOM) on the mobility. Results showed that the positively-charged CPC-CNT was entirely retained in the columns while the negatively-charged SDBS-CNT and TX-100-CNT more or less broke through the columns. Pearson correlation analyses revealed that soil texture rather than SOM controlled the mobility. Electrostatic attraction to and/or precipitation on the grain surfaces together with the straining effect could explain the CNT retention. These novel results will help to understand the eco-effects of CNTs.

  20. Facilitated transport of uranium(VI) across supported liquid membranes containing T2EHDGA as the carrier extractant.

    PubMed

    Panja, S; Mohapatra, P K; Tripathi, S C; Manchanda, V K

    2011-04-15

    Facilitated transport of uranyl ion from nitric acid feed solutions was investigated across PTFE supported liquid membranes using N,N,N',N'-tetra-2-ethylhexyl-3-pentane-diamide (T2EHDGA) in n-dodecane as the carrier extractant containing 30% iso-decanol as the phase modifier. Solvent extraction studies indicated extraction of species of the type, UO(2)(NO(3))(2)·T2EHDGA. The distribution coefficients increased in the presence of NaNO(3) as compared to equivalent concentration of HNO(3) which was exactly the opposite of what was reported for Am(III)-TODGA extraction system. Supported liquid membrane studies indicated about 11h were required for quantitative transport of U(VI) from a feed of 3M HNO(3) using 0.2M T2EHDGA in n-dodecane containing 30% iso-decanol as the carrier extractant. Effect of various parameters such as feed acidity, T2EHDGA concentration, and nature of the strippant on the transport rate was investigated. The transport was found to be diffusion controlled in the membrane phase and the permeability coefficient was calculated to be (3.20 ± 0.13)× 10(-4)cm/s for the feed composition of 3M HNO(3), receiver phase composition of 0.01 M HNO(3) and membrane carrier phase of 0.2M T2EHDGA in n-dodecane containing 30% iso-decanol. The present results may be useful for the separation of U from lean solutions or radioactive wastes considered hazardous due to the presence of alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

  1. Multiple Surface Regions on the Niemann-Pick C2 Protein Facilitate Intracellular Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    McCauliff, Leslie A; Xu, Zhi; Li, Ran; Kodukula, Sarala; Ko, Dennis C; Scott, Matthew P; Kahn, Peter C; Storch, Judith

    2015-11-06

    The cholesterol storage disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is caused by defects in either of two late endosomal/lysosomal proteins, NPC1 and NPC2. NPC2 is a 16-kDa soluble protein that binds cholesterol in a 1:1 stoichiometry and can transfer cholesterol between membranes by a mechanism that involves protein-membrane interactions. To examine the structural basis of NPC2 function in cholesterol trafficking, a series of point mutations were generated across the surface of the protein. Several NPC2 mutants exhibited deficient sterol transport properties in a set of fluorescence-based assays. Notably, these mutants were also unable to promote egress of accumulated intracellular cholesterol from npc2(-/-) fibroblasts. The mutations mapped to several regions on the protein surface, suggesting that NPC2 can bind to more than one membrane simultaneously. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that WT NPC2 promotes vesicle-vesicle interactions. These interactions were abrogated, however, by mutations causing defective sterol transfer properties. Molecular modeling shows that NPC2 is highly plastic, with several intense positively charged regions across the surface that could interact favorably with negatively charged membrane phospholipids. The point mutations generated in this study caused changes in NPC2 surface charge distribution with minimal conformational changes. The plasticity, coupled with membrane flexibility, probably allows for multiple cholesterol transfer routes. Thus, we hypothesize that, in part, NPC2 rapidly traffics cholesterol between closely appositioned membranes within the multilamellar interior of late endosomal/lysosomal proteins, ultimately effecting cholesterol egress from this compartment.

  2. Biosorption of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and hexachlorobenzene in groundwater and its implications for facilitated transport.

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, R; Enfield, C G

    1992-01-01

    The potential for enhanced mobility of hydrophobic pollutants by cotransport with bacteria in saturated soils was evaluated from measurements of biosorption of 14C-labeled hexachlorobenzene and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) to five strains of soil and sewage bacteria. The sorption process could be described by a linear partition equation and appeared to be reversible, but desorption kinetics were slow and/or partly irreversible. The DDT partition coefficients varied with equilibration time, possibly reflecting DDT-induced changes in the physiology of the bacteria. The partition coefficients, normalized to the masses of the bacteria, ranged from 250 to 14,000 for live cells, but the largest coefficients were associated with autoclaved cells of a Pseudomonas sp. The sorptive capacity of the bacterial biomass was greater for DDT than for hexachlorobenzene but was not correlated to overall bacterial hydrophobicity, measured by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. In a column study, 1.2 x 10(9) cells of a Bacillus sp. strain per ml enhanced DDT transport about 8-fold, whereas an advective-dispersive-sorptive equilibrium model for two mobile phases, water and free-living bacteria, suggested a 14-fold enhancement, based on the DDT partition coefficient. The disagreement was in part due to a retarded nonequilibrium movement of the bacteria. Model calculations based on literature data covering a wide range of organisms and compounds suggested that 10(6) cells ml-1 would increase the mobility of very hydrophobic compounds (log octanol-water partition coefficient [K(ow) of greater than or equal to 6), whereas higher densities of bacteria (10(8) cells ml-1) would have a significant impact on compounds with a log K(ow) of greater than or equal to 4.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1637158

  3. Stomatal Spacing Safeguards Stomatal Dynamics by Facilitating Guard Cell Ion Transport Independent of the Epidermal Solute Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Papanatsiou, Maria; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Stomata enable gaseous exchange between the interior of the leaf and the atmosphere through the stomatal pore. Control of the pore aperture depends on osmotic solute accumulation by, and its loss from the guard cells surrounding the pore. Stomata in most plants are separated by at least one epidermal cell, and this spacing is thought to enhance stomatal function, although there are several genera that exhibit stomata in clusters. We made use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stomatal patterning mutants to explore the impact of clustering on guard cell dynamics, gas exchange, and ion transport of guard cells. These studies showed that stomatal clustering in the Arabidopsis too many mouths (tmm1) mutant suppressed stomatal movements and affected CO2 assimilation and transpiration differentially between dark and light conditions and were associated with alterations in K(+) channel gating. These changes were consistent with the impaired dynamics of tmm1 stomata and were accompanied by a reduced accumulation of K(+) ions in the guard cells. Our findings underline the significance of spacing for stomatal dynamics. While stomatal spacing may be important as a reservoir for K(+) and other ions to facilitate stomatal movements, the effects on channel gating, and by inference on K(+) accumulation, cannot be explained on the basis of a reduced number of epidermal cells facilitating ion supply to the guard cells.

  4. Human copper transporter 2 is localized in late endosomes and lysosomes and facilitates cellular copper uptake

    PubMed Central

    vandenBerghe, Peter V. E.; Folmer, Dineke E.; Malingré, Helga E. M.; vanBeurden, Ellen; Klomp, Adriana E. M.; vandeSluis, Bart; Merkx, Maarten; Berger, Ruud; Klomp, Leo W. J.

    2007-01-01

    High-affinity cellular copper uptake is mediated by the CTR (copper transporter) 1 family of proteins. The highly homologous hCTR (human CTR) 2 protein has been identified, but its function in copper uptake is currently unknown. To characterize the role of hCTR2 in copper homoeostasis, epitope-tagged hCTR2 was transiently expressed in different cell lines. hCTR2–vsvG (vesicular-stomatitis-virus glycoprotein) predominantly migrated as a 17 kDa protein after imunoblot analysis, consistent with its predicted molecular mass. Chemical cross-linking resulted in the detection of higher-molecular-mass complexes containing hCTR2–vsvG. Furthermore, hCTR2–vsvG was co-immunoprecipitated with hCTR2–FLAG, suggesting that hCTR2 can form multimers, like hCTR1. Transiently transfected hCTR2–eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) was localized exclusively to late endosomes and lysosomes, and was not detected at the plasma membrane. To functionally address the role of hCTR2 in copper metabolism, a novel transcription-based copper sensor was developed. This MRE (metal-responsive element)–luciferase reporter contained four MREs from the mouse metallothionein 1A promoter upstream of the firefly luciferase open reading frame. Thus the MRE–luciferase reporter measured bioavailable cytosolic copper. Expression of hCTR1 resulted in strong activation of the reporter, with maximal induction at 1 μM CuCl2, consistent with the Km of hCTR1. Interestingly, expression of hCTR2 significantly induced MRE–luciferase reporter activation in a copper-dependent manner at 40 and 100 μM CuCl2. Taken together, these results identify hCTR2 as an oligomeric membrane protein localized in lysosomes, which stimulates copper delivery to the cytosol of human cells at relatively high copper concentrations. This work suggests a role for endosomal and lysosomal copper pools in the maintenance of cellular copper homoeostasis. PMID:17617060

  5. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of 137Cs in Fracture-Fill Material. Experiments and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-29

    In this study, we demonstrate how a combination of batch sorption/desorption experiments and column transport experiments were used to effectively parameterize a model describing the colloid-facilitated transport of Cs in the Grimsel granodiorite/FFM system. Cs partition coefficient estimates onto both the colloids and the stationary media obtained from the batch experiments were used as initial estimates of partition coefficients in the column experiments, and then the column experiment results were used to obtain refined estimates of the number of different sorption sites and the adsorption and desorption rate constants of the sites. The desorption portion of the column breakthrough curves highlighted the importance of accounting for adsorption-desorption hysteresis (or a very nonlinear adsorption isotherm) of the Cs on the FFM in the model, and this portion of the breakthrough curves also dictated that there be at least two different types of sorption sites on the FFM. In the end, the two-site model parameters estimated from the column experiments provided excellent matches to the batch adsorption/desorption data, which provided a measure of assurance in the validity of the model.

  6. A DTX/MATE-type transporter facilitates abscisic acid efflux and modulates ABA sensitivity and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiwen; Zhu, Huifen; Pan, Yajun; Yu, Yuexuan; Luan, Sheng; Li, Legong

    2014-10-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates numerous physiological and developmental processes in plants. Recent studies identify intracellular ABA receptors, implicating the transport of ABA across cell membranes as crucial for ABA sensing and response. Here, we report that a DTX/Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) family member in Arabidopsis thaliana, AtDTX50, functions as an ABA efflux transporter. When expressed heterologously in both an Escherichia coli strain and Xenopus oocyte cells, AtDTX50 was found to facilitate ABA efflux. Furthermore, dtx50 mutant mesophyll cells preloaded with ABA released less ABA compared with the wild-type (WT). The AtDTX50 gene was expressed mainly in the vascular tissues and guard cells and its expression was strongly up-regulated by exogenous ABA. The AtDTX50::GFP fusion protein was localized predominantly to the plasma membrane. The dtx50 mutant plants were observed to be more sensitive to ABA in growth inhibition. In addition, compared with the WT, dtx50 mutant plants were more tolerant to drought with lower stomatal conductance, consistent with its function as an ABA efflux carrier in guard cells.

  7. The human concentrative and equilibrative nucleoside transporter families, SLC28 and SLC29.

    PubMed

    Young, James D; Yao, Sylvia Y M; Baldwin, Jocelyn M; Cass, Carol E; Baldwin, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoside transport in humans is mediated by members of two unrelated protein families, the SLC28 family of cation-linked concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs) and the SLC29 family of energy-independent, equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). These families contain three and four members, respectively, which differ both in the stoichiometry of cation coupling and in permeant selectivity. Together, they play key roles in nucleoside and nucleobase uptake for salvage pathways of nucleotide synthesis. Moreover, they facilitate cellular uptake of several nucleoside and nucleobase drugs used in cancer chemotherapy and treatment of viral infections. Thus, the transporter content of target cells can represent a key determinant of the response to treatment. In addition, by regulating the concentration of adenosine available to cell surface receptors, nucleoside transporters modulate many physiological processes ranging from neurotransmission to cardiovascular activity. This review describes the molecular and functional properties of the two transporter families, with a particular focus on their physiological roles in humans and relevance to disease treatment.

  8. Inhibiting Glycine Transporter-1 Facilitates Cocaine-Cue Extinction and Attenuates Reacquisition of Cocaine-Seeking Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Nic Dhonnchadha, Bríd Á; Pinard, Emmanuel; Alberati, Daniela; Wettstein, Joseph G.; Spealman, Roger D.; Kantak, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Combining extinction training with cognitive-enhancing pharmacotherapy represents a novel strategy for improving the efficacy of exposure therapy for drug relapse prevention. We investigated if the selective glycine transporter-1 (GlyT-1) inhibitor RO4543338 could facilitate extinction of cocaine-conditioned responses and attenuate reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior. Methods Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.3 mg/kg), which was associated with a 2-sec light cue under a second-order schedule of i.v. drug injection. Rats received vehicle, 30 or 45 mg/kg of RO4543338 prior to three 1-hr extinction-training sessions spaced at weekly intervals. Responses were extinguished by substituting saline for cocaine while maintaining response-contingent cue presentations. Reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior during self-administration sessions began one week after the last extinction session. Control experiments were conducted under conditions that precluded explicit extinction of cocaine-conditioned responses. Results Compared to vehicle, 30 and 45 mg/kg RO4543338 significantly decreased responding early in extinction training and during subsequent reacquisition sessions. The latter effect persisted for at least five sessions. In control studies, reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior was not altered when RO4543338 was administered either prior to weekly self-administration control sessions or prior to weekly control sessions in which cocaine and cues were omitted and the levers retracted. Conclusions As the GlyT-1 inhibitor facilitated cocaine-cue extinction learning and attenuated subsequent reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior, this class of compounds may have utility as a pharmacological adjunct to cocaine-cue exposure therapy in addicts. PMID:21992874

  9. A Re-Examination of Nucleobases in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Z.; Botta, O.; de Vries, M.; Becker, L.; Ehrenfreund, E.

    The biomolecular building blocks of life, as we know it, are amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. The latter two form the bases of DNA and RNA, molecules that are used in the storage, transcription and translation of genetic information in all terrestrial organisms. A dedicated search for these compounds in meteorites can shed light on the origins of life in two ways: (i) Results can help assess the plausibility of extraterrestrial formation of prebiotic molecules followed by their meteoritic delivery to the early Earth. (ii) Such studies can also provide insights into possible prebiotic synthetic routes. We will search for these compounds in selected carbonaceous chondrites using formic acid extraction and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to isolate specific nucleobases from the bulk meteorite material as previously reported [1,2,3]. We will also use a new technique, resonant two-photon ionization mass spectrometry (R2PI) that can, not only identify organic compounds by their mass, but at the same time by their vibronic spectroscopy [4]. R2PI dramatically enhances the specificity for certain compounds (e.g. amino acids, nucleobases) and allows for distinction of structural isomers, tautomers and enantiomers as well as providing additional information due to isotope shifts. The optical spectroscopy can thus help us to further discriminate between terrestrial and extraterrestrial nucleobases. References: [1] Van Der Velden, W. and Schwarts, A. W. (1977) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 41, 961-968. [2] Stoks, P. G. and Schwartz, A. W. (1979a) Nature, 282, 709-10. [3] Glavin, D. P. and Bada, J. L. (2004) In Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV, Abstract # 1022, Houston. [4] Nir, E., Grace, L. I., Brauer, B. and de Vries, M. S. (1999) Journal of the American Chemical Society, 121, 4896-4897.

  10. Dual Functional Polymer Interlayer for Facilitating Ion Transport and Reducing Charge Recombination in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Chiao; Li, Shao-Sian; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Liang-Yih; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2016-12-14

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) present low-cost alternatives to conventional wafer-based inorganic solar cells and have remarkable power conversion efficiency. To further enhance performance, we propose a new DSSC architecture with a novel dual-functional polymer interlayer that prevents charge recombination and facilitates ionic conduction, as well as maintaining dye loading and regeneration. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (p(VDF-TrFE)) was coated on the outside of a dye-sensitized TiO2 photoanode by a simple solution process that did not sacrifice the amount of adsorbed dye molecules in the DSSC device. Light-intensity-modulated photocurrent and photovoltage spectroscopy revealed that the proposed p(VDF-TrFE)-coated anode yielded longer electron lifetime and improved the injection of photogenerated electrons into TiO2, thereby reducing the electron transport time. Comparative cyclic voltammetry and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy based on a ferrocene-ferrocenium external standard material demonstrated that p(VDF-TrFE) enhanced the power conversion efficiency from 7.67% to 9.11%. This dual functional p(VDF-TrFE) interlayer is a promising candidate for improving the performance of DSSCs and can also be employed in other electrochemical devices.

  11. A New Natural Product Analog of Blasticidin S Reveals Cellular Uptake Facilitated by the NorA Multidrug Transporter.

    PubMed

    Davison, Jack R; Lohith, Katheryn M; Wang, Xiaoning; Bobyk, Kostyantyn; Mandadapu, Sivakoteswara R; Lee, Su-Lin; Cencic, Regina; Nelson, Justin; Simpkins, Scott; Frank, Karen M; Pelletier, Jerry; Myers, Chad L; Piotrowski, Jeff; Smith, Harold E; Bewley, Carole A

    2017-04-03

    The permeation of antibiotics through bacterial membranes to their target site is a crucial determinant of drug activity, but in many cases remains poorly understood. During screening efforts to discover new broad-spectrum antibiotic compounds from marine sponge samples, we identified a new analog of the peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic blasticidin S that exhibited up to 16-fold improved potency against a range of laboratory and clinical bacterial strains, which we named P10. Whole genome sequencing of laboratory-evolved strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to blasticidin S and P10, combined with genome-wide assessment of the fitness of barcoded Escherichia coli knockout strains in the presence of the antibiotics, revealed that the restriction of cellular access was a key feature in the development of resistance to this class of drug. In particular, the gene encoding the well-characterized multidrug efflux pump NorA was found to be mutated in 69% of all S. aureus isolates resistant to blasticidin S or P10. Unexpectedly, resistance was associated with inactivation of norA, suggesting that the NorA transporter facilitates cellular entry of peptidyl nucleosides in addition to its known role in the efflux of diverse compounds including fluoroquinolone antibiotics.

  12. Progress report on colloid-facilitated transport at Yucca Mountain: Yucca Mountain site characterization program milestone 3383

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.R.; Degueldre, C.; Wistrom, A.O.; Cotter, C.R.; Lemons, W.W.

    1996-06-01

    To assess colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in groundwaters at the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, it is very important to understand the generation and stability of colloids, including naturally occurring colloids. To this end, we measured the colloid concentration in waters from Well J-13, which is on the order of 106 particles per milliliter (for particle sizes larger than 100 manometers). At this low particle loading, the sorption of radionuclides to colloids would have to be extremely high before the colloids could carry a significant amount of radionuclides from the repository to the accessible environment. We also performed aggregation experiments to evaluate the stability of silica (particle diameter: 85 nm) and clay colloids (particle diameter: 140 nm) as a function of ionic strength in a carbonate-rich synthetic groundwater. When the concentration of electrolyte is increased to induce aggregation, the aggregation is irreversible and the rate of aggregation increases with increasing electrolyte strength. We used autocorrelation photon spectroscopy to estimate the rate of particle aggregation for both types of colloids. By relating the measured aggregation rate to the Smoluchowski rate expression, we determined the stability ratio, W. Aggregation of silica particles and kaolinite clay particles decreased dramatically for an electrolyte concentration, C{sub NaCl}, below 300 mM and 200 mM, respectively.

  13. Experimental evidence for ternary colloid-facilitated transport of Th(IV) with hematite (α-Fe2O3) colloids and Suwannee River fulvic acid.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Hilary P; Hickok, Katherine A; Powell, Brian A

    2016-12-01

    Previous field experiments have suggested colloid-facilitated transport via inorganic and organic colloids as the primary mechanism of enhanced actinide transport in the subsurface at former nuclear weapons facilities. In this work, research was guided by the hypothesis that humic substances can enhance tetravalent actinide (An(IV)) migration by coating and mobilizing natural colloids in environmental systems and increasing An(IV) sorption to colloids. This mechanism is expected to occur under relatively acidic conditions where organic matter can sorb and coat colloid surfaces and facilitate formation of ternary colloid-ligand-actinide complexes. The objective of this work was to examine Th transport through packed columns in the presence of hematite colloids and/or Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). In the presence of SRFA, with or without hematite colloids, significant transport (>60% recovery within the effluent) of thorium occurred through quartz columns. It is notable that the SRFA contributed to increased transport of both Th and hematite colloids, while insignificant transport occurred in the absence of fulvic acid. Further, in the presence of a natural sandy sediment (as opposed to pure quartz), transport is negligible in the presence of SRFA due to interactions with natural, clay-sized sediment coatings. Moreover, this data shows that the transport of Th through quartz columns is enhanced in ternary Th-colloid-SRFA and binary Th-SRFA systems as compared to a system containing only Th.

  14. Colloid and Colloid-Facilitated Contaminant Transport Experiments and Models to Support Assessments of Radionuclide Migration at Yucca Mountain and the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    P. Reimus

    2004-06-01

    In recent years, numerous laboratory and field experiments have been conducted to assess and parameterize colloid and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport for the Yucca Mountain Project and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Environmental Restoration Project. Radionuclide contamination of ground water currently exists within or near underground nuclear test cavities at the NTS, and the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository represents a potential future source of radionuclide contamination of ground water at the NTS. Furthermore, recent field observations have indicated that small amounts of Plutonium, which normally adsorbs very strongly to mineral surfaces in aquifers, can transport quite rapidly and over significant distances in ground water when associated with inorganic colloids (Kersting et al., 1999). Groundwater samples from all over the Nevada Test Site have been analyzed for colloid concentrations and size distributions, and it is clear that there are significant mass loadings of colloids in the ground water at some locations. These colloids represent mobile surface area for potentially transporting strongly-adsorbed radionuclides. Field transport experiments have involved the use of fluorescent-dyed carboxylate-modified latex (CML) microspheres in the 250- to 650-nm diameter size range as surrogates for natural colloids in forced-gradient tracer tests. These experiments have indicated that effective colloid filtration coefficients appear to decrease as time and length scales increase. They suggest that a small fraction of colloids may be able to transport significant distances in groundwater systems. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to determine radionuclide sorption and desorption parameters onto inorganic colloids present in the groundwater systems and also to determine transport parameters for inorganic colloids in both fractured and porous media present at the Nevada Test Site. More recent laboratory experiments have

  15. Two-Photon-Induced Fluorescence of Isomorphic Nucleobase Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Richard S. K.; Jones, Rosemary; Sinkeldam, Renatus W.

    2014-01-01

    Five isomorphic fluorescent uridine mimics have been subjected to two-photon (2P) excitation analysis to investigate their potential applicability as non-perturbing probes for the single-molecule detection of nucleic acids. We find that small structural differences can cause major changes in the two-photon excitation probability, with the 2P cross sections varying by over one order of magnitude. Two of the probes, both furan-modified uridine analogs, have the highest 2P cross sections (3.8 GM and 7.6 GM) reported for nucleobase analogs, using a conventional Ti:sapphire laser for excitation at 690 nm; they also have the lowest emission quantum yields. In contrast, the analogs with the highest reported quantum yields have the lowest 2P cross sections. The structure-photophysical property relationship presented here is a first step towards the rational design of emissive nucleobase analogs with controlled 2P characteristics. The results demonstrate the potential for major improvements through judicious structural modifications. PMID:24604669

  16. Mg2+ ions: do they bind to nucleobase nitrogens?

    PubMed Central

    Leonarski, Filip; D'Ascenzo, Luigi; Auffinger, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Given the many roles proposed for Mg2+ in nucleic acids, it is essential to accurately determine their binding modes. Here, we surveyed the PDB to classify Mg2+ inner-sphere binding patterns to nucleobase imine N1/N3/N7 atoms. Among those, purine N7 atoms are considered to be the best nucleobase binding sites for divalent metals. Further, Mg2+ coordination to N7 has been implied in several ribozyme catalytic mechanisms. We report that Mg2+ assigned near imine nitrogens derive mostly from poor interpretations of electron density patterns and are most often misidentified Na+, K+, NH4+ ions, water molecules or spurious density peaks. Consequently, apart from few documented exceptions, Mg2+ ions do not bind to N7 atoms. Without much of a surprise, Mn2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+, which have a higher affinity for nitrogens, may contact N7 atoms when present in crystallization buffers. In this respect, we describe for the first time a potential Zn2+ ribosomal binding site involving two purine N7 atoms. Further, we provide a set of guidelines to help in the assignment of Mg2+ in crystallographic, cryo-EM, NMR and model building practices and discuss implications of our findings related to ion substitution experiments. PMID:27923930

  17. Click Reaction on Solid Phase Enables High Fidelity Synthesis of Nucleobase-Modified DNA.

    PubMed

    Tolle, Fabian; Rosenthal, Malte; Pfeiffer, Franziska; Mayer, Günter

    2016-03-16

    The post-synthetic functionalization of nucleic acids via click chemistry (CuAAC) has seen tremendous implementation, extending the applicability of nucleobase-modified nucleic acids in fields like fluorescent labeling, nanotechnology, and in vitro selection. However, the production of large quantities of high-density functionalized material via solid phase synthesis has been hampered by oxidative by-product formation associated with the alkaline workup conditions. Herein, we describe a rapid and cost-effective protocol for the high fidelity large-scale production of nucleobase-modified nucleic acids, exemplified with a recently described nucleobase-modified aptamer.

  18. Structural evolution of nucleobase clusters using force field models and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriki, Siva; Dagar, Anuradha; Bulusu, Satya S.

    2015-08-01

    We report global minima for all nucleobase clusters (nucleobase)n, with 2 ≤ n ≤ 4. The global minima are predicted using force field based global optimization methods followed by local optimizations using the dispersion corrected DFT method. In this study, we use both non-polarizable (OPLS-AA) and polarizable (AMOEBA) force fields for global optimization. Here we emphasize on the reliability of AMOEBA force field used for predicting accurate global minima of nucleobase clusters. The average deviation in binding energies using AMOEBA is 3 kcal/mol from the DFT while the average deviation using OPLS-AA is 8 kcal/mol from DFT.

  19. MATE Transporters Facilitate Vacuolar Uptake of Epicatechin 3′-O-Glucoside for Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian; Dixon, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana MYB transcription factor TRANSPARENT TESTA 2 (TT2) in Medicago trunculata hairy roots induces both proanthocyanidin accumulation and the ATP-dependent vacuolar/vesicular uptake of epicatechin 3′-O-glucoside; neither process is active in control roots that do, however, possess anthocyanidin 3-O-glucoside vacuolar uptake activity. A vacuolar membrane-localized multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporter, Medicago MATE1, was identified at the molecular level and shown to preferentially transport epicatechin 3′-O-glucoside. Genetic evidence has implicated TT12, a tonoplastic MATE transporter from Arabidopsis, in the transport of precursors for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in the seed coat. However, although Arabidopsis TT12 facilitates the transport of cyanidin 3-O-glucoside into membrane vesicles when expressed in yeast, there is no evidence that cyanidin 3-O-glucoside is converted to proanthocyanidins after transport into the vacuole. Here, we show that Arabidopsis TT12, like Medicago MATE1, functions to transport epicatechin 3′-O-glucoside as a precursor for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis, and Medicago MATE1 complements the seed proanthocyanidin phenotype of the Arabidopsis tt12 mutant both quantitatively and qualitatively. On the basis of biochemical properties, tissue-specific expression pattern, and genetic loss-of-function analysis, we conclude that MATE1 is an essential membrane transporter for proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in the Medicago seed coat. Implications of these findings for the assembly of oligomeric proanthocyanidins are discussed. PMID:19684242

  20. The Major Facilitative Folate Transporters Solute Carrier 19A1 and Solute Carrier 46A1: Biology and Role in Antifolate Chemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mike R.; Hou, Zhanjun

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the biology of the major facilitative membrane transporters, the reduced folate carrier (RFC) (Solute Carrier 19A1) and the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) (Solute Carrier 46A1). Folates are essential vitamins, and folate deficiency contributes to a variety of health disorders. RFC is ubiquitously expressed and is the major folate transporter in mammalian cells and tissues. PCFT mediates the intestinal absorption of dietary folates and appears to be important for transport of folates into the central nervous system. Clinically relevant antifolates for cancer, such as methotrexate and pralatrexate, are transported by RFC, and loss of RFC transport is an important mechanism of methotrexate resistance in cancer cell lines and in patients. PCFT is expressed in human tumors, and is active at pH conditions associated with the tumor microenvironment. Pemetrexed is an excellent substrate for both RFC and PCFT. Novel tumor-targeted antifolates related to pemetrexed with selective membrane transport by PCFT over RFC are being developed. In recent years, there have been major advances in understanding the structural and functional properties and the regulation of RFC and PCFT. The molecular bases for methotrexate resistance associated with loss of RFC transport and for hereditary folate malabsorption, attributable to mutant PCFT, were determined. Future studies should continue to translate molecular insights from basic studies of RFC and PCFT biology into new therapeutic strategies for cancer and other diseases. PMID:24396145

  1. The major facilitative folate transporters solute carrier 19A1 and solute carrier 46A1: biology and role in antifolate chemotherapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Matherly, Larry H; Wilson, Mike R; Hou, Zhanjun

    2014-04-01

    This review summarizes the biology of the major facilitative membrane transporters, the reduced folate carrier (RFC) (Solute Carrier 19A1) and the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) (Solute Carrier 46A1). Folates are essential vitamins, and folate deficiency contributes to a variety of health disorders. RFC is ubiquitously expressed and is the major folate transporter in mammalian cells and tissues. PCFT mediates the intestinal absorption of dietary folates and appears to be important for transport of folates into the central nervous system. Clinically relevant antifolates for cancer, such as methotrexate and pralatrexate, are transported by RFC, and loss of RFC transport is an important mechanism of methotrexate resistance in cancer cell lines and in patients. PCFT is expressed in human tumors, and is active at pH conditions associated with the tumor microenvironment. Pemetrexed is an excellent substrate for both RFC and PCFT. Novel tumor-targeted antifolates related to pemetrexed with selective membrane transport by PCFT over RFC are being developed. In recent years, there have been major advances in understanding the structural and functional properties and the regulation of RFC and PCFT. The molecular bases for methotrexate resistance associated with loss of RFC transport and for hereditary folate malabsorption, attributable to mutant PCFT, were determined. Future studies should continue to translate molecular insights from basic studies of RFC and PCFT biology into new therapeutic strategies for cancer and other diseases.

  2. First Principles Study of Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions in Single and Double Chain DNA and Solid Nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, T. P.; Pink, R. H.; Badu, S. R.; Dubey, Archana; Scheicher, R. H.; Saha, H. P.; Chow, Lee; Huang, M. B.

    2009-03-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions (NQI) of ^17O, ^14N and ^2H nuclei have been studied for free nucleobases and nucleobases in single strand and double strand DNA and in solid state. Our first-principles investigations were carried out using the Gaussian 2003 set of programs to implement the Hartree-Fock procedure combined with many-body effects included using many-body perturbation theory. As expected for NQI in general, many-body effects are found to be small. Results will be presented for the quadrupole coupling constants (e^2qQ) and asymmetry parameters (η) for the nucleobases in the various environments. Trends in e^2qQ and η in the different environments will be discussed. In the case of the solid nucleobases, comparisons will be made with available experimental data [1] for ^17O nuclei.[3pt] [1] Gang Wu et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124, 1768 (2002)

  3. Which Electronic and Structural Factors Control the Photostability of DNA and RNA Purine Nucleobases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollum, Marvin; Reichardt, Christian; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Corral, Inés; Rauer, Clemens; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2015-06-01

    Following ultraviolet excitation, the canonical purine nucleobases, guanine and adenine, are able to efficiently dissipate the absorbed energy within hundreds of femtoseconds. This property affords these nucleobases with great photostability. Conversely, non-canonical purine nucleobases exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields or efficiently populate long-lived triplet excited states from which chemistry can occur. Using femtosecond broadband transient absorption spectroscopy in combination with ab initio static and surface hopping dynamics simulations we have determined the electronic and structural factors that regulate the excited state dynamics of the purine nucleobase derivatives. Importantly, we have uncovered that the photostability of the guanine and adenine nucleobases is not due to the structure of the purine core itself and that the substituent at the C6 position of the purine nucleobase plays a more important role than that at the C2 position in the ultrafast relaxation of deleterious electronic energy. [The authors acknowledge the CAREER program of the National Science Foundation (Grant No. CHE-1255084) for financial support.

  4. Canonical and unconventional pairing schemes between bis(nucleobase) complexes of trans-a2PtII: Artificial nucleobase quartets and C—H…N bonds

    PubMed Central

    Freisinger, Eva; Rother, Irene B.; Lüth, Marc Sven; Lippert, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    If two nucleobases are crosslinked by trans-a2PtII, self-association via H bonding may take place either through individual bases or jointly through both bases. Due to the blockage of an acceptor site by the metal, the number of feasible pairing patterns can be reduced, and the preferred ones altered. If the metalated base pair as a whole undergoes association, base quartets can form. Various scenarios resulting from the application of guanine, hypoxanthine, and cytosine model nucleobases are discussed. Unconventional C—H…N hydrogen bonding has been observed in several instances. PMID:12651957

  5. Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily transporter from Botrytis cinerea, provides tolerance towards the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin and towards fungicides.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keisuke; Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; De Waard, Maarten A

    2002-10-01

    Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily gene from Botrytis cinerea, was cloned, and replacement and overexpression mutants were constructed to study its function. Replacement mutants showed increased sensitivity to the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin, produced by the plant Camptotheca acuminata and the plant pathogenic fungus Cercospora kikuchii, respectively. Overexpression mutants displayed decreased sensitivity to these compounds and to structurally unrelated fungicides, such as sterol demethylation inhibitors (DMIs). A double-replacement mutant of Bcmfs1 and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene BcatrD was more sensitive to DMI fungicides than a single-replacement mutant of BcatrD, known to encode an important ABC transporter of DMIs. The sensitivity of the wild-type strain and mutants to DMI fungicides correlated with Bcmfs1 expression levels and with the initial accumulation of oxpoconazole by germlings of these isolates. The results indicate that Bcmfs1 is a major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter involved in protection against natural toxins and fungicides and has a substrate specificity that overlaps with the ABC transporter BcatrD. Bcmfs1 may be involved in protection of B. cinerea against plant defense compounds during the pathogenic phase of growth on host plants and against fungitoxic antimicrobial metabolites during its saprophytic phase of growth.

  6. A primary fish gill cell culture model to assess pharmaceutical uptake and efflux: Evidence for passive and facilitated transport

    PubMed Central

    Stott, Lucy C.; Schnell, Sabine; Hogstrand, Christer; Owen, Stewart F.; Bury, Nic R.

    2015-01-01

    The gill is the principle site of xenobiotic transfer to and from the aqueous environment. To replace, refine or reduce (3Rs) the large numbers of fish used in in vivo uptake studies an effective in vitro screen is required that mimics the function of the teleost gill. This study uses a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary gill cell culture system grown on permeable inserts, which tolerates apical freshwater thus mimicking the intact organ, to assess the uptake and efflux of pharmaceuticals across the gill. Bidirectional transport studies in media of seven pharmaceuticals (propranolol, metoprolol, atenolol, formoterol, terbutaline, ranitidine and imipramine) showed they were transported transcellularly across the epithelium. However, studies conducted in water showed enhanced uptake of propranolol, ranitidine and imipramine. Concentration-equilibrated conditions without a concentration gradient suggested that a proportion of the uptake of propranolol and imipramine is via a carrier-mediated process. Further study using propranolol showed that its transport is pH-dependent and at very low environmentally relevant concentrations (ng L−1), transport deviated from linearity. At higher concentrations, passive uptake dominated. Known inhibitors of drug transport proteins; cimetidine, MK571, cyclosporine A and quinidine inhibited propranolol uptake, whilst amantadine and verapamil were without effect. Together this suggests the involvement of specific members of SLC and ABC drug transporter families in pharmaceutical transport. PMID:25544062

  7. Membrane transport of camptothecin: facilitation by human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and multidrug resistance protein 2 (ABCC2)

    PubMed Central

    Lalloo, Anita K; Luo, Feng R; Guo, Ailan; Paranjpe, Pankaj V; Lee, Sung-Hack; Vyas, Viral; Rubin, Eric; Sinko, Patrick J

    2004-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to continue the investigation of the membrane transport mechanisms of 20-(S)-camptothecin (CPT) in order to understand the possible role of membrane transporters on its oral bioavailability and disposition. Methods The intestinal transport kinetics of CPT were characterized using Caco-2 cells, MDCKII wild-type cells and MDCKII cells transfected with human P-glycoprotein (PGP) (ABCB1) or human multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) (ABCC2). The effects of drug concentration, inhibitors and temperature on CPT directional permeability were determined. Results The absorptive (apical to basolateral) and secretory (basolateral to apical) permeabilities of CPT were found to be saturable. Reduced secretory CPT permeabilities with decreasing temperatures suggests the involvement of an active, transporter-mediated secretory pathway. In the presence of etoposide, the CPT secretory permeability decreased 25.6%. However, inhibition was greater in the presence of PGP and of the breast cancer resistant protein inhibitor, GF120918 (52.5%). The involvement of additional secretory transporters was suggested since the basolateral to apical permeability of CPT was not further reduced in the presence of increasing concentrations of GF120918. To investigate the involvement of specific apically-located secretory membrane transporters, CPT transport studies were conducted using MDCKII/PGP cells and MDCKII/MRP2 cells. CPT carrier-mediated permeability was approximately twofold greater in MDCKII/PGP cells and MDCKII/MRP2 cells than in MDCKII/wild-type cells, while the apparent Km values were comparable in all three cell lines. The efflux ratio of CPT in MDCKII/PGP in the presence of 0.2 μM GF120918 was not completely reversed (3.36 to 1.49). However, the decrease in the efflux ratio of CPT in MDCKII/MRP2 cells (2.31 to 1.03) suggests that CPT efflux was completely inhibited by MK571, a potent inhibitor of the Multidrug Resistance Protein

  8. MdMYB1 Regulates Anthocyanin and Malate Accumulation by Directly Facilitating Their Transport into Vacuoles in Apples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Da-Gang; Sun, Cui-Hui; Ma, Qi-Jun; You, Chun-Xiang; Cheng, Lailiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-03-01

    Tonoplast transporters, including proton pumps and secondary transporters, are essential for plant cell function and for quality formation of fleshy fruits and ornamentals. Vacuolar transport of anthocyanins, malate, and other metabolites is directly or indirectly dependent on the H(+)-pumping activities of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (VHA) and/or vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase, but how these proton pumps are regulated in modulating vacuolar transport is largely unknown. Here, we report a transcription factor, MdMYB1, in apples that binds to the promoters of two genes encoding the B subunits of VHA, MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2, to transcriptionally activate its expression, thereby enhancing VHA activity. A series of transgenic analyses in apples demonstrates that MdMYB1/10 controls cell pH and anthocyanin accumulation partially by regulating MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2. Furthermore, several other direct target genes of MdMYB10 are identified, including MdVHA-E2, MdVHP1, MdMATE-LIKE1, and MdtDT, which are involved in H(+)-pumping or in the transport of anthocyanins and malates into vacuoles. Finally, we show that the mechanism by which MYB controls malate and anthocyanin accumulation in apples also operates in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These findings provide novel insights into how MYB transcription factors directly modulate the vacuolar transport system in addition to anthocyanin biosynthesis, consequently controlling organ coloration and cell pH in plants.

  9. Influence of biofilms on the movement of colloids in porous media. Implications for colloid facilitated transport in subsurface environments.

    PubMed

    Leon Morales, Carlos Felipe; Strathmann, Martin; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2007-05-01

    Colloid transport through porous media can be influenced by the presence of biofilms. Sterile and non-sterile sand columns were investigated using Laponite RD as model colloid and a highly mucoid strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as model biofilm former. Laponite RD was marked specifically by fluorescent complexes with rhodamine 6G. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) were used as parameters for determination of colloid transport characteristics. In the sterile columns, the colloid was mobile (collision efficiencies from 0.05 to 0.08) both after the presence of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions followed by deionised water influent. In the biofilm-grown column, the same treatment did not result in colloid retention in the case of Na(+) exposure, but in altered or enhanced colloid transport. In the case of Ca(2+) ions exposure, colloid retention increased with biofilm age. After 3 weeks, almost complete retention was observed. Similar observations were made in columns packed with material from slow sand filtration units. These data reveal the complex interactions between biofilms, cations and colloid transport. Changes in the electrolyte composition of water percolating the subsurface can frequently occur and will result in different colloid transport characteristics with regard to the dominating species of ions and the relative abundance of microbial biofilms. This has to be considered when modelling colloid transport through the subsurface.

  10. Seeding the Pregenetic Earth: Meteoritic Abundances of Nucleobases and Potential Reaction Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Ben K. D.; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    2015-07-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are a class of meteorite known for having high contents of water and organics. In this study, the abundances of the nucleobases, i.e., the building blocks of RNA and DNA, found in carbonaceous chondrites are collated from a variety of published data and compared across various meteorite classes. An extensive review of abiotic chemical reactions producing nucleobases is then performed. These reactions are then reduced to a list of 15 individual reaction pathways that could potentially occur within meteorite parent bodies. The nucleobases guanine, adenine, and uracil are found in carbonaceous chondrites in amounts of 1-500 ppb. It is currently unknown which reaction is responsible for their synthesis within the meteorite parent bodies. One class of carbonaceous meteorite dominates the abundances of both amino acids and nucleobases—the so-called CM2 (e.g., Murchison meteorite). CR2 meteorites (e.g., Graves Nunataks) also dominate the abundances of amino acids, but are the least abundant in nucleobases. The abundances of total nucleobases in these two classes are 330 ± 250 and 16 ± 13 ppb, respectively. Guanine most often has the greatest abundances in carbonaceous chondrites with respect to the other nucleobases, but is 1-2 orders of magnitude less abundant in CM2 meteorites than glycine (the most abundant amino acid). Our survey of the reaction mechanisms for nucleobase formation suggests that Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (i.e., CO, H2, and NH3 gases reacting in the presence of a catalyst such as alumina or silica) is the most likely candidate for conditions that characterize the early states of planetesimals.

  11. Synthesis and binding properties of new selective ligands for the nucleobase opposite the AP site.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yukiko; Nakagawa, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Rie; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2012-06-01

    DNA is continuously damaged by endogenous and exogenous factors such as oxidative stress or DNA alkylating agents. These damaged nucleobases are removed by DNA N-glycosylase and form apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) as intermediates in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. AP sites are also representative DNA damages formed by spontaneous hydrolysis. The AP sites block DNA polymerase and a mismatch nucleobase is inserted opposite the AP sites by polymerization to cause acute toxicities and mutations. Thus, AP site specific compounds have attracted much attention for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. In this study, we have developed nucleobase-polyamine conjugates as the AP site binding ligand by expecting that the nucleobase part would play a role in the specific recognition of the nucleobase opposite the AP site by the Watson-Crick base pair formation and that the polyamine part should contribute to the access of the ligand to the AP site by a non-specific interaction to the DNA phosphate backbone. The nucleobase conjugated with 3,3'-diaminodipropylamine (A-ligand, G-ligand, C-ligand, T-ligand and U-ligand) showed a specific stabilization of the duplex containing the AP site depending on the complementary combination with the nucleobase opposite the AP site; that is A-ligand to T, G-ligand to C, C-ligand to G, T- and U-ligand to A. The thermodynamic binding parameters clearly indicated that the specific stabilization is due to specific binding of the ligands to the complementary AP site. These results have suggested that the complementary base pairs of the Watson-Crick type are formed at the AP site.

