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Sample records for facility location models

  1. MIP models for connected facility location: A theoretical and computational study☆

    PubMed Central

    Gollowitzer, Stefan; Ljubić, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    This article comprises the first theoretical and computational study on mixed integer programming (MIP) models for the connected facility location problem (ConFL). ConFL combines facility location and Steiner trees: given a set of customers, a set of potential facility locations and some inter-connection nodes, ConFL searches for the minimum-cost way of assigning each customer to exactly one open facility, and connecting the open facilities via a Steiner tree. The costs needed for building the Steiner tree, facility opening costs and the assignment costs need to be minimized. We model ConFL using seven compact and three mixed integer programming formulations of exponential size. We also show how to transform ConFL into the Steiner arborescence problem. A full hierarchy between the models is provided. For two exponential size models we develop a branch-and-cut algorithm. An extensive computational study is based on two benchmark sets of randomly generated instances with up to 1300 nodes and 115,000 edges. We empirically compare the presented models with respect to the quality of obtained bounds and the corresponding running time. We report optimal values for all but 16 instances for which the obtained gaps are below 0.6%. PMID:25009366

  2. New spatial clustering-based models for optimal urban facility location considering geographical obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Maryam; Shahrabi, Jamal

    2014-03-01

    The problems of facility location and the allocation of demand points to facilities are crucial research issues in spatial data analysis and urban planning. It is very important for an organization or governments to best locate its resources and facilities and efficiently manage resources to ensure that all demand points are covered and all the needs are met. Most of the recent studies, which focused on solving facility location problems by performing spatial clustering, have used the Euclidean distance between two points as the dissimilarity function. Natural obstacles, such as mountains and rivers, can have drastic impacts on the distance that needs to be traveled between two geographical locations. While calculating the distance between various supply chain entities (including facilities and demand points), it is necessary to take such obstacles into account to obtain better and more realistic results regarding location-allocation. In this article, new models were presented for location of urban facilities while considering geographical obstacles at the same time. In these models, three new distance functions were proposed. The first function was based on the analysis of shortest path in linear network, which was called SPD function. The other two functions, namely PD and P2D, were based on the algorithms that deal with robot geometry and route-based robot navigation in the presence of obstacles. The models were implemented in ArcGIS Desktop 9.2 software using the visual basic programming language. These models were evaluated using synthetic and real data sets. The overall performance was evaluated based on the sum of distance from demand points to their corresponding facilities. Because of the distance between the demand points and facilities becoming more realistic in the proposed functions, results indicated desired quality of the proposed models in terms of quality of allocating points to centers and logistic cost. Obtained results show promising

  3. A Hybrid Tabu Search Heuristic for a Bilevel Competitive Facility Location Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küçükaydın, Hande; Aras, Necati; Altınel, I. Kuban

    We consider a problem in which a firm or franchise enters a market by locating new facilities where there are existing facilities belonging to a competitor. The firm aims at finding the location and attractiveness of each facility to be opened so as to maximize its profit. The competitor, on the other hand, can react by adjusting the attractiveness of its existing facilities, opening new facilities and/or closing existing ones with the objective of maximizing its own profit. The demand is assumed to be aggregated at certain points in the plane and the facilities of the firm can be located at prespecified candidate sites. We employ Huff's gravity-based rule in modeling the behavior of the customers where the fraction of customers at a demand point that visit a certain facility is proportional to the facility attractiveness and inversely proportional to the distance between the facility site and demand point. We formulate a bilevel mixed-integer nonlinear programming model where the firm entering the market is the leader and the competitor is the follower. In order to find a feasible solution of this model, we develop a hybrid tabu search heuristic which makes use of two exact methods as subroutines: a gradient ascent method and a branch-and-bound algorithm with nonlinear programming relaxation.

  4. A reliable facility location design model with site-dependent disruption in the imperfect information context

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Lifen; Wang, Xifu; Fan, Hongqiang; Li, Xiaopeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a reliable facility location design model under imperfect information with site-dependent disruptions; i.e., each facility is subject to a unique disruption probability that varies across the space. In the imperfect information contexts, customers adopt a realistic “trial-and-error” strategy to visit facilities; i.e., they visit a number of pre-assigned facilities sequentially until they arrive at the first operational facility or give up looking for the service. This proposed model aims to balance initial facility investment and expected long-term operational cost by finding the optimal facility locations. A nonlinear integer programming model is proposed to describe this problem. We apply a linearization technique to reduce the difficulty of solving the proposed model. A number of problem instances are studied to illustrate the performance of the proposed model. The results indicate that our proposed model can reveal a number of interesting insights into the facility location design with site-dependent disruptions, including the benefit of backup facilities and system robustness against variation of the loss-of-service penalty. PMID:28486564

  5. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed. PMID:27583542

  6. A facility location model for municipal solid waste management system under uncertain environment.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vinay; Bhurjee, A K; Karmakar, Subhankar; Dikshit, A K

    2017-12-15

    In municipal solid waste management system, decision makers have to develop an insight into the processes namely, waste generation, collection, transportation, processing, and disposal methods. Many parameters (e.g., waste generation rate, functioning costs of facilities, transportation cost, and revenues) in this system are associated with uncertainties. Often, these uncertainties of parameters need to be modeled under a situation of data scarcity for generating probability distribution function or membership function for stochastic mathematical programming or fuzzy mathematical programming respectively, with only information of extreme variations. Moreover, if uncertainties are ignored, then the problems like insufficient capacities of waste management facilities or improper utilization of available funds may be raised. To tackle uncertainties of these parameters in a more efficient manner an algorithm, based on interval analysis, has been developed. This algorithm is applied to find optimal solutions for a facility location model, which is formulated to select economically best locations of transfer stations in a hypothetical urban center. Transfer stations are an integral part of contemporary municipal solid waste management systems, and economic siting of transfer stations ensures financial sustainability of this system. The model is written in a mathematical programming language AMPL with KNITRO as a solver. The developed model selects five economically best locations out of ten potential locations with an optimum overall cost of [394,836, 757,440] Rs. 1 /day ([5906, 11,331] USD/day) approximately. Further, the requirement of uncertainty modeling is explained based on the results of sensitivity analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Text Summarization Model based on Facility Location Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Hiroya; Okumura, Manabu

    e propose a novel multi-document generic summarization model based on the budgeted median problem, which is a facility location problem. The summarization method based on our model is an extractive method, which selects sentences from the given document cluster and generates a summary. Each sentence in the document cluster will be assigned to one of the selected sentences, where the former sentece is supposed to be represented by the latter. Our method selects sentences to generate a summary that yields a good sentence assignment and hence covers the whole content of the document cluster. An advantage of this method is that it can incorporate asymmetric relations between sentences such as textual entailment. Through experiments, we showed that the proposed method yields good summaries on the dataset of DUC'04.

  8. A Game Theoretical Model for Location of Terror Response Facilities under Capacitated Resources

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Qi; Xu, Weisheng; Wu, Qidi

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of capacity constraints on the locations of terror response facilities. We assume that the state has limited resources, and multiple facilities may be involved in the response until the demand is satisfied consequently. We formulate a leader-follower game model between the state and the terrorist and prove the existence and uniqueness of the Nash equilibrium. An integer linear programming is proposed to obtain the equilibrium results when the facility number is fixed. The problem is demonstrated by a case study of the 19 districts of Shanghai, China. PMID:24459446

  9. 30 CFR 71.401 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Location of facilities. 71.401 Section 71.401... Location of facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities shall be in a location convenient for the use of the miners. Where these facilities are designed to serve more than one...

  10. 30 CFR 71.401 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.401 Location of facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities shall be in a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Location of facilities. 71.401 Section 71.401...

  11. 30 CFR 71.401 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.401 Location of facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities shall be in a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Location of facilities. 71.401 Section 71.401...

  12. 30 CFR 71.401 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.401 Location of facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities shall be in a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Location of facilities. 71.401 Section 71.401...

  13. 30 CFR 71.401 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.401 Location of facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities shall be in a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Location of facilities. 71.401 Section 71.401...

  14. Minimizing Security Forces Response Times Through the Use of Facility Location Methodologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    etc. In his book Network and Discrete Location: Models, Algorithms, and Applications author Mark S. Daskin provides a comprehensive introduction to...the art and science of locating facilities. ( Daskin , 1995) The book espouses to be a hands-on guide to using and developing facility location models...method used in this research is from Daskin (1995). The formulation presented by Daskin includes a multiplicative weighting factor for the amount

  15. 7 CFR 1735.91 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of facilities. 1735.91 Section 1735.91 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... All Acquisitions and Mergers § 1735.91 Location of facilities. Telephone facilities to be acquired...

  16. 7 CFR 1738.12 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of facilities. 1738.12 Section 1738.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Location of facilities. RUS will make broadband loans for facilities which RUS determines are necessary to...

  17. Competitive Facility Location with Random Demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Takeshi; Katagiri, Hideki; Kato, Kosuke

    2009-10-01

    This paper proposes a new location problem of competitive facilities, e.g. shops and stores, with uncertain demands in the plane. By representing the demands for facilities as random variables, the location problem is formulated to a stochastic programming problem, and for finding its solution, three deterministic programming problems: expectation maximizing problem, probability maximizing problem, and satisfying level maximizing problem are considered. After showing that one of their optimal solutions can be found by solving 0-1 programming problems, their solution method is proposed by improving the tabu search algorithm with strategic vibration. Efficiency of the solution method is shown by applying to numerical examples of the facility location problems.

  18. Planning of public healthcare facility using a location allocation modelling: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, S. Sarifah Radiah; Moin, Noor Hasnah; Omar, Mohd

    2014-09-01

    Finding the correct location of any facility and determining the demands which are to be assigned to it is very crucial in public health service. This is to ensure that the public gain maximum benefits. This article analyzes the previous location decisions of public primary healthcare (PHC) facilities in the district of Kuala Langat, Malaysia. With total population of 220214 (in 2010), the PHC in the district is currently served by 28 facilities. The percentages of total population covered (in 2007) within the maximum allowable distance of 3km and 5km are 69.7 percent and 77.8 percent respectively. This is very low compared to the Malaysian National Health Policy of Health for All or 100 percent coverage. The determination of health facility location should be planned carefully to further increase effective primary health service to the nation that is required for economic sustainability.

  19. Comparison of optimized algorithms in facility location allocation problems with different distance measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Chandrawat, Rajesh Kumar; Garg, B. P.; Joshi, Varun

    2017-07-01

    Opening the new firm or branch with desired execution is very relevant to facility location problem. Along the lines to locate the new ambulances and firehouses, the government desires to minimize average response time for emergencies from all residents of cities. So finding the best location is biggest challenge in day to day life. These type of problems were named as facility location problems. A lot of algorithms have been developed to handle these problems. In this paper, we review five algorithms that were applied to facility location problems. The significance of clustering in facility location problems is also presented. First we compare Fuzzy c-means clustering (FCM) algorithm with alternating heuristic (AH) algorithm, then with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithms using different type of distance function. The data was clustered with the help of FCM and then we apply median model and min-max problem model on that data. After finding optimized locations using these algorithms we find the distance from optimized location point to the demanded point with different distance techniques and compare the results. At last, we design a general example to validate the feasibility of the five algorithms for facilities location optimization, and authenticate the advantages and drawbacks of them.

  20. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Type Certificates § 21.43 Location of manufacturing facilities... location of the manufacturer's facilities places no undue burden on the FAA in administering applicable...

  1. Planning the location of facilities to implement a reverse logistic system of post-consumer packaging using a location mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Couto, Maria Claudia Lima; Lange, Liséte Celina; Rosa, Rodrigo de Alvarenga; Couto, Paula Rogeria Lima

    2017-12-01

    The implementation of reverse logistics systems (RLS) for post-consumer products provides environmental and economic benefits, since it increases recycling potential. However, RLS implantation and consolidation still face problems. The main shortcomings are the high costs and the low expectation of broad implementation worldwide. This paper presents two mathematical models to decide the number and the location of screening centers (SCs) and valorization centers (VCs) to implement reverse logistics of post-consumer packages, defining the optimum territorial arrangements (OTAs), allowing the inclusion of small and medium size municipalities. The paper aims to fill a gap in the literature on RLS location facilities that not only aim at revenue optimization, but also the participation of the population, the involvement of pickers and the service universalization. The results showed that implementation of VCs can lead to revenue/cost ratio higher than 100%. The results of this study can supply companies and government agencies with a global view on the parameters that influence RLS sustainability and help them make decisions about the location of these facilities and the best reverse flows with the social inclusion of pickers and serving the population of small and medium-sized municipalities.

  2. Optimal Facility-Location

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Christoph Witzgall, the honoree of this Symposium, can count among his many contributions to applied mathematics and mathematical operations research a body of widely-recognized work on the optimal location of facilities. The present paper offers to non-specialists a sketch of that field and its evolution, with emphasis on areas most closely related to Witzgall’s research at NBS/NIST. PMID:27274920

  3. Scaling and entropy in p-median facility location along a line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastner, Michael T.

    2011-09-01

    The p-median problem is a common model for optimal facility location. The task is to place p facilities (e.g., warehouses or schools) in a heterogeneously populated space such that the average distance from a person's home to the nearest facility is minimized. Here we study the special case where the population lives along a line (e.g., a road or a river). If facilities are optimally placed, the length of the line segment served by a facility is inversely proportional to the square root of the population density. This scaling law is derived analytically and confirmed for concrete numerical examples of three US interstate highways and the Mississippi River. If facility locations are permitted to deviate from the optimum, the number of possible solutions increases dramatically. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compute how scaling is affected by an increase in the average distance to the nearest facility. We find that the scaling exponents change and are most sensitive near the optimum facility distribution.

  4. 30 CFR 75.1712-2 - Location of surface facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-2 Location of surface facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be in a location... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Location of surface facilities. 75.1712-2...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1712-2 - Location of surface facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-2 Location of surface facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be in a location... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Location of surface facilities. 75.1712-2...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1712-2 - Location of surface facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-2 Location of surface facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be in a location... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Location of surface facilities. 75.1712-2...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1712-2 - Location of surface facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-2 Location of surface facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be in a location... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Location of surface facilities. 75.1712-2...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1712-2 - Location of surface facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Location of surface facilities. 75.1712-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-2 Location of surface facilities. Bathhouses, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be in a location...

  9. Competitive Facility Location with Fuzzy Random Demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Takeshi; Katagiri, Hideki; Kato, Kosuke

    2010-10-01

    This paper proposes a new location problem of competitive facilities, e.g. shops, with uncertainty and vagueness including demands for the facilities in a plane. By representing the demands for facilities as fuzzy random variables, the location problem can be formulated as a fuzzy random programming problem. For solving the fuzzy random programming problem, first the α-level sets for fuzzy numbers are used for transforming it to a stochastic programming problem, and secondly, by using their expectations and variances, it can be reformulated to a deterministic programming problem. After showing that one of their optimal solutions can be found by solving 0-1 programming problems, their solution method is proposed by improving the tabu search algorithm with strategic oscillation. The efficiency of the proposed method is shown by applying it to numerical examples of the facility location problems.

  10. TRI Reporting for Facilities Located in Indian Country

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A final rule requires facilities that meet TRI reporting requirements and that are located in Indian country to submit TRI forms to EPA and the appropriate tribe, rather than to the state in which the facility is geographically located.

  11. Stochastic Multi-Commodity Facility Location Based on a New Scenario Generation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahootchi, M.; Fattahi, M.; Khakbazan, E.

    2011-11-01

    This paper extends two models for stochastic multi-commodity facility location problem. The problem is formulated as two-stage stochastic programming. As a main point of this study, a new algorithm is applied to efficiently generate scenarios for uncertain correlated customers' demands. This algorithm uses Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) and a scenario reduction approach. The relation between customer satisfaction level and cost are considered in model I. The risk measure using Conditional Value-at-Risk (CVaR) is embedded into the optimization model II. Here, the structure of the network contains three facility layers including plants, distribution centers, and retailers. The first stage decisions are the number, locations, and the capacity of distribution centers. In the second stage, the decisions are the amount of productions, the volume of transportation between plants and customers.

  12. Pricing and location decisions in multi-objective facility location problem with M/M/m/k queuing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakkoli-Moghaddam, Reza; Vazifeh-Noshafagh, Samira; Taleizadeh, Ata Allah; Hajipour, Vahid; Mahmoudi, Amin

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a new multi-objective model for a facility location problem with congestion and pricing policies. This model considers situations in which immobile service facilities are congested by a stochastic demand following M/M/m/k queues. The presented model belongs to the class of mixed-integer nonlinear programming models and NP-hard problems. To solve such a hard model, a new multi-objective optimization algorithm based on a vibration theory, namely multi-objective vibration damping optimization (MOVDO), is developed. In order to tune the algorithms parameters, the Taguchi approach using a response metric is implemented. The computational results are compared with those of the non-dominated ranking genetic algorithm and non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm. The outputs demonstrate the robustness of the proposed MOVDO in large-sized problems.

  13. Predicting site locations for biomass using facilities with Bayesian methods

    Treesearch

    Timothy M. Young; James H. Perdue; Xia Huang

    2017-01-01

    Logistic regression models combined with Bayesian inference were developed to predict locations and quantify factors that influence the siting of biomass-using facilities that use woody biomass in the Southeastern United States. Predictions were developed for two groups of mills, one representing larger capacity mills similar to pulp and paper mills (Group II...

  14. Recourse-based facility-location problems in hybrid uncertain environment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuming; Watada, Junzo; Pedrycz, Witold

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to study facility-location problems in the presence of a hybrid uncertain environment involving both randomness and fuzziness. A two-stage fuzzy-random facility-location model with recourse (FR-FLMR) is developed in which both the demands and costs are assumed to be fuzzy-random variables. The bounds of the optimal objective value of the two-stage FR-FLMR are derived. As, in general, the fuzzy-random parameters of the FR-FLMR can be regarded as continuous fuzzy-random variables with an infinite number of realizations, the computation of the recourse requires solving infinite second-stage programming problems. Owing to this requirement, the recourse function cannot be determined analytically, and, hence, the model cannot benefit from the use of techniques of classical mathematical programming. In order to solve the location problems of this nature, we first develop a technique of fuzzy-random simulation to compute the recourse function. The convergence of such simulation scenarios is discussed. In the sequel, we propose a hybrid mutation-based binary ant-colony optimization (MBACO) approach to the two-stage FR-FLMR, which comprises the fuzzy-random simulation and the simplex algorithm. A numerical experiment illustrates the application of the hybrid MBACO algorithm. The comparison shows that the hybrid MBACO finds better solutions than the one using other discrete metaheuristic algorithms, such as binary particle-swarm optimization, genetic algorithm, and tabu search.

  15. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of location, housing, or facilities. (a) A certificated repair station...

  16. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of location, housing, or facilities. (a) A certificated repair station...

  17. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of location, housing, or facilities. (a) A certificated repair station...

  18. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of location, housing, or facilities. (a) A certificated repair station...

  19. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of location, housing, or facilities. (a) A certificated repair station...

  20. 14 CFR 21.137 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.137 Section 21.137 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Certificates § 21.137 Location of...

  1. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43 Section 21.43 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT.... Except as provided in § 21.29, the FAA does not issue a type certificate if the manufacturing facilities...

  2. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43 Section 21.43 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT.... Except as provided in § 21.29, the FAA does not issue a type certificate if the manufacturing facilities...

  3. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43 Section 21.43 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT.... Except as provided in § 21.29, the FAA does not issue a type certificate if the manufacturing facilities...

  4. Solving the competitive facility location problem considering the reactions of competitor with a hybrid algorithm including Tabu Search and exact method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherinejad, Jafar; Niknam, Azar

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a leader-follower competitive facility location problem considering the reactions of the competitors is studied. A model for locating new facilities and determining levels of quality for the facilities of the leader firm is proposed. Moreover, changes in the location and quality of existing facilities in a competitive market where a competitor offers the same goods or services are taken into account. The competitor could react by opening new facilities, closing existing ones, and adjusting the quality levels of its existing facilities. The market share, captured by each facility, depends on its distance to customer and its quality that is calculated based on the probabilistic Huff's model. Each firm aims to maximize its profit subject to constraints on quality levels and budget of setting up new facilities. This problem is formulated as a bi-level mixed integer non-linear model. The model is solved using a combination of Tabu Search with an exact method. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with an upper bound that is achieved by applying Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Computational results show that our algorithm finds near the upper bound solutions in a reasonable time.

  5. Logistic regression models of factors influencing the location of bioenergy and biofuels plants

    Treesearch

    T.M. Young; R.L. Zaretzki; J.H. Perdue; F.M. Guess; X. Liu

    2011-01-01

    Logistic regression models were developed to identify significant factors that influence the location of existing wood-using bioenergy/biofuels plants and traditional wood-using facilities. Logistic models provided quantitative insight for variables influencing the location of woody biomass-using facilities. Availability of "thinnings to a basal area of 31.7m2/ha...

  6. Cuckoo search via Levy flights applied to uncapacitated facility location problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, Armacheska; Castromayor, Kris; Garillos-Manliguez, Cinmayii; Calag, Vicente

    2017-11-01

    Facility location problem (FLP) is a mathematical way to optimally locate facilities within a set of candidates to satisfy the requirements of a given set of clients. This study addressed the uncapacitated FLP as it assures that the capacity of every selected facility is finite. Thus, even if the demand is not known, which often is the case, in reality, organizations may still be able to take strategic decisions such as locating the facilities. There are different approaches relevant to the uncapacitated FLP. Here, the cuckoo search via Lévy flight (CS-LF) was used to solve the problem. Though hybrid methods produce better results, this study employed CS-LF to determine first its potential in finding solutions for the problem, particularly when applied to a real-world problem. The method was applied to the data set obtained from a department store in Davao City, Philippines. Results showed that applying CS-LF yielded better facility locations compared to particle swarm optimization and other existing algorithms. Although these results showed that CS-LF is a promising method to solve this particular problem, further studies on other FLP are recommended to establish a strong foundation of the capability of CS-LF in solving FLP.

  7. 76 FR 60390 - Irradiation Treatment; Location of Facilities in the Southern United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... [Docket No. APHIS-2009-0100] RIN 0579-AD35 Irradiation Treatment; Location of Facilities in the Southern... irradiation treatment facilities in the Southern States of the United States. This action would allow irradiation facilities to be located anywhere in these States, subject to approval, rather than only in the...

  8. 28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS LINCOLN BOULEVARD, BIG LOST RIVER, AND NAVAL REACTORS FACILITY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-101-2. DATED OCTOBER 12, 1965. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0101 851 151969. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43 Section 21.43 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT.... Except as provided in § 21.29, the Administrator does not issue a type certificate if the manufacturing...

  10. 10 CFR 75.6 - Facility and location reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facility and location reporting. 75.6 Section 75.6 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA..., all communications concerning the regulations in this Part shall be addressed to the U.S. Nuclear...

  11. 10 CFR 75.6 - Facility and location reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facility and location reporting. 75.6 Section 75.6 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA..., all communications concerning the regulations in this Part shall be addressed to the U.S. Nuclear...

  12. 10 CFR 75.6 - Facility and location reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facility and location reporting. 75.6 Section 75.6 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA..., all communications concerning the regulations in this Part shall be addressed to the U.S. Nuclear...

  13. 10 CFR 75.6 - Facility and location reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Facility and location reporting. 75.6 Section 75.6 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA..., all communications concerning the regulations in this Part shall be addressed to the U.S. Nuclear...

  14. 10 CFR 75.6 - Facility and location reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facility and location reporting. 75.6 Section 75.6 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA..., all communications concerning the regulations in this Part shall be addressed to the U.S. Nuclear...

  15. 75 FR 19555 - NARA Facility Locations and Hours

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... at 41 CFR part 101-20. The National Archives at Philadelphia on Market Street (in Philadelphia) and... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION 36 CFR Parts 1200, 1253, and 1280 [FDMS Docket NARA-10-0002] RIN 3095-AB66 NARA Facility Locations and Hours AGENCY: National Archives and Records...

  16. Modelling optimal location for pre-hospital helicopter emergency medical services.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Nadine; Bell, Nathaniel J; L'Heureux, Randy; Hameed, Syed M

    2009-05-09

    Increasing the range and scope of early activation/auto launch helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) may alleviate unnecessary injury mortality that disproportionately affects rural populations. To date, attempts to develop a quantitative framework for the optimal location of HEMS facilities have been absent. Our analysis used five years of critical care data from tertiary health care facilities, spatial data on origin of transport and accurate road travel time catchments for tertiary centres. A location optimization model was developed to identify where the expansion of HEMS would cover the greatest population among those currently underserved. The protocol was developed using geographic information systems (GIS) to measure populations, distances and accessibility to services. Our model determined Royal Inland Hospital (RIH) was the optimal site for an expanded HEMS - based on denominator population, distance to services and historical usage patterns. GIS based protocols for location of emergency medical resources can provide supportive evidence for allocation decisions - especially when resources are limited. In this study, we were able to demonstrate conclusively that a logical choice exists for location of additional HEMS. This protocol could be extended to location analysis for other emergency and health services.

