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Sample records for facility closure plans

  1. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  2. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Interim Status Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2000-12-01

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). WESF is located within the 225B Facility in the 200 East Area on the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based on Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the storage unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the intention is to clean close WESF, postclosure activities are not applicable to this interim status closure plan. To clean close the storage unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or environmentally is impracticable, the interim status closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. WESF stores cesium and strontium encapsulated salts. The encapsulated salts are stored in the pool cells or process cells located within 225B Facility. The dangerous waste is contained within a double containment system to preclude spills to the environment. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the capsules, operating methods and administrative controls require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  3. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  4. 303-K Storage Facility closure plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-15

    Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 303-K Storage Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 303-K Storage Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 303-K Storage Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 303-K Storage Facility. The 303-K Storage Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

  5. Closure Plan for the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.R.

    2000-10-30

    A closure plan has been developed to comply with the applicable requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.2 Manual and Guidance. The plan is organized according to the specifications of the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans.

  6. Preliminary Closure Plan for the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    BURBANK, D.A.

    2000-08-31

    This document describes the preliminary plans for closure of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) disposal facility to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington. The facility will provide near-surface disposal of up to 204,000 cubic meters of ILAW in engineered trenches with modified RCRA Subtitle C closure barriers.

  7. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan - Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment Unit Glovebox HA-20MB

    SciTech Connect

    PRIGNANO, A.L.

    2003-06-25

    This closure plan describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) glovebox HA-20MB that housed an interim status ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) of 1976 treatment unit. This closure plan is certified and submitted to Ecology for incorporation into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (HF RCRA Permit) in accordance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement; TPA) Milestone M-83-30 requiring submittal of a certified closure plan for ''glovebox HA-20MB'' by July 31, 2003. Glovebox HA-20MB is located within the 231-5Z Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Currently glovebox HA-20MB is being used for non-RCRA analytical purposes. The schedule of closure activities under this plan supports completion of TPA Milestone M-83-44 to deactivate and prepare for dismantlement the above grade portions of the 234-5Z and ZA, 243-Z, and 291-Z and 291-Z-1 stack buildings by September 30, 2015. Under this closure plan, glovebox HA-20MB will undergo clean closure to the performance standards of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 with respect to all dangerous waste contamination from glovebox HA-20MB RCRA operations. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP treatment unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. Any information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. Clearance form only sent to

  8. The 4843 Alkali Metal Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The 4843 AMSF has been used primarily to provide a centralized building to receive and store dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste, including sodium and lithium, which has been generated at the Fast Flux Test Facility and at various other Hanford Site operations that used alkali metals. Most of the dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste received consists of retired equipment from liquid sodium processes. The unit continues to store material. In general, only solid alkali metal waste that is water reactive is stored at the 4843 AMSF. The 4843 AMSF will be closed in a manner consistent with Ecology guidelines and regulations (WAC 173-303-610). The general closure procedure is detailed as follows.

  9. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1992-11-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. The 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility (3718-F Facility), located in the 300 Area, was used to store and treat alkali metal wastes. Therefore, it is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989) and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy the thermal treatment facility closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the 3718-F Facility, the history of wastes managed, and the approach that will be followed to close the facility. Only hazardous constituents derived from 3718-F Facility operations will be addressed.

  10. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Checklist for the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950's and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Clean closure is the proposed method of closure for the LSFF. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  11. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan for the Y-12 9409-5 Tank Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This document presents information on the closure of the Y-12 9409-5 Tank Storage Facility. Topics discussed include: facility description; closure history; closure performance standard; partial closure; maximum waste inventory; closure activities; schedule; and postclosure care.

  12. Technical Review of Retrieval and Closure Plans for the INEEL INTEC Tank Farm Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A; Burks, Barry L; Quigley, Keith D; Falter, Diedre D

    2001-09-28

    The purpose of this report is to document the conclusions of a technical review of retrieval and closure plans for the Idaho National Energy and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility. In addition to reviewing retrieval and closure plans for these tanks, the review process served as an information exchange mechanism so that staff in the INEEL High Level Waste (HLW) Program could become more familiar with retrieval and closure approaches that have been completed or are planned for underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Hanford sites. This review focused not only on evaluation of the technical feasibility and appropriateness of the approach selected by INEEL but also on technology gaps that could be addressed through utilization of technologies or performance data available at other DOE sites and in the private sector. The reviewers, Judith Bamberger of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Dr. Barry Burks of The Providence Group Applied Technology, have extensive experience in the development and application of tank waste retrieval technologies for nuclear waste remediation.

  13. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System

    SciTech Connect

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-31

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under the Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan for Tank System TRA-009. The tank system to be closed is identified as VCO-SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-009. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  14. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) environmental checklist forms for 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 304 Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 304 Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The 304 Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

  15. Mobilization plan for the Y-12 9409-5 tank storage facility RCRA closure plan. Final report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    This mobilization plan identifies the activities and equipment necessary to begin the field sampling for the Oak Ridge Y-12 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility (DTSF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure. Elements of the plan outline the necessary components of each mobilization task and identify whether SAIC or the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Y-12 Environmental Restoration Division will be responsible for task coordination. Field work will be conducted in two phases: mobilization phase and soil sampling phase. Training and medical monitoring, access, permits and passes, decontamination/staging area, equipment, and management are covered in this document.

  16. Soil sampling and analysis plan for the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility closure activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1997-05-01

    Amendment V.13.B.b to the approved closure plan (DOE-RL 1995a) requires that a soil sampling and analysis plan be prepared and submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) for review and approval. Amendment V.13.B.c requires that a diagram of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility unit (the treatment, storage, and disposal [TSD] unit) boundary that is to be closed, including the maximum extent of operation, be prepared and submitted as part is of the soil sampling and analysis plan. This document describes the sampling and analysis that is to be performed in response to these requirements and amends the closure plan. Specifically, this document supersedes Section 6.2, lines 43--46, and Section 7.3.6 of the closure plan. Results from the analysis will be compared to cleanup levels identified in the closure plan. These cleanup levels will be established using residential exposure assumptions in accordance with the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Cleanup Regulation (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-340) as required in Amendment V.13.B.I. Results of all sampling, including the raw analytical data, a summary of analytical results, a data validation package, and a narrative summary with conclusions will be provided to Ecology as specified in Amendment V.13.B.e. The results and process used to collect and analyze the soil samples will be certified by a licensed professional engineer. These results and a certificate of closure for the balance of the TSD unit, as outlined in Chapter 7.0 of the approved closure plan (storage shed, concrete pad, burn building, scrubber, and reaction tanks), will provide the basis for a closure determination.

  17. Phase 1 sampling and analysis plan for the 304 Concretion Facility closure activities

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.G.

    1994-09-14

    This document provides guidance for the initial (Phase 1) sampling and analysis activities associated with the proposed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) clean closure of the 304 Concretion Facility. Over its service life, the 304 Concretion Facility housed the pilot plants associated with cladding uranium cores, was used to store engineering equipment and product chemicals, was used to treat low-level radioactive mixed waste, recyclable scrap uranium generated during nuclear fuel fabrication, and uranium-titanium alloy chips, and was used for the repackaging of spent halogenated solvents from the nuclear fuels manufacturing process. The strategy for clean closure of the 304 Concretion Facility is to decontaminate, sample (Phase 1 sampling), and evaluate results. If the evaluation indicates that a limited area requires additional decontamination for clean closure, the limited area will be decontaminated, resampled (Phase 2 sampling), and the result evaluated. If the evaluation indicates that the constituents of concern are below action levels, the facility will be clean closed. Or, if the evaluation indicates that the constituents of concern are present above action levels, the condition of the facility will be evaluated and appropriate action taken. There are a total of 37 sampling locations comprising 12 concrete core, 1 concrete chip, 9 soil, 11 wipe, and 4 asphalt core sampling locations. Analysis for inorganics and volatile organics will be performed on the concrete core and soil samples. Separate concrete core samples will be required for the inorganic and volatile organic analysis (VOA). Analysis for inorganics only will be performed on the concrete chip, wipe, and asphalt samples.

  18. Final closure plan for the high-explosives open burn treatment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, S.

    1997-04-01

    This document addresses the interim status closure of the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility, as detailed by Title 22, Division 4.5, Chapter 15, Article 7 of the Califonia Code of Regulations (CCR) and by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, Subpart G, ``Closure and Post Closure.`` The Closure Plan (Chapter 1) and the Post- Closure Plan (Chapter 2) address the concept of long-term hazard elimination. The Closure Plan provides for capping and grading the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility and revegetating the immediate area in accordance with applicable requirements. The Closure Plan also reflects careful consideration of site location and topography, geologic and hydrologic factors, climate, cover characteristics, type and amount of wastes, and the potential for contaminant migration. The Post-Closure Plan is designed to allow LLNL to monitor the movement, if any, of pollutants from the treatment area. In addition, quarterly inspections will ensure that all surfaces of the closed facility, including the cover and diversion ditches, remain in good repair, thus precluding the potential for contaminant migration.

  19. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure.

  20. FINAL CLOSURE PLAN SURFACE IMPOUNDMENTS CLOSURE, SITE 300

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J E; Scott, J E; Mathews, S E

    2004-09-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of the University of California (LLNL) operates two Class II surface impoundments that store wastewater that is discharged from a number of buildings located on the Site 300 Facility (Site 300). The wastewater is the by-product of explosives processing. Reduction in the volume of water discharged from these buildings over the past several years has significantly reduced the wastewater storage needs. In addition, the impoundments were constructed in 1984, and the high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane liners are nearing the end of their service life. The purpose of this project is to clean close the surface impoundments and provide new wastewater storage using portable, above ground storage tanks at six locations. The tanks will be installed prior to closure of the impoundments and will include heaters for allowing evaporation during relatively cool weather. Golder Associates (Golder) has prepared this Final Closure Plan (Closure Plan) on behalf of LLNL to address construction associated with the clean closure of the impoundments. This Closure Plan complies with State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Section 21400 of the California Code of Regulations Title 27 (27 CCR {section}21400). As required by these regulations and guidance, this Plan provides the following information: (1) A site characterization, including the site location, history, current operations, and geology and hydrogeology; (2) The regulatory requirements relevant to clean closure of the impoundments; (3) The closure procedures; and, (4) The procedures for validation and documentation of clean closure.

  1. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S. K.

    2007-11-07

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Old Hydrofracture Facility Tank Closure Plan and Grout Development Status Report for FY 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.E.

    2000-05-08

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities across the country have radioactive waste underground storage tanks, which will require either complete removal of the tank contents and tank shells or in-place stabilization of sludge heels. Complete removal of the sludge and tank shells can become costly while providing little benefit to health, safety, and the environment. An alternative to the removal of the residual wastes and tank shells is the use of in situ solidification and stabilization techniques to immobilize the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and radioactive components present in waste storage tanks. One technology for in situ remediation of tank wastes is Ground Environmental Service's (GES's) Multi-Point-Injection (MPI.) technology. MPI technology is a patented delivery system, which uses simple and inexpensive injection tools for rapid delivery of grout or other treatment agents, as well as for the emplacement of subsurface barriers. Through the use of tailored grout formulations in conjunction with a system of specially designed grout injection tools, MPI technology is capable of producing a uniform mixture of sludge and grout. Grouts can be tailored for the immobilization of specific RCRA and radioactive constituents. The system of injection tools is designed to maximize the mixing efficiency of the grout with the wastes in the tank. MPI technology has been successfully demonstrated on the solidification of shallow buried wastes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and in large-scale pumping and mixing tests in both cylindrical and horizontal simulated waste tanks. Hot demonstration of the technology will be accomplished during the closure of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tank at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in fiscal year 2000. This report describes the closure plan for the OHF tanks and presents the status of grout formulation development at ORNL.

  3. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    LESPERANCE, C.P.

    2007-05-23

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast reactor situated on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in the southeastern portion of Washington State. DOE issued the final order to shut down the facility in 2001, when it was concluded that there was no longer a need for FFTF. Deactivation activities are in progress to remove or stabilize major hazards and deactivate systems to achieve end points documented in the project baseline. The reactor has been defueled, and approximately 97% of the fuel has been removed from the facility. Approximately 97% of the sodium has been drained from the plant's systems and placed into an on-site Sodium Storage Facility. The residual sodium will be kept frozen under a blanket of inert gas until it is removed later as part of the facility's decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). Plant systems have been shut down and placed in a low-risk state to minimize requirements for surveillance and maintenance. D&D work cannot begin until an Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared to evaluate various end state options and to provide a basis for selecting one of the options. The Environmental Impact Statement is expected to be issued in 2009.

  4. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) HISTORY & STATUS & FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    FARABEE, O.A.

    2006-02-24

    In 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) decided to shut down the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) due to lack of national missions that justified the annual operating budget of approximately $88M/year. The initial vision was to ''deactive'' the facility to an industrially and radiologically safe condition to allow long-term, minimal surveillance storage until approximately 2045. This approach would minimize near term cash flow and allow the radioactive decay of activated components. The final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) would then be performed using then-current methodology in a safe and efficient manner. the philosophy has now changed to close coupling the initial deactivation with final D and D. This paper presents the status of the facility and focuses on the future challenge of sodium removal.

  5. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    BURKE, T.M.

    2005-04-13

    Deactivation activities are currently in progress at the Fast Flux Test Facility. These deactivation activities are intended to remove most hazardous materials and prepare the facility for final disposition. The two major hazards to be removed are the nuclear fuel and the alkali metal (most sodium) coolant. The fuel and coolant removal activities are proceeding well and are expected to complete in 2006. Plant systems are being shut down as allowed by completion of various fuel and coolant removal actions. A Decommissioning Environmental Impact Statement is in progress to evaluate a range of potential final disposition end states.

  6. 40 CFR 264.112 - Closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....112 Section 264.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES... operator of a hazardous waste management facility must have a written closure plan. In addition,...

  7. Hanford Patrol Academy demolition sites closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    The Hanford Site is owned by the U.S. Government and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and serves as co-operator of the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites, the unit addressed in this paper. This document consists of a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application, Form 3 (Revision 4), and a closure plan for the site. An explanation of the Part A Form 3 submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. This Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan submittal contains information current as of December 15, 1994.

  8. 303-K Storage Facility report on FY98 closure activities

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.G.

    1998-07-17

    This report summarizes and evaluates the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample analysis performed in support of the closure of the 303-K Storage Facility. The evaluation is based on the validated data included in the data validation package (98-EAP-346) for the 303-K Storage Facility. The results of this evaluation will be used for assessing contamination for the purpose of closing the 303-K Storage Facility as described in the 303-K Storage Facility Closure Plan, DOE/RL-90-04. The closure strategy for the 303-K Storage Facility is to decontaminate the interior of the north half of the 303-K Building to remove known or suspected dangerous waste contamination, to sample the interior concrete and exterior soils for the constituents of concern, and then to perform data analysis, with an evaluation to determine if the closure activities and data meet the closure criteria. The closure criteria for the 303-K Storage Facility is that the concentrations of constituents of concern are not present above the cleanup levels. Based on the evaluation of the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample data, determination has been made that the soils at the 303-K Storage Facility meet the cleanup performance standards (WMH 1997) and can be clean closed. The evaluation determined that the 303-K Building cannot be clean closed without additional closure activities. An additional evaluation will be needed to determine the specific activities required to clean close the 303-K Storage Facility. The radiological contamination at the 303-K Storage Facility is not addressed by the closure strategy.

  9. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-05-17

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999.

  10. 40 CFR 265.112 - Closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and final closure including, but not limited to, procedures for cleaning equipment and removing... closure of a boiler or industrial furnace. The owner or operator must submit the closure plan to the... expects to begin partial or final closure of a boiler or industrial furnace. Owners or operators...

  11. 40 CFR 265.112 - Closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and final closure including, but not limited to, procedures for cleaning equipment and removing... closure of a boiler or industrial furnace. The owner or operator must submit the closure plan to the... expects to begin partial or final closure of a boiler or industrial furnace. Owners or operators...

  12. 40 CFR 265.112 - Closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and final closure including, but not limited to, procedures for cleaning equipment and removing... closure of a boiler or industrial furnace. The owner or operator must submit the closure plan to the... expects to begin partial or final closure of a boiler or industrial furnace. Owners or operators...

  13. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC's Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON.

  14. Contingent post-closure plan, hazardous waste management units at selected maintenance facilities, US Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, is a US Army training installation that provides tactical experience for battalion/task forces and squadrons in a mid- to high-intensity combat scenario. Through joint exercises with US Air Force and other services, the NTC also provides a data source for improvements of training doctrines, organization, and equipment. To meet the training and operational needs of the NTC, several maintenance facilities provide general and direct support for mechanical devices, equipment, and vehicles. Maintenance products used at these facilities include fuels, petroleum-based oils, lubricating grease, various degreasing solvents, antifreeze (ethylene glycol), transmission fluid, brake fluid, and hydraulic oil. Used or spent petroleum-based products generated at the maintenance facilities are temporarily accumulated in underground storage tanks (USTs), collected by the NTC hazardous waste management contractor (HAZCO), and stored at the Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant (POL) Storage Facility, Building 630, until shipped off site to be recovered, reused, and/or reclaimed. Spent degreasing solvents and other hazardous wastes are containerized and stored on-base for up to 90 days at the NTC`s Hazardous Waste Storage Facility, Building 703. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed an inspection and reviewed the hazardous waste management operations of the NTC. Inspections indicated that the NTC had violated one or more requirements of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and as a result of these violations was issued a Notice of Noncompliance, Notice of Necessity for Conference, and Proposed Compliance Schedule (NON) dated October 13, 1989. The following post-closure plan is the compliance-based approach for the NTC to respond to the regulatory violations cited in the NON.

  15. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C.

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

  16. PLAN FOR CLOSURE OF HANFORDS CENTRAL PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    AUSTIN, B.A.

    2004-12-15

    This paper summarizes an approach to reduce risk to the public and environment through accelerated closure of Hanford's Central Plateau, based on a plan developed by Fluor Hanford and submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE)-Richland Office, for consideration, in September, 2004. This plan provides a framework and starting point for discussions with regulators and further planning for closure activities on the Plateau. The closure strategy and approach required developing a full inventory of items needing closure as well as identifying and defining technical and regulatory approaches that were compatible with current regulatory processes, reduce risks, and met DOE objectives. This effort, and the paper that follows, integrates closure activities among several contractors and two DOE field offices.

  17. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

  18. Closure Plan for Active Low Level Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    2000-11-16

    This plan has been prepared in response to direction from the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of the plan is to define approaches that will be implemented to ensure protection of the public and the environment when active Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) at the Hanford Site are closed. Performance assessments for active burial grounds in the 200 East and West 200 Areas provide current estimates of potential environmental contamination and doses to the ''maximum exposed individual'' from burial ground operation and closure and compare dose estimates to performance objective dose limits for the facilities. This is an Operational Closure Plan. The intent of the guidance in DOE Order 435.1 is that this plan will be a living document, like the facility performance assessments, and will be revised periodically through the operational life of the LLBGs to reflect updated information on waste inventory. management practices, facility transition planning, schedule dates, assessments of post-closure performance, and environmental consequences. Out year dates identified in this plan are tentative. A Final Closure Plan will be prepared in the future when the timing and extent of closure-related activities for LLBGs can be established with greater certainty. After current operations at the LLBGs are concluded, this plan proposes transitioning of these facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program. This action will enable the Environmental Restoration Program to design and implement consistent and coordinated final remedial actions for active and inactive LLBGs. Active and inactive burial grounds in the 200 West and 200 East Areas are commingled. This plan describes approaches that will be implemented during Interim Closure, Final Closure, and Institutional Control Periods to prepare LLBGs for surface barriers, and the construction of barriers, as well as the scope of inspection, monitoring and maintenance practices that will be performed during and after closure

  19. COMPREHENSIVE CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect

    LACKEY, M.B.

    2005-05-31

    This paper describes a comprehensive and strategic plan that has been recently developed for the environmental closure of the Central Plateau area of the Hanford Site, a former weapons-production complex managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This approach was submitted to the DOE Richland Operations Office by Fluor Hanford to provide a framework and roadmap to integrate ongoing operations with closure of facilities that are no longer actively used--all with a view to closing the Central Plateau by 2035. The plan is currently under consideration by the DOE.

  20. 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, S.N.

    1994-08-15

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

  1. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA.

  2. 2401-W Waste storage building closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    LUKE, S.M.

    1999-07-15

    This plan describes the performance standards met and closure activities conducted to achieve clean closure of the 2401-W Waste Storage Building (2401-W) (Figure I). In August 1998, after the last waste container was removed from 2401-W, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) notified Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in writing that the 2401-W would no longer receive waste and would be closed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit (98-EAP-475). Pursuant to this notification, closure activities were conducted, as described in this plan, in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and completed on February 9, 1999. Ecology witnessed the closure activities. Consistent with clean closure, no postclosure activities will be necessary. Because 2401-W is a portion of the Central Waste Complex (CWC), these closure activities become the basis for removing this building from the CWC TSD unit boundary. The 2401-W is a pre-engineered steel building with a sealed concrete floor and a 15.2-centimeter concrete curb around the perimeter of the floor. This building operated from April 1988 until August 1998 storing non-liquid containerized mixed waste. All waste storage occurred indoors. No potential existed for 2401-W operations to have impacted soil. A review of operating records and interviews with cognizant operations personnel indicated that no waste spills occurred in this building (Appendix A). After all waste containers were removed, a radiation survey of the 2401-W floor for radiological release of the building was performed December 17, 1998, which identified no radiological contamination (Appendix B).

  3. Closure Plan for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-09-01

    The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the preliminary closure plan for the Area 5 RWMS at the NTS that was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (DOE, 2005a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure schedule, updated closure inventory, updated site and facility characterization data, the Title II engineering cover design, and the closure process for the 92-Acre Area of the RWMS. The format and content of this site-specific plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). This interim closure plan meets closure and post-closure monitoring requirements of the order DOE O 435.1, manual DOE M 435.1-1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 40 CFR 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632. The Area 5 RWMS accepts primarily packaged low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) for disposal in excavated disposal cells.

  4. Simple Case Treatment Planning: Diastema Closure.

    PubMed

    Calamia, Vincent; Pantzis, Alexandria

    2015-07-01

    This article demonstrates the use of a smile evaluation form as an adjunct in arriving at diagnosis and developing a treatment plan for a patient desiring Diastema closure. It also shows the importance of the diagnostic wax-up for temporization and visualization of case outcome. The case also demonstrates the use of soft tissue lasers to create a gingival harmony that enhanced the resulting esthetics. Feldspathic porcelain was used for the final restorations because they provide optimal esthetics and translucency.

  5. 40 CFR 265.118 - Post-closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must amend the post-closure plan at least 60 days prior to the proposed change in facility design or operation, or no later than 60 days after an unexpected event has occurred which has affected the post... operation, or no more than 60 days after an unexpected event has occurred which has affected the...

  6. Single-shell tank closure work plan. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In January 1994, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Conset Order (Tri-Party Agreement) was amended to reflect a revised strategy for remediation of radioactive waste in underground storage tanks. These amendments include milestones for closure of the single-shell tank (SST) operable units, to be initiated by March 2012 and completed by September 2024. This SST-CWP has been prepared to address the principal topical areas identified in Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-06 (i.e., regulatory pathway, operable unit characterization, waste retrieval, technology development, and a strategy for achieving closure). Chapter 2.0 of this SST-CWP provides a brief description of the environmental setting, SST System, the origin and characteristics of SST waste, and ancillary equipment that will be remediated as part of SST operable unit closure. Appendix 2A provides a description of the hydrogeology of the Hanford Site, including information on the unsaturated sediments (vadose zone) beneath the 200 Areas Plateau. Chapter 3.0 provides a discussion of the laws and regulations applicable to closure of the SST farm operable units. Chapter 4.0 provides a summary description of the ongoing characterization activities that best align with the proposed regulatory pathway for closure. Chapter 5.0 describes aspects of the SST waste retrieval program, including retrieval strategy, technology, and sequence, potential tank leakage during retrieval, and considerations of deployment of subsurface barriers. Chapter 6.0 outlines a proposed strategy for closure. Chapter 7.0 provides a summary of the programs underway or planned to develop technologies to support closure. Ca. 325 refs.

  7. Interim Status Closure Plan Open Burning Treatment Unit Technical Area 16-399 Burn Tray

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R.

    2012-05-07

    This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close one of the interim status hazardous waste open burning treatment units at Technical Area (TA) 16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Facility), hereinafter referred to as the 'TA-16-399 Burn Tray' or 'the unit'. The information provided in this closure plan addresses the closure requirements specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 265, Subparts G and P for the thermal treatment units operated at the Facility under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. Closure of the open burning treatment unit will be completed in accordance with Section 4.1 of this closure plan.

  8. 324 Building REC and HLV Tank Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Becker-Khaleel, B; Schlick, K.

    1995-12-01

    This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close the 324 Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC) and High-Level Vault (HLV) in accordance with the Washington State Dangerous Waste regulations. To provide a complete description of the activities required, the closure plan relies on information contained in the 324 Building B-Cell Safety Cleanout Project (BCCP) plans, the 324 Building REC HLV Interim Waste Management Plan (IWMP), the Project Management Plan for Nuclear Facilities Management 300 Area Compliance Program, and the 324 High Level Vault Interim Removal Action Project (project management plan [PMP]). The IWMP addresses the management of mixed waste in accordance with state and federal hazardous waste regulations. It provides a strategy for managing high-activity mixed waste in compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements or provides for an alternative management approach for the waste. The BCCP outlines the past, present, and future activities necessary for removing from B-Cell the solid waste, including mixed waste generated as a result of historical research and development (R&D) activities conducted in the cell. The BCCP also includes all records and project files associated with the B-Cell cleanout. This information is referenced throughout the closure plan. The PMP sets forth the plans, organization, and systems that Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will use to direct and control the 324 High-Level Vault Interim Removal Action Project. This project will develop and implement a treatment strategy that will remove and stabilize the inventory of liquid waste from the 324 HLV tanks. The PMP also provides for flushing and sampling the flush solution.

  9. Hanford facility contingency plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, L.N.

    1996-07-01

    The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit- specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. Applicability of this plan to Hanford Facility activities is described in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion, General Condition II.A. General Condition II.A applies to Part III TSD units, Part V TSD units, and to releases of hazardous substances which threaten human health or the environment. Additional information about the applicability of this document may also be found in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Handbook (DOE/RL-96-10). This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous substance spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. The term hazardous substances is defined in WAC 173-303-040 as: ``any liquid, solid, gas, or sludge, including any material, substance, product, commodity, or waste, regardless of quantity, that exhibits any of the physical, chemical or biological properties described in WAC 173-303-090 or 173-303-100.`` Whenever the term hazardous substances is used in this document, it will be used in the context of this definition. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases of hazardous substances occurring at areas between TSD units that may, or may not, threaten human health or the environment.

  10. Tonopah Test Range closure sites revegetation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    This document is a revegetation plan for long-term stabilization (revegetation) of land disturbed by activities associated with the closure of a Bomblet Pit and the Five Points Landfill. Both sites are on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) located in south-central Nevada. This document contains general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during the revegetation of these sites. The revegetation procedures proposed have been developed over several years of research and include the results of reclamation trials at Area 11 and Area 19 on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and more recently at the Double Tracks (Nellis Air Force Range) reclamation demonstration plots. In addition, the results of reclamation efforts and concurrent research efforts at the Yucca Mountain Project have been considered in the preparation of this revegetation plan.

  11. Closure plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6: Volume 1, Closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This Closure Plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) a disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and hazardous materials, of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) describes how portions of SWSA 6 will be closed under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status per 40 CFR 265 Subpart G (TN Rule 1200-1-11-.05(7)). An overview is provided of activities necessary for final closure and corrective measures for all of SWSA 6. Results of surface waters and groundwater sampling are provided.

  12. Facility Closure Report for T-Tunnel (U12t), Area 12, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-08-01

    This Facility Closure Report (FCR) has been prepared to document the actions taken to permanently close the remaining accessible areas of U12t-Tunnel (T-Tunnel) in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of T-Tunnel was a prerequisite to transfer facility ownership from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Closure of the facility was accomplished with the cooperation and concurrence of both NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The purpose of this FCR is to document that the closure of T-Tunnel complied with the closure requirements specified in the Facility Closure Plan for N- and T-Tunnels Area 12, Nevada Test Site (Appendix D) and that the facility is ready for transfer to NNSA/NSO. The Facility Closure Plan (FCP) is provided in Appendix D. T-Tunnel is located approximately 42 miles north of Mercury in Area 12 of the NTS (Figure 1). Between 1970 and 1987, T-Tunnel was used for six Nuclear Weapons Effects Tests (NWETs). The tunnel was excavated horizontally into the volcanic tuffs of Rainier Mesa. The T-Tunnel complex consists of a main access drift with two NWET containment structures, a Gas Seal Plug (GSP), and a Gas Seal Door (GSD) (Figure 2). The T-Tunnel complex was mothballed in 1993 to preserve the tunnel for resumption of testing, should it happen in the future, to stop the discharge of tunnel effluent, and to prevent unauthorized access. This was accomplished by sealing the main drift GSD.

  13. Underground storage tank 253-D1U1 Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

    1993-09-01

    This report is a closure plan for a diesel fuel tank at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Included are maps of the site, work plans, and personnel information regarding training and qualification.

  14. Comprehensive facilities plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  15. 40 CFR 264.118 - Post-closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) and 264.258(c)(1)(ii) must submit a post-closure plan to the Regional Administrator within 90 days... days after an unexpected event has occurred which has affected the post-closure plan. An owner or....258(c)(1)(ii) must submit a post-closure plan to the Regional Administrator no later than 90...

  16. Comprehensive Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Governor's Office, Atlanta.

    This paper asserts that given the net growth in Georgia's student population and the need to house these students, a logical and systematic approach to disburse state funds based upon an assessment of needs is critical. It explains that a local facilities plan encourages the local school system to look into the future and assess their needs and…

  17. Preparing a Facilities Master Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalina, David

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the steps in creating a facilities master plan. The facilities master plan is a long-range look at the development of one's facilities, combined with an implementation plan that indicates the steps, sequence and costs to get one there. There are three basic steps: (1) analyzing what one has (assessing one's facilities to…

  18. 216-B-3 expansion ponds closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This document describes the activities for clean closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) of the 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds. The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds are operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds consists of a series of three earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. The 3A, 3B, and 3C ponds are referred to as Expansion Ponds because they expanded the capability of the B Pond System. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the Bypass pipe (Project X-009). Water discharged to the Bypass pipe flows directly into the 216-B-3C Pond. The ponds were operated in a cascade mode, where the Main Pond overflowed into the 3A Pond and the 3A Pond overflowed into the 3C Pond. The 3B Pond has not received waste water since May 1985; however, when in operation, the 3B Pond received overflow from the 3A Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to the Expansion Ponds had the potential to have contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the dangerous waste portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA.