  12. Fatty acid binding protein facilitates sarcolemmal fatty acid transport but not mitochondrial oxidation in rat and human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Graham P; Lally, Jamie; Nickerson, James G; Alkhateeb, Hakam; Snook, Laelie A; Heigenhauser, George J F; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend

    2007-01-01

    The transport of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) across mitochondrial membranes is regulated by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) activity. However, it appears that additional fatty acid transport proteins, such as fatty acid translocase (FAT)/CD36, influence not only LCFA transport across the plasma membrane, but also LCFA transport into mitochondria. Plasma membrane-associated fatty acid binding protein (FABPpm) is also known to be involved in sacrolemmal LCFA transport, and it is also present on the mitochondria. At this location, it has been identified as mitochondrial aspartate amino transferase (mAspAT), despite being structurally identical to FABPpm. Whether this protein is also involved in mitochondrial LCFA transport and oxidation remains unknown. Therefore, we have examined the ability of FABPpm/mAspAT to alter mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Muscle contraction increased (P < 0.05) the mitochondrial FAT/CD36 content in rat (+22%) and human skeletal muscle (+33%). By contrast, muscle contraction did not alter the content of mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein in either rat or human muscles. Electrotransfecting rat soleus muscles, in vivo, with FABPpm cDNA increased FABPpm protein in whole muscle (+150%; P < 0.05), at the plasma membrane (+117%; P < 0.05) and in mitochondria (+80%; P < 0.05). In these FABPpm-transfected muscles, palmitate transport into giant vesicles was increased by +73% (P < 0.05), and fatty acid oxidation in intact muscle was increased by +18% (P < 0.05). By contrast, despite the marked increase in mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein content (+80%), the rate of mitochondrial palmitate oxidation was not altered (P > 0.05). However, electrotransfection increased mAspAT activity by +70% (P < 0.05), and the mitochondrial FABPpm/mAspAT protein content was significantly correlated with mAspAT activity (r= 0.75). It is concluded that FABPpm has two distinct functions depending on its subcellular location: (a) it contributes to

  13. The phage shock protein PspA facilitates divalent metal transport and is required for virulence of Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Karlinsey, Joyce E; Maguire, Michael E; Becker, Lynne A; Crouch, Marie-Laure V; Fang, Ferric C

    2010-11-01

    The phage shock protein (Psp) system is induced by extracytoplasmic stress and thought to be important for the maintenance of proton motive force. We investigated the contribution of PspA to Salmonella virulence. A pspA deletion mutation significantly attenuates the virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium following intraperitoneal inoculation of C3H/HeN (Ity(r) ) mice. PspA was found to be specifically required for virulence in mice expressing the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1) (Slc11a1) divalent metal transporter, which restricts microbial growth by limiting the availability of essential divalent metals within the phagosome. Salmonella competes with Nramp1 by expressing multiple metal uptake systems including the Nramp-homologue MntH, the ABC transporter SitABCD and the ZIP family transporter ZupT. PspA was found to facilitate Mn(2+) transport by MntH and SitABCD, as well as Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) transport by ZupT. In vitro uptake of (54) Mn(2+) by MntH and ZupT was reduced in the absence of PspA. Transport-deficient mutants exhibit reduced viability in the absence of PspA when grown under metal-limited conditions. Moreover, the ZupT transporter is required for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence in Nramp1-expressing mice. We propose that PspA promotes Salmonella virulence by maintaining proton motive force, which is required for the function of multiple transporters mediating bacterial divalent metal acquisition during infection.

  14. Nucleobases in Space: Laboratory Studies of Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie; Mattioda, Andy; Bernstein, Max; Sandford, Scott; Hudgins, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs) are heterocyclic aromatics Le., PAHs with carbon atoms replaced by a nitrogen atom. These molecules have been detected in meteorite extracts, and in general these nitrogen heterocycles are of astrobiological interest since this class of molecules include nucleobases, basic components of our nucleic acids. These compounds are predicted to be present in the interstellar medium and in Titan tholin, but have received relatively little attention. We will present spectra and reactions of PANHs, frozen in solid H2O at 12 K, conditions germane to astronomical observations. In contrast to simple PAHs, that do not interact strongly with solid H2O, the nitrogen atoms in PANHs are potentially capable of hydrogen bonding with H20 changing their spectra, complicating their remote detection on the surfaces of icy bodies. Moreover, we have studied the photo-chemistry of these interesting compounds under astrophysical conditions and will use our lab studies to assess a potential interstellar heritage of these compounds in carbonaceous chondrites.

  15. DNA photoreacts by nucleobase ring cleavage to form labile isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Buschhaus, Laura; Rolf, Josefin; Kleinermanns, Karl

    2013-11-14

    Differential infrared absorption spectroscopy was used to study the formation of isocyanates and further photo-products in the oligonucleotides dG10, dC10 and dT10 and in their mononucleosides by ultraviolet light at 266 nm. We find that α-cleavage takes place in oligonucleotides and mononucleosides both in films and in solution. The very intense and spectrally isolated isocyanate (N=C=O) asymmetric stretch vibration at 2277 cm(-1) is used as a spectroscopic marker for detection of the photo-product. The band disappears upon reaction with small amounts of water vapour as expected for isocyanates. Quantum yields for isocyanate formation by nucleobase ring cleavage in the α-position to the carbonyl group are ∼5 × 10(-5) in the mononucleosides and up to 5 × 10(-4) in the oligonucleotides. In the mixed oligonucleotides dG10/dC10 and dA10/dT10 the quantum yield of α-cleavage drops by a factor of 10 compared to the single oligonucleotides. Implications for DNA repair and photo-induced DNA-protein cross-linking via isocyanate reaction with NH2 groups of amino acids are discussed.

  16. The nucleobase adenine as a signalling molecule in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Thimm, D; Schiedel, A C; Peti-Peterdi, J; Kishore, B K; Müller, C E

    2015-04-01

    In 2002, the first receptor activated by the nucleobase adenine was discovered in rats. In the past years, two adenine receptors (AdeRs) in mice and one in Chinese hamsters, all of which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), were cloned and pharmacologically characterized. Based on the nomenclature for other purinergic receptor families (P1 for adenosine receptors and P2 for nucleotide, e.g. ATP, receptors), AdeRs were designated P0 receptors. Pharmacological data indicate the existence of G protein-coupled AdeRs in pigs and humans as well; however, those have not been cloned so far. Current data suggest a role for adenine and AdeRs in renal proximal tubules. Furthermore, AdeRs are suggested to be functional counterplayers of vasopressin in the collecting duct system, thus exerting diuretic effects. We are only at the beginning of understanding the significance of this new class of purinergic receptors, which might become future drug targets.

  17. The role of nucleobase interactions in RNA structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bottaro, Sandro; Di Palma, Francesco; Bussi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The intricate network of interactions observed in RNA three-dimensional structures is often described in terms of a multitude of geometrical properties, including helical parameters, base pairing/stacking, hydrogen bonding and backbone conformation. We show that a simple molecular representation consisting in one oriented bead per nucleotide can account for the fundamental structural properties of RNA. In this framework, canonical Watson-Crick, non-Watson-Crick base-pairing and base-stacking interactions can be unambiguously identified within a well-defined interaction shell. We validate this representation by performing two independent, complementary tests. First, we use it to construct a sequence-independent, knowledge-based scoring function for RNA structural prediction, which compares favorably to fully atomistic, state-of-the-art techniques. Second, we define a metric to measure deviation between RNA structures that directly reports on the differences in the base–base interaction network. The effectiveness of this metric is tested with respect to the ability to discriminate between structurally and kinetically distant RNA conformations, performing better compared to standard techniques. Taken together, our results suggest that this minimalist, nucleobase-centric representation captures the main interactions that are relevant for describing RNA structure and dynamics. PMID:25355509

  18. Accumulation of formamide in hydrothermal pores to form prebiotic nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Niether, Doreen; Afanasenkau, Dzmitry; Dhont, Jan K G; Wiegand, Simone

    2016-04-19

    Formamide is one of the important compounds from which prebiotic molecules can be synthesized, provided that its concentration is sufficiently high. For nucleotides and short DNA strands, it has been shown that a high degree of accumulation in hydrothermal pores occurs, so that temperature gradients might play a role in the origin of life [Baaske P, et al. (2007)Proc Natl Acad Sci USA104(22):9346-9351]. We show that the same combination of thermophoresis and convection in hydrothermal pores leads to accumulation of formamide up to concentrations where nucleobases are formed. The thermophoretic properties of aqueous formamide solutions are studied by means of Infrared Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering. These data are used in numerical finite element calculations in hydrothermal pores for various initial concentrations, ambient temperatures, and pore sizes. The high degree of formamide accumulation is due to an unusual temperature and concentration dependence of the thermophoretic behavior of formamide. The accumulation fold in part of the pores increases strongly with increasing aspect ratio of the pores, and saturates to highly concentrated aqueous formamide solutions of ∼85 wt% at large aspect ratios. Time-dependent studies show that these high concentrations are reached after 45-90 d, starting with an initial formamide weight fraction of[Formula: see text]wt % that is typical for concentrations in shallow lakes on early Earth.

  19. Accumulation of formamide in hydrothermal pores to form prebiotic nucleobases

    PubMed Central

    Niether, Doreen; Afanasenkau, Dzmitry; Dhont, Jan K. G.

    2016-01-01

    Formamide is one of the important compounds from which prebiotic molecules can be synthesized, provided that its concentration is sufficiently high. For nucleotides and short DNA strands, it has been shown that a high degree of accumulation in hydrothermal pores occurs, so that temperature gradients might play a role in the origin of life [Baaske P, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104(22):9346−9351]. We show that the same combination of thermophoresis and convection in hydrothermal pores leads to accumulation of formamide up to concentrations where nucleobases are formed. The thermophoretic properties of aqueous formamide solutions are studied by means of Infrared Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering. These data are used in numerical finite element calculations in hydrothermal pores for various initial concentrations, ambient temperatures, and pore sizes. The high degree of formamide accumulation is due to an unusual temperature and concentration dependence of the thermophoretic behavior of formamide. The accumulation fold in part of the pores increases strongly with increasing aspect ratio of the pores, and saturates to highly concentrated aqueous formamide solutions of ∼85 wt% at large aspect ratios. Time-dependent studies show that these high concentrations are reached after 45–90 d, starting with an initial formamide weight fraction of 10−3 wt % that is typical for concentrations in shallow lakes on early Earth. PMID:27044100

  20. M4FT-16LL080303052-State of Knowledge for Colloid Facilitated Radionuclide Transport and Update on Actinide Diffusion in Bentonite Backfill

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, Mavrik; Joseph, C.

    2016-08-16

    This progress report (Level 4 Milestone Number M4FT-16LL080303052) summarizes research conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) within the Crystalline Disposal R&D Activity Number FT-16LL080303051 and Crystalline International Collaborations Activity Number FT-16LL080303061. The focus of this research is the interaction of radionuclides with Engineered Barrier System (EBS) and host rock materials at various physico-chemical conditions relevant to subsurface repository environments. They include both chemical and physical processes such as solubility, sorption, and diffusion. The colloid-facilitated transport effort focused on preparation of a draft manuscript summarizing the state of knowledge and parameterization of colloid-facilitated transport mechanisms in support of reactive transport and performance assessment models for generic crystalline repositories. This draft manuscript is being submitted as a level 3 milestone with LANL as the primary author. LLNL’s contribution to that effort is summarized only briefly in the present report. A manuscript summarizing long-term U(VI) diffusion experiments through bentonite backfill material was recently accepted for publication; the contents of that manuscript are summarized in the present report. The Np(IV) diffusion experiments were started mid-year and are ongoing. The completion of these experiments is planned for early FY17. Our progress in quantifying Np(IV) diffusion in bentonite backfill is summarized in the present report. Our involvement with the NEA TDB project was summarized in a recent Argillite Disposal activity report. It is not included in this report.

  1. AtSWEET4, a hexose facilitator, mediates sugar transport to axial sinks and affects plant development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaozhu; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Chao; Tian, Zhihong; Li, Jianxiong

    2016-01-01

    Plants transport photoassimilates from source organs to sink tissues through the phloem translocation pathway. In the transport phloem, sugars that escape from the sieve tubes are released into the apoplasmic space between the sieve element/companion cell complex (SE/CC) and phloem parenchyma cells (PPCs) during the process of long-distance transport. The competition for sugar acquisition between SE/CC and adjoining PPCs is mediated by plasma membrane translocators. YFP-tagged AtSWEET4 protein is localized in the plasma membrane, and PromoterAtSWEET4-GUS analysis showed that AtSWEET4 is expressed in the stele of roots and veins of leaves and flowers. Overexpression of AtSWEET4 in Arabidopsis increases plant size and accumulates more glucose and fructose. By contrast, knock-down of AtSWEET4 by RNA-interference leads to small plant size, reduction in glucose and fructose contents, chlorosis in the leaf vein network, and reduction in chlorophyll content in leaves. Yeast assays demonstrated that AtSWEET4 is able to complement both fructose and glucose transport deficiency. Transgenic plants of AtSWEET4 overexpression exhibit higher freezing tolerance and support more growth of bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121. We conclude that AtSWEET4 plays an important role in mediating sugar transport in axial tissues during plant growth and development. PMID:27102826

  2. MdMYB1 Regulates Anthocyanin and Malate Accumulation by Directly Facilitating Their Transport into Vacuoles in Apples1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Da-Gang; Sun, Cui-Hui; Ma, Qi-Jun; You, Chun-Xiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Tonoplast transporters, including proton pumps and secondary transporters, are essential for plant cell function and for quality formation of fleshy fruits and ornamentals. Vacuolar transport of anthocyanins, malate, and other metabolites is directly or indirectly dependent on the H+-pumping activities of vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA) and/or vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase, but how these proton pumps are regulated in modulating vacuolar transport is largely unknown. Here, we report a transcription factor, MdMYB1, in apples that binds to the promoters of two genes encoding the B subunits of VHA, MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2, to transcriptionally activate its expression, thereby enhancing VHA activity. A series of transgenic analyses in apples demonstrates that MdMYB1/10 controls cell pH and anthocyanin accumulation partially by regulating MdVHA-B1 and MdVHA-B2. Furthermore, several other direct target genes of MdMYB10 are identified, including MdVHA-E2, MdVHP1, MdMATE-LIKE1, and MdtDT, which are involved in H+-pumping or in the transport of anthocyanins and malates into vacuoles. Finally, we show that the mechanism by which MYB controls malate and anthocyanin accumulation in apples also operates in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These findings provide novel insights into how MYB transcription factors directly modulate the vacuolar transport system in addition to anthocyanin biosynthesis, consequently controlling organ coloration and cell pH in plants. PMID:26637549

  3. Conformational Change of a Tryptophan Residue in BtuF Facilitates Binding and Transport of Cobinamide by the Vitamin B12 Transporter BtuCD-F

    PubMed Central

    Mireku, S. A.; Ruetz, M.; Zhou, T.; Korkhov, V. M.; Kräutler, B.; Locher, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    BtuCD-F is an ABC transporter that mediates cobalamin uptake into Escherichia coli. Early in vivo data suggested that BtuCD-F might also be involved in the uptake of cobinamide, a cobalamin precursor. However, neither was it demonstrated that BtuCD-F indeed transports cobinamide, nor was the structural basis of its recognition known. We synthesized radiolabeled cyano-cobinamide and demonstrated BtuCD-catalyzed in vitro transport, which was ATP- and BtuF-dependent. The crystal structure of cobinamide-bound BtuF revealed a conformational change of a tryptophan residue (W66) in the substrate binding cleft compared to the structure of cobalamin-bound BtuF. High-affinity binding of cobinamide was dependent on W66, because mutation to most other amino acids substantially reduced binding. The structures of three BtuF W66 mutants revealed that tight packing against bound cobinamide was only provided by tryptophan and phenylalanine, in line with the observed binding affinities. In vitro transport rates of cobinamide and cobalamin were not influenced by the substitutions of BtuF W66 under the experimental conditions, indicating that W66 has no critical role in the transport reaction. Our data present the molecular basis of the cobinamide versus cobalamin specificity of BtuCD-F and provide tools for in vitro cobinamide transport and binding assays. PMID:28128319

  4. N-h and N-C bond activation of pyrimidinic nucleobases and nucleosides promoted by an osmium polyhydride.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; García-Raboso, Jorge; Oliván, Montserrat; Oñate, Enrique

    2012-05-21

    Complex OsH(6)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (1) reacts with 1-methylthymine and 1-methyluracil to give OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2)(nucleobase') (2, 3) containing the deprotonated nucleobases (nucleobase') κ(2)-N,O coordinated by the nitrogen atom at position 3 and the oxygen bonded to the carbon atom of the ring at position 4. Similarly, the reactions of 1 with thymidine, 5-methyluridine, deoxyuridine, and uridine lead to OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2)(nucleoside') (4-7) with the deprotonated nucleoside (nucleoside') κ(2)-N,O coordinated by the nitrogen atom at position 3 and the oxygen bonded to the carbon atom at position 4 of the nucleobases. Treatment of complexes 5 and 7, containing nucleosides derived from ribose, with OsH(2)Cl(2)(P(i)Pr(3))(2) (8) in the presence of Et(3)N affords dinuclear species OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2)(nucleobase')-(ribose)(P(i)Pr(3))(2)H(2)Os (9, 10) formed by two different metal fragments. Complex 1 also promotes the cleavage of the N-C bond of 2-7 to give the dinuclear species {OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2)}(2)(nucleobase'') (11, 12) with the nucleobase skeleton (nucleobase'') κ(2)-N,O coordinated to both metal fragments. These compounds can be also prepared by reaction of 1 with 0.5 equiv of thymine and uracil. The use of 1:1 hexahydride:nucleobase molar ratios gives rise to the preferred formation of the mononuclear complexes OsH(3)(P(i)Pr(3))(2)(nucleobase''') (13, 14; nucleobase''' = monodeprotonated thymine or uracil). The X-ray structures of complexes 6, 11, and 14 are also reported.

  5. High resolution mapping of modified DNA nucleobases using excision repair enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, D. Suzi; Ransom, Monica; Adane, Biniam; York, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    The incorporation and creation of modified nucleobases in DNA have profound effects on genome function. We describe methods for mapping positions and local content of modified DNA nucleobases in genomic DNA. We combined in vitro nucleobase excision with massively parallel DNA sequencing (Excision-seq) to determine the locations of modified nucleobases in genomic DNA. We applied the Excision-seq method to map uracil in E. coli and budding yeast and discovered significant variation in uracil content, wherein uracil is excluded from the earliest and latest replicating regions of the genome, possibly driven by changes in nucleotide pool composition. We also used Excision-seq to identify sites of pyrimidine dimer formation induced by UV light exposure, where the method could distinguish between sites of cyclobutane and 6-4 photoproduct formation. These UV mapping data enabled analysis of local sequence bias around pyrimidine dimers and suggested a preference for an adenosine downstream from 6-4 photoproducts. The Excision-seq method is broadly applicable for high precision, genome-wide mapping of modified nucleobases with cognate repair enzymes. PMID:25015380

  6. The Formation of Nucleobases from the Irradiation of Purine in Astophysical Ices and Comparisons with Meteorites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Materese, C. K.; Nuevo, M.

    2016-01-01

    N-heterocycles have been identified in meteorites and their extraterrestrial origins are suggested by isotopic ratio measurements. Although small N- heterocycles have not been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM), recent experiments in our lab have shown that the irradiation of the aromatic molecules like benzene (C6H6) and naphthalene (C10H8) in mixed molecular ices leads to the formation of O- and N-heterocyclic molecules. Among the class of N-heterocycles are the nucleobases, which are of astrobiological interest because they are the information bearing units of DNA and RNA. Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites [3-5], with isotopic signatures that are also consistent with an extraterrestrial origin. Three of the biologically relevant nucleobases (uracil, cytosine, and guanine) have a pyrimidine core structure while the remaining two (adenine and guanine) possess a purine core. Previous experiments in our lab have demonstrated that all of the bio-logical nucleobases (and numerous other molecules) with a pyrimidine core structure can be produced by irradiating pyrimidine in mixed molecular ices of several compositions [6-8]. In this work, we study the formation of purine-based molecules, including the nucleobases adenine, and guanine, from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of purine in ices consisting mixtures of H2O and NH3 at low temperature. The experiments are designed to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which these species may be formed in dense molecular clouds, protoplanetary disks, or on the surfaces of icy bodies in planetary systems.

  7. Meteorites and the RNA World: A Thermodynamic Model of Nucleobase Synthesis within Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Ben K. D.; Pudritz, Ralph E.

    2016-11-01

    The possible meteorite parent body origin of Earth's pregenetic nucleobases is substantiated by the guanine (G), adenine (A), and uracil (U) measured in various meteorites. Cytosine (C) and thymine (T), however, are absent in meteorites, making the emergence of an RNA and later RNA/DNA/protein world problematic. We investigated the meteorite parent body (planetesimal) origin of all nucleobases by computationally modeling 18 reactions that potentially contribute to nucleobase formation in such environments. Out of this list, we identified the two most important reactions for each nucleobase and found that these involve small molecules such as HCN, CO, NH3, and water that ultimately arise from the protoplanetary disks in which planetesimals are built. The primary result of this study is that cytosine is unlikely to persist within meteorite parent bodies due to aqueous deamination. Thymine has a thermodynamically favorable reaction pathway from uracil, formaldehyde, and formic acid but likely did not persist within planetesimals containing H2O2 due to an oxidation reaction with this molecule. Finally, while Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis is found to be the dominant source of nucleobases within our model planetesimal, non-catalytic (NC) synthesis may still be significant under certain chemical conditions (e.g., within CR2 parent bodies). We discuss several major consequences of our results for the origin of the RNA world.

  8. Simultaneous determination of 10 nucleosides and nucleobases in Antrodia camphorata using QTRAP LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Zhang, Fengsu; Yang, Nianyun; Liu, Xunhong

    2014-09-01

    A liquid chromatography-triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-QTrap-MS) analysis has been developed for the identification and quantification of 10 nucleosides and nucleobases in extracts of Antrodia camphorata. The method was successfully used to qualitatively identify for six nucleosides namely, cytidine, uridine, inosine, guanosine, thymidine, adenosine and four nucleobases namely, uracil, guanine, xanthine, adenine in A. camphorata. Under optimized chromatographic conditions, good separation for 10 target compounds were obtained on an Agilent HC-C18(2) column (4.6 × 250 mm, 5 μm) eluted by a mobile phase of 5 mM ammonium acetate solution-methanol at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Data acquisition was carried out in multiple reaction monitoring transition mode. Additional identification and confirmation of target compounds were performed using the enhanced product ion modus of the linear ion trap. It was the first report about simultaneous analysis of nucleosides and nucleobases in A. camphorata using this method. These results demonstrated that the QTRAP LC-MS/MS was a useful tool for quality evaluation of some medicinal plant products by using nucleosides and nucleobases as chemical markers. This method might also be utilized for the investigation of edible plant materials and agricultural products containing nucleosides and nucleobases.

  9. Humic acid facilitates the transport of ARS-labeled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in iron oxyhydroxide-coated sand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) have been widely used to remediate soil and wastewater contaminated with metals and radionuclides. However, our understanding of nHAP transport and fate is limited in natural environments that exhibit significant variability in solid and solution chemistry. The tr...

  10. Humic acid facilitates the transport of ARS-labeled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in iron oxyhydroxide-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dengjun; Bradford, Scott A; Harvey, Ronald W; Gao, Bin; Cang, Long; Zhou, Dongmei

    2012-03-06

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) have been widely used to remediate soil and wastewater contaminated with metals and radionuclides. However, our understanding of nHAP transport and fate is limited in natural environments that exhibit significant variability in solid and solution chemistry. The transport and retention kinetics of Alizarin red S (ARS)-labeled nHAP were investigated in water-saturated packed columns that encompassed a range of humic acid concentrations (HA, 0-10 mg L(-1)), fractional surface coverage of iron oxyhydroxide coatings on sand grains (λ, 0-0.75), and pH (6.0-10.5). HA was found to have a marked effect on the electrokinetic properties of ARS-nHAP, and on the transport and retention of ARS-nHAP in granular media. The transport of ARS-nHAP was found to increase with increasing HA concentration because of enhanced colloidal stability and the reduced aggregate size. When HA = 10 mg L(-1), greater ARS-nHAP attachment occurred with increasing λ because of increased electrostatic attraction between negatively charged nanoparticles and positively charged iron oxyhydroxides, although alkaline conditions (pH 8.0 and 10.5) reversed the surface charge of the iron oxyhydroxides and therefore decreased deposition. The retention profiles of ARS-nHAP exhibited a hyperexponential shape for all test conditions, suggesting some unfavorable attachment conditions. Retarded breakthrough curves occurred in sands with iron oxyhydroxide coatings because of time-dependent occupation of favorable deposition sites. Consideration of the above effects is necessary to improve remediation efficiency of nHAP for metals and actinides in soils and subsurface environments.

  11. The activity of anandamide at vanilloid VR1 receptors requires facilitated transport across the cell membrane and is limited by intracellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, L; Bisogno, T; Maccarrone, M; Davis, J B; Finazzi-Agro, A; Di Marzo, V

    2001-04-20

    The endogenous ligand of CB(1) cannabinoid receptors, anandamide, is also a full agonist at vanilloid VR1 receptors for capsaicin and resiniferatoxin, thereby causing an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in human VR1-overexpressing (hVR1-HEK) cells. Two selective inhibitors of anandamide facilitated transport into cells, VDM11 and VDM13, and two inhibitors of anandamide enzymatic hydrolysis, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and methylarachidonoyl fluorophosphonate, inhibited and enhanced, respectively, the VR1-mediated effect of anandamide, but not of resiniferatoxin or capsaicin. The nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside, known to stimulate anandamide transport, enhanced anandamide effect on the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Accordingly, hVR1-HEK cells contain an anandamide membrane transporter inhibited by VDM11 and VDM13 and activated by sodium nitroprusside, and an anandamide hydrolase activity sensitive to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and methylarachidonoyl fluorophosphonate, and a fatty acid amide hydrolase transcript. These findings suggest the following. (i) Anandamide activates VR1 receptors by acting at an intracellular site. (ii) Degradation by fatty acid amide hydrolase limits anandamide activity on VR1; and (iii) the anandamide membrane transporter inhibitors can be used to distinguish between CB(1) or VR1 receptor-mediated actions of anandamide. By contrast, the CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A inhibited also the VR1-mediated effect of anandamide and capsaicin on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, although at concentrations higher than those required for CB(1) antagonism.

  12. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Rare-Gas Solvated Nucleobase Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonaugurio, Angela M.; Chen, Jing; Bowen, Kit H.

    2012-06-01

    Gas-phase polar molecular anions [uracil (U^-), thymine (T^-), 1-3 dimethyluracil (DMU^-)] solvated by rare gas atoms were studied by means of negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. The photoelectron spectrum (PES) of U^-, T^-, and DMU^- each exhibit a distinctive dipole-bound (DB) spectral signature. The spectra of U^-, U^- (Ar)_1,2 and U^- (Kr)_1 also only displayed the DB anion feature. Upon the solvation of more rare gas atoms, the spectra of U^- (Ar)_3, U^- (Kr)_2, and U^- (Xe)1-3 not only retained the DB signature but also exhibited the valence anion features. Moreover, the DB and the valence features shifted together to higher electron binding energies (EBEs) with increasing numbers of rare gas solvent atoms. Therefore, the co-existing DB and the valence anions appeared to be strongly coupled with each other, i.e. they effectively form a single state that is a superposition of both DB and valence anion states. For both U^- and T^- series, the ``onset size" of the Xe, Kr, and Ar solvents for the co-existing of the two anionic states was 1, 2, and 3 respectively. In addition, a minimum of 2 methane (CH_4) molecules or 1 ethane (C_2H_6) molecule were required to induce the coupling between the two states in the T^- series. Thus, the nucleobase anion interaction with non-polar solvent atoms tracks as the sum of the solvent polarizabilities. However for the DMU- series, the DB and the valence anions of DMU^-(Xe)_1, DMU^-(Kr)_2, and DMU^-(Ar)_3 were completely absent in both the mass spectra and the PES. Beyond these ``holes", their PES displayed the similar behaviors to the U^- and T^- series. Extrapolated EA values for these missing species were at or very close to zero, which may explain why they were not seen. However, why this was the case is not clear. With better Franck-Condon overlap between the origins of the NB^- (Rg)_n valence anion and the neutral NB(Rg)n than between those of the NB^- (H2O)n valence anion and the neutral NB(H2O)n, extrapolation of

  13. Accumulation of formamide in hydrothermal pores to form prebiotic nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niether, Doreen; Afanasenkau, Dzmitry; Dhont, Jan K. G.

    2016-04-01

    Formamide is one of the important compounds from which prebiotic molecules can be synthesized, provided that its concentration is sufficiently high. For nucleotides and short DNA strands, it has been shown that a high degree of accumulation in hydrothermal pores occurs, so that temperature gradients might play a role in the origin of life [Baaske P, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104(22):9346-9351]. We show that the same combination of thermophoresis and convection in hydrothermal pores leads to accumulation of formamide up to concentrations where nucleobases are formed. The thermophoretic properties of aqueous formamide solutions are studied by means of Infrared Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering. These data are used in numerical finite element calculations in hydrothermal pores for various initial concentrations, ambient temperatures, and pore sizes. The high degree of formamide accumulation is due to an unusual temperature and concentration dependence of the thermophoretic behavior of formamide. The accumulation fold in part of the pores increases strongly with increasing aspect ratio of the pores, and saturates to highly concentrated aqueous formamide solutions of ˜85 wt% at large aspect ratios. Time-dependent studies show that these high concentrations are reached after 45-90 d, starting with an initial formamide weight fraction of 10-310-3 wt % that is typical for concentrations in shallow lakes on early Earth.

  14. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  15. The origin of efficient triplet state population in sulfur-substituted nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Sebastian; Pollum, Marvin; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Dunn, Nicholas; Marquetand, Philipp; Corral, Inés; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; González, Leticia

    2016-10-01

    Elucidating the photophysical mechanisms in sulfur-substituted nucleobases (thiobases) is essential for designing prospective drugs for photo- and chemotherapeutic applications. Although it has long been established that the phototherapeutic activity of thiobases is intimately linked to efficient intersystem crossing into reactive triplet states, the molecular factors underlying this efficiency are poorly understood. Herein we combine femtosecond transient absorption experiments with quantum chemistry and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations to investigate 2-thiocytosine as a necessary step to unravel the electronic and structural elements that lead to ultrafast and near-unity triplet-state population in thiobases in general. We show that different parts of the potential energy surfaces are stabilized to different extents via thionation, quenching the intrinsic photostability of canonical DNA and RNA nucleobases. These findings satisfactorily explain why thiobases exhibit the fastest intersystem crossing lifetimes measured to date among bio-organic molecules and have near-unity triplet yields, whereas the triplet yields of canonical nucleobases are nearly zero.

  16. The origin of efficient triplet state population in sulfur-substituted nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Mai, Sebastian; Pollum, Marvin; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Dunn, Nicholas; Marquetand, Philipp; Corral, Inés; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E; González, Leticia

    2016-10-05

    Elucidating the photophysical mechanisms in sulfur-substituted nucleobases (thiobases) is essential for designing prospective drugs for photo- and chemotherapeutic applications. Although it has long been established that the phototherapeutic activity of thiobases is intimately linked to efficient intersystem crossing into reactive triplet states, the molecular factors underlying this efficiency are poorly understood. Herein we combine femtosecond transient absorption experiments with quantum chemistry and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations to investigate 2-thiocytosine as a necessary step to unravel the electronic and structural elements that lead to ultrafast and near-unity triplet-state population in thiobases in general. We show that different parts of the potential energy surfaces are stabilized to different extents via thionation, quenching the intrinsic photostability of canonical DNA and RNA nucleobases. These findings satisfactorily explain why thiobases exhibit the fastest intersystem crossing lifetimes measured to date among bio-organic molecules and have near-unity triplet yields, whereas the triplet yields of canonical nucleobases are nearly zero.

  17. Survival of gas phase amino acids and nucleobases in space radiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, S.; Andrade, D. P. P.; de Castilho, R. B.; Cavasso-Filho, R. L.; Lago, A. F.; Coutinho, L. H.; de Souza, G. G. B.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.; de Brito, A. Naves

    2008-10-01

    We present experimental studies on the photoionization and photodissociation processes (photodestruction) of gaseous amino acids and nucleobases in interstellar and interpla-netary radiation analogs conditions. The measurements have been undertaken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft X-ray photons. The experimental set up basically consists of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer kept under high vacuum conditions. Mass spectra were obtained using a photoelectron photoion coincidence technique. We have shown that the amino acids are effectively more destroyed (up to 70 80%) by the stellar radiation than the nucleobases, mainly in the VUV. Since polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have the same survival capability and seem to be ubiquitous in the ISM, it is not unreasonable to predict that nucleobases could survive in the interstellar medium and/or in comets, even as a stable cation.

  18. Nucleobases and Other Prebiotic Species from the UV Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott; Materese, Christopher; Nuevo, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Nucleobases are aromatic N-heterocycles that constitute the informational subunits of DNA and RNA and are divided into two families: pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites and their extraterrestrial origin confirmed by isotope measurement. Although no N-heterocycles have been individually identified in the ISM, the 6.2-micron interstellar emission feature seen towards many astronomical objects suggests a population of such molecules is likely present. We report on a study of the formation of pyrimidine-based molecules, including nucleobases and other species of prebiotic interest, from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in low temperature ices containing H2O, NH3, C3OH, and CH4, to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which prebiotic species may be formed in the Solar System.

  19. Vaccinia Virus Uses Retromer-Independent Cellular Retrograde Transport Pathways To Facilitate the Wrapping of Intracellular Mature Virions during Virus Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Kate; Haga, Ismar R.; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Jasim, Seema; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Gillet, Daniel; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Digard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poxviruses, such as vaccinia virus (VACV), undertake a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle which involves morphogenesis through four distinct virion forms and includes a crucial wrapping step whereby intracellular mature virions (IMVs) are wrapped in two additional membranes to form intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). To determine if cellular retrograde transport pathways are required for this wrapping step, we examined VACV morphogenesis in cells with reduced expression of the tetrameric tethering factor known as the GARP (Golgi-associated retrograde pathway), a central component of retrograde transport. VACV multistep replication was significantly impaired in cells transfected with small interfering RNA targeting the GARP complex and in cells with a mutated GARP complex. Detailed analysis revealed that depletion of the GARP complex resulted in a reduction in the number of IEVs, thereby linking retrograde transport with the wrapping of IMVs. In addition, foci of viral wrapping membrane proteins without an associated internal core accumulated in cells with a mutated GARP complex, suggesting that impaired retrograde transport uncouples nascent IMVs from the IEV membranes at the site of wrapping. Finally, small-molecule inhibitors of retrograde transport strongly suppressed VACV multistep growth in vitro and reduced weight loss and clinical signs in an in vivo murine model of systemic poxviral disease. This work links cellular retrograde transport pathways with the morphogenesis of poxviruses and identifies a panel of novel inhibitors of poxvirus replication. IMPORTANCE Cellular retrograde transport pathways traffic cargo from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network and are a key part of the intracellular membrane network. This work reveals that the prototypic poxvirus vaccinia virus (VACV) exploits cellular retrograde transport pathways to facilitate the wrapping of intracellular mature virions and therefore promote the production of extracellular virus

  20. Infrared spectral investigations of UV irradiated nucleobases adsorbed on mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaro, Teresa; Brucato, John Robert; Pace, Emanuele; Guidi, Mariangela Cestelli; Branciamore, Sergio; Pucci, Amaranta

    2013-09-01

    The interaction between electromagnetic radiation and bio-molecules in heterogeneous environments is a prebiotically relevant process. Minerals may have a pivotal role in the prebiotic evolution of complex chemical systems, mediating the effects of electromagnetic radiation, influencing the photostability of bio-molecules, catalyzing important chemical reactions and/or protecting molecules against degradation. In particular, nucleobases are relevant bio-molecules to investigate both in the prebiotic context, because they are coding components of nucleic acids, and from the standpoint of the survival of biological systems in space conditions. Several studies on the photodynamics of nucleobases suggest that their structure could have been naturally selected for the ability to dissipate electronic energy through ultrafast photophysical decay. Considering the putative involvement of minerals in the prebiotic chemistry, it is necessary to study the photostability of nucleobases under space conditions in the presence of mineral matrices, to investigate both the prebiotic processes that might have had a role in the development of the first living entities on Earth and the physical and chemical processes occurring in extraterrestrial environments. We focused our study on the characterization of the nature of the interaction between nucleobases and the surface of the minerals magnesium oxide and forsterite by infrared vibrational spectroscopy. We observed that most of the characteristic bands of pure nucleobases vanished when adsorbed on magnesium oxide. On the contrary, in the case of adenine and uracil adsorbed on forsterite, very intense nucleobase absorption peaks appeared. This phenomenon pertains to the surface selection rules changes related to molecular orientation. Moreover, based on the vibrational shifts, we deduced the molecular interaction sites with the mineral surfaces. Furthermore, we investigated the photostability of nucleobases adsorbed on such minerals

  1. Infrared spectral investigations of UV irradiated nucleobases adsorbed on mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucato, John Robert; Pace, Emanuele; Pucci, Amaranta; Branciamore, Sergio; Cestelli Guidi, Mariangela; Fornaro, Teresa

    The interaction between electromagnetic radiation and bio-molecules in heterogeneous environments is a prebiotically relevant process. Minerals may have a pivotal role in the prebiotic evolution of complex chemical systems, mediating the effects of electromagnetic radiation, influencing the photostability of bio-molecules, catalyzing important chemical reactions and/or protecting molecules against degradation. In particular, nucleobases are relevant bio-molecules to investigate both in the prebiotic context, because they are coding components of nucleic acids, and from the standpoint of the survival of biological systems in space conditions. In this talk, laboratory results on photostability of nucleobases adsorbed on minerals will be presented.

  2. Computational analysis of stacking interactions between 3-nitropyrrole and natural nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Hisashi; Seio, Kohji; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    The stacking energies between natural nucleobases and a universal base of 3-nitropyrrole (3-NP) were calculated by use of two theoretically independent quantum chemical methods, namely, molecular orbital (MO) and density function theory (DFT) calculations. The parameters required for molecular mechanics calculation of 3-NP were obtained by use of a software of Direct Force Field and used to evaluate the stacking energy of the complexes formed between 3-NP and canonical four nucleobases. Dependence of the twist angle between the two stacked bases on the stacking energy was studied in great detail.

  3. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 facilitates neuronal glutathione synthesis by upregulating neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter 3 expression.

    PubMed

    Escartin, Carole; Won, Seok Joon; Malgorn, Carole; Auregan, Gwennaelle; Berman, Ari E; Chen, Pei-Chun; Déglon, Nicole; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Suh, Sang Won; Swanson, Raymond A

    2011-05-18

    Astrocytes support neuronal antioxidant capacity by releasing glutathione, which is cleaved to cysteine in brain extracellular space. Free cysteine is then taken up by neurons through excitatory amino acid transporter 3 [EAAT3; also termed Slc1a1 (solute carrier family 1 member 1)] to support de novo glutathione synthesis. Activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant responsive element (ARE) pathway by oxidative stress promotes astrocyte release of glutathione, but it remains unknown how this release is coupled to neuronal glutathione synthesis. Here we evaluated transcriptional regulation of the neuronal cysteine transporter EAAT3 by the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Nrf2 activators and Nrf2 overexpression both produced EAAT3 transcriptional activation in C6 cells. A conserved ARE-related sequence was found in the EAAT3 promoter of several mammalian species. This ARE-related sequence was bound by Nrf2 in mouse neurons in vivo as observed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Chemical activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in mouse brain increased both neuronal EAAT3 levels and neuronal glutathione content, and these effects were abrogated in mice genetically deficient in either Nrf2 or EAAT3. Selective overexpression of Nrf2 in brain neurons by lentiviral gene transfer was sufficient to upregulate both neuronal EAAT3 protein and glutathione content. These findings identify a mechanism whereby Nrf2 activation can coordinate astrocyte glutathione release with neuronal glutathione synthesis through transcriptional upregulation of neuronal EAAT3 expression.

  4. The maltose ABC transporter in Lactococcus lactis facilitates high-level sensitivity to the circular bacteriocin garvicin ML.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Christina; Brede, Dag A; Hernández, Pablo E; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2012-06-01

    We generated and characterized a series of spontaneous mutants of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 with average 6- to 11-fold-lowered sensitivities to the circular bacteriocin garvicin ML (GarML). Carbohydrate fermentation assays highlighted changes in carbohydrate metabolism, specifically loss of the ability to metabolize starch and maltose, in these mutants. PCR and sequencing showed that a 13.5-kb chromosomal deletion encompassing 12 open reading frames, mainly involved in starch and maltose utilization, had spontaneously occurred in the GarML-resistant mutants. Growth experiments revealed a correlation between sensitivity to GarML and carbon catabolite repression (CCR); i.e., sensitivity to GarML increased significantly when wild-type cells were grown on maltose and galactose as sole carbohydrates, an effect which was alleviated by the presence of glucose. Among the genes deleted in the mutants were malEFG, which encode a CCR-regulated membrane-bound maltose ABC transporter. The complementation of mutants with these three genes recovered normal sensitivity to the bacteriocin, suggesting an essential role of the maltose ABC transporter in the antimicrobial activity of GarML. This notion was supported by the fact that the level of sensitivity to GarML was dose dependent, increasing with higher expression levels of malEFG over a 50-fold range. To our knowledge, this is the first time a specific protein complex has been demonstrated to be involved in sensitivity to a circular bacteriocin.

  5. The Role of Desorption Kinetics on the Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cesium and Strontium in a Partially-Saturated Quartz Sand Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Ryan, J. N.; Saiers, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid-facilitated transport (CFT) is a mechanism for enhanced transport of contaminants under certain environmental conditions. In order for CFT to be significant, three conditions must be met: (1) colloids must be present at a significant concentration, 2) the contaminant must associate with and remain associated with the colloids, and 3) colloids must be transported faster than the contaminant on its own. Colloids are often present in significant concentrations; therefore, CFT strongly depends on slow desorption kinetics and colloid mobility. The goal of this research was to identify and quantify the effects of desorption kinetics on the transport of cesium and strontium through a quartz sand column at different degrees of saturation (moisture contents). Breakthrough experiments were conducted using a rainfall simulator suspended over a column (12.7 cm diameter, 33.5 cm depth) packed with clean, sieved quartz sand (d50 = 360 µm). The effluent was collected with a fraction collector. Cesium and strontium were used as model contaminants because they are common contaminants found on Department of Energy sites in the US and because they have contrasting sorption kinetics with illite, which was used as the model colloid. The column was instrumented with three tensiometers and three moisture sensors to ensure uniform flow under partially-saturated conditions. Relative saturations of 0.33, 0.80, and 1.0 were established in the column. For aqueous breakthrough experiments, solutions at pH 7.3 containing cesium or strontium at a concentration of 7.5 x 10-6 M were applied to the top of the column until breakthrough (C/C0 > 0.5) was achieved. Following breakthrough, the solution was switched to a cesium- or strontium-free pH 7.3 solution for about 40 pore volumes. These experiments were repeated with the addition of illite colloids at a concentration of 100 mg L-1 in equilibrium with the cesium of strontium solution. Cesium and strontium breakthrough was monitored by

  6. Structure determination of a major facilitator peptide transporter: Inward facing PepTSt from Streptococcus thermophilus crystallized in space group P3121

    PubMed Central

    Quistgaard, Esben M.; Martinez Molledo, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) peptide transporters (typically referred to as PepT, POT or PTR transporters) mediate the uptake of di- and tripeptides, and so play an important dietary role in many organisms. In recent years, a better understanding of the molecular basis for this process has emerged, which is in large part due to a steep increase in structural information. Yet, the conformational transitions underlying the transport mechanism are still not fully understood, and additional data is therefore needed. Here we report in detail the detergent screening, crystallization, experimental MIRAS phasing, and refinement of the peptide transporter PepTSt from Streptococcus thermophilus. The space group is P3121, and the protein is crystallized in a monomeric inward facing form. The binding site is likely to be somewhat occluded, as the lobe encompassing transmembrane helices 10 and 11 is markedly bent towards the central pore of the protein, but the extent of this potential occlusion could not be determined due to disorder at the apex of the lobe. Based on structural comparisons with the seven previously determined P212121 and C2221 structures of inward facing PepTSt, the structural flexibility as well as the conformational changes mediating transition between the inward open and inward facing occluded states are discussed. In conclusion, this report improves our understanding of the structure and conformational cycle of PepTSt, and can furthermore serve as a case study, which may aid in supporting future structure determinations of additional MFS transporters or other integral membrane proteins. PMID:28264013

  7. Monsoon-facilitated characteristics and transport of atmospheric mercury at a high-altitude background site in southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Fu, Xuewu; Lin, Che-Jen; Shang, Lihai; Zhang, Yiping; Feng, Xinbin; Lin, Cynthia

    2016-10-01

    To better understand the influence of monsoonal climate and transport of atmospheric mercury (Hg) in southwestern China, measurements of total gaseous mercury (TGM, defined as the sum of gaseous elemental mercury, GEM, and gaseous oxidized mercury, GOM), particulate bound mercury (PBM) and GOM were carried out at Ailaoshan Station (ALS, 2450 m a.s.l.) in southwestern China from May 2011 to May 2012. The mean concentrations (± SD) for TGM, GOM and PBM were 2.09 ± 0.63, 2.2 ± 2.3 and 31.3 ± 28.4 pg m-3, respectively. TGM showed a monsoonal distribution pattern with relatively higher concentrations (2.22 ± 0.58 ng m-3, p = 0.021) during the Indian summer monsoon (ISM, from May to September) and the east Asia summer monsoon (EASM, from May to September) periods than that (1.99 ± 0.66 ng m-3) in the non-ISM period. Similarly, GOM and PBM concentrations were higher during the ISM period than during the non-ISM period. This study suggests that the ISM and the EASM have a strong impact on long-range and transboundary transport of Hg between southwestern China and south and southeast Asia. Several high TGM events were accompanied by the occurrence of northern wind during the ISM period, indicating anthropogenic Hg emissions from inland China could rapidly increase TGM levels at ALS due to strengthening of the EASM. Most of the TGM and PBM events occurred at ALS during the non-ISM period. Meanwhile, high CO concentrations were also observed at ALS, indicating that a strong south tributary of westerlies could have transported Hg from south and southeast Asia to southwestern China during the non-ISM period. The biomass burning in southeast Asia and anthropogenic Hg emissions from south Asia are thought to be the source of atmospheric Hg in remote areas of southwestern China during the non-ISM period.