  17. Capacitated set-covering model considering the distance objective and dependency of alternative facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayan Suletra, I.; Priyandari, Yusuf; Jauhari, Wakhid A.

    2018-03-01

    We propose a new model of facility location to solve a kind of problem that belong to a class of set-covering problem using an integer programming formulation. Our model contains a single objective function, but it represents two goals. The first is to minimize the number of facilities, and the other is to minimize the total distance of customers to facilities. The first goal is a mandatory goal, and the second is an improvement goal that is very useful when alternate optimum solutions for the first goal exist. We use a big number as a weight on the first goal to force the solution algorithm to give first priority to the first goal. Besides considering capacity constraints, our model accommodates a kind of either-or constraints representing facilities dependency. The either-or constraints will prevent the solution algorithm to select two or more facilities from the same set of facility with mutually exclusive properties. A real location selection problem to locate a set of wastewater treatment facility (IPAL) in Surakarta city, Indonesia, will describe the implementation of our model. A numerical example is given using the data of that real problem.

  18. Network Performance Evaluation Model for assessing the impacts of high-occupancy vehicle facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, B.N.; Zozaya-Gorostiza, C.; Southworth, F.

    1986-09-01

    A model to assess the impacts of major high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) facilities on regional levels of energy consumption and vehicle air pollution emissions in urban aeas is developed and applied. This model can be used to forecast and compare the impacts of alternative HOV facility design and operation plans on traffic patterns, travel costs, model choice, travel demand, energy consumption and vehicle emissions. The model is designed to show differences in the overall impacts of alternative HOV facility types, locations and operation plans rather than to serve as a tool for detailed engineering design and traffic planning studies. The Networkmore » Performance Evaluation Model (NETPEM) combines several urban transportation planning models within a multi-modal network equilibrium framework including modules with which to define the type, location and use policy of the HOV facility to be tested, and to assess the impacts of this facility.« less

  19. 77 FR 33479 - Information Collection Activities: Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located Seaward...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ...-0010; OMB Control Number 1014-0007] Information Collection Activities: Oil-Spill Response Requirements... regulations under Part 254, ``Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located Seaward of the Coast Line... 254, Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located Seaward of the Coast Line. OMB Control...

  20. A Probabilistic, Facility-Centric Approach to Lightning Strike Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.; Roeder, William p.; Merceret, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    A new probabilistic facility-centric approach to lightning strike location has been developed. This process uses the bivariate Gaussian distribution of probability density provided by the current lightning location error ellipse for the most likely location of a lightning stroke and integrates it to determine the probability that the stroke is inside any specified radius of any location, even if that location is not centered on or even with the location error ellipse. This technique is adapted from a method of calculating the probability of debris collisionith spacecraft. Such a technique is important in spaceport processing activities because it allows engineers to quantify the risk of induced current damage to critical electronics due to nearby lightning strokes. This technique was tested extensively and is now in use by space launch organizations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Future applications could include forensic meteorology.

  1. Library Facility Siting and Location Handbook. The Greenwood Library Management Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koontz, Christine M.

    This handbook is a guide to the complex process of library facility siting and location. It includes relevant research and professionals' siting experiences, as well as actual case studies of closures, openings, mergers, and relocations of library facilities. While the bulk of the volume provides practical information, the work also presents an…

  2. 77 FR 42621 - Irradiation Treatment; Location of Facilities in the Southern United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    .... APHIS-2009-0100] RIN 0579-AD35 Irradiation Treatment; Location of Facilities in the Southern United... amending the phytosanitary treatment regulations to provide generic criteria for new irradiation treatment facilities in the Southern States of the United States. This action will allow irradiation facilities to be...

  3. Application of Spatial Models in Making Location Decisions of Wind Power Plant in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płuciennik, Monika; Hełdak, Maria; Szczepański, Jakub; Patrzałek, Ciechosław

    2017-10-01

    In this paper,we explore the process of making decisions on the location of wind power plants in Poland in connection with a gradually increasing consumption of energy from renewable sources and the increase of impact problems of such facilities. The location of new wind power plants attracts much attention, and both positive and negative publicity. Visualisations can be of assistance when choosing the most advantageous location for a plant, as three-dimensional variants of the facility to be constructed can be prepared. This work involves terrestrial laser scanning of an existing wind power plant and 3D modelling followed by. The model could be subsequently used in visualisation of real terrain, with special purpose in local land development plan. This paper shows a spatial model of a wind power plant as a new element of a capital investment process in Poland. Next, we incorporate the model into an undeveloped site, intended for building a wind farm, subject to the requirements for location of power plants.

  4. 86. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. VIEW OF LIQUID NITROGEN STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST OF THE SLC-3W FUEL APRON. NOTE HEAT EXCHANGER IN BACKGROUND. CAMERA TOWER LOCATED DIRECTLY IN FRONT OF LIQUID NITROGEN STORAGE TANK. NITROGEN AND HELIUM GAS STORAGE TANKS AT SOUTH END OF FUEL APRON IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  5. Location-allocation models and new solution methodologies in telecommunication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, S.; Ciucur, V.

    2016-08-01

    When designing a telecommunications network topology, three types of interdependent decisions are combined: location, allocation and routing, which are expressed by the following design considerations: how many interconnection devices - consolidation points/concentrators should be used and where should they be located; how to allocate terminal nodes to concentrators; how should the voice, video or data traffic be routed and what transmission links (capacitated or not) should be built into the network. Including these three components of the decision into a single model generates a problem whose complexity makes it difficult to solve. A first method to address the overall problem is the sequential one, whereby the first step deals with the location-allocation problem and based on this solution the subsequent sub-problem (routing the network traffic) shall be solved. The issue of location and allocation in a telecommunications network, called "The capacitated concentrator location- allocation - CCLA problem" is based on one of the general location models on a network in which clients/demand nodes are the terminals and facilities are the concentrators. Like in a location model, each client node has a demand traffic, which must be served, and the facilities can serve these demands within their capacity limit. In this study, the CCLA problem is modeled as a single-source capacitated location-allocation model whose optimization objective is to determine the minimum network cost consisting of fixed costs for establishing the locations of concentrators, costs for operating concentrators and costs for allocating terminals to concentrators. The problem is known as a difficult combinatorial optimization problem for which powerful algorithms are required. Our approach proposes a Fuzzy Genetic Algorithm combined with a local search procedure to calculate the optimal values of the location and allocation variables. To confirm the efficiency of the proposed algorithm with respect

  6. Optimal Facility Location Tool for Logistics Battle Command (LBC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    64 Appendix B. VBA Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Appendix C. Story...should city planners have located emergency service facilities so that all households (the demand) had equal access to coverage?” The critical...programming language called Visual Basic for Applications ( VBA ). CPLEX is a commercial solver for linear, integer, and mixed integer linear programming problems

  7. Site-wide seismic risk model for Savannah River Site nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Eide, S.A.; Shay, R.S.; Durant, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    The 200,000 acre Savannah River Site (SRS) has nearly 30 nuclear facilities spread throughout the site. The safety of each facility has been established in facility-specific safety analysis reports (SARs). Each SAR contains an analysis of risk from seismic events to both on-site workers and the off-site population. Both radiological and chemical releases are considered, and air and water pathways are modeled. Risks to the general public are generally characterized by evaluating exposure to the maximally exposed individual located at the SRS boundary and to the off-site population located within 50 miles. Although the SARs are appropriate methods for studyingmore » individual facility risks, there is a class of accident initiators that can simultaneously affect several of all of the facilities, Examples include seismic events, strong winds or tornados, floods, and loss of off-site electrical power. Overall risk to the off-site population from such initiators is not covered by the individual SARs. In such cases multiple facility radionuclide or chemical releases could occur, and off-site exposure would be greater than that indicated in a single facility SAR. As a step towards an overall site-wide risk model that adequately addresses multiple facility releases, a site-wide seismic model for determining off-site risk has been developed for nuclear facilities at the SRS. Risk from seismic events up to the design basis earthquake (DBE) of 0.2 g (frequency of 2.0E-4/yr) is covered by the model. Present plans include expanding the scope of the model to include other types of initiators that can simultaneously affect multiple facilities.« less

  8. 30 CFR 254.50 - Spill response plans for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Spill response plans for facilities located in...

  9. 30 CFR 254.50 - Spill response plans for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Spill response plans for facilities located in...

  10. 30 CFR 254.50 - Spill response plans for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters Seaward... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Spill response plans for facilities located in...

  11. 30 CFR 254.50 - Spill response plans for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Spill response plans for facilities located in...

  12. Accreditation status and geographic location of outpatient vascular testing facilities among Medicare beneficiaries: the VALUE (Vascular Accreditation, Location & Utilization Evaluation) study.

    PubMed

    Rundek, Tatjana; Brown, Scott C; Wang, Kefeng; Dong, Chuanhui; Farrell, Mary Beth; Heller, Gary V; Gornik, Heather L; Hutchisson, Marge; Needleman, Laurence; Benenati, James F; Jaff, Michael R; Meier, George H; Perese, Susana; Bendick, Phillip; Hamburg, Naomi M; Lohr, Joann M; LaPerna, Lucy; Leers, Steven A; Lilly, Michael P; Tegeler, Charles; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Katanick, Sandra L

    2014-10-01

    There is limited information on the accreditation status and geographic distribution of vascular testing facilities in the US. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) provide reimbursement to facilities regardless of accreditation status. The aims were to: (1) identify the proportion of Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) accredited vascular testing facilities in a 5% random national sample of Medicare beneficiaries receiving outpatient vascular testing services; (2) describe the geographic distribution of these facilities. The VALUE (Vascular Accreditation, Location & Utilization Evaluation) Study examines the proportion of IAC accredited facilities providing vascular testing procedures nationally, and the geographic distribution and utilization of these facilities. The data set containing all facilities that billed Medicare for outpatient vascular testing services in 2011 (5% CMS Outpatient Limited Data Set (LDS) file) was examined, and locations of outpatient vascular testing facilities were obtained from the 2011 CMS/Medicare Provider of Services (POS) file. Of 13,462 total vascular testing facilities billing Medicare for vascular testing procedures in a 5% random Outpatient LDS for the US in 2011, 13% (n=1730) of facilities were IAC accredited. The percentage of IAC accredited vascular testing facilities in the LDS file varied significantly by US region, p<0.0001: 26%, 12%, 11%, and 7% for the Northeast, South, Midwest, and Western regions, respectively. Findings suggest that the proportion of outpatient vascular testing facilities that are IAC accredited is low and varies by region. Increasing the number of accredited vascular testing facilities to improve test quality is a hypothesis that should be tested in future research. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. 30 CFR 75.1712-8 - Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for underground sanitary facilities. 75.1712-8 Section 75.1712-8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-8 Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities. Applications for waivers of the location requirements of § 75.1712-6 shall be...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1712-8 - Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for underground sanitary facilities. 75.1712-8 Section 75.1712-8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-8 Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities. Applications for waivers of the location requirements of § 75.1712-6 shall be...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1712-8 - Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for underground sanitary facilities. 75.1712-8 Section 75.1712-8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-8 Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities. Applications for waivers of the location requirements of § 75.1712-6 shall be...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1712-8 - Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for underground sanitary facilities. 75.1712-8 Section 75.1712-8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-8 Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities. Applications for waivers of the location requirements of § 75.1712-6 shall be...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1712-8 - Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for underground sanitary facilities. 75.1712-8 Section 75.1712-8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-8 Application for waiver of location requirements for underground sanitary facilities. Applications for waivers of the location requirements of § 75.1712-6 shall be...

  18. A heuristic approach to handle capacitated facility location problem evaluated using clustering internal evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanto, G. R.; Kim, S.; Kim, D.; Sutanto, H.

    2018-03-01

    One of the problems in dealing with capacitated facility location problem (CFLP) is occurred because of the difference between the capacity numbers of facilities and the number of customers that needs to be served. A facility with small capacity may result in uncovered customers. These customers need to be re-allocated to another facility that still has available capacity. Therefore, an approach is proposed to handle CFLP by using k-means clustering algorithm to handle customers’ allocation. And then, if customers’ re-allocation is needed, is decided by the overall average distance between customers and the facilities. This new approach is benchmarked to the existing approach by Liao and Guo which also use k-means clustering algorithm as a base idea to decide the facilities location and customers’ allocation. Both of these approaches are benchmarked by using three clustering evaluation methods with connectedness, compactness, and separations factors.

  19. SOUTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING NORTH. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-15-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. NORTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION OF IRRADIATED FUEL STORAGE FACILITY LOCATED IN FUEL STORAGE BUILDING (CPP-603). PHOTO TAKEN LOOKING SOUTH. INL PHOTO NUMBER HD-54-16-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 8/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... license or exemption is filed for a project located at a Government dam, as defined in section 3(10) of...

  2. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... license or exemption is filed for a project located at a Government dam, as defined in section 3(10) of...

  3. Site survey for optimum location of Optical Communication Experimental Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Site survey was made to determine the optimum location for an Optical Communication Experimental Facility /OCEF/ and to recommend several sites, graded according to preference. A site was desired which could perform two-way laser communication with a spacecraft and laser tracking with a minimum of interruption by weather effects.

  4. 30 CFR 254.50 - Spill response plans for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Spill response plans for facilities located in...

  5. Integer Optimization Model for a Logistic System based on Location-Routing Considering Distance and Chosen Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyasari, Joni; Mawengkang, Herman; Efendi, Syahril

    2018-02-01

    In a distribution network it is important to decide the locations of facilities that impacts not only the profitability of an organization but the ability to serve customers.Generally the location-routing problem is to minimize the overall cost by simultaneously selecting a subset of candidate facilities and constructing a set of delivery routes that satisfy some restrictions. In this paper we impose restriction on the route that should be passed for delivery. We use integer programming model to describe the problem. A feasible neighbourhood search is proposed to solve the result model.

  6. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208 Section... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. (a) A hydroelectric small power production facility that impounds or diverts the water of a natural watercourse by...

  7. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208 Section... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. (a) A hydroelectric small power production facility that impounds or diverts the water of a natural watercourse by...

  8. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208 Section... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. (a) A hydroelectric small power production facility that impounds or diverts the water of a natural watercourse by...

  9. 14 CFR 21.309 - Location of or change to manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of or change to manufacturing facilities. 21.309 Section 21.309 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Approval of Materials, Parts, Processes...

  10. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... the Federal Power Act, at which non-Federal hydroelectric development is permissible; or (2) An...

  11. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... the Federal Power Act, at which non-Federal hydroelectric development is permissible; or (2) An...

  12. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... the Federal Power Act, at which non-Federal hydroelectric development is permissible; or (2) An...

  13. A Benders based rolling horizon algorithm for a dynamic facility location problem

    DOE PAGES

    Marufuzzaman,, Mohammad; Gedik, Ridvan; Roni, Mohammad S.

    2016-06-28

    This study presents a well-known capacitated dynamic facility location problem (DFLP) that satisfies the customer demand at a minimum cost by determining the time period for opening, closing, or retaining an existing facility in a given location. To solve this challenging NP-hard problem, this paper develops a unique hybrid solution algorithm that combines a rolling horizon algorithm with an accelerated Benders decomposition algorithm. Extensive computational experiments are performed on benchmark test instances to evaluate the hybrid algorithm’s efficiency and robustness in solving the DFLP problem. Computational results indicate that the hybrid Benders based rolling horizon algorithm consistently offers high qualitymore » feasible solutions in a much shorter computational time period than the standalone rolling horizon and accelerated Benders decomposition algorithms in the experimental range.« less

  14. Optimal location of emergency stations in underground mine networks using a multiobjective mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Lotfian, Reza; Najafi, Mehdi

    2018-02-26

    Background Every year, many mining accidents occur in underground mines all over the world resulting in the death and maiming of many miners and heavy financial losses to mining companies. Underground mining accounts for an increasing share of these events due to their special circumstances and the risks of working therein. Thus, the optimal location of emergency stations within the network of an underground mine in order to provide medical first aid and transport injured people at the right time, plays an essential role in reducing deaths and disabilities caused by accidents Objective The main objective of this study is to determine the location of emergency stations (ES) within the network of an underground coal mine in order to minimize the outreach time for the injured. Methods A three-objective mathematical model is presented for placement of ES facility location selection and allocation of facilities to the injured in various stopes. Results Taking into account the radius of influence for each ES, the proposed model is capable to reduce the maximum time for provision of emergency services in the event of accident for each stope. In addition, the coverage or lack of coverage of each stope by any of the emergency facility is determined by means of Floyd-Warshall algorithm and graph. To solve the problem, a global criterion method using GAMS software is used to evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of the model. Conclusions 7 locations were selected from among 46 candidates for the establishment of emergency facilities in Tabas underground coal mine. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. 30 CFR 254.54 - Spill prevention for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters... of the steps you are taking to prevent spills of oil or mitigate a substantial threat of such a...

  16. 30 CFR 254.54 - Spill prevention for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters Seaward... of the steps you are taking to prevent spills of oil or mitigate a substantial threat of such a...

  17. 30 CFR 254.54 - Spill prevention for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters... of the steps you are taking to prevent spills of oil or mitigate a substantial threat of such a...

  18. 30 CFR 254.54 - Spill prevention for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located in State Waters... of the steps you are taking to prevent spills of oil or mitigate a substantial threat of such a...

  19. 33 CFR 137.65 - Visual inspections of the facility, the real property on which the facility is located, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rights-of-way, or other vantage point (e.g., aerial photography), including a visual inspection of areas... the facility is located from the nearest accessible vantage point, such as the property line or public...

  20. Do objective neighbourhood characteristics relate to residents' preferences for certain sports locations? A cross-sectional study using a discrete choice modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Deelen, Ineke; Jansen, Marijke; Dogterom, Nico J; Kamphuis, Carlijn B M; Ettema, Dick

    2017-12-11

    The number of sports facilities, sports clubs, or city parks in a residential neighbourhood may affect the likelihood that people participate in sports and their preferences for a certain sports location. This study aimed to assess whether objective physical and socio-spatial neighbourhood characteristics relate to sports participation and preferences for sports locations. Data from Dutch adults (N = 1201) on sports participation, their most-used sports location, and socio-demographic characteristics were collected using an online survey. Objective land-use data and the number of sports facilities were gathered for each participant using a 2000-m buffer around their home locations, whereas socio-spatial neighbourhood characteristics (i.e., density, socio-economic status, and safety) were determined at the neighbourhood level. A discrete choice-modelling framework (multinomial probit model) was used to model the associations between neighbourhood characteristics and sports participation and location. Higher proportions of green space, blue space, and the number of sports facilities were positively associated with sports participation in public space, at sports clubs, and at other sports facilities. Higher degrees of urbanization were negatively associated with sports participation at public spaces, sports clubs, and other sports facilities. Those with more green space, blue space or sports facilities in their residential neighbourhood were more likely to participate in sports, but these factors did not affect their preference for a certain sports location. Longitudinal study designs are necessary to assess causality: do active people choose to live in sports-facilitating neighbourhoods, or do neighbourhood characteristics affect sports participation?

  1. Public Library Site Evaluation and Location: Past and Present Market-Based Modelling Tools for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koontz, Christine M.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a methodology for construction of location modeling for public library facilities in diverse urban environments. Historical and current research in library location is reviewed; and data collected from a survey of six library systems are analyzed according to population, spatial, library use, and library attractiveness variables. (48…

  2. 76 FR 68170 - Instructions for Implementing Sustainable Locations for Federal Facilities in Accordance With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... for integrating sustainable facility location decision-making principles into agency policies and..., Energy, and Economic Performance,'' signed by President Obama on October 5, 2009. 74 FR 52117, Oct. 8...

  3. Combined analysis of modeled and monitored SO2 concentrations at a complex smelting facility.

    PubMed

    Rehbein, Peter J G; Kennedy, Michael G; Cotsman, David J; Campeau, Madonna A; Greenfield, Monika M; Annett, Melissa A; Lepage, Mike F

    2014-03-01

    Vale Canada Limited owns and operates a large nickel smelting facility located in Sudbury, Ontario. This is a complex facility with many sources of SO2 emissions, including a mix of source types ranging from passive building roof vents to North America's tallest stack. In addition, as this facility performs batch operations, there is significant variability in the emission rates depending on the operations that are occurring. Although SO2 emission rates for many of the sources have been measured by source testing, the reliability of these emission rates has not been tested from a dispersion modeling perspective. This facility is a significant source of SO2 in the local region, making it critical that when modeling the emissions from this facility for regulatory or other purposes, that the resulting concentrations are representative of what would actually be measured or otherwise observed. To assess the accuracy of the modeling, a detailed analysis of modeled and monitored data for SO2 at the facility was performed. A mobile SO2 monitor sampled at five locations downwind of different source groups for different wind directions resulting in a total of 168 hr of valid data that could be used for the modeled to monitored results comparison. The facility was modeled in AERMOD (American Meteorological Society/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model) using site-specific meteorological data such that the modeled periods coincided with the same times as the monitored events. In addition, great effort was invested into estimating the actual SO2 emission rates that would likely be occurring during each of the monitoring events. SO2 concentrations were modeled for receptors around each monitoring location so that the modeled data could be directly compared with the monitored data. The modeled and monitored concentrations were compared and showed that there were no systematic biases in the modeled concentrations. This paper is a case study of a Combined Analysis

  4. 40. View of dual projector system located in MWOC facility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. View of dual projector system located in MWOC facility in transmitter building no. 102 by Bessler Company. System used to project images in MWOC on backlit screen system with fiber optic electro/mechanical system linked to computer output to indicate information on screen linked with display from projector system. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. Locations and attributes of utility-scale solar power facilities in Colorado and New Mexico, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ignizio, Drew A.; Carr, Natasha B.

    2012-01-01

    The data series consists of polygonal boundaries for utility-scale solar power facilities (both photovoltaic and concentrating solar power) located within Colorado and New Mexico as of December 2011. Attributes captured for each facility include the following: facility name, size/production capacity (in MW), type of solar technology employed, location, state, operational status, year the facility came online, and source identification information. Facility locations and perimeters were derived from 1-meter true-color aerial photographs (2011) produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP); the photographs have a positional accuracy of about ±5 meters (accessed from the NAIP GIS service: http://gis.apfo.usda.gov/arcgis/services). Solar facility perimeters represent the full extent of each solar facility site, unless otherwise noted. When visible, linear features such as fences or road lines were used to delineate the full extent of the solar facility. All related equipment including buildings, power substations, and other associated infrastructure were included within the solar facility. If solar infrastructure was indistinguishable from adjacent infrastructure, or if solar panels were installed on existing building tops, only the solar collecting equipment was digitized. The "Polygon" field indicates whether the "equipment footprint" or the full "site outline" was digitized. The spatial accuracy of features that represent site perimeters or an equipment footprint is estimated at +/- 10 meters. Facilities under construction or not fully visible in the NAIP imagery at the time of digitization (December 2011) are represented by an approximate site outline based on the best available information and documenting materials. The spatial accuracy of these facilities cannot be estimated without more up-to-date imagery – users are advised to consult more recent imagery as it becomes available. The "Status" field provides information about the operational

  6. Analysis of selected materials flown on interior locations of the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. A.; Nelson, K. M.; Eash, D.; Pippin, H. G.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the post-flight condition of selected hardware taken from interior locations on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). This hardware was generally in excellent condition. Outgassing data is presented for heat shrink tubing and fiberglass composite shims. Variation in total mass loss (TML) values for heat shrink tubing were correlated with location. Nylon grommets were evaluated for mechanical integrity; slight embrittlement was observed for flight specimens. Multi-layer insulation blankets, wire bundles, and paints in non-exposed interior locations were all in visibly good condition. Silicon-containing contaminant films were observed on silver-coated hex nuts at the space- and Earth-end interior locations.

  7. Scenario-based modeling for multiple allocation hub location problem under disruption risk: multiple cuts Benders decomposition approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahyaei, Mohsen; Bashiri, Mahdi

    2017-12-01

    The hub location problem arises in a variety of domains such as transportation and telecommunication systems. In many real-world situations, hub facilities are subject to disruption. This paper deals with the multiple allocation hub location problem in the presence of facilities failure. To model the problem, a two-stage stochastic formulation is developed. In the proposed model, the number of scenarios grows exponentially with the number of facilities. To alleviate this issue, two approaches are applied simultaneously. The first approach is to apply sample average approximation to approximate the two stochastic problem via sampling. Then, by applying the multiple cuts Benders decomposition approach, computational performance is enhanced. Numerical studies show the effective performance of the SAA in terms of optimality gap for small problem instances with numerous scenarios. Moreover, performance of multi-cut Benders decomposition is assessed through comparison with the classic version and the computational results reveal the superiority of the multi-cut approach regarding the computational time and number of iterations.

  8. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner or between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid through the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  9. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  10. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Laine, D.L.; Laine, E.F.

    1997-08-26

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution. 6 figs.