  19. 40 CFR 264.112 - Closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... final closure satisfy the closure performance standards, including, but not limited to, ground-water... the owner or operator from removing hazardous wastes and decontaminating or dismantling equipment...

  20. Achieving and documenting closure in plant growth facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, W. M.; Sager, John C.; Wheeler, Ray

    1992-01-01

    As NASA proceeds with its effort to develop a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) that will provide life support to crews during long duration space missions, it must address the question of facility and system closure. The concept of closure as it pertains to CELSS and engineering specifications, construction problems and monitoring procedures used in the development and operation of a closed plant growth facility for the CELSS program are described. A plant growth facility is one of several modules required for a CELSS. A prototype of this module at Kennedy Space Center is the large (7m tall x 3.5m diameter) Biomass Production Chamber (BPC), the central facility of the CELSS Breadboard Project. The BPC is atmospherically sealed to a leak rate of approximately 5 percent of its total volume per 24 hours. This paper will discuss the requirements for atmospheric closure in the facility, present CO2 and trace gas data from initial tests of the BPC with and without plants, and describe how the chamber was sealed atmospherically. Implications that research conducted in this type of facility will have for the CELSS program are discussed.

  1. 300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This section provides a description of the Hanford Site, identifies the proposed method of 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS) closure, and briefly summarizes the contents of each chapter of this plan.

  2. Handbook on Planning School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clutter, Wayne, Comp.; Elswick, Bill, Comp.

    This guide details the development of a 10-year Comprehensive Educational Facilities Plan (CEFP), along with its components and governing regulations. Chapters examine the CEFP process and requirements in the following areas: educational facilities planning; site design; common facilities necessary for school operation; facilities for primary…

  3. Regulatory review of closure, post-closure and perpetual care funds at the energy solutions, LLC mixed waste facility

    SciTech Connect

    Willoughby III, O.H.; Lukes, G.C.

    2007-07-01

    EnergySolutions, LLC operates its Mixed Waste Facility at Clive, Utah under the provisions of its State-issued Part B Permit. The facility accepts waste that contains both hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Utah is an EPA Agreement State and therefore the Utah Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (DSHW) is authorized to regulate the hazardous waste operations at the facility. The radioactive portion of the waste is regulated by the Utah Division of Radiation Control. 40 CFR 264.142 outlines the facility requirements for Closure Costs. The owner or operator must have a detailed written estimate of the cost of closing the facility in accordance with the rules. For many years the State of Utah had relied on the facility's estimate of closure costs as the amount that needed to be funded. This amount is reviewed annually and adjusted for inflation and for changes at the facility. In 2004 the agency and the facility requested bids from independent contractors to provide their estimate for closure costs. Three engineering firms bid on the project. The facility funded the project and both the agency and the facility chose one of the firms to provide an independent estimate. The engineering firms met with both parties and toured the facility. They were also provided with the current closure cost line items. Each firm provided an estimated cost for closure of the facility at the point in the facility's active life that would make the closure most expensive. Included with the direct costs were indirect line items such as overhead, profit, mobilization, hazardous working conditions and regulatory oversight. The agency and the facility reviewed the independent estimates and negotiated a final Closure and Post-Closure Cost Estimate for the Mixed Waste Facility. There are several mechanisms allowed under the rules to fund the Closure and Post- Closure Care Funds. EnergySolutions has chosen to fund their costs through the use of an insurance policy. Changing mechanisms from

  4. 40 CFR 264.112 - Closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and final closure, including, but not limited to, procedures for cleaning equipment and removing... closure of a boiler or industrial furnace, whichever is earlier. (2) The date when he “expects to...

  5. 40 CFR 264.112 - Closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and final closure, including, but not limited to, procedures for cleaning equipment and removing... closure of a boiler or industrial furnace, whichever is earlier. (2) The date when he “expects to...

  6. 40 CFR 264.112 - Closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and final closure, including, but not limited to, procedures for cleaning equipment and removing... closure of a boiler or industrial furnace, whichever is earlier. (2) The date when he “expects to...

  7. Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Interim Status Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    PRIGNANO, A.L.

    2000-07-01

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located within the 234-52 Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based upon Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit manages transuranic mixed (TRUM) waste, there are many controls placed on management of the waste. Based on the many controls placed on management of TRUM waste, releases of TRUM waste are not anticipated to occur in the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will be operated to immobilize and/or repackage plutonium-bearing waste in a glovebox process. The waste to be processed is in a solid physical state (chunks and coarse powder) and will be sealed into and out of the glovebox in closed containers. The containers of immobilized waste will be stored in the glovebox and in additional permitted storage locations at PFP. The waste will be managed to minimize the potential for spills outside the glovebox, and to preclude spills from reaching soil. Containment surfaces will be maintained to ensure

  8. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the CPP-602 Laboratory Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2009-09-30

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure (HWMA/RCRA) Plan for the CPP-602 laboratory lines was developed to meet the tank system closure requirements of the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.008 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 264, Subpart G. CPP-602 is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The lines in CPP-602 were part of a liquid hazardous waste collection system included in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Liquid Waste Management System Permit. The laboratory lines discharged to the Deep Tanks System in CPP-601 that is currently being closed under a separate closure plan. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards. The closure approach for the CPP-602 laboratory lines is to remove the lines, components, and contaminants to the extent practicable. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Site CPP-117 includes the CPP-602 waste trench and the area beneath the basement floor where waste lines are direct-buried. Upon completion of rinsing or mopping to remove contamination to the extent practicable from the waste trench and rinsing the intact buried lines (i.e., stainless steel sections), these areas will be managed as part of CERCLA Site CPP-117 and will not be subject to further HWMA/RCRA closure activities. The CPP-602 building is being decontaminated and decommissioned under CERCLA as a non-time critical removal action in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement/Consent Order. As such, all waste generated by this CERCLA action, including closure-generated waste, will be managed in coordination with that CERCLA action in substantive compliance with HWMA/RCRA regulations. All waste will be subject to a hazardous waste determination for the purpose of supporting appropriate management and will be managed in accordance

  9. Underground storage tank 511-D1U1 closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

    1993-09-01

    This document contains the closure plan for diesel fuel underground storage tank 511-D1U1 and appendices containing supplemental information such as staff training certification and task summaries. Precision tank test data, a site health and safety plan, and material safety data sheets are also included.

  10. Closure plan evaluation for risk of acid rock drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Dwire, D.L.; Krause, A.J.; Russell, L.J.

    1999-07-01

    Control of acid rock drainage (ARD) is a long-term issue for many mine sites and is often a primary objective of remediation efforts. Some sites continue to require monitoring and management of ARD long after mine operation has ceased and closure is complete. In New Zealand, an innovative and quantitative approach was applied to evaluate the expected risk of ARD after implementation of the closure plan for the Golden Cross Mine. In addition, this future risk was compared to current operating conditions to provide an estimate of the reduction in risk provided by the remediation activities. This approach was useful to both the mine proponent and the regulatory agencies in assessing the effectiveness of the existing closure plan and providing focus on the components of greatest risk. Mine components remaining on site after closure that could potentially generate ARD under various failure scenarios were identified and evaluated. These components included the tailings decant pond, waste rock, stockpiles, open pit mine and water treatment systems. For each component, a series of initiating events and failure scenarios were identified, and a decision tree methodology was utilized to estimate the probability of ARD generation for both current and closure conditions. Due to the implementation of closure plans designed to minimize or eliminate ARD through regarding, construction of engineered covers and water management designs, the risk of ARD generation will be significantly reduced over time.

  11. Partial Closure Report for the Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Abri, M

    2005-05-02

    The purpose of this partial closure report is to inform the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) of the status of final closure of the Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility (Area 514) and fulfill the DTSC requirements to proceed with the implementation of the interim action. Area 514 is located at the Livermore main site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LLNL is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated jointly by DOE and the University of California. LLNL received its permit to operate hazardous waste facilities from DTSC in 1997. The hazardous waste treatment and storage operations of Area 514 were transferred to a newly constructed complex, the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF), in 2003. Once the DWTF was operational, the final closure of Area 514 began in accordance with the DTSC-approved closure plan in June 2004. Abri Environmental Engineering, Inc., was retained by LLNL to observe the A514 closure process and prepare this partial closure report and certification. Prior to closure, the configuration of the Area 514 Treatment and Storage Facility consisted of Building 514, the Area 514-1 Container Storage and Treatment unit, the Area 514-2 Container Storage Unit (CSU), the Area 514-3 CSU, Building 513, the Wastewater Treatment Tank Farm unit, and the associated Area 514 yard area. The fenced area of Area 514 included approximately 27,350 ft2 on the LLNL Livermore site. To date, except for the 514-3 CSU, all of the other Area 514 structures have been demolished; and sampling and analysis have taken place. The non-hazardous wastes have been disposed of. At the time of writing this report, the hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive wastes are in the process of profiling for final disposition. Once the disposition of all wastes has been finalized, the implementation of the approved closure plan will be completed. As a part of the closure process, LLNL is required to submit a closure report and a

  12. Grout Facilities standby plan

    SciTech Connect

    Claghorn, R.D.; Kison, P.F.; Nunamaker, D.R.; Yoakum, A.K.

    1994-09-29

    This plan defines how the Grout Facilities will be deactivated to meet the intent of the recently renegotiated Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). The TPA calls for the use of the grout process as an emergency option only in the event that tank space is not available to resolve tank safety issues. The availability of new tanks is expected by 1997. Since a grout startup effort would take an estimated two years, a complete termination of the Grout Disposal Program is expected in December 1995. The former Tank Waste Remediation (TWRS) Strategy, adopted in 1988, called for the contents of Hanford`s 28 newer double-shell waste tanks to be separated into high-level radioactive material to be vitrified and disposed of in a geologic repository; low-level wastes were to be sent to the Grout Facility to be made into a cement-like-mixture and poured into underground vaults at Hanford for disposal. The waste in the 149 older single-shell tanks (SST) were to undergo further study and analysis before a disposal decision was made.

  13. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2006-03-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos.

  14. Idaho HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tanks WM-182 and WM-183 - Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Susan Kay; unknown

    2000-12-01

    This document presents the plan for the closure of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility tanks WM-182 and WM-183 in accordance with Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act interim status closure requirements. Closure of these two tanks is the first in a series of closures leading to the final closure of the eleven 300,000-gal tanks in the Tank Farm Facility. As such, closure of tanks WM-182 and WM-183 will serve as a proof-of-process demonstration of the waste removal, decontamination, and sampling techniques for the closure of the remaining Tank Farm Facility tanks. Such an approach is required because of the complexity and uniqueness of the Tank Farm Facility closure. This plan describes the closure units, objectives, and compliance strategy as well as the operational history and current status of the tanks. Decontamination, closure activities, and sampling and analysis will be performed with the goal of achieving clean closure of the tanks. Coordination with other regulatory requirements, such as U.S. Department of Energy closure requirements, is also discussed.

  15. Considerations on Facilities Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Most facilities renovation projects occur because someone at the executive or board level has lobbied successfully for them. Often in public schools, the voters have agreed to the project as well via a building referendum. Therefore, facilities projects are highly visible to the community. Unlike many other issues in schools, facilities projects…

  16. Closure plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6: Volume 1, Closure plan. Remedial investigation/feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This Closure Plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) a disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and hazardous materials, of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) describes how portions of SWSA 6 will be closed under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status per 40 CFR 265 Subpart G [TN Rule 1200-1-11-.05(7)]. An overview is provided of activities necessary for final closure and corrective measures for all of SWSA 6. Results of surface waters and groundwater sampling are provided.

  17. Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure

    SciTech Connect

    White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  18. Planning School Library Media Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Pauline H.

    This manual examines the planning process for building or renovating new library media facilities. It is concerned with building programs, local building and fire codes, design, working with architects, reading blueprints, engineering and mechanical plans, budgets, bids, and change orders. It offers help with such sensitive issues as the politics…

  19. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 400 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination resulted from an evaluation conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 400 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Two major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 400 Area were evaluated: the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Fuels Manufacturing and examination Facility. The determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Of these two facilities, only the Fast Flux Test Facility will require a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Underground storage tank 431-D1U1, Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mancieri, S.

    1993-09-01

    This document contains information about the decommissioning of Tank 431-D1U1. This tank was installed in 1965 for diesel fuel storage. This tank will remain in active usage until closure procedures begin. Soils and ground water around the tank will be sampled to check for leakage. Appendices include; proof of proper training for workers, health and safety briefing record, task hazard analysis summary, and emergency plans.

  1. Guide for Planning Educational Facilities. Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Deborah P., Ed.

    A looseleaf format allows for the easy addition of annual updates to this practitioner's handbook for planning educational facilities from the conception of needs through occupancy and use. Each unit contains numerous photographs, drawings, and figures that illustrate the contents. Unit subjects are as follows: historical perspectives; planning…

  2. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Knaus, Z.C.

    1995-06-12

    This is the decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan for the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility at Hanford Reservation. This document supports the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan, DOE-RL-90-25. The 105-DR LSFF, which operated from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The LSFF was established to investigate fire fighting and safety associated with alkali metal fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor facilities. The decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan identifies the decontamination procedures, sampling locations, any special handling requirements, quality control samples, required chemical analysis, and data validation needed to meet the requirements of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  3. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-09-29

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

  4. Cad Graphics in Facilities Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Linda M.

    1984-01-01

    By applying a computer-aided drafting system to a range of facilities layouts and plans, a division of Tektronix, Inc., Oregon, is maintaining staffing levels with an added workload. The tool is also being used in other areas of the company for illustration, design, and administration. (MLF)

  5. Closure Plan for the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-09-01

    The Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the interim closure plan for the Area 3 RWMS, which was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) (DOE, 2005). The format and content of this plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure date, updated closure inventory, the new institutional control policy, and the Title II engineering cover design. The plan identifies the assumptions and regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment in which they are located, presents the design of the closure cover, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the site. The Area 3 RWMS accepts low-level waste (LLW) from across the DOE Complex in compliance with the NTS Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Area 3 RWMS accepts both packaged and unpackaged unclassified bulk LLW for disposal in subsidence craters that resulted from deep underground tests of nuclear devices in the early 1960s. The Area 3 RWMS covers 48 hectares (119 acres) and comprises seven subsidence craters--U-3ax, U-3bl, U-3ah, U-3at, U-3bh, U-3az, and U-3bg. The area between craters U-3ax and U-3bl was excavated to form one large disposal unit (U-3ax/bl); the area between craters U-3ah and U-3at was also excavated to form another large disposal unit (U-3ah/at). Waste unit U-3ax/bl is closed; waste units U-3ah/at and U-3bh are active; and the remaining craters, although currently undeveloped, are available for disposal of waste if required. This plan specifically addresses the closure of the U-3ah/at and the U-3bh LLW units. A final closure

  6. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

    2012-11-21

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead

  7. Closure plan for Corrective Action Unit 109: U-2bu subsidence crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The U-2bu subsidence crater, Corrective Action Unit 109, will be closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection operational permit, and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The U-2bu subsidence crater is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. It was created in 1971 by an underground nuclear test with the name Miniata. The crater has a diameter of 288 meters (944 feet) and an approximate depth of 35 meters (115 feet). Based on the results of the analyses reported in the site characterization report, the only constituents of concern in the U-2bu subsidence crater include leachable lead and total petroleum hydrocarbons. Closure activities will include the excavation and disposal of impacted soil from the top of the crater. Upon completion of excavation, verification samples will be collected to show that the leachable lead has been removed to concentrations below the regulatory action level. After sample results show that the lead has been removed, the excavated area will be backfilled and a soil flood diversion berm will be constructed as a best management practice. An independent registered professional engineer will certify the site was closed following the approved Closure Plan. Post-closure care is not warranted for this site because closure activities will involve removal of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act constituents of concern.

  8. The use of mine-development models to support mine closure and reclamation planning

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, R.W. Jr.; Wolf, C.P.

    1999-07-01

    Geochemical characterization and the development of compositional models for waste-rock and spent leach piles and tailing impoundments are in integral part of mine closure and reclamation planning. A compositional model is a three-dimensional graphical representation of a waste facility that shows the distribution of the different types of mined or milled materials comprising it. As part of closure plans, regulatory authorities typically require the characterization of potential sources of dissolved contaminants. Geologic resource and mineable reserve (mine-development or block) models may be used, in conjunction with mine development records, to create compositional models of waste-rock and leach piles and tailing impoundments. The procedures involves: (1) the collection and analysis of samples that represent the geochemical variability of the different rocks that occur in the mine that are also components of the mine waste; (2) classification and grouping of the different rock types based on their potential to release contaminants (e.g., ABA, leachable metals); and (3) evaluation of historical records concerning the volume and disposition of mined materials. This approach significantly reduces the efforts and costs associated with traditional characterization (e.g., drilling and sampling on grids) of the waste facilities. The block models of the mine and compositional models of the waste facilities may also be used to: (1) develop more effective rock handling plans; (2) support the creation of hydrogeochemical models used to predict long-term environmental impacts to groundwater and surface water; and (3) support evaluations of cost-effective closure and reclamation alternatives (e.g., cover designs and revegetation).

  9. Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2006-06-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post-closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report.

  10. 40 CFR 265.112 - Closure plan; amendment of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....112 Section 265.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND... to provisions of this section, the owner or operator of a hazardous waste management facility...

  11. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Burmeister

    2007-09-01

    This CR provides documentation and justification for the closure of CAU 118 without further corrective action. This justification is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative and closure activities conducted in accordance with the CAU 118 SAFER Plan: Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for CAU 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The SAFER Plan provides information relating to site history as well as the scope and planning of the investigation. This CR also provides the analytical and radiological survey data to confirm that the remediation goals were met as specified in the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) approved the CAU 118 SAFER Plan (Murphy, 2006), which recommends closure in place with use restrictions (URs).

  12. 42 CFR 488.446 - Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility... PROCEDURES Enforcement of Compliance for Long-Term Care Facilities with Deficiencies § 488.446 Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility closures. Any individual who is or was the administrator of a...

  13. 42 CFR 488.446 - Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility... PROCEDURES Enforcement of Compliance for Long-Term Care Facilities with Deficiencies § 488.446 Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility closures. Any individual who is or was the administrator of a...

  14. 42 CFR 488.446 - Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility... PROCEDURES Enforcement of Compliance for Long-Term Care Facilities with Deficiencies § 488.446 Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility closures. Any individual who is or was the administrator of a...

  15. 42 CFR 488.446 - Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility... PROCEDURES Enforcement of Compliance for Long-Term Care Facilities with Deficiencies § 488.446 Administrator sanctions: long-term care facility closures. Any individual who is or was the administrator of a...

  16. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    L. Desotell; D. Wieland; V. Yucel; G. Shott; J. Wrapp

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is planning to close the 92-Acre Area of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Closure planning for this facility must take into account the regulatory requirements for a diversity of waste streams, disposal and storage configurations, disposal history, and site conditions. This paper provides a brief background of the Area 5 RWMS, identifies key closure issues, and presents the closure strategy. Disposals have been made in 25 shallow excavated pits and trenches and 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes at the 92-Acre Area since 1961. The pits and trenches have been used to dispose unclassified low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform waste, and to store classified low-level and low-level mixed materials. The GCD boreholes are intermediate-depth disposal units about 10 feet (ft) in diameter and 120 ft deep. Classified and unclassified high-specific activity LLW, transuranic (TRU), and mixed TRU are disposed in the GCD boreholes. TRU waste was also disposed inadvertently in trench T-04C. Except for three disposal units that are active, all pits and trenches are operationally covered with 8-ft thick alluvium. The 92-Acre Area also includes a Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) operating under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status, and an asbestiform waste unit operating under a state of Nevada Solid Waste Disposal Site Permit. A single final closure cover is envisioned over the 92-Acre Area. The cover is the evapotranspirative-type cover that has been successfully employed at the NTS. Closure, post-closure care, and monitoring must meet the requirements of the following regulations: U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Title 40 CFR Part 265, Nevada Administrative

  17. Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-02-01

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs).

  18. The 'People Plan' Concept for Contract Closure - 12432

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Peter

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) first-of-a-kind closure project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, still has more than 3 years to run, but its contractor, Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), has already started its plans for going out of business. It will be the first contract that closes in increments and, paramount to its success, will be its ability to provide a disciplined and positive approach to release personnel while at the same time retaining personnel critical to timely and safe completion of the work scope. In May 2011, WCH produced the people plan, a program that maximizes communication and support for employees being released, provides an incentivization strategy to retain personnel to the end of their assignments, and reflects a sensitivity to the long-term goals of the contract and WCH's parent companies. The combination of all of these efforts equal one thing: treating employees with respect by providing specific information in a timely manner; respecting employees by sharing as much information as possible, as soon as possible, with as much detail as possible; and respecting each individual's ability to be in control of their next step in their life or career. The project is only in the second ORW and has 13 more before the end of the contract. That time remaining will continue to bring new challenges and unknowns, but the confidence and trust of the employees is proving to be solid. This is largely as a result of the stability provided by the people plan program. A success that can only truly be measured by the continued positive response it has already received from WCH's employees. (authors)

  19. National Ignition Facility: Experimental plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    As part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE), and EG&G formed an NIF Target Diagnostics Working Group. The purpose of the Target Diagnostics Working Group is to prepare conceptual designs of target diagnostics for inclusion in the facility CDR and to determine how these specifications impact the CDR. To accomplish this, a subgroup has directed its efforts at constructing an approximate experimental plan for the ignition campaign of the NIF CDR. The results of this effort are contained in this document, the Experimental Plan for achieving fusion ignition in the NIF. This group initially concentrated on the flow-down requirements of the experimental campaign leading to ignition, which will dominate the initial efforts of the NIF. It is envisaged, however, that before ignition, there will be parallel campaigns supporting weapons physics, weapons effects, and other research. This plan was developed by analyzing the sequence of activities required to finally fire the laser at the level of power and precision necessary to achieve the conditions of an ignition hohlraum target, and to then use our experience in activating and running Nova experiments to estimate the rate of completing these activities.

  20. 324 Building radiochemical engineering cells, high-level vault, low-level vault, and associated areas closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.M.

    1998-03-25

    The Hanford Site, located adjacent to and north of Richland, Washington, is operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The 324 Building is located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The 324 Building was constructed in the 1960s to support materials and chemical process research and development activities ranging from laboratory/bench-scale studies to full engineering-scale pilot plant demonstrations. In the mid-1990s, it was determined that dangerous waste and waste residues were being stored for greater than 90 days in the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC) and in the High-Level Vault/Low-Level Vault (HLV/LLV) tanks. [These areas are not Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) permitted portions of the 324 Building.] Through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-89, agreement was reached to close the nonpermitted RCRA unit in the 324 Building. This closure plan, managed under TPA Milestone M-20-55, addresses the identified building areas targeted by the Tri-Party Agreement and provides commitments to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable, given the special technical difficulties of managing mixed waste that contains high-activity radioactive materials, and the physical limitations of working remotely in the areas within the subject closure unit. This closure plan is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1.0 provides the introduction, historical perspective, 324 Building history and current mission, and the regulatory basis and strategy for managing the closure unit. Chapters 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 discuss the detailed facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring respectively. Chapter 6.0 deals with the closure strategy and performance standard, including the closure activities for the B-Cell, D-Cell, HLV, LLV; piping and miscellaneous associated building areas. Chapter 7.0 addresses the

  1. Preservation Impacts on Educational Facilities Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, James A.

    This paper examines the significance of facilities preservation for educational facilities planning and identifies various forms of facilities preservation applicable to educational facilities. It analyzes why educational facilities planners need to be aware of preservation considerations, reviews the relevant literature for preservation…

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the fast flux test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J M; Dahl, N R

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  3. 2727-S Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility clean closure evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, S.N.

    1994-07-14

    This report presents the analytical results of 2727-S NRDWS facility closure verification soil sampling and compares these results to clean closure criteria. The results of this comparison will determine if clean closure of the unit is regulatorily achievable. This report also serves to notify regulators that concentrations of some analytes at the site exceed sitewide background threshold levels (DOE-RL 1993b) and/or the limits of quantitation (LOQ). This report also presents a Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup (MTCA) (WAC 173-340) regulation health-based closure standard under which the unit can clean close in lieu of closure to background levels or LOQ in accordance with WAC 173-303-610. The health-based clean closure standard will be closure to MTCA Method B residential cleanup levels. This report reconciles all analyte concentrations reported above background or LOQ to this health-based cleanup standard. Regulator acceptance of the findings presented in this report will qualify the TSD unit for clean closure in accordance with WAC 173-303-610 without further TSD unit soil sampling, or soil removal and/or decontamination. Nondetected analytes require no further evaluation.

  4. Revised RCRA closure plan for the Interim Drum Yard (S-030) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.M.

    1994-09-01

    The Interim Drum Yard (IDY) facility is a containerized waste storage area located in the Y-12 exclusion area. It was used to store waste materials which are regulated by RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act); uranyl nitrate solutions were also stored there. The closure plan outlines the actions required to achieve closure of IDY and is being submitted in accordance with TN Rule 1200-1-11.05(7) and 40 CFR 265.110.

  5. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Burmeister

    2009-06-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 117 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 26-41-01, Pluto Disassembly Facility, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 117 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 117 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From May 2008 through February 2009, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117, Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 117. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities indicated that the final action levels were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) reported as total Aroclor and

  6. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Fluorinel Dissolution Process Makeup and Cooling and Heating Systems Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan Tank Systems INTEC-066, INTEC-067, INTEC-068, and INTEC-072

    SciTech Connect

    M.E. Davis

    2007-05-01

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the fluorinel dissolution process makeup and cooling and heating systems located in the Fluorinel Dissolution Process and Fuel Storage Facility (CPP-666), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The systems to be closed include waste piping associated with the fluorinel dissolution process makeup systems. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards.

  7. RADIATION DOSE CALCULATION FOR FUEL HANDLING FACILITY CLOSURE CELL EQUIPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    D. Musat

    2005-03-07

    This calculation evaluates the energy deposition rates in silicon, gamma and neutron flux spectra at various locations of interest throughout FHF closure cell. The physical configuration features a complex geometry, with particle flux attenuation of many orders of magnitude that cannot be modeled by computer codes that use deterministic methods. Therefore, in this calculation the Monte Carlo method was used to solve the photon and neutron transport. In contrast with the deterministic methods, Monte Carlo does not solve an explicit transport equation, but rather obtain answers by simulating individual particles, recording the aspects of interest of their average behavior, and estimates the statistical precision of the results.

  8. The 324 building radiochemical engineering scales and high-level vault closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Prignano, A.L.

    1997-05-29

    This closure plan incorporates the requirements and decisions made during a Data Quality Objectives process held in 1996 by the State of Washington Department of Ecology, US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, and contractors associated with closure of the 324 Building.

  9. Underground storage tank 291-D1U1: Closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

    1993-09-01

    The 291-D1U1 tank system was installed in 1983 on the north side of Building 291. It supplies diesel fuel to the Building 291 emergency generator and air compressor. The emergency generator and air compressor are located southwest and southeast, respectively, of the tank (see Appendix B, Figure 2). The tank system consists of a single-walled, 2,000- gallon, fiberglass tank and a fuel pump system, fill pipe, vent pipe, electrical conduit, and fuel supply and return piping. The area to be excavated is paved with asphalt and concrete. It is not known whether a concrete anchor pad is associated with this tank. Additionally, this closure plan assumes that the diesel tank is below the fill pad. The emergency generator and air compressor for Building 291 and its associated UST, 291-D1U1, are currently in use. The generator and air compressor will be supplied by a temporary above-ground fuel tank prior to the removal of 291-D1U1. An above-ground fuel tank will be installed as a permanent replacement for 291-D1U1. The system was registered with the State Water Resources Control Board on June 27, 1984, as 291-41D and has subsequently been renamed 291-D1U1. Figure 1 (see Appendix B) shows the location of the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Figure 2 (see Appendix B) shows the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to Building 291. Figure 3 (see Appendix B) shows a plan view of the 291-D1U1 tank system.

  10. Strategic facility planning improves capital decision making.

    PubMed

    Reeve, J R

    2001-03-01

    A large, Midwestern IDS undertook a strategic facility-planning process to evaluate its facility portfolio and determine how best to allocate future investments in facility development. The IDS assembled a facility-planning team, which initiated the planning process with a market analysis to determine future market demands and identify service areas that warranted facility expansion. The team then analyzed each of the IDS's facilities from the perspective of uniform capacity measurements, highest and best use compared with needs, building condition and investment-worthiness, and facility growth and site development opportunities. Based on results of the analysis, the strategy adopted entailed, in part, shifting some space from inpatient care to ambulatory care services and demolishing and replacing the 11 percent of facilities deemed to be in the worst condition.

  11. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Environmental Checklist Form 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The 216-B-3 Expansion Ponds Closure Plan (Revision 1) consists of a Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and five appendices. The 216-B-3 Pond System consists of a series of four earthen, unlined, interconnected ponds and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch that receive waste water from various 200 East Area operating facilities. These four ponds, collectively. Waste water (primarily cooling water, steam condensate, and sanitary water) from various 200 East Area facilities is discharged to the 216-B-3-3 Ditch. Water discharged to the 216-8-3-3 Ditch flows directly into the 216-B-3 Pond. In the past, waste water discharges to B Pond and the 216-B-3-3 Ditch contained mixed waste (radioactive waste and dangerous waste). The radioactive portion of mixed waste has been interpreted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to be regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the nonradioactive dangerous portion of mixed waste is regulated under RCRA. Mixed waste also may be considered a hazardous substance under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) when considering remediation of waste sites.