  8. A novel major facilitator transporter TrSTR1 is essential for pentose utilization and involved in xylanase induction in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen-Bang; Chen, Xiu-Zhen; Qin, Li-Na; Wu, Hong-Qing; Su, Xiao-Yun; Dong, Zhi-Yang

    2015-05-08

    Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) is an industrially important filamentous fungus for glycoside hydrolases production, with its xylanolytic enzymes widely applied in many areas. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying xylanase expression are still insufficiently understood. In particular, the effect of sugar transporter on the induction of xylanase expression is unclear. In this work, we identified a novel major facilitator transporter TrSTR1 that is capable of transporting xylose by using a xylose utilization system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In T. reesei, TrSTR1 is essential for the utilization of d-xylose, l-arabinose, and even their downstream metabolites D-xylitol and L-arabitol. TrSTR1 is also involved in the induction of xylanase expression since both the xylanase activity and extracellular protein concentration in the Tu6△str1 strain were decreased, which further confirmed by a qRT-PCR analysis of the transcript levels of the key transcriptional regulators. Our observations provide new insights into connections between pentose utilization and xylanase production in T. reesei.

  9. A Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporter-Mediated Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Fungicides Requires Yap1, Skn7, and MAP Kinases in the Citrus Fungal Pathogen Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hung; Tsai, Hsieh-Chin; Yu, Pei-Ling; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2017-01-01

    Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) transporters play an important role in multidrug resistance in fungi. We report an AaMFS19 gene encoding a MFS transporter required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and fungicides in the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata. AaMFS19, containing 12 transmembrane domains, displays activity toward a broad range of substrates. Fungal mutants lacking AaMFS19 display profound hypersensitivities to cumyl hydroperoxide, potassium superoxide, many singlet oxygen-generating compounds (eosin Y, rose Bengal, hematoporphyrin, methylene blue, and cercosporin), and the cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor, Congo red. AaMFS19 mutants also increase sensitivity to copper ions, clotrimazole, fludioxonil, and kocide fungicides, 2-chloro-5-hydroxypyridine (CHP), and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA). AaMFS19 mutants induce smaller necrotic lesions on leaves of a susceptible citrus cultivar. All observed phenotypes in the mutant are restored by introducing and expressing a wild-type copy of AaMFS19. The wild-type strain of A. alternata treated with either CHP or TIBA reduces radial growth and formation and germination of conidia, increases hyphal branching, and results in decreased expression of the AaMFS19 gene. The expression of AaMFS19 is regulated by the Yap1 transcription activator, the Hog1 and Fus3 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, the 'two component' histidine kinase, and the Skn7 response regulator. Our results demonstrate that A. alternata confers resistance to different chemicals via a membrane-bound MFS transporter.

  10. Macroscopic and microscopic observations of particle-facilitated mercury transport from New Idria and Sulphur Bank mercury mine tailings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowry, G.V.; Shaw, S.; Kim, C.S.; Rytuba, J.J.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2004-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) release from inoperative Hg mines in the California Coast Range has been documented, but little is known about the release and transport mechanisms. In this study, tailings from Hg mines located in different geologic settings-New Idria (NI), a Si-carbonate Hg deposit, and Sulphur Bank (SB), a hot-spring Hg deposit-were characterized, and particle release from these wastes was studied in column experiments to (1) investigate the mechanisms of Hg release from NI and SB mine wastes, (2) determine the speciation of particle-bound Hg released from the mine wastes, and (3) determine the effect of calcinations on Hg release processes. The physical and chemical properties of tailings and the colloids released from them were determined using chemical analyses, selective chemical extractions, XRD, SEM, TEM, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. The total Hg concentration in tailings increased with decreasing particle size in NI and SB calcines (roasted ore), but reached a maximum at an intermediate particle size in the SB waste rock (unroasted ore). Hg in the tailings exists predominantly as low-solubility HgS (cinnabar and metacinnabar), with NI calcines having >50% HgS, SB calcines having >89% HgS, and SB waste rock having ???100% HgS. Leaching experiments with a high-ionic-strength solution (0.1 M NaCl) resulted in a rapid but brief release of soluble and particulate Hg. Lowering the ionic strength of the leach solution (0.005 M NaCl) resulted in the release of colloidal Hg from two of the three mine wastes studied (NI calcines and SB waste rock). Colloid-associated Hg accounts for as much as 95% of the Hg released during episodic particle release. Colloids generated from the NI calcines are produced by a breakup and release mechanism and consist of hematite, jarosite/alunite, and Al-Si gel with particle sizes of 10-200 nm. ATEM and XAFS analyses indicate that the majority (???78%) of the mercury is present in the form of HgS. SB calcines also

  11. Monitoring of event based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: Calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles which is typically enhanced during events such as floods, snow melts etc. As the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants in rivers such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. On-line turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) then allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics. In this study, pronounced flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting catchments in Southwest Germany (Rivers Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar. Samples were analyzed for turbidity, the total amount of PAH and total suspended solids (TSS) in water. Additionally, the grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined. Discharge and turbidity were measured on-line at gauging stations in three of the catchments. Results showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the flood samples (i.e. independent on grain size). This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on the turbidity measurements and TSS versus PAH relationships - even for very high turbidity or TSS values (> 2000 NTU or mg l-1, respectively). From these linear regressions concentrations of PAHs on suspended particles were obtained which varied by catchment. The values comprise a robust measure of the average sediment quality in a river network and may be correlated to the degree of urbanization represented by the number of inhabitants per total flux of suspended particles. Based on long-term on-line turbidity measurements mass flow rates of particle bound pollutants over time could be calculated. Results showed that by far the largest amount

  12. Enhanced vascular permeability facilitates entry of plasma HDL and promotes macrophage-reverse cholesterol transport from skin in mice.

    PubMed

    Kareinen, Ilona; Cedó, Lídia; Silvennoinen, Reija; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Jauhiainen, Matti; Julve, Josep; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam

    2015-02-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway from macrophage foam cells initiates when HDL particles cross the endothelium, enter the interstitial fluid, and induce cholesterol efflux from these cells. We injected [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded J774 macrophages into the dorsal skin of mice and measured the transfer of macrophage-derived [(3)H]cholesterol to feces [macrophage-RCT (m-RCT)]. Injection of histamine to the macrophage injection site increased locally vascular permeability, enhanced influx of intravenously administered HDL, and stimulated m-RCT from the histamine-treated site. The stimulatory effect of histamine on m-RCT was abolished by prior administration of histamine H1 receptor (H1R) antagonist pyrilamine, indicating that the histamine effect was H1R-dependent. Subcutaneous administration of two other vasoactive mediators, serotonin or bradykinin, and activation of skin mast cells to secrete histamine and other vasoactive compounds also stimulated m-RCT. None of the studied vasoactive mediators affected serum HDL levels or the cholesterol-releasing ability of J774 macrophages in culture, indicating that acceleration of m-RCT was solely due to increased availability of cholesterol acceptors in skin. We conclude that disruption of the endothelial barrier by vasoactive compounds enhances the passage of HDL into interstitial fluid and increases the rate of RCT from peripheral macrophage foam cells, which reveals a novel tissue cholesterol-regulating function of these compounds.

  13. The gelatinous extracellular matrix facilitates transport studies in kelp: visualization of pressure-induced flow reversal across sieve plates

    PubMed Central

    Knoblauch, Jan; Peters, Winfried S.; Knoblauch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims In vascular plants, important questions regarding phloem function remain unanswered due to problems with invasive experimental procedures in this highly sensitive tissue. Certain brown algae (kelps; Laminariales) also possess sieve tubes for photoassimilate transport, but these are embedded in large volumes of a gelatinous extracellular matrix which isolates them from neighbouring cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that kelp sieve tubes might tolerate invasive experimentation better than their analogues in higher plants, and sought to establish Nereocystis luetkeana as an experimental system. Methods The predominant localization of cellulose and the gelatinous extracellular matrix in N. luetkeana was verified using specific fluorescent markers and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Sieve tubes in intact specimens were loaded with fluorescent dyes, either passively (carboxyfluorescein diacetate; CFDA) or by microinjection (rhodamine B), and the movement of the dyes was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Key Results Application of CFDA demonstrated source to sink bulk flow in N. luetkeana sieve tubes, and revealed the complexity of sieve tube structure, with branches, junctions and lateral connections. Microinjection into sieve elements proved comparatively easy. Pulsed rhodamine B injection enabled the determination of flow velocity in individual sieve elements, and the direct visualization of pressure-induced reversals of flow direction across sieve plates. Conclusions The reversal of flow direction across sieve plates by pressurizing the downstream sieve element conclusively demonstrates that a critical requirement of the Münch theory is satisfied in kelp; no such evidence exists for tracheophytes. Because of the high tolerance of its sieve elements to experimental manipulation, N. luetkeana is a promising alternative to vascular plants for studying the fluid mechanics of sieve tube networks. PMID:26929203

  14. The Photochemistry of Pyrimidine in Realistic Astrophysical Ices and the Production of Nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.; Sandford, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    Nucleobases, together with deoxyribose/ribose and phosphoric acid, are the building blocks of DNA and RNA for all known life. The presence of nucleobase-like compounds in carbonaceous chondrites delivered to the Earth raises the question of an extraterrestrial origin for the molecules that triggered life on our planet. Whether these molecules are formed in interstellar/protostellar environments, in small parent bodies in the solar system, or both, is currently unclear. Recent experiments show that the UV irradiation of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) in H2O-rich ice mixtures that contain NH3, CH3OH, or CH4 leads to the formation of the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we discuss the low-temperature UV irradiation of pyrimidine in realistic astrophysical ice mixtures containing H2O, CH3OH, and NH3, with or without CH4, to search for the production of nucleobases and other prebiotic compounds. These experiments show the presence of uracil, urea, glycerol, hexamethylenetetramine, small amino acids, and small carboxylic acids in all samples. Cytosine was only found in one sample produced from ices irradiated with a higher UV dose, while thymine was not found in any sample, even after irradiation with a higher UV dose. Results are discussed to evaluate the role of the photochemistry of pyrimidine in the inventory of organic molecules detected in meteorites and their astrophysical/astrobiological implications.

  15. Optical properties of organically functionalized silicon surfaces: Uracil-like nucleobases on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, Elena; Cappellini, Giancarlo; Onida, Giovanni; Fratesi, Guido

    2017-02-01

    We predict UV reflectance anisotropy spectra (RAS) of the organically functionalized silicon (001) surface covered by pyrimidinic uracil-like nucleobases. First-principles results based on density functional theory show characteristic spectral features appearing in the UV range between 3 and 7 eV, besides the expected quench in the well-known two-minima RAS signal of clean Si(001). Nucleobase adsorption in the energetically favored "dimer bridge" configuration gives rise to a characteristic RAS line shape, common to thymine, uracil, and 5-fluorouracil. We trace back the origin of such spectral features by singling out RAS structures induced by relaxation and passivation effects on the Si surface, and those directly associated with molecular excitations. The former turn out to be the same for the three nucleobases, and are totally unaffected by molecular tilting. The sign and position of the latter RAS peaks at higher energy exhibit a moderate nucleobase dependence, and can be fully rationalized in terms of the molecular orbitals involved. The present theoretical results call for a RAS experimental study in the UV region extending up to ≃6 -7 eV.

  16. Macrocyclic Metal Complex-DNA Conjugates for Electrochemical Sensing of Single Nucleobase Changes in DNA.

    PubMed

    Duprey, Jean-Louis H A; Carr-Smith, James; Horswell, Sarah L; Kowalski, Jarosław; Tucker, James H R

    2016-01-27

    The direct incorporation of macrocyclic cyclidene complexes into DNA via automated synthesis results in a new family of metal-functionalized DNA derivatives that readily demonstrate their utility through the ability of one redox-active copper(II)-containing strand to distinguish electrochemically between all four canonical DNA nucleobases at a single site within a target sequence of DNA.

  17. 6-Pyrazolylpurine as an Artificial Nucleobase for Metal-Mediated Base Pairing in DNA Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Léon, J. Christian; Sinha, Indranil; Müller, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The artificial nucleobase 6-pyrazol-1-yl-purine (6PP) has been investigated with respect to its usability in metal-mediated base pairing. As was shown by temperature-dependent UV spectroscopy, 6PP may form weakly stabilizing 6PP–Ag(I)–6PP homo base pairs. Interestingly, 6PP can be used to selectively recognize a complementary pyrimidine nucleobase. The addition of Ag(I) to a DNA duplex comprising a central 6PP:C mispair (C = cytosine) leads to a slight destabilization of the duplex. In contrast, a stabilizing 6PP–Ag(I)–T base pair is formed with a complementary thymine (T) residue. It is interesting to note that 6PP is capable of differentiating between the pyrimidine moieties despite the fact that it is not as sterically crowded as 6-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)purine, an artificial nucleobase that had previously been suggested for the recognition of nucleic acid sequences via the formation of a metal-mediated base pair. Hence, the additional methyl groups of 6-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)purine may not be required for the specific recognition of the complementary nucleobase. PMID:27089326

  18. Hartree-Fock Cluster Study of Electronic Structures and Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions in Solid Nucleobases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheicher, R. H.; Dubey, Archana; Badu, S. R.; Saha, H. P.; Pink, R. H.; Nagamine, K.; Torikai, E.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    2008-03-01

    In recent work [1] we have studied nucleobases attached to a CH3 group to simulate the influence of their binding to the sugar rings and the phosphate groups in DNA and RNA and the effect of this binding on the nuclear quadrupole interactions of ^14N, ^17O and ^2H nuclei. Our results from this work have indicated that for ^17O, the binding to the CH3 group moves our results from the free nucleobases closer to the experimentally observed data [2] in the solid nucleobases. We are now investigating the solid nucleobases by the first --principles Hartree-Fock cluster procedure that we have employed earlier for the halogen molecular solids [3]. Our results for the binding energy of an imidazole molecule in the molecular solid system and the ^14N, ^17O and ^2H nuclear quadrupole interaction parameters will be presented. [1] T.P. Das et al (at this APS meeting), [2] Gang Wu et al, J. Am.Chem. Soc. 124, 1768(2002). [3] M.M. Aryal et al Hyperfine Interactions (to be published).

  19. Human SLC2A9a and SLC2A9b isoforms mediate electrogenic transport of urate with different characteristics in the presence of hexoses.

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Kate; Smith, Kyla M; Yao, Sylvia Y M; Ng, Amy M L; O'Neill, Debbie; Karpinski, Edward; Young, James D; Cheeseman, Christopher I

    2012-08-15

    Human SLC2A9 (GLUT9) is a novel high-capacity urate transporter belonging to the facilitated glucose transporter family. In the present study, heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes has allowed us to undertake an in-depth radiotracer flux and electrophysiological study of urate transport mediated by both isoforms of SLC2A9 (a and b). Addition of urate to SLC2A9-producing oocytes generated outward currents, indicating electrogenic transport. Urate transport by SLC2A9 was voltage dependent and independent of the Na(+) transmembrane gradient. Urate-induced outward currents were affected by the extracellular concentration of Cl(-), but there was no evidence for exchange of the two anions. [(14)C]urate flux studies under non-voltage-clamped conditions demonstrated symmetry of influx and efflux, suggesting that SLC2A9 functions in urate efflux driven primarily by the electrochemical gradient of the cell. Urate uptake in the presence of intracellular hexoses showed marked differences between the two isoforms, suggesting functional differences between the two splice variants. Finally, the permeant selectivity of SLC2A9 was examined by testing the ability to transport a panel of radiolabeled purine and pyrimidine nucleobases. SLC2A9 mediated the uptake of adenine in addition to urate, but did not function as a generalized nucleobase transporter. The differential expression pattern of the two isoforms of SLC2A9 in the human kidney's proximal convoluted tubule and its electrogenic transport of urate suggest that these transporters play key roles in the regulation of plasma urate levels and are therefore potentially important participants in hyperuricemia and hypouricemia.

  20. Photochemistry of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ices: Formation of Nucleobases and Other Prebiotic Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuevo, Michel; Sandford, Scott A.; Materese, Christopher K.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleobases are N-heterocycles that are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA. They are divided into two molecular groups: pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites, and their extraterrestrial origin confirmed by isotopic measurements. Although no N-heterocycles have ever been observed in the ISM, the positions of the 6.2- m interstellar emission features suggest a population of such molecules is likely to be present. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in ices of astrophysical relevance such as H2O, NH3, CH3OH, CH4, CO, or combinations of these at low temperature (less than or equal to 20 K) leads to the formation of several pyrimidine derivatives including the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as precursors such as 4(3H)-pyrimidone and 4-aminopyrimidine. Quantum calculations on the formation of 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil from the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices are in agreement with their experimental formation pathways.10 In those residues, other species of prebiotic interest such as urea as well as the amino acids glycine and alanine could also be identified. However, only very small amounts of pyrimidine derivatives containing CH3 groups could be detected, suggesting that the addition of methyl groups to pyrimidine is not an efficient process. For this reason, the nucleobase thymine was not observed in any of the samples. In this work, we study the formation of nucleobases and other photo-products of prebiotic interest from the UV irradiation of pyrimidine in ices containing H2O, NH3, CH3OH, and CO, mixed in astrophysical proportions.

  1. Mapping the UV Photophysics of Platinum Metal Complexes Bound to Nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ananya; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    We report the first UV laser spectroscopic study of isolated gas-phase complexes of Platinum metal complex anions bound to a nucleobase as model systems for exploring at the molecular level the key photophysical processes involved in photodynamic therapy. Spectra of the PtIV CN 6 2 - • Uracil and PtII CN 4 2 - • Uracil complexes were acquired across the 220 -320 nm range using mass-selective photodepletion and photofragment action spectroscopy. The spectra of both complexes reveal prominent UV absorption bands that we assign primarily to excitation of the Uracil π - π * localized chromophore. Distinctive UV photofragments are observed for the complexes, with PtIV CN 6 2 - • Uracil photoexcitation resulting in complex fission, while PtII CN 4 2 - • Uracil photoexcitation initiates a nucleobase proton-transfer reaction across 4.4 -5.2 eV and electron detachment above 5.2 eV. The observed photofragments are consistent with ultrafast decay of a Uracil localized excited state back to the electronic ground state followed by intramolecular vibrational relaxation and ergodic complex fragmentation. In addition, we present recent results to explore how the photophysics of the Platinum complex-nucleobase clusters evolves as a function of nucleobase. Results are presented for PtII CN 4 2 - • Uracil complexed to Cytosine, Thymine and Adenine, reveal distinctive decay dynamics which we attribute to the intrinsic decay dynamics of the nucleobase. JPC. Lett. 2014, 5, 3281 to 3285 and PCCP 2014, 16, 15490 to 15500.

  2. Colloid facilitated transport of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) to the groundwater at Ma Da area, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Thilo; Wendelborn, Anke

    2007-06-01

    PCDD/Fs are hydrophobic organic substances and strongly sorbing to soil particles. Once adsorbed to soil particles they are believed to be virtually immobile. However, research in the last decades confirmed that strong sorbing contaminants may reach the groundwater via colloid-facilitated transport. This pathway has not been investigated before in Vietnam. Ma Da area, 100 km north of Ho Chi Minh City, was repeatedly sprayed during the Vietnam War (1962-1971) with herbicides like Agent Orange containing, beside others, the teratogenic contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). 11 surface soil samples and 12 water samples were collected in Ma Da area for analysis of PCDD/Fs in solids. Soil TCDD concentrations ranged from 1-41 ppt with a mean of 8.8 ppt and a mean I-TEQ of 9.7 ppt. Two surface water samples showed colloid bound TCDD (7 and 19 ppt). Groundwater samples showed elevated colloid bound PCDD concentrations (mean 770 ng/kg), mainly octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. Groundwater colloids separated by filtration did not show any TCDD. The results support that TCDD/Fs can be relocated from the top soil to the groundwater by colloidal pathway. They did not provide evidence that the dioxins bound to groundwater colloids are leftovers from the Second Indochinese War. However, this study reinforces that the colloidal transport pathway has to be included investigating the relocation of strong sorbing organic contaminants.

  3. MgMfs1, a major facilitator superfamily transporter from the fungal wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola, is a strong protectant against natural toxic compounds and fungicides.

    PubMed

    Roohparvar, Ramin; De Waard, Maarten A; Kema, Gert H J; Zwiers, Lute-Harm

    2007-05-01

    MgMfs1, a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) gene from the wheat pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola, was identified in expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries. The encoded protein has high homology to members of the drug:H(+) antiporter efflux family of MFS transporters with 14 predicted transmembrane spanners (DHA14), implicated in mycotoxin secretion and multidrug resistance. Heterologous expression of MgMfs1 in a hypersensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain resulted in a strong decrease in sensitivity of this organism to a broad range of unrelated synthetic and natural toxic compounds. The sensitivity of MgMfs1 disruption mutants of M. graminicola to most of these compounds was similar when compared to the wild-type but the sensitivity to strobilurin fungicides and the mycotoxin cercosporin was increased. Virulence of the disruption mutants on wheat seedlings was not affected. The results indicate that MgMfs1 is a true multidrug transporter that can function as a determinant of pathogen sensitivity and resistance to fungal toxins and fungicides.

  4. A Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporter-Mediated Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Fungicides Requires Yap1, Skn7, and MAP Kinases in the Citrus Fungal Pathogen Alternaria alternata

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Hung; Tsai, Hsieh-Chin; Yu, Pei-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) transporters play an important role in multidrug resistance in fungi. We report an AaMFS19 gene encoding a MFS transporter required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and fungicides in the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata. AaMFS19, containing 12 transmembrane domains, displays activity toward a broad range of substrates. Fungal mutants lacking AaMFS19 display profound hypersensitivities to cumyl hydroperoxide, potassium superoxide, many singlet oxygen-generating compounds (eosin Y, rose Bengal, hematoporphyrin, methylene blue, and cercosporin), and the cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor, Congo red. AaMFS19 mutants also increase sensitivity to copper ions, clotrimazole, fludioxonil, and kocide fungicides, 2-chloro-5-hydroxypyridine (CHP), and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA). AaMFS19 mutants induce smaller necrotic lesions on leaves of a susceptible citrus cultivar. All observed phenotypes in the mutant are restored by introducing and expressing a wild-type copy of AaMFS19. The wild-type strain of A. alternata treated with either CHP or TIBA reduces radial growth and formation and germination of conidia, increases hyphal branching, and results in decreased expression of the AaMFS19 gene. The expression of AaMFS19 is regulated by the Yap1 transcription activator, the Hog1 and Fus3 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, the ‘two component’ histidine kinase, and the Skn7 response regulator. Our results demonstrate that A. alternata confers resistance to different chemicals via a membrane-bound MFS transporter. PMID:28060864

  5. Role of Achiral Nucleobases in Multicomponent Chiral Self-Assembly: Purine-Triggered Helix and Chirality Transfer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ming; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Yuqian; Liu, Minghua

    2016-11-21

    Chiral self-assembly is a basic process in biological systems, where many chiral biomolecules such as amino acids and sugars play important roles. Achiral nucleobases usually covalently bond to saccharides and play a significant role in the formation of the double helix structure. However, it remains unclear how the achiral nucleobases can function in chiral self-assembly without the sugar modification. Herein, we have clarified that purine nucleobases could trigger N-(9-fluorenylmethox-ycarbonyl) (Fmoc)-protected glutamic acid to self-assemble into helical nanostructures. Moreover, the helical nanostructure could serve as a matrix and transfer the chirality to an achiral fluorescence probe, thioflavin T (ThT). Upon chirality transfer, the ThT showed not only supramolecular chirality but also circular polarized fluorescence (CPL). Without the nucleobase, the self-assembly processes cannot happen, thus providing an example where achiral molecules played an essential role in the expression and transfer of the chirality.

  6. Increased gene expression of a facilitated diffusion urea transporter in the skin of the African lungfish (Protopterus annectens) during massively elevated post-terrestrialization urea excretion.

    PubMed

    Hung, Carrie Y C; Galvez, Fernando; Ip, Yuen K; Wood, Chris M

    2009-04-01

    The full-length cDNA sequence of a putative urea transporter (lfUT) of the facilitated diffusion UT-A type has been cloned from the African lungfish Protopterus annectens. The lfUT cDNA is 1990 bp in length and its open reading frame encodes a 409 amino acid long protein, with a calculated molecular mass of 44,723 Da. The sequence is closest to those of amphibians ( approximately 65% amino acid homology), followed by mammals and elasmobranchs ( approximately 60%), and then teleosts ( approximately 50%). lfUT was clearly expressed in gill, kidney, liver, skeletal muscle and skin. Upon re-immersion in water after 33 days of air exposure ('terrestrialization'), lungfish exhibited a massive rise in urea-N excretion which peaked at 12-30 h with rates of 2000-5000 micromol-N kg(-1) h(-1) (versus normal aquatic rates of <130 micromol-N kg(-1) h(-1)) and persisted until 70 h. This appears to occur mainly through the skin. Total 'excess' urea-N excretion amounted to approximately 81,000-91,000 micromol-N kg(-1) over 3 days. By real-time PCR, there was no difference in lfUT expression in the ventral abdominal skin between aquatic ammoniotelic controls and terrestrialized lungfish immediately after return to water (0 h), and no elevation of urea-N excretion at this time. However, skin biopsies revealed a significant 2.55-fold elevation of lfUT expression at 14 h, coincident with peak urea-N excretion. At 48 h, there was no longer any significant difference in lfUT mRNA levels from those at 0 and 14 h, or from aquatic fed controls. In accordance with earlier studies, which identified elevated urea-N excretion via the skin of P. dolloi with pharmacology typical of UT-A carriers, these results argue that transcriptional activation of a facilitated diffusion type urea transporter (lfUT) occurs in the skin during re-immersion. This serves to clear the body burden of urea-N accumulated during terrestrialization.

  7. Exciton energy transfer-based quantum dot fluorescence sensing array: "chemical noses" for discrimination of different nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbo; Li, Gui; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Li, Li; Liu, Wei; Shi, Xing; Guo, Yali

    2015-01-20

    A novel exciton energy transfer-based fluorescence sensing array for the discrimination of different nucleobases was developed through target nucleobase-triggered self-assembly of quantum dots (QDs). Four QD nanoprobes with different ligand receptors, including mercaptoethylamine, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, 2-dimethyl-aminethanethiol, and thioglycolic acid, were created to detect and identify nucleobase targets. These QDs served as both selective recognition scaffolds and signal transduction elements for a biomolecule target. The extent of particle assembly, induced by the analyte-triggered self-assembly of QDs, led to an exciton energy transfer effect between interparticles that gave a readily detectable fluorescence quenching and distinct fluorescence response patterns. These patterns are characteristic for each nucleobase and can be quantitatively differentiated by linear discriminate analysis. Furthermore, a fingerprint-based barcode was established to conveniently discriminate the nucleobases. This pattern sensing was successfully used to identify nucleobase samples at unknown concentrations and five rare bases. In this "chemical noses" strategy, the robust characteristics of QD nanoprobes, coupled with the diversity of surface functionality that can be readily obtained using nanoparticles, provides a simple and label-free biosensing approach that shows great promise for biomedical applications.

  8. Functional interplay between the ATP binding cassette Msr(D) protein and the membrane facilitator superfamily Mef(E) transporter for macrolide resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nunez-Samudio, Virginia; Chesneau, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Macrolides have wide clinical applications in the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, among which streptococci are the most frequent causative agents. An active efflux-based mechanism of macrolide resistance, referred to as the M phenotype in streptococcal isolates, has been associated with the presence of mef genes that encode a subset of major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters like Mef(E). An msr(D) gene, adjacent to and co-transcribed with mef in the presence of erythromycin, has also been implicated in drug efflux, but its role remains elusive. Msr(D) belongs to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins and harbors two fused nucleotide-binding domains with no membrane-spanning domains. The present work indicates that the major resistance traits of the M phenotype in Escherichia coli may be due to Msr(D) and not to Mef(E). Fluorescence microscopy using Mef(E) tagged with GFP linked low efficacy of the chimera in conferring macrolide resistance with improper subcellular localization. The active role of Msr(D) in directing Mef(E)-GFP to the cell poles was demonstrated, as was synergistic effect in terms of levels of resistance when both proteins were expressed. A trans-dominant negative mutation within ABC Msr(D) affecting MFS Mef(E) strongly suggests that both proteins can interact in vivo, and such a physical interaction was supported in vitro. This is the first reported example of a functional interplay between an ABC component and an MFS transporter. The direct involvement of Msr(D) in the efflux of macrolides remains to be demonstrated.

  9. Formation of Nucleobases from the UV Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Nuevo, Michel; Sandford, Scott A.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    Previous laboratory simulations showed that complex molecules, including prebiotic compounds/can be formed under interstellar conditions from the vacuum UV irradiation of interstellar ice analogs containing H2O, CO, NH3 etc. Although some complex prebiotic species have not been confirmed In the interstellar medium, they are known to be present in meteorites. Nucleobases, the building blocks of DNA and RNA, have also been detected in meteorites. Here, we present a study of the formation of pyrimidine-based compounds from the UV irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O- and/or NH3-ices at 20-30 K, Our results show that various derivatives, induding the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, are formed under these conditions.

  10. Nucleobase and Ribose Modifications Control Immunostimulation by a MicroRNA-122-mimetic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Hayden; Fucini, Raymond V.; Jayalath, Prasanna; Ibarra-Soza, José M.; Haringsma, Henry J.; Flanagan, W. Michael; Willingham, Aarron; Beal, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Immune stimulation is a significant hurdle in the development of effective and safe RNA interference therapeutics. Here, we address this problem in the context of a mimic of microRNA-122 by employing novel nucleobase and known 2′-ribose modifications. The nucleobase modifications are analogues of adenosine and guanosine that contain cyclopentyl and propyl minor-groove projections. Via a site-by-site chemical modification analysis, we identify several immunostimulatory ‘hot spots’ within the miRNA guide strand at which single base modifications significantly reduce immune stimulation. A duplex containing one base modification on each strand proved to be most effective in preventing immune stimulation. PMID:21612237

  11. Important factors stabilizing stacking interaction between 3-nitropyrrole and natural nucleobases revealed by ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Seio, Kohji; Ukawa, Hisashi; Shohda, Koh-ichiro; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    Stacking energies between canonical nucleobases and a universal base, 3-nitropyrrole (3-NP), were estimated by use of molecular orbital (MO) and molecular mechanics (MM) calculations. The detailed analysis of the energy profiles revealed the importance of the London dispersion energy to stabilize the stacked dimers and electrostatic interactions to determine the orientation of 3-NP to the nucleobases in the dimers. Although the energy profiles of 3-NP/natural base dimers obtained by the MO and MM calculations were qualitatively correlated with each other, the correlations were poorer than those obtained for the stacking between natural bases. The origin of the difference between 3-NP and natural bases will be discussed to understand the possibility and limitation of the current MM calculations for the simulation and design of other universal bases.

  12. Terahertz spectra of DNA nucleobase crystals: A joint experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Zhao, Dongbo; Dong, Hao; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yunfei; Li, Shuhua

    2017-02-21

    Terahertz (THz) spectra of DNA nucleobase crystals were experimentally studied by terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and computationally studied by the generalized energy-based fragmentation approach under periodic boundary conditions (denoted as PBC-GEBF). We analyzed the vibrational spectra of solid-state DNA nucleobases and assigned the corresponding vibrational modes to the main peaks in the experimental spectra with the PBC-GEBF results. The computational results were verified to be in good accordance with the experimental data. Harmonic vibrational frequency results revealed that all the vibrational modes belong to collective vibrational modes, which involve complicated mixtures of inter- and intramolecular displacements, somewhere in the vicinity of 0.5-9THz.

  13. The photochemistry of pyrimidine in realistic astrophysical ices and the production of nucleobases

    SciTech Connect

    Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.; Sandford, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    Nucleobases, together with deoxyribose/ribose and phosphoric acid, are the building blocks of DNA and RNA for all known life. The presence of nucleobase-like compounds in carbonaceous chondrites delivered to the Earth raises the question of an extraterrestrial origin for the molecules that triggered life on our planet. Whether these molecules are formed in interstellar/protostellar environments, in small parent bodies in the solar system, or both, is currently unclear. Recent experiments show that the UV irradiation of pyrimidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}) in H{sub 2}O-rich ice mixtures that contain NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}OH, or CH{sub 4} leads to the formation of the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we discuss the low-temperature UV irradiation of pyrimidine in realistic astrophysical ice mixtures containing H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}OH, and NH{sub 3}, with or without CH{sub 4}, to search for the production of nucleobases and other prebiotic compounds. These experiments show the presence of uracil, urea, glycerol, hexamethylenetetramine, small amino acids, and small carboxylic acids in all samples. Cytosine was only found in one sample produced from ices irradiated with a higher UV dose, while thymine was not found in any sample, even after irradiation with a higher UV dose. Results are discussed to evaluate the role of the photochemistry of pyrimidine in the inventory of organic molecules detected in meteorites and their astrophysical/astrobiological implications.

  14. Synthesis of rigid homo- and heteroditopic nucleobase-terminated molecules incorporating adenine and/or thymine.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Mikkel F; Andersen, Casper S; Knudsen, Martin M; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2007-07-19

    A series of homo- and heteroditopic thymine- and/or adenine-terminated molecules incorporating rigid aryl or oligo(phenylene ethynylene) linkers has been efficiently synthesized. The key steps involved in the synthesis are the construction of the N-arylated nucleobases using the Chan-Lam-Evans-modified Ullman coupling and their further elaboration using the Sonogashira coupling. Furthermore, the synthesis of a rigid tripodal thymine derivative is reported.

  15. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for ‘lab-on-a-chip’ type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  16. Formation of Nucleobases from the UV Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleobases are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA. They consist of Nheterocycles that belong to either the pyrimidine-base group (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) or the purinebase group (adenine and guanine). Several nucleobases, mostly purine bases, have been detected in meteorites [1-3], with isotopic signatures consistent with an extraterrestrial origin [4]. Uracil is the only pyrimidine-base compound formally reported in meteorites [2], though the presence of cytosine cannot be ruled out [5,6]. However, the actual process by which the uracil was made and the reasons for the non-detection of thymine in meteorites have yet to be fully explained. Although no N-heterocycles have ever been observed in the ISM [7,8], the positions of the 6.2-µm interstellar emission features suggest a population of such molecules is likely to be present [9]. In this work we study the formation of pyrimidine-based molecules, including the three nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in ices consisting of several combinations of H(sub2)O, NH(sub3), CH(sub3)OH, and CH(sub4) at low temperature, in order to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which prebiotic species may be formed in the interstellar medium, in the protosolar nebula, and on icy bodies of the Solar System.

  17. Determination of HDV ribozyme N(-1) nucleobase and functional group specificity using internal competition kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kellerman, Daniel L; Simmons, Kandice S; Pedraza, Mayra; Piccirilli, Joseph A; York, Darrin M; Harris, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Biological catalysis involves interactions distant from the site of chemistry that can position the substrate for reaction. Catalysis of RNA 2′-O-transphosphorylation by the HDV ribozyme is sensitive to the identity of the N(-1) nucleotide flanking the reactive phosphoryl group. However, the interactions that affect the conformation of this position, and in turn the 2′O nucleophile, are unclear. Here, we describe the application of multiple substrate internal competition kinetic analyses to understand how the N(-1) nucleobase contributes to HDV catalysis, and to test the utility of this approach for RNA structure-function studies. Internal competition reactions containing all four substrate sequence variants at the N(-1) position in reactions using ribozyme active site mutations at A77 and A78 were used to test a proposed basepairing interaction. Mutants A78U, A78G and A79G retain significant catalytic activity, but do not alter the specificity for the N(-1) nucleobase. Effects of nucleobase analog substitutions at N(-1) indicate that U is preferred due to the ability to donate an H-bond in the Watson-Crick face and avoid minor groove steric clash. The results provide information essential for evaluating models of the HDV active site, and illustrate multiple-substrate kinetic analyses as a practical approach for characterizing structure-function relationships in RNA reactions. PMID:25937290

  18. Nucleobase and amino acid formation through impacts of meteorites on the early ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Sekine, Toshimori; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks on the prebiotic Earth was the first crucial step for the origins of life. Extraterrestrial delivery of intact amino acids and nucleobases is the prevailing hypothesis for their availability on prebiotic Earth because of the difficulties associated with the production of these organics from terrestrial carbon and nitrogen sources under plausible prebiotic conditions. However, the variety and amounts of these intact organics delivered by meteorites would have been limited. Previous shock-recovery experiments have demonstrated that meteorite impact reactions could have generated organics on the prebiotic Earth. Here, we report on the simultaneous formation of nucleobases (cytosine and uracil) found in DNA and/or RNA, various proteinogenic amino acids (glycine, alanine, serine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, valine, leucine, isoleucine, and proline), non-proteinogenic amino acids, and aliphatic amines in experiments simulating reactions induced by extraterrestrial objects impacting on the early oceans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the formation of nucleobases from inorganic materials by shock conditions. In these experiments, bicarbonate was used as the carbon source. Bicarbonate, which is a common dissolved carbon species in CO2-rich atmospheric conditions, was presumably the most abundant carbon species in the early oceans and in post-impact plumes. Thus, the present results expand the possibility that impact-induced reactions generated various building blocks for life on prebiotic Earth in large quantities through the use of terrestrial carbon reservoirs.

  19. Studies on effective atomic numbers and electron densities of nucleobases in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok

    2016-10-01

    Various parameters of dosimetric importance such as effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Nel) of nucleobases in DNA have been calculated for the total and partial photon interaction processes in the wide energy range of 1 keV-100 GeV. The variations of Zeff and Nel with energy are shown graphically for all partial and total interaction processes and are found to be similar. Up to 10 keV, Zeff and Nel show a sharp increase for cytosine-guanine and thymine-adenine whereas for all the other nucleobases, it is almost constant. Then there is sharp decrease in Zeff and Nel with energy up to 100 keV for all the nucleobases. From 100 keV to 6 MeV, Zeff and Nel are almost independent of energy. From 6 MeV to 100 MeV, there is regular increase in Zeff and Nel with photon energy. Above 400 MeV, Zeff and Nel remain almost constant. The obtained results are due to the dominance of photoelectric absorption, Compton scattering and pair production in different energy regions as respectively stated above and their dependences on the chemical compositions of the interacting media.

  20. The origin of efficient triplet state population in sulfur-substituted nucleobases

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Sebastian; Pollum, Marvin; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Dunn, Nicholas; Marquetand, Philipp; Corral, Inés; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; González, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the photophysical mechanisms in sulfur-substituted nucleobases (thiobases) is essential for designing prospective drugs for photo- and chemotherapeutic applications. Although it has long been established that the phototherapeutic activity of thiobases is intimately linked to efficient intersystem crossing into reactive triplet states, the molecular factors underlying this efficiency are poorly understood. Herein we combine femtosecond transient absorption experiments with quantum chemistry and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations to investigate 2-thiocytosine as a necessary step to unravel the electronic and structural elements that lead to ultrafast and near-unity triplet-state population in thiobases in general. We show that different parts of the potential energy surfaces are stabilized to different extents via thionation, quenching the intrinsic photostability of canonical DNA and RNA nucleobases. These findings satisfactorily explain why thiobases exhibit the fastest intersystem crossing lifetimes measured to date among bio-organic molecules and have near-unity triplet yields, whereas the triplet yields of canonical nucleobases are nearly zero. PMID:27703148

  1. 49 CFR 38.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 38.2 Section 38.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES General § 38.2 Equivalent facilitation. Departures from...

  2. 49 CFR 38.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 38.2 Section 38.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES General § 38.2 Equivalent facilitation. Departures from...

  3. 49 CFR 38.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 38.2 Section 38.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES General § 38.2 Equivalent facilitation. Departures from...

  4. 49 CFR 38.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 38.2 Section 38.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES General § 38.2 Equivalent facilitation. Departures from...

  5. 49 CFR 38.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 38.2 Section 38.2 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES General § 38.2 Equivalent facilitation. Departures from...

  6. Nucleobases and other Prebiotic Species from the Ultraviolet Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Nuevo, M.; Materese, C. K.; Milam, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleobases are N-heterocycles that are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA, and are divided into two families: pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites and their extraterrestrial origin confirmed by isotope measurement. Although no Nheterocycles have ever been observed in the ISM, the positions of the 6.2-m interstellar emission features suggest a population of such molecules is likely to be present. In this work we study the formation of pyrimidine-based molecules, including nucleobases, as well as other species of prebiotic interest, from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in combinations of H2O, NH3, CH3OH, and CH4 ices at low temperature, in order to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which prebiotic species may be formed in the interstellar medium and icy bodies of the Solar System. Experimental: Gas mixtures are prepared in a glass mixing line (background pressure approx. 10(exp -6)-10(exp -5) mbar). Relative proportions between mixture components are determined by their partial pressures. Gas mixtures are then deposited on an aluminum foil attached to a cold finger (15-20 K) and simultaneously irradiated with an H2 lamp emitting UV photons (Lyman and a continuum at approx.160 nm). After irradiation samples are warmed to room temperature, at which time the remaining residues are recovered to be analyzed with liquid and gas chromatographies. Results: These experiments showed that the UV irradiation of pyrimidine mixed in these ices at low temperature leads to the formation of several photoproducts derived from pyrimidine, including the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as their precursors 4(3H)-pyrimidone and 4-aminopyrimidine (Fig. 1). Theoretical quantum calculations on the formation of 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil from the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices are in agreement with their experimental formation pathways. In

  7. Enhanced Binding Affinity for an i-Motif DNA Substrate Exhibited by a Protein Containing Nucleobase Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaoguang; Talukder, Poulami; Daskalova, Sasha M; Roy, Basab; Chen, Shengxi; Li, Zhongxian; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2017-03-17

    Several variants of a nucleic acid binding motif (RRM1) of putative transcription factor hnRNP LL containing nucleobase amino acids at specific positions have been prepared and used to study binding affinity for the BCL2 i-motif DNA. Molecular modeling suggested a number of amino acids in RRM1 likely to be involved in interaction with the i-motif DNA, and His24 and Arg26 were chosen for modification based on their potential ability to interact with G14 of the i-motif DNA. Four nucleobase amino acids were introduced into RRM1 at one or both of positions 24 and 26. The introduction of cytosine nucleobase 2 into position 24 of RRM1 increased the affinity of the modified protein for the i-motif DNA, consistent with the possible Watson-Crick interaction of 2 and G14. In comparison, the introduction of uracil nucleobase 3 had a minimal effect on DNA affinity. Two structurally simplified nucleobase analogues (1 and 4) lacking both the N-1 and the 2-oxo substituents were also introduced in lieu of His24. Again, the RRM1 analogue containing 1 exhibited enhanced affinity for the i-motif DNA, while the protein analogue containing 4 bound less tightly to the DNA substrate. Finally, the modified protein containing 1 in lieu of Arg26 also bound to the i-motif DNA more strongly than the wild-type protein, but a protein containing 1 both at positions 24 and 26 bound to the DNA less strongly than wild type. The results support the idea of using nucleobase amino acids as protein constituents for controlling and enhancing DNA-protein interaction. Finally, modification of the i-motif DNA at G14 diminished RRM1-DNA interaction, as well as the ability of nucleobase amino acid 1 to stabilize RRM1-DNA interaction.