  11. Onshore industrial wind turbine locations for the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Compton, Roger; Kramer, Louisa; Ancona, Zach; Norton, Donna

    2017-01-01

    This dataset provides industrial-scale onshore wind turbine locations in the United States, corresponding facility information, and turbine technical specifications. The database has wind turbine records that have been collected, digitized, locationally verified, and internally quality controlled. Turbines from the Federal Aviation Administration Digital Obstacles File, through product release date July 22, 2013, were used as the primary source of turbine data points. The dataset was subsequently revised and reposted as described in the revision histories for the report. Verification of the turbine positions was done by visual interpretation using high-resolution aerial imagery in Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri) ArcGIS Desktop. Turbines without Federal Aviation Administration Obstacles Repository System numbers were visually identified and point locations were added to the collection. We estimated a locational error of plus or minus 10 meters for turbine locations. Wind farm facility names were identified from publicly available facility datasets. Facility names were then used in a Web search of additional industry publications and press releases to attribute additional turbine information (such as manufacturer, model, and technical specifications of wind turbines). Wind farm facility location data from various wind and energy industry sources were used to search for and digitize turbines not in existing databases. Technical specifications for turbines were assigned based on the wind turbine make and model as described in literature, specifications listed in the Federal Aviation Administration Digital Obstacles File, and information on the turbine manufacturer’s Web site. Some facility and turbine information on make and model did not exist or was difficult to obtain. Thus, uncertainty may exist for certain turbine specifications. That uncertainty was rated and a confidence was recorded for both location and attribution data quality.

  12. 30 CFR 254.54 - Spill prevention for facilities located in State waters seaward of the coast line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities... Regional Supervisor a description of the steps you are taking to prevent spills of oil or mitigate a...

  13. A multiobjective modeling approach to locate multi-compartment containers for urban-sorted waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tralhao, Lino, E-mail: lmlrt@inescc.p; Coutinho-Rodrigues, Joao, E-mail: coutinho@dec.uc.p; Alcada-Almeida, Luis, E-mail: alcada@inescc.p

    2010-12-15

    The location of multi-compartment sorted waste containers for recycling purposes in cities is an important problem in the context of urban waste management. The costs associated with those facilities and the impacts placed on populations are important concerns. This paper introduces a mixed-integer, multiobjective programming approach to identify the locations and capacities of such facilities. The approach incorporates an optimization model in a Geographical Information System (GIS)-based interactive decision support system that includes four objectives. The first objective minimizes the total investment cost; the second one minimizes the average distance from dwellings to the respective multi-compartment container; the last twomore » objectives address the 'pull' and 'push' characteristics of the decision problem, one by minimizing the number of individuals too close to any container, and the other by minimizing the number of dwellings too far from the respective multi-compartment container. The model determines the number of facilities to be opened, the respective container capacities, their locations, their respective shares of the total waste of each type to be collected, and the dwellings assigned to each facility. The approach proposed was tested with a case study for the historical center of Coimbra city, Portugal, where a large urban renovation project, addressing about 800 buildings, is being undertaken. This paper demonstrates that the models and techniques incorporated in the interactive decision support system (IDSS) can be used to assist a decision maker (DM) in analyzing this complex problem in a realistically sized urban application. Ten solutions consisting of different combinations of underground containers for the disposal of four types of sorted waste in 12 candidate sites, were generated. These solutions and tradeoffs among the objectives are presented to the DM via tables, graphs, color-coded maps and other graphics. The DM can then use this

  14. 34 CFR 395.30 - The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... blind vendors on Federal property. 395.30 Section 395.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... EDUCATION VENDING FACILITY PROGRAM FOR THE BLIND ON FEDERAL AND OTHER PROPERTY Federal Property Management § 395.30 The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property. (a...

  15. 34 CFR 395.30 - The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... blind vendors on Federal property. 395.30 Section 395.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... EDUCATION VENDING FACILITY PROGRAM FOR THE BLIND ON FEDERAL AND OTHER PROPERTY Federal Property Management § 395.30 The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property. (a...

  16. 34 CFR 395.30 - The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... blind vendors on Federal property. 395.30 Section 395.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... EDUCATION VENDING FACILITY PROGRAM FOR THE BLIND ON FEDERAL AND OTHER PROPERTY Federal Property Management § 395.30 The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property. (a...

  17. 34 CFR 395.30 - The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... blind vendors on Federal property. 395.30 Section 395.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... EDUCATION VENDING FACILITY PROGRAM FOR THE BLIND ON FEDERAL AND OTHER PROPERTY Federal Property Management § 395.30 The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property. (a...

  18. Verified Centers, Nonverified Centers or Other Facilities: A National Analysis of Burn Patient Treatment Location

    PubMed Central

    Zonies, David; Mack, Christopher; Kramer, Bradley; Rivara, Frederick; Klein, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Background Although comprehensive burn care requires significant resources, patients may be treated at verified burn centers, non-verified burn centers, or other facilities due to a variety of factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between patient and injury characteristics and treatment location using a national database. Study Design We performed an analysis of all burn patients admitted to United States hospitals participating in the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project over 2 years. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify patient and injury factors associated with the likelihood of treatment at designated burn care facilities. Definitve care facilities were categorized as American Burn Association verified centers, non-verified burn centers, or other facilities. Results Over the two years, 29,971 burn patients were treated in 1,376 hospitals located in 19 participating states. A total of 6,712 (22%) patients were treated at verified centers, with 26% and 52% treated at non-verified or other facilities, respectively. Patients treated at verified centers were younger than those at non-verified or other facilities (33.1 years vs. 33.7 years vs. 41.9 years, p<0.001) and had a higher rate of inhalation injury (3.4% vs. 3.2% vs. 2.2%, p<0.001). Independent factors associated with treatment at verified centers include burns to the head/neck (RR 2.4, CI 2.1-2.7), hand (RR 1.8, CI 1.6-1.9), electrical injury (RR 1.4, CI 1.4, CI 1.2-1.7), and fewer co-morbidities (RR 0.55, CI 0.5-0.6). Conclusions More than two-thirds of significantly burned patients are treated at non-verified burn centers in the U.S. Many patients meeting ABA criteria for transfer to a burn center are being treated at non-burn center facilities. PMID:20193892

  19. 34 CFR 395.30 - The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EDUCATION VENDING FACILITY PROGRAM FOR THE BLIND ON FEDERAL AND OTHER PROPERTY Federal Property Management... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true The location and operation of vending facilities for blind vendors on Federal property. 395.30 Section 395.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the...

  20. A Monte Carlo modeling alternative for the API Gamma Ray Calibration Facility.

    PubMed

    Galford, J E

    2017-04-01

    The gamma ray pit at the API Calibration Facility, located on the University of Houston campus, defines the API unit for natural gamma ray logs used throughout the petroleum logging industry. Future use of the facility is uncertain. An alternative method is proposed to preserve the gamma ray API unit definition as an industry standard by using Monte Carlo modeling to obtain accurate counting rate-to-API unit conversion factors for gross-counting and spectral gamma ray tool designs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ant colony optimization for solving university facility layout problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Jani, Nurul Hafiza; Mohd Radzi, Nor Haizan; Ngadiman, Mohd Salihin

    2013-04-01

    Quadratic Assignment Problems (QAP) is classified as the NP hard problem. It has been used to model a lot of problem in several areas such as operational research, combinatorial data analysis and also parallel and distributed computing, optimization problem such as graph portioning and Travel Salesman Problem (TSP). In the literature, researcher use exact algorithm, heuristics algorithm and metaheuristic approaches to solve QAP problem. QAP is largely applied in facility layout problem (FLP). In this paper we used QAP to model university facility layout problem. There are 8 facilities that need to be assigned to 8 locations. Hence we have modeled a QAP problem with n ≤ 10 and developed an Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithm to solve the university facility layout problem. The objective is to assign n facilities to n locations such that the minimum product of flows and distances is obtained. Flow is the movement from one to another facility, whereas distance is the distance between one locations of a facility to other facilities locations. The objective of the QAP is to obtain minimum total walking (flow) of lecturers from one destination to another (distance).

  2. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208 Section... 201 AND 210 OF THE PUBLIC UTILITY REGULATORY POLICIES ACT OF 1978 WITH REGARD TO SMALL POWER PRODUCTION AND COGENERATION Qualifying Cogeneration and Small Power Production Facilities § 292.208 Special...

  3. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208 Section... 201 AND 210 OF THE PUBLIC UTILITY REGULATORY POLICIES ACT OF 1978 WITH REGARD TO SMALL POWER PRODUCTION AND COGENERATION Qualifying Cogeneration and Small Power Production Facilities § 292.208 Special...

  4. Capacity planning for electronic waste management facilities under uncertainty: multi-objective multi-time-step model development.

    PubMed

    Poonam Khanijo Ahluwalia; Nema, Arvind K

    2011-07-01

    Selection of optimum locations for locating new facilities and decision regarding capacities at the proposed facilities is a major concern for municipal authorities/managers. The decision as to whether a single facility is preferred over multiple facilities of smaller capacities would vary with varying priorities to cost and associated risks such as environmental or health risk or risk perceived by the society. Currently management of waste streams such as that of computer waste is being done using rudimentary practices and is flourishing as an unorganized sector, mainly as backyard workshops in many cities of developing nations such as India. Uncertainty in the quantification of computer waste generation is another major concern due to the informal setup of present computer waste management scenario. Hence, there is a need to simultaneously address uncertainty in waste generation quantities while analyzing the tradeoffs between cost and associated risks. The present study aimed to address the above-mentioned issues in a multi-time-step, multi-objective decision-support model, which can address multiple objectives of cost, environmental risk, socially perceived risk and health risk, while selecting the optimum configuration of existing and proposed facilities (location and capacities).

  5. The LMOP Locator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the LMOP Locator, a tool that allows a user to geographically search for facilities that can potentially utilize LFG, or for landfills located near a facility that is interested in utilizing LFG.

  6. 77 FR 60715 - Information Collection Activities: Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located Seaward...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Section 311 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of October 18, 1972, as Amended, and the Oil... Facilities Located Seaward of the Coast Line. OMB Control Number: 1014-0007. Abstract: The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA), requires that a spill-response...

  7. EnergySolution's Clive Disposal Facility Operational Research Model - 13475

    SciTech Connect

    Nissley, Paul; Berry, Joanne

    2013-07-01

    EnergySolutions owns and operates a licensed, commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility located in Clive, Utah. The Clive site receives low-level radioactive waste from various locations within the United States via bulk truck, containerised truck, enclosed truck, bulk rail-cars, rail boxcars, and rail inter-modals. Waste packages are unloaded, characterized, processed, and disposed of at the Clive site. Examples of low-level radioactive waste arriving at Clive include, but are not limited to, contaminated soil/debris, spent nuclear power plant components, and medical waste. Generators of low-level radioactive waste typically include nuclear power plants, hospitals, national laboratories, and various United States government operatedmore » waste sites. Over the past few years, poor economic conditions have significantly reduced the number of shipments to Clive. With less revenue coming in from processing shipments, Clive needed to keep its expenses down if it was going to maintain past levels of profitability. The Operational Research group of EnergySolutions were asked to develop a simulation model to help identify any improvement opportunities that would increase overall operating efficiency and reduce costs at the Clive Facility. The Clive operations research model simulates the receipt, movement, and processing requirements of shipments arriving at the facility. The model includes shipment schedules, processing times of various waste types, labor requirements, shift schedules, and site equipment availability. The Clive operations research model has been developed using the WITNESS{sup TM} process simulation software, which is developed by the Lanner Group. The major goals of this project were to: - identify processing bottlenecks that could reduce the turnaround time from shipment arrival to disposal; - evaluate the use (or idle time) of labor and equipment; - project future operational requirements under different forecasted scenarios. By

  8. NIMBY, CLAMP, and the location of new nuclear-related facilities: U.S. national and 11 site-specific surveys.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael R

    2009-09-01

    Public and political opposition have made finding locations for new nuclear power plants, waste management, and nuclear research and development facilities a challenge for the U.S. government and the nuclear industry. U.S. government-owned properties that already have nuclear-related activities and commercial nuclear power generating stations are logical locations. Several studies and utility applications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission suggest that concentrating locations at major plants (CLAMP) has become an implicit siting policy. We surveyed 2,101 people who lived within 50 miles of 11 existing major nuclear sites and 600 who lived elsewhere in the United States. Thirty-four percent favored CLAMP for new nuclear power plants, 52% for waste management facilities, and 50% for new nuclear laboratories. College educated, relatively affluent male whites were the strongest CLAMP supporters. They disproportionately trusted those responsible for the facilities and were not worried about existing nuclear facilities or other local environmental issues. Notably, they were concerned about continuing coal use. Not surprisingly, CLAMP proponents tended to be familiar with their existing local nuclear site. In short, likely CLAMP sites have a large and politically powerful core group to support a CLAMP policy. The challenge to proponents of nuclear technologies will be to sustain this support and expand the base among those who clearly are less connected and receptive to new nearby sites.

  9. GIS based location optimization for mobile produced water treatment facilities in shale gas operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitwadkar, Amol Hanmant

    Over 60% of the nation's total energy is supplied by oil and natural gas together and this demand for energy will continue to grow in the future (Radler et al. 2012). The growing demand is pushing the exploration and exploitation of onshore oil and natural gas reservoirs. Hydraulic fracturing has proven to not only create jobs and achieve economic growth, but also has proven to exert a lot of stress on natural resources---such as water. As water is one of the most important factors in the world of hydraulic fracturing, proper fluids management during the development of a field of operation is perhaps the key element to address a lot of these issues. Almost 30% of the water used during hydraulic fracturing comes out of the well in the form of flowback water during the first month after the well is fractured (Bai et. al. 2012). Handling this large amount of water coming out of the newly fractured wells is one of the major issues as the volume of the water after this period drops off and remains constant for a long time (Bai et. al. 2012) and permanent facilities can be constructed to take care of the water over a longer period. This paper illustrates development of a GIS based tool for optimizing the location of a mobile produced water treatment facility while development is still occurring. A methodology was developed based on a multi criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to optimize the location of the mobile treatment facilities. The criteria for MCDA include well density, ease of access (from roads considering truck hauls) and piping minimization if piping is used and water volume produced. The area of study is 72 square miles east of Greeley, CO in the Wattenberg Field in northeastern Colorado that will be developed for oil and gas production starting in the year 2014. A quarterly analysis is done so that we can observe the effect of future development plans and current circumstances on the location as we move from quarter to quarter. This will help the operators to

  10. Sports Facilities, Shopping Centers or Homes: What Locations are Important for Adults' Physical Activity? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Marijke; Ettema, Dick; Pierik, Frank; Dijst, Martin

    2016-03-04

    Physical activity (PA) is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA behavior at different types of locations (e.g., home, work, shopping centers, and sports facilities). Therefore, this study describes where adults aged 45-65 years were active with moderate-to-vigorous intensity (MVPA), and examines associations of socio-demographic factors and neighborhood with MVPA at these locations. Participants' (N = 308) PA was measured for seven days using accelerometers and GPS-devices. Adults spent most minutes of MVPA at home and work. Highest MVPA-ratios of total time spent at a location were achieved in sports facilities and during transport. Neighborhood characteristics and socio-demographic factors such as work status, health status and household structure, had significant effects on MVPA at various locations and on total MVPA. Understanding PA behavior at various locations may provide insights that allow professionals in different domains (e.g., health, landscaping, urban planning) to develop strategies to stimulate PA.

  11. Sports Facilities, Shopping Centers or Homes: What Locations are Important for Adults’ Physical Activity? A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Marijke; Ettema, Dick; Pierik, Frank; Dijst, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA behavior at different types of locations (e.g., home, work, shopping centers, and sports facilities). Therefore, this study describes where adults aged 45–65 years were active with moderate-to-vigorous intensity (MVPA), and examines associations of socio-demographic factors and neighborhood with MVPA at these locations. Participants’ (N = 308) PA was measured for seven days using accelerometers and GPS-devices. Adults spent most minutes of MVPA at home and work. Highest MVPA-ratios of total time spent at a location were achieved in sports facilities and during transport. Neighborhood characteristics and socio-demographic factors such as work status, health status and household structure, had significant effects on MVPA at various locations and on total MVPA. Understanding PA behavior at various locations may provide insights that allow professionals in different domains (e.g., health, landscaping, urban planning) to develop strategies to stimulate PA. PMID:26959041

  12. 77 FR 58470 - Irradiation Treatment; Location of Facilities in the Southern United States; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    .... APHIS-2009-0100] RIN 0579-AD35 Irradiation Treatment; Location of Facilities in the Southern United... things, allow for irradiation treatment of mangoes from India upon arrival in the mainland United States... 20, 2012, we amended the regulations in Sec. 319.56-46 to allow for irradiation treatment of mangoes...

  13. Estimation of source locations of total gaseous mercury measured in New York State using trajectory-based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Ji; Holsen, Thomas M.; Hopke, Philip K.

    Ambient gaseous phase mercury concentrations (TGM) were measured at three locations in NY State including Potsdam, Stockton, and Sterling from May 2000 to March 2005. Using these data, three hybrid receptor models incorporating backward trajectories were used to identify source areas for TGM. The models used were potential source contribution function (PSCF), residence time weighted concentration (RTWC), and simplified quantitative transport bias analysis (SQTBA). Each model was applied using multi-site measurements to resolve the locations of important mercury sources for New York State. PSCF results showed that southeastern New York, Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Louisiana, and Virginia were important TGM source areas for these sites. RTWC identified Canadian sources including the metal production facilities in Ontario and Quebec, but US regional sources including the Ohio River Valley were also resolved. Sources in southeastern NY, Massachusetts, western Pennsylvania, Indiana, and northern Illinois were identified to be significant by SQTBA. The three modeling results were combined to locate the most important probable source locations, and those are Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The Atlantic Ocean was suggested to be a possible source as well.

  14. Centralization vs. Decentralization: A Location Analysis Approach for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffel, Jeffrey; Shishko, Robert

    1972-01-01

    An application of location theory to the question of centralized versus decentralized library facilities for a university, with relevance for special libraries is presented. The analysis provides models for a single library, for two or more libraries, or for decentralized facilities. (6 references) (Author/NH)

  15. Semiparametric Modeling of Daily Ammonia Levels in Naturally Ventilated Caged-Egg Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Zapata, Diana María; Galeano-Vasco, Luis Fernando; Cerón-Muñoz, Mario Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia concentration (AMC) in poultry facilities varies depending on different environmental conditions and management; however, this is a relatively unexplored subject in Colombia (South America). The objective of this study was to model daily AMC variations in a naturally ventilated caged-egg facility using generalized additive models. Four sensor nodes were used to record AMC, temperature, relative humidity and wind speed on a daily basis, with 10 minute intervals for 12 weeks. The following variables were included in the model: Heat index, Wind, Hour, Location, Height of the sensor to the ground level, and Period of manure accumulation. All effects included in the model were highly significant (p<0.001). The AMC was higher during the night and early morning when the wind was not blowing (0.0 m/s) and the heat index was extreme. The average and maximum AMC were 5.94±3.83 and 31.70 ppm, respectively. Temperatures above 25°C and humidity greater than 80% increased AMC levels. In naturally ventilated caged-egg facilities the daily variations observed in AMC primarily depend on cyclic variations of the environmental conditions and are also affected by litter handling (i.e., removal of the bedding material). PMID:26812150

  16. Models, solution, methods and their applicability of dynamic location problems (DLPs) (a gap analysis for further research)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedhosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Makui, Ahmad; Shahanaghi, Kamran; Torkestani, Sara Sadat

    2016-09-01

    Determining the best location to be profitable for the facility's lifetime is the important decision of public and private firms, so this is why discussion about dynamic location problems (DLPs) is a critical significance. This paper presented a comprehensive review from 1968 up to most recent on published researches about DLPs and classified them into two parts. First, mathematical models developed based on different characteristics: type of parameters (deterministic, probabilistic or stochastic), number and type of objective function, numbers of commodity and modes, relocation time, number of relocation and relocating facilities, time horizon, budget and capacity constraints and their applicability. In second part, It have been also presented solution algorithms, main specification, applications and some real-world case studies of DLPs. At the ends, we concluded that in the current literature of DLPs, distribution systems and production-distribution systems with simple assumption of the tackle to the complexity of these models studied more than any other fields, as well as the concept of variety of services (hierarchical network), reliability, sustainability, relief management, waiting time for services (queuing theory) and risk of facility disruption need for further investigation. All of the available categories based on different criteria, solution methods and applicability of them, gaps and analysis which have been done in this paper suggest the ways for future research.

  17. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in Colorado, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Natasha B.; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Fancher, Tammy S.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Leib, Kenneth J.; Matherne, Anne-Marie; Turner, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The Colorado wind-turbine data series provides geospatial data for all wind turbines established within the State as of August 2009. Attributes specific to each turbine include: turbine location, manufacturer and model, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, potential megawatt output, land ownership, and county. Wind energy facility data for each turbine include: facility name, facility power capacity, number of turbines associated with each facility to date, facility developer, facility ownership, year the facility went online, and development status of wind facility. Turbine locations were derived from August 2009 1-meter true-color aerial photographs produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program; the photographs have a positional accuracy of about + or - 5 meters. The location of turbines under construction during August 2009 likely will be less accurate than the location of existing turbines. This data series contributes to an Online Interactive Energy Atlas currently (2011) in development by the U.S. Geological Survey. The Energy Atlas will synthesize data on existing and potential energy development in Colorado and New Mexico and will include additional natural resource data layers. This information may be used by decisionmakers to evaluate and compare the potential benefits and tradeoffs associated with different energy development strategies or scenarios. Interactive maps, downloadable data layers, comprehensive metadata, and decision-support tools will be included in the Energy Atlas. The format of the Energy Atlas will facilitate the integration of information about energy with key terrestrial and aquatic resources for evaluating resource values and minimizing risks from energy development.

  18. Estimates of Radioxenon Released from Southern Hemisphere Medical isotope Production Facilities Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Lowrey, Justin D.

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and Xe-133 data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of Xe-133 from medicalmore » isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8×1014 Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 1.2×1016 to 2.5×1016 Bq and estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 6.1×1013 to 3.6×1014 Bq. Although some releases from the facility in Argentina may reach these IMS sampling locations, the solution to the objective function is insensitive to the magnitude of those releases.« less

  19. Demonstration of Antimicrobial Corrosion-Resisting Interior Coating Systems for Military Facilities in Warm, Humid Locations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-01

    ER D C/ CE RL T R- 17 -1 9 DoD Corrosion Prevention and Control Program Demonstration of Antimicrobial Corrosion- Resisting Interior ...Demonstration of Antimicrobial Corrosion- Resisting Interior Coating Systems for Military Facilities in Warm, Humid Locations Final Report on...Under Project F10-AR04, “Application of New Corrosion-Resistant Mold Abatement Technologies for Interior Surfaces of Buildings at Fort Polk, LA” ERDC

  20. Developing a plan for primary health care facilities in Soweto, South Africa. Part II: Applying locational criteria.

    PubMed

    Doherty, J; Rispel, L; Webb, N

    1996-12-01

    This article is the second of a two-part series describing the development of a ten-year plan for primary health care facility development in Soweto. The first article concentrated on the political problems and general methodological approach of the project. This second article describes how the technical problem of planning in the context of scanty information was overcome. The reasoning behind the various assumptions and criteria which were used to assist the planning of the location of facilities is explained, as well as the process by which they were applied. The merits and limitations of this planning approach are discussed, and it is suggested that the approach may be useful to other facility planners, particularly in the developing world.

  1. Public-Facilities Locator For The Blind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Kevin D.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed optoelectronic system guides blind people to important locations in public buildings, With system, sightless person easily determines directions and distances of restrooms, water fountains, stairways, emergency exits, and elevators. Circuitry uncomplicated and inexpensive, in both transmitter and receiver. Readily-available light-emitting diodes, photodiodes, and integrated-circuit chips used to build locator aid for the blind.