  12. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendices 3 through 6 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab. permeability, in-situ permeability, and compaction characteristics, representative of kaolin clays from the Aiken, South Carolina vicinity. (KJD)

  13. Planning and Managing School Facilities. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore J.

    This book addresses the administrative procedures associated with planning and managing school facilities. As noted at the outset, practitioner interest in school facilities has been growing rapidly in recent years because decades of neglect, poor planning, and cost cutting have created a situation in which large numbers of America's school…

  14. Facilities Planning for Interactive Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Alex

    1997-01-01

    Provides basic information relating to the different aspects of facilities planning for interactive distance education, including site selection, acoustics, lighting, environmental considerations, and electrical power. The importance of facilities planning during the developmental stages of an interactive distance education project is emphasized.…

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    SciTech Connect

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  16. Planning for emission reduction credit allocation in Naval base closure and realignment actions in the San Francisco Bay region

    SciTech Connect

    Peoples, C.; Kannapel, P.; Heroy-Rogalski, K.

    1997-12-31

    Several Naval bases in the California San Francisco Bay Area are closing due to the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Acts recently passed by the US Congress. These were home to significant manufacturing and repair facilities that, when fully operating, generated over 100 tons per year of nitrogen oxide and ozone precursor compound emissions. As the bases close, these emissions are dropping, and there is an opportunity to gain credit for them through emissions banking. In order to distribute these emission reductions to meet both the needs of the government and the local redevelopment objectives, an allocation plan was developed. The allocation plan included generating emission reduction credits from the shutdown of permitted air emission sources. This paper highlights the benefits of early planning for emission reductions and subsequent allocation of those emission reductions in the case of the closure of Naval facilities in the San Francisco Bay Area. It illustrates that early planning can ensure that the needs of the military and local community are satisfied and that the highest quantity of bankable emission reductions are identified, and properly quantified and documented, and that emission reduction credits (ERCs) are generated. This paper also presents lessons learned from the experience of banking emissions from closing Navy facilities.

  17. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  18. Planning Requirements for Small School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, J. Clark; McQueen, Robert

    The unique requirements of small school facilities, designed to handle multiple curricular functions within the same operational space, necessitate the creation of educational specifications tying the curriculum to that portion of the facility in which each curriculum component will be implemented. Thus, in planning the facility the major concern…

  19. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  20. Closure Plan for Corrective Action Unit 109: U-2bu Subsidence Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Parsons

    1999-03-01

    The U-2bu subsidence crater, Corrective Action Unit 109, will be closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection operational permit, and the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order. The U-2bu subsidence crater is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. It was created in 1971 by an underground nuclear test with the name Miniata. The crater has a diameter of 288 meters (944 feet) and an approximate depth of 35 meters (115 feet). The subsidence crater was used as a land disposal unit for radioactive and hazardous waste from 1973 to 1988. Site disposal history is supported by memorandums, letters, and personnel who worked at the Nevada Test Site at the time of active disposal. Closure activities will include the excavation and disposal of impacted soil form the tip of the crater. Upon completion of excavation, verification samples will be collected to show that lead has been removed to concentrations be low regulatory action level. The area will then be backfilled and a soil flood diversion berm will be constructed, and certified by an independent professional engineer as to having followed the approved Closure Plan.

  1. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  2. Fall Semiannual Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    D. F. Gianotto N. C. Hutten

    2007-01-12

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  3. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  4. Data Management Facility Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, Nicole N

    2014-06-30

    The Data Management Facility (DMF) is the data center that houses several critical Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility services, including first-level data processing for the ARM Mobile Facilities (AMFs), Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Southern Great Plains (SGP), and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, as well as Value-Added Product (VAP) processing, development systems, and other network services.

  5. Integrated Planning: Consolidating Annual Facility Planning - More Time for Execution

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J. G.; R., L. Morton; Ramirez, C.; Morris, P. S.; McSwain, J. T.

    2011-02-02

    Previously, annual planning for Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities (RTBF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) was fragmented, disconnected, circular, and occurred constantly throughout the fiscal year (FY) comprising 9 of the 12 months, reducing the focus on implementation and execution. This required constant “looking back” instead of “looking forward.” In FY 2009, annual planning was consolidated into one comprehensive integrated plan (IP) for each facility/project, which comprised annual task planning/outyear budgeting, AMPs, and investment planning (i.e., TYIP). In FY 2010, the Risk Management Plans were added to the IPs. The integrated planning process achieved the following: 1) Eliminated fragmented, circular, planning and moved the plan to be more forward-looking; 2) Achieved a 90% reduction in schedule planning timeframe from 40 weeks (9 months) to 6 weeks; 3) Achieved an 80% reduction in cost from just under $1.0M to just over $200K, for a cost savings of nearly $800K (reduced combined effort from over 200 person-weeks to less than 40); 4) Reduced the number of plans generated from 21 plans (1 per facility per plan) per year to 8 plans per year (1 per facility plus 1 program-level IP); 5) Eliminated redundancy in common content between plans and improved consistency and overall quality; 6) Reduced the preparation time and cost of the FY 2010 SEP by 50% due to information provided in the IP; 7) Met the requirements for annual task planning, annual maintenance planning, ten-year investment planning, and risk management plans.

  6. Planning the Facilities for Business Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selden, William

    In addition to space and equipment requirements, guidelines are suggested for layouts and facilities. Detailed equipment lists are given for each area. Sample questionnaires for use in planning are included. (FS)

  7. Kentucky School Facilities Planning Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boysen, Thomas C.

    The Kentucky State Board for Elementary and Secondary Education has published this manual containing criteria school districts should use for planning new school construction and renovation projects. The criteria is used for determining the following activities: (1) the selection of the Local Planning Committee (LPC) responsible for the…

  8. A Checklist for Planning Community College Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlo, Frank P.

    It is noted that in any planning process for community colleges, physical facilities are only an adjunct to the instructional program, and any types of facilities that evolve should be based on the nature of the students, the curriculum, and the general philosophy and operation of the college. A list is presented as a suggested guide for questions…

  9. Planning and Equipping Industrial Arts Instructional Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Education, Jefferson City.

    This guide is intended to assist industrial arts teachers, school administrators, and architects in planning and designing functional facilities for instructional purposes or in remodeling existing facilities. It was developed under the auspices of the Council for Industrial Arts Education and published by the Missouri State Department of…

  10. PLANNING THE INDOOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HASE, GERALD J.; HICK, BASIL L.

    THIS PAMPHLET IS DESIGNED TO HELP ARCHITECTS AND LOCAL SCHOOL OFFICIALS IN THE PREPARATION OF PLANS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES IN NEW AND EXISTING BUILDINGS. FACILITIES MENTIONED INCLUDE--(1) GYMNASIUM, (2) SWIMMING POOL, (3) SMALL GROUP ACTIVITY ROOM, (4) DRESSING AND SHOWERING ROOMS, (5) TEAM ROOM, (6) EQUIPMENT DRYING ROOM, (7) LAUNDRY…

  11. Fall 2010 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility and the CPP 601/627/640 Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Ann

    2010-11-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report, as agreed between the Idaho Cleanup Project and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. The Permit Condition III.H. portion of this report includes a description and the results of field methods associated with groundwater monitoring of the Waste Calcining Facility. Analytical results from groundwater sampling, results of inspections and maintenance of monitoring wells in the Waste Calcining Facility groundwater monitoring network, and results of inspections of the concrete cap are summarized. The Permit Condition I.U. portion of this report includes noncompliances not otherwise required to be reported under Permit Condition I.R. (advance notice of planned changes to facility activity which may result in a noncompliance) or Permit Condition I.T. (reporting of noncompliances which may endanger human health or the environment). This report also provides groundwater sampling results for wells that were installed and monitored as part of the Phase 1 post-closure period of the landfill closure components in accordance with HWMA/RCRA Landfill Closure Plan for the CPP-601 Deep

  12. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendix 2 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, Laboratory permeability, and compaction characteristics representative of Kaolin clays from the aiken, South Carolina vicinity. Included in this report are daily field reports Nos. 1 to 54. (KJD)

  13. Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Rawlinson

    2001-09-01

    Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) (one site is in Area 3 and the other is in Area 5) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV). The current DOE Order governing management of radioactive waste is 435.1. Associated with DOE Order 435.1 is a Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) and Guidance (DOE G 435.1-1). The Manual and Guidance specify that preliminary closure and monitoring plans for a low-level waste (LLW) management facility be developed and initially submitted with the Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) for that facility. The Manual and Guidance, and the Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued for the Area 3 RWMS further specify that the preliminary closure and monitoring plans be updated within one year following issuance of a DAS. This Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) fulfills both requirements. Additional updates will be conducted every third year hereafter. This document is an integrated plan for closing and monitoring both RWMSs, and is based on guidance issued in 1999 by the DOE for developing closure plans. The plan does not follow the format suggested by the DOE guidance in order to better accommodate differences between the two RWMSs, especially in terms of operations and site characteristics. The modification reduces redundancy and provides a smoother progression of the discussion. The closure and monitoring plans were integrated because much of the information that would be included in individual plans is the same, and integration provides efficient presentation and program management. The ICMP identifies the regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment where they are located, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the sites.

  14. CONSIDERATIONS FOR GROUT FORMULATIONS FOR FACILITY CLOSURES USING IN SITU STRATEGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gladden, J.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.; Long, T.; Blankenship, J.; Hannah, G.; Stubblefield, R.; Szilagyi, A.

    2010-08-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting in situ closures (entombment) at a large number of facilities throughout the complex. Among the largest closure actions currently underway are the closures of the P and R Reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. In these facilities, subgrade open spaces are being stabilized with grout; this ensures the long term structural integrity of the facilities and permanently immobilizes and isolates residual contamination. The large size and structural complexity of these facilities present a wide variety of challenges for the identification and selection of appropriate fill materials. Considerations for grout formulations must account for flowability, long term stability, set times, heat generation and interactions with materials within the structure. The large size and configuration of the facility necessitates that grout must be pumped from the exterior to the spaces to be filled, which requires that the material must retain a high degree of flowability to move through piping without clogging while achieving the required leveling properties at the pour site. Set times and curing properties must be controlled to meet operations schedules, while not generating sufficient heat to compromise the properties of the fill material. The properties of residual materials can result in additional requirements for grout formulations. If significant quantities of aluminum are present in the facility, common formulations of highly alkaline grouts may not be appropriate because of the potential for hydrogen generation with the resultant risks. SRS is developing specialized inorganic grout formulations that are designed to address this issue. One circum-neutral chemical grout formulation identified for initial consideration did not possess the proper chemical characteristics, having exceptionally short set times and high heat of hydration. Research efforts are directed toward developing grout formulations

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1995-05-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using specific guidelines. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

  16. Effect of wastewater treatment facility closure on endocrine disrupting chemicals in a Coastal Plain stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Clark, Jimmy M.

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insight into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The U.S. Geological Survey assessed the fate of select endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) in surface water and streambed sediment one year before and one year after closure of a long-term WWTF located within the Spirit Creek watershed at Fort Gordon, Georgia. Sample sites included a WWTF-effluent control located upstream from the outfall, three downstream effluent-impacted sites located between the outfall and Spirit Lake, and one downstream from the lake's outfall. Prior to closure, the 2.2-km stream segment downstream from the WWTF outfall was characterized by EDC concentrations significantly higher (α = 0.05) than at the control site; indicating substantial downstream transport and limited in-stream attenuation of EDC, including pharmaceuticals, estrogens, alkylphenol ethoxylate (APE) metabolites, and organophosphate flame retardants (OPFR). Wastewater-derived pharmaceutical, APE metabolites, and OPFR compounds were also detected in the outflow of Spirit Lake, indicating the potential for EDC transport to aquatic ecosystems downstream of Fort Gordon under effluent discharge conditions. After the WWTF closure, no significant differences in concentrations or numbers of detected EDC compounds were observed between control and downstream locations. The results indicated EDC pseudo-persistence under preclosure, continuous supply conditions, with rapid attenuation following WWTF closure. Low concentrations of EDC at the control site throughout the study and comparable concentrations in downstream locations after WWTF closure indicated additional, continuing, upstream contaminant sources within the Spirit Creek watershed. 

  17. Mission College Educational and Facilities Master Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mission Coll., Santa Clara, CA.

    This document details Mission College's 2001 master plan for education and facilities. The plan makes several recommendations. (1) It is imperative to stay on the "cutting edge" in high-demand fields; (2) With a changing student population (45% ESL and 85% first-generation college students), it is also important to provide a strong, basic…

  18. Clay Cap Test Program for the Mixed Waste Management Facility closure at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J.W. , Inc., Charlotte, NC )

    1989-01-01

    A 58 acre low-level radioactive waste disposal facility at the Savannah River Site, a Department of Energy facility near Aiken, South Carolina, requires closure with a RCRA clay cap. A three-foot thick can requiring 300,000 cubic yards of local Tertiary Kaolin clay with an in-situ permeability of less than or equal to 1 {times} 10{sup -7} centimeters per second is to be constructed. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab permeability, in-situ permeability, compaction characteristics, representative kaolin clays from the Aiken, SC vicinity. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Site and facility transportation services planning documents

    SciTech Connect

    Ratledge, J.E. ); Danese, L.; Schmid, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) will eventually ship Purchasers' (10 CFR 961.3) spent nuclear fuel from approximately 122 commercial nuclear facilities. The preparation and processing of Site and Facility Specific Transportation Services Planning Documents (SPDs) and Site Specific Servicing Plans (SSSPs) provides a focus for advanced planning and the actual shipping of waste, as well as the overall development of transportation requirements for the waste transportation system. SPDs will be prepared for each of the affected nuclear waste facilities over the next 2 years with initial emphasis on facilities likely to be served during the earliest years of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS) operations. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lockie, K.A.; Suttora, L.C.; Quigley, K.D.; Stanisich, N.

    2007-07-01

    Significant progress has been made at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to clean and close emptied radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks have historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Although four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage, the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste and cleaned in preparation of final closure. A water spray cleaning system was developed and deployed to clean internal tank surfaces and remove remaining tank wastes. The cleaning system was effective in removing all but a very small volume of solid residual waste particles. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, has allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. In November 2006, three of the 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout to provide long-term stability. It is currently planned that all seven cleaned 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks, as well as the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks and all associated tank vaults and interconnecting piping, will be stabilized with grout as early as 2008. (authors)

  1. Environmental assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to close the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). The WCF is a surplus DOE facility located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Six facility components in the WCF have been identified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Ace (RCRA)-units in the INEL RCRA Part A application. The WCF is an interim status facility. Consequently, the proposed WCF closure must comply with Idaho Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste contained in the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) Section 16.01.05. These state regulations, in addition to prescribing other requirements, incorporate by reference the federal regulations, found at 40 CFR Part 265, that prescribe the requirements for facilities granted interim status pursuant to the RCRA. The purpose of the proposed action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce potential risks to human health and the environment, and to comply with the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) requirements.

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  3. Implementing change in the facilities planning process

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    In the post-Cold War climate of reduced budgets at the national laboratories, the Sites Planning Department at Sandia National Laboratories was faced with the problem of securing funding for capital construction projects in a very competitive environment. The Department of Energy (DOE), felt that requests for new facilities were not always well coordinated with its mission needs. The Sites Planning Department needed to revolutionize the way they were doing business. To be successful in obtaining approval and funding for future facilities, they recognized the need to concentrate their efforts on project proposals that tap strategic programs at DOE. The authors developed a series of new processes to identify, evaluate, prioritize, and develop line item project proposals to request approval and obtain funding. A matrixed group of sites and facilities directors was formed to establish criteria and make preliminary recommendations to upper management. Matrixed working groups were also established at the staff level to develop and prepare projects for the prioritization process. Ultimately, similar processes will be applied to all project types, and a prioritized plan generated for each. These plans will become the blueprint for an overarching strategic site plan. What started as a means of increasing success in obtaining approval and funding of capital projects has launched a whole new approach to project development that permits incorporation of facilities planning into overall corporate strategic planning.

  4. Library Automation and Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Aaron; Cohen, Elaine

    This seminar and workbook are designed to aid librarians in planning and designing attractive and efficient libraries in light of the changing technologies of the 1980s. It is based on the premise that the electronic revolution of the 1980s will cause substantial changes in the work force, work processes, and the nature of physical layouts of…

  5. Liquid effluent retention facility final-status groundwater monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.D.; Chou, C.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    The following sections describe the groundwater-monitoring program for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF). The LERF is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The LERF is included in the {open_quotes}Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, Permit WA890008967{close_quotes}, (referred to herein as the Permit) (Ecology 1994) and is subject to final-status requirements for groundwater monitoring (WAC 173-303-645). This document describes a RCRA/WAC groundwater detection-monitoring program for groundwater in the uppermost aquifer system at the LERF. This plan describes the LERF monitoring network, constituent list, sampling schedule, statistical methods, and sampling and analysis protocols that will be employed for the LERF. This plan will be used to meet the groundwater monitoring requirements from the time the LERF becomes part of the Permit and through the post-closure care period, until certification of final closure.

  6. Hanford tanks initiative alternatives generation and analysis plan for AX tank farm closure basis

    SciTech Connect

    Schaus, P. S.

    1997-10-22

    The purpose of this document is: (1) to review the HTI Mission Analysis and related documents to determine their suitability for use in developing performance measures for AX Tank Farm closure, (2) to determine the completeness and representativeness of selected alternative closure scenarios, (3) to determine the completeness of current plans for development of tank end-state criteria, and (4) to analyze the activities that are necessary and sufficient to recommend the end-state criteria and performance measures for the AX Tank Farm and recommend activities not currently planned to support establishment of its end-state criteria.

  7. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  8. Fernald - Developing and Executing an Accelerated Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.A.

    2006-07-01

    In November 2000 the Department of Energy (DOE) and Fluor Fernald entered into a closure contract that incited Fluor Fernald to reduce the cost and schedule of the Fernald site cleanup. The contract established a target schedule and target cost and how Fluor Fernald performs against these targets determines the amount of fee the company earns. In response to these new challenges, Fluor Fernald developed a 13-part strategy to safely accelerate work and more efficiently utilize the available funding. Implementation of this strategy required a dramatic culture change at Fernald - from a 'government job mind set' to an entrepreneurial/commercial model. Fluor Fernald's strategy and culture change has proved to be successful as the company is on track to close the site ahead of the target schedule at a total project cost less than the target cost. The elements of Fluor Fernald's strategy and the lessons learned during implementation provide valuable information that could be utilized by other DOE sites that will be undergoing closure over the next decade. (authors)

  9. Spring 2009 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post-Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Ann M.

    2009-05-31

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under and approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  10. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2007. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2007. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. Two additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2007. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during these additional inspections are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records

  11. The Environmental Agency's Assessment of the Post-Closure Safety Case for the BNFL DRIGG Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Streatfield, I. J.; Duerden, S. L.; Yearsley, R. A.

    2002-02-26

    The Environment Agency is responsible, in England and Wales, for authorization of radioactive waste disposal under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) is currently authorized by the Environment Agency to dispose of solid low level radioactive waste at its site at Drigg, near Sellafield, NW England. As part of a planned review of this authorization, the Environment Agency is currently undertaking an assessment of BNFL's Post-Closure Safety Case Development Programme for the Drigg disposal facility. This paper presents an outline of the review methodology developed and implemented by the Environment Agency specifically for the planned review of BNFL's Post-Closure Safety Case. The paper also provides an overview of the Environment Agency's progress in its on-going assessment programme.

  12. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.161 Section 63.161 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  13. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.161 Section 63.161 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  14. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure. 63.161 Section 63.161 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  15. The Impact of Hospital-Based Skilled Nursing Facility Closures on Rehospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Momotazur; Zinn, Jacqueline S; Mor, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of reductions in hospital-based (HB) skilled nursing facility (SNF) bed supply on the rate of rehospitalization of patients discharged to any SNF from zip codes that lost HB beds. Data Source We used Medicare enrollment records, Medicare hospital and SNF claims, and nursing home Minimum Dataset assessments and characteristics (OSCAR) to examine nearly 10 million Medicare fee-for-service hospital discharges to SNFs between 1999 and 2006. Study Design We calculated the number of HB and freestanding (FS) SNF beds within a 22 km radius from the centroid of all zip codes in which Medicare beneficiaries reside in all years. We examined the relationship between HB and FS bed supply and the rehospitalization rates of the patients residing in corresponding zip codes in different years using zip code fixed effects and instrumental variable methods including extensive sensitivity analyses. Principal Findings Our estimated coefficients suggest that closure of 882 HB homes during our study period resulted in 12,000–18,000 extra rehospitalizations within 30 days of discharge. The effect was largely concentrated among the most acutely ill, high-need patients. Conclusions SNF patient-based prospective payment resulted in closure of higher cost HB facilities that had served most postacute patients. As other, less experienced SNFs replaced HB facilities, they were less able to manage high acuity patients without rehospitalizing them. PMID:23033808

  16. Lessons Learned from the On-Site Disposal Facility at Fernald Closure Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kumthekar, U.A.; Chiou, J.D.

    2006-07-01

    The On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fernald Closure Project near Cincinnati, Ohio is an engineered above-grade waste disposal facility being constructed to permanently store low level radioactive waste (LLRW) and treated mixed LLRW generated during Decommissioning and Demolition (D and D) and soil remediation performed in order to achieve the final land use goal at the site. The OSDF is engineered to store 2.93 million cubic yards of waste derived from the remediation activities. The OSDF is intended to isolate its LLRW from the environment for at least 200 years and for up to 1,000 years to the extent practicable and achievable. Construction of the OSDF started in 1997 and waste placement activities will complete by the middle of April 2006 with the final cover (cap) placement over the last open cell by the end of Spring 2006. An on-site disposal alternative is considered critical to the success of many large-scale DOE remediation projects throughout the United States. However, for various reasons this cost effective alternative is not readily available in many cases. Over the last ten years Fluor Fernald Inc. has cumulated many valuable lessons learned through the complex engineering, construction, operation, and closure processes of the OSDF. Also in the last several years representatives from other DOE sites, State agencies, as well as foreign government agencies have visited the Fernald site to look for proven experiences and practices, which may be adapted for their sites. This paper present a summary of the major issues and lessons leaned at the Fernald site related to engineering, construction, operation, and closure processes for the disposal of remediation waste. The purpose of this paper is to share lessons learned and to benefit other projects considering or operating similar on-site disposal facilities from our successful experiences. (authors)

  17. Recommended management practices for operation and closure of shallow injection wells at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Safe Drinking Water Act established the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program to ensure that underground injection of wastes does not endanger an underground source of drinking water. Under UIC regulations, an injection well is a hole in the ground, deeper than it is wide, that receives wastes or other fluid substances. Types of injection wells range from deep cased wells to shallow sumps, drywells, and drainfields. The report describes the five classes of UIC wells and summarizes relevant regulations for each class of wells and for the UIC program. The main focus of the report is Class IV and V shallow injection wells. Class IV wells are prohibited and should be closed when they are identified. Class V wells are generally authorized by rule, but EPA or a delegated state may require a permit for a Class V well. This report provides recommendations on sound operating and closure practices for shallow injection wells. In addition the report contains copies of several relevant EPA documents that provide additional information on well operation and closure. Another appendix contains information on the UIC programs in 21 states in which there are DOE facilities discharging to injection wells. The appendix includes the name of the responsible regulatory agency and contact person, a summary of differences between the state`s regulations and Federal regulations, and any closure guidelines for Class IV and V wells.

  18. National Ignition Facility Title II Design Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpan, S

    1997-03-01

    This National Ignition Facility (NIF) Title II Design Plan defines the work to be performed by the NIF Project Team between November 1996, when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed Title I design and authorized the initiation of Title H design and specific long-lead procurements, and September 1998, when Title 11 design will be completed.

  19. Planning Tool for Strategic Evaluation of Facility Plans - 13570

    SciTech Connect

    Magoulas, Virginia; Cercy, Michael; Hall, Irin

    2013-07-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a strategic planning tool for the evaluation of the utilization of its unique resources for processing and research and development of nuclear materials. The Planning Tool is a strategic level tool for assessing multiple missions that could be conducted utilizing the SRNL facilities and showcasing the plan. Traditional approaches using standard scheduling tools and laying out a strategy on paper tended to be labor intensive and offered either a limited or cluttered view for visualizing and communicating results. A tool that can assess the process throughput, duration, and utilization of the facility was needed. SRNL teamed with Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS), a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries, to create the next generation Planning Tool. The goal of this collaboration was to create a simulation based tool that allows for quick evaluation of strategies with respect to new or changing missions, and clearly communicates results to the decision makers. This tool has been built upon a mature modeling and simulation software previously developed by NNS. The Planning Tool provides a forum for capturing dependencies, constraints, activity flows, and variable factors. It is also a platform for quickly evaluating multiple mission scenarios, dynamically adding/updating scenarios, generating multiple views for evaluating/communicating results, and understanding where there are areas of risks and opportunities with respect to capacity. The Planning Tool that has been developed is useful in that it presents a clear visual plan for the missions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). It not only assists in communicating the plans to SRS corporate management, but also allows the area stakeholders a visual look at the future plans for SRS. The design of this tool makes it easily deployable to other facility and mission planning endeavors. (authors)

  20. 2101-M pond closure plan. Volume 1, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, R. D.; Lerch, R. E.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment.

  1. National Ignition Facility wet weather construction plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, A N

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a wet weather construction plan for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project. Construction of the NIF commenced in mid- 1997, and excavation of the site was completed in the fall. Preparations for placing concrete foundations began in the fall, and above normal rainfall is expected over the tinter. Heavy rainfall in late November impacted foundation construction, and a wet weather construction plan was determined to be needed. This wet weather constiction plan recommends a strategy, techniques and management practices to prepare and protect the site corn wet weather effects and allow construction work to proceed. It is intended that information in this plan be incorporated in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) as warranted.

  2. Planning for closure and deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    SciTech Connect

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; Poland, H.F.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-07-01

    In January 1994, DOE terminated the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program. Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a detailed plan to put Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a safe condition, including removal of irradiated fueled subassemblies from the plant, transfer of subassemblies, and removal and stabilization of primary and secondary sodium liquid heat transfer metal. The goal of deactivation is to stabilize the EBR-II complex until decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) is implemented, thereby minimizing maintenance and surveillance. Deactivation of a sodium cooled reactor presents unique concerns. Residual sodium in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude concerns with explosive sodium-air reactions. Also, residual sodium on components will effectively solder these items in place, making removal unfeasible. Several special cases reside in the primary system, including primary cold traps, a cesium trap, a cover gas condenser, and systems containing sodium-potassium alloy. The sodium or sodium-potassium alloy in these components must be reacted in place or the components removed. The Sodium Components Maintenance Shop at ANL-W provides the capability for washing primary components, removing residual quantities of sodium while providing some decontamination capacity. Considerations need to be given to component removal necessary for providing access to primary tank internals for D&D activities, removal of hazardous materials, and removal of stored energy sources. ANL-W`s plan for the deactivation of EBR-II addresses these issues, providing for an industrially and radiologically safe complex, requiring minimal surveillance during the interim period between deactivation and D&D. Throughout the deactivation and closure of the EBR-II complex, federal environmental concerns will be addressed, including obtaining the proper permits for facility condition and waste processing and disposal. 2 figs.

  3. National Ignition Facility (NIF) FY2015 Facility Use Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, P.; Wisoff, Jeff

    2014-12-18

    Major features of the FY2015 NIF Use Plan include: • Performing a record number of layered DT experiments with 28 planned compared with 15 in FY2014. Executing the first plutonium experiments on the NIF in support of the Science Campaigns. • Over 300 targets shots, a 57% increase compared to FY14. This is a stretch goal defined in the 120-Day Study document, and relies upon the success of many shot-rate improvement actions, as well as on the distribution of shot type selected by the users. While the Plan is consistent with this goal, the increased proportion of layered DT experiments described above reduces the margin against this goal. • Commissioning of initial ARC capability, which will support both SSP-HED and SSPICF programs. • Increase in days allocated to Discovery Science to a level that supports an ongoing program for academic use of NIF and an annual solicitation for new proposals. • Six Facility Maintenance and Reconfiguration (FM&R) periods totaling 30 days dedicated to major facility maintenance and modifications. • Utilization of the NIF Facility Advisory Schedule Committee (FASC) to provide stakeholder review and feedback on the NIF schedule. The Use Plan assumes a total FY2015 LLNL NIF Operations funding in MTE 10.7 of $229.465M and in MTE 10.3 of 47.0M. This Use Plan will be revised in the event of significant changes to the FY2015 funding or if NNSA provides FY2016 budget guidance significantly reduced compared to FY2015.

  4. 40 CFR 264.144 - Cost estimate for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost estimate for post-closure care... FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 264.144 Cost estimate for post-closure care. (a) The owner or operator of... contingent closure and post-closure plan, must have a detailed written estimate, in current dollars, of...

  5. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan

    SciTech Connect

    Callaghan, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

  6. Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

  7. Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-03-17

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria

  8. Development of a prototype plan for the effective closure of a waste disposal site in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.; Barnes, F.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype plan for the effective closure and stabilization of a semiarid low-level waste disposal site. This prototype plan will provide demonstrated closure techniques for a trench in a disposal site at Los Alamos based on previous shallow land burial (SLB) field research both at the Los Alamos Experimental Engineered Test Facility (EETF), and at a waste disposal area at Los Alamos. The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems at Waste Disposal Area B having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that one of the two models tested represented soil moisture more accurately than the second model. The accuracy of modeling all of the parameters of the water balance equation was then evaluated using field data from the Integrated Systems Demonstration plots at the EETF. Optimized parameters were developed for one model to describe observed values of deep percolation, evapotranspiration, and runoff from the field plots containing an SLB trench cap configuration.

  9. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Clobes, A.R.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility M Project. It was prepared for the NIP Prood Office by the NIF Procurement Manager.

  10. Management plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J.M.; Pratt, D.R.

    1991-08-01

    The DOE/RL 89-19, United States Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (1989), requires the Hanford Site to prepare an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) by November 9, 1991. The DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (1991), provides additional guidance and requires implementation of the EMP within 36 months of the effective data of the rule. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each US Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials to prepare an EMP. This EMP is to identify and discuss two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. At the Hanford Site, the site-wide EMP will consist of the following elements: (1) A conceptual plan addressing effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance; (2) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) site-wide environmental surveillance program; (3) Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) effluent monitoring program consisting of the near-field operations environmental monitoring activities and abstracts of each Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP). This management plan addresses the third of these three elements of the EMP, the FEMPs.

  11. Draft environmental assessment -- Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, J.B.; Irving, J.S.; Staley, C.S.; Stanley, N.

    1996-04-01

    The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce these risks to human health and the environment and to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. The WCF closure project is described in the DOE Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement (Programmatic EIS). DOE determined in the Programmatic EIS Record of Decision (ROD) that certain actions would be implemented and other actions deferred. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations. Based on the analysis in the EA, the action will not have a significant effect on the human environment.