  8. Mumps Virus Is Released from the Apical Surface of Polarized Epithelial Cells, and the Release Is Facilitated by a Rab11-Mediated Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Kubota, Toru; Sakata, Masafumi; Takeda, Makoto; Kidokoro, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mumps virus (MuV) is an airborne virus that causes a systemic infection in patients. In vivo, the epithelium is a major replication site of MuV, and thus, the mode of MuV infection of epithelial cells is a subject of interest. Our data in the present study showed that MuV entered polarized epithelial cells via both the apical and basolateral surfaces, while progeny viruses were predominantly released from the apical surface. In polarized cells, intracellular transport of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes was dependent on Rab11-positive endosomes, and vRNP complexes were transported to the apical membrane. Expression of a dominant negative form of Rab11 (Rab11S25N) reduced the progeny virus release in polarized cells but not in nonpolarized cells. Although in this way these effects were correlated with cell polarity, Rab11S25N did not modulate the direction of virus release from the apical surface. Therefore, our data suggested that Rab11 is not a regulator of selective apical release of MuV, although it acts as an activator of virus release from polarized epithelial cells. In addition, our data and previous studies on Sendai virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and measles virus suggested that selective apical release from epithelial cells is used by many paramyxoviruses, even though they cause either a systemic infection or a local respiratory infection. IMPORTANCE Mumps virus (MuV) is the etiological agent of mumps and causes a systemic infection. However, the precise mechanism by which MuV breaks through the epithelial barriers and achieves a systemic infection remains unclear. In the present study, we show that the entry of MuV is bipolar, while the release is predominantly from the apical surface in polarized epithelial cells. In addition, the release of progeny virus was facilitated by a Rab11-positive recycling endosome and microtubule network. Our data provide important insights into the mechanism of transmission and pathogenesis of MuV. PMID

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Proteins Interact with the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) Machinery via Ubiquitination To Facilitate Viral Envelopment

    PubMed Central

    Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Neveu, Gregory; Xiao, Fei; Beer, Melanie; Bekerman, Elena; Schor, Stanford; Campbell, Joseph; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Lindenbach, Brett; Lu, Albert; Jacob, Yves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enveloped viruses commonly utilize late-domain motifs, sometimes cooperatively with ubiquitin, to hijack the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery for budding at the plasma membrane. However, the mechanisms underlying budding of viruses lacking defined late-domain motifs and budding into intracellular compartments are poorly characterized. Here, we map a network of hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein interactions with the ESCRT machinery using a mammalian-cell-based protein interaction screen and reveal nine novel interactions. We identify HRS (hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate), an ESCRT-0 complex component, as an important entry point for HCV into the ESCRT pathway and validate its interactions with the HCV nonstructural (NS) proteins NS2 and NS5A in HCV-infected cells. Infectivity assays indicate that HRS is an important factor for efficient HCV assembly. Specifically, by integrating capsid oligomerization assays, biophysical analysis of intracellular viral particles by continuous gradient centrifugations, proteolytic digestion protection, and RNase digestion protection assays, we show that HCV co-opts HRS to mediate a late assembly step, namely, envelopment. In the absence of defined late-domain motifs, K63-linked polyubiquitinated lysine residues in the HCV NS2 protein bind the HRS ubiquitin-interacting motif to facilitate assembly. Finally, ESCRT-III and VPS/VTA1 components are also recruited by HCV proteins to mediate assembly. These data uncover involvement of ESCRT proteins in intracellular budding of a virus lacking defined late-domain motifs and a novel mechanism by which HCV gains entry into the ESCRT network, with potential implications for other viruses. PMID:27803188

  10. The Trehalose Phosphotransferase System (PTS) in E. coli W Can Transport Low Levels of Sucrose that Are Sufficient to Facilitate Induction of the csc Sucrose Catabolism Operon

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Jennifer A.; Bohlke, Nina; Vickers, Claudia E.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2014-01-01

    Plasticity in substrate acceptance is a well-characterised phenomenon for disaccharide transporters. Sucrose, a non-reducing disaccharide, is usually metabolised via either the permease-mediated chromosomally-encoded sucrose catabolism (csc) regulon or the sucrose phosphotransferase system (PTS). E. coli W is a fast-growing strain which efficiently utilises sucrose at concentrations above 1% via the csc regulon. To examine if sucrose could be metabolised via other routes, a library of transposon mutants was generated and screened on 0.2% sucrose. One mutant identified from this library had an insertion in the repressor for the regulon controlling catabolism of the disaccharide trehalose (treR). A series of mutants was constructed to elucidate the mechanism of sucrose utilization in the treR insertion strain. Analysis of these mutants provided evidence that deletion of TreR enables uptake of sucrose via TreB, an enzyme II protein required for PTS-mediated uptake of trehalose. Once inside the cell, this sucrose is not processed by the TreC hydrolase, nor is it sufficient for growth of the strain. QRT-PCR analysis showed that levels of cscA (invertase) transcript increased in the WΔtreR mutant relative to the wild-type strain when grown under low sucrose conditions. This result suggests that the intracellular sucrose provided by TreB can facilitate de-repression of the csc regulon, leading to increased gene expression, sucrose uptake and sucrose utilization in the treR mutant. PMID:24586369

  11. Engineering Rhodosporidium toruloides with a membrane transporter facilitates production and separation of carotenoids and lipids in a bi-phasic culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaslyn J L; Chen, Liwei; Cao, Bin; Chen, Wei Ning

    2016-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides has great biotechnological potential. It accumulates a high amount of lipids which can be used for biofuels and also produces carotenoids which are valuable in the food and pharmaceutical industry. However, the location of these two hydrophobic products in the cell membrane prohibits its efficient harvesting and separation. Here, the transporter Pdr10 was engineered into R. toruloides and cultured in two-phase media containing oil. This enabled the production and in situ export of carotenoids into the oil and concurrent separation from intracellular lipids in the cells. When Pdr10 strain was cultured in the two-phase media, carotenoids and fatty acids yield increased from 1.9 to 2.9 μg/mg and 0.07 to 0.09 mg/mg, respectively. A total of 1.8 μg/mg carotenoids was exported by Pdr10 strain, as compared to 0.3 μg/mg in the wild type. In the Pdr10 strain, the composition of carotenoids and fatty acid it produced also changed. Torulene became the major carotene produced instead of torularhodin. Also, the unsaturated fatty acid C18:2 became the dominant fatty acid produced instead of the saturated C16:0, which was similar to the grape seed oil used in the two-phase media. This indicated that oil was being consumed by the cells, which was supported by the increased intracellular glycerol levels detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our approach represents an easy and greener extraction method which could serve to increase the yield and facilitate separation of carotenoids and fatty acids.

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Proteins Interact with the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) Machinery via Ubiquitination To Facilitate Viral Envelopment.

    PubMed

    Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Neveu, Gregory; Xiao, Fei; Beer, Melanie; Bekerman, Elena; Schor, Stanford; Campbell, Joseph; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Lindenbach, Brett; Lu, Albert; Jacob, Yves; Einav, Shirit

    2016-11-01

    Enveloped viruses commonly utilize late-domain motifs, sometimes cooperatively with ubiquitin, to hijack the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery for budding at the plasma membrane. However, the mechanisms underlying budding of viruses lacking defined late-domain motifs and budding into intracellular compartments are poorly characterized. Here, we map a network of hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein interactions with the ESCRT machinery using a mammalian-cell-based protein interaction screen and reveal nine novel interactions. We identify HRS (hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate), an ESCRT-0 complex component, as an important entry point for HCV into the ESCRT pathway and validate its interactions with the HCV nonstructural (NS) proteins NS2 and NS5A in HCV-infected cells. Infectivity assays indicate that HRS is an important factor for efficient HCV assembly. Specifically, by integrating capsid oligomerization assays, biophysical analysis of intracellular viral particles by continuous gradient centrifugations, proteolytic digestion protection, and RNase digestion protection assays, we show that HCV co-opts HRS to mediate a late assembly step, namely, envelopment. In the absence of defined late-domain motifs, K63-linked polyubiquitinated lysine residues in the HCV NS2 protein bind the HRS ubiquitin-interacting motif to facilitate assembly. Finally, ESCRT-III and VPS/VTA1 components are also recruited by HCV proteins to mediate assembly. These data uncover involvement of ESCRT proteins in intracellular budding of a virus lacking defined late-domain motifs and a novel mechanism by which HCV gains entry into the ESCRT network, with potential implications for other viruses.

  13. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  14. Probing Nucleobase Interactions and Predicting Mechanisms of Synthetic Interest Using Computational Chemistry, and Furthering the Development of BVI Education in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Jason Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) and molecular docking methods are used to probe systems of biological and synthetic interest. Probing interactions of nucleobases within proteins, and properly modeling said interactions toward novel nucleobase development, is extremely difficult, and of great utility in RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutics. The issues in…

  15. Ab Initio Inverstagation of the Excited States of Nucleobases and Nucleosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Péter G.; Fogarasi, Géza; Watson, Thomas; Perera, Ajith; Lotrich, Victor; Bartlett, Rod J.

    2011-06-01

    Most living bodies are exposed to sunlight, essential life sustaining processes are using this natural radiation. Sunlight has, however, several components (has a broad "spectrum") and in particular the invisible component (UV, ultraviolet) is harmful for living organisms. Scientists around the word are busy to understand what happens in the cell when it is exposed to light: it seems that the building blocks of cells and in particular those carrying the genetic information (DNA and RNA) are highly protected against this exposition. Our research focuses on the spectral properties of the building blocks of DNA and RNA, the so called nucleobases and nucleosides, in order to understand this mechanism. Due to improvement in computer technology both at hardware and software side we are now able to use the most accurate methods of ab initio quantum chemistry to investigate the spectroscopic properties of these building blocks. These calculations provide direct information on the properties of these molecules but also provide important benchmarks for cheaper methods which can be used for even larger systems. We have calculated the excited state properties for the nucleobases (cytosine, guanine and adenine), their complexes with water and with each other (Watson-Crick base pairs and stacks) as well as corresponding nucleosides at the EOM-CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory and try to answer the following questions: (1) how the order of excited states varies in different nucleobases; (2) how hydration influences the excitation energy and order of excited states; (3) is there any effect of the sugar substituent; (4) how do close lying other bases change the spectrum. The calculations involve over hundred correlated electrons and up to thousand basis functions. Such calculations are now routinely available with the recently developed ACESIII code and can make use of hundreds or even several thousand of processors. V. Lotrich, N. Flocke, M. Ponton, A. Yau, A. Perera, E. Deumens

  16. The role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding on nucleobase acidification following metal coordination: possible implications of an "indirect" role of metals in acid-base catalysis of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Roitzsch, Michael; Añorbe, Marta Garijo; Miguel, Pablo J Sanz; Müller, Barbara; Lippert, Bernhard

    2005-11-01

    The acidifying effect of Pt(II) on nucleobase -NH and -NH2 groups depends both on the site of metal coordination and on the efficiency of stabilization of the deprotonated nucleobase via intracomplex hydrogen bonding. Weakly acidic nucleobase protons with pK (a) values between 9 and 17 can be acidified by a single Pt(II) to have pK (a) values which are well within the physiological pH range. This could open the possibility of an acid-base catalysis occurring at pH 7, with the metal-nucleobase entity functioning either as an acid or a base. Examples of Pt(II) complexes studied here include, among others, mixed nucleobase systems of 1-methylcytosine and 1,9-dimethyladenine as well as a complex of the rare iminooxo tautomer of 1-methylcytosine having the metal bonded at N4.

  17. Role of pKa of Nucleobases in the Origins of Chemical Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The formation of canonical base pairs through Watson–Crick hydrogen bonding sits at the heart of the genetic apparatus. The specificity of the base pairing of adenine with thymine/uracil and guanine with cytosine preserves accurate information for the biochemical blueprint and replicates the instructions necessary for carrying out biological function. The chemical evolution question of how these five canonical nucleobases were selected over various other possibilities remains intriguing. Since these and alternative nucleobases would have been available for chemical evolution, the reasons for the emergence of this system appear to be primarily functional. While investigating the base-pairing properties of structural nucleic acid analogs, we encountered a relationship between the pKa of a series of nonstandard (and canonical) nucleobases and the pH of the aqueous medium. This relationship appeared to correspond with the propensity of these molecules to self-assemble via Watson–Crick-type base-pairing interactions. A simple correlation of the “magnitude of the difference between the pKa and pH” (pKa–pH correlation) enables a general prediction of which types of heterocyclic recognition elements form hydrogen-bonded base pairs in aqueous media. Using the pKa–pH relationship, we can rationalize why nature chose the canonical nucleobases in terms of hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, and further extrapolate its significance within the context of chemical evolution. The connection between the physicochemical properties of bioorganic compounds and the interactions with their aqueous environment directly affects structure and function, at both a molecular and a supramolecular level. A general structure–function pattern emerges in biomolecules and biopolymers in aqueous media near neutral pH. A pKa – pH < 2 generally prompts catalytic functions, central to metabolism, but a difference in pKa – pH > 2 seems to result in the emergence of structure

  18. Identification of the distribution of adenosine phosphates, nucleosides and nucleobases in royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liming; Chen, Lanzhen; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Wei, Yue; Wang, Yong; Li, Yi; Zhao, Jing; Xue, Xiaofeng

    2015-04-15

    Nucleotides, nucleosides and nucleobases play a greater role in the physiological activity of organisms which are highly present in royal jelly (RJ). The objective of the present study is to develop a HPLC method to simultaneous determine nucleotides, nucleosides and nucleobases in RJ and access them in fresh and commercial RJ samples. The LOD and LOQ were 12.2-99.6 μg/L and 40.8-289.4 μg/L, respectively with nearly 100.9% recoveries. Except uric acid, all other compounds were found in RJ samples. Significant difference in the average content of compounds in fresh (2682.93 mg/kg) and commercial samples (3152.78 mg/kg) were observed. AMP, adenosine and adenine were found predominant in all the samples. Significant higher levels of ATP, ADP and AMP was seen in fresh RJ samples, and IMP, uridine, guanosine, and thymidine was seen in commercial RJ samples. The investigated compounds can be used as indexes for assessment RJ freshness and quality.

  19. Understanding prebiotic chemistry through the analysis of extraterrestrial amino acids and nucleobases in meteorites.

    PubMed

    Burton, Aaron S; Stern, Jennifer C; Elsila, Jamie E; Glavin, Daniel P; Dworkin, Jason P

    2012-08-21

    The discoveries of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in many meteorites over the last 50 years have revolutionized the Astrobiology field. A variety of non-terrestrial amino acids similar to those found in life on Earth have been detected in meteorites. A few amino acids have even been found with chiral excesses, suggesting that meteorites could have contributed to the origin of homochirality in life on Earth. In addition to amino acids, which have been productively studied for years, sugar-like molecules, activated phosphates, and nucleobases have also been determined to be indigenous to numerous meteorites. Because these molecules are essential for life as we know it, and meteorites have been delivering them to the Earth since accretion, it is plausible that the origin(s) of life on Earth were aided by extraterrestrially-synthesized molecules. Understanding the origins of life on Earth guides our search for life elsewhere, helping to answer the question of whether biology is unique to Earth. This tutorial review focuses on meteoritic amino acids and nucleobases, exploring modern analytical methods and possible formation mechanisms. We will also discuss the unique window that meteorites provide into the chemistry that preceded life on Earth, a chemical record we do not have access to on Earth due to geologic recycling of rocks and the pervasiveness of biology across the planet. Finally, we will address the future of meteorite research, including asteroid sample return missions.

  20. Catalytic Role of Manganese Oxides in Prebiotic Nucleobases Synthesis from Formamide.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Brij; Nayak, Arunima; Kamaluddin

    2016-06-01

    Origin of life processes might have begun with the formation of important biomonomers, such as amino acids and nucleotides, from simple molecules present in the prebiotic environment and their subsequent condensation to biopolymers. While studying the prebiotic synthesis of naturally occurring purine and pyrimidine derivatives from formamide, the manganese oxides demonstrated not only good binding for formamide but demonstrated novel catalytic activity. A novel one pot manganese oxide catalyzed synthesis of pyrimidine nucleobases like thymine is reported along with the formation of other nucleobases like purine, 9-(hydroxyacetyl) purine, cytosine, 4(3 H)-pyrimidinone and adenine in acceptable amounts. The work reported is significant in the sense that the synthesis of thymine has exhibited difficulties especially under one pot conditions and also such has been reported only under the catalytic activity of TiO2. The lower oxides of manganese were reported to show higher potential as catalysts and their existence were favored by the reducing atmospheric conditions prevalent on early Earth; thereby confirming the hypothesis that mineral having metals in reduced form might have been more active during the course of chemical evolution. Our results further confirm the role of formamide as a probable precursor for the formation of purine and pyrimidine bases during the course of chemical evolution and origin of life.

  1. Infrared spectral investigations of UV irradiated nucleobases adsorbed on mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucato, J. R.; Fornaro, T.

    2014-04-01

    Spectroscopic studies of the effects of UV radiation on biomolecules such as nucleobases in heterogeneous environments are particularly relevant in prebiotic chemistry to unravel the role of minerals in the transformation/preservation of biomolecules in abiotic environments. Minerals may have a pivotal role in the prebiotic evolution of complex chemical systems, mediating the effects of electromagnetic radiation, influencing the photostability of biomolecules, catalyzing important chemical reactions and/or protecting molecules against degradation. Studies on the photodegradation of biomolecules adsorbed on minerals have applications also in the life detection context to identify potential biomarkers for future space mission and hence to develop suitable sample-extraction protocols for bioanalytical instruments [1]. Moreover, the characterization of the spectroscopic features of biomolecules-mineral complexes provides a support in remote sensing spectroscopy for detecting organic compounds on planetary surfaces or cometary grains and asteroid surfaces. In this context we will present laboratory results on UV photostability of nucleobases adsorbed on magnesium oxide and forsterite minerals and analysed with infrared spectroscopic [2,3].

  2. Recent discovery of non-nucleobase thymidine phosphorylase inhibitors targeting cancer.

    PubMed

    Bera, Hriday; Chigurupati, Sridevi

    2016-11-29

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP, EC 2.4.2.4), an enzyme involved in pyrimidine salvage pathway, is identical to platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) and gliostatin. It is extremely upregulated in a variety of solid tumours. The TP amplification is associated with concomitant overexpression of many angiogenic factors such as matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), interleukins (ILs), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) etc., resulting in promotion of angiogenesis and cancer metastasis. In addition, overshooting TP level protects tumour cells from apoptosis and helps cell survival. Thus, TP is identified as a prime target for developing novel anticancer therapies. Pioneering research activities investigated a large number of TP inhibitors, most of which are pyrimidine or purine analogues. Recently, an array of structurally diverse non-nucleobase derivatives was designed, synthesized and established as promising TP inhibitors. This review, following an outline on the TP structure and functions, gives an overview of the recent advancement of various non-nucleobase TP inhibitors as novel anti-cancer agents.

  3. Nucleobase-functionalized graphene nanoribbons for accurate high-speed DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulechka, Eugene; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A.; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Kazakov, Andrei; Smolyanitsky, Alex

    2016-01-01

    We propose a water-immersed nucleobase-functionalized suspended graphene nanoribbon as an intrinsically selective device for nucleotide detection. The proposed sensing method combines Watson-Crick selective base pairing with graphene's capacity for converting anisotropic lattice strain to changes in an electrical current at the nanoscale. Using detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we study sensor operation at ambient conditions. We combine simulated data with theoretical arguments to estimate the levels of measurable electrical signal variation in response to strains and determine that the proposed sensing mechanism shows significant promise for realistic DNA sensing devices without the need for advanced data processing, or highly restrictive operational conditions.We propose a water-immersed nucleobase-functionalized suspended graphene nanoribbon as an intrinsically selective device for nucleotide detection. The proposed sensing method combines Watson-Crick selective base pairing with graphene's capacity for converting anisotropic lattice strain to changes in an electrical current at the nanoscale. Using detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we study sensor operation at ambient conditions. We combine simulated data with theoretical arguments to estimate the levels of measurable electrical signal variation in response to strains and determine that the proposed sensing mechanism shows significant promise for realistic DNA sensing devices without the need for advanced data processing, or highly restrictive operational conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07061a

  4. The search for and identification of amino acids, nucleobases and nucleosides in samples returned from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, Charles W.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril; Kuo, Kenneth C.; Stalling, David L.; Zumwalt, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the returned Mars samples for biologically important organic compounds, with emphasis on amino acid, the puring and pyrimidine bases, and nucleosides is proposed. These studies would be conducted on subsurface samples obtained by drilling past the surface oxidizing layer with emphasis on samples containing the larges quantities of organic carbon as determined by the rover gas chromatographic mass spectrometer (GCMS). Extraction of these molecules from the returned samples will be performed using the hydrothermal extraction technique described by Cheng and Ponnamperuma. More rigorous extraction methods will be developed and evaluated. For analysis of the extract for free amino acids or amino acids present in a bound or peptidic form, aliquots will be analyzed by capillary GCMS both before and after hydrolysis with 6N hydrochloric acid. Establishment of the presence of amino acids would then lead to the next logical step which would be the use of chiral stationary gas chromatography phases to determine the enatiomeic composition of the amino acids present, and thus potentially establish their biotic or abiotic origin. Confirmational analyses for amino acids would include ion-exchange and reversed-phase liquid chromatographic analysis. For analyses of the returned Mars samples for nucleobases and nucleosides, affinity and reversed-phase liquid chromatography would be utilized. This technology coupled with scanning UV detection for identification, presents a powerful tool for nucleobase and nucleoside analysis. Mass spectrometric analysis of these compounds would confirm their presence in samples returned form Mars.

  5. Interaction of nucleobases with silicon doped and defective silicon doped graphene and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Mudedla, Sathish Kumar; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Kamaraj, Manoharan; Subramanian, Venkatesan

    2016-01-07

    The interaction of nucleobases (NBs) with the surface of silicon doped graphene (SiGr) and defective silicon doped graphene (dSiGr) has been studied using electronic structure methods. A systematic comparison of the calculated interaction energies (adsorption strength) of NBs with the surface of SiGr and dSiGr with those of pristine graphene (Gr) has also been made. The doping of graphene with silicon increases the adsorption strength of NBs. The introduction of defects in SiGr further enhances the strength of interaction with NBs. The appreciable stability of complexes (SiGr-NBs and dSiGr-NBs) arises due to the partial electrostatic and covalent (Si···O(N)) interaction in addition to π-π stacking. The interaction energy increases with the size of graphene models. The strong interaction between dSiGr-NBs and concomitant charge transfer causes significant changes in the electronic structure of dSiGr in contrast to Gr and SiGr. Further, the calculated optical properties of all the model systems using time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) reveal that absorption spectra of SiGr and dSiGr undergo appreciable changes after adsorption of NBs. Thus, the significant variations in the HOMO-LUMO gap and absorption spectra of dSiGr after interaction with the NBs can be exploited for possible applications in the sensing of DNA nucleobases.

  6. Supramolecular copolymer micelles based on the complementary multiple hydrogen bonds of nucleobases for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dali; Su, Yue; Jin, Chengyu; Zhu, Bangshang; Pang, Yan; Zhu, Lijuan; Liu, Jinyao; Tu, Chunlai; Yan, Deyue; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2011-04-11

    Novel supramolecular copolymer micelles with stimuli-responsive abilities were successfully prepared through the complementary multiple hydrogen bonds of nucleobases and then applied for rapid intracellular release of drugs. First, both adenine-terminated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL-A) and uracil-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-U) were synthesized. The supramolecular amphiphilic block copolymers (PCL-A:U-PEG) were formed based on multiple hydrogen bonding interactions between PCL-A and PEG-U. The micelles self-assembled from PCL-A:U-PEG were sufficiently stable in water but prone to fast aggregation in acidic condition due to the dynamic and sensitive nature of noncovalent interactions. The low cytotoxicity of supramolecular copolymer micelles was confirmed by MTT assay against NIH/3T3 normal cells. As a hydrophobic anticancer model drug, doxorubicin (DOX) was encapsulated into these supramolecular copolymer micelles. In vitro release studies demonstrated that the release of DOX from micelles was significantly faster at mildly acid pH of 5.0 compared to physiological pH. MTT assay against HeLa cancer cells showed DOX-loaded micelles had high anticancer efficacy. Hence, these supramolecular copolymer micelles based on the complementary multiple hydrogen bonds of nucleobases are very promising candidates for rapid controlled release of drugs.

  7. Ultraviolet Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Interstellar Ice Analogs: Formation and Photo-Stability of Nucleobases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuevo, Michel; Milam, Stefanie N.; Sandford, Scott A.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    Astrochemistry laboratory experiments recently showed that molecules of prebiotic interest can potentially form in space, as supported by the detection of amino acids in organic residues formed by the UV photolysis of ices simulating interstellar and cometary environments (H2O, CO, CO2, CH3OH, NH3, etc.). Although the presence of amino acids in the interstellar medium (ISM) is still under debate, experiments and the detection of amino acids in meteorites both support a scenario in which prebiotic molecules could be of extraterrestrial origin, before they are delivered to planets by comets, asteroids, and interplanetary dust particles. Nucleobases, the informational subunits of DNA and RNA, have also been detected in meteorites, although they have not yet been observed in the ISM. Thus, these molecules constitute another family of prebiotic compounds that can possibly form via abiotical processes in astrophysical environments. Nucleobases are nitrogen-bearing cyclic aromatic species with various functional groups attached, which are divided into two classes: pyrimidines (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purines (adenine and guanine). In this work, we study how UV irradiation affects pyrimidine mixed in interstellar ice analogs (H2O, NH3, CH3OH). In particular, we show that the UV irradiation of H2O:pyrimidine mixtures leads to the production of oxidized compounds including uracil, and show that both uracil and cytosine are formed upon irradiation of H2O:NH3:pyrimidine mixtures. We also study the photostability of pyrimidine and its photoproducts formed during these experiments.

  8. New approach for designing single-chain magnets: organization of chains via hydrogen bonding between nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Xiong; Shiga, Takuya; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2012-04-25

    Two one-dimensional (1D) manganese complexes, [Mn(2)(naphtmen)(2)(L)](ClO(4))·2Et(2)O·2MeOH·H(2)O (1) and [Mn(2)(naphtmen)(2)(HL)](ClO(4))(2)·MeOH (2), were synthesized by using a bridging ligand with a nucleobase moiety, 6-amino-9-β-carboxyethylpurine, and a salen-type manganese(III) dinuclear complex, [Mn(2)(naphtmen)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (naphtmen(2-) = N,N'-(1,1,2,2-tetramethylethylene)bis(naphthylideneiminato) dianion). In 1 and 2, the carboxylate-bridged Mn(III) dinuclear units are alternately linked by two kinds of weak Mn···O interactions into 1D chains. As a result, canted antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic interactions are alternately present along the chains, leading to a 1D chain with non-cancellation of anisotropic spins. Since the chains connected via H-bonds between nucleobase moieties are magnetically isolated, both 1 and 2 act as single-chain magnets (SCMs). More importantly, this result shows the smaller canting angles hinder long-range ordering in favor of SCM dynamics.

  9. First-principles study of interaction of serine with nucleobases of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Haider

    2017-03-01

    The nature of interaction between serine-a vital molecule for cancer cell proliferation and nucleic acid bases-adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T), and uracil (U) is investigated within the framework of Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and density functional theory (DFT). To quantify the interaction strength between serine and nucleobases, the corresponding binding energies were computed, showing energetic ordering such that G > C > T > A > U. This shows that the interaction energy of serine with guanine is the highest, while with uracil it is the lowest. The amount of charge transferred is the lowest in case of the serine-guanine complex and highest in case of the serine-uracil complex. The results show the serine-guanine complex to be more stable and to have a salt bridge structure involving the -COOH group. Theoretical analysis based on MP2 and DFT shows that the interaction between the serine and nucleobases is mainly determined by hydrogen bonding.

  10. Biochemical retrosynthesis of 2'-deoxyribonucleosides from glucose, acetaldehyde, and a nucleobase.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Jun; Kawano, Takako; Sakai, Takafumi; Saito, Kyota; Matsumoto, Seiichiro; Sasaki, Mie; Mikami, Yoichi; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2006-08-01

    2'-Deoxyribonucleosides are important as building blocks for the synthesis of antisense drugs, antiviral nucleosides, and 2'-deoxyribonucleotides for polymerase chain reaction. The microbial production of 2'-deoxyribonucleosides from simple materials, glucose, acetaldehyde, and a nucleobase, through the reverse reactions of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside degradation and the glycolytic pathway, was investigated. The glycolytic pathway of baker's yeast yielded fructose 1,6-diphosphate from glucose using the energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate generated from adenosine 5'-monophosphate through alcoholic fermentation with the yeast. Fructose 1,6-diphosphate was further transformed to 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate in the presence of acetaldehyde by deoxyriboaldolase-expressing Escherichia coli cells via D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. E. coli transformants expressing phosphopentomutase and nucleoside phosphorylase produced 2'-deoxyribonucleosides from 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate and a nucleobase via 2-deoxyribose 1-phosphate through the reverse reactions of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside degradation. Coupling of the glycolytic pathway and deoxyriboaldolase-catalyzing reaction efficiently supplied 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate, which is a key intermediate for 2'-deoxyribonucleoside synthesis. 2'-Deoxyinosine (9.9 mM) was produced from glucose, acetaldehyde, and adenine through three-step reactions via fructose 1,6-diphosphate and then 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate, the molar yield as to glucose being 17.8%.

  11. Catalytic Role of Manganese Oxides in Prebiotic Nucleobases Synthesis from Formamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Brij; Nayak, Arunima; Kamaluddin

    2016-06-01

    Origin of life processes might have begun with the formation of important biomonomers, such as amino acids and nucleotides, from simple molecules present in the prebiotic environment and their subsequent condensation to biopolymers. While studying the prebiotic synthesis of naturally occurring purine and pyrimidine derivatives from formamide, the manganese oxides demonstrated not only good binding for formamide but demonstrated novel catalytic activity. A novel one pot manganese oxide catalyzed synthesis of pyrimidine nucleobases like thymine is reported along with the formation of other nucleobases like purine, 9-(hydroxyacetyl) purine, cytosine, 4(3 H)-pyrimidinone and adenine in acceptable amounts. The work reported is significant in the sense that the synthesis of thymine has exhibited difficulties especially under one pot conditions and also such has been reported only under the catalytic activity of TiO2. The lower oxides of manganese were reported to show higher potential as catalysts and their existence were favored by the reducing atmospheric conditions prevalent on early Earth; thereby confirming the hypothesis that mineral having metals in reduced form might have been more active during the course of chemical evolution. Our results further confirm the role of formamide as a probable precursor for the formation of purine and pyrimidine bases during the course of chemical evolution and origin of life.

  12. Enthalpy-Entropy Tuning in the Adsorption of Nucleobases at the Au(111) Surface.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Marta; Corni, Stefano; Di Felice, Rosa

    2014-04-08

    The interaction of DNA molecules with hard substrates is of paramount importance both for the study of DNA itself and for the variety of possible technological applications. Interaction with inorganic surfaces strongly modifies the helical shape of DNA. Hence, an accurate understanding of DNA structure and function at interfaces is a fundamental question with enormous impact in science and society. This work sets the fundamentals for the simulation of entire DNA oligomers on gold surfaces in dry and wet conditions. Thanks to the new GolDNA-AMBER force field, which was derived from first principles and includes dispersion interactions and polarization effects, we simulated self-assembled guanine and adenine monolayers on Au(111) in vacuo and the adsorption of all nucleobases on the same substrate in aqueous conditions. The periodic monolayers obtained from classical simulations match very well those from first principle calculations and experiments, assessing the robustness of the force field and motivating the application to more complex systems for which quantum calculations are not affordable and experiments are elusive. The energetics of nucleobases on Au(111) in solution reveal fundamental physicochemical effects: we find that the adsorption paradigm shifts from purely enthalpic to dominantly entropic by changing the environment and aggregation phase.

  13. Meteoritic Input of Amino Acids and Nucleobases: Methodology and Implications for the Origins of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    The discoveries of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in many meteorites over the last 40 years have revolutionized the Astrobiology field. A variety of non-terrestrial amino acids similar to those found in life on Earth have been detected in meteorites. A few amino acids have even been found with chiral excesses, suggesting that meteorites could have contributed to the origin of homochirality in life on Earth. In addition to amino acids, which have been productively studied for years, sugar-like molecules, activated phosphates, and nucleobases have also been determined to be indigenous to numerous meteorites. Because these molecules are essential for life as we know it, and meteorites have been delivering them to the Earth since accretion, it is plausible that the origin(s) of life on Earth were aided by extraterrestrially-synthesized molecules. Understanding the origins of life on Earth guides our search for life elsewhere, helping to answer the question of whether biology is unique to Earth. This tutorial review focuses on meteoritic amino acids and nucleobases, exploring modern analytical methods and possible formation mechanisms. We will also discuss the unique window that meteorites provide into the chemistry that preceded life on Earth, a chemical record we do not have access to on Earth due to geologic recycling of rocks and the pervasiveness of biology across the planet. Finally, we will address the future of meteorite research, including asteroid sample return mIssIons.

  14. Understanding Prebiotic Chemistry Through the Analysis of Extraterrestrial Amino Acids and Nucleobases in Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    The discoveries of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in many meteorites over the last 50 years have revolutionized the Astrobiology field. A variety of non-terrestrial amino acids similar to those found in life on Earth have been detected in meteorites. A few amino acids have even been found with chiral excesses, suggesting that meteorites could have contributed to the origin of homochirality in life on Earth. In addition to amino acids, which have been productively studied for years, sugar-like molecules, activated phosphates, and nucleobases have also been determined to be indigenous to numerous meteorites. Because these molecules are essential for life as we know it, and meteorites have been delivering them to the Earth since accretion, it is plausible that the origines) of life on Earth were aided by extrataterrestrially-synthesized molecules. Understanding the origins of life on Earth guides our search for life elsewhere, helping to answer the question of whether biology is unique to Earth. This tutorial focuses on meteoritic amino acids and nucleobases, exploring modern analytical methods and possible formation mechanisms. We will also discuss the unique window that meteorites provide into the chemistry that preceded life on Earth, a chemical record we do not have access to on Earth due to geologic recycling of rocks and the pervasiveness of biology across the planet. Finally. we will address the future of meteorite research, including asteroid sample return missions.

  15. Folate and Thiamine Transporters mediated by Facilitative Carriers (SLC19A1-3 and SLC46A1) and Folate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David

    2013-01-01

    The reduced folate carrier (RFC,SLC19A1), thiamine transporter-1 (ThTr1,SLC19A2) and thiamine transporter-2 (ThTr2,SLC19A3) evolved from the same family of solute carriers. SLC19A1 transports folates but not thiamine. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 transport thiamine but not folates. SLC19A1 and SLC19A2 deliver their substrates to systemic tissues; SLC19A3 mediates intestinal thiamine absorption. The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT,SLC46A1) is the mechanism by which folates are absorbed across the apical-brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine. Two folate receptors (FOLR1 and FOLR2) mediate folate transport across epithelia by an endocytic process. Folate transporters are routes of delivery of drugs for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases. There are autosomal recessive disorders associated with mutations in genes encoded for SLC46A1 (hereditary folate malabsorption), FOLR1 (cerebral folate deficiency), SLC19A2 (thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia), and SLC19A3 (biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease). PMID:23506878

  16. Construction of peptides with nucleobase amino acids: design and synthesis of the nucleobase-conjugated peptides derived from HIV-1 Rev and their binding properties to HIV-1 RRE RNA.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hamasaki, K; Ueno, A; Mihara, H

    2001-04-01

    In order to develop a novel molecule that recognizes a specific structure of RNA, we have attempted to design peptides having L-alpha-amino acids with a nucleobase at the side chain (nucleobase amino acid (NBA)), expecting that the function of a nucleobase which can specifically recognize a base in RNA is regulated in a peptide conformation. In this study, to demonstrate the applicability of the NBA units in the peptide to RNA recognition, we designed and synthesized a variety of NBA-conjugated peptides, derived from HIV-1 Rev. Circular dichroism study revealed that the conjugation of the Rev peptide with an NBA unit did not disturb the peptide conformation. RNA-binding affinities of the designed peptides with RRE IIB RNA were dependent on the structure of the nucleobase moieties in the peptides. The peptide having the cytosine NBA at the position of the Asn40 site in the Rev showed a higher binding ability for RRE IIB RNA, despite the diminishing the Asn40 function. Furthermore, the peptide having the guanine NBA at the position of the Arg44 site, which is the most important residue for the RNA binding in the Rev, bound to RRE IIB RNA in an ability similar to Rev34-50 with native sequence. These results demonstrate that an appropriate NBA unit in the peptide plays an important role in the RNA binding with a specific contact such as hydrogen bonding, and the interaction between the nucleobase in the peptide and the base in the RNA can enhance the RNA-binding affinity and specificity.

  17. Absolute binding-free energies between standard RNA/DNA nucleobases and amino-acid sidechain analogs in different environments.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Anita; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the great importance of nucleic acid-protein interactions in the cell, our understanding of their physico-chemical basis remains incomplete. In order to address this challenge, we have for the first time determined potentials of mean force and the associated absolute binding free energies between all standard RNA/DNA nucleobases and amino-acid sidechain analogs in high- and low-dielectric environments using molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella sampling. A comparison against a limited set of available experimental values for analogous systems attests to the quality of the computational approach and the force field used. Overall, our analysis provides a microscopic picture behind nucleobase/sidechain interaction preferences and creates a unified framework for understanding and sculpting nucleic acid-protein interactions in different contexts. Here, we use this framework to demonstrate a strong relationship between nucleobase density profiles of mRNAs and nucleobase affinity profiles of their cognate proteins and critically analyze a recent hypothesis that the two may be capable of direct, complementary interactions.

  18. On the Origin of the Canonical Nucleobases: An Assessment of Selection Pressures across Chemical and Early Biological Evolution.

    PubMed

    Rios, Andro C; Tor, Yitzhak

    2013-06-01

    The native bases of RNA and DNA are prominent examples of the narrow selection of organic molecules upon which life is based. How did nature "decide" upon these specific heterocycles? Evidence suggests that many types of heterocycles could have been present on the early Earth. It is therefore likely that the contemporary composition of nucleobases is a result of multiple selection pressures that operated during early chemical and biological evolution. The persistence of the fittest heterocycles in the prebiotic environment towards, for example, hydrolytic and photochemical assaults, may have given some nucleobases a selective advantage for incorporation into the first informational polymers. The prebiotic formation of polymeric nucleic acids employing the native bases remains, however, a challenging problem to reconcile. Hypotheses have proposed that the emerging RNA world may have included many types of nucleobases. This is supported by the extensive utilization of non-canonical nucleobases in extant RNA and the resemblance of many of the modified bases to heterocycles generated in simulated prebiotic chemistry experiments. Selection pressures in the RNA world could have therefore narrowed the composition of the nucleic acid bases. Two such selection pressures may have been related to genetic fidelity and duplex stability. Considering these possible selection criteria, the native bases along with other related heterocycles seem to exhibit a certain level of fitness. We end by discussing the strength of the N-glycosidic bond as a potential fitness parameter in the early DNA world, which may have played a part in the refinement of the alphabetic bases.

  19. Modeling of Calcite Precipitation Driven by Bacteria-facilitated Urea Hydrolysis in A Flow Column Using A Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Parallel Reactive Transport Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.

    2009-12-01

    One approach for immobilizing subsurface metal contaminants involves stimulating the in situ production of mineral phases that sequester or isolate contaminants. One example is using calcium carbonate to immobilize strontium. The success of such approaches depends on understanding how various processes of flow, transport, reaction and resulting porosity-permeability change couple in subsurface systems. Reactive transport models are often used for such purpose. Current subsurface reactive transport simulators typically involve a de-coupled solution approach, such as operator-splitting, that solves the transport equations for components and batch chemistry sequentially, which has limited applicability for many biogeochemical processes with fast kinetics and strong medium property-reaction interactions. A massively parallel, fully coupled, fully implicit reactive transport simulator has been developed based on a parallel multi-physics object oriented software environment computing framework (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Within this simulator, the system of transport and reaction equations is solved simultaneously in a fully coupled manner using the Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method with preconditioning. The simulator was applied to model reactive transport in a one-dimensional column where conditions that favor calcium carbonate precipitation are generated by urea hydrolysis that is catalyzed by urease enzyme. Simulation results are compared to both laboratory column experiments and those obtained using the reactive transport simulator STOMP in terms of: the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitates and reaction rates and other major species in the reaction system; the changes in porosity and permeability; and the computing efficiency based on wall clock simulation time.

  20. Synthesis of oligonucleotides containing N,N-disubstituted 3-deazacytosine nucleobases by post-elongation modification and their triplex-forming ability with double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Akabane-Nakata, Masaaki; Obika, Satoshi; Hari, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-28

    A phosphoramidite of a 2'-O,4'-C-methylene-bridged nucleoside, bearing 4-(2,4,6-triisopropylbenzenesulfonyloxy)pyridin-2-one as a nucleobase precursor, was synthesized and introduced into an oligonucleotide. Treatment with various secondary amines after elongating the oligonucleotide on an automated DNA synthesizer enabled facile and mild conversion of the precursor into the corresponding N,N-disubstituted 3-deazacytosine nucleobases. The evaluation of the triplex-forming ability of the synthesized oligonucleotides with double-stranded DNA showed that the nucleobase possessing the (3S)-3-guanidinopyrrolidine moiety can recognize a CG base pair with high sequence-selectivity and binding-affinity.

  1. Alpha-beta chimeric oligo-DNA bearing intercalator-conjugated nucleobase inside the linker sequence remarkably improves thermal stability of an alternate-stranded triple helix.

    PubMed

    Zafrul Azam, A T M; Hasegawa, Minoru; Moriguchi, Tomohisa; Shinozuka, Kazuo

    2004-12-06

    Novel alpha-beta chimeric oligodeoxynucleotides bearing an intercalator-conjugated nucleobase located at the internal 4-nt linker region were synthesized, and their triplex-stabilizing property was examined. The triple helical DNA formed between the modified chimera DNA and double-stranded DNA exhibited remarkable thermal stability; however, the position of the intercalator-conjugated nucleobase had little influence on the stability. Among the examined, modified chimera DNA bearing the two intercalator-conjugated nucleobases at adjacent positions exhibited the highest stability.

  2. CsNIP2;1 is a Plasma Membrane Transporter from Cucumis sativus that Facilitates Urea Uptake When Expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Yan, Jiapei; Vatamaniuk, Olena K; Du, Xiangge

    2016-03-01

    Urea is an important source of nitrogen (N) for the growth and development of plants. It occurs naturally in soils, is the major N source in agricultural fertilizers and is an important N metabolite in plants. Therefore, the identification and characterization of urea transporters in higher plants is important for the fundamental understanding of urea-based N nutrition in plants and for designing novel strategies for improving the N-use efficiency of urea based-fertilizers. Progress in this area, however, is hampered due to scarce knowledge of plant urea transporters. From what is known, urea uptake from the soil into plant roots is mediated by two types of transporters: the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) and the DUR3 orthologs, mediating low- and high-affinity urea transport, respectively. Here we characterized a MIP family member from Cucumis sativus, CsNIP2;1, with regard to its contribution to urea transport. We show that CsNIP2;1 is a plasma membrane transporter that mediates pH-dependent urea uptake when expressed in yeast. We also found that ectopic expression of CsNIP2;1 improves growth of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and rescues growth and development of the atdur3-3 mutant on medium with urea as the sole N source. In addition, CsNIP2;1 is transcriptionally up-regulated by N deficiency, urea and NO3 (-). These data and results from the analyses of the pattern of CsNIP2;1 expression in A. thaliana and cucumber suggest that CsNIP2;1 might be involved in multiple steps of urea-based N nutrition, including urea uptake and internal transport during N remobilization throughout seed germination and N delivery to developing tissues.

  3. The UV absorption of nucleobases: semi-classical ab initio spectra simulations.

    PubMed

    Barbatti, Mario; Aquino, Adelia J A; Lischka, Hans

    2010-05-21

    Semi-classical simulations of the UV-photoabsorption cross sections of adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil in gas phase were performed at the resolution-of-identity coupled cluster to the second-order (RI-CC2) level. With the exception of cytosine, the spectra of the other four nucleobases show a two band pattern separated by a low intensity region. The spectrum of cytosine is shaped by a sequence of three bands of increasing intensity. The first band of guanine is composed by two pipi* transitions of similar intensities. The analysis of individual contributions to the spectra allows a detailed assignment of bands. It is shown that the semi-classical simulations are able to predict general features of the experimental spectra, including their absolute intensities.