  2. Variation in Nephrologist Visits to Patients on Hemodialysis across Dialysis Facilities and Geographic Locations

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kelvin B.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Geographic and other variations in medical practices lead to differences in medical costs, often without a clear link to health outcomes. This work examined variation in the frequency of physician visits to patients receiving hemodialysis to measure the relative importance of provider practice patterns (including those patterns linked to geographic region) and patient health in determining visit frequency. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This work analyzed a nationally representative 2006 database of patients receiving hemodialysis in the United States. A variation decomposition analysis of the relative importance of facility, geographic region, and patient characteristics—including demographics, socioeconomic status, and indicators of health status—in explaining physician visit frequency variation was conducted. Finally, the associations between facility, geographic and patient characteristics, and provider visit frequency were measured using multivariable regression. Results Patient characteristics accounted for only 0.9% of the total visit frequency variation. Accounting for case-mix differences, patients’ hemodialysis facilities explained about 24.9% of visit frequency variation, of which 9.3% was explained by geographic region. Visit frequency was more closely associated with many facility and geographic characteristics than indicators of health status. More recent dialysis initiation and recent hospitalization were associated with decreased visit frequency. Conclusions In hemodialysis, provider visit frequency depends more on geography and facility location and characteristics than patients’ health status or acuity of illness. The magnitude of variation unrelated to patient health suggests that provider visit frequency practices do not reflect optimal management of patients on dialysis. PMID:23430207

  3. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in Colorado, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Natasha B.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Fancher, Tammy; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Latysh, Natalie; Leib, Kenneth J.; Matherne, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This dataset represents an update to U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 597. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in Colorado, 2009 (available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/597/). This updated Colorado wind turbine Data Series provides geospatial data for all 1,204 wind turbines established within the State of Colorado as of September 2011, an increase of 297 wind turbines from 2009. Attributes specific to each turbine include: turbine location, manufacturer and model, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, potential megawatt output, land ownership, county, and development status of the wind turbine. Wind energy facility data for each turbine include: facility name, facility power capacity, number of turbines associated with each facility to date, facility developer, facility ownership, and year the facility went online. The locations of turbines are derived from 1-meter true-color aerial photographs produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP); the photographs have a positional accuracy of about ±5 meters. Locations of turbines constructed during or prior to August 2009 are based on August 2009 NAIP imagery and turbine locations constructed after August 2009 were based on September 2011 NAIP imagery. The location of turbines under construction during September 2011 likely will be less accurate than the location of existing turbines. This data series contributes to an Online Interactive Energy Atlas developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (http://my.usgs.gov/eerma/). The Energy Atlas synthesizes data on existing and potential energy development in Colorado and New Mexico and includes additional natural resource data layers. This information may be used by decisionmakers to evaluate and compare the potential benefits and tradeoffs associated with different energy development strategies or scenarios. Interactive maps, downloadable data layers, comprehensive metadata, and decision-support tools also are included in the Energy Atlas. The format of

  4. Coupled Facility/Payload Vibration Modeling Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.; Kaiser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A major phase of aerospace hardware verification is vibration testing. The standard approach for such testing is to use a shaker to induce loads into the payload. In preparation for vibration testing at NASA/GSFC there is an analysis to assess the responses of the payload. A new method of modeling the test is presented that takes into account dynamic interactions between the facility and the payload. This dynamic interaction has affected testing in the past, but been ignored or adjusted for during testing. By modeling the combination of the facility and test article (payload) it is possible to improve the prediction of hardware responses. Many aerospace test facilities work in similar way to those at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Lessons learned here should be applicable to other test facilities with similar setups.

  5. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.

    2011-07-18

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come frommore » many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.« less

  6. Coupled Facility-Payload Vibration Modeling Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.; Kaiser, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    A major phase of aerospace hardware verification is vibration testing. The standard approach for such testing is to use a shaker to induce loads into the payload. In preparation for vibration testing at National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center an analysis is performed to assess the responses of the payload. A new method of modeling the test is presented that takes into account dynamic interactions between the facility and the payload. This dynamic interaction has affected testing in the past, but been ignored or adjusted for during testing. By modeling the combined dynamics of the facility and test article (payload) it is possible to improve the prediction of hardware responses. Many aerospace test facilities work in similar way to those at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Lessons learned here should be applicable to other test facilities with similar setups.

  7. Parameter meta-optimization of metaheuristics of solving specific NP-hard facility location problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakov, E. S.; Malysh, V. N.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the work is to create an evolutionary method for optimizing the values of the control parameters of metaheuristics of solving the NP-hard facility location problem. A system analysis of the tuning process of optimization algorithms parameters is carried out. The problem of finding the parameters of a metaheuristic algorithm is formulated as a meta-optimization problem. Evolutionary metaheuristic has been chosen to perform the task of meta-optimization. Thus, the approach proposed in this work can be called “meta-metaheuristic”. Computational experiment proving the effectiveness of the procedure of tuning the control parameters of metaheuristics has been performed.

  8. Location of an intermediate hub for port activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burciu, Ş.; Ştefănică, C.; Roşca, E.; Dragu, V.; Ruscă, F.

    2015-11-01

    An intermediate hub might increase the accessibility level of ports but also hinterland and so it can be considered more than a facility with a transhipment role. These hubs might lead to the development of other transport services and enhance their role in gathering and covering economic centres within hinterlands and also getting the part of logistic facility for the ports, with effects on port utilization and its connectivity to global economy. A new location for a hub terminal leads to reduced transport distances within hinterland, with decreased transport costs and external effects, so with gains in people's life quality. Because the production and distribution systems are relatively fixed on short and medium term and the location decisions are strategic and on long term, the logistic chains activities location models have to consider the uncertainties regarding the possible future situations. In most models, production costs are considered equal, the location problem reducing itself to a problem that aims to minimize the total transport costs, meaning the transport problem. The main objective of the paper is to locate a hub terminal that links the producers of cereals that are going to be exported by naval transportation with the Romanian fluvial-maritime ports (Galaţi, Brăila). GIS environment can be used to integrate and analyse a great amount of data and has the ability of using functions as location - allocation models necessary both to private and public sector, being able to determine the optimal location for services like factories, warehouses, logistic platforms and other public services.

  9. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in New Mexico, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Natasha B.; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Fancher, Tammy S.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Leib, Kenneth J.; Matherne, Anne-Marie; Turner, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The New Mexico wind-turbine data series provides geospatial data for all wind turbines established within the State as of August 2009. Attributes specific to each turbine include: turbine location, manufacturer and model, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, potential megawatt output, land ownership, and county. Wind energy facility data for each turbine include: facility name, facility power capacity, number of turbines associated with each facility to date, facility developer, facility ownership, year the facility went online, and development status of wind facility. Turbine locations were derived from 1-meter August 2009 true-color aerial photographs produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program; the photographs have a positional accuracy of about + or - 5 meters. The location of turbines under construction during August 2009 likely will be less accurate than the location of existing turbines. This data series contributes to an Online Interactive Energy Atlas currently (2011) in development by the U.S. Geological Survey. The Energy Atlas will synthesize data on existing and potential energy development in Colorado and New Mexico and will include additional natural resource data layers. This information may be used by decisionmakers to evaluate and compare the potential benefits and tradeoffs associated with different energy development strategies or scenarios. Interactive maps, downloadable data layers, comprehensive metadata, and decision-support tools will be included in the Energy Atlas. The format of the Energy Atlas will facilitate the integration of information about energy with key terrestrial and aquatic resources for evaluating resource values and minimizing risks from energy development.

  10. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in New Mexico, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Natasha B.; Diffendorfer, James B.; Fancher, Tammy; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Latysh, Natalie; Leib, Kenneth J.; Matherne, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This dataset represents an update to U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 596. Locations and attributes of wind turbines in New Mexico, 2009 (available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/596/).This updated New Mexico wind turbine Data Series provides geospatial data for all 562 wind turbines established within the State of New Mexico as of June 2011, an increase of 155 wind turbines from 2009. Attributes specific to each turbine include: turbine location, manufacturer and model, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, potential megawatt output, land ownership, county, and development status of wind turbine. Wind energy facility data for each turbine include: facility name, facility power capacity, number of turbines associated with each facility to date, facility developer, facility ownership, and year the facility went online. The locations of turbines are derived from 1-meter true-color aerial photographs produced by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP); the photographs have a positional accuracy of about ±5 meters. The locations of turbines constructed during or prior to August 2009 are based on August 2009 NAIP imagery and turbine locations constructed after August 2009 were based June 2011 NAIP imagery. The location of turbines under construction during June 2011 likely will be less accurate than the location of existing turbines. This data series contributes to an Online Interactive Energy Atlas developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (http://my.usgs.gov/eerma/). The Energy Atlas synthesizes data on existing and potential energy development in Colorado and New Mexico and includes additional natural resource data layers. This information may be used by decisionmakers to evaluate and compare the potential benefits and tradeoffs associated with different energy development strategies or scenarios. Interactive maps, downloadable data layers, comprehensive metadata, and decision-support tools also are included in the Energy Atlas. The format of the Energy

  11. Accreditation Status and Geographic Location of Outpatient Echocardiographic Testing Facilities Among Medicare Beneficiaries: The VALUE-ECHO Study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Scott C; Wang, Kefeng; Dong, Chuanhui; Yi, Li; Marinovic Gutierrez, Carolina; Di Tullio, Marco R; Farrell, Mary Beth; Burgess, Pamela; Gornik, Heather L; Hamburg, Naomi M; Needleman, Laurence; Orsinelli, David; Robison, Susana; Rundek, Tatjana

    2018-02-01

    Accreditation of echocardiographic testing facilities by the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) is supported by the American College of Cardiology and American Society of Echocardiography. However, limited information exists on the accreditation status and geographic distribution of echocardiographic facilities in the United States. Our study aimed to identify (1) the proportion of outpatient echocardiography facilities used by Medicare beneficiaries that are IAC accredited, (2) their geographic distribution, and (3) variations in procedure type and volume by accreditation status. As part of the VALUE-ECHO (Value of Accreditation, Location, and Utilization Evaluation-Echocardiography) study, we examined the proportion of IAC-accredited echocardiographic facilities performing outpatient echocardiography in the 2013 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services outpatient limited data set (100% sample) and their geographic distribution using geocoding in ArcGIS (ESRI, Redlands, CA). Among 4573 outpatient facilities billing Medicare for echocardiographic testing in 2013, 99.6% (n = 4554) were IAC accredited (99.7% in the 50 US states and 86.2% in Puerto Rico). The proportion IAC-accredited echocardiographic facilities varied by region, with 98.7%, 99.9%, 99.9%, 99.5%, and 86.2% of facilities accredited in the Northeast, South, Midwest, West, and Puerto Rico, respectively (P < .01, Fisher exact test). Of all echocardiographic outpatient procedures conducted (n = 1,890,156), 99.8% (n = 1,885,382) were performed in IAC-accredited echocardiographic facilities. Most procedures (90.9%) were transthoracic echocardiograms, of which 99.7% were conducted in IAC-accredited echocardiographic facilities. Almost all outpatient echocardiographic facilities billed by Medicare are IAC accredited. This accreditation rate is substantially higher than previously reported for US outpatient vascular testing facilities (13% IAC accredited). The uniformity of imaging

  12. GIS modeling of archaeological site locations: A low-tech approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Futato, Eugene M.

    1991-01-01

    A Geographic Information System (GIS)-type analysis of archaeological site locations using a dBase III plus program and a desk top computer is presented. A previously developed model of site locations in the Sequatchie Valley of northeastern Alabama is tested against known site locations in another large survey area there. The model fails to account for site locations in the test area. A model is developed for the test area and indicates the site locations are indeed different. Whether this is due to differences in site locations on a sub-regional level, or to sample error in the original model is unknown.

  13. National Transonic Facility model and model support vibration problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Popernack, Thomas G., Jr.; Gloss, Blair B.

    1990-01-01

    Vibrations of models and model support system were encountered during testing in the National Transonic Facility. Model support system yaw plane vibrations have resulted in model strain gage balance design load limits being reached. These high levels of vibrations resulted in limited aerodynamic testing for several wind tunnel models. The yaw vibration problem was the subject of an intensive experimental and analytical investigation which identified the primary source of the yaw excitation and resulted in attenuation of the yaw oscillations to acceptable levels. This paper presents the principal results of analyses and experimental investigation of the yaw plane vibration problems. Also, an overview of plans for development and installation of a permanent model system dynamic and aeroelastic response measurement and monitoring system for the National Transonic Facility is presented.

  14. Location | FNLCR Staging

    Cancer.gov

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research campus is located 50 miles northwest of Washington, D.C., and 50 miles west of Baltimore, Maryland, in Frederick, Maryland. Satellite locations include leased and government facilities extending s

  15. Association of U.S. Dialysis Facility Neighborhood Characteristics with Facility-Level Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Laura; Pastan, Stephen; Kramer, Michael; McClellan, Ann; Krisher, Jenna; Patzer, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Improving access to optimal healthcare may depend on attributes of neighborhoods where patients receive healthcare services. We investigated whether characteristics of dialysis facility neighborhoods—where most patients with end-stage renal disease are treated—were associated with facility-level kidney transplantation. Methods We examined the association between census tract (neighborhood)-level sociodemographic factors and facility-level kidney transplantation rate in 3,983 U.S. dialysis facilities with reported kidney transplantation rates. Number of kidney transplants and total person-years contributed at the facility level in 2007-2010 were obtained from the Dialysis Facility Report and linked to census tract data on sociodemographic characteristics from the American Community Survey 2006-2010 by dialysis facility location. We used multivariable Poisson models with generalized estimating equations to estimate associations between neighborhood characteristics and transplant incidence. Results U.S. dialysis facilities were located in neighborhoods with substantially greater proportions of black and poor residents, relative to the national average. Most facility neighborhood characteristics were associated with transplant, with incidence rate ratios (95% CI) for standardized increments (in percentage) of neighborhood exposures of: living in poverty, 0.88 (0.84-0.92), black race, 0.83 (0.78-0.89); high school graduates, 1.22 (1.17-1.26); and unemployed, 0.90 (0.85-0.95). Conclusion Dialysis facility neighborhood characteristics may be modestly associated with facility rates of kidney transplantation. The success of dialysis facility interventions to improve access to kidney transplantation may partially depend on reducing neighborhood-level barriers. PMID:25196018

  16. Using the NPSS Environment to Model an Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Thomas M.; Owen, Albert K.; Huffman, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    An altitude test facility was modeled using Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). This altitude test facility model represents the most detailed facility model developed in the NPSS architecture. The current paper demonstrates the use of the NPSS system to define the required operating range of a component for the facility. A significant number of additional component models were easily developed to complete the model. Discussed in this paper are the additional components developed and what was done in the development of these components.

  17. Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric Dispersion at Onsite Locations for Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Alan; Chaves, Chris

    2015-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has performed an evaluation of the technical bases for the default value for the atmospheric dispersion parameter χ/Q. This parameter appears in the calculation of radiological dose at the onsite receptor location (co-located worker at 100 meters) in safety analysis of DOE nuclear facilities. The results of the calculation are then used to determine whether safety significant engineered controls should be established to prevent and/or mitigate the event causing the release of hazardous material. An evaluation of methods for calculation of the dispersion of potential chemical releases for the purpose of estimating the chemical exposuremore » at the co-located worker location was also performed. DOE’s evaluation consisted of: (a) a review of the regulatory basis for the default χ/Q dispersion parameter; (b) an analysis of this parameter’s sensitivity to various factors that affect the dispersion of radioactive material; and (c) performance of additional independent calculations to assess the appropriate use of the default χ/Q value.« less

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Kauai Test Facility

    Science.gov Websites

    Defense Systems & Assessments About Defense Systems & Assessments Program Areas Accomplishments Foundations Bioscience Computing & Information Science Electromagnetics Engineering Science Geoscience Suppliers iSupplier Account Accounts Payable Contract Information Construction & Facilities Contract

  19. An Integrated Assessment of Location-Dependent Scaling for Microalgae Biofuel Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Andre M.; Abodeely, Jared; Skaggs, Richard

    Successful development of a large-scale microalgae-based biofuels industry requires comprehensive analysis and understanding of the feedstock supply chain—from facility siting/design through processing/upgrading of the feedstock to a fuel product. The evolution from pilot-scale production facilities to energy-scale operations presents many multi-disciplinary challenges, including a sustainable supply of water and nutrients, operational and infrastructure logistics, and economic competitiveness with petroleum-based fuels. These challenges are addressed in part by applying the Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF)—an integrated multi-scale modeling, analysis, and data management suite—to address key issues in developing and operating an open-pond facility by analyzing how variability and uncertainty in space andmore » time affect algal feedstock production rates, and determining the site-specific “optimum” facility scale to minimize capital and operational expenses. This approach explicitly and systematically assesses the interdependence of biofuel production potential, associated resource requirements, and production system design trade-offs. The IAF was applied to a set of sites previously identified as having the potential to cumulatively produce 5 billion-gallons/year in the southeastern U.S. and results indicate costs can be reduced by selecting the most effective processing technology pathway and scaling downstream processing capabilities to fit site-specific growing conditions, available resources, and algal strains.« less

  20. An integrated assessment of location-dependent scaling for microalgae biofuel production facilities

    DOE PAGES

    Coleman, André M.; Abodeely, Jared M.; Skaggs, Richard L.; ...

    2014-06-19

    Successful development of a large-scale microalgae-based biofuels industry requires comprehensive analysis and understanding of the feedstock supply chain—from facility siting and design through processing and upgrading of the feedstock to a fuel product. The evolution from pilot-scale production facilities to energy-scale operations presents many multi-disciplinary challenges, including a sustainable supply of water and nutrients, operational and infrastructure logistics, and economic competitiveness with petroleum-based fuels. These challenges are partially addressed by applying the Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF) – an integrated multi-scale modeling, analysis, and data management suite – to address key issues in developing and operating an open-pond microalgae production facility.more » This is done by analyzing how variability and uncertainty over space and through time affect feedstock production rates, and determining the site-specific “optimum” facility scale to minimize capital and operational expenses. This approach explicitly and systematically assesses the interdependence of biofuel production potential, associated resource requirements, and production system design trade-offs. To provide a baseline analysis, the IAF was applied in this paper to a set of sites in the southeastern U.S. with the potential to cumulatively produce 5 billion gallons per year. Finally, the results indicate costs can be reduced by scaling downstream processing capabilities to fit site-specific growing conditions, available and economically viable resources, and specific microalgal strains.« less

  1. 40 CFR 265.18 - Location standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Location standards. 265.18 Section 265.18 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... FACILITIES General Facility Standards § 265.18 Location standards. The placement of any hazardous waste in a...

  2. Protein (multi-)location prediction: utilizing interdependencies via a generative model

    PubMed Central

    Shatkay, Hagit

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Proteins are responsible for a multitude of vital tasks in all living organisms. Given that a protein’s function and role are strongly related to its subcellular location, protein location prediction is an important research area. While proteins move from one location to another and can localize to multiple locations, most existing location prediction systems assign only a single location per protein. A few recent systems attempt to predict multiple locations for proteins, however, their performance leaves much room for improvement. Moreover, such systems do not capture dependencies among locations and usually consider locations as independent. We hypothesize that a multi-location predictor that captures location inter-dependencies can improve location predictions for proteins. Results: We introduce a probabilistic generative model for protein localization, and develop a system based on it—which we call MDLoc—that utilizes inter-dependencies among locations to predict multiple locations for proteins. The model captures location inter-dependencies using Bayesian networks and represents dependency between features and locations using a mixture model. We use iterative processes for learning model parameters and for estimating protein locations. We evaluate our classifier MDLoc, on a dataset of single- and multi-localized proteins derived from the DBMLoc dataset, which is the most comprehensive protein multi-localization dataset currently available. Our results, obtained by using MDLoc, significantly improve upon results obtained by an initial simpler classifier, as well as on results reported by other top systems. Availability and implementation: MDLoc is available at: http://www.eecis.udel.edu/∼compbio/mdloc. Contact: shatkay@udel.edu. PMID:26072505

  3. Protein (multi-)location prediction: utilizing interdependencies via a generative model.

    PubMed

    Simha, Ramanuja; Briesemeister, Sebastian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Shatkay, Hagit

    2015-06-15

    Proteins are responsible for a multitude of vital tasks in all living organisms. Given that a protein's function and role are strongly related to its subcellular location, protein location prediction is an important research area. While proteins move from one location to another and can localize to multiple locations, most existing location prediction systems assign only a single location per protein. A few recent systems attempt to predict multiple locations for proteins, however, their performance leaves much room for improvement. Moreover, such systems do not capture dependencies among locations and usually consider locations as independent. We hypothesize that a multi-location predictor that captures location inter-dependencies can improve location predictions for proteins. We introduce a probabilistic generative model for protein localization, and develop a system based on it-which we call MDLoc-that utilizes inter-dependencies among locations to predict multiple locations for proteins. The model captures location inter-dependencies using Bayesian networks and represents dependency between features and locations using a mixture model. We use iterative processes for learning model parameters and for estimating protein locations. We evaluate our classifier MDLoc, on a dataset of single- and multi-localized proteins derived from the DBMLoc dataset, which is the most comprehensive protein multi-localization dataset currently available. Our results, obtained by using MDLoc, significantly improve upon results obtained by an initial simpler classifier, as well as on results reported by other top systems. MDLoc is available at: http://www.eecis.udel.edu/∼compbio/mdloc. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Query Language for Location-Based Services: A Model Checking Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoareau, Christian; Satoh, Ichiro

    We present a model checking approach to the rationale, implementation, and applications of a query language for location-based services. Such query mechanisms are necessary so that users, objects, and/or services can effectively benefit from the location-awareness of their surrounding environment. The underlying data model is founded on a symbolic model of space organized in a tree structure. Once extended to a semantic model for modal logic, we regard location query processing as a model checking problem, and thus define location queries as hybrid logicbased formulas. Our approach is unique to existing research because it explores the connection between location models and query processing in ubiquitous computing systems, relies on a sound theoretical basis, and provides modal logic-based query mechanisms for expressive searches over a decentralized data structure. A prototype implementation is also presented and will be discussed.

  5. Computer Model Locates Environmental Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Catherine Huybrechts Burton founded San Francisco-based Endpoint Environmental (2E) LLC in 2005 while she was a student intern and project manager at Ames Research Center with NASA's DEVELOP program. The 2E team created the Tire Identification from Reflectance model, which algorithmically processes satellite images using turnkey technology to retain only the darkest parts of an image. This model allows 2E to locate piles of rubber tires, which often are stockpiled illegally and cause hazardous environmental conditions and fires.

  6. A case study of potential human health impacts from petroleum coke transfer facilities.

    PubMed

    Dourson, Michael L; Chinkin, Lyle R; MacIntosh, David L; Finn, Jennifer A; Brown, Kathleen W; Reid, Stephen B; Martinez, Jeanelle M

    2016-11-01

    Petroleum coke or "petcoke" is a solid material created during petroleum refinement and is distributed via transfer facilities that may be located in densely populated areas. The health impacts from petcoke exposure to residents living in proximity to such facilities were evaluated for a petcoke transfer facilities located in Chicago, Illinois. Site-specific, margin of safety (MOS) and margin of exposure (MOE) analyses were conducted using estimated airborne and dermal exposures. The exposure assessment was based on a combined measurement and modeling program that included multiyear on-site air monitoring, air dispersion modeling, and analyses of soil and surfaces in residential areas adjacent to two petcoke transfer facilities located in industrial areas. Airborne particulate matter less than 10 microns (PM 10 ) were used as a marker for petcoke. Based on daily fence line monitoring, the average daily PM 10 concentration at the KCBX Terminals measured on-site was 32 μg/m 3 , with 89% of 24-hr average PM 10 concentrations below 50 μg/m 3 and 99% below 100 μg/m 3 . A dispersion model estimated that the emission sources at the KCBX Terminals produced peak PM 10 levels attributed to the petcoke facility at the most highly impacted residence of 11 μg/m 3 on an annual average basis and 54 μg/m 3 on 24-hr average basis. Chemical indicators of petcoke in soil and surface samples collected from residential neighborhoods adjacent to the facilities were equivalent to levels in corresponding samples collected at reference locations elsewhere in Chicago, a finding that is consistent with limited potential for off-site exposure indicated by the fence line monitoring and air dispersion modeling. The MOE based upon dispersion model estimates ranged from 800 to 900 for potential inhalation, the primary route of concern for particulate matter. This indicates a low likelihood of adverse health effects in the surrounding community. Implications: Handling of petroleum coke at

  7. Selection of facility location under environmental damage priority and using ELECTRE method.

    PubMed

    Gundogdu, Ceren Erdin

    2011-03-01

    In the recent years, the environmental problems have reached to a vital extent, which is pushing the boundaries and far beyond daily evaluations. Industrial plants, the energy sources and uncontrolled release of pollutant gases (SO2, CO2 etc.) in the production stage have the greatest share in the occurrence of unfavorable environmental conditions. For this reason, the dimension of the problems that may arise in the production stage of industrial plants is directly related to the selection of facility location. In this study, geographical regions (a total of 7 regions) of our country have been analyzed in terms of environmental values based on their basins and the unfavorable environmental problems that are currently being experienced. Considered as such, with the directives of an expert group composed of nature scientists, the criteria and alternative areas are determined using the data gathered on ecosystem, basin characteristics, and land types. Since the primary goal is to keep the environmental damages at the minimum level, comprehensive definition of the problem is constructed by consultation of the expert group and the criteria are determined. Considering the fact that it will prevent the drawbacks generated by making decisions depending on certain stereotypes toa great extent, ELECTRE (Elimination and Choice Translating Reality English - Elimination Et Choix Traduisant la Realite) method is used to determine in which geographic region our country's industrial plants should be located.