  12. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

  13. 40 CFR 35.925-1 - Facilities planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Facilities planning. 35.925-1 Section... Facilities planning. That, if the award is for step 2, step 3, or step 2=3 grant assistance, the facilities planning requirements in § 35.917 et seq. have been met....

  14. 40 CFR 35.917 - Facilities planning (step 1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... schedule shall be inserted as a special condition in the grant agreement. (e) Facilities planning may not... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Facilities planning (step 1). 35.917... Facilities planning (step 1). (a) Sections 35.917 through 35.917-9 establish the requirements for...

  15. Emergency evacuation/transportation plan update: Traffic model development and evaluation of early closure procedures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-28

    Prolonged delays in traffic experienced by Laboratory personnel during a recent early dismissal in inclement weather, coupled with reconstruction efforts along NM 502 east of the White Rock Wye for the next 1 to 2 years, has prompted Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to re-evaluate and improve the present transportation plan and its integration with contingency plans maintained in other organizations. Facilities planners and emergency operations staff need to evaluate the transportation system`s capability to inefficiently and safely evacuate LANL under different low-level emergency conditions. A variety of potential procedures governing the release of employees from the different technical areas (TAs) requires evaluation, perhaps with regard to multiple emergency-condition scenarios, with one or more optimal procedures ultimately presented for adoption by Lab Management. The work undertaken in this project will hopefully lay a foundation for an on-going, progressive transportation system analysis capability. It utilizes microscale simulation techniques to affirm, reassess and validate the Laboratory`s Early Dismissal/Closure/Delayed Opening Plan. The Laboratory is required by Federal guidelines, and compelled by prudent practice and conscientious regard for the welfare of employees and nearby residents, to maintain plans and operating procedures for evacuation if the need arises. The tools developed during this process can be used outside of contingency planning. It is anticipated that the traffic models developed will allow site planners to evaluate changes to the traffic network which could better serve the normal traffic levels. Changes in roadway configuration, control strategies (signalization and signing), response strategies to traffic accidents, and patterns of demand can be modelled using the analysis tools developed during this project. Such scenarios typically are important considerations in master planning and facilities programming.

  16. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report summarizes the information gathered in constructing the clay cap test section. The purpose of the test section was to determine compaction characteristics of four representative kaolin clays and demonstrate in-situ permeability for these clays of 1 {times} 10 {sup {minus}7} cm/sec or less. The final technical specifications with regard to maximum clod size, acceptable ranges of placement water content, lift thickness, and degree of compaction will be based on experience gained from the test section. The data derived from this study will also be used in the development of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) methods to be used during actual cap construction of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Closure project. 7 tabs.

  17. Closure plan for CAU No. 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The steam cleaning effluent ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Nevada Operations Office operates the NTS and has entered into a trilateral agreement with the State of Nevada and the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA). The trilateral agreement provides a framework for identifying, characterizing, remediating, and closing environmental sites on the NTS and associated bombing ranges. The SCEP waste unit consists of: two steam cleaning effluent ponds; layout pad and associated grease trap; Building 6-623 steam cleaning pad; test pad; Building 6-623 grease trap; Building 6-800 steam cleaning pad; Building 6-800 separator; Building 6-621 sump; and the concrete asbestos piping connecting these components to both SCEPs. Clean closure is the recommended closure strategy for the majority of the components within this CAU. Four components of the unit (Building 6-621 Sump, Test Pad Grease Trap, Building 6-623 Steam Cleaning Pad, and North SCEP pipeline) are recommended to be closed in place. This closure plan provides the strategy and backup information necessary to support the clean closure of each of the individual components within CAU 93. Analytical data generated during the characterization field work and earlier sampling events indicates the majority of CAU 93 soil and infrastructure is non-hazardous (i.e., impacted primarily with petroleum hydrocarbons).

  18. National Ignition Facility Configuration Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral, S G; Moore, T L

    2002-10-01

    This Configuration Management Plan (CMP) describes the technical and administrative management process for controlling the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project configuration. The complexity of the NIF Project (i.e., participation by multiple national laboratories and subcontractors involved in the development, fabrication, installation, and testing of NIF hardware and software, as well as construction and testing of Project facilities) requires implementation of the comprehensive configuration management program defined in this plan. A logical schematic illustrating how the plan functions is provided in Figure 1. A summary of the process is provided in Section 4.0, Configuration Change Control. Detailed procedures that make up the overall process are referenced. This CMP is consistent with guidance for managing a project's configuration provided in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1, Guide PMG 10, ''Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning''. Configuration management is a formal discipline comprised of the following four elements: (1) Identification--defines the functional and physical characteristics of a Project and uniquely identifies the defining requirements. This includes selection of components of the end product(s) subject to control and selection of the documents that define the project and components. (2) Change management--provides a systematic method for managing changes to the project and its physical and functional configuration to ensure that all changes are properly identified, assessed, reviewed, approved, implemented, tested, and documented. (3) Data management--ensures that necessary information on the project and its end product(s) is systematically recorded and disseminated for decision-making and other uses. Identifies, stores and controls, tracks status, retrieves, and distributes documents. (4) Assessments and validation--ensures that the planned configuration requirements match actual physical configurations and

  19. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1301-N, 1324-N/NA, and 1325-N RCRA Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2002-06-08

    The 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, the 1324-N Surface Impoundment, and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100 N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). The closure plans for these facilities stipulate that groundwater is monitored according to the 100-N Pilot Project: Proposed Consolidated Groundwater Monitoring Program (BHI-00725). This document supplements the consolidated plan by providing information on sampling and analysis protocols, quality assurance, data management, and a conceptual model for the RCRA sites. Monitoring well networks, constituents, and sampling frequency remain the same as in the consolidated plan or the previous groundwater monitoring plan (Hartman 1996).

  20. Sampling and analysis plan for site assessment during the closure or replacement of nonradioactive underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Gitt, M.J.

    1990-08-01

    The Tank Management Program is responsible for closure or replacement of nonradioactive underground storage tanks throughout the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been developed that complies with EPA regulations and with INEL Tank Removal Procedures for sampling activities associated with site assessment during these closure or replacement activities. The SAP will ensure that all data are valid, and it also will function as a Quality Assurance Project Plan. 18 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

  2. HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2

    SciTech Connect

    KIRK WINTERHOLLER

    2008-02-25

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

  3. Pre/post-closure assessment of groundwater pharmaceutical fate in a wastewater-facility-impacted stream reach.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul M; Barber, Larry B; Clark, Jimmy M; Duris, Joseph W; Foreman, William T; Furlong, Edward T; Givens, Carrie E; Hubbard, Laura E; Hutchinson, Kasey J; Journey, Celeste A; Keefe, Steffanie H; Kolpin, Dana W

    2016-10-15

    Pharmaceutical contamination of contiguous groundwater is a substantial concern in wastewater-impacted streams, due to ubiquity in effluent, high aqueous mobility, designed bioactivity, and to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insights into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The USGS conducted a combined pre/post-closure groundwater assessment adjacent to an effluent-impacted reach of Fourmile Creek, Ankeny, Iowa, USA. Higher surface-water concentrations, consistent surface-water to groundwater concentration gradients, and sustained groundwater detections tens of meters from the stream bank demonstrated the importance of WWTF effluent as the source of groundwater pharmaceuticals as well as the persistence of these contaminants under effluent-driven, pre-closure conditions. The number of analytes (110 total) detected in surface water decreased from 69 prior to closure down to 8 in the first post-closure sampling event approximately 30 d later, with a corresponding 2 order of magnitude decrease in the cumulative concentration of detected analytes. Post-closure cumulative concentrations of detected analytes were approximately 5 times higher in proximal groundwater than in surface water. About 40% of the 21 contaminants detected in a downstream groundwater transect immediately before WWTF closure exhibited rapid attenuation with estimated half-lives on the order of a few days; however, a comparable number exhibited no consistent attenuation during the year-long post-closure assessment. The results demonstrate the potential for effluent-impacted shallow groundwater systems to accumulate pharmaceutical contaminants and serve as long-term residual sources, further increasing the risk of adverse ecological effects in groundwater and the near-stream ecosystem.

  4. Pre/post-closure assessment of groundwater pharmaceutical fate in a wastewater-facility-impacted stream reach.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul M; Barber, Larry B; Clark, Jimmy M; Duris, Joseph W; Foreman, William T; Furlong, Edward T; Givens, Carrie E; Hubbard, Laura E; Hutchinson, Kasey J; Journey, Celeste A; Keefe, Steffanie H; Kolpin, Dana W

    2016-10-15

    Pharmaceutical contamination of contiguous groundwater is a substantial concern in wastewater-impacted streams, due to ubiquity in effluent, high aqueous mobility, designed bioactivity, and to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insights into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The USGS conducted a combined pre/post-closure groundwater assessment adjacent to an effluent-impacted reach of Fourmile Creek, Ankeny, Iowa, USA. Higher surface-water concentrations, consistent surface-water to groundwater concentration gradients, and sustained groundwater detections tens of meters from the stream bank demonstrated the importance of WWTF effluent as the source of groundwater pharmaceuticals as well as the persistence of these contaminants under effluent-driven, pre-closure conditions. The number of analytes (110 total) detected in surface water decreased from 69 prior to closure down to 8 in the first post-closure sampling event approximately 30 d later, with a corresponding 2 order of magnitude decrease in the cumulative concentration of detected analytes. Post-closure cumulative concentrations of detected analytes were approximately 5 times higher in proximal groundwater than in surface water. About 40% of the 21 contaminants detected in a downstream groundwater transect immediately before WWTF closure exhibited rapid attenuation with estimated half-lives on the order of a few days; however, a comparable number exhibited no consistent attenuation during the year-long post-closure assessment. The results demonstrate the potential for effluent-impacted shallow groundwater systems to accumulate pharmaceutical contaminants and serve as long-term residual sources, further increasing the risk of adverse ecological effects in groundwater and the near-stream ecosystem. PMID:27350092

  5. Pre/post-closure assessment of groundwater pharmaceutical fate in a wastewater‑facility-impacted stream reach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Barber, Larry B.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Duris, Joseph; Foreman, William; Furlong, Edward T.; Givens, Carrie E.; Hubbard, Laura E.; Hutchinson, Kasey J.; Journey, Celeste A.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Kolpin, Dana W.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical contamination of contiguous groundwater is a substantial concern in wastewater-impacted streams, due to ubiquity in effluent, high aqueous mobility, designed bioactivity, and to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) closures are rare environmental remediation events; offering unique insights into contaminant persistence, long-term wastewater impacts, and ecosystem recovery processes. The USGS conducted a combined pre/post-closure groundwater assessment adjacent to an effluent-impacted reach of Fourmile Creek, Ankeny, Iowa, USA. Higher surface-water concentrations, consistent surface-water to groundwater concentration gradients, and sustained groundwater detections tens of meters from the stream bank demonstrated the importance of WWTF effluent as the source of groundwater pharmaceuticals as well as the persistence of these contaminants under effluent-driven, pre-closure conditions. The number of analytes (110 total) detected in surface water decreased from 69 prior to closure down to 8 in the first post-closure sampling event approximately 30 d later, with a corresponding 2 order of magnitude decrease in the cumulative concentration of detected analytes. Post-closure cumulative concentrations of detected analytes were approximately 5 times higher in proximal groundwater than in surface water. About 40% of the 21 contaminants detected in a downstream groundwater transect immediately before WWTF closure exhibited rapid attenuation with estimated half-lives on the order of a few days; however, a comparable number exhibited no consistent attenuation during the year-long post-closure assessment. The results demonstrate the potential for effluent-impacted shallow groundwater systems to accumulate pharmaceutical contaminants and serve as long-term residual sources, further increasing the risk of adverse ecological effects in groundwater and the near-stream ecosystem.

  6. Facility Planning for Physical Education, Recreation, and Athletics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Richard B., Ed.

    This publication reflects the composite knowledge of many professionals on the topic of the planning and construction of facilities for athletics, physical education, and recreation. The text is organized into nine chapters: (1) "Facility Planning Process: Factors To Consider" (H. R. White and J. D. Karabetsos); (2) "Indoor Facilities" (E.…

  7. 15 CFR 923.13 - Energy facility planning process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Energy facility planning process. 923... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Uses Subject to Management § 923.13 Energy facility planning process. The management program must contain a planning process for energy...

  8. 15 CFR 923.13 - Energy facility planning process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy facility planning process. 923... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Uses Subject to Management § 923.13 Energy facility planning process. The management program must contain a planning process for energy...

  9. 15 CFR 923.13 - Energy facility planning process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Energy facility planning process. 923... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Uses Subject to Management § 923.13 Energy facility planning process. The management program must contain a planning process for energy...

  10. 15 CFR 923.13 - Energy facility planning process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Energy facility planning process. 923... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Uses Subject to Management § 923.13 Energy facility planning process. The management program must contain a planning process for energy...

  11. 15 CFR 923.13 - Energy facility planning process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Energy facility planning process. 923... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM REGULATIONS Uses Subject to Management § 923.13 Energy facility planning process. The management program must contain a planning process for energy...

  12. Planning Guide for Maintaining School Facilities. NCES 2003-347

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

    The planning guide was developed to help readers better understand why and how to develop, implement, and evaluate a school facilities maintenance plan. The guide is designed for staff at the local school district level, where most facility maintenance is planned, managed, and carried out. This audience includes school business officials, school…

  13. 12. Photocopy of engineering drawing. LAUNCHING FACILITY BLOCKHOUSE: FOUNDATION PLAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of engineering drawing. LAUNCHING FACILITY BLOCKHOUSE: FOUNDATION PLAN AND SECTIONS-STRUCTURAL, 1964 (ORIGINALLY APPROVED MARCH 1954). - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28401, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. The Remote Handled Immobilization Low Activity Waste Disposal Facility Environmental Permits & Approval Plan

    SciTech Connect

    DEFFENBAUGH, M.L.

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to revise Document HNF-SD-ENV-EE-003, ''Permitting Plan for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Project, which was submitted on September 4, 1997. That plan accounted for the interim storage and disposal of Immobilized-Low Activity Waste at the existing Grout Treatment Facility Vaults (Project W-465) and within a newly constructed facility (Project W-520). Project W-520 was to have contained a combination of concrete vaults and trenches. This document supersedes that plan because of two subsequent items: (1) A disposal authorization that was received on October 25, 1999, in a U. S. Department of Energy-Headquarters, memorandum, ''Disposal Authorization Statement for the Department of Energy Hanford site Low-Level Waste Disposal facilities'' and (2) ''Breakthrough Initiative Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Alternative,'' August 1999, from Lucas Incorporated, Richland, Washington. The direction within the U. S. Department of Energy-Headquarters memorandum was given as follows: ''The DOE Radioactive Waste Management Order requires that a Disposal authorization statement be obtained prior to construction of new low-level waste disposal facility. Field elements with the existing low-level waste disposal facilities shall obtain a disposal authorization statement in accordance with the schedule in the complex-wide Low-Level Waste Management Program Plan. The disposal authorization statement shall be issued based on a review of the facility's performance assessment and composite analysis or appropriate CERCLA documentation. The disposal authorization shall specify the limits and conditions on construction, design, operations, and closure of the low-level waste facility based on these reviews. A disposal authorization statement is a part of the required radioactive waste management basis for a disposal facility. Failure to obtain a disposal authorization statement or record of decision shall result in shutdown of an operational

  15. Site Development Planning--A Must for Education Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, James K.

    1989-01-01

    School site development planning involves consideration of location, topography, utilities, accessibility, lighting, landscaping, traffic and parking, playground areas, and athletic facilities. A checklist is provided. (MLF)

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  17. Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination - 12543

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, Kurt; Chamberlain, Grover; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin; Wellman, Dawn; Deeb, Rula; Hawley, Elisabeth

    2012-07-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination

  18. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration work plan for Corrective Action Unit 126: Closure of aboveground storage tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This plan addresses the closure of several aboveground storage tanks in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site. The unit is currently identified as Corrective Action Unit 126 in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order and is listed as having six Corrective Action Sites. This plan addresses the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration closure for five of the six sites. Four of the CASs are located at the Engine Test Stand complex and one is located in the Central Support Area. The sites consist of aboveground tanks, two of which were used to store diesel fuel and one stored Nalcool (an antifreeze mixture). The remaining tanks were used as part of a water demineralization process and stored either sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide, and one was used as a charcoal adsorption furnace. Closure will be completed by removal of the associated piping, tank supports and tanks using a front end loader, backhoe, and/or crane. When possible, the tanks will be salvaged as scrap metal. The piping that is not removed will be sealed using a cement grout.

  19. NSTX: Facility/Research Highlights and Near Term Facility Plans

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono

    2008-11-19

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a collaborative mega-ampere-class spherical torus research facility with high power heating and current drive systems and the state-of-the-art comprehensive diagnostics. For the 2008 experimental campaign, the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating efficiency in deuterium improved significantly with lithium evaporation and produced a record central Te of 5 keV. The HHFW heating of NBI-heated discharges was also demonstrated for the first time with lithium application. The EBW emission in H-mode was also improved dramatically with lithium which was shown to be attributable to reduced edge collisional absorption. Newly installed FIDA energetic particle diagnostic measured significant transport of energetic ions associated with TAE avalanche as well as n=1 kink activities. A full 75 channel poloidal CHERS system is now operational yielding tantalizing initial results. In the near term, major upgrade activities include a liquid-lithium divertor target to achieve lower collisionality regime, the HHFW antenna upgrades to double its power handling capability in H-mode, and a beam-emission spectroscopy diagnostic to extend the localized turbulence measurements toward the ion gyro-radius scale from the present concentration on the electron gyro-radius scale. For the longer term, a new center stack to significantly expand the plasma operating parameters is planned along with a second NBI system to double the NBI heating and CD power and provide current profile control. These upgrades will enable NSTX to explore fully non-inductive operations over a much expanded plasma parameter space in terms of higher plasma temperature and lower collisionality, thereby significantly reducing the physics parameter gap between the present NSTX and the projected next-step ST experiments.

  20. PK-12 Public Educational Facilities Master Plan Evaluation Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    21st Century School Fund, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Proper planning of school facilities is critical for all school districts no matter how large or small, whether major construction is in the works or the district is managing enrollment declines. When school districts properly plan for their school facilities they have better schools, more public use and higher value for public spending. This…

  1. Planning Physical Education and Athletic Facilities in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penman, Kenneth A.

    This book is primarily designed for a course in planning physical education and athletic facilities and as a supplementary textbook for administration courses. It illustrates the skills necessary for designing and planning facilities, stresses the need for effective communication between planners and users, and covers elementary through college…

  2. Information security management system planning for CBRN facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lenaeu, Joseph D.; O'Neil, Lori Ross; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Landine, Guy P.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lewis, John; Mathers, Gemma; Rodger, Robert; Johnson, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this document is to provide guidance for the development of information security management system planning documents at chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) facilities. It describes a risk-based approach for planning information security programs based on the sensitivity of the data developed, processed, communicated, and stored on facility information systems.

  3. Educational Facilities: Planning, Modernization, and Management. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castaldi, Basil

    Written for both students and practitioners, this book is a comprehensive treatise on the planning, remodeling, and maintenance of educational facilities. The subject matter is organized to blend theory and practice. Part I deals primarily with theory, principles, and techniques of educational facilities planning, covering school building history,…

  4. Visions: Involving Teachers as Process Partners for Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanard, Marilynn

    1996-01-01

    Suggests teachers be involved in educational school facility planning efforts in order to fulfill educational program needs. The creation or vision process for facilities planning includes the program description, educational program overview, imagining the future, storyboarding, a Gap Analysis to identify program needs, and a force field analysis…

  5. NSTX Facility/Research Status and Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Masayuki

    2008-11-01

    The NSTX team completed the FY 2008 run with a record number of plasma discharges with newly implemented facility and diagnostic capabilities. The dual lithium evaporator (LITER) system was introduced to provide complete toroidal coverage of the lower divertor with a solid lithium film which prouced improved plasma confinement and ELM-free discharges. LITER together with EF/RWM feedback control system led to record pulse length / high performance discharges on NSTX. The 75 ch PCHERS and Fast Ion D-alpha diagnostic systems were also successfully commissioned. For the 2009 run, a liquid-lithium divertor target to achieve lower collisionality, the HHFW antenna upgrade to double its power handling capability, and a BES diagnostic to extend the localized turbulence measurements and an MSE-LIF system for Er and B measurements will be introduced. For longer term upgrades, a new center stack to enable ˜ 1 T, 2 MA, and 5 s operation is planned along with a second NBI for providing current profile control. These upgrades will enable NSTX to study fully non-inductive operations over much expanded plasma parameter space with lower collisionality and higher plasma temperature needed for the next-step STs.

  6. Post-Closure Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2004-04-02

    The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Consevation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Surface and underground features of the facilities have been removed and laboratory analyses showed that soil met the closure performance standards. These sites have been backfilled and revegetated.

  7. Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS, T.L.

    2003-02-01

    Among the highest priorities for action under the ''Hanford Federal Facility and Agreement and Consent Order'', hereafter referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement, is the retrieval, treatment and disposal of Hanford Site tank waste. Tank waste is recognized as one of the primary threats to the Columbia River and one of the most complex technical challenges. Progress has been made in resolving safety issues, characterizing tank waste and past tank leaks, enhancing double-shell tank waste transfer and operations systems, retrieving single-shell tank waste, deploying waste treatment facilities, and planning for the disposal of immobilized waste product. However, limited progress has been made in developing technologies and providing a sound technical basis for tank system closure. To address this limitation the Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project was created to develop information through technology demonstrations in support of waste retrieval and closure decisions. To complete its mission the Accelerated Tank Closure Demonstration Project has adopted performance objectives that include: protecting human health and the environment; minimizing/eliminating potential waste releases to the soil and groundwater; preventing water infiltration into the tank; maintaining accessibility of surrounding tanks for future closure; maintaining tank structural integrity; complying with applicable waste retrieval, disposal, and closure regulations; and maintaining flexibility for final closure options in the future.

  8. 40 CFR 264.258 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.258... Waste Piles § 264.258 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure, the owner or operator must remove... facility and perform post-closure care in accordance with the closure and post-closure care...

  9. Final closure cover for a Hanford radioactive mixed waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.D.

    1996-02-06

    This study provides a preliminary design for a RCRA mixed waste landfill final closure cover. The cover design was developed by a senior class design team from Seattle University. The design incorporates a layered design of indigenous soils and geosynthetics in a layered system to meet final closure cover requirements for a landfill as imposed by the Washington Administrative Code WAC-173-303 implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  10. Planning and Managing the Campus Facilities Portfolio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daigneau, William A., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The campus and facilities of a college should be managed using the same principles as any other investment in an institution's financial portfolio. Stemming from the APPA/National Association of College & University Business Officers (NACUBO) Institute for Facilities Finance, this book addresses the totality of managing the facilities investment…

  11. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-41-03. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for CAS 25-41-03. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of corrective actions will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The CAS will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-41-03. The following text summarizes the SAFER

  12. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 3: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This volume contains information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the six options described in Volume 1, Section 2: Option 1 -- Total removal clean closure; No subsequent use; Option 2 -- Risk-based clean closure; LLW fill; Option 3 -- Risk-based clean closure; CERCLA fill; Option 4 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; LLW fill; Option 5 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; CERCLA fill; and Option 6 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; Clean fill. This volume is divided into two portions. The first portion contains the cost and planning schedule estimates while the second portion contains life-cycle costs and yearly cash flow information for each option.

  13. Development plan for the Nucleon Physics Laboratory Facility at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.B.; Bacher, A.; Boudrie, R.L.; Carey, T.A.; Donahue, J.; Goodman, C.D.; McNaufhton, M.W.; Tanaka, N.; van Dyck, O.B.; Werbeck, R.

    1986-02-01

    A 3- to 4-year plan is described for upgrading the LAMPF Nucleon Physics Laboratory including a neutron time-of-flight facility for the (p,n) reaction, a medium-resolution spectrometer for (p,p') and n,p) studies, and a dedicated facility for atomic beam studies. Development of these facilities and relationships to other ongoing developments are detailed. The scope of the new physics programs supported by such a facility is discussed.

  14. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    G. N. Doyle

    2002-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

  15. 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities -- Quality assurance program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, L.

    1995-03-13

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance and management controls used by the 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEF) to perform its activities in accordance with DOE Order 5700.6C. The 200 Area LEF consists of the following facilities: Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF); Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF); Liquid Effluent Retention facility (LERF); and Truck Loading Facility -- (Project W291). The intent is to ensure that all activities such as collection of effluents, treatment, concentration of secondary wastes, verification, sampling and disposal of treated effluents and solids related with the LEF operations, conform to established requirements.

  16. 40 CFR 265.445 - Closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....443(b)(1) must: (i) Include in the closure plan for the drip pad under § 265.112 both a plan for... STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Drip Pads..., contaminated containment system components (pad, liners, etc.), contaminated subsoils, and structures...

  17. 40 CFR 265.445 - Closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....443(b)(1) must: (i) Include in the closure plan for the drip pad under § 265.112 both a plan for... STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Drip Pads..., contaminated containment system components (pad, liners, etc.), contaminated subsoils, and structures...

  18. 40 CFR 265.445 - Closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....443(b)(1) must: (i) Include in the closure plan for the drip pad under § 265.112 both a plan for... STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Drip Pads..., contaminated containment system components (pad, liners, etc.), contaminated subsoils, and structures...

  19. 40 CFR 265.445 - Closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....443(b)(1) must: (i) Include in the closure plan for the drip pad under § 265.112 both a plan for... STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Drip Pads..., contaminated containment system components (pad, liners, etc.), contaminated subsoils, and structures...

  20. A Report on a New School Facilities Capital Plan by the School Facilities Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This report reflects the recommendations of the School Facilities Task Force (appointed for Alberta in February 1997) regarding the development of a new school facilities capital plan. Guiding principles included the needs of students, local decision making, and long-range planning. Nine appendixes include a sample school capital funding scenario;…

  1. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    D. Wieland, V. Yucel, L. Desotell, G. Shott, J. Wrapp

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) plans to close the waste and classified material storage cells in the southeast quadrant of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), informally known as the '92-Acre Area', by 2011. The 25 shallow trenches and pits and the 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) borings contain various waste streams including low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), transuranic (TRU), mixed transuranic (MTRU), and high specific activity LLW. The cells are managed under several regulatory and permit programs by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Although the specific closure requirements for each cell vary, 37 closely spaced cells will be closed under a single integrated monolayer evapotranspirative (ET) final cover. One cell will be closed under a separate cover concurrently. The site setting and climate constrain transport pathways and are factors in the technical approach to closure and performance assessment. Successful implementation of the integrated closure plan requires excellent communication and coordination between NNSA/NSO and the regulators.

  2. Antenna Test Facility (ATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  3. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  4. Radiant Heat Test Facility (RHTF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the RHTF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  5. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  6. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  7. Planning and Designing Facilities. Facility Design and Development--Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hypes, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    Before one begins the planning process for a new facility, it is important to determine if there is a need for a new facility. The demand for a new facility can be drawn from increases in the number of users, the type of users, and the type of events to be conducted in the facility. A feasibility study should be conducted to analyze the legal…

  8. Planning for Maintaining School Facilities? Help Is on the Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szuba, Thomas; Young, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Describes cooperative effort between Association of School Business Officials, International and National Forum on Education Statistics to develop a guide to facilities maintenance planning, to be completed in 2 years, for use by local school districts. (PKP)

  9. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  10. Near-facility environmental monitoring quality assurance project plan

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near facility environmental monitoring performed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations and supersedes WHC-EP-0538-2. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by waste management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations in implementing facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site.

  11. Safer Work Plan for CAUs 452, 454, 456, and 464 Closure of Historical UST Release Sites Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Bonn

    1997-08-01

    This plan addresses characterization and closure of nine underground storage tank petroleum hydrocarbon release sites. The sites are located at the Nevada Test Site in Areas 2, 9, 12, 23, and 25. The underground storage tanks associated with the release sites and addressed by this plan were closed between 1990 and 1996 by the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. One underground storage tank was closed in place (23-111-1) while the remaining eight were closed by removal. Hydrocarbon releases were identified at each of the sites based upon laboratory analytical data samples collected below the tank bottoms. The objective of this plan is to provide a method for implementing characterization and closure of historical underground storage tank hydrocarbon release sites.

  12. Time-Management Planning for Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIsaac, Donald N.; And Others

    Three conference papers concerned with systems analysis and time management planning. One paper is concerned with techniques, especially the application of the "critical path method" or PERT (Program Evaluation Review Technique) in planning construction activities. A second paper concerns problems associated with collecting and communicating…

  13. Planning Educational Facilities for the Next Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earthman, Glen I.

    This book examines each phase in the process of planning capital projects and those individuals in the schools who make decisions about the buildings students will use. It uses the long range planning process of the school system as the vehicle for providing the proper housing for students and programs. Program development, student enrollment…

  14. Instructional Television Facilities: A Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherspoon, John P.; Kessler, William J.

    When planning an instructional television (ITV) system, it is suggested that educational objectives should outweigh technological considerations and that expert advice be secured before the planning process is far advanced. In line with the latter suggestion, the book offers a background of technical knowledge aimed at educational administrators…

  15. GUIDE FOR PLANNING COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MERLO, FRANK P.; WALLING, W. DONALD

    DISCUSSION OF THE PLACE OF PLANNING IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT IS FOLLOWED BY CONSIDERATION OF FACTORS RELATED TO SITE (LOCATION, SIZE, MASTER PLANNING, PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, SHAPE, ZONING, PARKING, LIGHTING, ROADS AND WALKS), BUILDINGS (THE BASIC BUILDINGS, CALCULATION OF SPACE NEEDS, STUDENT CAPACITIES, LOCATION ON THE SITE,…

  16. Planning Guide for Secondary School Music Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenger Corp., Owatonna, MN.

    This planning guide focuses on the fundamental requirements for planning and designing school music suites. The guide provides brief explanations of critical factors affecting music suites so that music directors and other stakeholders can more quickly and clearly communicate music area fundamentals to architects and administrators. Topics cover…

  17. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 222-S Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, J.M.; Warwick, G.J.

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable Federal, State, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  18. Campus Planning and Construction: Physical Facilities for Universities and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Sam F.