  4. Intersystem Crossing Pathways in the Noncanonical Nucleobase 2-Thiouracil: A Time-Dependent Picture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The deactivation mechanism after ultraviolet irradiation of 2-thiouracil has been investigated using nonadiabatic dynamics simulations at the MS-CASPT2 level of theory. It is found that after excitation the S2 quickly relaxes to S1, and from there intersystem crossing takes place to both T2 and T1 with a time constant of 400 fs and a triplet yield above 80%, in very good agreement with recent femtosecond experiments in solution. Both indirect S1 → T2 → T1 and direct S1 → T1 pathways contribute to intersystem crossing, with the former being predominant. The results contribute to the understanding of how some noncanonical nucleobases respond to harmful ultraviolet light, which could be relevant for prospective photochemotherapeutic applications. PMID:27167106

  5. Novel bead-based platform for direct detection of unlabelled nucleic acids through Single Nucleobase Labelling.

    PubMed

    Venkateswaran, Seshasailam; Luque-González, Maria Angélica; Tabraue-Chávez, Mavys; Fara, Mario Antonio; López-Longarela, Barbara; Cano-Cortes, Victoria; López-Delgado, Francisco Javier; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario María; Ilyine, Hugh; Bradley, Mark; Pernagallo, Salvatore; Díaz-Mochón, Juan José

    2016-12-01

    Over the last decade, circulating microRNAs have received attention as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In particular, microRNA122 has been demonstrated to be an early and more sensitive indicator of drug-induced liver injury than the widely used biomarkers such as alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. Recently, microRNA122 has been used in vitro to assess the cellular toxicity of new drugs and as a biomarker for the development of a rapid test for drug overdose/liver damage. In this proof-of-concept study, we report a PCR-free and label-free detection method that has a limit of detection (3 standard deviations) of 15 fmoles of microRNA122, by integrating a dynamic chemical approach for "Single Nucleobase Labelling" with a bead-based platform (Luminex(®)) thereby, in principle, demonstrating the exciting prospect of rapid and accurate profiling of any microRNAs related to diseases and toxicology.

  6. Synthesis Structure and Imaging of Oligodeoxyribonucleotides with Tellurium-nucleobase Derivatization

    SciTech Connect

    J Sheng; A Hassan; W Zhang; J Zhou; B Xu; A Soares; Z Huang

    2011-12-31

    We report here the first synthesis of 5-phenyl-telluride-thymidine derivatives and the Te-phosphoramidite. We also report here the synthesis, structure and STM current-imaging studies of DNA oligonucleotides containing the nucleobases (thymine) derivatized with 5-phenyl-telluride functionality (5-Te). Our results show that the 5-Te-DNA is stable, and that the Te-DNA duplex has the thermo-stability similar to the corresponding native duplex. The crystal structure indicates that the 5-Te-DNA duplex structure is virtually identical to the native one, and that the Te-modified T and native A interact similarly to the native T and A pair. Furthermore, while the corresponding native showed weak signals, the DNA duplex modified with electron-rich tellurium functionality showed strong topographic and current peaks by STM imaging, suggesting a potential strategy to directly image DNA without structural perturbation.

  7. Synthesis, structure and imaging of oligodeoxyribonucleotides with tellurium-nucleobase derivatization

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, J.; Soares, A.; Hassan, A. E. A.; Zhang, W.; Zhou, J.; Xu, B.; Huang, Z.

    2011-05-01

    We report here the first synthesis of 5-phenyl-telluride-thymidine derivatives and the Te-phosphoramidite. We also report here the synthesis, structure and STM current-imaging studies of DNA oligonucleotides containing the nucleobases (thymine) derivatized with 5-phenyl-telluride functionality (5-Te). Our results show that the 5-Te-DNA is stable, and that the Te-DNA duplex has the thermo-stability similar to the corresponding native duplex. The crystal structure indicates that the 5-Te-DNA duplex structure is virtually identical to the native one, and that the Te-modified T and native A interact similarly to the native T and A pair. Furthermore, while the corresponding native showed weak signals, the DNA duplex modified with electron-rich tellurium functionality showed strong topographic and current peaks by STM imaging, suggesting a potential strategy to directly image DNA without structural perturbation.

  8. Synthesis, structure and imaging of oligodeoxyribonucleotides with tellurium-nucleobase derivatization.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jia; Hassan, Abdalla E A; Zhang, Wen; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Bingqian; Soares, Alexei S; Huang, Zhen

    2011-05-01

    We report here the first synthesis of 5-phenyl-telluride-thymidine derivatives and the Te-phosphoramidite. We also report here the synthesis, structure and STM current-imaging studies of DNA oligonucleotides containing the nucleobases (thymine) derivatized with 5-phenyl-telluride functionality (5-Te). Our results show that the 5-Te-DNA is stable, and that the Te-DNA duplex has the thermo-stability similar to the corresponding native duplex. The crystal structure indicates that the 5-Te-DNA duplex structure is virtually identical to the native one, and that the Te-modified T and native A interact similarly to the native T and A pair. Furthermore, while the corresponding native showed weak signals, the DNA duplex modified with electron-rich tellurium functionality showed strong topographic and current peaks by STM imaging, suggesting a potential strategy to directly image DNA without structural perturbation.

  9. Intersystem Crossing Pathways in the Noncanonical Nucleobase 2-Thiouracil: A Time-Dependent Picture.

    PubMed

    Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-06-02

    The deactivation mechanism after ultraviolet irradiation of 2-thiouracil has been investigated using nonadiabatic dynamics simulations at the MS-CASPT2 level of theory. It is found that after excitation the S2 quickly relaxes to S1, and from there intersystem crossing takes place to both T2 and T1 with a time constant of 400 fs and a triplet yield above 80%, in very good agreement with recent femtosecond experiments in solution. Both indirect S1 → T2 → T1 and direct S1 → T1 pathways contribute to intersystem crossing, with the former being predominant. The results contribute to the understanding of how some noncanonical nucleobases respond to harmful ultraviolet light, which could be relevant for prospective photochemotherapeutic applications.

  10. New size-expanded RNA nucleobase analogs: a detailed theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Laibin; Zhang, Zhenwei; Ren, Tingqi; Tian, Jianxiang; Wang, Mei

    2015-04-05

    Fluorescent nucleobase analogs have attracted much attention in recent years due to their potential applications in nucleic acids research. In this work, four new size-expanded RNA base analogs were computationally designed and their structural, electronic, and optical properties are investigated by means of DFT calculations. The results indicate that these analogs can form stable Watson-Crick base pairs with natural counterparts and they have smaller ionization potentials and HOMO-LUMO gaps than natural ones. Particularly, the electronic absorption spectra and fluorescent emission spectra are calculated. The calculated excitation maxima are greatly red-shifted compared with their parental and natural bases, allowing them to be selectively excited. In gas phase, the fluorescence from them would be expected to occur around 526, 489, 510, and 462 nm, respectively. The influences of water solution and base pairing on the relevant absorption spectra of these base analogs are also examined.

  11. Cellular Delivery and Photochemical Activation of Antisense Agents through a Nucleobase Caging Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Jeane M.; Uprety, Rajendra; Thomas, Meryl; Lusic, Hrvoje; Lively, Mark O.; Deiters, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides are powerful tools to regulate gene expression in cells and model organisms. However, a transfection or microinjection is needed for efficient delivery of the antisense agent. We report the conjugation of multiple HIV TAT peptides to a hairpin-protected antisense agent through a light-cleavable nucleobase caging group. This conjugation allows for the facile delivery of the antisense agent without a transfection reagent and photochemical activation offers precise control over gene expression. The developed approach is highly modular, as demonstrated by the conjugation of folic acid to the caged antisense agent. This enabled targeted cell delivery through cell-surface folate receptors followed by photochemical triggering of antisense activity. Importantly, the presented strategy delivers native oligonucleotides after light-activation, devoid of any delivery functionalities or modifications that could otherwise impair their antisense activity. PMID:23915424

  12. New size-expanded RNA nucleobase analogs: A detailed theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Laibin; Zhang, Zhenwei; Ren, Tingqi; Tian, Jianxiang; Wang, Mei

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleobase analogs have attracted much attention in recent years due to their potential applications in nucleic acids research. In this work, four new size-expanded RNA base analogs were computationally designed and their structural, electronic, and optical properties are investigated by means of DFT calculations. The results indicate that these analogs can form stable Watson-Crick base pairs with natural counterparts and they have smaller ionization potentials and HOMO-LUMO gaps than natural ones. Particularly, the electronic absorption spectra and fluorescent emission spectra are calculated. The calculated excitation maxima are greatly red-shifted compared with their parental and natural bases, allowing them to be selectively excited. In gas phase, the fluorescence from them would be expected to occur around 526, 489, 510, and 462 nm, respectively. The influences of water solution and base pairing on the relevant absorption spectra of these base analogs are also examined.

  13. Interaction of Nucleobases with Semiconducting Nanotubes and Nanocages: Does the Solvent Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhoufei; Slough, William; He, Haiying; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi

    2013-03-01

    The tremendous advancement in nanotechnology has brought great promise in the area of bio-applications. Nanoscale materials and structures have attracted a lot of interest for their potential applications in biosensing, biorecognition, luminescent probes for DNA, biomedical labeling, drug delivery etc. Gaining fundamental understanding of the interaction of bio-systems with nanomaterials is critical in putting all these applications into full play. Despite the fact that most of these interactions appear in aqueous environment, the solvent effect has often been neglected in previous computational studies. In this talk, we will report our comparison study of nucleobases interacting with BN nanotubes and chalcogenide nanocages with/without considering the aqueous solution, based on first-principles calculations. The results reveal a significant effect from the water solution, which may largely reduce the interaction energy due to the polarization of the dielectric solvent medium.

  14. Direct Oxidative Damage of Naked DNA Generated upon Absorption of UV Radiation by Nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Mendoza, Miguel; Banyasz, Akos; Douki, Thierry; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2016-10-06

    It has been shown that in addition to formation of pyrimidine dimers, UV irradiation of DNA in the absence of photosensitizer also induces formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, but the mechanism of formation of that oxidized base has not been clearly established. In the present study, we provide an unambiguous demonstration that absorption of UVC and UVB radiation by the nucleobases induces DNA oxidation via a direct process (one-electron oxidation) and not singlet oxygen. Evidence arose from the fact that polyamine-guanine adducts that are specifically produced through the transient formation of guanine radical cation are generated following UV irradiation of DNA in the presence of a polyamine even in the absence of any photosensitizer.

  15. Carbon nanotube-nucleobase hybrids: nanorings from uracil-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Toma, Francesca Maria; Kumar, Jitendra; Venkatesh, V; Raya, Jesus; Prato, Maurizio; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2011-06-06

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been covalently functionalized with uracil nucleobase. The hybrids have been characterized by using complementary spectroscopic and microscopic techniques including solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The uracil-functionalized SWCNTs are able to self-assemble into regular nanorings with a diameter of 50-70 nm, as observed by AFM and TEM. AFM shows that the rings do not have a consistent height and thickness, which indicates that they may be formed by separate bundles of CNTs. The simplest model for the nanoring formation likely involves two bundles of CNTs interacting with each other via uracil-uracil base-pairing at both CNT ends. These nanorings can be envisaged for the development of advanced electronic circuits.

  16. Identification and quantification of nucleosides and nucleobases in Geosaurus and Leech by hydrophilic-interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei; Li, Wei; Li, Qin; Wang, Yinghua; Li, Zhenguo; Ni, Yefeng; Koike, Kazuo

    2011-09-15

    A simple hydrophilic-interaction chromatography (HILIC) method was developed for the identification and quantification of 14 nucleosides and nucleobases, namely cytosine, uracil, cytidine, guanine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, uridine, thymine, inosine, guanosine, thymidine, 2'-deoxyadenosine, 2'-deoxyinosine and 2'-deoxyuridine in two traditional Chinese medicines, Geosaurus and Leech. The separation was achieved on a TSKgel Amide-80 column (150 mm × 2.0 mm, 3.0 μm) with a mixture of acetonitrile and 10 mM aqueous ammonium acetate as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The temperature was set at 30°C and UV detection wavelength was set at 260 nm. All calibration curves showed good linearity (R(2)>0.9957) within the test ranges. The overall intra- and inter-day RSD ranged from 0.4 to 3.4% and from 0.7 to 3.3%, respectively. The LOD and LOQ were in the range of 0.07-30.49 ng/mL and 0.26-60.98 ng/mL, respectively. The repeatability of the method was in the range of 2.2-5.8% for Geosaurus and 1.4-5.5% for Leech. The recoveries of the samples were in the range of 91.4-100.9% for Geosaurus, and 91.9-99.3% for Leech. The established method was applied successfully for the analysis of nucleosides and nucleobases in 22 commercially available samples collected from different regions in China and Japan. Our data showed that HILIC had advantages as a useful tool for the study of the bioactive components in Geosaurus and Leech as well as their quality control, and could therefore be used for the determination of the analytes in pharmaceutical products and biological fluids.

  17. Mechanisms of Damage to DNA Labeled with Electrophilic Nucleobases Induced by Ionizing or UV Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rak, Janusz; Chomicz, Lidia; Wiczk, Justyna; Westphal, Kinga; Zdrowowicz, Magdalena; Wityk, Paweł; Żyndul, Michał; Makurat, Samanta; Golon, Łukasz

    2015-07-02

    Hypoxia--a hallmark of solid tumors--makes hypoxic cells radioresistant. On the other hand, DNA, the main target of anticancer therapy, is not sensitive to the near UV photons and hydrated electrons, one of the major products of water radiolysis under hypoxic conditions. A possible way to overcome these obstacles to the efficient radio- and photodynamic therapy of cancer is to sensitize the cellular DNA to electrons and/or ultraviolet radiation. While incorporated into genomic DNA, modified nucleosides, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in particular, sensitize cells to both near-ultraviolet photons and γ rays. It is believed that, in both sensitization modes, the reactive nucleobase radical is formed as a primary product which swiftly stabilizes, leading to serious DNA damage, like strand breaks or cross-links. However, despite the apparent similarity, such radio- and photosensitization of DNA seems to be ruled by fundamentally different mechanisms. In this review, we demonstrate that the most important factors deciding on radiodamage to the labeled DNA are (i) the electron affinity (EA) of modified nucleoside (mNZ), (ii) the local surroundings of the label that significantly influences the EA of mNZ, and (iii) the strength of the chemical bond holding together the substituent and a nucleobase. On the other hand, we show that the UV damage to sensitized DNA is governed by long-range photoinduced electron transfer, the efficiency of which is controlled by local DNA sequences. A critical review of the literature mechanisms concerning both types of damage to the labeled biopolymer is presented. Ultimately, the perspectives of studies on DNA sensitization in the context of cancer therapy are discussed.

  18. Electron Detachment as a Probe of Intrinsic Nucleobase Dynamics in Dianion-Nucleobase Clusters: Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Platinum II Cyanide Dianion Bound to Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Adenine.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ananya; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2015-09-03

    We report the first low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the platinum II cyanide dianion bound to nucleobases. These systems are models for understanding platinum-complex photodynamic therapies, and a knowledge of the intrinsic photodetachment properties is crucial for characterizing their broader photophysical properties. Well-resolved, distinct peaks are observed in the spectra, consistent with complexes where the Pt(CN)4(2-) moiety is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the dianion-nucleobase complexes are measured to be 2.39-2.46 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers of the complexes are estimated to be between 1.9 and 2.1 eV, values that are lower than for the bare Pt(CN)4(2-) dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four dianion-nucleobase complexes and also in the 266 nm spectra of the Pt(CN)4(2-)·thymine and Pt(CN)4(2-)·adenine complexes. The selective excitation of these features in the 266 nm spectra is attributed to one-photon excitation of [Pt(CN)4(2-)·thymine]* and [Pt(CN)4(2-)·adenine]* long-lived excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment signals. We attribute the delayed electron detachment bands observed here for Pt(CN)4(2-)·thymine and Pt(CN)4(2-)·adenine but not for Pt(CN)4(2-)·uracil and Pt(CN)4(2-)·cytosine to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics following 266 nm excitation. This indicates that the Pt(CN)4(2-) dianion in the clusters can be viewed as a "dynamic tag" which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase displays a long-lived excited state.

  19. Electron Detachment as a Probe of Intrinsic Nucleobase Dynamics in Dianion-Nucleobase Clusters: Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Platinum II Cyanide Dianion Bound to Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine and Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ananya; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-08-05

    We report the first low-temperature photodetachment photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the platinum II cyanide dianion bound to nucleobases. These systems are model systems for understanding platinum-complex photodynamic therapies, and knowledge of the intrinsic photodetachment properties is crucial for understanding their broader photophysical properties. Well-resolved, distinct peaks are observed in the spectra consistent with the complexes where the Pt(CN)42- moiety is largely intact. The adiabatic electron detachment energies for the dianion-nucleobase complexes are measured to be between 2.39-2.46 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers of the complexes are estimated to be between 1.9 and 2.1 eV, values that are lower than for the bare Pt(CN)42- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photodetachment spectra of the four nucleobase-dianion complexes, and also in the 266 nm spectra of the Pt(CN)42-∙thymine and Pt(CN)42-∙adenine complexes. The selective excitation of these features in the 266 nm spectra is attributed to one-photon excitation of [Pt(CN)42-∙T]* and [Pt(CN)42-∙A]* long-lived excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment signals. We attribute the resonant electron detachment bands observed here for Pt(CN)42-∙T and Pt(CN)42-∙A but not for Pt(CN)42-∙U and Pt(CN)42-∙C to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics following 266 nm excitation. This indicates that the Pt(CN)42- dianion in the Pt(CN)42-∙M clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase disaplys a long-lived excited state.

  20. Vibrio cholerae NspS, a homologue of ABC-type periplasmic solute binding proteins, facilitates transduction of polyamine signals independent of their transport

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, Steven R.; Rutkovsky, Alex C.; Zayner, Josiah P.; Cooper, Rebecca E.; Porter, Lindsay R.; Pendergraft, Sam S.; Parker, Zach M.; McGinnis, Marcus W.

    2014-01-01

    The polyamines norspermidine and spermidine are among the environmental signals that regulate Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation. The effects of these polyamines are mediated by NspS, a member of the bacterial periplasmic solute binding protein superfamily. Almost all members of this superfamily characterized to date are components of ATP-binding cassette-type transporters involved in nutrient uptake. Consequently, in the current annotation of the V. cholerae genome, NspS has been assigned a function in transport. The objective of this study was to further characterize NspS and investigate its potential role in transport. Our results support a role for NspS in signal transduction in response to norspermidine and spermidine, but not their transport. In addition, we provide evidence that these polyamine signals are processed by c-di-GMP signalling networks in the cell. Furthermore, we present comparative genomics analyses which reveal the presence of NspS-like proteins in a variety of bacteria, suggesting that periplasmic ligand binding proteins may be widely utilized for sensory transduction. PMID:24530989

  1. Transporter oligomerization: form and function

    PubMed Central

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Cameron, Alexander D.; Diallinas, George; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Transporters are integral membrane proteins with central roles in the efficient movement of molecules across biological membranes. Many transporters exist as oligomers in the membrane. Depending on the individual transport protein, oligomerization can have roles in membrane trafficking, function, regulation and turnover. For example, our recent studies on UapA, a nucleobase ascorbate transporter, from Aspergillus nidulans, have revealed both that dimerization of this protein is essential for correct trafficking to the membrane and the structural basis of how one UapA protomer can affect the function of the closely associated adjacent protomer. Here, we review the roles of oligomerization in many particularly well-studied transporters and transporter families. PMID:27913684

  2. Identification of a Stelar-Localized Transport Protein That Facilitates Root-to-Shoot Transfer of Chloride in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Baumann, Ute; Hrmova, Maria; Evrard, Aurelie; Johnson, Alexander A.T.; Birnbaum, Kenneth D.; Mayo, Gwenda M.; Jha, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Under saline conditions, higher plants restrict the accumulation of chloride ions (Cl–) in the shoot by regulating their transfer from the root symplast into the xylem-associated apoplast. To identify molecular mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon, we undertook a transcriptional screen of salt stressed Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots. Microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter-GUS fusions identified a candidate gene involved in Cl– xylem loading from the Nitrate transporter 1/Peptide Transporter family (NPF2.4). This gene was highly expressed in the root stele compared to the cortex, and its expression decreased after exposure to NaCl or abscisic acid. NPF2.4 fused to fluorescent proteins, expressed either transiently or stably, was targeted to the plasma membrane. Electrophysiological analysis of NPF2.4 in Xenopus laevis oocytes suggested that NPF2.4 catalyzed passive Cl– efflux out of cells and was much less permeable to NO3−. Shoot Cl– accumulation was decreased following NPF2.4 artificial microRNA knockdown, whereas it was increased by overexpression of NPF2.4. Taken together, these results suggest that NPF2.4 is involved in long-distance transport of Cl– in plants, playing a role in the loading and the regulation of Cl– loading into the xylem of Arabidopsis roots during salinity stress. PMID:26662602

  3. Lutein transport by Caco-2 TC-7 cells occurs partly by a facilitated process involving the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI).

    PubMed

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Abou, Lydia; Mikail, Céline; Ghiringhelli, Odette; André, Marc; Portugal, Henri; Jourdheuil-Rahmani, Dominique; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Lairon, Denis; Borel, Patrick

    2005-04-15

    The carotenoid lutein is thought to play a role in the human eye and to protect against age-related macular degeneration. Lutein transport in the human intestine has not been characterized. We examined lutein transport processes using Caco-2 TC-7 monolayers as a model for human intestinal epithelium. Purified lutein was mixed with phospholipids, lysophospholipids, cholesterol, mono-olein, oleic acid and taurocholate to obtain lutein-rich mixed micelles that mimicked those found under physiological conditions. The micelles were added to the apical side of Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers for 30 min or 3 h at 37 degrees C. Absorbed lutein, i.e. the sum of lutein recovered in the scraped cells and in the basolateral chamber, was quantified by HPLC. Transport rate was measured (i) as a function of time (from 15 to 60 min), (ii) as a function of micellar lutein concentration (from 1.5 to 15 microM), (iii) at 4 degrees C, (iv) in the basolateral to apical direction, (v) after trypsin pretreatment, (vi) in the presence of beta-carotene and/or lycopene, (vii) in the presence of increasing concentrations of antibody against SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B type 1) and (viii) in the presence of increasing concentrations of a chemical inhibitor of the selective transfer of lipids mediated by SR-BI, i.e. BLT1 (blocks lipid transport 1). The rate of transport of lutein as a function of time and as a function of concentration was saturable. It was significantly lower at 4 degrees C than at 37 degrees C (approx. 50%), in the basal to apical direction than in the opposite direction (approx. 85%), and after trypsin pretreatment (up to 45%). Co-incubation with beta-carotene, but not lycopene, decreased the lutein absorption rate (approx. 20%) significantly. Anti-SR-BI antibody and BLT1 significantly impaired the absorption rate (approx. 30% and 57% respectively). Overall, these results indicate that lutein absorption is, at least partly, protein-mediated and that some lutein is taken up

  4. Lutein transport by Caco-2 TC-7 cells occurs partly by a facilitated process involving the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The carotenoid lutein is thought to play a role in the human eye and to protect against age-related macular degeneration. Lutein transport in the human intestine has not been characterized. We examined lutein transport processes using Caco-2 TC-7 monolayers as a model for human intestinal epithelium. Purified lutein was mixed with phospholipids, lysophospholipids, cholesterol, mono-olein, oleic acid and taurocholate to obtain lutein-rich mixed micelles that mimicked those found under physiological conditions. The micelles were added to the apical side of Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers for 30 min or 3 h at 37 °C. Absorbed lutein, i.e. the sum of lutein recovered in the scraped cells and in the basolateral chamber, was quantified by HPLC. Transport rate was measured (i) as a function of time (from 15 to 60 min), (ii) as a function of micellar lutein concentration (from 1.5 to 15 μM), (iii) at 4 °C, (iv) in the basolateral to apical direction, (v) after trypsin pretreatment, (vi) in the presence of β-carotene and/or lycopene, (vii) in the presence of increasing concentrations of antibody against SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B type 1) and (viii) in the presence of increasing concentrations of a chemical inhibitor of the selective transfer of lipids mediated by SR-BI, i.e. BLT1 (blocks lipid transport 1). The rate of transport of lutein as a function of time and as a function of concentration was saturable. It was significantly lower at 4 °C than at 37 °C (approx. 50%), in the basal to apical direction than in the opposite direction (approx. 85%), and after trypsin pretreatment (up to 45%). Co-incubation with β-carotene, but not lycopene, decreased the lutein absorption rate (approx. 20%) significantly. Anti-SR-BI antibody and BLT1 significantly impaired the absorption rate (approx. 30% and 57% respectively). Overall, these results indicate that lutein absorption is, at least partly, protein-mediated and that some lutein is taken up through SR

  5. Americium, Cesium, and Plutonium Colloid-Facilitated Transport in a Groundwater/Bentonite/Fracture Fill Material System: Column Experiments and Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Boukhalfa, H.; Reimus, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of desorption kinetics and colloid transport on radionuclides with different sorption affinities. We focused on quantifying transport mechanisms important for upscaling in time and distance. This will help determine the long-term fate and transport of radionuclides to aid in risk assessments. We selected a fractured/weathered granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland as a model crystalline rock repository system because the system has been thoroughly studied and field experiments involving radionuclides have already been conducted. Working on this system provides a unique opportunity to compare lab experiments with field-scale observations. Weathered fracture fill material (FFM) and bentonite used as backfill at the GTS were characterized (e.g., BET, SEM/EDS, QXRD), and batch and breakthrough column experiments were conducted. Solutions were prepared in synthetic groundwaters that matched the natural water chemistry. FFM samples were crushed, rinsed, sieved (150-355 μm), and equilibrated with synthetic groundwater. Bentonite was crushed, sodium-saturated, equilibrated with synthetic groundwater, and settled to yield a stable suspension. Suspensions were equilibrated with Am, Cs, or Pu. All experiments were conducted with Teflon®materials to limit sorption to system components. After radionuclide/colloid injections reached stability, radionuclide-free solutions were injected to observe the desorption and release behavior. Aliquots of effluent were measured for pH, colloid concentration, and total and dissolved radionuclides. Unanalyzed effluent from the first column was then injected through a second column of fresh material. The process was repeated for a third column and the results of all three breakthrough curves were modeled with a multi-site/multi-rate MATLAB code to elucidate the sorption rate coefficients and binding site densities of the bentonite colloids and

  6. Automated quantum chemistry based molecular dynamics simulations of electron ionization induced fragmentations of the nucleobases Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Guanine.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Stefan; Bauer, Christopher Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase decomposition pathways of electron ionization (EI)-induced radical cations of the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and guanine are investigated by means of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. No preconceived fragmentation channels are used in the calculations. The results compare well to a plethora of experimental and theoretical data for these important biomolecules. With our combined stochastic and dynamic approach, one can access in an unbiased way the energetically available decomposition mechanisms. Additionally, we are able to separate the EI mass spectra of different tautomers of cytosine and guanine. Our method (previously termed quantum chemistry electron ionization mass spectra) reproduces free nucleobase experimental mass spectra well and provides detailed mechanistic in-sight into high-energy unimolecular decomposition processes.

  7. A search for amino acids and nucleobases in the Martian meteorite Roberts Massif 04262 using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Baker, Eleni M.; Smith, Karen E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2013-05-01

    The investigation into whether Mars contains signatures of past or present life is of great interest to science and society. Amino acids and nucleobases are compounds that are essential for all known life on Earth and are excellent target molecules in the search for potential Martian biomarkers or prebiotic chemistry. Martian meteorites represent the only samples from Mars that can be studied directly in the laboratory on Earth. Here, we analyzed the amino acid and nucleobase content of the shergottite Roberts Massif (RBT) 04262 using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We did not detect any nucleobases above our detection limit in formic acid extracts; however, we did measure a suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids in hot-water extracts with high relative abundances of β-alanine and γ-amino-n-butyric acid. The presence of only low (to absent) levels of several proteinogenic amino acids and a lack of nucleobases suggest that this meteorite fragment is fairly uncontaminated with respect to these common biological compounds. The distribution of straight-chained amine-terminal n-ω-amino acids in RBT 04262 resembled those previously measured in thermally altered carbonaceous meteorites (Burton et al. 2012; Chan et al. 2012). A carbon isotope ratio of -24‰ ± 6‰ for β-alanine in RBT 04262 is in the range of reduced organic carbon previously measured in Martian meteorites (Steele et al. 2012). The presence of n-ω-amino acids may be due to a high temperature Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis during igneous processing on Mars or impact ejection of the meteorites from Mars, but more experimental data are needed to support these hypotheses.

  8. Real-time analysis of self-assembled nucleobases by Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Na, Na; Shi, Ruixia; Long, Zi; Lu, Xin; Jiang, Fubin; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the real-time analysis of self-assembled nucleobases was employed by Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry (V-EASI-MS). With the analysis of three nucleobases including 6-methyluracil (6MU), uracil (U) and thymine (T) as examples, different orders of clusters centered with different metal ions were recorded in both positive and negative modes. Compared with the results obtained by traditional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) under the same condition, more clusters with high orders, such as [6MU7+Na](+), [6MU15+2NH4](2+), [6MU10+Na](+), [T7+Na](+), and [T15+2NH4](2+) were detected by V-EASI-MS, which demonstrated the soft ionization ability of V-EASI for studying the non-covalent interaction in a self-assembly process. Furthermore, with the injection of K(+) to the system by a syringe pumping, the real-time monitoring of the formation of nucleobases clusters was achieved by the direct extraction of samples from the system under the Venturi effect. Therefore, the effect of cations on the formation of clusters during self-assembly of nucleobases was demonstrated, which was in accordance with the reports. Free of high voltage, heating or radiation during the ionization, this technique is much soft and suitable for obtaining the real-time information of the self-assembly system, which also makes it quite convenient for extraction samples from the reaction system. This "easy and soft" ionization technique has provided a potential pathway for monitoring and controlling the self-assembly processes.

  9. A Search for Amino Acids and Nucleobases in the Martian Meteorite Roberts Massif 04262 Using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Burton, Aaron S.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Baker, Eleni M.; Smith, Karen E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation into whether Mars contains signatures of past or present life is of great interest to science and society. Amino acids and nucleobases are compounds that are essential for all known life on Earth and are excellent target molecules in the search for potential Martian biomarkers or prebiotic chemistry. Martian meteorites represent the only samples from Mars that can be studied directly in the laboratory on Earth. Here, we analyzed the amino acid and nucleobase content of the shergottite Roberts Massif (RBT) 04262 using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We did not detect any nucleobases above our detection limit in formic acid extracts; however, we did measure a suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids in hot-water extracts with high relative abundances of beta-alanine and gamma-amino-eta-butyric acid. The presence of only low (to absent) levels of several proteinogenic amino acids and a lack of nucleobases suggest that this meteorite fragment is fairly uncontaminated with respect to these common biological compounds. The distribution of straight-chained amine-terminal eta-omega-amino acids in RBT 04262 resembled those previously measured in thermally altered carbonaceous meteorites. A carbon isotope ratio of -24(0/00) +/- 6(0/00) for beta-alanine in RBT 04262 is in the range of reduced organic carbon previously measured in Martian meteorites (Steele et al. 2012). The presence of eta-omega-amino acids may be due to a high temperature Fischer-Tropschtype synthesis during igneous processing on Mars or impact ejection of the meteorites from Mars, but more experimental data are needed to support these hypotheses.

  10. Facilitated transport of Mn2+ in sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells and excised maize root tips. A comparative 31P n.m.r. study in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Roby, C; Bligny, R; Douce, R; Tu, S I; Pfeffer, P E

    1988-01-01

    Movement of paramagnetic Mn2+ into sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells has been indirectly examined by observing the line broadening exhibited in its 31P n.m.r. spectra. Mn2+ was observed to pass into the vacuole, while exhibiting a very minor accumulation in the cytoplasm. With time, gradual leakage of phosphate from the vacuole to the cytoplasm was observed along with an increase in glucose-6-phosphate. Anoxia did not appear to affect the relative distribution of Mn2+ in the cytoplasm and vacuole. Under hypoxic conditions restriction of almost all movement of Mn2+ across the plasmalemma as well as the tonoplast was observed. In contrast, maize root tips showed entry and complete complexation of nucleotide triphosphate by Mn2+ during hypoxia. The rate of passage of Mn2+ across the tonoplast in both sycamore and maize root cells is approximately the same. However, the rates of facilitated movement across the respective plasma membranes appear to differ. More rapid movement of Mn2+ across the plasmalemma in maize root tip cells allows a gradual build-up of metal ion in the cytoplasm prior to its diffusion across the tonoplast. Sycamore cells undergo a slower uptake of Mn2+ into their cytoplasms (comparable with the rate of diffusion through the tonoplast), so little or no observable accumulation of Mn2+ is observed in this compartment. PMID:3415663

  11. Determination of DNA adducts by combining acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and chromatographic analysis of the carcinogen-modified nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Leung, Elvis M K; Deng, Kailin; Wong, Tin-Yan; Chan, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The commonly used method of analyzing carcinogen-induced DNA adducts involves the hydrolysis of carcinogen-modified DNA samples by using a mixture of enzymes, followed by (32)P-postlabeling or liquid chromatography (LC)-based analyses of carcinogen-modified mononucleotides/nucleosides. In the present study, we report the development and application of a new approach to DNA adduct analysis by combining the H(+)/heat-catalyzed release of carcinogen-modified nucleobases and the use of LC-based methods to analyze DNA adducts. Results showed that heating the carcinogen-modified DNA samples at 70 °C for an extended period of 4 to 6 h in the presence of 0.05% HCl can efficiently induce DNA depurination, releasing the intact carcinogen-modified nucleobases for LC analyses. After optimizing the hydrolysis conditions, DNA samples with C8- and N (2) -modified 2'-deoxyguanosine, as well as N (6) -modified 2'-deoxyadenosine, were synthesized by reacting DNA with 1-nitropyrene, acetaldehyde, and aristolochic acids, respectively. These samples were then hydrolyzed, and the released nucleobase adducts were analyzed using LC-based analytical methods. Analysis results demonstrated a dose-dependent release of target DNA adducts from carcinogen-modified DNA samples, indicating that the developed H(+)/heat-catalyzed hydrolysis method was quantitative. Comparative studies with enzymatic digestion method on carcinogen-modified DNA samples revealed that the two hydrolysis methods did not yield systematically different results.

  12. Environment influences on the aromatic character of nucleobases and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Szefler, Beata

    2010-01-01

    Geometric (HOMA) and magnetic (NICS) indices of aromaticity were estimated for aromatic rings of amino acids and nucleobases. Cartesian coordinates were taken directly either from PDB files deposited in public databases at the finest resolution available (≤1.5 Å), or from structures resulting from full gradient geometry optimization in a hybrid QM/MM approach. Significant environmental effects imposing alterations of HOMA values were noted for all aromatic rings analysed. Furthermore, even extra fine resolution (≤1.0 Å) is not sufficient for direct estimation of HOMA values based on Cartesian coordinates provided by PDB files. The values of mean bond errors seem to be much higher than the 0.05 Å often reported for PDB files. The use of quantum chemistry geometry optimization is strongly advised; even a simple QM/MM model comprising only the aromatic substructure within the QM region and the rest of biomolecule treated classically within the MM framework proved to be a promising means of describing aromaticity inside native environments. According to the results presented, three consequences of the interaction with the environment can be observed that induce changes in structural and magnetic indices of aromaticity. First, broad ranges of HOMA or NICS values are usually obtained for different conformations of nearest neighborhood. Next, these values and their means can differ significantly from those characterising isolated monomers. The most significant increase in aromaticities is expected for the six-membered rings of guanine, thymine and cytosine. The same trend was also noticed for all amino acids inside proteins but this effect was much smaller, reaching the highest value for the five-membered ring of tryptophan. Explicit water solutions impose similar changes on HOMA and NICS distributions. Thus, environment effects of protein, DNA and even explicit water molecules are non-negligible sources of aromaticity changes appearing in the rings of

  13. An effective approach to artificial nucleases using copper(II) complexes bearing nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Tao; Xia, Qing; Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Huo-Yan; Chao, Hui; Mao, Zong-Wan; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2010-02-28

    Novel copper(ii) complexes bearing 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) derivatives with adenine, thymine and uracil nucleobases [Cu(L(1))Cl(2)].2H(2)O (1), [Cu(L(2))Cl(2)] (2) and [Cu(L(3))Cl(2)].H(2)O (3) (L(1) = 5,5'-Di[N9-adenylmethyl]-2,2'-bipyridine, L(2) = 5,5'-Di[N1-thyminylmethyl]-2,2'-bipyridine and L(3) = 5,5'-Di[N1-uracilmethyl]-2,2'-bipyridine) were synthesized and characterized. Structure simulation was performed for these complexes. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra revealed the interactions between these ligands and pBR322 DNA and showed that the local DNA structure was perturbed by these ligands. Cleavage of pBR322 DNA by these complexes was carried out in 20 mM HEPES (pH 7.5) at 37 degrees C. The calculated pseudo-Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters (k(cat)) were 14.7 +/- 0.6 and 40.4 +/- 1.3 h(-1) for and . The cleavage efficiency of was 80-fold higher than that of its simple analogue [Cu(bpy)Cl(2)] (k(cat) = 0.50 h(-1)) and very close to the catalytic rate constant of natural EcoRI endonuclease (k(cat) = 43.2 h(-1)) at similar conditions. Thus, complex might be one of the most effective artificial nucleases that could catalyze double-stranded DNA hydrolytic cleavage so far. Hydrolytic mechanisms involved in DNA cleavage were explored using radical scavengers and T4 ligase. Competitive experiments with special binding agents showed that complexes could preferentially bind to the minor groove of double-stranded DNA, suggesting specific DNA binding characteristics. Molecular docking calculations also indicated that complexes could bind to the minor groove of targeted DNA much more strongly than their simple analogues and preferentially bind at the AT region of the dodecamer. Such high DNA cleavage ability and selectivity of these copper(ii) complexes could be attributed to the synergic effects of the metal center and the pendant nucleobases.

  14. Monitoring of event-based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport in field and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Egner, Marius; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to mobilization of suspended particles which typically occurs during floods. Since the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants such as PAHs, PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. Online turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) would then also allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics if once calibrated against TSS and total pollutant concentrations for a given catchment. In this study, distinct flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting sub-catchments of the River Neckar in Southwest Germany (Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar itself and investigated for the total amount of PAHs and TSS in water; turbidity (NTU) and grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined as well. Laboratory experiments were performed with natural river bed sediments from different locations (Ammer) to investigate PAH concentrations, TSS and turbidity during sedimentation of suspended particles under controlled conditions (yielding smaller and smaller suspended particles and TSS with time). Laboratory and field results agreed very well and showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the field samples and up to 8000 NTU in lab experiments. This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on turbidity measurements and TSS vs. PAHs relationships - even for high turbidity values observed during flood events (>2000 NTU). Total PAH concentrations on suspended solids were independent of grain size of suspended particles. This implies that for the rivers investigated the sorption capacity of particles did not change significantly during the observed events.

  15. Preliminary studies on unusual polymorphs of thymine: Structural comparison with other nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennuru, Ramanaiah; Muthudoss, Prakash; Ramakrishnan, Srividya; Mohammad, Amjad Basha; Ravi Chandra Babu, R.; Mahapatra, Sudarshan; Nayak, Susanta K.

    2016-09-01

    Two polymorphs Form-R2 and Form-R4 of anhydrous thymine, one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid of DNA were obtained via sublimation crystallization and desolvation technique respectively. Form-R2 crystallizes in monoclinic C 2/c with a = 25.107(7) Å, b = 6.846(2) Å, c = 6.715(2) Å, β = 90.529(6)⁰ and V = 1154.1(5) Å3. The supramolecular assembly in Form-R2 is a sheet of hydrogen bonded network similar to that found in the crystal structures of other reported anhydrous form of thymine (Form-R1). Interestingly the thermal behavior is similar for these two forms with a minor difference in powder X-ray diffraction pattern. Further thymine Form-R2 closely matches with one of the predicted form of thymine using Polymorph module of Accelrys. Form-R4 is obtained by the dehydration of the mono hydrated form (Form-R3) and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopic techniques and thermal analysis.

  16. Determination of pKa values for deprotonable nucleobases in short model oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    González-Olvera, Julio C; Martínez-Reyes, José; González-Jasso, Eva; Pless, Reynaldo C

    2015-11-01

    The deprotonation of ionizable nucleobases centrally placed in short model oligonucleotides was examined under different physical conditions, using UV absorption spectroscopy. The oligonucleotide sequences were designed so that only the central base would be ionized over the pH range examined. pKa values of 9.90±0.01 and 9.34±0.04 were determined for the guanine group in the oligomer d-ACAGCAC and 2'-deoxyguanosine, respectively, both at 25°C and 0.1M NaCl. Lengthening the oligonucleotide up to the tridecamer stage further increases the pKa of the central guanine moiety. Electrolyte concentration, temperature, and mixed water-ethanol solvents affect the acidity of the central base. Changes in the sequence surrounding the central guanine can also have a significant effect, especially in the case of strongly stacking sequences. The pKa values were also determined for the hepta(2'-O-methyl)ribonucleotide and the heptamer PNA of identical sequence, as well as for oligodeoxyribonucleotides with different deprotonable bases, viz. thymine, uracil, or hypoxanthine, in the central position. The results are interpreted in terms of the electric-field effect exerted on the departing proton by the negative electric charges located on the internucleotide phosphate groups, and calculations show this effect to approximately explain the magnitude of the pKa difference observed between the deoxyriboheptanucleotide and its electroneutral PNA analogue.

  17. High-energy chemistry of formamide: A unified mechanism of nucleobase formation

    PubMed Central

    Ferus, Martin; Nesvorný, David; Šponer, Jiří; Kubelík, Petr; Michalčíková, Regina; Shestivská, Violetta; Šponer, Judit E.; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2015-01-01

    The coincidence of the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) period and the emergence of terrestrial life about 4 billion years ago suggest that extraterrestrial impacts could contribute to the synthesis of the building blocks of the first life-giving molecules. We simulated the high-energy synthesis of nucleobases from formamide during the impact of an extraterrestrial body. A high-power laser has been used to induce the dielectric breakdown of the plasma produced by the impact. The results demonstrate that the initial dissociation of the formamide molecule could produce a large amount of highly reactive CN and NH radicals, which could further react with formamide to produce adenine, guanine, cytosine, and uracil. Based on GC-MS, high-resolution FTIR spectroscopic results, as well as theoretical calculations, we present a comprehensive mechanistic model, which accounts for all steps taking place in the studied impact chemistry. Our findings thus demonstrate that extraterrestrial impacts, which were one order of magnitude more abundant during the LHB period than before and after, could not only destroy the existing ancient life forms, but could also contribute to the creation of biogenic molecules. PMID:25489115

  18. A general method for quantifying sequence effects on nucleobase oxidation in DNA.

    PubMed

    Margolin, Yelena; Dedon, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA has long been associated with aging and disease, with guanine serving as the primary target for oxidation owing to its low ionization potential. Emerging evidence points to a critical role for sequence context as a determinant of the guanine ionization potential and the associated chemical reactivity of the guanine, as well as the spectrum of damage products that arise from oxidation. Recent studies also suggest that the generally accepted model of oxidation hotspots in runs of guanine bases may not hold for biologically relevant oxidants. One of the primary methods used to address these important problems of sequence context utilizes gel electrophoresis to identify the location and quantity of base damage arising in model oligonucleotides. However, this approach has limited study to those agents that produce few strand breaks arising from deoxyribose oxidation, while ionizing radiation, Fenton chemistry and other biologically relevant oxidants produce sizeable proportions of both base and sugar damage. To this end, we have developed a universal method to quantify sequence context effects on nucleobase damage without interference by strand breaks from deoxyribose oxidation.

  19. Formation of Nucleobases from the UV Photo-Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, S. N.; Nuevo, M.; Sandford, S. A.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Astrochemistry laboratory simulations have shown that complex organic molecules including compounds of astrobiological interest can be formed under interstellarl/circumstellar conditions from the vacuum UV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs containing H2O, CO, CO2, CH3OH, NH13, etc. Of all prebiotic compounds, the formation of amino acids under such experimental conditions has been the most extensively studied. Although the presence of amino acids in the interstellar medium (ISM) has yet to be confirmed, they have been detected in meteorites, indicating that biomolecules and/or their precursors can be formed under extraterrestrial, abiotic conditions. Nucleobases, the building blocks of DNA and RNA, as well as other 1V-heterocycles, have also been detected in meteorites, but like amino acids, they have yet to be observed in the ISM. In this work, we present an experimental study of the formation of pyrimidine-based compounds from the UV photo-irradiation of pyrimidine in ice mixtures containing H2O, NH3, and/or CH3OH at low temperature and pressure.