  8. Mathematical Models of IABG Thermal-Vacuum Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doring, Daniel; Ulfers, Hendrik

    2014-06-01

    IABG in Ottobrunn, Germany, operates thermal-vacuum facilities of different sizes and complexities as a service for space-testing of satellites and components. One aspect of these tests is the qualification of the thermal control system that keeps all onboard components within their save operating temperature band. As not all possible operation / mission states can be simulated within a sensible test time, usually a subset of important and extreme states is tested at TV facilities to validate the thermal model of the satellite, which is then used to model all other possible mission states. With advances in the precision of customer thermal models, simple assumptions of the test environment (e.g. everything black & cold, one solar constant of light from this side) are no longer sufficient, as real space simulation chambers do deviate from this ideal. For example the mechanical adapters which support the spacecraft are usually not actively cooled. To enable IABG to provide a model that is sufficiently detailed and realistic for current system tests, Munich engineering company CASE developed ESATAN models for the two larger chambers. CASE has many years of experience in thermal analysis for space-flight systems and ESATAN. The two models represent the rather simple (and therefore very homogeneous) 3m-TVA and the extremely complex space simulation test facility and its solar simulator. The cooperation of IABG and CASE built up extensive knowledge of the facilities thermal behaviour. This is the key to optimally support customers with their test campaigns in the future. The ESARAD part of the models contains all relevant information with regard to geometry (CAD data), surface properties (optical measurements) and solar irradiation for the sun simulator. The temperature of the actively cooled thermal shrouds is measured and mapped to the thermal mesh to create the temperature field in the ESATAN part as boundary conditions. Both models comprise switches to easily

  9. 47 CFR 95.1107 - Authorized locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO... care facility provided the facility is located anywhere a CB station operation is permitted under § 95... associated with a health care facility. ...

  10. Using classification tree modelling to investigate drug prescription practices at health facilities in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kajungu, Dan K; Selemani, Majige; Masanja, Irene; Baraka, Amuri; Njozi, Mustafa; Khatib, Rashid; Dodoo, Alexander N; Binka, Fred; Macq, Jean; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Speybroeck, Niko

    2012-09-05

    Drug prescription practices depend on several factors related to the patient, health worker and health facilities. A better understanding of the factors influencing prescription patterns is essential to develop strategies to mitigate the negative consequences associated with poor practices in both the public and private sectors. A cross-sectional study was conducted in rural Tanzania among patients attending health facilities, and health workers. Patients, health workers and health facilities-related factors with the potential to influence drug prescription patterns were used to build a model of key predictors. Standard data mining methodology of classification tree analysis was used to define the importance of the different factors on prescription patterns. This analysis included 1,470 patients and 71 health workers practicing in 30 health facilities. Patients were mostly treated in dispensaries. Twenty two variables were used to construct two classification tree models: one for polypharmacy (prescription of ≥3 drugs) on a single clinic visit and one for co-prescription of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) with antibiotics. The most important predictor of polypharmacy was the diagnosis of several illnesses. Polypharmacy was also associated with little or no supervision of the health workers, administration of AL and private facilities. Co-prescription of AL with antibiotics was more frequent in children under five years of age and the other important predictors were transmission season, mode of diagnosis and the location of the health facility. Standard data mining methodology is an easy-to-implement analytical approach that can be useful for decision-making. Polypharmacy is mainly due to the diagnosis of multiple illnesses.

  11. Modeling Natural Attenuation of an Industrial Facility in Houston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater monitoring is currently ongoing at a commercial/industrial facility located in Deer Park, Texas (the site). The subject site is an approximate 10 acre commercial/industrial facility that began operation in the late-1970s. Operations have historically consisted of vehicle maintenance services, administrative, and equipment storage. Assessment and groundwater monitoring activities have been conducted at the site to evaluate the magnitude and extent of groundwater affected with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Groundwater data has been collected at this site since the mid-2000s on a quarterly basis. Presently, VOC constituents tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE), 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC) are the only chemicals of concern (COCs) detected at concentrations exceeding the TCEQ Actions Levels established by the state of Texas. The goal is that one day the site will receive a certificate of completion from the state, which states that all non-responsible parties are released from all liability to the state for cleanup. The remediation technology that is currently being used at this site is Monitoring Natural Attenuation (MNA). A significant question is whether MNA is efficiently removing COCs in groundwater and how long will this process take to achieve the remediation goals. The objective of this study is to provide an estimate of concentrations of COCs in groundwater at the site using the Biochlor model. The Biochlor model will help answer the question as to whether or not natural attenuation is occurring at the site efficiently. Results show that Monitored Natural Attenuation may not be the optimal remediation technology to use at this site. Other remedial technologies are needed to clean up chemical in the site. Groundwater monitoring is currently ongoing at a commercial/industrial facility located in Deer Park, Texas (the site). The subject site is an approximate 10 acre

  12. Solving a bi-objective mathematical model for location-routing problem with time windows in multi-echelon reverse logistics using metaheuristic procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezavati, V. R.; Beigi, M.

    2016-12-01

    During the last decade, the stringent pressures from environmental and social requirements have spurred an interest in designing a reverse logistics (RL) network. The success of a logistics system may depend on the decisions of the facilities locations and vehicle routings. The location-routing problem (LRP) simultaneously locates the facilities and designs the travel routes for vehicles among established facilities and existing demand points. In this paper, the location-routing problem with time window (LRPTW) and homogeneous fleet type and designing a multi-echelon, and capacitated reverse logistics network, are considered which may arise in many real-life situations in logistics management. Our proposed RL network consists of hybrid collection/inspection centers, recovery centers and disposal centers. Here, we present a new bi-objective mathematical programming (BOMP) for LRPTW in reverse logistic. Since this type of problem is NP-hard, the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) is proposed to obtain the Pareto frontier for the given problem. Several numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model and algorithm. Also, the present work is an effort to effectively implement the ɛ-constraint method in GAMS software for producing the Pareto-optimal solutions in a BOMP. The results of the proposed algorithm have been compared with the ɛ-constraint method. The computational results show that the ɛ-constraint method is able to solve small-size instances to optimality within reasonable computing times, and for medium-to-large-sized problems, the proposed NSGA-II works better than the ɛ-constraint.

  13. [Location selection for Shenyang urban parks based on GIS and multi-objective location allocation model].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Shi, Tie-Mao; Hu, Yuan-Man; Gao, Chang; Liu, Miao; Song, Lin-Qi

    2011-12-01

    Based on geographic information system (GIS) technology and multi-objective location-allocation (LA) model, and in considering of four relatively independent objective factors (population density level, air pollution level, urban heat island effect level, and urban land use pattern), an optimized location selection for the urban parks within the Third Ring of Shenyang was conducted, and the selection results were compared with the spatial distribution of existing parks, aimed to evaluate the rationality of the spatial distribution of urban green spaces. In the location selection of urban green spaces in the study area, the factor air pollution was most important, and, compared with single objective factor, the weighted analysis results of multi-objective factors could provide optimized spatial location selection of new urban green spaces. The combination of GIS technology with LA model would be a new approach for the spatial optimizing of urban green spaces.

  14. Propagation of the velocity model uncertainties to the seismic event location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesret, A.; Desassis, N.; Noble, M.; Romary, T.; Maisons, C.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquake hypocentre locations are crucial in many domains of application (academic and industrial) as seismic event location maps are commonly used to delineate faults or fractures. The interpretation of these maps depends on location accuracy and on the reliability of the associated uncertainties. The largest contribution to location and uncertainty errors is due to the fact that the velocity model errors are usually not correctly taken into account. We propose a new Bayesian formulation that integrates properly the knowledge on the velocity model into the formulation of the probabilistic earthquake location. In this work, the velocity model uncertainties are first estimated with a Bayesian tomography of active shot data. We implement a sampling Monte Carlo type algorithm to generate velocity models distributed according to the posterior distribution. In a second step, we propagate the velocity model uncertainties to the seismic event location in a probabilistic framework. This enables to obtain more reliable hypocentre locations as well as their associated uncertainties accounting for picking and velocity model uncertainties. We illustrate the tomography results and the gain in accuracy of earthquake location for two synthetic examples and one real data case study in the context of induced microseismicity.

  15. Modeling the Variable Heliopause Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-03-01

    In 2012, Voyager 1 zipped across the heliopause. Five and a half years later, Voyager 2 still hasnt followed its twin into interstellar space. Can models of the heliopause location help determine why?How Far to the Heliopause?Artists conception of the heliosphere with the important structures and boundaries labeled. [NASA/Goddard/Walt Feimer]As our solar system travels through the galaxy, the solar outflow pushes against the surrounding interstellar medium, forming a bubble called the heliosphere. The edge of this bubble, the heliopause, is the outermost boundary of our solar system, where the solar wind and the interstellar medium meet. Since the solar outflow is highly variable, the heliopause is constantly moving with the motion driven by changes inthe Sun.NASAs twin Voyager spacecraft were poisedto cross the heliopause after completingtheir tour of the outer planets in the 1980s. In 2012, Voyager 1 registered a sharp increase in the density of interstellar particles, indicating that the spacecraft had passed out of the heliosphere and into the interstellar medium. The slower-moving Voyager 2 was set to pierce the heliopause along a different trajectory, but so far no measurements have shown that the spacecraft has bid farewell to oursolar system.In a recent study, ateam of scientists led by Haruichi Washimi (Kyushu University, Japan and CSPAR, University of Alabama-Huntsville) argues that models of the heliosphere can help explain this behavior. Because the heliopause location is controlled by factors that vary on many spatial and temporal scales, Washimiand collaborators turn to three-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamics simulations of the heliosphere. In particular, they investigate how the position of the heliopause along the trajectories of Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 changes over time.Modeled location of the heliopause along the paths of Voyagers 1 (blue) and 2 (orange). Click for a closer look. The red star indicates the location at which Voyager

  16. A model for distribution centers location-routing problem on a multimodal transportation network with a meta-heuristic solving approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazayeli, Saeed; Eydi, Alireza; Kamalabadi, Isa Nakhai

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, organizations have to compete with different competitors in regional, national and international levels, so they have to improve their competition capabilities to survive against competitors. Undertaking activities on a global scale requires a proper distribution system which could take advantages of different transportation modes. Accordingly, the present paper addresses a location-routing problem on multimodal transportation network. The introduced problem follows four objectives simultaneously which form main contribution of the paper; determining multimodal routes between supplier and distribution centers, locating mode changing facilities, locating distribution centers, and determining product delivery tours from the distribution centers to retailers. An integer linear programming is presented for the problem, and a genetic algorithm with a new chromosome structure proposed to solve the problem. Proposed chromosome structure consists of two different parts for multimodal transportation and location-routing parts of the model. Based on published data in the literature, two numerical cases with different sizes generated and solved. Also, different cost scenarios designed to better analyze model and algorithm performance. Results show that algorithm can effectively solve large-size problems within a reasonable time which GAMS software failed to reach an optimal solution even within much longer times.

  17. A model for distribution centers location-routing problem on a multimodal transportation network with a meta-heuristic solving approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazayeli, Saeed; Eydi, Alireza; Kamalabadi, Isa Nakhai

    2018-07-01

    Nowadays, organizations have to compete with different competitors in regional, national and international levels, so they have to improve their competition capabilities to survive against competitors. Undertaking activities on a global scale requires a proper distribution system which could take advantages of different transportation modes. Accordingly, the present paper addresses a location-routing problem on multimodal transportation network. The introduced problem follows four objectives simultaneously which form main contribution of the paper; determining multimodal routes between supplier and distribution centers, locating mode changing facilities, locating distribution centers, and determining product delivery tours from the distribution centers to retailers. An integer linear programming is presented for the problem, and a genetic algorithm with a new chromosome structure proposed to solve the problem. Proposed chromosome structure consists of two different parts for multimodal transportation and location-routing parts of the model. Based on published data in the literature, two numerical cases with different sizes generated and solved. Also, different cost scenarios designed to better analyze model and algorithm performance. Results show that algorithm can effectively solve large-size problems within a reasonable time which GAMS software failed to reach an optimal solution even within much longer times.

  18. Plant model of KIPT neutron source facility simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yan; Wei, Thomas Y.; Grelle, Austin L.

    2016-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine are collaborating on constructing a neutron source facility at KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility has 100-kW electron beam driving a subcritical assembly (SCA). The electron beam interacts with a natural uranium target or a tungsten target to generate neutrons, and deposits its power in the target zone. The total fission power generated in SCA is about 300 kW. Two primary cooling loops are designed to remove 100-kW and 300-kW from the target zone and the SCA, respectively. A secondary cooling system ismore » coupled with the primary cooling system to dispose of the generated heat outside the facility buildings to the atmosphere. In addition, the electron accelerator has a low efficiency for generating the electron beam, which uses another secondary cooling loop to remove the generated heat from the accelerator primary cooling loop. One of the main functions the KIPT neutron source facility is to train young nuclear specialists; therefore, ANL has developed the KIPT Neutron Source Facility Simulator for this function. In this simulator, a Plant Control System and a Plant Protection System were developed to perform proper control and to provide automatic protection against unsafe and improper operation of the facility during the steady-state and the transient states using a facility plant model. This report focuses on describing the physics of the plant model and provides several test cases to demonstrate its capabilities. The plant facility model uses the PYTHON script language. It is consistent with the computer language of the plant control system. It is easy to integrate with the simulator without an additional interface, and it is able to simulate the transients of the cooling systems with system control variables changing on real-time.« less

  19. Evaluation of the Location and Recency of Faulting Near Prospective Surface Facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern

  20. Simulation of infiltration facilities using the SEEP/W model and quantification of flood runoff reduction effect by the decrease in CN.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chulsang; Ku, Jung Mo; Jun, Changhyun; Zhu, Ju Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four infiltration facilities (permeable pavement, infiltration gutter, infiltration trench, and infiltration well) have been investigated and compared with their flood runoff reduction effect. The SEEP/W model was used to estimate the infiltration amount of each facility, and the flood runoff reduction effect was quantified by the decrease in curve number (CN). As a result of this study, we found that: (1) the infiltration could be successfully simulated by the SEEP/W model, whose result could also be quantified effectively by the decrease in CN; (2) among the four infiltration facilities considered in this study, the infiltration well and infiltration trench were found to be most efficient and economical; (3) finally, the intervention effect of the nearby infiltration facility was found not so significant. In an extreme case where the infiltration wells were located at 1 m interval, the intervention effect was found to be just 1%.

  1. FEDERAL FACILITIES IN EPA REGION 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    Locations of federal facilities in EPA Region 6. Facilities from the Corps of Engineers, Veterans Administration, Army, Navy, Air National Guard, etc. are included. This is not a complete set of facilities. The facilities included are only those with value added locations used in...

  2. Modeling of Non-Homogeneous Containment Atmosphere in the ThAI Experimental Facility Using a CFD Code

    SciTech Connect

    Babic, Miroslav; Kljenak, Ivo; Mavko, Borut

    2006-07-01

    The CFD code CFX4.4 was used to simulate an experiment in the ThAI facility, which was designed for investigation of thermal-hydraulic processes during a severe accident inside a Light Water Reactor containment. In the considered experiment, air was initially present in the vessel, and helium and steam were injected during different phases of the experiment at various mass flow rates and at different locations. The main purpose of the simulation was to reproduce the non-homogeneous temperature and species concentration distributions in the ThAI experimental facility. A three-dimensional model of the ThAI vessel for the CFX4.4 code was developed. The flowmore » in the simulation domain was modeled as single-phase. Steam condensation on vessel walls was modeled as a sink of mass and energy using a correlation that was originally developed for an integral approach. A simple model of bulk phase change was also introduced. The calculated time-dependent variables together with temperature and concentration distributions at the end of experiment phases are compared to experimental results. (authors)« less

  3. A model for evaluating the environmental benefits of elementary school facilities.

    PubMed

    Ji, Changyoon; Hong, Taehoon; Jeong, Kwangbok; Leigh, Seung-Bok

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a model that is capable of evaluating the environmental benefits of a new elementary school facility was developed. The model is composed of three steps: (i) retrieval of elementary school facilities having similar characteristics as the new elementary school facility using case-based reasoning; (ii) creation of energy consumption and material data for the benchmark elementary school facility using the retrieved similar elementary school facilities; and (iii) evaluation of the environmental benefits of the new elementary school facility by assessing and comparing the environmental impact of the new and created benchmark elementary school facility using life cycle assessment. The developed model can present the environmental benefits of a new elementary school facility in terms of monetary values using Environmental Priority Strategy 2000, a damage-oriented life cycle impact assessment method. The developed model can be used for the following: (i) as criteria for a green-building rating system; (ii) as criteria for setting the support plan and size, such as the government's incentives for promoting green-building projects; and (iii) as criteria for determining the feasibility of green building projects in key business sectors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Developing Livestock Facility Type Information from USDA Agricultural Census Data for Use in Epidemiological and Economic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C; Robertson, A; Hullinger, P

    2006-10-24

    The epidemiological and economic modeling of livestock diseases requires knowing the size, location, and operational type of each livestock facility within the US. At the present time, the only national database of livestock facilities that is available to the general public is the USDA's 2002 Agricultural Census data, published by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, herein referred to as the 'NASS data.' The NASS data provides facility data at the county level for various livestock types (i.e., beef cows, milk cows, cattle on feed, other cattle, total hogs and pigs, sheep and lambs, milk goats, and angora goats). However, themore » number and sizes of facilities for the various livestock types are not independent since some facilities have more than one type of livestock, and some livestock are of more than one type (e.g., 'other cattle' that are being fed for slaughter are also 'cattle on feed'). In addition, any data tabulated by NASS that could identify numbers of animals or other data reported by an individual respondent is suppressed by NASS and coded with a 'D.'. To be useful for epidemiological and economic modeling, the NASS data must be converted into a unique set of facility types (farms having similar operational characteristics). The unique set must not double count facilities or animals. At the same time, it must account for all the animals, including those for which the data has been suppressed. Therefore, several data processing steps are required to work back from the published NASS data to obtain a consistent database for individual livestock operations. This technical report documents data processing steps that were used to convert the NASS data into a national livestock facility database with twenty-eight facility types. The process involves two major steps. The first step defines the rules used to estimate the data that is suppressed within the NASS database. The second step converts the NASS livestock types into the operational

  5. 14 CFR 21.137 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....137 Section 21.137 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... manufacturing facilities. The Administrator does not issue a production certificate if the manufacturing... the United States in administering the applicable requirements of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 or...

  6. Visual-search models for location-known detection tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, H. C.; Karbaschi, Z.; Banerjee, K.; Das, M.

    2017-03-01

    Lesion-detection studies that analyze a fixed target position are generally considered predictive of studies involving lesion search, but the extent of the correlation often goes untested. The purpose of this work was to develop a visual-search (VS) model observer for location-known tasks that, coupled with previous work on localization tasks, would allow efficient same-observer assessments of how search and other task variations can alter study outcomes. The model observer featured adjustable parameters to control the search radius around the fixed lesion location and the minimum separation between suspicious locations. Comparisons were made against human observers, a channelized Hotelling observer and a nonprewhitening observer with eye filter in a two-alternative forced-choice study with simulated lumpy background images containing stationary anatomical and quantum noise. These images modeled single-pinhole nuclear medicine scans with different pinhole sizes. When the VS observer's search radius was optimized with training images, close agreement was obtained with human-observer results. Some performance differences between the humans could be explained by varying the model observer's separation parameter. The range of optimal pinhole sizes identified by the VS observer was in agreement with the range determined with the channelized Hotelling observer.

  7. United Space Alliance LLC Parachute Refurbishment Facility Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esser, Valerie; Pessaro, Martha; Young, Angela

    2007-01-01

    The Parachute Refurbishment Facility Model was created to reflect the flow of hardware through the facility using anticipated start and delivery times from a project level IV schedule. Distributions for task times were built using historical build data for SFOC work and new data generated for CLV/ARES task times. The model currently processes 633 line items from 14 SFOC builds for flight readiness, 16 SFOC builds returning from flight for defoul, wash, and dry operations, 12 builds for CLV manufacturing operations, and 1 ARES 1X build. Modeling the planned workflow through the PRF is providing a reliable way to predict the capability of the facility as well as the manpower resource need. Creating a real world process allows for real world problems to be identified and potential workarounds to be implemented in a safe, simulated world before taking it to the next step, implementation in the real world.

  8. Modeling the National Ignition Facility neutron imaging system.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D C; Grim, G P; Tregillis, I L; Wilke, M D; Patel, M V; Sepke, S M; Morgan, G L; Hatarik, R; Loomis, E N; Wilde, C H; Oertel, J A; Fatherley, V E; Clark, D D; Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Schmitt, M J; Marinak, M M; Munro, D H; Merrill, F E; Moran, M J; Wang, T-S F; Danly, C R; Hilko, R A; Batha, S H; Frank, M; Buckles, R

    2010-10-01

    Numerical modeling of the neutron imaging system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), forward from calculated target neutron emission to a camera image, will guide both the reduction of data and the future development of the system. Located 28 m from target chamber center, the system can produce two images at different neutron energies by gating on neutron arrival time. The brighter image, using neutrons near 14 MeV, reflects the size and symmetry of the implosion "hot spot." A second image in scattered neutrons, 10-12 MeV, reflects the size and symmetry of colder, denser fuel, but with only ∼1%-7% of the neutrons. A misalignment of the pinhole assembly up to ±175 μm is covered by a set of 37 subapertures with different pointings. The model includes the variability of the pinhole point spread function across the field of view. Omega experiments provided absolute calibration, scintillator spatial broadening, and the level of residual light in the down-scattered image from the primary neutrons. Application of the model to light decay measurements of EJ399, BC422, BCF99-55, Xylene, DPAC-30, and Liquid A suggests that DPAC-30 and Liquid A would be preferred over the BCF99-55 scintillator chosen for the first NIF system, if they could be fabricated into detectors with sufficient resolution.

  9. Scaling laws between population and facility densities.

    PubMed

    Um, Jaegon; Son, Seung-Woo; Lee, Sung-Ik; Jeong, Hawoong; Kim, Beom Jun

    2009-08-25

    When a new facility like a grocery store, a school, or a fire station is planned, its location should ideally be determined by the necessities of people who live nearby. Empirically, it has been found that there exists a positive correlation between facility and population densities. In the present work, we investigate the ideal relation between the population and the facility densities within the framework of an economic mechanism governing microdynamics. In previous studies based on the global optimization of facility positions in minimizing the overall travel distance between people and facilities, it was shown that the density of facility D and that of population rho should follow a simple power law D approximately rho(2/3). In our empirical analysis, on the other hand, the power-law exponent alpha in D approximately rho(alpha) is not a fixed value but spreads in a broad range depending on facility types. To explain this discrepancy in alpha, we propose a model based on economic mechanisms that mimic the competitive balance between the profit of the facilities and the social opportunity cost for populations. Through our simple, microscopically driven model, we show that commercial facilities driven by the profit of the facilities have alpha = 1, whereas public facilities driven by the social opportunity cost have alpha = 2/3. We simulate this model to find the optimal positions of facilities on a real U.S. map and show that the results are consistent with the empirical data.

  10. 7 CFR 1735.91 - Location of facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE GENERAL POLICIES, TYPES OF LOANS, LOAN REQUIREMENTS-TELECOMMUNICATIONS PROGRAM Requirements for... must be located so that they can be efficiently operated by the borrower and provide adequate security...

  11. 78 FR 37760 - Electrical Equipment in Hazardous Locations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... floating facilities engaged in OCS activities, however, equipment could be installed in hazardous locations... composition and the extent of equipment replacement. The myriad types of MODUs and facilities operating on the.... USCG-2012-0850] RIN 1625-AC00 Electrical Equipment in Hazardous Locations AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...

  12. An NPSS Model of a Proposed Altitude Test Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    An NPSS Model of a Proposed Altitude Test Facility by Brian C. Huffman, Thomas M. Lavelle, and Albert K. Owen ARL-RP-310 February 2011...originator. Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-RP-310 February 2011 An NPSS Model of a Proposed...January 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An NPSS Model of a Proposed Altitude Test Facility 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DAAB07-03-D-2389 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  13. Models for disaster relief shelter location and supply routing.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-01-01

    This project focuses on the development of a natural disaster response planning model that determines where to locate points of distribution for relief supplies after a disaster occurs. Advance planning (selecting locations for points of distribution...

  14. Utah FORGE Site Location, Datasets, and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Moore

    This submission includes the geographic extent shapefile of the Milford FORGE site located in Utah, along with a shapefile of seismometer positions throughout the area, and models of basin depth and potentiometric contours.

  15. Executive Order 12898 and Social, Economic, and Sociopolitical Factors Influencing Toxic Release Inventory Facility Location in EPA Region 6: A Multi-Scale Spatial Assessment of Environmental Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Andrea Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Release Inventory facilities are among the many environmental hazards shown to create environmental inequities in the United States. This project examined four factors associated with Toxic Release Inventory, specifically, manufacturing facility location at multiple spatial scales using spatial analysis techniques (i.e., O-ring statistic and…

  16. Development of a model forecasting Dermanyssus gallinae's population dynamics for advancing Integrated Pest Management in laying hen facilities.