    The important phases of planning and constructing physical facilities for universities and colleges are brought together so that persons responsible for providing these facilities can readily evaluate their present policies and organizations. The subject is addressed from the point of view of the professional physical plant administrator. The text…

  19. High School Educational Specifications: Facilities Planning Standards. Edition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County School District R-1, Denver, CO.

    The Jefferson County School District (Colorado) has developed a manual of high school specifications for Design Advisory Groups and consultants to use for planning and designing the district's high school facilities. The specifications are provided to help build facilities that best meet the educational needs of the students to be served.…

  20. 29. FLOOR PLAN OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY SHOWING MAIN ABOVEGRADE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. FLOOR PLAN OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY SHOWING MAIN ABOVE-GRADE FLOOR LEVEL. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106354. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. 31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR AT MEZZANINE AND LOWER LEVELS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106352. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. 30. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS LEVELS ABOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS LEVELS ABOVE GRADE AND AT LEVEL OF OPERATING CORRIDOR. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106351. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Interim Closure Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Boehlecke, R. F.

    2011-10-24

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 to support ongoing access and generate information necessary to plan future closure activities. General housekeeping and cleanup of debris was conducted in the EMAD yard, cold bays, support areas of Building 3900, and postmortem cell tunnel area of the hot bay. All non-asbestos ceiling tiles and loose and broken non-friable asbestos floor tiles were removed from support galleries and office areas. Non-radiologically contaminated piping and equipment in the cold areas of the building and in the two 120-ton locomotives in the yard were tapped, characterized, drained, and verified free of contents.

  4. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-11-15

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  5. 40 CFR 265.258 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.258... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Waste Piles § 265.258 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure, the owner or... or decontaminated, he must close the facility and perform post-closure care in accordance with...

  6. 40 CFR 35.917 - Facilities planning (step 1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for step 2 or step 3 may be awarded before approval of a facilities plan for the entire geographic area to be served by the complete waste treatment system of which the proposed treatment works will be... plan and will be a component part of the complete system; and (2) The applicant agrees to complete...

  7. 40 CFR 35.917 - Facilities planning (step 1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for step 2 or step 3 may be awarded before approval of a facilities plan for the entire geographic area to be served by the complete waste treatment system of which the proposed treatment works will be... plan and will be a component part of the complete system; and (2) The applicant agrees to complete...

  8. The mixed waste management facility, FY95 plan

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.

    1994-12-01

    This document contains the Fiscal Year 1995 Plan for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Major objectives to be completed during FY 1995 for the MWMF project are listed and described. This report also contains a budget plan, project task summaries, a milestone control log, and a responsibility assignment matrix for the MWMF project.

  9. Creative Facilities Planning for Occupational Education, and Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finsterbach, Fred C.; McNeice, William C.

    This comprehensive manual deals with the problems of planning vocational facilities. Volume I provides floor layouts and specialized designs that interpret educational concepts, equipment needs, and services into functional units for architectural adaptation. Additional planning guidelines clarify purchasing policies and procedures, explain the…

  10. Educational Specifications. Educational Facility Series: A Guide to Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Bureau of Facility Planning.

    Although the concept of educational specifications for planning school buildings has been discussed over a long period of time and has found its way into virtually every facility's planning publication in the last 20 years, there remains a considerable lack of understanding of what educational specifications should include and how they should be…

  11. Guidance for Preparing a Facility Plan. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This document provides information to assist with preparing a preliminary facility plan for construction of municipal sewage treatment works. The text describes the requirements in the applicable laws and regulations and suggests a planning process by which they can be met. (CS)

  12. DFL, Canada's Space AIT Facilities - Current and Planned Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, R.; Mishra, S.; Choueiry, E.; Dumoulin, J.; Ahmed, S.

    2004-08-01

    The David Florida Laboratory (DFL) of the Canadian Space Agency is the Canadian national ISO 9001:2000 registered facility for the assembly, integration, and (environmental) testing of space hardware. This paper briefly describes the three main qualification facilities: Structural Qualification Facilities (SQF); Radio Frequency Qualification Facilities (RFQF); and Thermal Qualification Facilities (TQF). The paper also describes the planned/new upgrades/improvements to the DFL's existing capabilities. These include: cylindrical near-field antenna measurement system, current capabilities in multi-frequency multi-band passive intermodulation (PIM) measurement; combined thermal/vibration test facility, improvement in efficiency and performance of the photogrammetry capability, acquisition of an additional mass properties measurement system for small and micro-satellites; combined control and data acquisition system for all existing thermal vacuum facilities, plus a new automatic thermal control system and hypobaric chamber.

  13. Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF

    SciTech Connect

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    1999-09-01

    The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

  14. Master Planning School District Facility Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager, Gary; Matschulat, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Most educational entities confront any number of facility issues. Upgrading the physical infrastructure to meet current and future demands can be intimidating. The quantity and magnitude of capital issues in a changing environment can be overwhelming. How can all this complexity be made coherent to assure that decisions are sound and limited…

  15. Planning and Designing Today's Career Tech Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaman, James

    2010-01-01

    During the past 20 years, career and technical education (CTE) has gone through significant changes. CTE has evolved in response to the changes technology has had on the job market. Preparing students for high-tech, high-skill job opportunities is the new focus. The facilities that house these programs, however, have not kept pace with these…

  16. Planning for a Healthier School Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belew, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    One might assume that, within the walls of a school, it is the shared responsibility of the school nurse, guidance counselor, physical fitness instructor, and food services staff to protect student health. In truth, such an important responsibility also belongs, in very large part, to the educational facility planner and school maintenance staff.…

  17. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-29

    This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

  18. Development of Facilities Master Plan and Laboratory Renovation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Andrea D

    2011-10-03

    Funding from this grant has allowed Morehouse School of Medicine to complete its first professionally developed, comprehensive campus master plan that is in alignment with the recently completed strategic plan. In addition to master planning activities, funds were used for programming and designing research renovations, and also to supplement other research facility upgrades by providing lighting and equipment. The activities funded by this grant will provide the catalyst for substantial improvement in the School's overall facilities for biomedical education and research, and will also provide much of the information needed to conduct a successful campaign to raise funds for proposed buildings and renovations.

  19. National Ignition Facility pollution prevention and waste minimization plan

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, B.; Celeste, J.

    1998-09-01

    This document is the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF) Pollution Prevention and Waste Minimization Plan. It will not only function as the planning document for anticipating, minimizing, and mitigating NIF waste generation, but it is also a Department of Energy (DOE) milestone document specified in the facility's Mitigation Action Plan (MAP). As such, it is one of the ''living'' reference documents that will guide NIF operations through all phases of the project. This document will be updated periodically to reflect development of the NIF, from construction through lifetime operations.

  20. Hanford Site waste tank farm facilities design reconstitution program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Vollert, F.R.

    1994-09-06

    Throughout the commercial nuclear industry the lack of design reconstitution programs prior to the mid 1980`s has resulted in inadequate documentation to support operating facilities configuration changes or safety evaluations. As a result, many utilities have completed or have ongoing design reconstitution programs and have discovered that without sufficient pre-planning their program can be potentially very expensive and may result in end-products inconsistent with the facility needs or expectations. A design reconstitution program plan is developed here for the Hanford waste tank farms facility as a consequence of the DOE Standard on operational configuration management. This design reconstitution plan provides for the recovery or regeneration of design requirements and basis, the compilation of Design Information Summaries, and a methodology to disposition items open for regeneration that were discovered during the development of Design Information Summaries. Implementation of this plan will culminate in an end-product of about 30 Design Information Summary documents. These documents will be developed to identify tank farms facility design requirements and design bases and thereby capture the technical baselines of the facility. This plan identifies the methodology necessary to systematically recover documents that are sources of design input information, and to evaluate and disposition open items or regeneration items discovered during the development of the Design Information Summaries or during the verification and validation processes. These development activities will be governed and implemented by three procedures and a guide that are to be developed as an outgrowth of this plan.

  1. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  2. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  3. The ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program Long Range Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.

    1984-09-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 76 individual surplus facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. The ORNL SFMP has prepared this Long Range Plan to outline the long-term management strategy for those facilities included in the program. The primary objective of this plan are to: (1) develop a base of information for each ORNL SFMP facility, (2) conduct preliminary decommissioning analyses to identify feasible alternatives, (3) assess the current and future risk of each facility, (4) establish a priority list for the decommissioning projects, and (5) integrate the individual project costs and schedules into an overall program schedule and cost estimate for the ORNL site. The Long Range Plan also provides an overview of the ORNL SFMP management structure, specifies the decommissioning criteria to be employed, and identifies special technical problems, research and development needs, and special facilities and equipment that may be required for decommissioning operations.

  4. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.J.

    1995-10-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure lonq-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

  5. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium-uranium extraction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  6. TRA Closure Plan REV 0-9-20-06 HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA/MTR Warm Waste System Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-007

    SciTech Connect

    Winterholler, K.

    2007-01-31

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for portions of the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System located in the Materials Test Reactor Building (TRA-603) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan SITE-TANK-005 for Tank System TRA-007. The reactor drain tank and canal sump to be closed are included in the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System. The reactor drain tank and the canal sump were characterized as having managed hazardous waste. The reactor drain tank and canal sump will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  7. Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, K.D.; Butterworth, St.W.; Lockie, K.A.

    2008-07-01

    Significant progress has been made at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to empty, clean and close radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks have historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Although four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage, the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste, cleaned and filled with grout. A water spray cleaning system was developed and deployed to clean internal tank surfaces and remove remaining tank wastes. The cleaning system was effective in removing all but a very small volume of solid residual waste particles. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, has allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. The first three 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were grouted in the Fall of 2006 and the fourth tank and the seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout in 2007 to provide long-term stability. It is currently planned that associated tank valve boxes and interconnecting piping, will be stabilized with grout as early as 2008. (authors)

  8. Facility for platforms planned in Tacoma

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    A joint venture to build a gigantic 660-ft-wide graving dock for constructing offshore concrete and steel platforms on the US West Coast in Tacoma, Washington is discussed. The new facility is needed to construct huge platforms for Alaska and for deepwater locations off California and Mexico. The assembly facility would be located in Tacoma's Commencement Bay Industrial Development District on the outer Hylebos Waterway, directly across the waterway from Tacoma Boatbuilding Co.'s Industrial Yard. The proposed site has no overhead obstructions and open water all the way to the Pacific Ocean. Water depths in Commencement Bay are over 500 ft, making it possible to build deepwater concrete-gravity platforms.

  9. Guide for Planning Industrial Arts Laboratory Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Community Colleges and Vocational Education.

    This guide was developed following a review of literature and a survey questionnaire which was completed by industrial arts consultants, teacher educators, teachers, and supervisors. The first draft was circulated to a state advisory committee for suggestions. Major sections are titled: (1) General Laboratory Specifications for Planning Industrial…

  10. Biomedical computing facility interface design plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puckett, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    The results are presented of a design study performed to establish overall system interface requirements for the Biomedical Laboratories Division's Sigma-3 computer system. Emphasis has been placed upon the definition of an overall implementation plan and associated schedule to meet both near-term and long-range requirements within the constraints at available resources.

  11. Planning the Teaching Environment: Secondary Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, David

    Reviews publications supporting the concept that carefully planned special characteristics of a classroom can facilitate desired activities both for the teacher and students. The author denotes these facilitating associations as the "suggestiveness of space," and applies the term "limiting conditions" to spacial characteristics which prevent…

  12. 340 Waste handling facility deactivation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stordeur, R.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-27

    This document provides an overview of both the present status of the 340 Complex (within Hanford`s 300 Area), and of tasks associated with the deactivation of segments associated with radioactive, mixed liquid waste receipt, storage, and shipping. The plan also describes activities that will allow portions of the 340 Complex to remain in service.

  13. Emergency Planning for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, R. A.; And Others

    This manual for the development of emergency operating plans for municipal wastewater treatment systems was compiled using information provided by over two hundred municipal treatment systems. It covers emergencies caused by natural disasters, civil disorders and strikes, faulty maintenance, negligent operation, and accidents. The effects of such…

  14. Higher Education Facilities Comprehensive Planning Program. Facilities Inventory Manual for New York State. Revised 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of Higher Education Planning.

    Guidelines are presented to assist New York institutions of higher education in classifying building data by means of a uniform system that will be compatible with a similar coding system in use throughout the United States. This facilities inventory manual includes a description of the Higher Education Facilities Comprehensive Planning Program…

  15. National Ignition Facility Risk Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Brereton, S.J.

    1997-02-01

    The NIF Risk Management Plan has been prepared in accordance with the DOE Life Cycle Asset Management Good Practice Guide to support Critical Decision 3 of the NIF Project. The objectives of the plan are to: 1) identify the risks to the completion of the Project in terms of meeting technical and regulatory requirements, cost, and schedule, 2) assess the risks in terms of likelihood of occurrence and their impact potential relative to technical performance, ES&H (environment, safety and health), costs, and schedule, and 3) address each identified risk in terms of suitable risk mitigation measures. The documents that form the basis for this risk assessment are as follows: 1. Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (DOE, 1996a) and Record of Decision (DOE, 1996b), 2. Preliminary Hazards Analysis (Brereton, 1993), 3. Fire Hazards Analysis (Jensen, 1997), 4. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (LLNL, 1996a), 5. Reliability, Availability and Maintainability Report, 6. Radiation Protection Evaluation, 7. Primary Criteria and Functional Requirements (LLNL, 1996b), 8. Project Execution Plan (DOE, 1996c), 9. Schedule Risk Assessment, 10. Construction Safety Program (LLNL, 1997), 11. Title I Design Media, 12. Congressional Data Sheet. The process used in developing this plan was to form a Risk Assessment team of knowledgeable project personnel. This included: Assurances Manager, Systems Integration Manager, Project Control Manager, a Risk Management consultant, Deputy Associate Project Engineer for Activation and Start-up (Co-chairperson), and Lead Engineer for Safety Analysis (Co-chairperson). They were familiar with the risk basis documents and developed a list of the key risk elements. A methodology for assigning likelihoods, consequences, and risks was developed. Risk elements were then reviewed, and likelihoods, consequences, and risks were assigned. Risk mitigation measures were then developed. Comments were obtained

  16. Test plan: Gas-threshold-pressure testing of the Salado Formation in the WIPP underground facility

    SciTech Connect

    Saulnier, G.J. Jr.

    1992-03-01

    Performance assessment for the disposal of radioactive waste from the United States defense program in the WIPP underground facility must assess the role of post-closure was generation by waste degradation and the subsequent pressurization of the facility. be assimilated by the host formation will Whether or not the generated gas can be assimilated by the host formation will determine the ability of the gas to reach or exceed lithostatic pressure within the repository. The purpose of this test plan is (1) to present a test design to obtain realistic estimates of gas-threshold pressure for the Salado Formation WIPP underground facility including parts of the formation disturbed by the underground of the Salado, and (2) to provide a excavations and in the far-field or undisturbed part framework for changes and amendments to test objectives, practices, and procedures. Because in situ determinations of gas-threshold pressure in low-permeability media are not standard practice, the methods recommended in this testplan are adapted from permeability-testing and hydrofracture procedures. Therefore, as the gas-threshold-pressure testing program progresses, personnel assigned to the program and outside observers and reviewers will be asked for comments regarding the testing procedures. New and/or improved test procedures will be documented as amendments to this test plan, and subject to similar review procedures.

  17. National Ignition Facility Project Execution Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2000-08-14

    The ''National Ignition Facility (NIF) Justification of Mission Need'', which was approved by the Secretary of Energy in January 1993, defines the mission of the National Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program and discusses the specific mission of the NIF Project. The NIF experimental capability will allow nuclear-weapons scientists to assess stockpile problems, verify computational tools, test for nuclear-weapons effects, and increase their understanding of weapons physics. The three weapons laboratory directors and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs have reviewed the role of the NIT; in Stockpile Stewardship in a joint letter. Along with the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative numerical simulations and other aboveground experimental facilities, the NIF will provide critical data that will allow the United States to maintain its technical capabilities in nuclear weapons in the absence of underground testing. As a secondary objective, the NIF will advance our understanding of ICF and help to assess its potential as an energy source. Achieving fusion ignition in the NIF will advance both defense and energy objectives. In affirming the Project's Critical Decision 2,* ''Approval of New Start'', the Secretary of Energy verified the mission need and emphasized that the NIF has the potential to contribute significantly to the DOE missions.

  18. 30 CFR 550.303 - Facilities described in a new or revised Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan. 550.303 Section 550.303 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN... Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan. (a) New plans. All Exploration Plans and Development and... Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan to determine whether any facility described in the...

  19. 30 CFR 550.303 - Facilities described in a new or revised Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan. 550.303 Section 550.303 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN... Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan. (a) New plans. All Exploration Plans and Development and... Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan to determine whether any facility described in the...

  20. 30 CFR 550.303 - Facilities described in a new or revised Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan. 550.303 Section 550.303 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN... Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan. (a) New plans. All Exploration Plans and Development and... Exploration Plan or Development and Production Plan to determine whether any facility described in the...

  1. Risk-Based Decision Process for Accelerated Closure of a Nuclear Weapons Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.; Norland, R. L.; DiSalvo, R.; Anderson, M.

    2003-02-25

    Nearly 40 years of nuclear weapons production at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Site) resulted in contamination of soil and underground systems and structures with hazardous substances, including plutonium, uranium and hazardous waste constituents. The Site was placed on the National Priority List in 1989. There are more than 370 Individual Hazardous Substance Sites (IHSSs) at RFETS. Accelerated cleanup and closure of RFETS is being achieved through implementation and refinement of a regulatory framework that fosters programmatic and technical innovations: (1) extensive use of ''accelerated actions'' to remediate IHSSs, (2) development of a risk-based screening process that triggers and helps define the scope of accelerated actions consistent with the final remedial action objectives for the Site, (3) use of field instrumentation for real time data collection, (4) a data management system that renders near real time field data assessment, and (5) a regulatory agency consultative process to facilitate timely decisions. This paper presents the process and interim results for these aspects of the accelerated closure program applied to Environmental Restoration activities at the Site.

  2. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 3720 Building

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the Environmental Science Laboratory (3720 Facility) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs'' This FEMP has been prepared for the 3720 Facility primarily because it has a major (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The 3720 Facility provides office and laboratory space for PNNL scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of materials characterization and testing and waste management. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials to conduct these activities. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, and dispersible particulate. The facility is in the process of being vacated for shutdown, but is considered a Major Emission Point as of the date of this document approval.

  3. 48 CFR 2452.237-77 - Temporary closure of HUD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... in the contract. If the contractor's personnel work on a holiday, no form of holiday or other premium... performing critical round-the-clock services or tasks, who are not already on duty at the facility shall not... facility. (3) The contractor agrees to continue to provide sufficient personnel to perform...

  4. 48 CFR 2452.237-77 - Temporary closure of HUD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in the contract. If the contractor's personnel work on a holiday, no form of holiday or other premium... performing critical round-the-clock services or tasks, who are not already on duty at the facility shall not... facility. (3) The contractor agrees to continue to provide sufficient personnel to perform...

  5. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-02-25

    This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

  6. Plans for National Ignition Facility operations training and operations procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Mantrom, D.D., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A preliminary plan for National Ignition Facility (NIF) Operations training developed for the 200+ staff anticipated to operate the NIF facility is discussed. We also address the development and implementation of NIF Operations procedures. These procedures serve as an essential part of the staff training program. A special aspect of NIF Operations procedures is that they will be on-line with electronic links to design, operations, and test databases, and will likely incorporate electronic checklists and archiving capabilities.

  7. Linkage Between Post-Closure Safety Case Review and the Authorization Process for Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Streatfield, I. J.; Duerden, S. L.; Yearsley, R. A.; Bennett, D. G.

    2003-02-27

    The Environment Agency (the Agency) has responsibilities under the Radioactive Substances Act of 1993 for regulating the disposal and storage of radioactive wastes in England and Wales, including regulation of the disposal site for UK solid low-level waste (LLW) at Drigg in Cumbria, NW England. To help inform the next review of the Drigg disposal authorization, the Agency has required the operator, British Nuclear Fuels plc to submit a Post-Closure Safety Case which will assess the potential long-term impacts from the site. With the aim of using best practice to determine authorization conditions, the Agency contracted Galson Sciences, Ltd to undertake an international survey of authorization procedures for comparable facilities in other countries. This paper provides an overview of the findings from the international survey.

  8. Double-shell tank waste transfer facilities integrity assessment plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hundal, T.S.

    1998-09-30

    This document presents the integrity assessment plan for the existing double-shell tank waste transfer facilities system in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of Hanford Site. This plan identifies and proposes the integrity assessment elements and techniques to be performed for each facility. The integrity assessments of existing tank systems that stores or treats dangerous waste is required to be performed to be in compliance with the Washington State Department of Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code WAC-173-303-640 requirements.

  9. Alaska SAR Facility Mission planning software - An interactive mission planning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Martin W.

    1989-01-01

    The Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Facility Mission Planning Subsystem is an interactive mission planning software system on the VAXStation 2000. This system has the capability to generate satellite ephemerides and mission parameters related to synthetic aperture radar missions. The mission data can be viewed as overlays on the world map in various projections and zooms. The system also provides schedule planning capabilities, using the INGRES DBMS to keep track of the various plans and schedules generated by the mission planner.

  10. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-04-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

  11. Closure of 324 Facility potential HEPA filter failure unreviewed safety questions

    SciTech Connect

    Enghusen, M.B.

    1997-11-07

    This document summarizes the activities which occurred to resolve an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) for the 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] involving Potential HEPA Filter Breach. The facility ventilation system had the capacity to fail the HEPA filters during accident conditions which would totally plug the filters. The ventilation system fans were modified which lowered fan operating parameters and prevented HEPA filter failures which might occur during accident conditions.

  12. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-02-25

    This Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII,Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a). This work plan describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to NMED’s guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit. The scope of work for the RFI Work Plan or SAP is being developed by the Permittees. The final content of the RFI Work Plan or SAP will be coordinated with the NMED for submittal on May 24, 2000. Specific project-related planning information will be included in the RFI Work Plan or SAP. The SWMU program at WIPP began in 1994 under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulatory authority. NMED subsequently received regulatory authority from EPA

  13. Operational readiness: an integral part of the facility planning process.

    PubMed

    Kidd, LeeAnne; Howe, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Large capital building projects benefit from an operational readiness strategy prior to new facility occupancy. St. Joseph's Healthcare used a structured approach for their readiness planning that included individual work plan meetings, tools for ensuring integration across programs and services and process improvement support to ensure a smooth transition. Over 1100 staff were oriented using a Train-the-Trainer model. Significant effort was required to co-ordinate the customized training, which involved "staffing up" to ensure sufficient resources for backfill. Operational readiness planning places additional demands on managers, requiring support and assistance from dedicated resources both prior to occupancy and several months post-move.

  14. Operational readiness: an integral part of the facility planning process.

    PubMed

    Kidd, LeeAnne; Howe, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Large capital building projects benefit from an operational readiness strategy prior to new facility occupancy. St. Joseph's Healthcare used a structured approach for their readiness planning that included individual work plan meetings, tools for ensuring integration across programs and services and process improvement support to ensure a smooth transition. Over 1100 staff were oriented using a Train-the-Trainer model. Significant effort was required to co-ordinate the customized training, which involved "staffing up" to ensure sufficient resources for backfill. Operational readiness planning places additional demands on managers, requiring support and assistance from dedicated resources both prior to occupancy and several months post-move. PMID:25906468

  15. 40 CFR 35.925-1 - Facilities planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Facilities planning. 35.925-1 Section 35.925-1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act §...

  16. 40 CFR 35.917 - Facilities planning (step 1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Facilities planning (step 1). 35.917 Section 35.917 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act §...

  17. 40 CFR 35.917 - Facilities planning (step 1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Facilities planning (step 1). 35.917 Section 35.917 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act §...

  18. 40 CFR 35.925-1 - Facilities planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Facilities planning. 35.925-1 Section 35.925-1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act §...

  19. 40 CFR 35.925-1 - Facilities planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Facilities planning. 35.925-1 Section 35.925-1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act §...

  20. 40 CFR 35.925-1 - Facilities planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Facilities planning. 35.925-1 Section 35.925-1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act §...

  1. 123. Back side technical facilities passageways, "key plan" architectural, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. Back side technical facilities passageways, "key plan" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 36-25-13, sheet 1 of 40, dated 23 November, 1960. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  2. State Education Department Facilities Planning Unit. Report 96-D-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    Generally, construction projects undertaken by school districts in New York State are financed in part by state aid. The Education Department's Facilities Planning unit approves state aid for school-district construction projects outside New York City. This report presents findings of an audit that evaluated whether the Unit management's oversight…

  3. Planning and Designing Functional Facilities for Industrial Arts Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Marshall L.; Taylor, James L.

    This publication's purpose is to provide assistance in the planning of industrial arts facilities through suggestions and guidelines for functional space utilization and meaningful educational specifications. It is one of a series on specialized areas of the school plant. Chapter headings include "Educational Trends and the Emerging Industrial…

  4. 30. 'Gould Island Facilities, General Plan,' submitted 29 December 1941 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. 'Gould Island Facilities, General Plan,' submitted 29 December 1941 by John Brackett, Consulting Engineer, to Public Works Department, Bureau of Yards & Docks. PW Drawing 3859-46, Y&D Drawing 190833. Scales 1' = 50' and 1' = 10'. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  5. 29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. PLAN OF THE ARVFS FIELD TEST FACILITY SHOWING BUNKER, CABLE CHASE, SHIELDING TANK AND FRAME ASSEMBLY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151970. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. SOUTH CAROLINA SCHOOL FACILITIES PLANNING AND CONSTRUCTION GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCELVEEN, W. POWERS

    THIS GUIDE PRESENTS A SET OF REGULATIONS FOR PLANNING AND CONSTRUCTING PUBLIC SCHOOL BUILDINGS. THE AREAS COVERED ARE--(1) DRAWING REQUIREMENTS, (2) POLICIES GOVERNING SCHOOL SITES, MINIMUM FACILITIES, AND SPACE ALLOWANCE, (3) DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS RELATING TO HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING, AND VENTILATION, (4) ELECTRICAL, INCLUDING…

  7. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1

    SciTech Connect

    David Strand

    2006-09-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

  8. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    DAVIS, W.E.

    2000-03-08

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

  9. Integrating disaster preparedness and surge capacity in emergency facility planning.

    PubMed

    Zilm, Frank; Berry, Robert; Pietrzak, Michael P; Paratore, Amy

    2008-01-01

    The ability to adapt and utilize emergency facilities is a critical element in responding to surges resulting from man-made and natural events. The current stresses on emergency services throughout the country find few adequately prepared to effectively absorb a sudden increase in patients along with some of the potential special requirements, such as quarantining of epidemic patients and mass decontamination. This article reviews major findings of the federally funded ER One project, a research initiative that has described a number of facility strategies, which should be considered in planning new emergency facilities. An early case study in the application of these principles at the recently completed Tampa General Hospital emergency service is provided, illustrating how, when integrated into the early planning and design, many of the ER One recommendations can be implemented at modest capital cost increases. PMID:18806597

  10. NIF conventional facilities construction health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, D W

    1998-05-14

    The purpose of this Plan is to outline the minimum health and safety requirements to which all participating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and non-LLNL employees (excluding National Ignition Facility [NIF] specific contractors and subcontractors covered under the construction subcontract packages (e.g., CSP-9)-see Construction Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility [CSP] Section I.B. ''NIF Construction Contractors and Subcontractors'' for specifics) shall adhere to for preventing job-related injuries and illnesses during Conventional Facilities construction activities at the NIF Project. For the purpose of this Plan, the term ''LLNL and non-LLNL employees'' includes LLNL employees, LLNL Plant Operations staff and their contractors, supplemental labor, contract labor, labor-only contractors, vendors, DOE representatives, personnel matrixed/assigned from other National Laboratories, participating guests, and others such as visitors, students, consultants etc., performing on-site work or services in support of the NIF Project. Based upon an activity level determination explained in Section 1.2.18, in this document, these organizations or individuals may be required by site management to prepare their own NIF site-specific safety plan. LLNL employees will normally not be expected to prepare a site-specific safety plan. This Plan also outlines job-specific exposures and construction site safety activities with which LLNL and non-LLNL employees shall comply.

  11. Facility Safety Plan B360 Complex CMLS-411r0

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G

    2007-01-08

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) policy is that all operations must be planned and performed safely for the protection of workers, the public, the environment, and limit possible loss to property, facilities and equipment assigned to this directorate. In addition to observing LLNL policies contained in the ''Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Manual'', LLNL workers will comply with applicable federal, state, and local regulations when conducting any activity that the Chemistry, Materials and Life Sciences (CMLS) Directorate has managerial control or oversight. Management has determined that the safety controls specified within this Facility Safety Plan (FSP) must also be followed to ensure that the operation is successfully performed efficiently and safely within this facility. Any operations conducted in this Complex that involve activities not commonly performed by the public require an Integration Work Sheet (IWS) or IWS/Safety Plan (IWS/SP) that specifically assesses the responsibilities, hazards and controls to conduct the operation safely. Everyone who enters this area (including students, workers, visitors, and consultants) must follow the applicable requirements in this FSP. Each person is expected to protect himself/herself and others from injury or illness. Regular facility occupants are expected to guide and govern visitors and assist new or temporary occupants in understanding and following this plan. When there are any doubts regarding the safety of any phase of work, workers and others will check with the facility manager. Changes to this FSP will be approved by the Facility Associate Director (AD). This will undergo triennial review to establish, at a minimum, that its contents are appropriate and adequate for current operations. The Hazards Control ES&H Team assists management in instituting and maintaining a minimum-risk and environmentally sound work environment. Any Laboratory worker has

  12. A Library Facilities and Services Plan for Southeastern Wisconsin. Planning Report No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, Waukesha.

    The Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission began a study of regional library planning in 1968. They identified needs and study objectives, and in 1969 inventoried existing library facilities, services, and use. This included public, school, academic, government, and special and institutional libraries both public and private. There…

  13. 40 CFR 265.197 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.197... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Tank Systems § 265.197 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a tank system..., then the owner or operator must close the tank system and perform post-closure care in accordance...

  14. 40 CFR 264.1202 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264... FACILITIES Hazardous Waste Munitions and Explosives Storage § 264.1202 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At... or decontaminated, he or she must close the facility and perform post-closure care in accordance...