  20. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:26750747

  1. High-resolution photoelectron spectra of the pyrimidine-type nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulfer, K. D.; Hardy, D.; Aguilar, A. A.; Poliakoff, E. D.

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution photoelectron spectra of the gas phase pyrimidine-type nucleobases, thymine, uracil, and cytosine, were collected using synchrotron radiation over the photon energy range 17 ≤ hν ≤ 150 eV. These data provide the highest resolution photoelectron spectra of thymine, uracil, and cytosine published to date. By comparing integrated regions of the energy dependent photoelectron spectra of thymine, the ionization potentials of the first four ionic states of thymine were estimated to be 8.8, 9.8, 10.3, and 10.8 eV. The thymine data also show evidence for low energy shape resonances in three of the outermost valence electronic states. Comparing the uracil spectrum with the thymine spectrum, the four outermost valence electronic states of uracil likely begin at binding energies 9.3, 9.9, 10.5, and 11.0 eV. High-resolution spectra indicate only one tautomeric form of cytosine contributes significantly to the spectrum with the four outermost valence electronic states beginning at binding energies 8.9, 9.9, 10.4, and 10.85 eV.

  2. Low-energy positron scattering from DNA nucleobases: the effects from permanent dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Jan; Gianturco, Francesco Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Ab initio quantum calculations for low-energy positron scattering from gas-phase isolated molecular nucleobases which are part of the DNA structure are presented and discussed over the range of 1 eV to 25 eV. The calculations report the integral cross sections (ICSs) and the momentum-transfer cross sections (MTCSs) for Adenine, Guanine, Thymine and Cytosine. The calculations show very clearly the important role of the dominant long-range interaction between the positron projectile and the permanent dipole-moments of the target molecules in deciding the relative sizes of the ICSs and MTCSs for the present series of molecules. Such results confirm the largely repulsive interaction between positron and DNA bases, which is nevertheless producing very large cross sections and marked deflection functions from the latter molecules. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Nano-scale Insights into Ion-beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Paulo Limão-Vieira and Malgorzata Smialek-Telega.

  3. An atlas of RNA base pairs involving modified nucleobases with optimal geometries and accurate energies.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Mohit; Oliva, Romina; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-08-18

    Posttranscriptional modifications greatly enhance the chemical information of RNA molecules, contributing to explain the diversity of their structures and functions. A significant fraction of RNA experimental structures available to date present modified nucleobases, with half of them being involved in H-bonding interactions with other bases, i.e. 'modified base pairs'. Herein we present a systematic investigation of modified base pairs, in the context of experimental RNA structures. To this end, we first compiled an atlas of experimentally observed modified base pairs, for which we recorded occurrences and structural context. Then, for each base pair, we selected a representative for subsequent quantum mechanics calculations, to find out its optimal geometry and interaction energy. Our structural analyses show that most of the modified base pairs are non Watson-Crick like and are involved in RNA tertiary structure motifs. In addition, quantum mechanics calculations quantify and provide a rationale for the impact of the different modifications on the geometry and stability of the base pairs they participate in.

  4. A Crystal Structure of a Functional RNA Molecule Containing an Artificial Nucleobase Pair.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Armando R; Shao, Yaming; Hoshika, Shuichi; Yang, Zunyi; Shelke, Sandip A; Herrou, Julien; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Kim, Myong-Jung; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Benner, Steven A

    2015-08-17

    As one of its goals, synthetic biology seeks to increase the number of building blocks in nucleic acids. While efforts towards this goal are well advanced for DNA, they have hardly begun for RNA. Herein, we present a crystal structure for an RNA riboswitch where a stem C:G pair has been replaced by a pair between two components of an artificially expanded genetic-information system (AEGIS), Z and P, (6-amino-5-nitro-2(1H)-pyridone and 2-amino-imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4-(8H)-one). The structure shows that the Z:P pair does not greatly change the conformation of the RNA molecule nor the details of its interaction with a hypoxanthine ligand. This was confirmed in solution by in-line probing, which also measured a 3.7 nM affinity of the riboswitch for guanine. These data show that the Z:P pair mimics the natural Watson-Crick geometry in RNA in the first example of a crystal structure of an RNA molecule that contains an orthogonal added nucleobase pair.

  5. Binding energies of nucleobase complexes: Relevance to homology recognition of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Sergio Cruz; Prentiss, Mara; Fyta, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The binding energies of complexes of DNA nucleobase pairs are evaluated using quantum mechanical calculations at the level of dispersion corrected density functional theory. We begin with Watson-Crick base pairs of singlets, duplets, and triplets and calculate their binding energies. At a second step, mismatches are incorporated into the Watson-Crick complexes in order to evaluate the variation in the binding energy with respect to the canonical Watson-Crick pairs. A linear variation of this binding energy with the degree of mismatching is observed. The binding energies for the duplets and triplets containing mismatches are further compared to the energies of the respective singlets in order to assess the degree of collectivity in these complexes. This study also suggests that mismatches do not considerably affect the energetics of canonical base pairs. Our work is highly relevant to the recognition process in DNA promoted through the RecA protein and suggests a clear distinction between recognition in singlets, and recognition in duplets or triplets. Our work assesses the importance of collectivity in the homology recognition of DNA.

  6. High-energy chemistry of formamide: a unified mechanism of nucleobase formation.

    PubMed

    Ferus, Martin; Nesvorný, David; Šponer, Jiří; Kubelík, Petr; Michalčíková, Regina; Shestivská, Violetta; Šponer, Judit E; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2015-01-20

    The coincidence of the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) period and the emergence of terrestrial life about 4 billion years ago suggest that extraterrestrial impacts could contribute to the synthesis of the building blocks of the first life-giving molecules. We simulated the high-energy synthesis of nucleobases from formamide during the impact of an extraterrestrial body. A high-power laser has been used to induce the dielectric breakdown of the plasma produced by the impact. The results demonstrate that the initial dissociation of the formamide molecule could produce a large amount of highly reactive CN and NH radicals, which could further react with formamide to produce adenine, guanine, cytosine, and uracil. Based on GC-MS, high-resolution FTIR spectroscopic results, as well as theoretical calculations, we present a comprehensive mechanistic model, which accounts for all steps taking place in the studied impact chemistry. Our findings thus demonstrate that extraterrestrial impacts, which were one order of magnitude more abundant during the LHB period than before and after, could not only destroy the existing ancient life forms, but could also contribute to the creation of biogenic molecules.

  7. High-resolution photoelectron spectra of the pyrimidine-type nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Fulfer, K D; Hardy, D; Aguilar, A A; Poliakoff, E D

    2015-06-14

    High-resolution photoelectron spectra of the gas phase pyrimidine-type nucleobases, thymine, uracil, and cytosine, were collected using synchrotron radiation over the photon energy range 17 ≤ hν ≤ 150 eV. These data provide the highest resolution photoelectron spectra of thymine, uracil, and cytosine published to date. By comparing integrated regions of the energy dependent photoelectron spectra of thymine, the ionization potentials of the first four ionic states of thymine were estimated to be 8.8, 9.8, 10.3, and 10.8 eV. The thymine data also show evidence for low energy shape resonances in three of the outermost valence electronic states. Comparing the uracil spectrum with the thymine spectrum, the four outermost valence electronic states of uracil likely begin at binding energies 9.3, 9.9, 10.5, and 11.0 eV. High-resolution spectra indicate only one tautomeric form of cytosine contributes significantly to the spectrum with the four outermost valence electronic states beginning at binding energies 8.9, 9.9, 10.4, and 10.85 eV.

  8. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring.

  9. Facilitating Facilitators: Enhancing PBL through a Structured Facilitator Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinitri, Francine D.; Wilhelm, Sheila M.; Crabtree, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing adoption of the problem-based learning (PBL) model, creative approaches to enhancing facilitator training and optimizing resources to maintain effective learning in small groups is essential. We describe a theoretical framework for the development of a PBL facilitator training program that uses the constructivist approach as the…

  10. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution.

  11. Electron ionization of the nucleobases adenine and hypoxanthine near the threshold: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Dawley, M Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Cantrell, William A; Plattner, Peter; Brinkmann, Nicole R; Scheier, Paul; Denifl, Stephan; Ptasińska, Sylwia

    2014-12-07

    Electron ionization of the DNA nucleobase, adenine, and the tRNA nucleobase, hypoxanthine, was investigated near the threshold region (∼5-20 eV) using a high-resolution hemispherical electron monochromator and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Ion efficiency curves of the threshold regions and the corresponding appearance energies (AEs) are presented for the parent cations and the five most abundant fragment cations of each molecule. The experimental ionization energies (IEs) of adenine and hypoxanthine were determined to be 8.70 ± 0.3 eV and 8.88 ± 0.5 eV, respectively. Quantum chemical calculations (B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p)) yielded a vertical IE of 8.08 eV and an adiabatic IE of 8.07 eV for adenine and a vertical IE of 8.51 eV and an adiabatic IE of 8.36 eV for hypoxanthine, and the lowest energy optimized structures of the fragment cations and their respective neutral species were calculated. The enthalpies of the possible reactions from the adenine and hypoxanthine cations were also obtained computationally, which assisted in determining the most likely electron ionization pathways leading to the major fragment cations. Our results suggest that the imidazole ring is more stable than the pyrimidine ring in several of the fragmentation reactions from both adenine and hypoxanthine. This electron ionization study contributes to the understanding of the biological effects of electrons on nucleobases and to the database of the electronic properties of biomolecules, which is necessary for modeling the damage of DNA in living cells that is induced by ionizing radiation.

  12. Solvation of nucleobases in 1,3-dialkylimidazolium acetate ionic liquids: NMR spectroscopy insights into the dissolution mechanism.

    PubMed

    Araújo, João M M; Ferreira, Rui; Marrucho, Isabel M; Rebelo, Luís P N

    2011-09-15

    NMR studies of uracil, thymine, and adenine dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate ([C(2)mim][CH(3)COO]) and 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate ([C(4)mim][CH(3)COO]) show that hydrogen bonds (HB) dictate the dissolution mechanism and that both cations and anions participate in the solvation process. For that, the 1,3-dialkylimidazolium acetate ionic liquids (ILs) were considered to be bifunctional solvation ionic liquids. In the solvation of uracil and thymine, the [CH(3)COO](-) anion favors the formation of hydrogen bonds with the hydrogen atoms of the N1-H and N3-H groups of the nucleobases, while the aromatic protons in the bulky cations ([C(2)mim](+) and [C(4)mim](+)), especially the most acidic H2, interact with the oxygen atoms of the carbonyl groups. In the adenine solvation, while the [CH(3)COO](-) anion favors the formation of hydrogen bonds with the hydrogen atoms of the amino and N9-H groups of adenine, the aromatic protons in the bulky cations ([C(2)mim](+) and [C(4)mim](+)), especially the most acidic H2, prefer to interact with the unprotonated nitrogen atoms (N1, N3, and N7) of adenine. It is clearly demonstrated that hydrogen bonding is the major driving force in the dissolution of nucleobases in 1,3-dialkylimidazolium acetate ILs. Our results show that the ionic liquid must be a good hydrogen bond acceptor and a moderate hydrogen bond donor to dissolve nucleic acid bases. To strengthen the evidence of the proposed mechanism, NMR studies in the absence of deuterated cosolvents have been used, because the use of deuterated solvents could seriously hinder the dissolving capability of the IL for nucleobases.

  13. Natural versus artificial creation of base pairs in DNA: origin of nucleobases from the perspectives of unnatural base pair studies.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Yamashige, Rie

    2012-12-18

    Since life began on Earth, the four types of bases (A, G, C, and T(U)) that form two sets of base pairs have remained unchanged as the components of nucleic acids that replicate and transfer genetic information. Throughout evolution, except for the U to T modification, the four base structures have not changed. This constancy within the genetic code raises the question of how these complicated nucleotides were generated from the molecules in a primordial soup on the early Earth. At some prebiotic stage, the complementarity of base pairs might have accelerated the generation and accumulation of nucleotides or oligonucleotides. We have no clues whether one pair of nucleobases initially appeared on the early Earth during this process or a set of two base pairs appeared simultaneously. Recently, researchers have developed new artificial pairs of nucleobases (unnatural base pairs) that function alongside the natural base pairs. Some unnatural base pairs in duplex DNA can be efficiently and faithfully amplified in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using thermostable DNA polymerases. The addition of unnatural base pair systems could expand the genetic alphabet of DNA, thus providing a new mechanism for the generation novel biopolymers by the site-specific incorporation of functional components into nucleic acids and proteins. Furthermore, the process of unnatural base pair development might provide clues to the origin of the natural base pairs in a primordial soup on the early Earth. In this Account, we describe the development of three representative types of unnatural base pairs that function as a third pair of nucleobases in PCR and reconsider the origin of the natural nucleic acids. As researchers developing unnatural base pairs, they use repeated "proof of concept" experiments. As researchers design new base pairs, they improve the structures that function in PCR and eliminate those that do not. We expect that this process is similar to the one functioning in the

  14. Absolute total and partial cross sections for ionization of nucleobases by proton impact in the Bragg peak velocity range

    SciTech Connect

    Tabet, J.; Eden, S.; Feil, S.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Ouaskit, S.; Maerk, T. D.

    2010-08-15

    We present experimental results for proton ionization of nucleobases (adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) based on an event-by-event analysis of the different ions produced combined with an absolute target density determination. We are able to disentangle in detail the various proton ionization channels from mass-analyzed product ion signals in coincidence with the charge-analyzed projectile. In addition we are able to determine a complete set of cross sections for the ionization of these molecular targets by 20-150 keV protons including the total and partial cross sections and the direct-ionization and electron-capture cross sections.

  15. Nucleobase-mediated, photocatalytic production of amphiphiles to promote the self-assembly of a simple self-replicating protocell.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Maurer, Sarah, E.; Albertsen, Anders, N.; Boncella, James, M.; Cape, Jonathan, L.

    replaced by a single nucleobase, 8-oxoguanine, which is tethered to one bipyridine ligand of the metal center. We report here the following major steps towards this chemical protocell: 1) the spontaneous formation of chemical structures consisting of decanoic acid, its precursor, and the simplified NA-ruthenium complexes. 2) the metabolism mediation by a nucleobase to effectively promote the photochemical amphiphile synthesis. 3) the demonstration of reaction selectivity dependent on the nature of the information molecule since only one specific nucleobase that has the required redox potential allows the metabolism to function. Finally, 4) the photochemical formation of amphiphiles can occur efficiently within a preformed membrane, i.e., the protocell compartment. The next step is the integration of short nucleic acid oligomers as opposed to a single nucleobase as the information material to study their photocatalytic activity mediation and polymerization.

  16. Solvent evaporation versus proton transfer in nucleobase-Pt(CN)(4,6)²⁻ dianion clusters: a collisional excitation and electronic laser photodissociation spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ananya; Luxford, Thomas F M; Yoshikawa, Naruo; Dessent, Caroline E H

    2014-08-07

    Isolated molecular clusters of adenine, cytosine, thymine and uracil with Pt(CN)6(2-) and Pt(CN)4(2-) were studied for the first time to characterize the binding and reactivity of isolated transition metal complex ions with nucleobases. These clusters represent model systems for understanding metal complex-DNA adducts, as a function of individual nucleobases. Collisional excitation revealed that the clusters decay on the ground electronic surface by either solvent evaporation (i.e. loss of a nucleobase unit from the cluster) or via proton transfer from the nucleobase to the dianion. The Pt(CN)6(2-)-nucleobase clusters decay only by solvent evaporation, while the Pt(CN)4(2-) clusters fragment by both pathways. The enhanced proton-transfer reactivity of Pt(CN)4(2-) is attributed to the higher charge-density of the ligands in this transition metal anion. % fragmentation curves of the clusters reveal that the adenine clusters display distinctively higher fragmentation onsets, which are traced to the propensity of adenine to form the shortest intercluster H-bond. We also present laser electronic photodissociation measurements for the Pt(CN)6(2-)·Ur, Pt(CN)4(2-)·Ur and Pt(CN)4(2-)·Ur2 clusters to illustrate the potential of exploring metal complex DNA photophysics as a function of nucleobase within well-defined gaseous clusters. The spectra reported herein represent the first such measurements. We find that the electronic excited states decay with production of the same fragments (associated with solvent evaporation and proton transfer) observed upon collisional excitation of the electronic ground state, indicating ultrafast deactivation of the excited-state uracil-localized chromophore followed by vibrational predissociation.

  17. Triplex-forming ability of oligonucleotides containing 1-aryl-1,2,3-triazole nucleobases linked via a two atom-length spacer.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yoshiyuki; Nakahara, Motoi; Obika, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    Phosphoramidites containing 2-propynyloxy or 1-butyn-4-yl as nucleobase precursors were synthesized and introduced into oligonucleotides using an automated DNA synthesizer. Copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of the oligonucleotides with various azides gave the corresponding triazolylated oligonucleotides, triplex-forming ability of these synthetic oligonucleotides with double-stranded DNA targets was evaluated by UV melting experiments. It was found that nucleobases containing 2-(1-m-carbonylaminophenyl-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)ethyl units likely interacted with A of a TA base pair in a parallel triplex DNA.

  18. Energy level alignment at the interfaces between typical electrodes and nucleobases: Al/adenine/indium-tin-oxide and Al/thymine/indium-tin-oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Younjoo; Lee, Hyunbok; Park, Soohyung; Yi, Yeonjin

    2012-12-03

    We investigated the interfacial electronic structures of Al/adenine/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) and Al/thymine/ITO using in situ ultraviolet and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Adenine shows both an interface dipole and level bending, whereas thymine shows only an interface dipole in contact with ITO. In addition, thymine possesses a larger ionization energy than adenine. These are understood with delocalized {pi} states confirmed with theoretical calculations. For the interface between nucleobases and Al, both nucleobases show a prominent reduction of the electron injection barrier from Al to each base in accordance with a downward level shift.

  19. 36 CFR 1192.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 1192.2 Section 1192.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION...

  20. 36 CFR 1192.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Equivalent facilitation. 1192.2 Section 1192.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION...

  1. 36 CFR 1192.2 - Equivalent facilitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Equivalent facilitation. 1192.2 Section 1192.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION...

  2. Fast Simultaneous Determination of 13 Nucleosides and Nucleobases in Cordyceps sinensis by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zong, Shi-Yu; Han, Han; Wang, Bing; Li, Ning; Dong, Tina Ting-Xia; Zhang, Tong; Tsim, Karl W K

    2015-12-04

    A reliable ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS) method for the fast simultaneous determination of 13 nucleosides and nucleobases in Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) with 2-chloroadenosine as internal standard was developed and validated. Samples were ultrasonically extracted in an ice bath thrice, and the optimum analyte separation was performed on an ACQUITY UPLC(TM) HSS C18 column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.8 μm) with gradient elution. All targeted analytes were separated in 5.5 min. Furthermore, all calibration curves showed good linear regression (r > 0.9970) within the test ranges, and the limits of quantitation and detection of the 13 analytes were less than 150 and 75 ng/mL, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of intra- and inter-day precisions were <6.23%. Recoveries of the quantified analytes ranged within 85.3%-117.3%, with RSD < 6.18%. The developed UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS method was successfully applied to determine nucleosides and nucleobases in 11 batches of C. sinensis samples from different regions in China. The range for the total content in the analyzed samples was 1329-2057 µg/g.

  3. Ultrafast Dynamics of a Nucleobase Analogue Illuminated by a Short Intense X-ray Free Electron Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, K.; Motomura, K.; Kukk, E.; Fukuzawa, H.; Wada, S.; Tachibana, T.; Ito, Y.; Mondal, S.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Koga, R.; Ohmura, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Kanno, M.; Rudenko, A.; Nicolas, C.; Liu, X.-J.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, J.; Anand, M.; Jiang, Y. H.; Kim, D.-E.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Kono, H.; Miron, C.; Yao, M.; Ueda, K.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding x-ray radiation damage is a crucial issue for both medical applications of x rays and x-ray free-electron-laser (XFEL) science aimed at molecular imaging. Decrypting the charge and fragmentation dynamics of nucleobases, the smallest units of a macro-biomolecule, contributes to a bottom-up understanding of the damage via cascades of phenomena following x-ray exposure. We investigate experimentally and by numerical simulations the ultrafast radiation damage induced on a nucleobase analogue (5-iodouracil) by an ultrashort (10 fs) high-intensity radiation pulse generated by XFEL at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron Laser (SACLA). The present study elucidates a plausible underlying radiosensitizing mechanism of 5-iodouracil. This mechanism is independent of the exact composition of 5-iodouracil and thus relevant to other such radiosensitizers. Furthermore, we found that despite a rapid increase of the net molecular charge in the presence of iodine, and of the ultrafast release of hydrogen, the other atoms are almost frozen within the 10-fs duration of the exposure. This validates single-shot molecular imaging as a consistent approach, provided the radiation pulse used is brief enough.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Facilitated Transport Membranes Composed of Chitosan-Styrene and Chitosan-Acrylonitrile Copolymers Modified by Methylimidazolium Based Ionic Liquids for CO2 Separation from CH4 and N2

    PubMed Central

    Otvagina, Ksenia V.; Mochalova, Alla E.; Sazanova, Tatyana S.; Petukhov, Anton N.; Moskvichev, Alexandr A.; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V.; Afonso, Carlos A. M.; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V.

    2016-01-01

    CO2 separation was found to be facilitated by transport membranes based on novel chitosan (CS)–poly(styrene) (PS) and chitosan (CS)–poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) copolymer matrices doped with methylimidazolium based ionic liquids: [bmim][BF4], [bmim][PF6], and [bmim][Tf2N] (IL). CS plays the role of biodegradable film former and selectivity promoter. Copolymers were prepared implementing the latest achievements in radical copolymerization with chosen monomers, which enabled the achievement of outstanding mechanical strength values for the CS-based membranes (75–104 MPa for CS-PAN and 69–75 MPa for CS-PS). Ionic liquid (IL) doping affected the surface and mechanical properties of the membranes as well as the gas separation properties. The highest CO2 permeability 400 Barrers belongs to CS-b-PS/[bmim][BF4]. The highest selectivity α (CO2/N2) = 15.5 was achieved for CS-b-PAN/[bmim][BF4]. The operational temperature of the membranes is under 220 °C. PMID:27294964

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Facilitated Transport Membranes Composed of Chitosan-Styrene and Chitosan-Acrylonitrile Copolymers Modified by Methylimidazolium Based Ionic Liquids for CO₂ Separation from CH₄ and N₂.

    PubMed

    Otvagina, Ksenia V; Mochalova, Alla E; Sazanova, Tatyana S; Petukhov, Anton N; Moskvichev, Alexandr A; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V; Afonso, Carlos A M; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V

    2016-06-09

    CO₂ separation was found to be facilitated by transport membranes based on novel chitosan (CS)-poly(styrene) (PS) and chitosan (CS)-poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) copolymer matrices doped with methylimidazolium based ionic liquids: [bmim][BF₄], [bmim][PF₆], and [bmim][Tf₂N] (IL). CS plays the role of biodegradable film former and selectivity promoter. Copolymers were prepared implementing the latest achievements in radical copolymerization with chosen monomers, which enabled the achievement of outstanding mechanical strength values for the CS-based membranes (75-104 MPa for CS-PAN and 69-75 MPa for CS-PS). Ionic liquid (IL) doping affected the surface and mechanical properties of the membranes as well as the gas separation properties. The highest CO₂ permeability 400 Barrers belongs to CS-b-PS/[bmim][BF₄]. The highest selectivity α (CO₂/N₂) = 15.5 was achieved for CS-b-PAN/[bmim][BF₄]. The operational temperature of the membranes is under 220 °C.

  6. Connectivity patterns and rotamer states of nucleobases determine acid-base properties of metalated purine quartets.

    PubMed

    Lüth, Marc Sven; Freisinger, Eva; Kampf, Gunnar; Garijo Anorbe, Marta; Griesser, Rolf; Operschall, Bert P; Sigel, Helmut; Lippert, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Potentiometric pH titrations and pD dependent (1)H NMR spectroscopy have been applied to study the acidification of the exocyclic amino group of adenine (A) model nucleobases (N9 position blocked by alkyl groups) when carrying trans-a2Pt(II) (with a=NH3 or CH3NH2) entities both at N1 and N7 positions. As demonstrated, in trinuclear complexes containing central A-Pt-A units, it depends on the connectivity pattern of the adenine bases (N7/N7 or N1/N1) and their rotamer states (head-head or head-tail), how large the acidifying effect is. Specifically, a series of trinuclear complexes with (A-N7)-Pt-(N7-A) and (A-N1)-Pt-(N1-A) cross-linking patterns and terminal 9-alkylguanine ligands (9MeGH, 9EtGH) have been analyzed in this respect, and it is shown that, for example, the 9MeA ligands in trans-,trans-,trans-[Pt(NH3)2(N7-9MeA-N1)2{Pt(NH3)2(9EtGH-N7)}2](ClO4)6·6H2O (4a) and trans-,trans-,trans-[Pt(NH3)2(N7-9EtA-N1)2{Pt(CH3NH2)2(9-MeGH-N7)}2](ClO4)6·3H2O (4b) are more acidic, by ca. 1.3 units (first pKa), than the linkage isomer trans-,trans-,trans-[Pt(CH3NH2)2(N1-9MeA-N7)2{Pt(NH3)2(9MeGH-N7)}2](NO3)6·6.25H2O (1b). Overall, acidifications in these types of complexes amount to 7-9 units, bringing the pKa values of such adenine ligands in the best case close to the physiological pH range. Comparison with pKa values of related trinuclear Pt(II) complexes having different co-ligands at the Pt ions, confirms this picture and supports our earlier proposal that the close proximity of the exocyclic amino groups in a head-head arrangement of (A-N7)-Pt-(N7-A), and the stabilization of the resulting N6H(-)⋯H2N6 unit, is key to this difference.

  7. HILIC-UPLC-MS/MS combined with hierarchical clustering analysis to rapidly analyze and evaluate nucleobases and nucleosides in Ginkgo biloba leaves.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Zhou, Guisheng; Tang, Yuping; Guo, Sheng; Qian, Dawei; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2015-02-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been widely used in dietary supplements and more recently in some foods and beverages. In addition to the well-known flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones, G. biloba leaves are also rich in nucleobases and nucleosides. To determine the content of nucleobases and nucleosides in G. biloba leaves at trace levels, a reliable method has been established by using hydrophilic interaction ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-UPLC-TQ-MS/MS) working in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Eleven nucleobases and nucleosides were simultaneously determined in seven min. The proposed method was fully validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, and repeatability, as well as recovery. Furthermore, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) was performed to evaluate and classify the samples according to the contents of the eleven chemical constituents. The established approach could be helpful for evaluation of the potential values as dietary supplements and the quality control of G. biloba leaves, which might also be utilized for the investigation of other medicinal herbs containing nucleobases and nucleosides.

  8. Double-coding nucleic acids: introduction of a nucleobase sequence in the major groove of the DNA duplex using double-headed nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Sorinas, Antoni Figueras; Nielsen, Lise J; Slot, Maria; Skytte, Kirstine; Nielsen, Annie S; Jensen, Michael D; Sharma, Pawan K; Vester, Birte; Petersen, Michael; Nielsen, Poul

    2014-09-05

    A series of double-headed nucleosides were synthesized using the Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction. In the reactions, additional nucleobases (thymine, cytosine, adenine, or guanine) were attached to the 5-position of 2'-deoxyuridine or 2'-deoxycytidine through a propyne linker. The modified nucleosides were incorporated into oligonucleotides, and these were combined in different duplexes that were analyzed by thermal denaturation studies. All of the monomers were well tolerated in the DNA duplexes and induced only small changes in the thermal stability. Consecutive incorporations of the monomers led to increases in duplex stability owing to increased stacking interactions. The modified nucleotide monomers maintained the Watson-Crick base pair fidelity. Stable duplexes were observed with heavily modified oligonucleotides featuring 14 consecutive incorporations of different double-headed nucleotide monomers. Thus, modified duplexes with an array of nucleobases on the exterior of the duplex were designed. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that the additional nucleobases could expose their Watson-Crick and/or Hoogsteen faces for recognition in the major groove. This presentation of nucleobases may find applications in providing molecular information without unwinding the duplex.

  9. 2',4'-BNA bearing a chiral guanidinopyrrolidine-containing nucleobase with potent ability to recognize the CG base pair in a parallel-motif DNA triplex.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yoshiyuki; Akabane, Masaaki; Obika, Satoshi

    2013-08-28

    In order to expand the target sequence used in triplex DNA formation, seven novel nucleotide analogues were synthesized and incorporated into triplex-forming oligonucleotides by post-elongation modification approaches. Among them, , equipped with a suitable restricted conformation of sugar and nucleobase moieties, was found to have the highest sequence-selectivity and affinity towards CG base pairs within double-stranded DNA.

  10. Controlled synthesis of Pt nanoparticles array through electroreduction of cisplatin bound at nucleobases terminated surface and application into H2O2 sensing.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shujun; Guo, Qingqing; Yue, Qiaoli; Wang, Lei; Wang, Huaisheng; Zhao, Jinsheng; Dong, Ruixin; Liu, Jifeng; Jia, Jianbo

    2011-01-15

    Fabrication of sub-monolayer array of Pt nanoparticles (PtNPs) assembled at nucleobases terminated layers and their application into H(2)O(2) and glucose sensing were reported. To prepare such a PtNPs assembly, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), Zr(4+), nucleotide-5'-monophosphate (NTMP including guanosine, adenosine, cytidine, uridine-5'-monophosphate, and abbreviations were GMP, AMP, CMP, UMP, respectively) were adsorbed onto Au substrate sequentially to form nucleobases terminated surface and Zr(4+) acted as binder to link carboxylic and phosphoric groups (NTMP/Zr(4+)/MPA/Au). Complexation of cisplatin, cis-Pt(NH(3))(2)Cl(2), with terminated nucleobases and following electrochemical reduction of surface-bound cisplatin gave PtNPs attached surface. Different PtNPs coverage or particle density was obtained depending on the NTMP used and decreased in the order: PtNPs/GMP/Zr(4+)/MPA/Au>PtNPs/AMP/Zr(4+)/MPA/Au>PtNPs/CMP/Zr(4+)/MPA/Au>PtNPs/UMP/Zr(4+)/MPA/Au. The surface loading of Pt was between 160 and 16 ng/cm(2). The as prepared PtNPs can be used as electrocatalysts for H(2)O(2) sensing (detection limit of H(2)O(2)<100 nM) and the sensitivity increased with decreasing PtNPs density. After adsorption of glucose oxidase, the modified electrode can be used as enzymatic electrode for glucose sensing and a detection limit of 38.5 μM was achieved. This study provided an example of fabricating PtNP arrays utilising surface complexation of cisplatin with nucleobases. The advantage of this method is that the NP density can be controlled through changing nucleobases or Pt complexes used to obtain suitable kinetics of the complexation reactions. Additionally, the PtNPs sub-monolayer as prepared has high sensitivity for H(2)O(2) sensing even at a very low loading of Pt.

  11. GAS PHASE SYNTHESIS OF (ISO)QUINOLINE AND ITS ROLE IN THE FORMATION OF NUCLEOBASES IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Dorian S. N.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Kostko, Oleg; Troy, Tyler P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Mebel, Alexander M.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2015-04-20

    Nitrogen-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) have been proposed to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, yet the formation mechanisms of even their simplest prototypes—quinoline and isoquinoline—remain elusive. Here, we reveal a novel concept that under high temperature conditions representing circumstellar envelopes of carbon stars, (iso)quinoline can be synthesized via the reaction of pyridyl radicals with two acetylene molecules. The facile gas phase formation of (iso)quinoline in circumstellar envelopes defines a hitherto elusive reaction class synthesizing aromatic structures with embedded nitrogen atoms that are essential building blocks in contemporary biological-structural motifs. Once ejected from circumstellar shells and incorporated into icy interstellar grains in cold molecular clouds, these NPAHs can be functionalized by photo processing forming nucleobase-type structures as sampled in the Murchison meteorite.

  12. Cytosine Nucleobase Ligand: A Suitable Choice for Modulating Magnetic Anisotropy in Tetrahedrally Coordinated Mononuclear Co(II) Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Rosaria; Vallejo, Julia; Marino, Nadia; De Munno, Giovanni; Krzystek, J; Cano, Joan; Pardo, Emilio; Armentano, Donatella

    2017-02-20

    A family of tetrahedral mononuclear Co(II) complexes with the cytosine nucleobase ligand is used as the playground for an in-depth study of the effects that the nature of the ligand, as well as their noninnocent distortions on the Co(II) environment, may have on the slow magnetic relaxation effects. Hence, those compounds with greater distortion from the ideal tetrahedral geometry showed a larger-magnitude axial magnetic anisotropy (D) together with a high rhombicity factor (E/D), and thus, slow magnetic relaxation effects also appear. In turn, the more symmetric compound possesses a much smaller value of the D parameter and, consequently, lacks single-ion magnet behavior.

  13. Contents Variation Analysis of Free Amino Acids, Nucleosides and Nucleobases in Semen sojae praeparatum Fermentation Using UFLC-QTRAP MS.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chuan; Cui, Xiaobing; Shan, Chenxiao; Yu, Sheng; Wen, Hongmei

    2017-03-31

    UFLC-QTRAP MS was used to develop a sensitive and rapid method of evaluating content variation during Semen sojae praeparatum (SSP) fermentation. It did this through the simultaneous quantification of 22 free amino acids (FAAs) and 16 nucleosides and nucleobases (Ns) in the raw materials and processed products of SSP. The method was shown to be reproducible and accurate. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantity (LOQ) values were between 0.09-168.75 and 0.31-562.50 ng/mL for the 38 analytes, respectively. The data was examined through Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to compare the content variations. The quantitative results showed that the ingredients were properly determined in most of the samples and were converted regularly throughout the SSP fermentation process. These results correspond to the morphologic changes and PCA results.

  14. Theoretical study of physisorption of nucleobases on boron nitride nanotubes: a new class of hybrid nano-biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Gowtham, S; Scheicher, Ralph H; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P

    2010-04-23

    We investigate the adsorption of the nucleic acid bases-adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T) and uracil (U)-on the outer wall of a high curvature semiconducting single-walled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) by first-principles density functional theory calculations. The calculated binding energy shows the order: G > A approximately C approximately T approximately U, implying that the interaction strength of the high curvature BNNT with the nucleobases, G being an exception, is nearly the same. A higher binding energy for the G-BNNT conjugate appears to result from hybridization of the molecular orbitals of G and the BNNT. A smaller energy gap predicted for the G-BNNT conjugate relative to that of the pristine BNNT may be useful in the application of this class of biofunctional materials to the design of next-generation sensing devices.

  15. On modeling biomolecular-surface nonbonded interactions: application to nucleobase adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotube surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdim, B.; Pachter, R.; Day, P. N.; Kim, S. S.; Naik, R. R.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we explored the selectivity of single nucleobases towards adsorption on chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by density functional theory calculations. Specifically, the adsorption of molecular models of guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T), and cytosine (C), as well as of AT and GC Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs on chiral SWCNT C(6, 5), C(9, 1) and C(8, 3) model structures, was analyzed in detail. The importance of correcting the exchange-correlation functional for London dispersion was clearly demonstrated, yet limitations in modeling such interactions by considering the SWCNT as a molecular model may mask subtle effects in a molecular-macroscopic material system. The trend in the calculated adsorption energies of the nucleobases on same diameter C(6, 5) and C(9, 1) SWCNT surfaces, i.e. G > A > T > C, was consistent with related computations and experimental work on graphitic surfaces, however contradicting experimental data on the adsorption of single-strand short homo-oligonucleotides on SWCNTs that demonstrated a trend of G > C > A > T (Albertorio et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 395101). A possible role of electrostatic interactions in this case was partially captured by applying the effective fragment potential method, emphasizing that the interplay of the various contributions in modeling nonbonded interactions is complicated by theoretical limitations. Finally, because the calculated adsorption energies for Watson-Crick base pairs have shown little effect upon adsorption of the base pair farther from the surface, the results on SWCNT sorting by salmon genomic DNA could be indicative of partial unfolding of the double helix upon adsorption on the SWCNT surface.

  16. Facilitating Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the three papers in this symposium, "Conflicts that Arise in Small Group Facilitation: A Descriptive Study of Accounts, Actions, Outcomes, and Assessments" (Judith A. Kolb, William J. Rothwell), contains self-report verbatim accounts contributed by facilitators and the results of a literature review on small group conflict.…

  17. Evaluator or Facilitator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolding, James T.

    1978-01-01

    In American schools, the classroom teacher must act in two conflicting capacities: as a facilitator of learning and as an evaluator of his own facilitating activities. To avoid problems inherent in this, the evaluator role could be assigned elsewhere, as in the Boy Scouts' merit badge system. (SJL)

  18. Pyrazolylborate-zinc-nucleobase-complexes, 2:(1) preparations and structures of Tp(Cum,Me)Zn and Tp(Ph,Me)Zn complexes.

    PubMed

    Badura, Dirk; Vahrenkamp, Heinrich

    2002-11-18

    The interactions of the nine most significant nucleobases (thymine, uracil, dihydrouracil, cytosine, adenine, guanine, diaminopurine, xanthine, hypoxanthine, in their deprotonated forms) with zinc and with themselves in pyrazolylborate zinc complexes Tp(Cum,Me)Zn-base and Tp(Ph,Me)Zn-base are described. Except for guanine, the complexes Tp*Zn-base could be isolated in all cases. Structure determinations could be performed for seven of the eight product types. Except for dihydrouracil and xanthine, the zinc ion is attached to that nitrogen of the base which in nucleosides bears the sugar moiety. In the solid state, all zinc-bound nucleobases are involved in hydrogen bonding interactions. Except for xanthine, this includes homo base pairing across a crystallographic inversion center.

  19. Facilitating Understandings of Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Christine C.; Bush, Sara

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates some learning encounters for facilitating first graders' understanding of geometry. Describes some of children's approaches using Cuisenaire rods and teacher's intervening. Presents six problems involving various combinations of Cuisenaire rods and cubes. (YP)

  20. Sequence and conformation effects on ionization potential and charge distribution of homo-nucleobase stacks using M06-2X hybrid density functional theory calculations

    PubMed Central

    Rooman, Marianne; Wintjens, René

    2013-01-01

    DNA is subject to oxidative damage due to radiation or by-products of cellular metabolism, thereby creating electron holes that migrate along the DNA stacks. A systematic computational analysis of the dependence of the electronic properties of nucleobase stacks on sequence and conformation was performed here, on the basis of single- and double-stranded homo-nucleobase stacks of 1–10 bases or 1–8 base pairs in standard A-, B-, and Z-conformation. First, several levels of theory were tested for calculating the vertical ionization potentials of individual nucleobases; the M06-2X/6-31G* hybrid density functional theory method was selected by comparison with experimental data. Next, the vertical ionization potential, and the Mulliken charge and spin density distributions were calculated and considered on all nucleobase stacks. We found that (1) the ionization potential decreases with the number of bases, the lowest being reached by Gua≡Cyt tracts; (2) the association of two single strands into a double-stranded tract lowers the ionization potential significantly (3) differences in ionization potential due to sequence variation are roughly three times larger than those due to conformational modifications. The charge and spin density distributions were found (1) to be located toward the 5′-end for single-stranded Gua-stacks and toward the 3′-end for Cyt-stacks and basically delocalized over all bases for Ade- and Thy-stacks; (2) the association into double-stranded tracts empties the Cyt- and Thy-strands of most of the charge and all the spin density and concentrates them on the Gua- and Ade-strands. The possible biological implications of these results for transcription are discussed. PMID:23582046

  1. Nucleobases and Prebiotic Molecules in Organic Residues Produced from the Ultraviolet Photo-Irradiation of Pyrimidine in NH3 and H2O+NH3 Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuevo, Michel; Milam, Stefanie N.; Sandford, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Although not yet identified in the interstellar medium (ISM), N-heterocycles including nucleobases the information subunits of DNA and RNA are present in carbonaceous chondrites, which indicates that molecules of biological interest can be formed in non-terrestrial environments via abiotic pathways. Recent laboratory experiments and ab-initio calculations have already shown that the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices leads to the formation of a suite of oxidized pyrimidine derivatives, including the nucleobase uracil. In the present work, NH3:pyrimidine and H2O:NH3:pyrimidine ice mixtures with different relative proportions were irradiated with UV photons under astrophysically relevant conditions. Liquid- and gas-chromatography analysis of the resulting organic residues has led to the detection of the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as other species of prebiotic interest such as urea and small amino acids. The presence of these molecules in organic residues formed under abiotic conditions supports scenarios in which extraterrestrial organics that formed in space and were subsequently delivered to telluric planets via comets and meteorites could have contributed to the inventory of molecules that triggered the first biological reactions on their surfaces.

  2. Development and evaluation of a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-MS/MS method to quantify 19 nucleobases and nucleosides in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Li, Yin-Jie; Hu, Xun-Xiu; Deng, Xu; Qian, Zeng-Ting; Li, Zheng; Guo, Meng-Zhe; Tang, Dao-Quan

    2017-04-01

    As essential endogenous compounds, nucleobases and nucleosides fulfill various functions in living organisms. This study presents the development and validation of a new hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of 19 nucleobases and nucleosides in rat plasma. For the sample preparation, 15 kinds of protein precipitants were evaluated according to the chromatographic profile and ion response of analytes. The optimization of chromatographic separation was respectively performed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mode; each separation mode included two test columns with different stationary phases. The chromatographic profile and parameters such as half-width (W1/2 ), capacity factor (K') and tailing factor (ft ) were used to evaluate the separation efficiencies. Furthermore, the adopted composition of two mobile phase systems and the concentrations of the additives in the optimum buffer system were also investigated. The developed method was fully validated and successfully applied quantitatively to determine 19 nucleobases and nucleosides in plasma from normal and diabetic nephropathy (DN) rats. Significant differences between normal and DN rats were found in plasma levels of cytosine, xanthine, thymidine, adenosine, guanosine, inosine and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. This information may provide a useful reference for the discovery of potential biomarkers of DN.

  3. A new route for the prebiotic synthesis of nucleobases and hydantoins in water/ice solutions involving the photochemistry of acetylene.

    PubMed

    Menor-Salván, César; Marín-Yaseli, Margarita R

    2013-05-10

    The origin of nucleobases and other heterocycles is a classic question in the chemistry of the origins of life. The construction of laboratory models for the abiotic synthesis of nitrogen heterocycles in plausible natural conditions also aids the understanding and prediction of chemical species in the Solar System. Here, we report a new explanation for the origin of hydantoins, purines, and pyrimidines in eutectic water/ice/urea solutions driven by ultraviolet irradiation (in the 185-254 nm range, UVC) of acetylene under anoxic conditions. An analysis of the products indicates the synthesis of hydantoin and 5-hydroxyhydantoin, the purines uric acid, xanthine, and guanine, and the pyrimidines uracil and cytosine. The synthesis occurred together with the photo-oxidation of bases in a complex process for which possible pathways are proposed. In conclusion, an acetylene-containing atmosphere could contribute to the origin of nucleobases in the presence of a urea/water system by an HCN-independent mechanism. The presence of ice has a dual role as a favorable medium for the synthesis of nucleobases and protection against degradation and as a source of free radicals for the synthesis of highly oxidized heterocycles. A mechanism for the origin of hydantoins and uracil from urea in plausible conditions for prebiotic chemistry is also proposed.

  4. Comparative characterization of nucleotides, nucleosides and nucleobases in Abelmoschus manihot roots, stems, leaves and flowers during different growth periods by UPLC-TQ-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Du, Le-yue; Qian, Da-wei; Jiang, Shu; Shang, Er-xin; Guo, Jian-ming; Liu, Pei; Su, Shu-lan; Duan, Jin-ao; Zhao, Min

    2015-12-01

    Nucleotides, nucleosides and nucleobases have been proven as important bioactive compounds related to many physiological processes. Abelmoschus manihot (L.) Medicus from the family of Malvaceae is an annual herbal plant of folk medicine widely distributed in Oceania and Asia. However, up to now, no detailed information could be available for the types and contents of nucleotides, nucleosides and nucleobases contained in A. manihot roots, stems, leaves as well as the flowers. In the present study, an UPLC-TQ-MS/MS method was established for detection of the twelve nucleotides, nucleosides and nucleobases. The validated method was successfully applied to identify the 12 analytes in different parts of A. manihot harvested at ten growth periods. 2'-deoxyinosine was not detected in all of the A. manihot samples. The data demonstrated that the distribution and concentration of the 12 compounds in A. manihot four parts were arranged in a decreasing order as leaf>flower>stem>root. Based on the results, the leaves and flowers of A. manihot could be developed as health products possessed nutraceutical and bioactive properties in the future. This method might also be utilized for the quality control of the A. manihot leaves and other herbal medicines being rich in nucleotides, nucleosides and nulecobases.