    PubMed

    Mul, Monique F; van Riel, Johan W; Roy, Lise; Zoons, Johan; André, Geert; George, David R; Meerburg, Bastiaan G; Dicke, Marcel; van Mourik, Simon; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W G

    2017-10-15

    The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, is the most significant pest of egg laying hens in many parts of the world. Control of D. gallinae could be greatly improved with advanced Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for D. gallinae in laying hen facilities. The development of a model forecasting the pests' population dynamics in laying hen facilities without and post-treatment will contribute to this advanced IPM and could consequently improve implementation of IPM by farmers. The current work describes the development and demonstration of a model which can follow and forecast the population dynamics of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities given the variation of the population growth of D. gallinae within and between flocks. This high variation could partly be explained by house temperature, flock age, treatment, and hen house. The total population growth variation within and between flocks, however, was in part explained by temporal variation. For a substantial part this variation was unexplained. A dynamic adaptive model (DAP) was consequently developed, as models of this type are able to handle such temporal variations. The developed DAP model can forecast the population dynamics of D. gallinae, requiring only current flock population monitoring data, temperature data and information of the dates of any D. gallinae treatment. Importantly, the DAP model forecasted treatment effects, while compensating for location and time specific interactions, handling the variability of these parameters. The characteristics of this DAP model, and its compatibility with different mite monitoring methods, represent progression from existing approaches for forecasting D. gallinae that could contribute to advancing improved Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for D. gallinae in laying hen facilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of intermodal facilities to the design of supply chains for biorefineries.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-08-15

    This paper analyzes the impact that an intermodal facility has on location and transportation decisions for biofuel production plants. Location decisions impact the management of the in-bound and out-bound logistics of a plant. We model this supply c...

  18. 10 CFR 75.11 - Location information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Location information. 75.11 Section 75.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and Location Information § 75.11 Location information. (a) As required by the Additional Protocol...

  19. Modelling Pedestrian Travel Time and the Design of Facilities: A Queuing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Khalidur; Abdul Ghani, Noraida; Abdulbasah Kamil, Anton; Mustafa, Adli; Kabir Chowdhury, Md. Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Pedestrian movements are the consequence of several complex and stochastic facts. The modelling of pedestrian movements and the ability to predict the travel time are useful for evaluating the performance of a pedestrian facility. However, only a few studies can be found that incorporate the design of the facility, local pedestrian body dimensions, the delay experienced by the pedestrians, and level of service to the pedestrian movements. In this paper, a queuing based analytical model is developed as a function of relevant determinants and functional factors to predict the travel time on pedestrian facilities. The model can be used to assess the overall serving rate or performance of a facility layout and correlate it to the level of service that is possible to provide the pedestrians. It has also the ability to provide a clear suggestion on the designing and sizing of pedestrian facilities. The model is empirically validated and is found to be a robust tool to understand how well a particular walking facility makes possible comfort and convenient pedestrian movements. The sensitivity analysis is also performed to see the impact of some crucial parameters of the developed model on the performance of pedestrian facilities. PMID:23691055

  20. Improving the food waste composting facilities site selection for sustainable development using a hybrid modified MADM model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kung-Ming; Lin, Sheng-Hau; Hsieh, Jing-Chzi; Tzeng, Gwo-Hshiung

    2018-05-01

    With the growth of population and the development of urbanization, waste management has always been a critical global issue. Recently, more and more countries have found that food waste constitutes the majority of municipal waste, if they are disposed of properly, will bring more benefits in sustainable development. Regarding the issue of selecting and improving the location to make the disposal facility towards achieving the aspiration level for sustainable development, since it involves multiple and complicated interaction factors about environment, society, and economy which have to be considered properly in the decision-making process of mutual influence relationship. It is basically a multiple attribute decision making (MADM) issue, a difficult problem which has been obsessing the governments of many countries is widely studied and discussed. This study uses the new hybrid modified MADM model, as follows, first to build an influential network relation map (INRM) via DEMATEL technique, next to confirm the influential weightings via DANP (DEMATEL-based ANP), and then to construct a decision-making model via a hybrid modified VIKOR method to improve and select the location for remaining the best disposal facilities. Finally, an empirical case study is illustrated to demonstrate that the proposed model can be effective and useful. In finding the process of decision making, environmental pollution is the main concern of many people in the area, but actually it is the resistance by the general public that has to be considered with first priority. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Modeling of ammonia dry deposition downwind of a large poultry facility

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a study investigating dry deposition of ammonia downwind of a poultry facility located on the southern perimeter of the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. This work is a component of a larger project conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: "Imp...

  2. EPA Facility Registry System (FRS): NEPT

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the National Environmental Performance Track (NEPT) Program dataset. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs

  3. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): NEI

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the National Emissions Inventory (NEI) Program dataset. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs

  4. Wi-Fi real time location systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Benjamin A.

    This thesis objective was to determine the viability of utilizing an untrained Wi-Fi. real time location system as a GPS alternative for indoor environments. Background. research showed that GPS is rarely able to penetrate buildings to provide reliable. location data. The benefit of having location information in a facility and how they might. be used for disaster or emergency relief personnel and their resources motivated this. research. A building was selected with a well-deployed Wi-Fi infrastructure and its. untrained location feature was used to determine the distance between the specified. test points and the system identified location. It was found that the average distance. from the test point throughout the facility was 14.3 feet 80% of the time. This fell within. the defined viable range and supported that an untrained Wi-Fi RTLS system could be a. viable solution for GPS's lack of availability indoors.

  5. EPA Facility Registry System (FRS): NCES

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). The primary federal database for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the United States and other Nations, NCES is located in the U.S. Department of Education, within the Institute of Education Sciences. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA00e2??s national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to NCES school facilities once the NCES data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website http://www.epa.gov/enviro/html/fii/index.html.

  6. A stochastic discrete optimization model for designing container terminal facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukhruf, Febri; Frazila, Russ Bona; Burhani, Jzolanda Tsavalista

    2017-11-01

    As uncertainty essentially affect the total transportation cost, it remains important in the container terminal that incorporates several modes and transshipments process. This paper then presents a stochastic discrete optimization model for designing the container terminal, which involves the decision of facilities improvement action. The container terminal operation model is constructed by accounting the variation of demand and facilities performance. In addition, for illustrating the conflicting issue that practically raises in the terminal operation, the model also takes into account the possible increment delay of facilities due to the increasing number of equipment, especially the container truck. Those variations expectantly reflect the uncertainty issue in the container terminal operation. A Monte Carlo simulation is invoked to propagate the variations by following the observed distribution. The problem is constructed within the framework of the combinatorial optimization problem for investigating the optimal decision of facilities improvement. A new variant of glow-worm swarm optimization (GSO) is thus proposed for solving the optimization, which is rarely explored in the transportation field. The model applicability is tested by considering the actual characteristics of the container terminal.

  7. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 112 - Facility-Specific Response Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Contents 1.0Model Facility-Specific Response Plan 1.1Emergency Response Action Plan 1.2Facility.... EC01MR92.015 1.1Emergency Response Action Plan Several sections of the response plan shall be co-located... sections shall be called the Emergency Response Action Plan. The Agency intends that the Action Plan...

  8. Three-dimensional geologic modeling to determine the spatial attributes of hydrocarbon contamination, Noval Facility Fuel Farm, El Centro, California

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Mutch, S.; Padgett, D.

    An investigation was conducted at the Naval Air Facility located in El Centro (NAFEC), to determine the vertical and horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the facilities fuel farm. The fuel products are the result of tank and pipeline leakage, past tank cleaning, and past disposal of fuel dispensing and filter cleaning practices. Subsurface soil and groundwater data was collected via soil borings, monitoring wells, and CPT probes. Soil, groundwater, and analytical data were integrated using the LYNX geoscience modeling system (GMS). Interactive sessions with the data visualizer helped guide the modeling and identify data gaps. Modeling results indicate amore » continuous surface confining clay layer to a depth of about 12 to 15 ft. Groundwater is confined beneath this clay layer and monitoring wells indicate about 3 to 5 ft of artesian head. Hydrocarbon contamination is concentrated within this clay layer from about 5 to 12 ft below the ground surface. Residual fuel products located in the groundwater are attributed to slow leakage through the confirming clay layer. LYNX was also used to compute volumes of contaminated soil to aid in remediation cost analysis. Preliminary figures indicate about 60,000 yards[sup 3] of contaminated soil. Since the contamination is primarily confined to relatively impermeable clayey soils, site remediation will likely be ex-situ land farming.« less

  9. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, A.M.M.; Paulson, C.C.; Peacock, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G.H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decisionmore » has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities.« less

  10. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Alan M. M.; Paulson, C. C.; Peacock, M. A.

    1995-09-15

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G. H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. Amore » decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities.« less

  11. 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft in Flow Visualization Facility (FVF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This image shows a plastic 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft inside the 'Water Tunnel' more formally known as the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. Water is pumped through the tunnel in the direction of normal airflow over the aircraft; then, colored dyes are pumped through tubes with needle valves. The dyes flow back along the airframe and over the airfoils highlighting their aerodynamic characteristics. The aircraft can also be moved through its pitch axis to observe airflow disruptions while simulating actual flight at high angles of attack. The Water Tunnel at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, became operational in 1983 when Dryden was a Flight Research Facility under the management of the Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. As a medium for visualizing fluid flow, water has played a significant role. Its use dates back to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), the Renaissance Italian engineer, architect, painter, and sculptor. In more recent times, water tunnels have assisted the study of complex flows and flow-field interactions on aircraft shapes that generate strong vortex flows. Flow visualization in water tunnels assists in determining the strength of vortices, their location, and possible methods of controlling them. The design of the Dryden Water Tunnel imitated that of the Northrop Corporation's tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. Called the Flow Visualization Facility, the Dryden tunnel was built to assist researchers in understanding the aerodynamics of aircraft configured in such a way that they create strong vortex flows, particularly at high angles of attack. The tunnel provides results that compare well with data from aircraft in actual flight in another fluid-air. Other uses of the tunnel have included study of how such flight hardware as antennas, probes, pylons, parachutes, and experimental fixtures affect airflow. The facility has also been helpful in finding the best locations for emitting smoke from flight vehicles for flow

  12. 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft in Flow Visualization Facility (FVF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This short movie clip shows a plastic 1/48-scale model of an F-18 aircraft inside the 'Water Tunnel' more formally known as the NASA Dryden Flow Visualization Facility. Water is pumped through the tunnel in the direction of normal airflow over the aircraft; then, colored dyes are pumped through tubes with needle valves. The dyes flow back along the airframe and over the airfoils highlighting their aerodynamic characteristics. The aircraft can also be moved through its pitch axis to observe airflow disruptions while simulating actual flight at high angles of attack. The Water Tunnel at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, became operational in 1983 when Dryden was a Flight Research Facility under the management of the Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. As a medium for visualizing fluid flow, water has played a significant role. Its use dates back to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), the Renaissance Italian engineer, architect, painter, and sculptor. In more recent times, water tunnels have assisted the study of complex flows and flow-field interactions on aircraft shapes that generate strong vortex flows. Flow visualization in water tunnels assists in determining the strength of vortices, their location, and possible methods of controlling them. The design of the Dryden Water Tunnel imitated that of the Northrop Corporation's tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. Called the Flow Visualization Facility, the Dryden tunnel was built to assist researchers in understanding the aerodynamics of aircraft configured in such a way that they create strong vortex flows, particularly at high angles of attack. The tunnel provides results that compare well with data from aircraft in actual flight in another fluid-air. Other uses of the tunnel have included study of how such flight hardware as antennas, probes, pylons, parachutes, and experimental fixtures affect airflow. The facility has also been helpful in finding the best locations for emitting smoke from flight vehicles

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, James

    2016-04-01

    Mission and Vision Statements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mission The ARM Climate Research Facility, a DOE scientific user facility, provides the climate research community with strategically located in situ and remote-sensing observatories designed to improve the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their interactions and coupling with the Earth’s surface. Vision To provide a detailed and accurate description of the Earth atmosphere in diverse climate regimes to resolve the uncertainties in climate and Earth system models toward the development ofmore » sustainable solutions for the nation's energy and environmental challenges.« less

  14. 46 CFR 108.233 - Location and size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Helicopter Facilities § 108.233 Location and size. (a) Each helicopter deck must be— (1) At least the size of the rotor diameter of the largest single main rotor helicopter that will be used on the facility; or (2) If tandem main rotor helicopters use the facility, at...

  15. 46 CFR 108.233 - Location and size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Helicopter Facilities § 108.233 Location and size. (a) Each helicopter deck must be— (1) At least the size of the rotor diameter of the largest single main rotor helicopter that will be used on the facility; or (2) If tandem main rotor helicopters use the facility, at...

  16. 46 CFR 108.233 - Location and size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Helicopter Facilities § 108.233 Location and size. (a) Each helicopter deck must be— (1) At least the size of the rotor diameter of the largest single main rotor helicopter that will be used on the facility; or (2) If tandem main rotor helicopters use the facility, at...

  17. 46 CFR 108.233 - Location and size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Helicopter Facilities § 108.233 Location and size. (a) Each helicopter deck must be— (1) At least the size of the rotor diameter of the largest single main rotor helicopter that will be used on the facility; or (2) If tandem main rotor helicopters use the facility, at...

  18. 46 CFR 108.233 - Location and size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Helicopter Facilities § 108.233 Location and size. (a) Each helicopter deck must be— (1) At least the size of the rotor diameter of the largest single main rotor helicopter that will be used on the facility; or (2) If tandem main rotor helicopters use the facility, at...

  19. National facilities study. Volume 3: Mission and requirements model report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The National Facility Study (NFS) was initiated in 1992 by Daniel S. Goldin, Administrator of NASA as an initiative to develop a comprehensive and integrated long-term plan for future facilities. The resulting, multi-agency NFS consisted of three Task Groups: Aeronautics, Space Operations, and Space Research and Development (R&D) Task Groups. A fourth group, the Engineering and Cost Analysis Task Group, was subsequently added to provide cross-cutting functions, such as assuring consistency in developing an inventory of space facilities. Space facilities decisions require an assessment of current and future needs. Therefore, the two task groups dealing with space developed a consistent model of future space mission programs, operations and R&D. The model is a middle ground baseline constructed for NFS analytical purposes with excursions to cover potential space program strategies. The model includes three major sectors: DOD, civilian government, and commercial space. The model spans the next 30 years because of the long lead times associated with facilities development and usage. This document, Volume 3 of the final NFS report, is organized along the following lines: Executive Summary -- provides a summary view of the 30-year mission forecast and requirements baseline, an overview of excursions from that baseline that were studied, and organization of the report; Introduction -- provides discussions of the methodology used in this analysis; Baseline Model -- provides the mission and requirements model baseline developed for Space Operations and Space R&D analyses; Excursions from the baseline -- reviews the details of variations or 'excursions' that were developed to test the future program projections captured in the baseline; and a Glossary of Acronyms.

  20. User Delay Cost Model and Facilities Maintenance Cost Model for a Terminal Control Area : Volume 3. User's Manual and Program Documentation for the Facilities Maintenance Cost Model

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1978-05-01

    The Facilities Maintenance Cost Model (FMCM) is an analytic model designed to calculate expected annual labor costs of maintenance within a given FAA maintenance sector. The model is programmed in FORTRAN IV and has been demonstrated on the CDC Krono...

  1. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): OIL

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This dataset contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Oil database. The Oil database contains information on Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) and Facility Response Plan (FRP) subject facilities to prevent and respond to oil spills. FRP facilities are referred to as substantial harm facilities due to the quantities of oil stored and facility characteristics. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to Oil facilities once the Oil data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  2. Region 9 NPDES Facilities - Waste Water Treatment Plants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Waste Water Treatment Plant Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates direct discharges from facilities that discharge treated waste water into waters of the US. Facilities are issued NPDES permits regulating their discharge as required by the Clean Water Act. A facility may have one or more outfalls (dischargers). The location represents the facility or operating plant.

  3. 7 CFR 1924.106 - Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROGRAM REGULATIONS..., either by location or terrain, to essential community facilities such as water, sewerage, schools...

  4. 7 CFR 1924.106 - Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROGRAM REGULATIONS..., either by location or terrain, to essential community facilities such as water, sewerage, schools...

  5. 7 CFR 1924.106 - Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROGRAM REGULATIONS..., either by location or terrain, to essential community facilities such as water, sewerage, schools...

  6. 7 CFR 1924.106 - Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROGRAM REGULATIONS..., either by location or terrain, to essential community facilities such as water, sewerage, schools...

  7. SPECIAL ANALYSIS AIR PATHWAY MODELING OF E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Hiergesell, R.; Taylor, G.

    This Special Analysis (SA) was initiated to address a concern expressed by the Department of Energy's Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) Review Team during their review of the 2008 E-Area Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC, 2008). Their concern was the potential for overlapping of atmospheric plumes, emanating from the soil surface above SRS LLW disposal facilities within the E-Area, to contribute to the dose received by a member of the public during the Institutional Control (IC) period. The implication of this concern was that the dose to the maximally-exposed individual (MEI) located at the SRS boundary mightmore » be underestimated during this time interval. To address this concern a re-analysis of the atmospheric pathway releases from E-Area was required. In the process of developing a new atmospheric release model (ARM) capable of addressing the LFRG plume overlap concern, it became obvious that new and better atmospheric pathway disposal limits should be developed for each of the E-Area disposal facilities using the new ARM. The scope of the SA was therefore expanded to include the generation of these new limits. The initial work conducted in this SA was to develop a new ARM using the GoldSim{reg_sign} program (GTG, 2009). The model simulates the subsurface vapor diffusion of volatile radionuclides as they release from E-Area disposal facility waste zones and migrate to the land surface. In the process of this work, many new features, including several new physical and chemical transport mechanisms, were incorporated into the model. One of the most important improvements was to incorporate a mechanism to partition volatile contaminants across the water-air interface within the partially saturated pore space of the engineered and natural materials through which vapor phase transport occurs. A second mechanism that was equally important was to incorporate a maximum concentration of 1.9E-07 Ci/m{sup 3} of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the air

  8. Location | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research campus is located 50 miles northwest of Washington, D.C., and 50 miles west of Baltimore, Maryland, in Frederick, Maryland. Satellite locations include leased and government facilities extending s

  9. Status Report for the Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelison, Charles J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility, located at Ames Research Center, is NASA's only aeroballistic facility. During 1997, its model imaging and time history recording systems were the focus of a major refurbishment effort. Specifically the model detection, spark gap (light source); Kerr cell (high speed shuttering); and interval timer sub-systems were inspected, repaired, modified or replaced as required. These refurbishment efforts have fully restored the HFFAF's capabilities to a much better condition, comparable to what it was 15 years ago. Details of this refurbishment effort along with a brief discussion of future upgrade plans are presented.

  10. Analyzing the impact of intermodal facilities to the design and management of biofuels supply chain.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact that an intermodal facility has on location and transportation : decisions for biofuel production plants. Location decisions impact the management of the in-bound and out-bound logistics of a plant. We model this supply...

  11. Computer Simulation of the Alonso Household Location Model in the Microeconomics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Roger E.

    2005-01-01

    Computer simulation of the Alonso household location model can enrich the intermediate microeconomics course. The model includes decisions on location, land space, and other goods and is a valuable complement to the usual textbook model of household consumption. It has three decision variables, one of which is a "bad," and one good's price is a…

  12. Towards a global network of gamma-ray detector calibration facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijs, Marco; Koomans, Ronald; Limburg, Han

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray logging tools are applied worldwide. At various locations, calibration facilities are used to calibrate these gamma-ray logging systems. Several attempts have been made to cross-correlate well known calibration pits, but this cross-correlation does not include calibration facilities in Europe or private company calibration facilities. Our aim is to set-up a framework that gives the possibility to interlink all calibration facilities worldwide by using `tools of opportunity' - tools that have been calibrated in different calibration facilities, whether this usage was on a coordinated basis or by coincidence. To compare the measurement of different tools, it is important to understand the behaviour of the tools in the different calibration pits. Borehole properties, such as diameter, fluid, casing and probe diameter strongly influence the outcome of gamma-ray borehole logging. Logs need to be properly calibrated and compensated for these borehole properties in order to obtain in-situ grades or to do cross-hole correlation. Some tool providers provide tool-specific correction curves for this purpose. Others rely on reference measurements against sources of known radionuclide concentration and geometry. In this article, we present an attempt to set-up a framework for transferring `local' calibrations to be applied `globally'. This framework includes corrections for any geometry and detector size to give absolute concentrations of radionuclides from borehole measurements. This model is used to compare measurements in the calibration pits of Grand Junction, located in the USA; Adelaide (previously known as AMDEL), located in Adelaide Australia; and Stonehenge, located at Medusa Explorations BV in the Netherlands.

  13. Senator Doug Jones (D-AL) Tour of MSFC Facilities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-02-22

    Senator Doug Jones (D-AL.) and wife, Louise, tour Marshall Space Flight facilities. Steve Doering, manager, Stages Element, Space Launch System (SLS) program at MSFC, explains the stages of the SLS rocket with the scale model rocket located in the lobby of building 4200.

  14. Location Distribution Optimization of Photographing Sites for Indoor Panorama Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Wu, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Xin, Z.; Liu, J.

    2017-09-01

    Generally, panoramas image modeling is costly and time-consuming because of photographing continuously to capture enough photos along the routes, especially in complicated indoor environment. Thus, difficulty follows for a wider applications of panoramic image modeling for business. It is indispensable to make a feasible arrangement of panorama sites locations because the locations influence the clarity, coverage and the amount of panoramic images under the condition of certain device. This paper is aim to propose a standard procedure to generate the specific location and total amount of panorama sites in indoor panoramas modeling. Firstly, establish the functional relationship between one panorama site and its objectives. Then, apply the relationship to panorama sites network. We propose the Distance Clarity function (FC and Fe) manifesting the mathematical relationship between panoramas and objectives distance or obstacle distance. The Distance Buffer function (FB) is modified from traditional buffer method to generate the coverage of panorama site. Secondly, transverse every point in possible area to locate possible panorama site, calculate the clarity and coverage synthetically. Finally select as little points as possible to satiate clarity requirement preferentially and then the coverage requirement. In the experiments, detailed parameters of camera lens are given. Still, more experiments parameters need trying out given that relationship between clarity and distance is device dependent. In short, through the function FC, Fe and FB, locations of panorama sites can be generated automatically and accurately.

  15. Obchs: AN Effective Harmony Search Algorithm with Oppositionbased Chaos-Enhanced Initialization for Solving Uncapacitated Facility Location Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, A. A.; Kazemizade, O.; Abbaspour, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a continuous harmony search (HS) approach is investigated for tackling the Uncapacitated Facility Location (UFL) task. This article proposes an efficient modified HS-based optimizer to improve the performance of HS on complex spatial tasks like UFL problems. For this aim, opposition-based learning (OBL) and chaotic patterns are utilized. The proposed technique is examined against several UFL benchmark challenges in specialized literature. Then, the modified HS is substantiated in detail and compared to the basic HS and some other methods. The results showed that new opposition-based chaotic HS (OBCHS) algorithm not only can exploit better solutions competently but it is able to outperform HS in solving UFL problems.

  16. 20 CFR 416.1023 - Facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Facilities. 416.1023 Section 416.1023... Facilities. (a) Space, equipment, supplies, and other services. Subject to appropriate Federal funding, the... and prompt disability determinations. (b) Location of facilities. Subject to appropriate Federal...

  17. Characterization of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) waste tanks located at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

    1997-04-01

    The Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) is located in Melton Valley within Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 and includes five underground storage tanks (T1, T2, T3, T4, and T9) ranging from 13,000 to 25,000 gal. capacity. During the period of 1996--97 there was a major effort to re-sample and characterize the contents of these inactive waste tanks. The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, examine concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPPmore » and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and to provide the data needed to meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data collected on both the supernatant and sludge samples taken from three different locations in each of the OHF tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ({sup 233}U and {sup 235}U) do not satisfy the denature ratios required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The fissile isotope of plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) are diluted with thorium far above the WAC requirements. In general, the OHF sludge was found to be hazardous (RCRA) based on total metal content and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the OHF sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.« less

  18. The 50-horsepower solar-powered irrigation facility located near Gila Bend, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. A.; Alexander, G.; Busch, D. F.

    1980-05-01

    The 50 horsepower solar powered irrigation facility near Gila Bend, Arizona which includes a Rankine cycle demonstrates the technical feasibility of solar powered pumping. The design of a facility specifically for the irrigation farmer using the technology that has been developed over the last four years is proposed.

  19. The 50-horsepower solar-powered irrigation facility located near Gila Bend, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. A.; Alexander, G.; Busch, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    The 50 horsepower solar powered irrigation facility near Gila Bend, Arizona which includes a Rankine cycle demonstrates the technical feasibility of solar powered pumping. The design of a facility specifically for the irrigation farmer using the technology that has been developed over the last four years is proposed.