  15. Current trends in health facility planning, design, and construction.

    PubMed

    Beale, Craig; Kittredge, Frank D

    2014-01-01

    It is critical now more than ever for today's healthcare facilities to serve as more than just a backdrop to the care provided--they can, and should, be an integral part of that care. In addition to promoting efficacy, delighting the senses, and placing patients and families at ease, facilities need to be high-performing, sustainable, and healthy environments. Creating today's healthcare facilities requires breaking through barriers in unexpected ways, and it often requires looking outside the healthcare profession for guidance. In this article, we explore current trends in health facility planning, design, and construction. Our focus is on the buildings that serve as venues for the provision of healthcare services across the full continuum, from prevention to critical care. In particular, we discuss four current broad trends and conclude with thoughts on future developments.

  16. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-02-14

    This 2002 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Permit Condition VII.U.3 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit) (New Mexico Environment Department [NMED], 1999a), and incorporates comments from the NMED received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2002 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMU) and Areas of Concern (AOC) specified in the Permit. The Permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the most recent guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, and completion of the August 2001 sampling requested by the NMED, the Permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the facility's Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA processcan be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable

  17. 33 CFR 150.50 - What are the requirements for a facility spill response plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facility emergency plan that meets part 127, subpart B of this chapter. (c) The response plan must be... facility spill response plan? 150.50 Section 150.50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... are the requirements for a facility spill response plan? (a) Each deepwater port which meets...

  18. 33 CFR 150.50 - What are the requirements for a facility spill response plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facility emergency plan that meets part 127, subpart B of this chapter. (c) The response plan must be... facility spill response plan? 150.50 Section 150.50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... are the requirements for a facility spill response plan? (a) Each deepwater port which meets...

  19. 40 CFR 300.211 - OPA facility and vessel response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... onshore facilities, these regulations are codified in 33 CFR part 154; (e) For pipeline facilities, these...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.211 OPA facility and vessel response plans....

  20. An arid zone lysimeter facility for performance assessment and closure investigations at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, D.G.; Lohrstorfer, C.F.; Sully, M.J.; Ginanni, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    Two precision weighing lysimeters were installed near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site to provide support for investigations of water, solute, and heat fluxes in the near-surface of the soil. The lysimeters consist of soil tanks with a volume of 16 cubic meters mounted on a sensitive scale. One lysimeter was revegetated with native shrubs whereas the other was kept bare to stimulate a non-vegetated waste cover. Data consisting of physical and hydrological properties of the lysimeter soils, thermal and moisture conditions in the lysimeters, and atmospheric boundary conditions are being collected for calibrating and verifying computer models for simulating the flow of water and heat in the near surface alluvium at the Area 5 RWMS. This effort will provide site- specific models for demonstration of ``no migration`` of constituents to the water table. Moisture and thermal conditions in the lysimeters are monitored daily using time domain reflectometry probes and thermocouple psychrometers. Daily evaporation and evapotranspiration are calculated from the lysimeter scales. Meteorological variables are monitored by sensors mounted on a 3 meter tower adjacent to the lysimeters. An array of soil-solution samplers to be installed through the side of the soil tank will allow studies of waste mobility under natural conditions. Conceptual designs for closure at the RWMS are focused on using an upper layer of repacked native alluvium, which can be tested with the lysimeters. In addition, performance of other components such as a capillary barrier can be tested by installing a scaled version in one of the lysimeter tanks.

  1. Technical data summary: Plan for closure of the 643-G burial ground

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J R

    1987-08-17

    This report involves the actions of closing the 643-G burial ground which involves waste removal, stabilization, and capping. Remedial action involves the removing of the transuranic waste and closing of the grid wells. The closure cap for the burial site will consist of native soil, clay, and gravel. This will assure long-term physical and chemical stability. (MB)

  2. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  3. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System (VES-SFE-106)

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Evans

    2006-08-15

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System located in the adjacent to the Sludge Tank Control House (CPP-648), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Laboratory, was developed to meet the interim status closure requirements for a tank system. The system to be closed includes a tank and associated ancillary equipment that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System will be "cleaned closed" in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of acheiving those standards for the CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System.

  4. Physics Experiments Planned for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdon, Charles P.

    1998-11-01

    This talk will review the current status and plans for high energy density physics experiments to be conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF a multi-laboratory effort, presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a 192 beam solid state glass laser system designed to deliver 1.8MJ (at 351nm) in temporal shaped pulses. This review will begin by introducing the NIF in the context of its role in the overall United States Stockpile Stewardship Program. The major focus of this talk will be to describe the physics experiments planned for the NIF. By way of introduction to the experiments a short review of the NIF facility design and projected capabilities will be presented. In addition the current plans and time line for the activation of the laser and experimental facilities will also be reviewed. The majority of this talk will focus on describing the national inertial confinement fusion integrated theory and experimental target ignition plan. This national plan details the theory and experimental program required for achieving ignition and modest thermonuclear gain on the NIF. This section of the presentation will include a status of the current physics basis, ignition target designs, and target fabrication issues associated with the indirect-drive and direct-drive approaches to ignition. The NIF design provides the capabilities to support experiments for both approaches to ignition. Other uses for the NIF, including non ignition physics relevant to the national security mission, studies relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy, and basic science applications, will also be described. The NIF offers the potential to generate new basic scientific understanding about matter under extreme conditions by making available a unique facility for research into: astrophysics and space physics, hydrodynamics, condensed matter physics, material properties, plasma physics and radiation sources, and radiative properties. Examples of

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Eversole, R.E.; Kibbe, R.K.

    1992-05-01

    The goal of the Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program (IFSP) is to place the isotopes facilities at ORNL in a radiologically and industrially safe condition for routine maintenance and surveillance prior to eventual decommissioning. Implementation and completion of the shutdown program will significantly reduce the risks to the environment and public safety and health. Furthermore, it should result in reduced surveillance and maintenance costs for future years. The IFSP Management Plan has been prepared to document the objectives, define or organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the program.

  6. KSC facilities status and planned management operations. [for Shuttle launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, R. H.; Omalley, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A status report is presented on facilities and planned operations at the Kennedy Space Center with reference to Space Shuttle launch activities. The facilities are essentially complete, with all new construction and modifications to existing buildings almost finished. Some activity is still in progress at Pad A and on the Mobile Launcher due to changes in requirements but is not expected to affect the launch schedule. The installation and testing of the ground checkout equipment that will be used to test the flight hardware is now in operation. The Launch Processing System is currently supporting the development of the applications software that will perform the testing of this flight hardware.

  7. Management plan -- Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, R.L.

    1995-01-11

    This Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Management Plan provides guidance for execution WHC MWTF Project activities related to design, procurement, construction, testing, and turnover. This Management Plan provides a discussion of organizational responsibilities, work planning, project management systems, quality assurance (QA), regulatory compliance, personnel qualifications and training, and testing and evaluations. Classified by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a major systems acquisition (MSA), the MWTF mission is to provide a safe, cost-effective, and environmentally sound method for interim storage of Hanford Site high-level wastes. This Management Plan provides policy guidance and direction to the Project Office for execution of the project activities.

  8. 40 CFR 265.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 265.145 Financial assurance for post-closure... waste disposal unit must establish financial assurance for post-closure care of the disposal unit(s). (a... hazardous waste disposal unit in accordance with the approved plan, the Regional Administrator will...

  9. 40 CFR 265.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 265.145 Financial assurance for post-closure... waste disposal unit must establish financial assurance for post-closure care of the disposal unit(s). (a... hazardous waste disposal unit in accordance with the approved plan, the Regional Administrator will...

  10. 40 CFR 265.145 - Financial assurance for post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 265.145 Financial assurance for post-closure... waste disposal unit must establish financial assurance for post-closure care of the disposal unit(s). (a... hazardous waste disposal unit in accordance with the approved plan, the Regional Administrator will...

  11. National Transonic Facility: A review of the operational plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, H. W.; Black, R. E.; Dietz, R. O.; Kirchner, M. E.; Sears, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The proposed National Transonic Facility (NTF) operational plan is reviewed. The NTF will provide an aerodynamic test capability significantly exceeding that of other transonic regime wind tunnels now available. A limited number of academic research program that might use the NTF are suggested. It is concluded that the NTF operational plan is useful for management, technical, instrumentation, and model building techniques available in the specialized field of aerodynamic analysis and simulation. It is also suggested that NASA hold an annual conference to discuss wind tunnel research results and to report on developments that will further improve the utilization and cost effectiveness of the NTF and other wind tunnels.

  12. 40 CFR 35.917-7 - State review and certification of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... comment on the plan; and (d) The plan conforms with any waste treatment management plan approved under... AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-7 State review and certification of facilities plan. Each facilities plan...

  13. 40 CFR 35.917-7 - State review and certification of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comment on the plan; and (d) The plan conforms with any waste treatment management plan approved under... AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-7 State review and certification of facilities plan. Each facilities plan...

  14. 40 CFR 35.917-7 - State review and certification of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comment on the plan; and (d) The plan conforms with any waste treatment management plan approved under... AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-7 State review and certification of facilities plan. Each facilities plan...

  15. Pinellas Plant contingency plan for the hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect

    1988-04-01

    Subpart D of Part 264 (264.50 through .56) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations require that each facility maintain a contingency plan detailing procedures to {open_quotes}minimize hazards to human health or the environment from fires, explosions, or any unplanned sudden or non-sudden release of hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents to air, soil, or surface water.{close_quotes}

  16. 38. Photograph of plans for alterations to IBM facilities, drawn ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photograph of plans for alterations to IBM facilities, drawn by U.S. Navy Bureau of Yards and Docks, c. 1960. Drawing on file at Caretaker Site Office, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, New London. Copyright-free. - Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Bowditch Hall, 600 feet east of Smith Street & 350 feet south of Columbia Cove, West bank of Thames River, New London, New London County, CT

  17. Disaster planning and response: guidance for healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    2005-09-01

    The widespread devastation and massive disruptions caused in the last few weeks by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita--in New Orleans and numerous other communities along the U.S. Gulf Coast--showed just how difficult it can be for communities to function in the face of large-scale disasters. In the wake of these storms, healthcare facilities throughout the world will undoubtedly be examining their emergency management plans to assess whether they are prepared to handle similar events.

  18. Multiobjective long-term planning of biopharmaceutical manufacturing facilities.

    PubMed

    Lakhdar, K; Savery, J; Papageorgiou, L G; Farid, S S

    2007-01-01

    Biopharmaceutical companies with large portfolios of clinical and commercial products typically need to allocate production across several multiproduct facilities, including third party contract manufacturers. This poses several capacity planning challenges which are further complicated by the need to satisfy different stakeholders often with conflicting objectives. This work addresses the question of how a biopharmaceutical manufacturer can make better long-term capacity planning decisions given multiple strategic criteria such as cost, risk, customer service level, and capacity utilization targets. A long-term planning model that allows for multiple facilities and accounts for multiple objectives via goal programming is developed. An industrial case study based on a large scale biopharmaceutical manufacturer is used to illustrate the functionality of the model. A single objective model is used to identify how best to use existing capacity so as to maximize profits for different demand scenarios. Mitigating risk due to unforeseen circumstances by including a dual facility constraint is shown to be a reasonable strategy at base case demand levels but unacceptable if demands are 150% higher than expected. The capacity analysis identifies where existing capacity fails to meet demands given the constraints. A multiobjective model is used to demonstrate how key performance measures change given different decision making policies where different weights are assigned to cost, customer service level, and utilization targets. The analysis demonstrates that a high profit can still be achieved while meeting key targets more closely. The sensitivity of the optimal solution to different limits on the targets is illustrated.

  19. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are

  20. 40 CFR 35.917-9 - Revision or amendment of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-9 Revision or amendment of facilities plan. A facilities plan may provide the...

  1. 40 CFR 35.917-9 - Revision or amendment of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-9 Revision or amendment of facilities plan. A facilities plan may provide the...

  2. 40 CFR 35.917-9 - Revision or amendment of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-9 Revision or amendment of facilities plan. A facilities plan may provide the...

  3. 40 CFR 35.917-9 - Revision or amendment of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-9 Revision or amendment of facilities plan. A facilities plan may provide the...

  4. Education Facilities Sector-Specific Plan: An Annex to the Government Facilities Sector-Specific Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Homeland Security, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) provide the essential services that support basic elements of American society. Compromise of these CIKR could disrupt key government and industry activities, facilities, and systems, producing cascading effects throughout the Nation's economy and society and profoundly affecting the national…

  5. Grout for closure of the demonstration vault at the US DOE Hanford Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Ernzen, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    The Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout to be used as a cold- (nonradioactive) cap or void-fill grout between the solidified low-level waste and the cover blocks of a demonstration vault for disposal of phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Facility. The project consisted of formulation and evaluation of candidate grouts and selection of the best candidate grout, followed by a physical scale-model test to verify grout performance under project-specific conditions. Further, the project provided data to verify numerical models (accomplished elsewhere) of stresses and isotherms inside the Hanford demonstration vault. Evaluation of unhardened grout included obtaining data on segregation, bleeding, flow, and working time. For hardened grout, strength, volume stability, temperature rise, and chemical compatibility with surrogate wasteform grout were examined. The grout was formulated to accommodate unique environmental boundary conditions (vault temperature = 45 C) and exacting regulatory requirements (mandating less than 0.1% shrinkage with no expansion and no bleeding); and to remain pumpable for a minimum of 2 hr. A grout consisting of API Class H oil-well cement, an ASTM C 618 Class F fly ash, sodium bentonite clay, and a natural sand from the Hanford area met performance requirements in laboratory studies. It is recommended for use in the DOE Hanford demonstration PSW vault.

  6. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA/MTR Warm Waste System Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-007

    SciTech Connect

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-30

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan was developed for portions of the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System located in the Materials Test Reactor Building (TRA-603) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan SITE-TANK-005 for the Tank System TRA-007. The reactor drain tank and canal sump to be closed are included in the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System. The reactor drain tank and the canal sump will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  7. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004

    SciTech Connect

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004.

  8. New Concepts in Planning and Funding Athletic, Physical Education, and Recreational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronzan, Robert T.

    The major purpose of this book is to provide information needed to plan, design, equip, and finance a sports-related facility. Planning and financing are discussed and guidelines offered for securing and compiling data for analysis in justifying new facilities. Other chapters discuss determining facility needs and eventual plans, selection of the…

  9. Closure plan for the decommissioned high explosives rinse-water lagoons at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.W.; Lamarre, A.L.; Crow, N.B.; Swearengen, P.M.

    1988-05-31

    The High Explosives (HE) Process Area is a major facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300. Within the Process Area, rinse water from various buildings formerly was discharged to nine relatively small, unlined lagoons where it was disposed of by evaporation and infiltration. In 1985, LLNL decommissioned these lagoons and diverted the rinse waters to two doubly lined surface impoundments. LLNL conducted the hydrogeologic investigations required to support the permanent closure of the none decommissioned lagoons. These studies included drilling ground water monitoring wells and extensively collecting soil and rock samples, which were analyzed for EPA toxic metals, HE compounds, and purgeable and extractable priority organic pollutants. On October 26, 1987, the RWQCB requested that we prepare a comprehensive report to summarize and discuss the findings of the LLNL HE Process Area Investigation. This report is our response to the Board's request. 22 refs., 19 figs. , 45 tabs.

  10. A Comprehensive Laboratory Animal Facility Pandemic Response Plan

    PubMed Central

    Roble, Gordon S; Lingenhol, Naomi M; Baker, Bryan; Wilkerson, Amy; Tolwani, Ravi J

    2010-01-01

    The potential of a severe influenza pandemic necessitates the development of an organized, rational plan for continued laboratory animal facility operation without compromise of the welfare of animals. A comprehensive laboratory animal program pandemic response plan was integrated into a university-wide plan. Preparation involved input from all levels of organizational hierarchy including the IACUC. Many contingencies and operational scenarios were considered based on the severity and duration of the influenza pandemic. Trigger points for systematic action steps were based on the World Health Organization's phase alert criteria. One extreme scenario requires hibernation of research operations and maintenance of reduced numbers of laboratory animal colonies for a period of up to 6 mo. This plan includes active recruitment and cross-training of volunteers for essential personnel positions, protective measures for employee and family health, logistical arrangements for delivery and storage of food and bedding, the removal of waste, and the potential for euthanasia. Strategies such as encouraging and subsidizing cryopreservation of unique strains were undertaken to protect valuable research assets and intellectual property. Elements of this plan were put into practice after escalation of the pandemic alerts due to influenza A (H1N1) in April 2009. PMID:20858365

  11. Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, R.

    1992-06-30

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

  12. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25 R-MAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-02-24

    This addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 113: Area 25, Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 3110, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOE/NV--891-VOL I-Rev. 1, dated July 2003, provides details of demolition, waste disposal, and use restriction (UR) modification for Corrective Action Unit 113, Area 25 R-MAD Facility. Demolition was completed on July 15, 2010, when the last of the building debris was disposed. Final field activities were concluded on August 30, 2010, after all equipment was demobilized and UR signs were posted. This work was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  13. Closure Plan for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 RWMS U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    T. M. Fitzmaurice

    2000-08-01

    This Closure Plan has been prepared for the Area 3 RWMS U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit Corrective Action Unit 110 in accordance with the Federal Facility and Consent Order (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). The U-3ax/bl is a historic disposal unit within the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The unit, which was formed by excavating the area between two subsidence craters (U-3ax and U-3bl), was operationally closed in 1987. The U-3ax/bl disposal unit is scheduled for permanent closure under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as a hazardous waste landfill. Existing records indicate that, from July 1968 to December 1987, U-3ax/bl received 2.3 x 10{sup 5} cubic meters (8.12 x 10{sup 6} cubic feet) of waste. NTS nuclear device testing generated approximately 95 percent of the total volume disposed of in U-3ax/bl, the majority of which came from the Waste Consolidation Project (80 percent of the total volume) (Elletson and Johnejack, 1995). Area 3 is located in Yucca Flat, within the northeast quadrant of the NTS. The Yucca Flat watershed is a structurally closed basin encompassing an area of approximately 780 square kilometers (300 square miles). The structural geomorphology of Yucca Flat is typical of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province. Yucca Flat lies in one of the most arid regions of the country. Water balance calculations for Area 3 indicate that it is continuously in a state of moisture deficit. The U-3ax/bl Disposal Unit will be closed in place by installing a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act equivalent cover. Following cover construction a fence will be installed around the cover to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring will consist of site inspections to determine the condition of the engineered cover and cover performance monitoring using Time-Domain Reflectometry arrays to monitor moisture migration in the cover. Any identified maintenance and

  14. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration, site characterization plan: Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility at the Nevada Test Site which will be conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division. The objectives of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient, sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site; obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and around the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site characterization and waste management purposes.

  15. Environmental restoration plan for the transfer of surplus facilities to the Facility Transition Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This report will provide guidance on management, coordination, and integration of plans to transition facilities to the Facility Transition Program and activities as related to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration Program facilities. This report gives (1) guidance on the steps necessary for identifying ORNL surplus facilities, (2) interfaces of Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) and Isotope Facility Deactivation program managers, (3) roles and responsibilities of the facility managers, and (4) initial S and M requirements upon acceptance into the Facility Transition Program.

  16. Waste sampling and characterization facility (WSCF) maintenance implementation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, J.L.

    1997-08-13

    This Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) is written to satisfy the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program that specifies the general policy and objectives for the establishment of the DOE controlled maintenance programs. These programs provide for the management and performance of cost effective maintenance and repair of the DOE property, which includes facilities. This document outlines maintenance activities associated with the facilities operated by Waste Management Hanford, Inc. (WMH). The objective of this MIP is to provide baseline information for the control and execution of WMH Facility Maintenance activities relative to the requirements of Order 4330.4B, assessment of the WMH maintenance programs, and actions necessary to maintain compliance with the Order. Section 2.0 summarizes the history, mission and description of the WMH facilities. Section 3.0 describes maintenance scope and requirements, and outlines the overall strategy for implementing the maintenance program. Specific elements of DOE Order 4330.4B are addressed in Section 4.0, listing the objective of each element, a discussion of the WMH compliance methodology, and current implementation requirements with references to WMH and HNF policies and procedures. Section 5.0 addresses deviations from policy requirements, and Section 6.0 is a schedule for specific improvements in support of this MIP.

  17. Woodbridge Army Research Facility RI/FS; volume 1. Field sampling plan. Report for 1995-1996

    SciTech Connect

    Choynowski, J.; Ehlers, M.; Elias, M.; Garcia, M.; Henry, C.

    1996-02-01

    U.S. Army Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) was used in the past as a major military communications center and a research and development laboratory where electromagnetic pulse energy was tested on military and other equipment. WRF is presently an inactive facility pursuant to the 1991 Base Realignment and Closure list. Past investigation activities indicate that polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) are primary chemicals of concern. The WRF is presently in the process of being turned over to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to be used as a wildlife refuge and training facility. This task calls for provision of the necessary staff and equipment to provide remedial investigation/feasibility support for the USAEC BRAC Program investigation at WRF. The scope of work includes Focused Feasibility Studies, Remedial Investigations, Feasibility Studies, ecological assessments, risk assessments, proposed plans, RODs, and community relations support. This Field Sampling Plan contains a description of the site, sample location rationale, technical approach to field operations, site safety procedures, and methods for ecological assessments, analyses of samples, data management, and disposal of investigation-derived wastes. Information contained in other plans which accompany this submittal is identified.

  18. Maintenance implementation plan for the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.A.

    1997-01-30

    This plan implements the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program (1994), at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The FFTF is a research and test reactor located near Richland, Washington, and is operated under contract for the DOE by the B&W Hanford Company (BWHC). The intent of this Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) is to describe the manner in which the activities of the maintenance function are executed and controlled at the FFTF and how this compares to the requirements of DOE 4330.4B. The MIP ii a living document that is updated through a Facility Maintenance Self- Assessment Program. During the continuing self-assessment program, any discrepancies found are resolved to meet DOE 4330.4B requirements and existing practices. The philosophy of maintenance management at the FFTF is also describe within this MIP. This MIP has been developed based on information obtained from various sources including the following: * A continuing self-assessment against the requirements of the Conduct of Maintenance Order * In-depth reviews conducted by the members of the task team that assembled this MIP * Inputs from routine audits and appraisals conducted at the facility The information from these sources is used to identify those areas in which improvements could be made in the manner in which the facility conducts maintenance activities. The action items identified in Rev. 1 of the MIP have been completed. The MIP is arranged in six sections. Section I is this Executive Summary. Section 2 describes the facility and its 0683 history. Section 3 describes the philosophy of the graded approach and how it is applied at FFTF. Section 3 also discusses the strategy and the basis for the prioritizing resources. Section 4 contains the detailed discussion of `the elements of DOE 4330.4B and their state of implementation. Section 5 is for waivers and requested deviations from the requirements of the order. Section 6 contains a copy of the Maintenance

  19. NESD CAE facility minimal implementation plan (June 1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, H. S.

    1983-08-04

    In conjunction with other divisions in the EE Department, the Nuclear Energy Systems Division is developing a Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) capability. Some of our needs in areas such as drafting, PC design, and IC design can be satisfied with existing turnkey systems. Many of our other needs, including modeling, analysis, document management and communication, software development, project management, and project communication will require the gradual development of an expanded computing environment. The purpose of this document is to describe our initial plans to implement a CAE facility.

  20. 40 CFR 264.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.1102 Section 264.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 264.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a...

  1. 40 CFR 264.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.1102 Section 264.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 264.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a...

  2. 40 CFR 264.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.1102 Section 264.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 264.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a...

  3. 40 CFR 264.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.1102 Section 264.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 264.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a...

  4. National Ignition Facility Risk Management Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brereton, S J

    2002-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Risk Management Plan (LLNL, 1997a) was originally prepared in 1997 in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Life Cycle Asset Management Good Practice Guide (DOE, 1996a) and supported NIF Critical Decision 3, approval to initiate construction (DOE, 1997a). The plan was updated in 1998 to reflect realized risks such as the finding and successful clean up of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-filled electrical capacitors at the NIF excavation during initial construction and the litigation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship (DOE, 1996b) by a group of non-governmental organizations led by the Natural Resources Defense Council. The current update of the Risk Management Plan brings it into compliance with the applicable DOE Orders and Standards and addresses new risks, such as assuring safety during the period when construction, special equipment installation, and commissioning are occurring simultaneously at the NIF site, and the extensive use of models to manage technical performance risk. The objectives of the updated plan are to: (1) Identify the risks to the completion of the Project in terms of meeting performance and regulatory requirements, ES&H, cost, and schedule; (2) Assess or the risks in terms of likelihood of occurrence and their impact potential relative to technical performance, ES&H, costs, and schedule; and (3) Address suitable risk mitigation measures for each identified risk.

  5. Discussion paper on applicability of oil and grease analysis for RCRA closure criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    A site characterization (SC) was performed for the Building 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility. The initial SC indicated areas which had oil and grease levels above the criteria of the currently proposed RCRA closure plan. After further investigation, it was demonstrated that the oil and grease parameter may not be an accurate indication of a release from this facility and should not be included as a contaminant of concern in the closure criteria.

  6. National Ignition Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Yatabe, J.

    1996-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a key constituent of the Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF will use inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to produce ignition and energy gain in ICF targets, and will perform weapons physics and high-energy- density experiments in support of national security and civilian objectives. The NIF Project is a national facility involving the collaboration of several DOE laboratories and subcontractors, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). The primary mission of the NIF Project is the construction and start-up operation of laser-based facilities that will demonstrate fusion ignition in the laboratory to provide nuclear-weapons-related physics data, and secondarily, to propagate fusion burn aimed at developing a potential source of civilian energy. To support the accomplishment of this very important mission, the LLNL Laser Directorate created the NIF Project Office to organize and bring about the Project. The NIF Project Office has established this Quality Assurance Program to ensure its success. This issue of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) adds the requirements for the conduct of Title 11 design, construction, procurement, and Title III engineering. This QAPP defines and describes the program-the management system-for specifying, achieving, and assuring the quality of all NIF Project work consistent with the policies of the Laboratory and the Laser Directorate.

  7. 30 CFR 254.3 - May I cover more than one facility in my response plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE General... elements required for a response plan in Subpart B, Oil Spill Response Plans for Outer Continental Shelf Facilities, or Subpart D, Oil Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters Seaward...

  8. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON POND FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2006-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by the NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2005. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2005. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Five additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in) within a 24-hour period during 2005. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2005 are included in Appendix C.

  9. EXPERIENCE AND PLANS OF THE JLAB FEL FACILITY AS A USER FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle D. Shinn

    2007-08-26

    Jefferson Lab's IR Upgrade FEL building was planned from the beginning to be a user facility, and includes an associated 600 m2 area containing seven laboratories. The high average power capability (multikilowatt-level) in the near-infrared (1-3 microns), and many hundreds of watts at longer wavelengths, along with an ultrafast (~ 1 ps) high PRF (10's MHz) temporal structure makes this laser a unique source for both applied and basic research. In addition to the FEL, we have a dedicated laboratory capable of delivering high power (many tens of watts) of broadband THz light. After commissioning the IR Upgrade, we once again began delivering beam to users in 2005. In this presentation, I will give an overview of the FEL facility and its current performance, lessons learned over the last two years, and a synopsis of current and future experiments.

  10. 40 CFR 35.917-8 - Submission and approval of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submission and approval of facilities plan. 35.917-8 Section 35.917-8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... such deficiencies. Approval of a plan of study or a facilities plan will not constitute an...

  11. 30 CFR 254.3 - May I cover more than one facility in my response plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE... Plans must address all the elements required for a response plan in Subpart B, Oil Spill Response Plans for Outer Continental Shelf Facilities, or Subpart D, Oil Spill Response Requirements for...

  12. 30 CFR 254.3 - May I cover more than one facility in my response plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE... Plans must address all the elements required for a response plan in Subpart B, Oil Spill Response Plans for Outer Continental Shelf Facilities, or Subpart D, Oil Spill Response Requirements for...

  13. 30 CFR 254.3 - May I cover more than one facility in my response plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE... Plans must address all the elements required for a response plan in Subpart B, Oil Spill Response Plans for Outer Continental Shelf Facilities, or Subpart D, Oil Spill Response Requirements for...

  14. FY 2012 Educational Facilities Master Plan and the Amended FY 2011-2016 Capital Improvements Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The FY 2012 Educational Facilities Master Plan (Master Plan) and Amendments to the FY 2011-2016 Capital Improvements Program (CIP) reflect the adopted actions of the Montgomery County (Maryland) Council and integrate the facilities planning process with the annual capital budget and the six-year CIP. The CIP is developed in accordance with the…

  15. FY 2007 Educational Facilities Master Plan and the FY 2007-2012 Capital Improvements Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The FY 2007 Educational Facilities Master Plan (Master Plan) and FY 2007-2012 Capital Improvements Program (CIP) reflect the adopted actions of the Montgomery County (Maryland) Council and integrate the facilities planning process with the annual capital budget and the six-year CIP. The CIP is developed in accordance with the Board of Education…

  16. FY 2011 Educational Facilities Master Plan & the FY 2011-2016 Capital Improvements Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The FY 2011 Educational Facilities Master Plan (Master Plan) and FY 2011-2016 Capital Improvements Program (CIP) reflect the adopted actions of the Montgomery County (Maryland) Council and integrate the facilities planning process with the annual capital budget and the six-year CIP. The CIP is developed in accordance with the Board of Education…

  17. FY 2013 Educational Facilities Master Plan and the FY 2013-2018 Capital Improvements Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The FY 2013 Educational Facilities Master Plan (Master Plan) and the FY 2013-2018 Capital Improvements Program (CIP) reflect the adopted actions of the Montgomery County (Maryland) Council and integrate the facilities planning process with the annual capital budget and the six-year CIP. The CIP is developed in accordance with the Board of…

  18. 42 CFR 422.53 - Eligibility to elect an MA plan for senior housing facility residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility to elect an MA plan for senior housing..., Election, and Enrollment § 422.53 Eligibility to elect an MA plan for senior housing facility residents. (a) Basic eligibility requirements. To be eligible to elect an MA senior housing facility plan,...

  19. 40 CFR 35.917-7 - State review and certification of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-Clean Water Act § 35.917-7 State review and certification of facilities plan. Each facilities plan must... under section 303(e) of the Act; (c) Any concerned 208 planning agency has been given the opportunity to... section 208(b) of the Act....

  20. 40 CFR 35.917-9 - Revision or amendment of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plan. 35.917-9 Section 35.917-9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-9 Revision or amendment of facilities plan. A facilities plan may provide the...