  5. [Drug facilitated sexual assault].

    PubMed

    Alempijević, Djordje; Savić, Slobodan; Stojanović, Jovan; Spasić, Andjelka

    2007-01-01

    In line with the fact that there is little information regarding drug facilitated sexual assault in national medical literature, the authors aimed to prepare a review of the phenomenon based on available international references. Therefore we offered a definition of the concept of sexual assault, and rape in particular. Consent and ability for valid consent for sexual intercourse were defined as well. A review contains discussion about the basic elements of a concept of drug-facilitated sexual assault. There is also available information in regard to pharmacology of common data rape drugs, i.e. flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), and ketamine. We indicate the utmost importance of prompt collecting of biological samples for toxicological screening in patients who are suspected victims of drug facilitated sexual assault.

  6. Multiple Condensation Reactions Involving Pt(II) /Pd(II) -OH2 , Pt-NH3 , and Cytosine-NH2 Groups: New Twists in Cisplatin-Nucleobase Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yin-Bandur, Lu; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Rodríguez-Santiago, Luis; Sodupe, Mariona; Berghaus, Melanie; Lippert, Bernhard

    2016-09-12

    The coordination chemistry of the antitumor agent cisplatin and related complexes with DNA and its constituents, that is, the nucleobases, appears to be dominated by 1:1 and 1:2 adducts of the types cis-[Pta2 (nucleobase)X] and cis-[Pta2 (nucleobase)2 ] (a=NH3 or amine; a2 =diamine or diimine; X=Cl, OH or OH2 ). Here, we have studied the interactions of the putative 1:1 adducts cis-[Pta2 (1-MeC-N3)(OH2 )](2+) (with a=NH3 , a2 =2,2'-bpy (2,2'-bipyridine), 1-MeC=model nucleobase 1-methylcytosine) with additional cis-[Pt(NH3 )2 (OH2 )2 ](2+) or its kinetically superior analogues [Pd(en)(OH2 )2 ](2+) (en=ethylenediamine) and [Pd(2,2'-bpy)(OH2 )2 ](2+) . Depending upon the conditions applied different compounds of different nuclearity are formed. Without exception they represent condensation products of the components, containing μ-1-MeC-H , μ-OH(-) , as well as μ-NH2 (-) bridges. In the presence of Ag(+) ions, the isolated products in several cases display additionally Pt→Ag dative bonds. On the basis of the cytosine-containing structures established by X-ray crystallography, it is proposed that any of the feasible initial 1:1 nucleobase adducts of cisplatin could form dinuclear Pt complexes upon reaction with additional hydrolyzed cisplatin, thereby generating nucleobase adducts other than the presently established ones. Two findings appear to be of particular significance: First, hydrolyzed cisplatin can have a moderately accelerating effect on the formation of a secondary nucleobase product. Second, NH3 ligands of the cisplatin moiety can be converted into bridging amido ligands following condensation with the diaqua species of cisplatin.

  7. Understanding Facilitation: Theory and Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Christine

    This book introduces newcomers to the concept of facilitation, and it presents a critical analysis of established and current theory on facilitation for existing practitioners. The following are among the topics discussed: (1) emergence of the field of facilitation; (2) development of facilitation in management; (3) development of facilitation in…

  8. Doped Graphene for DNA Analysis: the Electrochemical Signal is Strongly Influenced by the Kind of Dopant and the Nucleobase Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Huidi; Wang, Lu; Sofer, Zdenek; Pumera, Martin; Bonanni, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    Doping graphene with heteroatoms can alter the electronic and electrochemical properties of the starting material. Contrasting properties should be expected when the doping is carried out with electron donating species (n-type dopants) or with electron withdrawing species (p-type dopants). This in turn can have a profound influence on the electroanalytical performance of the doped material being used for the detection of specific probes. Here we investigate the electrochemical oxidation of DNA bases adenine, guanine, thymine and cytosine on two heteroatom-doped graphene platforms namely boron-doped graphene (p-type dopant) and nitrogen-doped graphene (n-type dopant). We found that overall, boron–doped graphene provided the best response in terms of electrochemical signal sensitivity for all bases. This is due to the electron deficiency of boron-doped graphene, which can promote the oxidation of DNA bases, as opposed to nitrogen-doped graphene which possesses an excess of electrons. Moreover, also the structure of the nucleobase was found to have significant influence on the obtained signal. Our study may open new frontiers in the electrochemical detection of DNA bases which is the first step for label-free DNA analysis.

  9. Doped Graphene for DNA Analysis: the Electrochemical Signal is Strongly Influenced by the Kind of Dopant and the Nucleobase Structure.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huidi; Wang, Lu; Sofer, Zdenek; Pumera, Martin; Bonanni, Alessandra

    2016-09-14

    Doping graphene with heteroatoms can alter the electronic and electrochemical properties of the starting material. Contrasting properties should be expected when the doping is carried out with electron donating species (n-type dopants) or with electron withdrawing species (p-type dopants). This in turn can have a profound influence on the electroanalytical performance of the doped material being used for the detection of specific probes. Here we investigate the electrochemical oxidation of DNA bases adenine, guanine, thymine and cytosine on two heteroatom-doped graphene platforms namely boron-doped graphene (p-type dopant) and nitrogen-doped graphene (n-type dopant). We found that overall, boron-doped graphene provided the best response in terms of electrochemical signal sensitivity for all bases. This is due to the electron deficiency of boron-doped graphene, which can promote the oxidation of DNA bases, as opposed to nitrogen-doped graphene which possesses an excess of electrons. Moreover, also the structure of the nucleobase was found to have significant influence on the obtained signal. Our study may open new frontiers in the electrochemical detection of DNA bases which is the first step for label-free DNA analysis.

  10. Molecular mechanism of diaminomaleonitrile to diaminofumaronitrile photoisomerization: an intermediate step in the prebiotic formation of purine nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Szabla, Rafał; Góra, Robert W; Sponer, Jiří; Sponer, Judit E

    2014-02-24

    The photoinduced isomerization of diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) to diaminofumaronitrile (DAFN) was suggested to play a key role in the prebiotically plausible formation of purine nucleobases and nucleotides. In this work we analyze two competitive photoisomerization mechanisms on the basis of state-of-the-art quantum-chemical calculations. Even though it was suggested that this process might occur on the triplet potential-energy surface, our results indicate that the singlet reaction channel should not be disregarded either. In fact, the peaked topography of the S1 /S0 conical intersection suggests that the deexcitation should most likely occur on a sub-picosecond timescale and the singlet photoisomerization mechanism might effectively compete even with a very efficient intersystem crossing. Such a scenario is further supported by the relatively small spin-orbit coupling of the S1 and T2 states in the Franck-Condon region, which does not indicate a very effective triplet bypass for this photoreaction. Therefore, we conclude that the triplet reaction channel in DAMN might not be as prominent as was previously thought.

  11. Doped Graphene for DNA Analysis: the Electrochemical Signal is Strongly Influenced by the Kind of Dopant and the Nucleobase Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Huidi; Wang, Lu; Sofer, Zdenek; Pumera, Martin; Bonanni, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Doping graphene with heteroatoms can alter the electronic and electrochemical properties of the starting material. Contrasting properties should be expected when the doping is carried out with electron donating species (n-type dopants) or with electron withdrawing species (p-type dopants). This in turn can have a profound influence on the electroanalytical performance of the doped material being used for the detection of specific probes. Here we investigate the electrochemical oxidation of DNA bases adenine, guanine, thymine and cytosine on two heteroatom-doped graphene platforms namely boron-doped graphene (p-type dopant) and nitrogen-doped graphene (n-type dopant). We found that overall, boron–doped graphene provided the best response in terms of electrochemical signal sensitivity for all bases. This is due to the electron deficiency of boron-doped graphene, which can promote the oxidation of DNA bases, as opposed to nitrogen-doped graphene which possesses an excess of electrons. Moreover, also the structure of the nucleobase was found to have significant influence on the obtained signal. Our study may open new frontiers in the electrochemical detection of DNA bases which is the first step for label-free DNA analysis. PMID:27623951

  12. A Study of π-π Stacking Interactions and Aromaticity in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon/Nucleobase Complexes.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sanz, Goar

    2016-02-03

    We analysed the interactions and aromaticity electron-density delocalisation observed in π-π complexes between the phenalenyl radical and acenaphthylene, and the DNA and RNA nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine and uracil). Interaction energies are obtained at the M06-2X/6-311++G(2df,p) computational level for gas phase and PCM-water conditions. For both the phenalenyl radical and acenaphthylene, the complexes formed with guanine are the most stable ones. Atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital results reveal weak π-π interactions between both interacting moieties, characterized by bond critical points between C⋅⋅⋅C and C⋅⋅⋅N atoms. Nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) indicate the retention of the aromatic character of the monomers in the outer region of the complex. The fluctuation indexes reveal a loss of electron delocalisation upon complexation for all cases except guanine complexes. Nevertheless, the interface region shows large negative NICS values, which is not associated with an increase of the aromaticity or electron-density delocalisation, but with magnetic couplings of both molecules, leading to an unrealistic description of the aromatic behaviour in that region.

  13. Facilitation of Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  14. Facilitator's Guide: Censorship Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layden, Kent

    To help leaders or "facilitators" of a series of simulation exercises on controversial issues for school board members, this guide describes how the simulations work and provides some of the materials required for the simulation exercise on censorship and book banning. After defining simulation or gaming exercises, the author notes the…

  15. Facilitating Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Mark H., Ed.; Rossman, Maxine E., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This collection of articles on distance learning reflects the perspectives and concerns of the learner and the facilitator of learning in distance education setting. Eight chapters are included: (1) "The Evolution and Advantages of Distance Education" (John E. Cantelon) traces the history of distance education and demonstrates how it transcends…

  16. Facilitative Strategies in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Thara M. A.; Haugabrook, Adrian K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes campus-based strategies to facilitate collaboration by examining the process of restructuring a division of student affairs as an educational partner with academic affairs. Describes three collaborative efforts at the University of Massachusetts Boston: the Beacon Leadership Project, the Diversity Research Initiative, and the Beacon…

  17. The Inclusion Facilitator's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Cheryl M.; Schuh, Mary C.; Nisbet, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Inclusion facilitators are educators who do more than teach children with disabilities--they advocate for change in schools and communities, sparking a passion for inclusion in teachers, administrators, and families and giving them the practical guidance they need to make it work. This is an essential new role in today's schools, and this guide…

  18. Structure of Bor1 supports an elevator transport mechanism for SLC4 anion exchangers

    PubMed Central

    Thurtle-Schmidt, Bryan H.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Boron is essential for plant growth because of its incorporation into plant cell walls; however, in excess it is toxic to plants. Boron transport and homeostasis in plants is regulated in part by the borate efflux transporter Bor1, a member of the solute carrier (SLC) 4 transporter family with homology to the human bicarbonate transporter Band 3. Here, we present the 4.1-Å resolution crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana Bor1. The structure displays a dimeric architecture in which dimerization is mediated by centralized Gate domains. Comparisons with a structure of Band 3 in an outward-open state reveal that the Core domains of Bor1 have rotated inwards to achieve an occluded state. Further structural comparisons with UapA, a xanthine transporter from the nucleobase-ascorbate transporter family, show that the downward pivoting of the Core domains relative to the Gate domains may access an inward-open state. These results suggest that the SLC4, SLC26, and nucleobase-ascorbate transporter families all share an elevator transport mechanism in which alternating access is provided by Core domains that carry substrates across a membrane. PMID:27601653

  19. ClickIn: a flexible protocol for quantifying mitochondrial uptake of nucleobase derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hoogewijs, Kurt; James, Andrew M; Smith, Robin A J; Abendroth, Frank; Gait, Michael J; Murphy, Michael P; Lightowlers, Robert N

    2017-04-06

    There is an increasing interest in targeting molecules to the mitochondrial matrix. Many proteins are naturally imported through the translocase complexes found in the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. One possible means for importing molecules is therefore to use a mitochondrial pre-protein as a vector and assess what forms of molecules can be attached to the pre-protein as cargo. A major difficulty with this approach is to ensure that any chimaeric molecule does indeed access the mitochondrial matrix and does not merely associate with the mitochondrial membranes. We have recently demonstrated that click chemistry can be used both to demonstrate convincingly mitochondrial import of a peptide-peptide nucleic acid conjugate and also to quantify the mitochondrial uptake for specific synthetic conjugates. We now report an adaptation of the synthesis to facilitate simple quantification of multiple molecules and hence to calculate the efficiency of their mitochondrial import.

  20. ClickIn: a flexible protocol for quantifying mitochondrial uptake of nucleobase derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Hoogewijs, Kurt; James, Andrew M.; Smith, Robin A. J.; Abendroth, Frank; Gait, Michael J.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in targeting molecules to the mitochondrial matrix. Many proteins are naturally imported through the translocase complexes found in the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. One possible means for importing molecules is therefore to use a mitochondrial pre-protein as a vector and assess what forms of molecules can be attached to the pre-protein as cargo. A major difficulty with this approach is to ensure that any chimaeric molecule does indeed access the mitochondrial matrix and does not merely associate with the mitochondrial membranes. We have recently demonstrated that click chemistry can be used both to demonstrate convincingly mitochondrial import of a peptide–peptide nucleic acid conjugate and also to quantify the mitochondrial uptake for specific synthetic conjugates. We now report an adaptation of the synthesis to facilitate simple quantification of multiple molecules and hence to calculate the efficiency of their mitochondrial import. PMID:28382203

  1. Electronic Transport and Thermopower in Aperiodic DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Stephan; Maciá, Enrique

    A detailed study of charge transport properties of synthetic and genomic DNA sequences is reported. Genomic sequences of the Chromosome 22, λ-bacteriophage, and D1s80 genes of Human and Pygmy chimpanzee are considered in this work, and compared with both periodic and quasiperiodic (Fibonacci) sequences of nucleotides. Charge transfer efficiency is compared for all these different sequences, and large variations in charge transfer efficiency, stemming from sequence-dependent effects, are reported. In addition, basic characteristics of tunneling currents, including contact effects, are described. Finally, the thermoelectric power of nucleobases connected in between metallic contacts at different temperatures is presented.

  2. Program Facilitates Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    KNET computer program facilitates distribution of computing between UNIX-compatible local host computer and remote host computer, which may or may not be UNIX-compatible. Capable of automatic remote log-in. User communicates interactively with remote host computer. Data output from remote host computer directed to local screen, to local file, and/or to local process. Conversely, data input from keyboard, local file, or local process directed to remote host computer. Written in ANSI standard C language.

  3. Charge Transport across DNA-Based Three-Way Junctions.

    PubMed

    Young, Ryan M; Singh, Arunoday P N; Thazhathveetil, Arun K; Cho, Vincent Y; Zhang, Yuqi; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Beratan, David N; Ratner, Mark A; Schatz, George C; Berlin, Yuri A; Lewis, Frederick D; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2015-04-22

    DNA-based molecular electronics will require charges to be transported from one site within a 2D or 3D architecture to another. While this has been shown previously in linear, π-stacked DNA sequences, the dynamics and efficiency of charge transport across DNA three-way junction (3WJ) have yet to be determined. Here, we present an investigation of hole transport and trapping across a DNA-based three-way junction systems by a combination of femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Hole transport across the junction is proposed to be gated by conformational fluctuations in the ground state which bring the transiently populated hole carrier nucleobases into better aligned geometries on the nanosecond time scale, thus modulating the π-π electronic coupling along the base pair sequence.

  4. Electronic and structural elements that regulate the excited-state dynamics in purine nucleobase derivatives.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Rauer, Clemens; Reichardt, Christian; Mai, Sebastian; Pollum, Marvin; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia; Corral, Inés

    2015-04-08

    The excited-state dynamics of the purine free base and 9-methylpurine are investigated using experimental and theoretical methods. Femtosecond broadband transient absorption experiments reveal that excitation of these purine derivatives in aqueous solution at 266 nm results primarily in ultrafast conversion of the S2(ππ*) state to the vibrationally excited (1)nπ* state. Following vibrational and conformational relaxation, the (1)nπ* state acts as a doorway state in the efficient population of the triplet manifold with an intersystem crossing lifetime of hundreds of picoseconds. Experiments show an almost 2-fold increase in the intersystem crossing rate on going from polar aprotic to nonpolar solvents, suggesting that a solvent-dependent energy barrier must be surmounted to access the singlet-to-triplet crossing region. Ab initio static and surface-hopping dynamics simulations lend strong support to the proposed relaxation mechanism. Collectively, the experimental and computational results demonstrate that the accessibility of the nπ* states and the topology of the potential energy surfaces in the vicinity of conical intersections are key elements in controlling the excited-state dynamics of the purine derivatives. From a structural perspective, it is shown that the purine chromophore is not responsible for the ultrafast internal conversion in the adenine and guanine monomers. Instead, C6 functionalization plays an important role in regulating the rates of radiative and nonradiative relaxation. C6 functionalization inhibits access to the (1)nπ* state while simultaneously facilitating access to the (1)ππ*(La)/S0 conical intersection, such that population of the (1)nπ* state cannot compete with the relaxation pathways to the ground state involving ring puckering at the C2 position.

  5. Electronic and Structural Elements That Regulate the Excited-State Dynamics in Purine Nucleobase Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The excited-state dynamics of the purine free base and 9-methylpurine are investigated using experimental and theoretical methods. Femtosecond broadband transient absorption experiments reveal that excitation of these purine derivatives in aqueous solution at 266 nm results primarily in ultrafast conversion of the S2(ππ*) state to the vibrationally excited 1nπ* state. Following vibrational and conformational relaxation, the 1nπ* state acts as a doorway state in the efficient population of the triplet manifold with an intersystem crossing lifetime of hundreds of picoseconds. Experiments show an almost 2-fold increase in the intersystem crossing rate on going from polar aprotic to nonpolar solvents, suggesting that a solvent-dependent energy barrier must be surmounted to access the singlet-to-triplet crossing region. Ab initio static and surface-hopping dynamics simulations lend strong support to the proposed relaxation mechanism. Collectively, the experimental and computational results demonstrate that the accessibility of the nπ* states and the topology of the potential energy surfaces in the vicinity of conical intersections are key elements in controlling the excited-state dynamics of the purine derivatives. From a structural perspective, it is shown that the purine chromophore is not responsible for the ultrafast internal conversion in the adenine and guanine monomers. Instead, C6 functionalization plays an important role in regulating the rates of radiative and nonradiative relaxation. C6 functionalization inhibits access to the 1nπ* state while simultaneously facilitating access to the 1ππ*(La)/S0 conical intersection, such that population of the 1nπ* state cannot compete with the relaxation pathways to the ground state involving ring puckering at the C2 position. PMID:25763596

  6. Quantum-chemical study of interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Mikulski, Damian; Szeląg, Małgorzata; Molski, Marcin

    2011-12-01

    Trans-resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin present in red wine and grapes, has gained considerable attention because of its antiproliferative, chemopreventive and proapoptotic activity against human cancer cells. The accurate quantum-chemical computations based on the density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2) have been performed for the first time to study interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-derived nitrogenous bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine in vacuum and water medium. This compound is found to show high affinity to nitrogenous bases and guanine-thymine dinucleotide. The electrostatic interactions from intermolecular hydrogen bonding increase the stability of complexes studied. In particular, significantly strong hydrogen bonds between 4'-H atom of trans-resveratrol and imidazole nitrogen as well as carbonyl oxygen atoms of nucleobases studied stabilize these systems. The stabilization energies computed reveal that the negatively charged trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide complex is more energetically stable in water medium than in vacuum. MP2 method gives more reliable and significantly high values of stabilization energy of trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide, trans-resveratrol-guanine and trans-resveratrol-thymine complexes than B3LYP exchange-correlation functional because it takes into account London dispersion energy. According to the results, in the presence of trans-resveratrol the 3'-5' phosphodiester bond in dinucleotide can be cleaved and the proton from 4'-OH group of trans-resveratrol migrates to the 3'-O atom of dinucleotide. It is concluded that trans-resveratrol is able to break the DNA strand. Hence, the findings obtained help understand antiproliferative and anticancer properties of this polyphenol.

  7. A QM/QTAIM microstructural analysis of the tautomerisationviathe DPT of the hypoxanthine·adenine nucleobase pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O.; Zhurakivsky, Roman O.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2014-08-01

    We provide a pathway for the tautomerisation of the biologically important hypoxanthine.adenine (Hyp.Ade) nucleobase pair (Cs) formed by the keto tautomer of the Hyp and the amino tautomer of the Ade into the Hyp*.Ade* base pair (Cs) formed by the enol tautomer of the Hyp and the imino tautomer of the Ade by applying quantum-mechanical calculations and Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules analysis. It was found out that the dipole active Hyp.Ade↔Hyp*.Ade* tautomerisation occurs via the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer (DPT) through the TSHyp.Ade↔Hyp*.Ade* (Cs). Based on the sweeps of the energies of the intermolecular H-bonds along the intrinsic reaction coordinate, it was established that the N6H...O6 H-bond (5.40) is cooperative with the N1H...N1 H-bond (6.99) in the Hyp.Ade base pair, as well as the O6H...N6 H-bond (11.50) is cooperative with the N1H...N1 H-bond (7.28 kcal.mol-1) in the Hyp*.Ade* base pair, mutually strengthening each other. The Hyp*.Ade* base pair possesses an extremely short lifetime 2.68.10-14 s, which is predetermined by the negative value of the Gibbs free energy of the reverse barrier of its tautomerisation, and all of the six low-frequency intermolecular vibrations cannot develop during this period of time. Consequently, the Hyp.Ade→Hyp*.Ade* DPT tautomerisation cannot serve as a source of the rare tautomers of the bases.

  8. Topology of RNA-protein nucleobase-amino acid π-π interactions and comparison to analogous DNA-protein π-π contacts.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katie A; Holland, Devany J; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2016-05-01

    The present work analyzed 120 high-resolution X-ray crystal structures and identified 335 RNA-protein π-interactions (154 nonredundant) between a nucleobase and aromatic (W, H, F, or Y) or acyclic (R, E, or D) π-containing amino acid. Each contact was critically analyzed (including using a visual inspection protocol) to determine the most prevalent composition, structure, and strength of π-interactions at RNA-protein interfaces. These contacts most commonly involve F and U, with U:F interactions comprising one-fifth of the total number of contacts found. Furthermore, the RNA and protein π-systems adopt many different relative orientations, although there is a preference for more parallel (stacked) arrangements. Due to the variation in structure, the strength of the intermolecular forces between the RNA and protein components (as determined from accurate quantum chemical calculations) exhibits a significant range, with most of the contacts providing significant stability to the associated RNA-protein complex (up to -65 kJ mol(-1)). Comparison to the analogous DNA-protein π-interactions emphasizes differences in RNA- and DNA-protein π-interactions at the molecular level, including the greater abundance of RNA contacts and the involvement of different nucleobase/amino acid residues. Overall, our results provide a clearer picture of the molecular basis of nucleic acid-protein binding and underscore the important role of these contacts in biology, including the significant contribution of π-π interactions to the stability of nucleic acid-protein complexes. Nevertheless, more work is still needed in this area in order to further appreciate the properties and roles of RNA nucleobase-amino acid π-interactions in nature.

  9. [Fructose transporter in yeasts].

    PubMed

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Dobrowolski, Adam; Robak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Study of hexoses transporter started with discovery of galactose permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose, fructose and mannose assimilation is assumed by numerous proteins encoded by different genes. To date over 20 hexoses transporters, belonging to Sugar Porter family and to Major Facilitator Superfamily, were known. Genome sequence analysis of Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, S. cerevisaie and Debaryomyces hansenii reveled potential presence of 17-48 sugar porter proteins. Glucose transporters in S. cerevisiae have been already characterized. In this paper, hexoses transporters, responsible for assimilation of fructose by cells, are presented and compared. Fructose specific transporter are described for yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Zygosaccharomyces bailli, K. lactis, Saccharomyces pastorianus, S. cerevisiae winemaking strain and for fungus Botritys cinerea and human (Glut5p). Among six yeasts transporters, five are fructose specific, acting by facilitated diffusion or proton symport. Yeasts monosaccharides transporter studies allow understanding of sugars uptake and metabolism important aspects, even in higher eukaryotes cells.

  10. Nitrogen doped nanographene structures; study on the adsorption of nucleobases, nucleotides, and their triphosphate derivatives using mixed docking, MD, and QM/MM approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadari, Rahim

    2017-01-01

    The interactions of the nucleobases, nucleotides, and their triphosphate derivatives in both neutral and anionic forms with the nitrogen doped graphenes (NG) were studied using docking and molecular dynamic simulation methods. In docking studies, based on binding energy results, the anionic species and nucleobases were showing the most and the least tendency toward the surface of the NG, respectively. The molecular mechanic/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area results revealed similar results, except for the anionic species; in these studies, the anionic species showed a lesser affinity toward the NG. The time-dependent density functional theory studies were carried out to investigate the effects of the NG on the electronic nature of the investigated ligands; a red-shift in all of the cases was observed. The results of binding energy decomposition and atoms in molecules studies showed that the interactions are van der Waals in nature. The graphitic, pyridinic, and pyrrolic nitrogen atoms which were considered in this study behaved similar to each other.

  11. Rational design for cooperative recognition of specific nucleobases using β-cyclodextrin-modified DNAs and fluorescent ligands on DNA and RNA scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Futamura, Akika; Uemura, Asuka; Imoto, Takeshi; Kitamura, Yusuke; Matsuura, Hirotaka; Wang, Chun-Xia; Ichihashi, Toshiki; Sato, Yusuke; Teramae, Norio; Nishizawa, Seiichi; Ihara, Toshihiro

    2013-08-05

    We propose a binary fluorimetric method for DNA and RNA analysis by the combined use of two probes rationally designed to work cooperatively. One probe is an oligonucleotide (ODN) conjugate bearing a β-cyclodextrin (β-CyD). The other probe is a small reporter ligand, which comprises linked molecules of a nucleobase-specific heterocycle and an environment-sensitive fluorophore. The heterocycle of the reporter ligand recognizes a single nucleobase displayed in a gap on the target labeled with the conjugate and, at the same time, the fluorophore moiety forms a luminous inclusion complex with nearby β-CyD. Three reporter ligands, MNDS (naphthyridine-dansyl linked ligand), MNDB (naphthyridine-DBD), and DPDB (pyridine-DBD), were used for DNA and RNA probing with 3'-end or 5'-end modified β-CyD-ODN conjugates. For the DNA target, the β-CyD tethered to the 3'-end of the ODN facing into the gap interacted with the fluorophore sticking out into the major groove of the gap site (MNDS and DPDB). Meanwhile the β-CyD on the 5'-end of the ODN interacted with the fluorophore in the minor groove (MNDB and DPDB). The results obtained by this study could be a guideline for the design of binary DNA/RNA probe systems based on controlling the proximity of functional molecules.

  12. Task Integration Facilitates Multitasking

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Rita F.; Raab, Markus; Hegele, Mathias; Schorer, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate multi-task integration in a continuous tracking task. We were particularly interested in how manipulating task structure in a dual-task situation affects learning of a constant segment embedded in a pursuit-tracking task. Importantly, we examined if dual-task effects could be attributed to task integration by varying the structural similarity and difficulty of the primary and secondary tasks. In Experiment 1 participants performed a pursuit tracking task while counting high-pitched tones and ignoring low-pitched tones. The tones were either presented randomly or structurally 250 ms before each tracking turn. Experiment 2 increased the motor load of the secondary tasks by asking participants to tap their feet to the tones. Experiment 3 further increased motor load of the primary task by increasing its speed and having participants tracking with their non-dominant hand. The results show that dual-task interference can be moderated by secondary task conditions that match the structure of the primary task. Therefore our results support proposals of task integration in continuous tracking paradigms. We conclude that multi-tasking is not always detrimental for motor learning but can be facilitated through task-integration. PMID:28360878

  13. Task Integration Facilitates Multitasking.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rita F; Raab, Markus; Hegele, Mathias; Schorer, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate multi-task integration in a continuous tracking task. We were particularly interested in how manipulating task structure in a dual-task situation affects learning of a constant segment embedded in a pursuit-tracking task. Importantly, we examined if dual-task effects could be attributed to task integration by varying the structural similarity and difficulty of the primary and secondary tasks. In Experiment 1 participants performed a pursuit tracking task while counting high-pitched tones and ignoring low-pitched tones. The tones were either presented randomly or structurally 250 ms before each tracking turn. Experiment 2 increased the motor load of the secondary tasks by asking participants to tap their feet to the tones. Experiment 3 further increased motor load of the primary task by increasing its speed and having participants tracking with their non-dominant hand. The results show that dual-task interference can be moderated by secondary task conditions that match the structure of the primary task. Therefore our results support proposals of task integration in continuous tracking paradigms. We conclude that multi-tasking is not always detrimental for motor learning but can be facilitated through task-integration.

  14. Program Facilitates CMMI Appraisals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweetser, Wesley

    2005-01-01

    A computer program has been written to facilitate appraisals according to the methodology of Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI). [CMMI is a government/industry standard, maintained by the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, for objectively assessing the engineering capability and maturity of an organization (especially, an organization that produces software)]. The program assists in preparation for a CMMI appraisal by providing drop-down lists suggesting required artifacts or evidence. It identifies process areas for which similar evidence is required and includes a copy feature that reduces or eliminates repetitive data entry. It generates reports to show the entire framework for reference, the appraisal artifacts to determine readiness for an appraisal, and lists of interviewees and questions to ask them during the appraisal. During an appraisal, the program provides screens for entering observations and ratings, and reviewing evidence provided thus far. Findings concerning strengths and weaknesses can be exported for use in a report or a graphical presentation. The program generates a chart showing capability level ratings of the organization. A context-sensitive Windows help system enables a novice to use the program and learn about the CMMI appraisal process.

  15. Simultaneous Determination of 16 Nucleosides and Nucleobases in Euryale ferox Salisb. by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Electro Spray Ionization Tandem Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-TQ-MS/MS) in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) Mode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Wu, Qinan; Wu, Chengying; Jiang, Zheng

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a simple, rapid, efficient analytical method was established for the qualification and quantification of 16 nucleosides and nucleobases in Euryale ferox Salisb. by using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-TQ-MS/MS) in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Ideal separation of 16 target compounds was achieved on Xbridge Amide HILIC column (4.6 × 150 mm, 3.5 μm) with gradient elution in 11 min by optimized conditions. Variations of nucleosides and nucleobase in samples from different cultivation regions ranging from 190.50 to 1594.30 μg/g were obvious. The total nucleoside contents were higher than total nucleobases, especially in the compositions of guanosine, cytidine and 2'-deoxyguanosine. Samples 1-18 with dense thorns were better characters than samples 19-26 without thorns in terms of nucleosides and nucleobases concentrations in general. The limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) for 16 analytical substances were investigated to be 0.11-6.33 ng/mL and 0.35-21.1 ng/mL, respectively. And the method was first applied to large aquatic plants with good linearity, precision, repeatability and accuracy. All present information provided a scientific and rational reference for quality assessment and control of Euryale ferox Salisb.

  16. Analogues of acyclic nucleosides derived from tris-(hydroxymethyl)phosphine oxide or bis-(hydroxymethyl)phosphinic acid coupled to DNA nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Barbara; Michalak, Olga; De Clercq, Erik; Stec, Wojciech J

    2004-11-01

    A series of novel acyclic nucleoside analogues containing bis-(hydroxymethyl)phosphinic acid (BHPA) or tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine oxide (THPO) coupled with DNA nucleobases or with 5-fluorouracil were prepared and their antiviral activity was studied against cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), parainfluenza-virus type 3, reovirus-type 1, sindbis, coxsackie B4, punta toro, vesicular stomatitis and respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus-type 1 (KOS) and type 2 (G), vaccinia virus and herpes simplex virus-1 (TK- KOS ACVr). No specific antiviral effects were noted for any of test compounds against viruses evaluated, except thymine, cytosine and adenine derivatives of BHPA exerting borderline activity against respiratory syncytial virus at the 80 mg/ml concentration.

  17. Two-color spectroscopy of UV excited ssDNA complex with a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) probe: Fast nucleobase autoionization mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotkin, Slava V.; Ignatova, Tetyana; Balaeff, Alexander; Zheng, Ming; Blades, Michael; Stoeckl, Peter

    DNA autoionization is a fundamental process wherein UV-photoexcited nucleobases dissipate energy to the environment without undergoing chemical damage. SWNT is shown to serve as a photoluminescent reporter for studying the mechanism and rates of DNA autoionization. Two-color photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy revealed a strong SWNT PL quenching when the UV pump is resonant with the DNA absorption [Nano Research, 2015]. Semiempirical calculations of the DNA-SWNT electronic structure, combined with a Green's function theory for charge transfer, show a 20 fs autoionization rate, dominated by the hole transfer. Rate-equation analysis of the spectroscopy data confirms that the quenching rate is limited by the thermalization of the free charge carriers transferred to the nanotube reservoir. The developed approach has a great potential for monitoring DNA excitation, autoionization, and chemical damage both in vivo and in vitro. NSF ECCS-1509786 (S.V.R.,T.I.) and PHY-1359195 (P.S.), NIST and UCF facilities.

  18. Facilitating Dialogues about Racial Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaye, Stephen John

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Facilitating dialogues about racial issues in higher education classroom settings continues to be a vexing problem facing postsecondary educators. In order for students to discuss race with their peers, they need skilled facilitators who are knowledgeable about racial issues and able to support students in these difficult…

  19. Facilitated Communication in Mainstream Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remington-Gurney, Jane; Crossley, Rosemary

    Facilitated communication is described as a method of training communication partners or facilitators to provide physical assistance to communication aid users, to help them overcome physical and emotional problems in using their aids. In Melbourne (Victoria, Australia), the DEAL (Dignity, Education and Language) Centre has identified 96 people…

  20. A Manual for Group Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auvine, Brian; And Others

    This resource manual presents guidelines and effective techniques for people who want to acquire group facilitation skills. It is a valuable resource for anyone planning or presenting a workshop; trainers or teachers interested in innovative classroom techniques; and anyone involved in a group as leader, facilitator, or participant. The manual…

  1. Lunar Farside Radio Astronomy Base Facilitated by Lunar Elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Maccone, C.; Radley, C. F.

    2015-10-01

    Dr. JD-Wörner, DG of ESA intends to align ESA to develop a “Moon Village” on the far side for radio astronomy and other purposes. This would encourage new infrastructure reducing transport costs. A lunar lift greatly facilitates this vision.

  2. Nanoparticle Facilitated Extracellular Electron Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-13

    KEYWORDS: Bacteria, facilitated electron transport, electrochemically active, iron sulfide, Shewanella Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are capable of...to MFC technology is the unique capability of electrochemically active bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter, to divert electrons from the... electrochemical studies also demonstra- ted that the current contribution from remote bacterial cells was significantly diminished at longer cell−electrode dis

  3. Intermolecular CH···O/N H-bonds in the biologically important pairs of natural nucleobases: a thorough quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Yurenko, Yevgen P; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to cast light on the physico-chemical nature and energetic of the non-conventional CH···O/N H-bonds in the biologically important natural nucleobase pairs using a comprehensive quantum-chemical approach. As a whole, the 36 biologically important pairs, involving canonical and rare tautomers of nucleobases, were studied by means of all available up-to-date state-of-the-art quantum-chemical techniques along with quantum theory "Atoms in molecules" (QTAIM), Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis, Grunenberg's compliance constants theory, geometrical and vibrational analyses to identify the CH···O/N interactions, reveal their physico-chemical nature and estimate their strengths as well as contribution to the overall base-pairs stability. It was shown that all the 38 CH···O/N contacts (25 CH···O and 13 CH···N H-bonds) completely satisfy all classical geometrical, electron-topological, in particular Bader's and "two-molecule" Koch and Popelier's, and vibrational criteria of H-bonding. The positive values of Grunenberg's compliance constants prove that the CH···O/N contacts in nucleobase pairs are stabilizing interactions unlike electrostatic repulsion and anti-H-bonds. NBO analysis indicates the electron density transfer from the lone electron pair of the acceptor atom (O/N) to the antibonding orbital corresponding to the donor group σ(∗)(CH). Moreover, significant increase in the frequency of the out-of-plane deformation modes γ (CH) under the formation of the CH···O (by 17.2÷81.3/10.8÷84.7 cm(-1)) and CH···N (by 32.7÷85.9/9.0÷77.9 cm(-1)) H-bonds at the density functional theory (DFT)/second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) levels of theory, respectively, and concomitant changes of their intensities can be considered as reliable indicators of H-bonding. The strengths of the CH···O/N interactions, evaluated by means of Espinosa-Molins-Lecomte formula, lie within the range 0.45÷3.89/0.62÷4.10 kcal/mol for the CH

  4. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus

    2005-06-01

    In the previous reporting period, we have clarified the qualitative mineral transformation pathways when Hanford sediments are reacted with caustic Hanford tank waste. The major finding was that cancrinite, sodalite, zeolite A and allophane form when Hanford tank waste leaks into subsurface sediments. Cancrinite and sodalite are the most stable phases. The morphology and crystallinity of the minerals formed vary with alkalinity, salinity, and the Si/Al ratio. Temperature affects the reaction rates, but not the reaction pathways. In this project period, we have further refined the reaction pathways by quantification of XRD patterns and determination of weight fractions of individual minerals. This allowed us to generalize the results as function of solution chemistry.

  5. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus

    2003-06-01

    Given that there is a wide range of chemical compositions of Hanford Tank Waste, we have studied mineral formation and transformation by systematically varying anion composition and OH concentrations of simulated tank solutions in presence and absence of Cs. The feldspathoids and zeolite formed in the presence of Cs were analyzed with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and solid state NMR. The presence of Cs in the simulant solutions did not affect the types of minerals formed in 1 M NaOH solutions until the Cs concentration was greater than 0.1 M, a concentration that is not likely to occur in the sediment underlying the Hanford tanks. Elemental mapping indicated that incorporated Cs was homogeneously distributed in cancrinite and sodalite. High concentrations of Cs promoted the formation of highly crystalline cancrinite in hexagonal bar shape. The presence of Cs in solutions precluded the influence anions have shown in the non-cesium system. The presence of chloride anion was favorable for the formation of pure sodalite in a non-cesium solution, yet no sodalite has been found in the precipitates formed at high Cs concentration (0.5 M). Adsorption experiments indicated that Cs could access the internal parts of LTA, cancrinite and sodalite, but the diffusion appeared more difficult than that of Na and K. Cesium exchange in cancrinite and sodalite caused structural disordering of the minerals as reflected by the XRD patterns.

  6. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus

    2005-06-01

    In the previous reporting period, we have clarified the qualitative mineral transformation pathways when Hanford sediments are reacted with caustic Hanford tank waste. The major finding was that cancrinite, sodalite, zeolite A and allophane form when Hanford tank waste leaks into subsurface sediments. Cancrinite and sodalite are the most stable phases. The morphology and crystallinity of the minerals formed vary with alkalinity, salinity, and the Si/Al ratio. Temperature affects the reaction rates, but not the reaction pathways. In this project period, we have further refined the reaction pathways by quantification of XRD patterns and determination of weight fractions of individual minerals. This allowed us to generalize the results as function of solution chemistry.

  7. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus; Lichtner, Peter C.; McCarthy, John F.

    2003-06-01

    We have completed the studies on reactions of minerals with caustic Hanford tank waste solutions. Systematic studies on the effects of different anions, cations, and the radionuclide Cs-137 were completed and technical manuscripts on these experiments were submitted for publication. The concentration of NaOH and the type of anion played the dominant roles in determining minerals formed. Increasing NaOH concentration and temperature enhanced the formation of feldspathoids; when NaOH concentration was high (e.g.,16 M), stable cancrinite and sodalite formed rapidly. Cancrinite formed in the presence of nitrate or sulfate; sodalite formed in the presence of chloride, carbonate or without added anions. Low concentration of Cs (< 100 mM) did not affect the formation of lepispheric cancrinite and sodalite, whereas only highly crystalline cancrinite formed when Cs concentration was >250mM. The presence of K did not alter but slowed down the formation of cancrinite and sodalite. The presence of divalent cations led to the formation of intermediate or stable silicates, aluminates, hydroxides or even aluminosilicates. We investigated the incorporation of Cs and the stability of the incorporated Cs in feldspathoids, zeolites, and allophane that may form in the sediments under conditions mimicking Hanford tank leaks. The incorporated Cs was quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy after digestion in 1 M HCl. Cancrinite, sodalite, LTA zeolite, the 3-D cross-shaped zeolite, and allophane were capable to preferentially incorporate Cs when they form in the alkaline simulants.

  8. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT FACILITATED BY COLLOIDAL-SIZED ORGANIC MOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluid passing through the pores of soils and geologic materials is not just water with dissolved inorganic chemicals, but a complex mixture of organic and inorganic molecules. Large organic molecules such as humic and fulvic materials may impact the movement of contaminants. ...

  9. Complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2//CASSCF) study of the dissociative electron attachment in canonical DNA nucleobases caused by low-energy electrons (0-3 eV)

    SciTech Connect

    Francés-Monerris, Antonio; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2015-12-07

    Low-energy (0-3 eV) ballistic electrons originated during the irradiation of biological material can interact with DNA/RNA nucleobases yielding transient-anion species which undergo decompositions. Since the discovery that these reactions can eventually lead to strand breaking of the DNA chains, great efforts have been dedicated to their study. The main fragmentation at the 0-3 eV energy range is the ejection of a hydrogen atom from the specific nitrogen positions. In the present study, the methodological approach introduced in a previous work on uracil [I. González-Ramírez et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2769-2776 (2012)] is employed to study the DNA canonical nucleobases fragmentations of N–H bonds induced by low-energy electrons. The approach is based on minimum energy path and linear interpolation of internal coordinates computations along the N–H dissociation channels carried out at the complete-active-space self-consistent field//complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory level. On the basis of the calculated theoretical quantities, new assignations for the adenine and cytosine anion yield curves are provided. In addition, the π{sub 1}{sup −} and π{sub 2}{sup −} states of the pyrimidine nucleobases are expected to produce the temporary anions at electron energies close to 1 and 2 eV, respectively. Finally, the present theoretical results do not allow to discard neither the dipole-bound nor the valence-bound mechanisms in the range of energies explored, suggesting that both possibilities may coexist in the experiments carried out with the isolated nucleobases.

  10. Complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2//CASSCF) study of the dissociative electron attachment in canonical DNA nucleobases caused by low-energy electrons (0-3 eV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francés-Monerris, Antonio; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Low-energy (0-3 eV) ballistic electrons originated during the irradiation of biological material can interact with DNA/RNA nucleobases yielding transient-anion species which undergo decompositions. Since the discovery that these reactions can eventually lead to strand breaking of the DNA chains, great efforts have been dedicated to their study. The main fragmentation at the 0-3 eV energy range is the ejection of a hydrogen atom from the specific nitrogen positions. In the present study, the methodological approach introduced in a previous work on uracil [I. González-Ramírez et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2769-2776 (2012)] is employed to study the DNA canonical nucleobases fragmentations of N-H bonds induced by low-energy electrons. The approach is based on minimum energy path and linear interpolation of internal coordinates computations along the N-H dissociation channels carried out at the complete-active-space self-consistent field//complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory level. On the basis of the calculated theoretical quantities, new assignations for the adenine and cytosine anion yield curves are provided. In addition, the π1- and π2- states of the pyrimidine nucleobases are expected to produce the temporary anions at electron energies close to 1 and 2 eV, respectively. Finally, the present theoretical results do not allow to discard neither the dipole-bound nor the valence-bound mechanisms in the range of energies explored, suggesting that both possibilities may coexist in the experiments carried out with the isolated nucleobases.