  20. PWR Facility Dose Modeling Using MCNP5 and the CADIS/ADVANTG Variance-Reduction Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, Edward D; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C

    2007-09-01

    The feasibility of modeling a pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) facility and calculating dose rates at all locations within the containment and adjoining structures using MCNP5 with mesh tallies is presented. Calculations of dose rates resulting from neutron and photon sources from the reactor (operating and shut down for various periods) and the spent fuel pool, as well as for the photon source from the primary coolant loop, were all of interest. Identification of the PWR facility, development of the MCNP-based model and automation of the run process, calculation of the various sources, and development of methods for visually examining mesh tally filesmore » and extracting dose rates were all a significant part of the project. Advanced variance reduction, which was required because of the size of the model and the large amount of shielding, was performed via the CADIS/ADVANTG approach. This methodology uses an automatically generated three-dimensional discrete ordinates model to calculate adjoint fluxes from which MCNP weight windows and source bias parameters are generated. Investigative calculations were performed using a simple block model and a simplified full-scale model of the PWR containment, in which the adjoint source was placed in various regions. In general, it was shown that placement of the adjoint source on the periphery of the model provided adequate results for regions reasonably close to the source (e.g., within the containment structure for the reactor source). A modification to the CADIS/ADVANTG methodology was also studied in which a global adjoint source is weighted by the reciprocal of the dose response calculated by an earlier forward discrete ordinates calculation. This method showed improved results over those using the standard CADIS/ADVANTG approach, and its further investigation is recommended for future efforts.« less

  1. 20 CFR 404.1623 - Facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Facilities. 404.1623 Section 404.1623...- ) Determinations of Disability Administrative Responsibilities and Requirements § 404.1623 Facilities. (a) Space... determinations. (b) Location of facilities. Subject to appropriate Federal funding, the State will determine the...

  2. Underwater hydrophone location survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Jack B.

    1993-01-01

    The Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) is a U.S. Navy test range located on Andros Island, Bahamas, and a Division of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC), Newport, RI. The Headquarters of AUTEC is located at a facility in West Palm Beach, FL. AUTEC's primary mission is to provide the U.S. Navy with a deep-water test and evaluation facility for making underwater acoustic measurements, testing and calibrating sonars, and providing accurate underwater, surface, and in-air tracking data on surface ships, submarines, aircraft, and weapon systems. Many of these programs are in support of Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW), undersea research and development programs, and Fleet assessment and operational readiness trials. Most tests conducted at AUTEC require precise underwater tracking (plus or minus 3 yards) of multiple acoustic signals emitted with the correct waveshape and repetition criteria from either a surface craft or underwater vehicle.

  3. Charging stations location model based on spatiotemporal electromobility use patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagany, Raphaela; Marquardt, Anna; Zink, Roland

    2016-04-01

    One of the major challenges for mainstream adoption of electric vehicles is the provision of infrastructure for charging the batteries of the vehicles. The charging stations must not only be located dense enough to allow users to complete their journeys, but the electric energy must also be provided from renewable sources in order to truly offer a transportation with less CO2 emissions. The examination of potential locations for the charging of electric vehicles can facilitate the adaption of electromobility and the integration of electronic vehicles in everyday life. A geographic information system (GIS) based model for optimal location of charging stations in a small and regional scale is presented. This considers parameters such as the forecast of electric vehicle use penetration, the relevant weight of diverse point of interests and the distance between parking area and destination for different vehicle users. In addition to the spatial scale the temporal modelling of the energy demand at the different charging locations has to be considerate. Depending on different user profiles (commuters, short haul drivers etc.) the frequency of charging vary during the day, the week and the year. In consequence, the spatiotemporal variability is a challenge for a reliable energy supply inside a decentralized renewable energy system. The presented model delivers on the one side the most adequate identified locations for charging stations and on the other side the interaction between energy supply and demand for electromobility under the consideration of temporal aspects. Using ESRI ArcGIS Desktop, first results for the case study region of Lower Bavaria are generated. The aim of the concept is to keep the model transferable to other regions and also open to integrate further and more detailed user profiles, derived from social studies about i.e. the daily behavior and the perception of electromobility in a next step.

  4. Region 9 NPDES Facilities 2012- Waste Water Treatment Plants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Waste Water Treatment Plant Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates direct discharges from facilities that discharge treated waste water into waters of the US. Facilities are issued NPDES permits regulating their discharge as required by the Clean Water Act. A facility may have one or more outfalls (dischargers). The location represents the facility or operating plant.

  5. A simple model to demonstrate the electronic apex locator.

    PubMed

    Tinaz, A C; Alaçam, T; Topuz, O

    2002-11-01

    To describe and evaluate a newly developed model for demonstrating and teaching the use of electronic apex locators. A phantom model, master jaw model and extracted human teeth were used to construct the demonstration model with alginate impression material as the periapical conductive medium. The model was validated in a series of length determinations with apical foramina enlarged to 0.20, 0.30 and 0.45 mm diameter, and the stability of the model was evaluated up to 45 h after construction. All evaluations were conducted with the Root ZX apex locator with 2.65 and 5.25% NaOCl in the canals. Most length measurements were within 1 mm of actual root length (range: -2.2 to +0.21 mm) and did not change significantly over 45 h for teeth with foramina of 0.3 mm or less. Measurements for teeth with wide (0.45 mm) apices were stable up to 28 h. NaOCl concentration did not significantly affect the readings. A simple, inexpensive model can be manufactured from plastic dental jaws, natural teeth and alginate impression material to demonstrate electronic working length measurement. The model is stable for many hours and provides consistent results with different concentrations of NaOCl in the canal and various apical diameters. The model is a useful teaching aid but needs further evaluation and refinement before use in research applications.

  6. Advanced nozzle and engine components test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.; Delroso, Richard L.; Delrosario, Ruben

    1992-01-01

    A test facility for conducting scaled advanced nozzle and engine component research is described. The CE-22 test facility, located in the Engine Research Building of the NASA Lewis Research Center, contains many systems for the economical testing of advanced scale-model nozzles and engine components. The combustion air and altitude exhaust systems are described. Combustion air can be supplied to a model up to 40 psig for primary air flow, and 40, 125, and 450 psig for secondary air flow. Altitude exhaust can be simulated up to 48,000 ft, or the exhaust can be atmospheric. Descriptions of the multiaxis thrust stand, a color schlieren flow visualization system used for qualitative flow analysis, a labyrinth flow measurement system, a data acquisition system, and auxiliary systems are discussed. Model recommended design information and temperature and pressure instrumentation recommendations are included.

  7. The Nature of Scatter at the DARHT Facility and Suggestions for Improved Modeling of DARHT Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Morneau, Rachel Anne; Klasky, Marc Louis

    The U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program [1] is designed to sustain and evaluate the nuclear weapons stockpile while foregoing underground nuclear tests. The maintenance of a smaller, aging U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing requires complex computer calculations [14]. These calculations in turn need to be verified and benchmarked [14]. A wide range of research facilities have been used to test and evaluate nuclear weapons while respecting the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) [2]. Some of these facilities include the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories, and the Dual Axismore » Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research will focus largely on DARHT (although some information from Cygnus and the Los Alamos Microtron may be used in this research) by modeling it and comparing to experimental data. DARHT is an electron accelerator that employs high-energy flash x-ray sources for imaging hydro-tests. This research proposes to address some of the issues crucial to understanding DARHT Axis II and the analysis of the radiographic images produced. Primarily, the nature of scatter at DARHT will be modeled and verified with experimental data. It will then be shown that certain design decisions can be made to optimize the scatter field for hydrotest experiments. Spectral effects will be briefly explored to determine if there is any considerable effect on the density reconstruction caused by changes in the energy spectrum caused by target changes. Finally, a generalized scatter model will be made using results from MCNP that can be convolved with the direct transmission of an object to simulate the scatter of that object at the detector plane. The region in which with this scatter model is appropriate will be explored.« less

  8. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): CAMDBS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Clean Air Markets Division Business System (CAMDBS). Administered by the EPA Clean Air Markets Division, within the Office of Air and Radiation, CAMDBS supports the implementation of market-based air pollution control programs, including the Acid Rain Program and regional programs designed to reduce the transport of ozone. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to CAMDBS facilities once the CAMDBS data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  9. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of hazardous waste facilities that link to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information System (RCRAInfo). EPA's comprehensive information system in support of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of 1984, RCRAInfo tracks many types of information about generators, transporters, treaters, storers, and disposers of hazardous waste. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to RCRAInfo hazardous waste facilities once the RCRAInfo data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs

  10. Contribution of Geographic Information Systems and location models to planning of wastewater systems.

    PubMed

    Leitão, J P; Matos, J S; Gonçalves, A B; Matos, J L

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the contributions of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and location models towards planning regional wastewater systems (sewers and wastewater treatment plants) serving small agglomerations, i.e. agglomerations with less than 2,000 inhabitants. The main goal was to develop a decision support tool for tracing and locating regional wastewater systems. The main results of the model are expressed in terms of number, capacity and location of Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTP) and the length of main sewers. The decision process concerning the location and capacity of wastewater systems has a number of parameters that can be optimized. These parameters include the total sewer length and number, capacity and location of WWTP. The optimization of parameters should lead to the minimization of construction and operation costs of the integrated system. Location models have been considered as tools for decision support, mainly when a geo-referenced database can be used. In these cases, the GIS may represent an important role for the analysis of data and results especially in the preliminary stage of planning and design. After selecting the spatial location model and the heuristics, two greedy algorithms were implemented in Visual Basic for Applications on the ArcGIS software environment. To illustrate the application of these algorithms a case study was developed, in a rural area located in the central part of Portugal.

  11. Rural-urban differences in end-of-life nursing home care: facility and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B

    2012-06-01

    This study examines urban-rural differences in end-of-life (EOL) quality of care provided to nursing home (NH) residents. We constructed 3 risk-adjusted EOL quality measures (QMs) for long-term decedent residents: in-hospital death, hospice referral before death, and presence of severe pain. We used CY2005-2007 100% Minimum Data Set, Medicare beneficiary file, and inpatient and hospice claims. Logistic regression models were estimated to predict the probability of each outcome conditional on decedents' risk factors. For each facility, QMs were calculated as the difference between the actual and the expected risk-adjusted outcome rates. We fit multivariate linear regression models, with fixed state effects, for each QM to assess the association with urban-rural location. We found urban-rural differences for in-hospital death and hospice QMs, but not for pain. Compared with NHs located in urban areas, facilities in smaller towns and in isolated rural areas have significantly (p < .001) worse EOL quality for in-hospital death and hospice use. Whereas the differences in these QMs are statistically significant between facilities located in large versus small towns, they are not statistically significant between facilities located in small towns and isolated rural areas. This study provides empirical evidence for urban-rural differences in EOL quality of care using a national sample of NHs. Identifying differences is a necessary first step toward improving care for dying NH residents and for bridging the urban-rural gap.

  12. Developing Poultry Facility Type Information from USDA Agricultural Census Data for Use in Epidemiological and Economic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C

    2007-12-05

    The epidemiological and economic modeling of poultry diseases requires knowing the size, location, and operational type of each poultry type operation within the US. At the present time, the only national database of poultry operations that is available to the general public is the USDA's 2002 Agricultural Census data, published by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, herein referred to as the 'NASS data'. The NASS data provides census data at the county level on poultry operations for various operation types (i.e., layers, broilers, turkeys, ducks, geese). However, the number of farms and sizes of farms for the various types aremore » not independent since some facilities have more than one type of operation. Furthermore, some data on the number of birds represents the number sold, which does not represent the number of birds present at any given time. In addition, any data tabulated by NASS that could identify numbers of birds or other data reported by an individual respondent is suppressed by NASS and coded with a 'D'. To be useful for epidemiological and economic modeling, the NASS data must be converted into a unique set of facility types (farms having similar operational characteristics). The unique set must not double count facilities or birds. At the same time, it must account for all the birds, including those for which the data has been suppressed. Therefore, several data processing steps are required to work back from the published NASS data to obtain a consistent database for individual poultry operations. This technical report documents data processing steps that were used to convert the NASS data into a national poultry facility database with twenty-six facility types (7 egg-laying, 6 broiler, 1 backyard, 3 turkey, and 9 others, representing ducks, geese, ostriches, emus, pigeons, pheasants, quail, game fowl breeders and 'other'). The process involves two major steps. The first step defines the rules used to estimate the data that is

  13. Grid Facilities | Grid Modernization | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    groundbreaking innovations and collaboration in grid research. Photo of the Energy Systems Integration Facility Energy Systems Integration Facility The Energy Systems Integration Facility is the nation's premier user Located in Boulder, Colorado, the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) offers similar integration

  14. 30 CFR 57.20008 - Toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toilet facilities. 57.20008 Section 57.20008....20008 Toilet facilities. (a) Toilet facilities shall be provided at locations that are compatible with the mine operations and that are readily accessible to mine personnel. (b) The facilities shall be...

  15. A firefly algorithm for solving competitive location-design problem: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Seyed Jafar; Ashtiani, Milad Gorji; Ramezanian, Reza; Makui, Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims at determining the optimal number of new facilities besides specifying both the optimal location and design level of them under the budget constraint in a competitive environment by a novel hybrid continuous and discrete firefly algorithm. A real-world application of locating new chain stores in the city of Tehran, Iran, is used and the results are analyzed. In addition, several examples have been solved to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed model and algorithm. The results demonstrate that the performed method provides good-quality results for the test problems.

  16. Integrated Payment and Delivery Models Offer Opportunities and Challenges for Residential Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C.; Caudry, Daryl J.; Dean, Katie M.; Stevenson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Under health care reform, a series of new financing and delivery models are being piloted to integrate health and long-term care services for older adults. To date, these programs have not encompassed residential care facilities, with most programs focusing on long-term care recipients in the community or the nursing home. Our analyses indicate that individuals living in residential care facilities have similarly high rates of chronic illness and Medicare utilization when compared with similar populations in the community and nursing home. These results suggest the residential care facility population could benefit greatly from models that coordinate health and long-term care. However, few providers have invested in integrated delivery models. Several challenges exist toward greater integration including the private payment of residential care facility services and the fact that residential care facilities do not share in any Medicare savings due to improved coordination of care. PMID:26438740

  17. Effects of ignition location models on the burn patterns of simulated wildfires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bar-Massada, A.; Syphard, A.D.; Hawbaker, T.J.; Stewart, S.I.; Radeloff, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Fire simulation studies that use models such as FARSITE often assume that ignition locations are distributed randomly, because spatially explicit information about actual ignition locations are difficult to obtain. However, many studies show that the spatial distribution of ignition locations, whether human-caused or natural, is non-random. Thus, predictions from fire simulations based on random ignitions may be unrealistic. However, the extent to which the assumption of ignition location affects the predictions of fire simulation models has never been systematically explored. Our goal was to assess the difference in fire simulations that are based on random versus non-random ignition location patterns. We conducted four sets of 6000 FARSITE simulations for the Santa Monica Mountains in California to quantify the influence of random and non-random ignition locations and normal and extreme weather conditions on fire size distributions and spatial patterns of burn probability. Under extreme weather conditions, fires were significantly larger for non-random ignitions compared to random ignitions (mean area of 344.5 ha and 230.1 ha, respectively), but burn probability maps were highly correlated (r = 0.83). Under normal weather, random ignitions produced significantly larger fires than non-random ignitions (17.5 ha and 13.3 ha, respectively), and the spatial correlations between burn probability maps were not high (r = 0.54), though the difference in the average burn probability was small. The results of the study suggest that the location of ignitions used in fire simulation models may substantially influence the spatial predictions of fire spread patterns. However, the spatial bias introduced by using a random ignition location model may be minimized if the fire simulations are conducted under extreme weather conditions when fire spread is greatest. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. 30 CFR 56.20008 - Toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toilet facilities. 56.20008 Section 56.20008... Toilet facilities. (a) Toilet facilities shall be provided at locations that are compatible with the mine operations and that are readily accessible to mine personnel. (b) The facilities shall be kept clean and...

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): TRI

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) System. TRI is a publicly available EPA database reported annually by certain covered industry groups, as well as federal facilities. It contains information about more than 650 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or released into the environment, and includes information about waste management and pollution prevention activities. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to TRI facilities once the TRI data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  20. Microseismic response characteristics modeling and locating of underground water supply pipe leak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    In traditional methods of pipeline leak location, geophones must be located on the pipe wall. If the exact location of the pipeline is unknown, the leaks cannot be identified accurately. To solve this problem, taking into account the characteristics of the pipeline leak, we propose a continuous random seismic source model and construct geological models to investigate the proposed method for locating underground pipeline leaks. Based on two dimensional (2D) viscoacoustic equations and the staggered grid finite-difference (FD) algorithm, the microseismic wave field generated by a leaking pipe is modeled. Cross-correlation analysis and the simulated annealing (SA) algorithm were utilized to obtain the time difference and the leak location. We also analyze and discuss the effect of the number of recorded traces, the survey layout, and the offset and interval of the traces on the accuracy of the estimated location. The preliminary results of the simulation and data field experiment indicate that (1) a continuous random source can realistically represent the leak microseismic wave field in a simulation using 2D visco-acoustic equations and a staggered grid FD algorithm. (2) The cross-correlation method is effective for calculating the time difference of the direct wave relative to the reference trace. However, outside the refraction blind zone, the accuracy of the time difference is reduced by the effects of the refracted wave. (3) The acquisition method of time difference based on the microseismic theory and SA algorithm has a great potential for locating leaks from underground pipelines from an array located on the ground surface. Keywords: Viscoacoustic finite-difference simulation; continuous random source; simulated annealing algorithm; pipeline leak location

  1. Comparing Two Types of Model Progression in an Inquiry Learning Environment with Modelling Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Yvonne G.; Lazonder, Ard W.; de Jong, Ton

    2011-01-01

    The educational advantages of inquiry learning environments that incorporate modelling facilities are often challenged by students' poor inquiry skills. This study examined two types of model progression as means to compensate for these skill deficiencies. Model order progression (MOP), the predicted optimal variant, gradually increases the…

  2. Video model deformation system for the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    A photogrammetric closed circuit television system to measure model deformation at the National Transonic Facility is described. The photogrammetric approach was chosen because of its inherent rapid data recording of the entire object field. Video cameras are used to acquire data instead of film cameras due to the inaccessibility of cameras which must be housed within the cryogenic, high pressure plenum of this facility. A rudimentary theory section is followed by a description of the video-based system and control measures required to protect cameras from the hostile environment. Preliminary results obtained with the same camera placement as planned for NTF are presented and plans for facility testing with a specially designed test wing are discussed.

  3. 43 CFR 3271.14 - What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? 3271.14 Section 3271.14 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  4. 43 CFR 3271.14 - What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? 3271.14 Section 3271.14 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  5. 43 CFR 3271.14 - What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? 3271.14 Section 3271.14 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  6. 43 CFR 3271.14 - What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What do I need to do to start building and testing a utilization facility if it is not located on Federal lands leased for geothermal resources? 3271.14 Section 3271.14 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  7. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the Hawaii State ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the Hawaii State Archives, Admiral Furlong Collection), HAS Neg. 199.016. U.S. Navy photograph, August 21, 1919. MRS. JOSEPHUS DANIELS, WIFE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, PUSHED A BUTTON AND DRYDOCK NO. 1 (FACILITY S779) WAS OFFICIALLY INAUGURATED. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waterfront Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 25 CFR 502.23 - Facility license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Facility license. 502.23 Section 502.23 Indians NATIONAL....23 Facility license. Facility license means a separate license issued by a tribe to each place, facility, or location on Indian lands where the tribe elects to allow class II or III gaming. [73 FR 6029...

  9. Geometric model of pseudo-distance measurement in satellite location systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchuk, K. L.; Lyashkov, A. A.; Lyubchinov, E. V.

    2018-04-01

    The existing mathematical model of pseudo-distance measurement in satellite location systems does not provide a precise solution of the problem, but rather an approximate one. The existence of such inaccuracy, as well as bias in measurement of distance from satellite to receiver, results in inaccuracy level of several meters. Thereupon, relevance of refinement of the current mathematical model becomes obvious. The solution of the system of quadratic equations used in the current mathematical model is based on linearization. The objective of the paper is refinement of current mathematical model and derivation of analytical solution of the system of equations on its basis. In order to attain the objective, geometric analysis is performed; geometric interpretation of the equations is given. As a result, an equivalent system of equations, which allows analytical solution, is derived. An example of analytical solution implementation is presented. Application of analytical solution algorithm to the problem of pseudo-distance measurement in satellite location systems allows to improve the accuracy such measurements.

  10. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Giesbrecht, Alan

    2015-03-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA) located in Butte County, Idaho at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell 1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell 2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell 3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5 acre land application site that utilizes a center pivot irrigation sprinkler system. The purpose ofmore » this current study is to update the analysis and conclusions of the December 2013 study. In this current study, the new seepage rate and influent flow rate data have been used to update the calculations, model, and analysis.« less

  11. Space Power Facility-Capabilities for Space Environmental Testing Within a Single Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorge, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the current and near-term environmental test capabilities of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Space Power Facility (SPF) located at Sandusky, Ohio. The paper will present current and near-term capabilities for conducting electromagnetic interference and compatibility testing, base-shake sinusoidal vibration testing, reverberant acoustic testing, and thermal-vacuum testing. The paper will also present modes of transportation, handling, ambient environments, and operations within the facility to conduct those tests. The SPF is in the midst of completing and activating new or refurbished capabilities which, when completed, will provide the ability to conduct most or all required full-scale end-assembly space simulation tests at a single test location. It is envisioned that the capabilities will allow a customer to perform a wide range of space simulation tests in one facility at reasonable cost.

  12. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  13. US EPA Region 4 RMP Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To improve public health and the environment, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) collects information about facilities, sites, or places subject to environmental regulation or of environmental interest. Through the Geospatial Data Download Service, the public is now able to download the EPA Geodata shapefile containing facility and site information from EPA's national program systems. The file is Internet accessible from the Envirofacts Web site (http://www.epa.gov/enviro). The data may be used with geospatial mapping applications. (Note: The shapefile omits facilities without latitude/longitude coordinates.) The EPA Geospatial Data contains the name, location (latitude/longitude), and EPA program information about specific facilities and sites. In addition, the file contains a Uniform Resource Locator (URL), which allows mapping applications to present an option to users to access additional EPA data resources on a specific facility or site.

  14. Comparison of hybrid receptor models to locate PCB sources in Chicago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Holsen, Thomas M.; Hopke, Philip K.

    Results of three hybrid receptor models, potential source contribution function (PSCF), concentration weighted trajectory (CWT), and residence time weighted concentration (RTWC), were compared for locating polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) sources contributing to the atmospheric concentrations in Chicago. Variations of these models, including PSCF using mean and 75% criterion concentrations, joint probability PSCF (JP-PSCF), changes of point filters and grid cell sizes for RTWC, and PSCF using wind trajectories started at different altitudes, are also discussed. Modeling results were relatively consistent between models. However, no single model provided as complete information as was obtained by using all of them. CWT and 75% PSCF appears to be able to distinguish between larger sources and moderate ones. RTWC resolved high potential source areas. RTWC and JP-PSCF pooling data from all sampling sites removed the trailing effect often seen in PSCF modeling. PSCF results using average concentration criteria, appears to identify both moderate and major sources. Each model has advantages and disadvantages. However, used in combination, they provide information that is not available if only one of them is used. For short-range atmospheric transport, PSCF results were consistent when using wind trajectories starting at different heights. Based on the archived PCB data, the modeling results indicate there is a large potential source area between Joliet and Kankakee, IL, and two moderate sources to the northwest and south of Chicago. On the south side of Chicago in the neighborhood of Lake Calumet, several PCB sources were identified. Other unidentified potential source location(s) will require additional upwind/downwind field sampling to verify modeling results.

  15. Urbanization and Spatial Organization: Hospital and Orphanage Location in Chicago, 1848-1916

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Marcus; Ocasio, William

    2007-01-01

    What factors affect where organizations locate facilities in local communities? This paper examines how urban development influenced the neighborhood location of two very different types of facilities, general hospitals and orphanages, over the 70-year period during which Chicago emerged as an urban metropolis. Our results suggest that the human…

  16. Relative efficiency of joint-model and full-conditional-specification multiple imputation when conditional models are compatible: The general location model.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Shaun R; Hughes, Rachael A

    2018-06-01

    Estimating the parameters of a regression model of interest is complicated by missing data on the variables in that model. Multiple imputation is commonly used to handle these missing data. Joint model multiple imputation and full-conditional specification multiple imputation are known to yield imputed data with the same asymptotic distribution when the conditional models of full-conditional specification are compatible with that joint model. We show that this asymptotic equivalence of imputation distributions does not imply that joint model multiple imputation and full-conditional specification multiple imputation will also yield asymptotically equally efficient inference about the parameters of the model of interest, nor that they will be equally robust to misspecification of the joint model. When the conditional models used by full-conditional specification multiple imputation are linear, logistic and multinomial regressions, these are compatible with a restricted general location joint model. We show that multiple imputation using the restricted general location joint model can be substantially more asymptotically efficient than full-conditional specification multiple imputation, but this typically requires very strong associations between variables. When associations are weaker, the efficiency gain is small. Moreover, full-conditional specification multiple imputation is shown to be potentially much more robust than joint model multiple imputation using the restricted general location model to mispecification of that model when there is substantial missingness in the outcome variable.

  17. Planning and Equipping Industrial Arts Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Dept. of Educational and Cultural Services, Augusta. Bureau of Vocational Education.