  1. Abbreviated sampling and analysis plan for planning decontamination and decommissioning at Test Reactor Area (TRA) facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The objective is to sample and analyze for the presence of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents within certain areas of the Test Reactor Area (TRA), prior to D and D activities. The TRA is composed of three major reactor facilities and three smaller reactors built in support of programs studying the performance of reactor materials and components under high neutron flux conditions. The Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) and Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) facilities are currently pending D/D. Work consists of pre-D and D sampling of designated TRA (primarily ETR) process areas. This report addresses only a limited subset of the samples which will eventually be required to characterize MTR and ETR and plan their D and D. Sampling which is addressed in this document is intended to support planned D and D work which is funded at the present time. Biased samples, based on process knowledge and plant configuration, are to be performed. The multiple process areas which may be potentially sampled will be initially characterized by obtaining data for upstream source areas which, based on facility configuration, would affect downstream and as yet unsampled, process areas. Sampling and analysis will be conducted to determine the level of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents present in designated areas within buildings TRA-612, 642, 643, 644, 645, 647, 648, 663; and in the soils surrounding Facility TRA-611. These data will be used to plan the D and D and help determine disposition of material by D and D personnel. Both MTR and ETR facilities will eventually be decommissioned by total dismantlement so that the area can be restored to its original condition.

  2. Facilities Planning Conference for Community-Junior College State-Level Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Inst. of Higher Education.

    This report on planning and developing facilities for community-junior colleges includes papers presented at a conference for state-level facility planners. The meeting covered the following areas: (1) development of physical facilities responsive to educational programs and community needs; (2) efficient use of existing facilities through…

  3. Laser programs facility management plan for environment, safety, and health

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) Laser Programs ES&H policy is established by the Associate Director for Laser Programs. This FMP is one component of that policy. Laser Programs personnel design, construct and operate research and development equipment located in various Livermore and Site 300 buildings. The Programs include a variety of activities, primarily laser research and development, inertial confinement fusion, isotope separation, and an increasing emphasis on materials processing, imaging systems, and signal analysis. This FMP is a formal statement of responsibilities and controls to assure operational activities are conducted without harm to employees, the general public, or the environment. This plan identifies the hazards associated with operating a large research and development facility and is a vehicle to control and mitigate those hazards. Hazards include, but are not limited to: laser beams, hazardous and radioactive materials, criticality, ionizing radiation or x rays, high-voltage electrical equipment, chemicals, and powered machinery.

  4. National ignition facility environment, safety, and health management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The ES&H Management Plan describes all of the environmental, safety, and health evaluations and reviews that must be carried out in support of the implementation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. It describes the policy, organizational responsibilities and interfaces, activities, and ES&H documents that will be prepared by the Laboratory Project Office for the DOE. The only activity not described is the preparation of the NIF Project Specific Assessment (PSA), which is to be incorporated into the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (PEIS). This PSA is being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with input from the Laboratory participants. As the independent NEPA document preparers ANL is directly contracted by the DOE, and its deliverables and schedule are agreed to separately with DOE/OAK.

  5. 33 CFR 106.405 - Format and content of the Facility Security Plan (FSP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Plan (FSP) § 106.405 Format and content of the...

  6. 33 CFR 106.405 - Format and content of the Facility Security Plan (FSP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Plan (FSP) § 106.405 Format and content of the...

  7. 33 CFR 106.405 - Format and content of the Facility Security Plan (FSP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Plan (FSP) § 106.405 Format and content of the...

  8. 33 CFR 106.405 - Format and content of the Facility Security Plan (FSP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Plan (FSP) § 106.405 Format and content of the...

  9. Design verification and validation plan for the cold vacuum drying facility

    SciTech Connect

    NISHIKAWA, L.D.

    1999-06-03

    The Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) provides the required process systems, supporting equipment, and facilities needed for drying spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins. This document presents the both completed and planned design verification and validation activities.

  10. 33 CFR 106.405 - Format and content of the Facility Security Plan (FSP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facility Security Plan (FSP) § 106.405 Format and content of the...

  11. Using multi-disciplinary strategic master facilities planning for organizations experiencing programmatic re-direction

    SciTech Connect

    Heubach, J.G.; Weimer, W.C.; Bruce, W.A.

    1993-12-01

    Facility master planning is critical to the future productivity of a laboratory and the quality of worklife for the laboratory staff. For organizations undergoing programmatic re-direction, a master facility planning approach linked to the organization`s strategic planning process is even more important. Major changes in an organization such as programmatic re-direction can significantly impact a broad range of variables which exceed the expertise of traditional planning teams, e.g., capacity variability, work team organization, organizational culture, and work process simplification. By expanding the diversity of the participants of the planning team, there is a greater likelihood that a research organization`s scientific, organizational, economic, and employees` needs can be meshed in the strategic plan and facility plan. Recent recommendations from facility planners suggest drawing from diverse fields in building multi-disciplinary planning teams: Architecture, engineering, natural science, social psychology, and strategic planning (Gibson,1993). For organizations undergoing significant operational or culture change, the master facility planning team should also include members with expertise in organizational effectiveness, industrial engineering, human resources, and environmental psychology. A recent planning and design project provides an example which illustrates the use of an expanded multi-disciplinary team engaged in planning laboratory renovations for a research organization undergoing programmatic re-direction. The purpose of the proposed poster session is to present a multi-disciplinary master facility planning process linked to an organization`s strategic planning process or organizational strategies.

  12. Proton Therapy Facility Planning From a Clinical and Operational Model.

    PubMed

    Das, Indra J; Moskvin, Vadim P; Zhao, Qingya; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Johnstone, Peter A

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a model for planning a new proton therapy center based on clinical data, referral pattern, beam utilization and technical considerations. The patient-specific data for the depth of targets from skin in each beam angle were reviewed at our center providing megavoltage photon external beam and proton beam therapy respectively. Further, data on insurance providers, disease sites, treatment depths, snout size and the beam angle utilization from the patients treated at our proton facility were collected and analyzed for their utilization and their impact on the facility cost. The most common disease sites treated at our center are head and neck, brain, sarcoma and pediatric malignancies. From this analysis, it is shown that the tumor depth from skin surface has a bimodal distribution (peak at 12 and 26 cm) that has significant impact on the maximum proton energy, requiring the energy in the range of 130-230 MeV. The choice of beam angles also showed a distinct pattern: mainly at 90° and 270°; this indicates that the number of gantries may be minimized. Snout usage data showed that 70% of the patients are treated with 10 cm snouts. The cost of proton beam therapy depends largely on the type of machine, maximum beam energy and the choice of gantry versus fixed beam line. Our study indicates that for a 4-room center, only two gantry rooms could be needed at the present pattern of the patient cohorts, thus significantly reducing the initial capital cost. In the USA, 95% and 100% of patients can be treated with 200 and 230 MeV proton beam respectively. Use of multi-leaf collimators and pencil beam scanning may further reduce the operational cost of the facility.

  13. Proton Therapy Facility Planning From a Clinical and Operational Model.

    PubMed

    Das, Indra J; Moskvin, Vadim P; Zhao, Qingya; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Johnstone, Peter A

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a model for planning a new proton therapy center based on clinical data, referral pattern, beam utilization and technical considerations. The patient-specific data for the depth of targets from skin in each beam angle were reviewed at our center providing megavoltage photon external beam and proton beam therapy respectively. Further, data on insurance providers, disease sites, treatment depths, snout size and the beam angle utilization from the patients treated at our proton facility were collected and analyzed for their utilization and their impact on the facility cost. The most common disease sites treated at our center are head and neck, brain, sarcoma and pediatric malignancies. From this analysis, it is shown that the tumor depth from skin surface has a bimodal distribution (peak at 12 and 26 cm) that has significant impact on the maximum proton energy, requiring the energy in the range of 130-230 MeV. The choice of beam angles also showed a distinct pattern: mainly at 90° and 270°; this indicates that the number of gantries may be minimized. Snout usage data showed that 70% of the patients are treated with 10 cm snouts. The cost of proton beam therapy depends largely on the type of machine, maximum beam energy and the choice of gantry versus fixed beam line. Our study indicates that for a 4-room center, only two gantry rooms could be needed at the present pattern of the patient cohorts, thus significantly reducing the initial capital cost. In the USA, 95% and 100% of patients can be treated with 200 and 230 MeV proton beam respectively. Use of multi-leaf collimators and pencil beam scanning may further reduce the operational cost of the facility. PMID:24988058

  14. The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility: Instrument Upgrades and Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Alan T.; Bus, S. J.; Connelley, M. S.; Rayner, J. T.

    2013-10-01

    The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) is a dedicated planetary 3-m telescope located at the summit of Mauna Kea. We discuss detector upgrades for our facility instruments, new instrument capabilities, and image quality upgrades. Detector upgrades are planned for SpeX during semester 2014A. We are also designing and constructing a new echelle spectrograph for 1-5 μm, to be commissioned starting in 2015. In terms of future capabilities, we would like input for planetary science cases needing diffraction-limited imaging at 1-5 μm and fast follow up of discoveries from sky surveys. Current instruments include: (1) SpeX, a 1-5 μm moderate-resolution spectrograph and camera, (2) MORIS, a high-speed CCD imager attached to SpeX for simultaneous visible and near-IR observations, (3) CSHELL, a 1-5 μm high-resolution spectrograph, and (4) NSFCAM, a 1-5 micron camera. MIRSI, an 8-25 μm camera, will be available after an upgrade to the array control electronics. Information on these instruments and also visitor instruments are given at: http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/Facility/. The IRTF supports remote observing from any site. This eliminates the need for travel to the observatory, and therefore short observing time slots can be supported. We also welcome on-site visiting astronomers. For further information see: http://irtfweb.ifa.hawaii.edu/. We gratefully acknowledge the support of Cooperative Agreement no. NNX13AG88A with the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Astronomy Program.

  15. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Burmeister

    2009-08-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility • 25-99-20, EMAD Facility Exterior Releases This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data

  16. Life science payloads planning study integration facility survey results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, G. W.; Brown, N. E.; Nelson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    The integration facility survey effort described is structured to examine the facility resources needed to conduct life science payload (LSP) integration checkout activities at NASA-JSC. The LSP integration facility operations and functions are defined along with the LSP requirements for facility design. A description of available JSC life science facilities is presented and a comparison of accommodations versus requirements is reported.

  17. 42 CFR 456.401 - State plan UR requirements and options; UR plan required for intermediate care facility services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care facility services. (a) The State plan must provide that— (1) UR is performed for each ICF that furnishes inpatient services under the plan; (2) Each ICF has on file a written UR plan that provides for review of each beneficiary's need for the services that the ICF furnishes him; and (3) Each written...

  18. 42 CFR 456.401 - State plan UR requirements and options; UR plan required for intermediate care facility services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... care facility services. (a) The State plan must provide that— (1) UR is performed for each ICF that furnishes inpatient services under the plan; (2) Each ICF has on file a written UR plan that provides for review of each beneficiary's need for the services that the ICF furnishes him; and (3) Each written...

  19. 42 CFR 456.401 - State plan UR requirements and options; UR plan required for intermediate care facility services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care facility services. (a) The State plan must provide that— (1) UR is performed for each ICF that furnishes inpatient services under the plan; (2) Each ICF has on file a written UR plan that provides for review of each recipient's need for the services that the ICF furnishes him; and (3) Each written ICF...

  20. 42 CFR 456.401 - State plan UR requirements and options; UR plan required for intermediate care facility services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care facility services. (a) The State plan must provide that— (1) UR is performed for each ICF that furnishes inpatient services under the plan; (2) Each ICF has on file a written UR plan that provides for review of each recipient's need for the services that the ICF furnishes him; and (3) Each written ICF...

  1. 42 CFR 456.401 - State plan UR requirements and options; UR plan required for intermediate care facility services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... care facility services. (a) The State plan must provide that— (1) UR is performed for each ICF that furnishes inpatient services under the plan; (2) Each ICF has on file a written UR plan that provides for review of each beneficiary's need for the services that the ICF furnishes him; and (3) Each written...

  2. The planning and design of a new PET radiochemistry facility.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Mark S; Hung, Joseph C; Mays, Trenton L; Mullan, Brian P

    2002-03-01

    The objectives of the Mayo positron emission tomography (PET) radiochemistry facility are the production of PET drugs for clinical service of our in-house patients, commercial distribution of PET drug products, and development of new PET drugs. The factors foremost in the planning and design phases were the current regulatory climate for PET drug production, radiation safety issues, and effective production flow. A medium-energy cyclotron was preferred for its small footprint to allow a compact vault, its high-proton energy to offer a higher product radioactivity; and its research capabilities. A vault installation was chosen instead of a self-shielded machine for improved access and ease of maintenance. Adjacent to the cyclotron is an area that houses the support equipment and a large dedicated workshop to support machine maintenance and targetry development. The total floor area of the PET radiochemistry facility is 344.2 m(2) (3,705.5 ft(2)), of which the radiochemistry laboratory occupies 130.7 m(2) (1,407 ft(2)). To reduce environmental contamination of PET drug products, the laboratory contains a controlled-air environment class 10,000 (M5.5) clean room with access via an interlocking entry change area. A fully shielded isolator (class 100 [M3.5]) is located in the clean room. The PET drugs are delivered via shielded tubing between the synthesizer and isolator. Inside the isolator, there is an automated device for dispensing the PET drug into either a bulk-activity vial or a unit-dose syringe. The dispensed PET radiopharmaceutical then passes through a hatch to a dedicated area where it is packaged for in-house use or commercial distribution. Unit doses for in-house patients are transported via pneumatic tube to the PET imaging area 76.2 m (250 ft) away. There is extensive radiation area monitoring throughout the facility that continuously measures radiation levels. We believe that our new PET radiochemistry facility not only meets overall objectives, but

  3. Closure plan for Corrective Action Unit 94: Building 650 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Building 650 Leachfield, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 94, will be clean closed by removal in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recover Act (RCRA) operational permit and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Historically, laboratory effluent was discharged through pipelines leading from the Radiochemistry Laboratory in Building 650 to a distribution box and a series of pipes dispersed across the leachfield. Effluent from the laboratory contained both hazardous and radioactive constituents. Discharge of hazardous and radioactive waste began in 1965. Discharge of radioactive waste ended in 1979 and hazardous waste discharge ended in 1987. From 1987 to 1993 the leachfield was used for the disposal of non-hazardous waste water. The piping leading to the leachfield was sealed in 1993.

  4. 40 CFR 300.211 - OPA facility and vessel response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.211 OPA facility and vessel response plans. This... codified as follows: (a) For tank vessels, these regulations are codified in 33 CFR part 155; (b)...

  5. 40 CFR 300.211 - OPA facility and vessel response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.211 OPA facility and vessel response plans. This... codified as follows: (a) For tank vessels, these regulations are codified in 33 CFR part 155; (b)...

  6. 40 CFR 300.211 - OPA facility and vessel response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.211 OPA facility and vessel response plans. This... codified as follows: (a) For tank vessels, these regulations are codified in 33 CFR part 155; (b)...

  7. 40 CFR 300.211 - OPA facility and vessel response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Planning and Preparedness § 300.211 OPA facility and vessel response plans. This... codified as follows: (a) For tank vessels, these regulations are codified in 33 CFR part 155; (b)...

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Plan, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-12

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which will be conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations OffIce (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration Division (ERD). The objectives of the planned activities are to: o Obtain sufficient, ample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies maybe developed for the site. o Obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. All references to regulations contained in this plan are to the versions of the regulations that are current at the time of publication of this plan. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and Mound the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site . . characterization and waste management purposes.

  9. Closure report for N Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This report has been prepared to satisfy Section 3156(b) of Public Law 101-189 (Reports in Connection with Permanent Closures of Department of Energy Defense Nuclear Facilities), which requires submittal of a Closure Report to Congress by the Secretary of Energy upon the permanent cessation of production operations at a US Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facility (Watkins 1991). This closure report provides: (1) A complete survey of the environmental problems at the facility; (2) Budget quality data indicating the cost of environmental restoration and other remediation and cleanup efforts at the facility; (3) A proposed cleanup schedule.

  10. Test plan for the soils facility demonstration: A petroleum contaminated soil bioremediation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lombard, K.H.

    1994-08-01

    The objectives of this test plan are to show the value added by using bioremediation as an effective and environmentally sound method to remediate petroleum contaminated soils (PCS) by: demonstrating bioremediation as a permanent method for remediating soils contaminated with petroleum products; establishing the best operating conditions for maximizing bioremediation and minimizing volatilization for SRS PCS during different seasons; determining the minimum set of analyses and sampling frequency to allow efficient and cost-effective operation; determining best use of existing site equipment and personnel to optimize facility operations and conserve SRS resources; and as an ancillary objective, demonstrating and optimizing new and innovative analytical techniques that will lower cost, decrease time, and decrease secondary waste streams for required PCS assays.

  11. Rocky Flats Closure Unit Cost Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, P.C.; Skokan, B.

    2007-07-01

    The Rocky Flats Closure Project has completed the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating environmental media and closing the Rocky Flats Site (Site). The project cost approximately $4.1 B and included the decommissioning of over 700 structures including 5 major plutonium facilities and 5 major uranium facilities, shipping over 14,600 cubic meters of transuranic and 565,000 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste, and remediating a 385-acre industrial area and the surrounding land. Actual costs were collected for a large variety of closure activities. These costs can be correlated with metrics associated with the facilities and environmental media to capture cost factors from the project that could be applicable to a variety of other closure projects both within and outside of the Department of Energy's weapons complex. The paper covers four general topics: the process to correlate the actual costs and metrics, an example of the correlated data for one large sub-project, a discussion of the results, and the additional activities that are planned to correlate and make this data available to the public. The process to collect and arrange the project control data of the Closure Project relied on the actual Closure Project cost information. It was used to correlate these actual costs with the metrics for the physical work, such as building area or waste generated, to support the development of parametric cost factors. The example provides cost factors for the Industrial Sites Project. The discussion addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the data, followed by a section identifying future activities to improve and extend the analyses and integrate it within the Department's Environmental Cost Analysis System. (authors)

  12. Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility mitigation action plan. Annual report for 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Haagenstad, T.

    1999-01-15

    This Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (MAPAR) has been prepared as part of implementing the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) to protect workers, soils, water, and biotic and cultural resources in and around the facility.

  13. Facility Master Plans: An Essential First Step in the Building Development Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickerham, Wendell E.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of the facility master plan (FMP) in defining project scope and validating or challenging the work of consultants. Offers three case studies illustrating how facility master plans averted problems or led to unanticipated benefits for the colleges involved. (EV)

  14. Guide for the Development of a Long-Range Facilities Plan. [4th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    A school district's long-range facilities plan is a compilation of information, policies, and statistical data about the district. The plan enables the district to determine and select among the alternatives for allocating facility resources to achieve the district's objectives while meeting community needs. This guide contains information on the…

  15. The Economic Impact of Implementing the Cincinnati Public Schools' Facilities Master Plan on Greater Cincinnati.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rexhausen, Jeff

    The construction proposed in the Cincinnati Public Schools' Facilities Master Plan will have a significant impact on the greater Cincinnati, Ohio, economy. Highlights include: (1) the Facilities Master Plan of the Cincinnati Public Schools envisions a 10-year program with $985 million in construction spending. The funding of this program includes…

  16. Higher Education Facilities Planning and Management Manuals, Nos. 1-7. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahnke, Harold L.; And Others

    This document comprises seven manuals that update and supersede a field review edition previously cited under ED 057 751. The first manual, an overview of the complete set, discusses the facilities planning cycle and the possible effects of currently changing instruction techniques on the facilities planning processes. The next four manuals…

  17. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2006. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2006. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. One additional inspection was performed after a precipitation event that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2006. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during this inspection, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklist and field notes completed during this additional inspection is included in Appendix A of this report. Precipitation records for 2006

  18. Sampling and monitoring for closure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLemore, V.T.; Russell, C.C.; Smith, K.S.

    2004-01-01

    The Metals Mining Sector of the Acid Drainage Technology Initiative (ADTI-MMS) addresses technical drainage-quality issues related to metal mining and related metallurgical operations, for future and active mines, as well as, for historical mines and mining districts. One of the first projects of ADTI-MMS is to develop a handbook describing the best sampling, monitoring, predicting, mitigating, and modeling of drainage from metal mines, pit lakes and related metallurgical facilities based upon current scientific and engineering practices. One of the important aspects of planning a new mine in today's regulatory environment is the philosophy of designing a new or existing mine or expansion of operations for ultimate closure. The holistic philosophy taken in the ADTI-MMS handbook maintains that sampling and monitoring programs should be designed to take into account all aspects of the mine-life cycle. Data required for the closure of the operation are obtained throughout the mine-life cycle, from exploration through post-closure.

  19. 40 CFR 265.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.1102 Section 265.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 265.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 265.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.1102 Section 265.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 265.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 265.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.1102 Section 265.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 265.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a)...

  2. 40 CFR 265.1102 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.1102 Section 265.1102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Containment Buildings § 265.1102 Closure and post-closure care. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 112.20 - Facility response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... any non-transportation-related onshore facility that, because of its location, could reasonably be... owner or operator of any non-transportation-related facility that handles, stores, or transports animal... require the owner or operator of any non-transportation-related onshore facility to prepare and submit...

  4. The NTF as a national facility. [project planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicks, O. W.

    1977-01-01

    Activities which led to the definition of the National Transonic Facility and the general agreements reached regarding its use and operations are reviewed. Topics discussed include: redefinition of test requirements, development of low cost options, consideration of a single transonic facility using existing hardware if feasible, facility concept recommendations, and acquisition schedule proposals.

  5. RCRA closure of mixed waste impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, F.J.; Greengard, T.C.; Arndt, M.B.

    1989-11-01

    A case study of a RCRA closure action at the Rocky Flats Plant is presented. Closure of the solar evaporation ponds involves removal and immobilization of a mixed hazardous/radioactive sludge, treatment of impounded water, groundwater monitoring, plume delineation, and collection and treatment of contaminated groundwater. The site closure is described within the context of regulatory negotiations, project schedules, risk assessment, clean versus dirty closure, cleanup levels, and approval of closure plans and reports. Lessons learned at Rocky Flats are summarized.

  6. Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

  7. From Concept to Commissioning: Planning, Design, and Construction of Campus Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guckert, Donald, Ed.

    To address the growing interest in campus planning, design, and construction projects, this anthology compiles articles previously published in "Facilities Manager." The beginning chapters focus on campus architecture, master planning, and project planning. The mid-section of the book offers information on the critical issues of time management,…

  8. Don't shoot the messenter: master facilities planning for the hospital.

    PubMed

    Remen, S

    1995-01-01

    The acute care medical/surgical (somatic) hospital is among the most politicized, scrutinized, technically complex and increasingly expensive of building types within the infrastructure of civilized live. Unless well prepared, hospitals will generally continue to evolve haphazardly and expensively to become accretions of macro and micro renovations and additions. companion and servant to a hospital's overall Strategic Plan, a Master Facilities Plan should be an eminently accessible ongoing document for charging a hospital's facilities policy. It should be designed to assure continuity so that facilities responses to short term and term goals will remain compatible, complimentary and inherently flexible over time. The techniques employed in master planning for hospitals will vary with the planners, the clients and the agendas of governmental regulators. Although some unfavourable information concerning the condition of existing facilities is surely to be anticipated, especially for older buildings, how clearly that information is presented and then creatively resolved is often at the core of fine Master Facilities Planning.

  9. Determinants of Quality of Family Planning Counseling among Private Health Facilities in Lagos.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Doug; Ugaz, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    We use a unique dataset that includes an objective measure of the quality of family planning counseling from 927 private health facilities in Lagos State, Nigeria, to determine which variables at the facility and provider levels are most closely correlated with the quality of family planning counseling. Our data on quality come from mystery client surveys in which the clients posed as women seeking family planning counseling. We find that quality is strongly associated with the cadre of provider, with doctors delivering substantially higher-quality counselling than nurses. Doctors not only outperform nurses overall, but also perform better on each category of quality and spend nearly three minutes longer on average counseling the mystery client. Location, fees charged for the service, and facility type are also strongly correlated with quality. The degree to which a facility specializes in family planning and facility size are only weakly predictive of quality.

  10. Transition and closeout of the Fernald Closure Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bilson, H.E.; Terry, T.; Reising, J.; Powell, J.; Miller, M.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Fluor Fernald have completed the majority of the cleanup of the Fernald Site. The over 1,000 acre complex for processing uranium has been demolished and soil contamination has been remediated. With acres of wetlands and prairies replacing the buildings and waste pits. At the end of the project the focus shifted to developing demonstrating the completion of the project and the contract, as well as ensuring a smooth transition of the facility from the DOE's Environmental Management (EM) Program to the DOE's Legacy Management (LM) Program. Working with the DOE, each portion of the closure contract was examined for specific closure definition. From this negotiation effort the Comprehensive Exit and Transition Plan (CE/T Plan) was written. The CE/T Plan is intended to assist DOE in the analysis that the site is ready for transfer into long-term stewardship (LTS) (also referred to as legacy management) and that Fluor Fernald, Inc. has satisfactorily completed the closure contract statement of work elements. Following the Lessons Learned from the closure of the Rocky Flats Site, the DOE's Legacy Management Program created a matrix of Transition Elements required to ensure adequate information was in place to allow the new prime contractor to perform the Legacy Management scope of work. The transition plan included over 1,000 elements broken down into functional areas and relied on specific Fernald Responsibility Transition Packages (RTPs) for detailed transition actions. The template for Closure and Transition Planning used at the Fernald Site was developed using the best Lessons Learned from across the DOE Complex. The template could be used for other sites, and lessons learned from this closure and transition will be appropriate for all closure projects. (authors)

  11. 40 CFR 112.20 - Facility response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR part 300) and applicable Area Contingency Plans prepared pursuant to... document accompanying the response plan, and that includes the following information: (i) The identity and... implement removal actions; (ii) The identity of individuals or organizations to be contacted in the event...

  12. 40 CFR 112.20 - Facility response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR part 300) and applicable Area Contingency Plans prepared pursuant to... document accompanying the response plan, and that includes the following information: (i) The identity and... implement removal actions; (ii) The identity of individuals or organizations to be contacted in the event...

  13. Criticality assessment of LLRWDF closure

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrack, A.G.; Weber, J.H.; Woody, N.D.

    1992-10-06

    During the operation of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF), large amounts (greater than 100 kg) of enriched uranium (EU) were buried. This EU came primarily from the closing and decontamination of the Naval Fuels Facility in the time period from 1987--1989. Waste Management Operations (WMO) procedures were used to keep the EU boxes separated to prevent possible criticality during normal operation. Closure of the LLRWDF is currently being planned, and waste stabilization by Dynamic Compaction (DC) is proposed. Dynamic compaction will crush the containers in the LLRWDF and result in changes in their geometry. Research of the LLRWDF operations and record keeping practices have shown that the EU contents of trenches are known, but details of the arrangement of the contents cannot be proven. Reviews of the trench contents, combined with analysis of potential critical configurations, revealed that some portions of the LLRWDF can be expected to be free of criticality concerns while other sections have credible probabilities for the assembly of a critical mass, even in the uncompacted configuration. This will have an impact on the closure options and which trenches can be compacted.

  14. Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ARMSEF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  15. PLANNING AREAS AND FACILITIES FOR HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION BY PARTICIPANTS IN NATIONAL FACILITIES CONFERENCE. REVISED 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    SPECIFIC INFORMATION IS PROVIDED IN THIS GUIDE TO PLANNERS OF AREAS AND FACILITIES FOR ATHLETICS, RECREATION, OUTDOOR EDUCATION, AND PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION. PART ONE CONCERNS BASIC CONCEPTS PERTINENT TO THE AREA OF CONSIDERATION. THE AIMS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SAFETY EDUCATION, AND RECREATION ARE LISTED. PLANNING PRINCIPLES,…

  16. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada With Errata Sheets, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Pat Matthews

    2007-09-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117, Pluto Disassembly Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 117 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 26-41-01, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 26-41-01. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 117 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before finalizing the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary following SAFER activities. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated to meet the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 27, 2007, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117.

  17. 40 CFR 35.917-8 - Submission and approval of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-8 Submission and approval of facilities plan. The State agency must submit...

  18. 40 CFR 35.917-8 - Submission and approval of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-8 Submission and approval of facilities plan. The State agency must submit...

  19. 40 CFR 35.917-8 - Submission and approval of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-8 Submission and approval of facilities plan. The State agency must submit...

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF DOE'S POST-CLOSURE MONITORING NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    The 2006 plan sets an ambitious agenda for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the remediation of sites contaminated by decades of nuclear weapons production activities. The plan's primary objective is to reduce overall clean up costs by first eliminating the environmental problems that are most expensive to control and safely maintain. In the context of the 2006 Plan, closure refers to the completion of area or facility specific cleanup projects. The cleanup levels are determined by the planned future use of the site or facility. Use restrictions are still undecided for most sites but are highly probable to exclude residential or agricultural activities. Most of the land will be remediated to ''industrial use'' levels with access restrictions and some areas will be closed-off through containment. Portions of the site will be reserved for waste disposal, either as a waste repository or the in-situ immobilization of contaminated soil and groundwater, and land use will be restricted to waste disposal only. The land used for waste disposal will require monitoring and maintenance activities after closure. Most of the land used for industrial use may also require such postclosure activities. The required postclosure monitoring and maintenance activities will be imposed by regulators and stakeholders. Regulators will not approve closure plans without clearly defined monitoring methods using approved technologies. Therefore, among all other more costly and labor-intensive closure-related activities, inadequate planning for monitoring and lack of appropriate monitoring technologies can prevent closure. The purpose of this project is to determine, document, and track the current and evolving postclosure monitoring requirements at DOE-EM sites. This information will aid CMST-CP in guiding its postclosure technology development and deployment efforts.

  1. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs.

  2. School Facilities Plan, U.S.D. 259 Wichita.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Public Schools, KS.

    The plan described in this report delineates present and future plant (site and building) needs for the period 1971-1991 in the Wichita school district. The optimum situation is discussed in terms of districtwide goals and objectives as set out by a study committee; then these statements are translated into standards for plan development.…

  3. 40 CFR 112.20 - Facility response plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., or transferred that materially alters the required response resources; (iii) A material change in... Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR part 300) and applicable Area Contingency Plans prepared pursuant to... prevent a substantial threat of a worst case discharge (To identify response resources to meet...