  11. Base-pairing energies of protonated nucleobase pairs and proton affinities of 1-methylated cytosines: model systems for the effects of the sugar moiety on the stability of DNA i-motif conformations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Moehlig, Aaron R; Frieler, C E; Rodgers, M T

    2015-02-05

    Expansion of (CCG)n·(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats leads to hypermethylation of cytosine residues and results in Fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability in humans. The (CCG)n·(CGG)n repeats adopt i-motif conformations that are preferentially stabilized by base-pairing interactions of noncanonical protonated nucleobase pairs of cytosine (C(+)·C). Previously, we investigated the effects of 5-methylation of cytosine on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) using threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. In the present work, we extend our investigations to include protonated homo- and heteronucleobase pairs of cytosine, 1-methylcytosine, 5-methylcytosine, and 1,5-dimethylcytosine. The 1-methyl substituent prevents most tautomerization processes of cytosine and serves as a mimic for the sugar moiety of DNA nucleotides. In contrast to permethylation of cytosine at the 5-position, 1-methylation is found to exert very little influence on the BPE. All modifications to both nucleobases lead to a small increase in the BPEs, with 5-methylation producing a larger enhancement than either 1-methyl or 1,5-dimethylation. In contrast, modifications to a single nucleobase are found to produce a small decrease in the BPEs, again with 5-methylation producing a larger effect than 1-methylation. However, the BPEs of all of the protonated nucleobase pairs examined here significantly exceed those of canonical G·C and neutral C·C base pairs, and thus should still provide the driving force stabilizing DNA i-motif conformations even in the presence of such modifications. The proton affinities of the methylated cytosines are also obtained from the TCID experiments by competitive analyses of the primary dissociation pathways that occur in parallel for the protonated heteronucleobase pairs.

  12. Complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2//CASSCF) study of the dissociative electron attachment in canonical DNA nucleobases caused by low-energy electrons (0-3 eV).

    PubMed

    Francés-Monerris, Antonio; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2015-12-07

    Low-energy (0-3 eV) ballistic electrons originated during the irradiation of biological material can interact with DNA/RNA nucleobases yielding transient-anion species which undergo decompositions. Since the discovery that these reactions can eventually lead to strand breaking of the DNA chains, great efforts have been dedicated to their study. The main fragmentation at the 0-3 eV energy range is the ejection of a hydrogen atom from the specific nitrogen positions. In the present study, the methodological approach introduced in a previous work on uracil [I. González-Ramírez et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2769-2776 (2012)] is employed to study the DNA canonical nucleobases fragmentations of N-H bonds induced by low-energy electrons. The approach is based on minimum energy path and linear interpolation of internal coordinates computations along the N-H dissociation channels carried out at the complete-active-space self-consistent field//complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory level. On the basis of the calculated theoretical quantities, new assignations for the adenine and cytosine anion yield curves are provided. In addition, the π1 (-) and π2 (-) states of the pyrimidine nucleobases are expected to produce the temporary anions at electron energies close to 1 and 2 eV, respectively. Finally, the present theoretical results do not allow to discard neither the dipole-bound nor the valence-bound mechanisms in the range of energies explored, suggesting that both possibilities may coexist in the experiments carried out with the isolated nucleobases.

  13. Animal transportation networks

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Andrea; Latty, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Many group-living animals construct transportation networks of trails, galleries and burrows by modifying the environment to facilitate faster, safer or more efficient movement. Animal transportation networks can have direct influences on the fitness of individuals, whereas the shape and structure of transportation networks can influence community dynamics by facilitating contacts between different individuals and species. In this review, we discuss three key areas in the study of animal transportation networks: the topological properties of networks, network morphogenesis and growth, and the behaviour of network users. We present a brief primer on elements of network theory, and then discuss the different ways in which animal groups deal with the fundamental trade-off between the competing network properties of travel efficiency, robustness and infrastructure cost. We consider how the behaviour of network users can impact network efficiency, and call for studies that integrate both network topology and user behaviour. We finish with a prospectus for future research. PMID:25165598

  14. Charge-transfer solids using nucleobases: supramolecular architectures composed of cytosine and [Ni(dmit)2] assembled by multiple hydrogen bonds and heteroatomic contacts.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yukihiro; Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Ishikawa, Manabu; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Hiramatsu, Takaaki; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi

    2013-09-09

    Protonated species of the nucleobase cytosine (C), namely the monoprotonated CH(+) and the hemiprotonated CHC(+), were used to obtain four charge-transfer complexes of [Ni(dmit)2] (dmit: 1,3-dithiole-2-thione-4,5-dithiolate). Diffusion methods afforded two semiconducting [Ni(dmit)2](-) salts; (CH)[Ni(dmit)2](CH3CN) (1) and (CHC)[Ni(dmit)2] (2). In salt 1, the [Ni(dmit)2](-) ions with a S = 1/2 spin construct a uniform one-dimensional array along the molecular long axis, and the significant intermolecular interaction along the face-to-face direction results in a spin-singlet ground state. In contrast, salt 2 exhibits the Mott insulating behavior associated with uniform 1D arrays of [Ni(dmit)2](-), which assemble a two-dimensional layer that is sandwiched between the layers of hydrogen-bonded CHC(+) ribbons. Multiple hydrogen bonds between CHC(+) and [Ni(dmit)2](-) seem to result in the absence of structural phase transition down to 0.5 K. Electrooxidation of [Ni(dmit)2](-) afforded the polymorphs of the [Ni(dmit)2](0.5-) salts, (CHC(+))[{Ni(dmit)2}(0.5-)]2 (3 and 4), which are the first mixed-valence salts of nucleobase cations with metal complex anions. Similar to 2, salt 3 contains CHC(+) ribbons that are sandwiched between the 2D [Ni(dmit)2](0.5-) layers. In the layer, the [Ni(dmit)2](0.5-) ions form dimers with a S = 1/2 spin and the narrow electronic bandwidth causes a semiconducting behavior. In salt 4, the CHC(+) units form an unprecedented corrugated 2D sheet, which is sandwiched between the 2D [Ni(dmit)2](0.5-) layers that involve ring-over-atom and spanning overlaps. In contrast to 3, salt 4 exhibits metallic behavior down to 1.8 K, associated with a wide bandwidth and a 2D Fermi surface. The ability of hydrogen-bonded CHC(+) sheets as a template for the anion radical arrangements is demonstrated.

  15. Facilitation of learning: part 1.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Tyler; Trish, Houghton; Barry, Debbie

    2016-04-06

    This article, the fourth in a series of 11, discusses the context for the facilitation of learning. It outlines the main principles and theories for understanding the process of learning, including examples which link these concepts to practice. The practical aspects of using these theories in a practice setting will be discussed in the fifth article of this series. Together, these two articles will provide mentors and practice teachers with knowledge of the learning process, which will enable them to meet the second domain of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice on facilitation of learning.

  16. Protein expression and subcellular localization of the general purine transporter UapC from Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Valdez-Taubas, J; Diallinas, G; Scazzocchio, C; Rosa, A L

    2000-07-01

    The uapC gene of Aspergillus nidulans belongs to a family of nucleobase-specific transporters conserved in prokaryotic and eucaryotic organisms. We report the use of immunological and green fluorescent protein based strategies to study protein expression and subcellular distribution of UapC. A chimeric protein containing a plant-adapted green fluorescent protein (sGFP) fused to the C-terminus of UapC was shown to be functional in vivo, as it complements a triple mutant (i.e., uapC(-) uapA(-) azgA(-)) unable to grow on uric acid as the sole nitrogen source. UapC-GFP is located in the plasma membrane and, secondarily, in internal structures observed as fluorescent dots. A strong correlation was found between cellular levels of UapC-GFP fluorescence and known patterns of uapC gene expression. This work represents the first in vivo study of protein expression and subcellular localization of a filamentous fungal nucleobase transporter.

  17. Conformation dependent electronic transport in a DNA double-helix

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Sourav Karmakar, S. N.

    2015-10-15

    We present a tight-binding study of conformation dependent electronic transport properties of DNA double-helix including its helical symmetry. We have studied the changes in the localization properties of DNA as we alter the number of stacked bases within every pitch of the double-helix keeping fixed the total number of nitrogen bases within the DNA molecule. We take three DNA sequences, two of them are periodic and one is random and observe that in all the cases localization length increases as we increase the radius of DNA double-helix i.e., number of nucleobases within a pitch. We have also investigated the effect of backbone energetic on the I-V response of the system and found that in presence of helical symmetry, depending on the interplay of conformal variation and disorder, DNA can be found in either metallic, semiconducting and insulating phases, as observed experimentally.

  18. Social Facilitation of Aiding Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartell, Patricia; And Others

    Research on individual's response to emergency situations in the presence of others has produced conflicting results. The bystander effect is the label applied to inaction or the unlikelihood of assistance with others present. The social facilitation effect occurs when the presence of others energizes response; strong habit responses are…

  19. Facilitating Creativity in Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Kuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Creativity in education research has received increasing attention, although the major focus of this research has been on children. Despite pleas by several adult educators for promoting creativity, very few studies have focused on adult learners, leaving to it to be explored what approaches are useful for adult educators to facilitate creativity…

  20. Facilitating Conditions for School Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; McInerney, Dennis M.

    Primary and high school students (277 in grades 5-6; 615 in grades 7-12) in the United States (47 percent boys) responded to 26 items of the Facilitating Conditions Questionnaire (FCQ). Results indicate 7 distinct FCQ factors: perceived value of schooling; affect toward schooling; peer positive academic climate (Peer Positive); encouragement from…

  1. Parietal connectivity mediates multisensory facilitation.

    PubMed

    Brang, David; Taich, Zachary J; Hillyard, Steven A; Grabowecky, Marcia; Ramachandran, V S

    2013-09-01

    Our senses interact in daily life through multisensory integration, facilitating perceptual processes and behavioral responses. The neural mechanisms proposed to underlie this multisensory facilitation include anatomical connections directly linking early sensory areas, indirect connections to higher-order multisensory regions, as well as thalamic connections. Here we examine the relationship between white matter connectivity, as assessed with diffusion tensor imaging, and individual differences in multisensory facilitation and provide the first demonstration of a relationship between anatomical connectivity and multisensory processing in typically developed individuals. Using a whole-brain analysis and contrasting anatomical models of multisensory processing we found that increased connectivity between parietal regions and early sensory areas was associated with the facilitation of reaction times to multisensory (auditory-visual) stimuli. Furthermore, building on prior animal work suggesting the involvement of the superior colliculus in this process, using probabilistic tractography we determined that the strongest cortical projection area connected with the superior colliculus includes the region of connectivity implicated in our independent whole-brain analysis.

  2. Facilitation of Mourning During Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert; And Others

    This paper discusses case studies of children psychologically disturbed by the death of parents or siblings. Illustrations of mourning facilitation were mainly gathered from 16 orphaned children, ages 3-14. Some techniques used in helping children mourn include: discussing physical details of the illness, discussing previous deaths of animals and…

  3. Nucleobase-Modified PNA Suppresses Translation by Forming a Triple Helix with a Hairpin Structure in mRNA In Vitro and in Cells.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Tamaki; Hnedzko, Dziyana; Rozners, Eriks; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-01-18

    Compounds that bind specifically to double-stranded regions of RNA have potential as regulators of structure-based RNA function; however, sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA is challenging. The modification of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with unnatural nucleobases enables the formation of PNA-RNA triplexes. Herein, we demonstrate that a 9-mer PNA forms a sequence-specific PNA-RNA triplex with a dissociation constant of less than 1 nm at physiological pH. The triplex formed within the 5' untranslated region of an mRNA reduces the protein expression levels both in vitro and in cells. A single triplet mismatch destabilizes the complex, and in this case, no translation suppression is observed. The triplex-forming PNAs are unique and potent compounds that hold promise as inhibitors of cellular functions that are controlled by double-stranded RNAs, such as RNA interference, RNA editing, and RNA localization mediated by protein-RNA interactions.

  4. Calculation of pKa values of nucleobases and the guanine oxidation products guanidinohydantoin and spiroiminodihydantoin using density functional theory and a polarizable continuum model.

    PubMed

    Verdolino, Vincenzo; Cammi, Roberto; Munk, Barbara H; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2008-12-25

    An efficient computational method has been identified that uses B3LYP density functional theory, IEF-PCM solvation modeling with a modified UFF cavity, and Boltzmann weighting of tautomers to predict the site-specific and global pKa of DNA nucleobases and their oxidation products. The method has been used to evaluate the acidity of guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), two highly mutagenic guanine oxidation products. The trend observed for the pKa values of Gh (9.64 and 8.15) is consistent with the experimentally observed values for guanidine cation (13.7) and hydantoin (9.16). The pKa1(calc) value for deprotonation of Sp cation (Sp+ --> Sp) is very close to the experimentally observed pKa1 for 8-oxoG and is consistent with the similarity in their structures. The data suggest that the imide (N7) proton in Sp is considerably more acidic than that in Gh, possibly due to the presence of the through-space electronic effects of the carbonyl group located at C6. This difference in the acidity of Gh and Sp may be an indication of their potential toxicity and mutagenicity in vivo and remains a fertile area for experimental study.

  5. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) induced effect on the hybridization and fluorescence properties of oligodeoxyribonucleotides modified with nucleobase-functionalized DNA monomers.

    PubMed

    Kaura, Mamta; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2015-07-14

    LNA and nucleobase-modified DNA monomers are two types of building blocks that are used extensively in oligonucleotide chemistry. However, there are only very few reports in which these two monomer families are used alongside each other. In the present study we set out to characterize the biophysical properties of oligodeoxyribonucleotides in which C5-modified 2'-deoxyuridine or C8-modified 2'-deoxyadenosine monomers are flanked by LNA nucleotides. We hypothesized that the LNA monomers would alter the sugar rings of the modified DNA monomers toward more RNA-like North-type conformations for maximal DNA/RNA affinity and specificity. Indeed, the incorporation of LNA monomers almost invariably results in increased target affinity and specificity relative to the corresponding LNA-free ONs, but the magnitude of the stabilization varies greatly. Introduction of LNA nucleotides as direct neighbors into C5-pyrene-functionalized pyrimidine DNA monomers yields oligonucleotide probes with more desirable photophysical properties as compared to the corresponding LNA-free probes, including more intense fluorescence emission upon target binding and improved discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These hybrid oligonucleotides are therefore promising probes for diagnostic applications.

  6. Fast and Efficient Separation and Determination of UV-absorbing Amino Acids, Nucleobases, and Creatinine Using a Carboxy-functionalized Cation-exchange Column.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yukio; Fujishima, Takeru; Kurota, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new HPLC technique for the determination of biogenic cations such as amino acids and nucleobases, using a weak-acid cation-exchange column. Fourteen analytes, five amino acids and seven bases in addition to creatinine and creatine, were separated in 12 min by means of a two-liquid gradient elution with UV detection. The newly released column packed with a carboxy-functionalized polymethacrylate resin could give excellent selectivity to the organic cations of interest, although such a column is in general suitable for the separation of inorganic common cations. The chromatographic intra-day repeatability was very good with RSDs less than 0.4%, and the quantitation precision based on peak area intensities was also good with RSDs less than 5% for all analytes. The linear calibration lines for quantitation ranged between 5 and 500 μM on 20-μL injections with R(2) more than 0.9990. Since the method could provide concentration data of urinary creatinine and some metabolites simultaneously, for example, the urinary phenylalanine/creatinine ratios for phenylketonuria of inborn errors of metabolism were simply determined through one chromatographic run. The ratios for patients were significantly higher than those for controls. We found that the new weak-acid cation-exchange column was suitable for the separation of organic cations as well as inorganic cations.

  7. Facilitating Facilitators to Facilitate, in Problem or Enquiry Based Learning Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) has been used in dental education over the past 20 years and uses a patient case scenario to stimulate learning in a small group setting, where a trained facilitator does not teach but guides the group to bring about deep contextualized learning, to be empathetic to each other and to encourage fair and equitable…

  8. As fast and selective as enzymatic ligations: unpaired nucleobases increase the selectivity of DNA-controlled native chemical PNA ligation.

    PubMed

    Ficht, Simon; Dose, Christian; Seitz, Oliver

    2005-11-01

    DNA-controlled reactions offer interesting opportunities in biological, chemical, and nanosciences. In practical applications, such as in DNA sequence analysis, the sequence fidelity of the chemical-ligation reaction is of central importance. We present a ligation reaction that is as fast as and much more selective than enzymatic T4 ligase-mediated oligonucleotide ligations. The selectivity was higher than 3000-fold in discriminating matched from singly mismatched DNA templates. It is demonstrated that this enormous selectivity is the hallmark of the particular ligation architecture, which is distinct from previous ligation architectures designed as "nick ligations". Interestingly, the fidelity of the native chemical ligation of peptide nucleic acids was increased by more than one order of magnitude when performing the ligation in such a way that an abasic-site mimic was formed opposite an unpaired template base. It is shown that the high sequence fidelity of the abasic ligation could facilitate the MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometric analysis of early cancer onset by allowing the detection of as little as 0.2 % of single-base mutant DNA in the presence of 99.8 % wild-type DNA.

  9. Stochastic facilitation in the brain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Lawrence M.; Greenwood, Priscilla E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe the context for three unsolved problems of noise in the brain as well as provide some new results relevant to one of them. The problems are: are neural oscillations better described as noisy limit cycles or as noise-driven quasicycles, does noise facilitate synchronization and information transmission in the brain, and do noise-driven spatial patterns (quasipatterns) coexist with noise-driven quasicycles in the brain? We provide a few new results indicating that, in models at least, spatial quasipatterns of quasicycles can occur, and resemble patterns observed in other areas, such as predator-prey systems and chemical reactions.

  10. Exciton delocalization, charge transfer, and electronic coupling for singlet excitation energy transfer between stacked nucleobases in DNA: An MS-CASPT2 study

    SciTech Connect

    Blancafort, Lluís; Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2014-03-07

    Exciton delocalization and singlet excitation energy transfer have been systematically studied for the complete set of 16 DNA nucleobase dimers in their ideal, single-strand stacked B-DNA conformation, at the MS-CASPT2 level of theory. The extent of exciton delocalization in the two lowest (π,π{sup *}) states of the dimers is determined using the symmetrized one-electron transition density matrices between the ground and excited states, and the electronic coupling is calculated using the delocalization measure and the energy splitting between the states [see F. Plasser, A. J. A. Aquino, W. L. Hase, and H. Lischka, J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 11151–11160 (2012)]. The calculated couplings lie between 0.05 eV and 0.14 eV. In the B-DNA conformation, where the interchromophoric distance is 3.38 Å, our couplings deviate significantly from those calculated with the transition charges, showing the importance of orbital overlap components for the couplings in this conformation. The calculation of the couplings is based on a two-state model for exciton delocalization. However, in three stacks with a purine in the 5{sup ′} position and a pyrimidine in the 3{sup ′} one (AT, GC, and GT), there is an energetically favored charge transfer state that mixes with the two lowest excited states. In these dimers we have applied a three-state model that considers the two locally excited diabatic states and the charge transfer state. Using the delocalization and charge transfer descriptors, we obtain all couplings between these three states. Our results are important in the context of DNA photophysics, since the calculated couplings can be used to parametrize effective Hamiltonians to model extended DNA stacks. Our calculations also suggest that the 5{sup ′}-purine-pyrimidine-3{sup ′} sequence favors the formation of charge transfer excited states.

  11. Exciton delocalization, charge transfer, and electronic coupling for singlet excitation energy transfer between stacked nucleobases in DNA: An MS-CASPT2 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancafort, Lluís; Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2014-03-01

    Exciton delocalization and singlet excitation energy transfer have been systematically studied for the complete set of 16 DNA nucleobase dimers in their ideal, single-strand stacked B-DNA conformation, at the MS-CASPT2 level of theory. The extent of exciton delocalization in the two lowest (π,π*) states of the dimers is determined using the symmetrized one-electron transition density matrices between the ground and excited states, and the electronic coupling is calculated using the delocalization measure and the energy splitting between the states [see F. Plasser, A. J. A. Aquino, W. L. Hase, and H. Lischka, J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 11151-11160 (2012)]. The calculated couplings lie between 0.05 eV and 0.14 eV. In the B-DNA conformation, where the interchromophoric distance is 3.38 Å, our couplings deviate significantly from those calculated with the transition charges, showing the importance of orbital overlap components for the couplings in this conformation. The calculation of the couplings is based on a two-state model for exciton delocalization. However, in three stacks with a purine in the 5' position and a pyrimidine in the 3' one (AT, GC, and GT), there is an energetically favored charge transfer state that mixes with the two lowest excited states. In these dimers we have applied a three-state model that considers the two locally excited diabatic states and the charge transfer state. Using the delocalization and charge transfer descriptors, we obtain all couplings between these three states. Our results are important in the context of DNA photophysics, since the calculated couplings can be used to parametrize effective Hamiltonians to model extended DNA stacks. Our calculations also suggest that the 5'-purine-pyrimidine-3' sequence favors the formation of charge transfer excited states.

  12. An expanding role for purine uptake permease-like transporters in plant secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jelesko, John G.

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, our understanding of the plant purine uptake permease (PUP) transporter family was primarily oriented on purine nucleobase substrates and their tissue-specific expression patterns in Arabidopsis. However, a tobacco PUP-like homolog demonstrating nicotine uptake permease activity was recently shown to affect both nicotine metabolism and root cell growth. These new findings expand the physiological role for PUP-like transporters to include plant secondary metabolism. Molecular evolution analyses of PUP-like transporters indicate they are distinct group within an ancient super family of drug and metabolite transporters (DMTs). The PUP-like family originated during terrestrial plant evolution sometime between the bryophytes and the lycophytes. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that the PUP-like transporters were likely derived from a pre-existing nucleotide-sugar transporter family within the DMT super family. Within the lycophyte Selaginella, there are three paralogous groups of PUP-like transporters. One of the three PUP-like paralogous groups showed an extensive pattern of gene duplication and diversification within the angiosperm lineage, whereas the more ancestral PUP-like paralogous groups did not. Biochemical characterization of four closely related PUP-like paralogs together with model-based phylogenetic analyses indicate both subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization during the molecular evolution of angiosperm PUP-like transporters. These findings suggest that members of the PUP-like family of DMT transporters are likely involved in diverse primary and secondary plant metabolic pathways. PMID:22639664

  13. Implications of Mycobacterium Major Facilitator Superfamily for Novel Measures against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zhen; Xie, Longxiang; Xie, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is an important secondary membrane transport protein superfamily conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. The MFS proteins are widespread among bacteria and are responsible for the transfer of substrates. Pathogenic Mycobacterium MFS transporters, their distribution, function, phylogeny, and predicted crystal structures were studied to better understand the function of MFS and to discover specific inhibitors of MFS for better tuberculosis control.

  14. The Influence of Facilitator and Facilitation Characteristics on Participants' Ratings of Stepfamily Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higginbotham, Brian J.; Myler, Cory

    2010-01-01

    We examine the relative importance of facilitator and facilitation characteristics on participant ratings of a stepfamily education program. Data from 48 facilitators and 598 participants suggest that quality facilitation is more meaningful to participants than whether facilitators have comparable demographic characteristics or life experiences.…

  15. Facilitating submetering implementation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    Residential submetering is the measurement and billing of electric use in individual apartments in master-metered buildings. In master-metered building situations, residents do not bear electricity costs in proportion to consumption levels. As a result, studies have confirmed that residents in master-metered buildings tend to consume more electricity than residents with individual apartment metering, and have established electrical submetering as an effective energy conservation measure. The New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA) has commissioned a project called Facilitating Submetering Implementation to identify and analyze barriers to the implementation of residential electrical submetering in New York and to formulate recommendations that would facilitate the removal of these barriers, streamlining the process. Experienced professionals in the technical, legal, regulatory, analytical, financial, and other aspects of submetering were retained to interview key interested parties and conduct public forums. This and other data were then analyzed to ascertain the barriers to submetering and develop recommendations designed to reduce or eliminate these barriers. The key barriers to submetering implementation were found to be the Public Service Commission (PSC) requirement for a vote of a majority of shareholders (for coops and condos) and the high initial cost that cannot easily be recouped by owners of both rental and shareholder-owned buildings. The key recommendations are to repeal the voting requirement, maintain the utility incentives, adopt a uniform dispute resolution mechanism, and increase awareness through an Ad-hoc Submetering Committee and supporting educational materials. Other funding sources not fully available can also be made available with regulatory agency support.

  16. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  17. The Teacher and Town Planner as Facilitator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peel, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of theories of facilitation in teaching focuses on citizen participation and the role of the facilitator in town planning. Highlights include hierarchies of learning; student-centered learning; facilitating community participation; information technology skills and interpersonal skills; and a rationale for participation. (LRW)

  18. Evaluation of the Facilitated Communication Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Martin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Office of Special Education and Student Services asked the Office of Shared Accountability to evaluate the "Facilitated Communication Pilot." In facilitated communication (FC), people with communication impairments express themselves by typing with the aid of a communication partner, called a facilitator, who provides physical (and…

  19. Technologies and Techniques for Supporting Facilitated Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnell, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, demand for education of all kinds is increasing beyond the capacity to provide it. One approach that shows potential for addressing this demand is facilitated video. In facilitated video, an educator is recorded teaching, and that video is sent to a remote site where it is shown to students by a facilitator who creates interaction…

  20. Fungal phylogenetic diversity drives plant facilitation.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Navarro, Alicia; Segarra-Moragues, J G; Valiente-Banuet, A; Verdú, M

    2016-06-01

    Plant-plant facilitation is a crucial ecological process, as many plant species (facilitated) require the presence of an established individual (nurse) to recruit. Some plant facilitative interactions disappear during the ontogenetic development of the facilitated plant but others persist, even when the two plants are adults. We test whether the persistence of plant facilitative interactions is explained by the phylogenetic diversity of mutualistic and non-mutualistic fungi that the nurse and the facilitated species add to the shared rhizosphere. We classify plant facilitative interactions as persistent and non-persistent interactions and quantify the phylogenetic diversity of mutualistic and non-mutualistic fungi added by the plant species to the shared rhizosphere. Our results show that the facilitated species add less phylogenetic diversity of non-mutualistic fungi when plant facilitative interactions persist than when they do not persist. However, persistent and non-persistent facilitative interactions did not differ in the phylogenetic diversity of mutualistic fungi added by the facilitated species to the shared rhizosphere. Finally, the fungal phylogenetic diversity added by the nurse to the shared rhizosphere did not differ between persistent and non-persistent interactions. This study suggests that considering the fungal associates of the plant species involved in facilitative interactions can shed light on the mechanisms of persistence for plant-plant interactions.

  1. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  2. Refinement of DNA structures through near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analysis: applications on guanine and cytosine nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hua, Weijie; Gao, Bin; Li, Shuhua; Agren, Hans; Luo, Yi

    2010-10-21

    In this work we highlight the potential of NEXAFS—near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure—analysis to perform refinements of hydrogen-bond structure in DNA. For this purpose we have carried out first-principle calculations of the N1s NEXAFS spectra of the guanine and cytosine nucleobases and their tautomers, nucleosides, and nucleotides in the gas phase, as well as for five crystal structures of guanine, cytosine, or guanosine. The spectra all clearly show imine (π1*) and amine (π2*) nitrogen absorption bands with a characteristic energy difference (Δ). Among all of the intramolecule covalent connections, the tautomerism of hydrogens makes the largest influence, around ±0.4−0.5 eV change of Δ, to the spectra due to a switch of single−double bonds. Deoxyribose and ribose sugars can cause at most 0.2 eV narrowing of Δ, while the phosphate groups have nearly negligible effects on the spectra. Two kinds of intermolecule interactions are analyzed, the hydrogen bonds and the stacking effect, by comparing “compressed” and “expanded” models or by comparing models including or excluding the nearest stacking molecules. The shortening of hydrogen-bond length by 0.2−0.3 Å can result in the reduction of Δ by 0.2−0.8 eV. This is because the hydrogen bonds make the electrons more delocalized, and the amine and imine nitrogens become less distinguishable. Moreover, the hydrogen bond has a different ability to influence the spectra of different crystals, with guanine crystals as the largest (change by 0.8 eV) and the guanosine crystal as the smallest (change by 0.2 eV). The stacking has negligible effects on the spectra in all studied systems. A comparison of guanosine to guanine crystals shows that the sugars in the crystal could create “blocks” in the π-and hydrogen bonds network of bases and thus makes the imine and amine nitrogens more distinguishable with a larger Δ. Our theoretical calculations offer a good match with experimental findings

  3. INFLUENCE OF MACROMOLECULES ON CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macromolecules in the pore fluid influence the mobility of hydrophobic compounds through soils. his study evaluated the significance of macromolecules in facilitating chemical transport under laboratory conditions. Partition coefficients between 14C-labeled hexachlorobenzene and ...

  4. Microbial drug efflux proteins of the major facilitator superfamily.

    PubMed

    Saidijam, Massoud; Benedetti, Giulia; Ren, Qinghu; Xu, Zhiqiang; Hoyle, Christopher J; Palmer, Sarah L; Ward, Alison; Bettaney, Kim E; Szakonyi, Gerda; Meuller, Johan; Morrison, Scott; Pos, Martin K; Butaye, Patrick; Walravens, Karl; Langton, Kate; Herbert, Richard B; Skurray, Ronald A; Paulsen, Ian T; O'reilly, John; Rutherford, Nicholas G; Brown, Melissa H; Bill, Roslyn M; Henderson, Peter J F

    2006-07-01

    Drug efflux proteins are widespread amongst microorganisms, including pathogens. They can contribute to both natural insensitivity to antibiotics and to emerging antibiotic resistance and so are potential targets for the development of new antibacterial drugs. The design of such drugs would be greatly facilitated by knowledge of the structures of these transport proteins, which are poorly understood, because of the difficulties of obtaining crystals of quality. We describe a structural genomics approach for the amplified expression, purification and characterisation of prokaryotic drug efflux proteins of the 'Major Facilitator Superfamily' (MFS) of transport proteins from Helicobacter pylori, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, Brucella melitensis, Campylobacter jejuni, Neisseria meningitides and Streptomyces coelicolor. The H. pylori putative drug resistance protein, HP1092, and the S. aureus QacA proteins are used as detailed examples. This strategy is an important step towards reproducible production of transport proteins for the screening of drug binding and for optimisation of crystallisation conditions to enable subsequent structure determination.

  5. Cysteine transport through excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3).

    PubMed

    Watts, Spencer D; Torres-Salazar, Delany; Divito, Christopher B; Amara, Susan G

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) limit glutamatergic signaling and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. Of the five known EAAT isoforms (EAATs 1-5), only the neuronal isoform, EAAT3 (EAAC1), can efficiently transport the uncharged amino acid L-cysteine. EAAT3-mediated cysteine transport has been proposed to be a primary mechanism used by neurons to obtain cysteine for the synthesis of glutathione, a key molecule in preventing oxidative stress and neuronal toxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the selective transport of cysteine by EAAT3 have not been elucidated. Here we propose that the transport of cysteine through EAAT3 requires formation of the thiolate form of cysteine in the binding site. Using Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells expressing EAAT2 and EAAT3, we assessed the transport kinetics of different substrates and measured transporter-associated currents electrophysiologically. Our results show that L-selenocysteine, a cysteine analog that forms a negatively-charged selenolate ion at physiological pH, is efficiently transported by EAATs 1-3 and has a much higher apparent affinity for transport when compared to cysteine. Using a membrane tethered GFP variant to monitor intracellular pH changes associated with transport activity, we observed that transport of either L-glutamate or L-selenocysteine by EAAT3 decreased intracellular pH, whereas transport of cysteine resulted in cytoplasmic alkalinization. No change in pH was observed when cysteine was applied to cells expressing EAAT2, which displays negligible transport of cysteine. Under conditions that favor release of intracellular substrates through EAAT3 we observed release of labeled intracellular glutamate but did not detect cysteine release. Our results support a model whereby cysteine transport through EAAT3 is facilitated through cysteine de-protonation and that once inside, the thiolate is rapidly re-protonated. Moreover, these findings suggest

  6. Structural comparison of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranjana, K.C.; Kakarla, Prathusha; Willmon, T. Mark; Hernandez, Alberto J.; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Barr, Sharla R.; Varela, Manuel F.

    2016-01-01

    The biological membrane is an efficient barrier against water-soluble substances. Solute transporters circumvent this membrane barrier by transporting water-soluble solutes across the membrane to the other sides. These transport proteins are thus required for all living organisms. Microorganisms, such as bacteria, effectively exploit solute transporters to acquire useful nutrients for growth or to expel substances that are inhibitory to their growth. Overall, there are distinct types of related solute transporters that are grouped into families or superfamilies. Of these various transporters, the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) represents a very large and constantly growing group and are driven by solute- and ion-gradients, making them passive and secondary active transporters, respectively. Members of the major facilitator superfamily transport an extreme variety of structurally different substrates such as antimicrobial agents, amino acids, sugars, intermediary metabolites, ions, and other small molecules. Importantly, bacteria, especially pathogenic ones, have evolved multidrug efflux pumps which belong to the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, members of this important superfamily share similar primary sequences in the form of highly conserved sequence motifs that confer useful functional properties during transport. The transporters of the superfamily also share similarities in secondary structures, such as possessing 12- or 14-membrane spanning α-helices and the more recently described 3-helix structure repeat element, known as the MFS fold. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps have been determined for only a few members of the superfamily, all drug pumps of which are surprisingly from Escherichia coli. This review briefly summarizes the structural properties of the bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily in a comparative manner and provides future directions for study. PMID:27065631

  7. Structural comparison of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily.

    PubMed

    Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranjana, K C; Kakarla, Prathusha; Willmon, T Mark; Hernandez, Alberto J; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Barr, Sharla R; Varela, Manuel F

    The biological membrane is an efficient barrier against water-soluble substances. Solute transporters circumvent this membrane barrier by transporting water-soluble solutes across the membrane to the other sides. These transport proteins are thus required for all living organisms. Microorganisms, such as bacteria, effectively exploit solute transporters to acquire useful nutrients for growth or to expel substances that are inhibitory to their growth. Overall, there are distinct types of related solute transporters that are grouped into families or superfamilies. Of these various transporters, the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) represents a very large and constantly growing group and are driven by solute- and ion-gradients, making them passive and secondary active transporters, respectively. Members of the major facilitator superfamily transport an extreme variety of structurally different substrates such as antimicrobial agents, amino acids, sugars, intermediary metabolites, ions, and other small molecules. Importantly, bacteria, especially pathogenic ones, have evolved multidrug efflux pumps which belong to the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, members of this important superfamily share similar primary sequences in the form of highly conserved sequence motifs that confer useful functional properties during transport. The transporters of the superfamily also share similarities in secondary structures, such as possessing 12- or 14-membrane spanning α-helices and the more recently described 3-helix structure repeat element, known as the MFS fold. The three-dimensional structures of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps have been determined for only a few members of the superfamily, all drug pumps of which are surprisingly from Escherichia coli. This review briefly summarizes the structural properties of the bacterial multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily in a comparative manner and provides future directions for study.

  8. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOEpatents

    Doktycz, Mitchel J [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  9. Simple scale interpolator facilitates reading of graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterman, D. E., Jr.

    1965-01-01

    Simple transparent overlay with interpolation scale facilitates accurate, rapid reading of graph coordinate points. This device can be used for enlarging drawings and locating points on perspective drawings.

  10. Inflatable stretcher to transport patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, C. C.; Gordon, F. T., Jr.; Schmidt, C. B.

    1970-01-01

    Inflatable plastic bag inside strong, inflexible outer bag facilitates emergency transport of seriously burned or disabled patients. When the bag is inflated the patient is completely immobilized and cushioned from external shock. Air for breathing, temperature controls and communications may be provided by appropriate plug-in connections.

  11. Facilitation of calcium-dependent potassium current.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S H

    1994-12-01

    The activation of Ca-dependent K+ current, Ic, was studied in macropatches on the cell bodies of molluscan neurons. When a depolarizing voltage-clamp pulse was applied repeatedly, Ic facilitated in a manner that resembled the facilitation of synaptic transmitter release. Facilitation was characterized by an increase in Ic amplitude, a progressive increase in instantaneous outward current, and a decrease in utilization time. Experiments were done to investigate the mechanism responsible for Ic facilitation. Facilitation was reduced by microinjection of an exogenous Ca2+ buffer into the cytoplasm, indicating that facilitation is a Ca(2+)-dependent process. It was also reduced at elevated temperatures. Conversely, facilitation was greatly potentiated by blocking the Na/Ca exchange mechanism. It is concluded that the facilitation of Ca-dependent K+ current results from the accumulation of Ca2+ at the inner face of the membrane during the repeated activation of Ca2+ channels by depolarization. The Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 was used in fluorescence imaging experiments to measure changes in [Ca]i near the cell membrane during repeated depolarizing pulses and the interpretation of these results was aided by numerical simulations of Ca2+ accumulation, diffusion, and buffering in the peripheral cytoplasm. These experiments showed that the time course of Ic facilitation matches the time course of Ca2+ accumulation at the membrane. It was found that the strength of Ic facilitation varies among patches on the same neuron, suggesting that the accumulation of Ca2+ is not uniform along the inner surface of the membrane and that gradients in [Ca]i develop and are maintained during trains of depolarizing pulses. Potential mechanisms that may lead to local differences in Ca2+ accumulation and Ic facilitation are discussed.

  12. The Role of Touch in Facilitated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezuka, Emiko

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the role of touch in the use of facilitated communication with Japanese individuals with autism. Five experiments were conducted involving a "telepathy game" using a rod with an attached strain gauge. Results found the facilitator's contact controlled the motor responses of the subjects. (Author/CR)

  13. Caring and Sharing: Becoming a Peer Facilitator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, Robert D.; Erney, Tom

    This book contains information and skill-building activities designed to train adolescents as peer facilitators. The first chapter describes peer facilitation and provides an overview of the book. The second chapter discusses principles, concepts, and ideas to help better understand how people learn, make decisions, change, and develop their own…

  14. Facilitated Communication: The Clinical and Social Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shane, Howard C., Ed.

    This text explains the phenomenon of facilitated communication (FC) from an empirical, data-based, and/or clinical perspective. It is not a how-to-facilitate text, but one that explores the clinical and sociological reality of FC. A common theme running through each of the papers in the book is the question of FC's legitimacy. The papers reveal…

  15. Interaction Patterns and Facilitation of Peer Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Marvin E.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Data show that giving information to members of a group is more important in determining the perception by others that the person is facilitating group performance. Asking for information and opinions is more important in actual facilitation of group learning. Social-emotional support becomes important after initial phases of group interaction.…

  16. A Dialogic Approach to Online Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    Social construction of understanding has long been a significant underlying principle of learning and teaching, and while there are many models for the design of online activities to promote this, there are considerably fewer models for the facilitation of such dialogue. This paper examines some of these facilitation models from the point of view…

  17. Getting the Words Out: Facilitated Communication Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Rosemary; Remington-Gurney, Jane

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of facilitated communication training with individuals labeled as intellectually impaired, including individuals diagnosed as autistic, at the DEAL Communication Centre in Victoria, Australia. The paper describes the clients, hand use problems addressed by facilitation, literacy, structuring success, fading support,…

  18. "Stepping Up": A Focus on Facilitator Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostouros, Patricia; Warthe, D. Gaye; Carter-Snell, Catherine; Burnett, Che

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impact on peer facilitators in "Stepping Up," a dating violence prevention program at a Canadian university. A focus group held eight months following the delivery of the program determined the personal impact of involvement in the program. Results indicate that peer facilitators experienced personal growth as…

  19. Facilitator Talk in EAP Reading Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Current sociocultural perspectives on language learning call on teachers to reinvent themselves in ways which facilitate student learning rather than transmit knowledge. For teachers, this means adopting new roles, and acquiring a new repertoire of teacher talk. This paper aims to further the work on facilitator talk begun by Clifton (2006) and…

  20. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  1. Facilitative Leadership: How Principals Lead without Dominating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; Goldman, Paul

    1994-01-01

    "Facilitative leadership" may be defined as the ability of principals to lead without controlling, while making it easier for all members of the school community to achieve agreed-upon goals. The bulk of the Bulletin consists of a discussion of 10 propositions related to facilitative leadership drawn from 3 sources: (1) studies in…

  2. The Limited Facilitative Effect of Typographical Signals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Jonathan M.; Fowler, Susan B.

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments with 188 college students investigated the facilitative effect of typographical signals such as underlining, headings, or other devices to help readers identify specific points. Results do not support a general facilitative effect of typographical signals but suggest that use of signals depends on the reader's strategic processing.…

  3. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  4. Quantification of 8-oxo-guanine and guanine as the nucleobase, nucleoside and deoxynucleoside forms in human urine by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weimann, Allan; Belling, Dorthe; Poulsen, Henrik E

    2002-01-15

    Oxidative DNA damage, linked pathogenically to a variety of diseases such as cancer and ageing, can be investigated by measuring specific DNA repair products in urine. Within the last decade, since it was established that such products were excreted into urine, progress in their analysis in urine has been limited. Guanine is the DNA base most prone to oxidation. We present a method for determination of the urinary 8-hydroxylated species of guanine, based on direct injection of urine onto a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry system. The analysis covers the 8-hydroxylated base, ribonucleoside and deoxynucleoside, and the corresponding non-oxidised species. Without pre-treatment of urine the detection limits for the nucleobases are approximately 2 nM (50 fmol injected) and for the nucleosides approximately 0.5 nM (12.5 fmol injected). Previously, liquid chromatography of the nucleobases has been problematic but is made possible by low-temperature reverse-phase C18 chromatography, a method that increases retention on the column. In the case of the nucleosides, retention was almost total and provides a means for on-column concentration of larger urine samples and controlled high peak gradient elution. The total excretion of 8-hydroxylated guanine species was 212 nmol/24 h. The oxidised base accounted for 64%, the ribonucleoside for 23% and the deoxynucleoside for 13%, indicating substantial oxidation of RNA in humans. In rat urine, excretion of the oxidised base was more dominant, the percentages of the oxidised base, ribonucleoside and deoxynucleosides being 89, 8 and 3%. This finding is at odds with previous reports using immunoaffinity pre-purification and HPLC-electrochemical detection analysis. The developed method now makes it possible to measure oxidative nucleic acid stress to both RNA and DNA in epidemiological and intervention settings, and our findings indicate a substantial RNA oxidation in addition to DNA oxidation. The

  5. Mechanistic characterization of the 5′-triphosphate-dependent activation of PKR: Lack of 5′-end nucleobase specificity, evidence for a distinct triphosphate binding site, and a critical role for the dsRBD

    PubMed Central

    Toroney, Rebecca; Hull, Chelsea M.; Sokoloski, Joshua E.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase PKR is activated by RNA to phosphorylate eIF-2α, inhibiting translation initiation. Long dsRNA activates PKR via interactions with the dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD). Weakly structured RNA also activates PKR and does so in a 5′-triphosphate (ppp)–dependent fashion, however relatively little is known about this pathway. We used a mutant T7 RNA polymerase to incorporate all four triphosphate-containing nucleotides into the first position of a largely single-stranded RNA and found absence of selectivity, in that all four transcripts activate PKR. Recognition of 5′-triphosphate, but not the nucleobase at the 5′-most position, makes this RNA-mediated innate immune response sensitive to a broad array of viruses. PKR was neither activated in the presence of γ-GTP nor recognized NTPs other than ATP in activation competition and ITC binding assays. This indicates that the binding site for ATP is selective, which contrasts with the site for the 5′ end of ppp-ssRNA. Activation experiments reveal that short dsRNAs compete with 5′-triphosphate RNAs and heparin for activation, and likewise gel-shift assays reveal that activating 5′-triphosphate RNAs and heparin compete with short dsRNAs for binding to PKR's dsRBD. The dsRBD thus plays a critical role in the activation of PKR by ppp-ssRNA and even heparin. At the same time, cross-linking experiments indicate that ppp-ssRNA interacts with PKR outside of the dsRBD as well. Overall, 5′-triphosphate-containing, weakly structured RNAs activate PKR via interactions with both the dsRBD and a distinct triphosphate binding site that lacks 5′-nucleobase specificity, allowing the innate immune response to provide broad-spectrum protection from pathogens. PMID:22912486

  6. Forensic toxicology in drug-facilitated sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Magalhães, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    The low rates of reporting, prosecution and conviction that characterize sexual assault, is likely even more evident in drug-facilitated cases. Typically, in these crimes, victims are incapacitated and left unable to resist sexual advances, unconscious, unable to fight off the abuser or to say "no" and unable to clearly remember the circumstances surrounding the events due to anterograde amnesia. The consequence is the delay in performing toxicological analysis aggravated by the reluctance of the victim to disclose the crime. Moreover since "date rape drugs" are often consumed with ethanol and exhibit similar toxicodynamic effects, the diagnosis is erroneously performed as being classical ethanol intoxication. Therefore, it is imperative to rapidly consider toxicological analysis in drug-facilitated sexual assaults. The major focus of this review is to harmonize practical approaches and guidelines to rapidly uncover drug-facilitated sexual assault, namely issues related to when to perform toxicological analysis, toxicological requests, samples to be collected, storage, preservation and transport precautions and xenobiotics or endobiotics to be analyzed.