  4. Standard format and content for emergency plans for fuel cycle and materials facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This regulatory guides is being developed to provide guidance acceptable to the NRC staff on the information to be included in emergency plans and to establish a format for presenting the information. Use of a standard format will help ensure uniformity and completeness in the preparation of emergency plans. An acceptable emergency plan should describe the licensed activities conducted at the facility and the types of accidents that might occur. It should provide information on classifying postulated accidents and the licensee's procedures for notifying and coordinating with offsite authorities. The plan should provide information on emergency response measures that might be necessary, the equipment and facilities available to respond to an emergency, and how the licensee will maintain emergency preparedness capability. It should describe the records and reports that will be maintained. There should also be a section on recovery after an accident and plans for restoring the facility to a safe condition. 4 refs.

  5. Site Development, Operations, and Closure Plan Topical Report 5 An Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin. Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, Robert; Payne, William; Kirksey, Jim

    2015-06-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has partnered with Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) and Schlumberger Carbon Services to conduct a large-volume, saline reservoir storage project at ADM’s agricultural products processing complex in Decatur, Illinois. The Development Phase project, named the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) involves the injection of 1 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a deep saline formation of the Illinois Basin over a three-year period. This report focuses on objectives, execution, and lessons learned/unanticipated results from the site development (relating specifically to surface equipment), operations, and the site closure plan.

  6. 75 FR 54025 - Vessel and Facility Response Plans for Oil: 2003 Removal Equipment Requirements and Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Facility Response Plans for Oil: 2003 Removal Equipment Requirements and Alternative Technology Revisions'' (74 FR 45004). This final rule amended its requirements for oil-spill removal equipment associated... facility with appropriate equipment and resources located in each zone of operation; specific lists...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix G to Part 112 - Tier I Qualified Facility SPCC Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tier I Qualified Facility SPCC Plan G Appendix G to Part 112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Pt. 112, App. G Appendix G to Part 112—Tier I Qualified Facility SPCC...

  8. Higher Education Facilities Commissions: A Self-Study of Operational Patterns and State Plan Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Executive Directors of Higher Education Facilities Commissions. Committee on Administration and State Plans.

    This document investigates operational patterns and state plan criteria of the Higher Education Facilities Commission. Four study procedures were delineated: (1) development of a list of common responsibilities inherent for state facilities commissions in related federal legislation, (2) development of a calendar of important date related to the…

  9. Planning Educational Facilities. [Course Outline for EDAD-6034, Virginia Polytechnic Institute].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earthman, Glen I.

    School administrators need in-depth information to mount effective facility planning efforts, to develop and maintain satisfactory buildings for modern educational programs, to supervise the work of other professionals and technicians in designing and constructing facilities, and to evaluate such efforts. This document is an outline or syllabus…

  10. 40 CFR Appendix G to Part 112 - Tier I Qualified Facility SPCC Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier I Qualified Facility SPCC Plan G Appendix G to Part 112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Pt. 112, App. G Appendix G to Part 112—Tier I Qualified Facility SPCC...

  11. Career Education Facilities: A Planning Guide for Space and Station Requirements. A Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Alan P.

    This publication provides the educational planner and the architect with some suggestions concerning models by which they may plan new flexible-use, shared-space facilities and supports the models with guidelines for the development of facilities and educational programs for occupational education. In addition to discussing the financial…

  12. PLANNERS AND PLANNING, A REPORT FROM THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE PLANNING CENTER ON COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAYHEW, LEWIS B.

    GROWTH OF STUDENT POPULATIONS AND THE KNOWLEDGE EXPANSION NECESSITATE CAREFUL PLANNING IN THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE. PLANT PLANNING DEPENDS ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM PLANNING, STAFF EMPLOYMENT AND ORGANIZATION, STUDENT PLANNING, FUNDING AND COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS. PLANNING SHOULD INVOLVE THE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, LIBRARIAN, FACULTY, OTHER STAFF,…

  13. Preventive Maintenance for Higher Education Facilities: A Planning & Budgeting Tool for Facilities Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This guide is designed to help higher education facilities managers, through the implementation of preventive maintenance (PM), to increase the life of facility systems and equipment, lower overall operating costs, and provide maximum responsiveness to the college/university community. Part One, "Selling the Need," is designed to address the…

  14. Five Recession-Driven Strategies for Planning and Managing Campus Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudden, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and universities continue to face significant fiscal challenges in the current recession. A review of ongoing campus facilities planning projects, coupled with a review of more than 30 recent campus master planning requests for proposals and the relevant literature, indicates that colleges and universities are finding innovative ways to…

  15. 76 FR 9276 - Tank Vessel and Marine Transportation-Related Facility Response Plans for Hazardous Substances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). D. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... response plans for vessels was published on January 12, 1996 (61 FR 1052), and the rule for facilities followed on February 29, 1996 (61 FR 7890). In addition to publication of oil spill response...

  16. 77 FR 6681 - Approval and Promulgation of State Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants; State of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... (75 FR 82269). However, EPA inadvertently indicated in 40 CFR 62.2355(a) that ``the plan applies to... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Approval and Promulgation of State Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants...: On December 30, 2010, EPA published a final rule approving the Clean Air Act (CAA) section...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 112 - Facility-Specific Response Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan as required by 40 CFR 112.3. In these cases, owners or... OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Pt. 112, App. F Appendix F to Part 112—Facility-Specific Response Plan Table... Logs 1.8.3Response Training 1.8.3.1Personnel Response Training Logs 1.8.3.2Discharge Prevention...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 112 - Facility-Specific Response Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan as required by 40 CFR 112.3. In these cases, owners or... OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Pt. 112, App. F Appendix F to Part 112—Facility-Specific Response Plan Table... Logs 1.8.3Response Training 1.8.3.1Personnel Response Training Logs 1.8.3.2Discharge Prevention...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 112 - Facility-Specific Response Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan as required by 40 CFR 112.3. In these cases, owners or... OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Pt. 112, App. F Appendix F to Part 112—Facility-Specific Response Plan Table... Logs 1.8.3Response Training 1.8.3.1Personnel Response Training Logs 1.8.3.2Discharge Prevention...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 112 - Facility-Specific Response Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan as required by 40 CFR 112.3. In these cases, owners or... OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Pt. 112, App. F Appendix F to Part 112—Facility-Specific Response Plan Table... Logs 1.8.3Response Training 1.8.3.1Personnel Response Training Logs 1.8.3.2Discharge Prevention...

  1. 40 CFR 35.917-8 - Submission and approval of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plan. 35.917-8 Section 35.917-8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-8 Submission and approval of facilities plan. The State agency must submit...

  2. The National Transonic Facility - Status and operational planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility is scheduled to be completed in 1982. Several technical concerns remain, including thermal stress constraints which may limit the rate at which temperatures can be changed, seal performance in the cryogenic environment, and the tunnel process controls which could affect data acquisition rate. The current design affords the capability of dealing with all these concerns if they become problems. The outstanding instrument need is a real-time model surface deformation measurement system. Finally, an examination of the occupancy cost and the cost of liquid nitrogen for high Reynolds number tests indicates that operating costs should not be an inhibiting factor in the use of the facility.

  3. Facility Planning for 21st Century. Technology, Industry, and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Franklin

    When the Orange County School Board (Orlando, Florida) decided to build a new high school, they recognized Central Florida's high technology emphasis as a special challenge. The new facility needed to meet present instructional demands while being flexible enough to incorporate 21st century technologies. The final result is a new $30 million high…

  4. State-of-the-Art Facility: A Planning Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William; Speicher, A. Dean

    Chief executive officers of school districts and facility planners must assume the role of change agent to meet the information needs of the 21st century. Public school learning, which will serve more groupings of people on a continual basis, will be disseminated through media learning centers. Management should follow six steps in planning…

  5. Integrating Sustainability Programs into the Facilities Capital Planning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    With detailed information about the costs and benefits of potential green investments, educational facilities can effectively evaluate which initiatives will ultimately provide the greatest results over the short and long term. Based on its overall goals, every school, college, or university will have different values and therefore different…

  6. Guidelines for Planning Industrial Education Facilities and Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallsmith, Douglas D.

    This guide presents alternatives, resources, and specifications for industrial education teachers to use in preparing a facilities proposal to present to administrators, boards of education, the community, and architects. Developed to reflect the objectives of industrial education as outlined in the "Wisconsin Guide to Local Curriculum Improvement…

  7. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume, Part 2, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-31

    This Draft Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed include: purpose and scope of the plan; site history and mission; draft plant organization; waste minimization; waste characterization; preferred option selection process; technology for treating low-level radioactive wastes and TRU wastes; future generation of mixed waste streams; funding; and process for evaluating disposal issues in support of the site treatment plan.

  8. A Simplified Approach To Include Essential Facilities In Risk Scenarios For Civil Defence Plans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Susagna, T.; Goula, X.; Roca, A.; Safina, S.

    Given the importance of essential facilities in an earthquake crisis, it is recommended that detailed studies for assessing their functional vulnerability should be carried out. Although there have been many experiences in past earthquakes showing the problems associated to the damages to these facilities, like hospitals and police and firemen departments, many civil defence plans do not take into account their vulnerability. In some cases the reason is that there has not been opportunity to perform detailed vulnerability studies for these buildings before the issue of the prevention plans. A simplified statistical approach for the quick evaluation of the functional vulnerability of firemen stations and hospitals has been developed. This method allows these building to be at least considered in a first approach within the emergency plans. The method has been applied to facilities in Catalonia, Spain and have been incorporated to the recent developed plans of the Civil Defence department.

  9. Electromagnetic Interference/Compatibility (EMI/EMC) Control Test and Measurement Facility: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the EMI/EMC Test Facility. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  10. Readiness assessment plan for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility (Trench 31)

    SciTech Connect

    Irons, L.G.

    1994-11-22

    This document provides the Readiness Assessment Plan (RAP) for the Project W-025 (Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility) Readiness Assessment (RA). The RAP documents prerequisites to be met by the operating organization prior to the RA. The RAP is to be implemented by the RA Team identified in the RAP. The RA Team is to verify the facility`s compliance with criteria identified in the RAP. The criteria are based upon the {open_quotes}Core Requirements{close_quotes} listed in DOE Order 5480.31, {open_quotes}Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes}.

  11. Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Poderis, Reed J.; King, Rebecca A.

    2013-09-30

    This Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan describes the activities performed between deactivation and final decommissioning of the following facilities located on the Nevada National Security Site, as documented in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order under the Industrial Sites program as decontamination and decommissioning sites: ? Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility: o EMAD Building (Building 25-3900) o Locomotive Storage Shed (Building 25-3901) ? Test Cell C (TCC) Facility: o Equipment Building (Building 25-3220) o Motor Drive Building (Building 25-3230) o Pump Shop (Building 25-3231) o Cryogenic Lab (Building 25-3232) o Ancillary Structures (e.g., dewars, water tower, piping, tanks) These facilities have been declared excess and are in various stages of deactivation (low-risk, long-term stewardship disposition state). This S&M Plan establishes and implements a solid, cost-effective, and balanced S&M program consistent with federal, state, and regulatory requirements. A graded approach is used to plan and conduct S&M activities. The goal is to maintain the facilities in a safe condition in a cost-effective manner until their final end state is achieved. This plan accomplishes the following: ? Establishes S&M objectives and framework ? Identifies programmatic guidance for S&M activities to be conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) ? Provides present facility condition information and identifies hazards ? Identifies facility-specific S&M activities to be performed and their frequency ? Identifies regulatory drivers, NNSA/NFO policies and procedures, and best management practices that necessitate implementation of S&M activities ? Provides criteria and frequencies for revisions and updates ? Establishes the process for identifying and dispositioning a condition that has not been previously identified or

  12. The Planning and Implementation of Test Facility Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberlander, Larry

    2008-01-01

    As engineering programs develop, and product testing begins, ideas for process improvement soon become obvious. Engineers envision new holding and handling fixtures. Additional custom-made support equipment may be needed. Perhaps modifications to the building or modifications to facility hardware are the order of the day. This is where a flexible creative test organization is needed. We need not be content with the status quo. All of these desired test innovations can make the difficult easy and improve the work flow. At times, implementing these new ideas demands more time or specialized expertise than test team members have. Through the coordinated use of labor resources, the needed improvements can still be made and in a timely fashion that supports program schedules. This presentation provides practical advice and a method whereby test personnel can creatively develop facility improvements and manage them from start to finish. You can control just how much time you invest and what part of your concepts you will personally design. By wisely defining the requirements and presenting them to the appropriate help sources (vendors, contractors, coworkers, and support departments), you can get the help you need to bring the improvements you have conceived, into fruition. Aspects of this presentation include defining requirements for test facility improvements, choosing labor resources, writing a statement of work, determining cost and benefits, securing department approval, coordinating procurement, managing the project, and training the end users. The process of successfully implementing test facility improvements is thoroughly explained. It has been tried, proven and improved over nearly 25 years of use. Whether considering a $50 improvement or a $50 million dollar improvement, this discussion will provide helpful pointers. Examples of improvements made through this process and their illustration will be included.

  13. Plans for an ERL Test Facility at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Erik; Bruning, O S; Calaga, Buchi Rama Rao; Schirm, Karl-Martin; Torres-Sanchez, R; Valloni, Alessandra; Aulenbacher, Kurt; Bogacz, Slawomir; Hutton, Andrew; Klein, M

    2014-12-01

    The baseline electron accelerator for LHeC and one option for FCC-he is an Energy Recovery Linac. To prepare and study the necessary key technologies, CERNhas started – in collaboration with JLAB and Mainz University – the conceptual design of an ERL Test Facility (ERL-TF). Staged construction will allow the study under different conditions with up to 3 passes, beam energies of up to about 1 GeV and currents of up to 50 mA. The design and development of superconducting cavity modules, including coupler and HOM damper designs, are also of central importance for other existing and future accelerators and their tests are at the heart of the current ERL-TF goals. However, the ERL-TF could also provide a unique infrastructure for several applications that go beyond developing and testing the ERL technology at CERN. In addition to experimental studies of beam dynamics, operational and reliability issues in an ERL, it could equally serve for quench tests of superconducting magnets, as physics experimental facility on its own right or as test stand for detector developments. This contribution will describe the goals and the concept of the facility and the status of the R&D.

  14. 40 CFR 35.917-1 - Content of facilities plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... employing the reuse of waste water and recycling of pollutants; (iii) Land application techniques; (iv... § 30.305-8). (g) A final responsiveness summary, consistent with 40 CFR 25.8 and § 35.917-5. (h) A... of applicable approved areawide WQM plans. (k) A municipal pretreatment program in accordance...

  15. Acoustical Considerations in Planning and Design of Library Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrightson, Denelle; Wrightson, John M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses acoustical demands in public libraries to consider during the design and construction process of new or renovated library space. Topics include intrusive noises; overly reverberant spaces; lack of speech privacy; sound transmission class; noise criteria; reverberation time and noise reduction coefficient; space planning; sound systems;…

  16. Recommendations for Emergency Management Planning for School Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Numerous events, such as hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes, constitute a natural disaster for public schools. Human-caused disasters include hazardous-material emergencies, civil riots, fires, and nuclear accidents. This document contains emergency-management planning guidelines, developed by the Texas Education Agency, to help local school…

  17. Plan for Progress in the Media Center. Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, Betty Jo

    Today's changing educational scene demands more materials of more varieties, more related services, more personnel, and more space for media centers and services. The handbook attempts to provide a clearer understanding of space planning problems and of a vocabulary for communication among the various personnel involved in design. Educational…

  18. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1987-06-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

  19. Status and plans for the PRIME Lab AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, D.; Ma, X.; Miller, T.; Mueller, K.; Perry, M.; Rickey, F.; Sharma, P.; Simms, P.; Lipschutz, M.; Vogt, S.

    1997-03-01

    The operation, status, performance, and upgrade plans for the Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) are described. The AMS system is in routine operation for all of the commonly-used AMS nuclides. Chemical preparation is being performed for all nuclides measured in many different matrices. Construction of a new injector and terminal stripper system is in progress; a fast-isotope-switching system is in the final design stage.

  20. DOE standard: Filter test facility quality program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    This standard was developed primarily for application in US Department of Energy programs. It contains specific direction for HEPA filter testing performed at a DOE-accepted HEPA Filter Test Facility (FTF). Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should be sent to the Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards (EH-31), US Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585, by letter or by using the self-addressed Document Improvement Proposal form (DOE F 1300.3) appearing at the end of this document.

  1. Waste Management Planned for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg

    2007-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program has been proposed to develop and employ advanced technologies to increase the proliferation resistance of spent nuclear fuels, recover and reuse nuclear fuel resources, and reduce the amount of wastes requiring permanent geological disposal. In the initial GNEP fuel cycle concept, spent nuclear fuel is to be reprocessed to separate re-useable transuranic elements and uranium from waste fission products, for fabricating new fuel for fast reactors. The separated wastes would be converted to robust waste forms for disposal. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF) is proposed by DOE for developing and demonstrating spent nuclear fuel recycling technologies and systems. The AFCF will include capabilities for receiving and reprocessing spent fuel and fabricating new nuclear fuel from the reprocessed spent fuel. Reprocessing and fuel fabrication activities will generate a variety of radioactive and mixed waste streams. Some of these waste streams are unique and unprecedented. The GNEP vision challenges traditional U.S. radioactive waste policies and regulations. Product and waste streams have been identified during conceptual design. Waste treatment technologies have been proposed based on the characteristics of the waste streams and the expected requirements for the final waste forms. Results of AFCF operations will advance new technologies that will contribute to safe and economical commercial spent fuel reprocessing facilities needed to meet the GNEP vision. As conceptual design work and research and design continues, the waste management strategies for the AFCF are expected to also evolve.

  2. Nursing home closures and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between quality of care in nursing homes and their likelihood of closure. We hypothesize that lower-quality facilities will be more likely to close than higher-quality facilities. Using the rates of physical restraint use, urethral catheterization, contractures, pressure ulcers, and psychotropic medication use as quality measures from approximately 12,000 facilities from 1992 to 1998, the author examine cross-sectional and change score relationships between these measures and a nursing home's likelihood of closure. The descriptive analysis shows that 621 nursing homes closed in this time period, and the results for physical restraint use were robust in their positive association with closures in most analyses lending some support for this study's hypothesis. However, overall, the author concludes that nursing facility closures are relatively rare events. And the likelihood of closure, even for poor-quality facilities, is low. PMID:15643031

  3. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  4. Pollution Prevention Plan for the Y-12 Analytical Chemistry Organization Off-Site Union Valley Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. G.

    2010-03-01

    The Y-12 Analytical Chemistry Organization (ACO) Off-Site Union Valley Facility (Union Valley Facility) is managed by Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, L.L.C. (B and W Y-12) through the Y-12 National Security Complex organization. Accordingly, the Y-12 Pollution Prevention Program encompasses the operations conducted at the Union Valley Facility. The Y-12 Program is designed to fully comply with state, federal and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements concerning waste minimization/pollution prevention as documented in the Y-12 Pollution Prevention Program Plan. The Program is formulated to reduce the generation and toxicity of all Y-12 wastes in all media, including those wastes generated by the Union Valley Facility operations. All regulatory and DOE requirements are met by the Y-12 Program Plan.

  5. A checklist for planning and designing audiovisual facilities in health sciences libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, G J; Bischoff, F A; Foxman, D S

    1984-01-01

    Developed by an MLA/HeSCA (Health Sciences Communications Association) joint committee, this checklist is intended to serve as a conceptual framework for planning a new or renovated audiovisual facility in a health sciences library. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical and organizational decisions that must be made about an audiovisual facility before the technical or spatial decisions can be wisely made. Specific standards for facilities or equipment are not included. The first section focuses on health sciences library settings. Ideas presented in the remaining sections could apply to academic learning resource center environments as well. A bibliography relating to all aspects of audiovisual facilities planning and design is included with references to specific sections of the checklist. PMID:6208957

  6. Near-field measurement facility plans at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, R. G.

    1983-05-01

    The direction of future antenna technology will be toward antennas which are large, both physically and electrically, will operate at frequencies up to 60 GHz, and are non-reciprocal and complex, implementing multiple-beam and scanning beam concepts and monolithic semiconductor devices and techniques. The acquisition of accurate antenna performance measurements is a critical part of the advanced antenna research program and represents a substantial antenna measurement technology challenge, considering the special characteristics of future spacecraft communications antennas. Comparison of various antenna testing techniques and their relative advantages and disadvantages shows that the near-field approach is necessary to meet immediate and long-term testing requirements. The LeRC facilities, the 22 ft x 22 ft horizontal antenna boresight planar scanner and the 60 ft x 60 ft vertical antenna boresight plant scanner (with a 60 GHz frequency and D/lamdba = 3000 electrical size capabilities), will meet future program testing requirements.

  7. MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) facility and machine grounding plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, H.H.; Rice, B.W.; Petersen, D.E.; Herrera, C.H.

    1987-10-07

    A key issue in the design of fusion research experiments and their related facilities is the control of ground currents. Because of the large magnetic field, high voltages and high currents present in most of these installations, it is essential to avoid ground loops, and to control ground currents during both normal operations and fault conditions. This paper describes the grounding policy that was developed for MTX. The vault area was divided into zones, and each of the four walls was treated as a separate grounding area. Cable runs and magnet buss bars were run into the machine radially. The paper also describes the steps taken to isolate diagnostic signals and power for pumps and instruments. The paper outlines some of the field calculations used to predict problem areas, and to reveal voltage isolation levels that were required. The paper includes the active ground fault detection system used to insure the integrity of the ground system. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Facility Safety Plan B360 Complex Biohazardous Operations CMLS-412r0

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G

    2007-01-08

    This Addendum to the Facility Safety Plan (FSP) 360 Complex describes the safety requirements for the safe conduct of all biohazardous research operations in all buildings within the 360 complex program areas. These requirements include all the responsibilities and authorities of building personnel, operational hazards, and environmental concerns and their controls. In addition, this Addendum prescribes facility-specific training requirements and emergency controls, as well as maintenance and quality assurance requirements for ES&H-related building systems.

  9. Computer software configuration management plan for 200 East/West Liquid Effluent Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1995-02-27

    This computer software management configuration plan covers the control of the software for the monitor and control system that operates the Effluent Treatment Facility and its associated truck load in station and some key aspects of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility that stores condensate to be processed. Also controlled is the Treated Effluent Disposal System`s pumping stations and monitors waste generator flows in this system as well as the Phase Two Effluent Collection System.

  10. Statistical sampling plan for the TRU waste assay facility

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, J. J.; Wright, T.; Schultz, F. J.; Haff, K.; Monroe, R. J.

    1983-08-01

    Due to limited space, there is a need to dispose appropriately of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory transuranic waste which is presently stored below ground in 55-gal (208-l) drums within weather-resistant structures. Waste containing less than 100 nCi/g transuranics can be removed from the present storage and be buried, while waste containing greater than 100 nCi/g transuranics must continue to be retrievably stored. To make the necessary measurements needed to determine the drums that can be buried, a transuranic Neutron Interrogation Assay System (NIAS) has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and can make the needed measurements much faster than previous techniques which involved ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy. The previous techniques are reliable but time consuming. Therefore, a validation study has been planned to determine the ability of the NIAS to make adequate measurements. The validation of the NIAS will be based on a paired comparison of a sample of measurements made by the previous techniques and the NIAS. The purpose of this report is to describe the proposed sampling plan and the statistical analyses needed to validate the NIAS. 5 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Engineering Task Plan for the Integrity Assessment Examination of Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRT) Catch Tanks and Ancillary facilities

    SciTech Connect

    BECKER, D.L.

    2000-05-23

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) presents the integrity assessment examination of three DCRTs, seven catch tanks, and two ancillary facilities located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Site. The integrity assessment examinations, as described in this ETP, will provide the necessary information to enable the independently qualified registered professional engineer (IQRPE) to assess the condition and integrity of these facilities. The plan is consistent with the Double-Shell Tank Waste Transfer Facilities Integrity Assessment Plan.

  12. Space Station Furnace Facility Preliminary Project Implementation Plan (PIP). Volume 2, Appendix 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkey, John K.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is an advanced facility for materials research in the microgravity environment of the Space Station Freedom and will consist of Core equipment and various sets of Furnace Module (FM) equipment in a three-rack configuration. This Project Implementation Plan (PIP) document was developed to satisfy the requirements of Data Requirement Number 4 for the SSFF study (Phase B). This PIP shall address the planning of the activities required to perform the detailed design and development of the SSFF for the Phase C/D portion of this contract.

  13. Space Station Furnace Facility preliminary Project Implementation Plan (PIP). Volume 2, appendix 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkey, John K.

    1992-05-01

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is an advanced facility for materials research in the microgravity environment of the Space Station Freedom and will consist of Core equipment and various sets of Furnace Module (FM) equipment in a three-rack configuration. This Project Implementation Plan (PIP) document was developed to satisfy the requirements of Data Requirement Number 4 for the SSFF study (Phase B). This PIP shall address the planning of the activities required to perform the detailed design and development of the SSFF for the Phase C/D portion of this contract.

  14. Successful completion of a RCRA closure for the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lippitt, J.M.; Kolthoff, K.

    1995-02-01

    This paper discusses the successful completion of a RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) closure of a HF (hydrofluoric acid) tank car at FEMP, which is on the national priorities list of hazardous waste sites and is undergoing CERCLA remediation. The HF tank car closure was conducted by FERMCO. Through a combination of sound planning and team work, the HF tank car was closed safely and ahead of schedule. During > 22,000 hr field work required for construction modifications and neutralization of 9,600 gallons of HF and decontamination rinseates, there were no OSHA recordable incidents. The system design avoided additional costs by maximizing use of existing equipment and facilities. This successful closure of the HF tank car demonstrates FEMP`s commitment to reducing risks and cleaning up the facility in a manner consistent with objectives of RCRA regulations and the Ohio EPA hazardous waste rules. This in turn facilitated ongoing negotiations with Ohio EPA to integrate RCRA closure and the ongoing CERCLA remediation activities. This paper addresses why the unit was clean closed under an approved RCRA Closure Plan. Integration of EPA regulations for RCRA and CERCLA programs and the DOE-Orders impacting design, construction and operation of an acid neutralization system is also reviewed. The paper concludes with a discussion of lessons learned in the process in preparing the closure plant and through final project close out.

  15. Site and facility waste transport planning documents (SPDs) status and findings

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, S P; Danese, F L; Wankerl, M W

    1993-05-01

    Site and Facility Waste Transportation Services Planning Documents (SPDS) are detailed desk-top reference documents that initiate planning for shipping commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the sites where it is currently generated and/or stored to another location. Because of the unique design features and individual variations in the spent fuel handling and cask loading operation requirements for each facility, one SPD will be written for each of the commercial facilities currently expected to deliver SNF into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) disposal system. One primary purpose of an SPD is to initiate the discussions that will lead to a determination of the type of spent fuel cask and transport mode that will be used to transport spent fuel from each facility. The initial assessment of which cask type and mode would best serve each facility is based on the principle that the largest possible capacity casks should be used at the greatest number of facilities to reduce the total number of spent fuel shipments. The final selection of cask and transportation mode will be arrived at following discussion with the facility licensed operator. Once agreed upon by OCRWM and the facility owner, the SPD wig be used as a primary input to the development of a Site Specific Servicing Plan (SSSP) that will detail chosen servicing options for the individual site. This paper will discuss the purpose and development of SPDs and the preliminary results of an evaluation of the ability of delivering facilities to handle and ship spent fuel casks within the confines of the local nation infrastructure.

  16. Application of microzoning and GIS in oil facilities for seismic risk emergency planning

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, M.

    1996-12-31

    A proposal on emergency response planning for oil facilities in seismic active regions is presented, considering an oil refinery. Most Venezuelan oil facilities are located in areas of moderate to high seismic activity. Therefore, it is recommended to carry out seismic and geotechnical microzonations to assess the vulnerability of existing structures, and optimize the earthquake resistant design of new ones. This information together with the facility inherent data are used in a Geographical Information System (GIS) to allow for better managing of the seismic hazard and its associated human, environmental, and economic risks.

  17. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchem, L.; Holmes, R.A.

    1991-03-02

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps.

  18. National Biomedical Tracer Facility planning and feasibility study. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchem, L.; Holmes, R.A.

    1991-03-02

    Since its establishment in mid-1989, the DOE Office of Isotope Production and Distribution has examined the recommendations of the Los Alamos Report and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (HERAC) Report. The main recommendation from these deliberations is for the DOE to establish an accelerator dedicated to biomedical radioisotope production. Representatives of the nuclear medicine community, meeting at a DOE workshop in August 1988, evaluated present and future needs for accelerator-produced radioisotopes. Workshop participants concluded in the Los Alamos Report that approximately 90% of their radioisotope needs could be met by a machine that delivers a 70 million electronic volts (MeV), 500-microamp proton beam. The HERAC Report provides more quantification of radioisotope needs, and included isotopes that can be produced effectively only at higher energies. An accelerator facility with an upper energy limit of 100 MeV and beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps, could produce all important accelerator- produced radioisotopes in current use, as well as those isotopes judged to have future potential value in medical research and clinical practice. We therefore recommend that the NBTF have a 100-MeV proton beam accelerator with an extracted beam current of 750 to 1,000 microamps.

  19. Closedure - Mine Closure Technologies Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppila, Päivi; Kauppila, Tommi; Pasanen, Antti; Backnäs, Soile; Liisa Räisänen, Marja; Turunen, Kaisa; Karlsson, Teemu; Solismaa, Lauri; Hentinen, Kimmo

    2015-04-01

    Closure of mining operations is an essential part of the development of eco-efficient mining and the Green Mining concept in Finland to reduce the environmental footprint of mining. Closedure is a 2-year joint research project between Geological Survey of Finland and Technical Research Centre of Finland that aims at developing accessible tools and resources for planning, executing and monitoring mine closure. The main outcome of the Closedure project is an updatable wiki technology-based internet platform (http://mineclosure.gtk.fi) in which comprehensive guidance on the mine closure is provided and main methods and technologies related to mine closure are evaluated. Closedure also provides new data on the key issues of mine closure, such as performance of passive water treatment in Finland, applicability of test methods for evaluating cover structures for mining wastes, prediction of water effluents from mine wastes, and isotopic and geophysical methods to recognize contaminant transport paths in crystalline bedrock.

  20. Identification of Selected Child-Resistant Closures (Continuous Thread, Lug-Bayonet, and Snap Closures).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Rosalind L.; White, Harry E.

    This publication describes a selected group of child-resistant closures used in packaging five categories of medicine and household products. The material in the document was collected to train survey personnel to identify closures for a planned household study of the effectiveness of child-resistant packaging. The 39 closures described are of…