    Architectural details, planning, and facility guidelines for industrial arts facilities are given, with data on planning the number, shape, size, and location of school shops. Industrial art programing and performance criteria for varying levels of education are discussed with regard for the different shop curriculums. The facility planning is…

  18. Improved Regional Seismic Event Locations Using 3-D Velocity Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-12-15

    regional velocity model to estimate event hypocenters. Travel times for the regional phases are calculated using a sophisticated eikonal finite...can greatly improve estimates of event locations. Our algorithm calculates travel times using a finite difference approximation of the eikonal ...such as IASP91 or J-B. 3-D velocity models require more sophisticated travel time modeling routines; thus, we use a 3-D eikonal equation solver

  19. An intelligent subtitle detection model for locating television commercials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yo-Ping; Hsu, Liang-Wei; Sandnes, Frode-Eika

    2007-04-01

    A strategy for locating television (TV) commercials in TV programs is proposed. Based on the observation that most TV commercials do not have subtitles, the first stage exploits six subtitle constraints and an adaptive neurofuzzy inference system model to determine whether a frame contains a subtitle or not. The second stage involves locating the mark-in/mark-out points using a genetic algorithm. An interactive user interface allows users to efficiently identify and fine-tune the exact boundaries separating the commercials from the program content. Furthermore, erroneous boundaries are manually corrected. Experimental results show that the precision rate and recall rates exceed 90%.

  20. Meeting the challenges of bringing a new base facility operation model to Gemini Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Atsuko; Arriagada, Gustavo; Adamson, A. J.; Cordova, Martin; Nunez, Arturo; Serio, Andrew; Kleinman, Scot

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the Gemini Observatory's Base Facilities Project is to provide the capabilities to perform routine night time operations with both telescopes and their instruments from their respective base facilities without anyone present at the summit. Tightening budget constraints prompted this project as both a means to save money and an opportunity to move toward increasing remote operations in the future. We successfully moved Gemini North nighttime operation to our base facility in Hawaii in Nov., 2015. This is the first 8mclass telescope to completely move night time operations to base facility. We are currently working on implementing BFO to Gemini South. Key challenges for this project include: (1) This is a schedule driven project. We have to implement the new capabilities by the end of 2015 for Gemini North and end of 2016 for Gemini South. (2) The resources are limited and shared with operations which has the higher priority than our project. (3) Managing parallel work within the project. (4) Testing, commissioning and introducing new tools to operational systems without adding significant disruptions to nightly operations. (5) Staff buying to the new operational model. (6) The staff involved in the project are spread on two locations separated by 10,000km, seven time zones away from each other. To overcome these challenges, we applied two principles: "Bare Minimum" and "Gradual Descent". As a result, we successfully completed the project ahead of schedule at Gemini North Telescope. I will discuss how we managed the cultural and human aspects of the project through these concepts. The other management aspects will be presented by Gustavo Arriagada [2], the Project Manager of this project. For technical details, please see presentations from Andrew Serio [3] and Martin Cordova [4].

  1. A multi-period capacitated school location problem with modular equipment and closest assignment considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmelle, Eric M.; Thill, Jean-Claude; Peeters, Dominique; Thomas, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    In rapidly growing urban areas, it is deemed vital to expand (or contract) an existing network of public facilities to meet anticipated changes in the level of demand. We present a multi-period capacitated median model for school network facility location planning that minimizes transportation costs, while functional costs are subject to a budget constraint. The proposed Vintage Flexible Capacitated Location Problem (ViFCLP) has the flexibility to account for a minimum school-age closing requirement, while the maximum capacity of each school can be adjusted by the addition of modular units. Non-closest assignments are controlled by the introduction of a parameter penalizing excess travel. The applicability of the ViFCLP is illustrated on a large US school system (Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina) where high school demand is expected to grow faster with distance to the city center. Higher school capacities and greater penalty on travel impedance parameter reduce the number of non-closest assignments. The proposed model is beneficial to policy makers seeking to improve the provision and efficiency of public services over a multi-period planning horizon.

  2. Correlating locations in ipsilateral breast tomosynthesis views using an analytical hemispherical compression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Schie, Guido; Tanner, Christine; Snoeren, Peter; Samulski, Maurice; Leifland, Karin; Wallis, Matthew G.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2011-08-01

    To improve cancer detection in mammography, breast examinations usually consist of two views per breast. In order to combine information from both views, corresponding regions in the views need to be matched. In 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), this may be a difficult and time-consuming task for radiologists, because many slices have to be inspected individually. For multiview computer-aided detection (CAD) systems, matching corresponding regions is an essential step that needs to be automated. In this study, we developed an automatic method to quickly estimate corresponding locations in ipsilateral tomosynthesis views by applying a spatial transformation. First we match a model of a compressed breast to the tomosynthesis view containing a point of interest. Then we estimate the location of the corresponding point in the ipsilateral view by assuming that this model was decompressed, rotated and compressed again. In this study, we use a relatively simple, elastically deformable sphere model to obtain an analytical solution for the transformation in a given DBT case. We investigate three different methods to match the compression model to the data by using automatic segmentation of the pectoral muscle, breast tissue and nipple. For validation, we annotated 208 landmarks in both views of a total of 146 imaged breasts of 109 different patients and applied our method to each location. The best results are obtained by using the centre of gravity of the breast to define the central axis of the model, around which the breast is assumed to rotate between views. Results show a median 3D distance between the actual location and the estimated location of 14.6 mm, a good starting point for a registration method or a feature-based local search method to link suspicious regions in a multiview CAD system. Approximately half of the estimated locations are at most one slice away from the actual location, which makes the method useful as a mammographic workstation tool for

  3. Integrated Payment And Delivery Models Offer Opportunities And Challenges For Residential Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, David C; Caudry, Daryl J; Dean, Katie M; Stevenson, David G

    2015-10-01

    Under health care reform, new financing and delivery models are being piloted to integrate health and long-term care services for older adults. Programs using these models generally have not included residential care facilities. Instead, most of them have focused on long-term care recipients in the community or the nursing home. Our analyses indicate that individuals living in residential care facilities have similarly high rates of chronic illness and Medicare utilization when compared with matched individuals in the community and nursing home, and rates of functional dependency that fall between those of their counterparts in the other two settings. These results suggest that the residential care facility population could benefit greatly from models that coordinated health and long-term care services. However, few providers have invested in the infrastructure needed to support integrated delivery models. Challenges to greater care integration include the private-pay basis for residential care facility services, which precludes shared savings from reduced Medicare costs, and residents' preference for living in a home-like, noninstitutional environment. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  4. Racial disparities in travel time to radiotherapy facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area

    PubMed Central

    Peipins, Lucy A.; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Flanagan, Barry

    2018-01-01

    Low-income women with breast cancer who rely on public transportation may have difficulty in completing recommended radiation therapy due to inadequate access to radiation facilities. Using a geographic information system (GIS) and network analysis we quantified spatial accessibility to radiation treatment facilities in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. We built a transportation network model that included all bus and rail routes and stops, system transfers and walk and wait times experienced by public transportation system travelers. We also built a private transportation network to model travel times by automobile. We calculated travel times to radiation therapy facilities via public and private transportation from a population-weighted center of each census tract located within the study area. We broadly grouped the tracts by low, medium and high household access to a private vehicle and by race. Facility service areas were created using the network model to map the extent of areal coverage at specified travel times (30, 45 and 60 min) for both public and private modes of transportation. The median public transportation travel time to the nearest radiotherapy facility was 56 min vs. approximately 8 min by private vehicle. We found that majority black census tracts had longer public transportation travel times than white tracts across all categories of vehicle access and that 39% of women in the study area had longer than 1 h of public transportation travel time to the nearest facility. In addition, service area analyses identified locations where the travel time barriers are the greatest. Spatial inaccessibility, especially for women who must use public transportation, is one of the barriers they face in receiving optimal treatment. PMID:23726213

  5. Racial disparities in travel time to radiotherapy facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Flanagan, Barry

    2013-07-01

    Low-income women with breast cancer who rely on public transportation may have difficulty in completing recommended radiation therapy due to inadequate access to radiation facilities. Using a geographic information system (GIS) and network analysis we quantified spatial accessibility to radiation treatment facilities in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. We built a transportation network model that included all bus and rail routes and stops, system transfers and walk and wait times experienced by public transportation system travelers. We also built a private transportation network to model travel times by automobile. We calculated travel times to radiation therapy facilities via public and private transportation from a population-weighted center of each census tract located within the study area. We broadly grouped the tracts by low, medium and high household access to a private vehicle and by race. Facility service areas were created using the network model to map the extent of areal coverage at specified travel times (30, 45 and 60 min) for both public and private modes of transportation. The median public transportation travel time to the nearest radiotherapy facility was 56 min vs. approximately 8 min by private vehicle. We found that majority black census tracts had longer public transportation travel times than white tracts across all categories of vehicle access and that 39% of women in the study area had longer than 1 h of public transportation travel time to the nearest facility. In addition, service area analyses identified locations where the travel time barriers are the greatest. Spatial inaccessibility, especially for women who must use public transportation, is one of the barriers they face in receiving optimal treatment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Assessing performance of Bayesian state-space models fit to Argos satellite telemetry locations processed with Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica A; Jonsen, Ian; Russell, Deborah J F; Prieto, Rui; Thompson, Dave; Baumgartner, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    Argos recently implemented a new algorithm to calculate locations of satellite-tracked animals that uses a Kalman filter (KF). The KF algorithm is reported to increase the number and accuracy of estimated positions over the traditional Least Squares (LS) algorithm, with potential advantages to the application of state-space methods to model animal movement data. We tested the performance of two Bayesian state-space models (SSMs) fitted to satellite tracking data processed with KF algorithm. Tracks from 7 harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) tagged with ARGOS satellite transmitters equipped with Fastloc GPS loggers were used to calculate the error of locations estimated from SSMs fitted to KF and LS data, by comparing those to "true" GPS locations. Data on 6 fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) were used to investigate consistency in movement parameters, location and behavioural states estimated by switching state-space models (SSSM) fitted to data derived from KF and LS methods. The model fit to KF locations improved the accuracy of seal trips by 27% over the LS model. 82% of locations predicted from the KF model and 73% of locations from the LS model were <5 km from the corresponding interpolated GPS position. Uncertainty in KF model estimates (5.6 ± 5.6 km) was nearly half that of LS estimates (11.6 ± 8.4 km). Accuracy of KF and LS modelled locations was sensitive to precision but not to observation frequency or temporal resolution of raw Argos data. On average, 88% of whale locations estimated by KF models fell within the 95% probability ellipse of paired locations from LS models. Precision of KF locations for whales was generally higher. Whales' behavioural mode inferred by KF models matched the classification from LS models in 94% of the cases. State-space models fit to KF data can improve spatial accuracy of location estimates over LS models and produce equally reliable behavioural estimates.

  7. Assessing Performance of Bayesian State-Space Models Fit to Argos Satellite Telemetry Locations Processed with Kalman Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Mónica A.; Jonsen, Ian; Russell, Deborah J. F.; Prieto, Rui; Thompson, Dave; Baumgartner, Mark F.

    2014-01-01

    Argos recently implemented a new algorithm to calculate locations of satellite-tracked animals that uses a Kalman filter (KF). The KF algorithm is reported to increase the number and accuracy of estimated positions over the traditional Least Squares (LS) algorithm, with potential advantages to the application of state-space methods to model animal movement data. We tested the performance of two Bayesian state-space models (SSMs) fitted to satellite tracking data processed with KF algorithm. Tracks from 7 harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) tagged with ARGOS satellite transmitters equipped with Fastloc GPS loggers were used to calculate the error of locations estimated from SSMs fitted to KF and LS data, by comparing those to “true” GPS locations. Data on 6 fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) were used to investigate consistency in movement parameters, location and behavioural states estimated by switching state-space models (SSSM) fitted to data derived from KF and LS methods. The model fit to KF locations improved the accuracy of seal trips by 27% over the LS model. 82% of locations predicted from the KF model and 73% of locations from the LS model were <5 km from the corresponding interpolated GPS position. Uncertainty in KF model estimates (5.6±5.6 km) was nearly half that of LS estimates (11.6±8.4 km). Accuracy of KF and LS modelled locations was sensitive to precision but not to observation frequency or temporal resolution of raw Argos data. On average, 88% of whale locations estimated by KF models fell within the 95% probability ellipse of paired locations from LS models. Precision of KF locations for whales was generally higher. Whales’ behavioural mode inferred by KF models matched the classification from LS models in 94% of the cases. State-space models fit to KF data can improve spatial accuracy of location estimates over LS models and produce equally reliable behavioural estimates. PMID:24651252

  8. Skin Friction and Transition Location Measurement on Supersonic Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Goodsell, Aga M.; Olsen, Lawrence E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques were used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative skin friction and transition location data in wind tunnel tests performed on two supersonic transport models at Mach 2.40. Oil-film interferometry was useful for verifying boundary layer transition, but careful monitoring of model surface temperatures and systematic examination of the effects of tunnel start-up and shutdown transients will be required to achieve high levels of accuracy for skin friction measurements. A more common technique, use of a subliming solid to reveal transition location, was employed to correct drag measurements to a standard condition of all-turbulent flow on the wing. These corrected data were then analyzed to determine the additional correction required to account for the effect of the boundary layer trip devices.

  9. Building Information Modeling (BIM) Primer. Report 1: Facility Life-Cycle Process and Technology Innovation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Building Information Modeling ( BIM ) Primer Report 1: Facility Life-cycle Process and Technology Innovation In fo...is unlimited. ERDC/ITL TR-12-2 August 2012 Building Information Modeling ( BIM ) Primer Report 1: Facility Life-cycle Process and Technology...and to enhance the quality of projects through the design, construction, and handover phases. Building Information Modeling ( BIM ) is a

  10. 42 CFR 456.605 - Number and location of teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Number and location of teams. 456.605 Section 456... Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.605 Number and location of teams. There must be a sufficient number of teams so located within the State that onsite inspections can be made at appropriate...

  11. 42 CFR 456.605 - Number and location of teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Number and location of teams. 456.605 Section 456... Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.605 Number and location of teams. There must be a sufficient number of teams so located within the State that onsite inspections can be made at appropriate...

  12. 42 CFR 456.605 - Number and location of teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Number and location of teams. 456.605 Section 456... Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.605 Number and location of teams. There must be a sufficient number of teams so located within the State that onsite inspections can be made at appropriate...

  13. 42 CFR 456.605 - Number and location of teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Number and location of teams. 456.605 Section 456... Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.605 Number and location of teams. There must be a sufficient number of teams so located within the State that onsite inspections can be made at appropriate...

  14. 42 CFR 456.605 - Number and location of teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Number and location of teams. 456.605 Section 456... Facilities and Institutions for Mental Diseases § 456.605 Number and location of teams. There must be a sufficient number of teams so located within the State that onsite inspections can be made at appropriate...

  15. A business planning model to identify new safety net clinic locations.

    PubMed

    Langabeer, James; Helton, Jeffrey; DelliFraine, Jami; Dotson, Ebbin; Watts, Carolyn; Love, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Community health clinics serving the poor and underserved are geographically expanding due to changes in U.S. health care policy. This paper describes the experience of a collaborative alliance of health care providers in a large metropolitan area who develop a conceptual and mathematical decision model to guide decisions on expanding its network of community health clinics. Community stakeholders participated in a collaborative process that defined constructs they deemed important in guiding decisions on the location of community health clinics. This collaboration also defined key variables within each construct. Scores for variables within each construct were then totaled and weighted into a community-specific optimal space planning equation. This analysis relied entirely on secondary data available from published sources. The model built from this collaboration revolved around the constructs of demand, sustainability, and competition. It used publicly available data defining variables within each construct to arrive at an optimal location that maximized demand and sustainability and minimized competition. This is a model that safety net clinic planners and community stakeholders can use to analyze demographic and utilization data to optimize capacity expansion to serve uninsured and Medicaid populations. Communities can use this innovative model to develop a locally relevant clinic location-planning framework.

  16. Effects of burn location and investigator on burn depth in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam J; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chung, Won Taek; Thode, Henry C; McClain, Steve; Raut, Vivek

    2016-02-01

    In order to be useful, animal models should be reproducible and consistent regardless of sampling bias, investigator creating burn, and burn location. We determined the variability in burn depth based on biopsy location, burn location and investigator in a porcine model of partial thickness burns. 24 partial thickness burns (2.5 cm by 2.5 cm each) were created on the backs of 2 anesthetized pigs by 2 investigators (one experienced, one inexperienced) using a previously validated model. In one of the pigs, the necrotic epidermis covering each burn was removed. Five full thickness 4mm punch biopsies were obtained 1h after injury from the four corners and center of the burns and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin and Masson's trichrome for determination of burn depth by a board certified dermatopathologist blinded to burn location and investigator. Comparisons of burn depth by biopsy location, burn location and investigator were performed with t-tests and ANOVA as appropriate. The mean (SD) depth of injury to blood vessels (the main determinant of burn progression) in debrided and non-debrided pigs pooled together was 1.8 (0.3)mm, which included 75% of the dermal depth. Non-debrided burns were 0.24 mm deeper than debrided burns (P<0.001). Burn depth increased marginally from cephalic to caudal in non-debrided burns, but showed no statistical differences for these locations, in debrided burns. Additionally, there were also no statistical differences in burn depths from midline to lateral in either of these burn types. Burn depth was similar for both investigators and among biopsy locations. Burn depth was greater for caudal locations in non-debrided burns and overall non-debrided burns were deeper than debrided burns. However, burn depth did not differ based on investigator, biopsy site, and medial-lateral location. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Source term model evaluations for the low-level waste facility performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, M.S.; Su, S.I.

    1995-12-31

    The estimation of release of radionuclides from various waste forms to the bottom boundary of the waste disposal facility (source term) is one of the most important aspects of LLW facility performance assessment. In this work, several currently used source term models are comparatively evaluated for the release of carbon-14 based on a test case problem. The models compared include PRESTO-EPA-CPG, IMPACTS, DUST and NEFTRAN-II. Major differences in assumptions and approaches between the models are described and key parameters are identified through sensitivity analysis. The source term results from different models are compared and other concerns or suggestions are discussed.

  18. MEASURE: An integrated data-analysis and model identification facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jaidip; Iyer, Ravi K.

    1990-01-01

    The first phase of the development of MEASURE, an integrated data analysis and model identification facility is described. The facility takes system activity data as input and produces as output representative behavioral models of the system in near real time. In addition a wide range of statistical characteristics of the measured system are also available. The usage of the system is illustrated on data collected via software instrumentation of a network of SUN workstations at the University of Illinois. Initially, statistical clustering is used to identify high density regions of resource-usage in a given environment. The identified regions form the states for building a state-transition model to evaluate system and program performance in real time. The model is then solved to obtain useful parameters such as the response-time distribution and the mean waiting time in each state. A graphical interface which displays the identified models and their characteristics (with real time updates) was also developed. The results provide an understanding of the resource-usage in the system under various workload conditions. This work is targeted for a testbed of UNIX workstations with the initial phase ported to SUN workstations on the NASA, Ames Research Center Advanced Automation Testbed.

  19. Facility Will Help Transition Models Into Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2009-02-01

    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Prediction Center (NOAA SWPC), in partnership with the U.S. Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), is establishing a center to promote and facilitate the transition of space weather models to operations. The new facility, called the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC), will take models used by researchers and rigorously test them to see if they can withstand continued use as viable warning systems. If a model used in a space weather warning system crashes or fails to perform well, severe consequences can result. These include increased radiation risks to astronauts and people traveling on high-altitude flights, national security vulnerabilities from the loss of military satellite communications, and the cost of replacing damaged military and commercial spacecraft.

  20. Cluster analysis for determining distribution center location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari Widaningrum, Dyah; Andika, Aditya; Murphiyanto, Richard Dimas Julian

    2017-12-01

    Determination of distribution facilities is highly important to survive in the high level of competition in today’s business world. Companies can operate multiple distribution centers to mitigate supply chain risk. Thus, new problems arise, namely how many and where the facilities should be provided. This study examines a fast-food restaurant brand, which located in the Greater Jakarta. This brand is included in the category of top 5 fast food restaurant chain based on retail sales. There were three stages in this study, compiling spatial data, cluster analysis, and network analysis. Cluster analysis results are used to consider the location of the additional distribution center. Network analysis results show a more efficient process referring to a shorter distance to the distribution process.

  1. National facilities study. Volume 4: Space operations facilities task group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The principal objectives of the National Facilities Study (NFS) were to: (1) determine where U.S. facilities do not meet national aerospace needs; (2) define new facilities required to make U.S. capabilities 'world class' where such improvements are in the national interest; (3) define where consolidation and phase-out of existing facilities is appropriate; and (4) develop a long-term national plan for world-class facility acquisition and shared usage. The Space Operations Facilities Task Group defined discrete tasks to accomplish the above objectives within the scope of the study. An assessment of national space operations facilities was conducted to determine the nation's capability to meet the requirements of space operations during the next 30 years. The mission model used in the study to define facility requirements is described in Volume 3. Based on this model, the major focus of the Task Group was to identify any substantive overlap or underutilization of space operations facilities and to identify any facility shortfalls that would necessitate facility upgrades or new facilities. The focus of this initial study was directed toward facility recommendations related to consolidations, closures, enhancements, and upgrades considered necessary to efficiently and effectively support the baseline requirements model. Activities related to identifying facility needs or recommendations for enhancing U.S. international competitiveness and achieving world-class capability, where appropriate, were deferred to a subsequent study phase.

  2. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ICIS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS). When complete, ICIS will provide a database that will contain integrated enforcement and compliance information across most of EPA's programs. The vision for ICIS is to replace EPA's independent databases that contain enforcement data with a single repository for that information. Currently, ICIS contains all Federal Administrative and Judicial enforcement actions and a subset of the Permit Compliance System (PCS), which supports the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). ICIS exchanges non-sensitive enforcement/compliance activities, non-sensitive formal enforcement actions and NPDES information with FRS. This web feature service contains the enforcement/compliance activities and formal enforcement action related facilities; the NPDES facilities are contained in the PCS_NPDES web feature service. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on f

  3. Human health risk characterization of petroleum coke calcining facility emissions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Davinderjit; Johnson, Giffe T; Harbison, Raymond D

    2015-12-01

    Calcining processes including handling and storage of raw petroleum coke may result in Particulate Matter (PM) and gaseous emissions. Concerns have been raised over the potential association between particulate and aerosol pollution and adverse respiratory health effects including decrements in lung function. This risk characterization evaluated the exposure concentrations of ambient air pollutants including PM10 and gaseous pollutants from a petroleum coke calciner facility. The ambient air pollutant levels were collected through monitors installed at multiple locations in the vicinity of the facility. The measured and modeled particulate levels in ambient air from the calciner facility were compared to standards protective of public health. The results indicated that exposure levels were, on occasions at sites farther from the facility, higher than the public health limit of 150 μg/m(3) 24-h average for PM10. However, the carbon fraction demonstrated that the contribution from the calciner facility was de minimis. Exposure levels of the modeled SO2, CO, NOx and PM10 concentrations were also below public health air quality standards. These results demonstrate that emissions from calcining processes involving petroleum coke, at facilities that are well controlled, are below regulatory standards and are not expected to produce a public health risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurement Requirements for Improved Modeling of Arcjet Facility Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.

    2000-01-01

    Current efforts to develop new reusable launch vehicles and to pursue low-cost robotic planetary missions have led to a renewed interest in understanding arc-jet flows. Part of this renewed interest is concerned with improving the understanding of arc-jet test results and the potential use of available computational-fluid- dynamic (CFD) codes to aid in this effort. These CFD codes have been extensively developed and tested for application to nonequilibrium, hypersonic flow modeling. It is envisioned, perhaps naively, that the application of these CFD codes to the simulation of arc-jet flows would serve two purposes: first. the codes would help to characterize the nonequilibrium nature of the arc-jet flows; and second. arc-jet experiments could potentially be used to validate the flow models. These two objectives are, to some extent, mutually exclusive. However, the purpose of the present discussion is to address what role CFD codes can play in the current arc-jet flow characterization effort, and whether or not the simulation of arc-jet facility tests can be used to eva1uate some of the modeling that is used to formu1ate these codes. This presentation is organized into several sections. In the introductory section, the development of large-scale, constricted-arc test facilities within NASA is reviewed, and the current state of flow diagnostics using conventional instrumentation is summarized. The motivation for using CFD to simulate arc-jet flows is addressed in the next section, and the basic requirements for CFD models that would be used for these simulations are briefly discussed. This section is followed by a more detailed description of experimental measurements that are needed to initiate credible simulations and to evaluate their fidelity in the different flow regions of an arc-jet facility. Observations from a recent combined computational and experiment.al investigation of shock-layer flows in a large-scale arc-jet facility are then used to illustrate the

  5. Influenza Vaccinations, Fall 2009: Model School-Located Vaccination Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herl Jenlink, Carolyn; Kuehnert, Paul; Mazyck, Donna

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza virus presented a major challenge to health departments, schools, and other community partners to effectively vaccinate large numbers of Americans, primarily children. The use of school-located vaccination (SLV) programs to address this challenge led health departments and schools to become creative in developing models for…

  6. Locating and Modeling Regional Earthquakes with Broadband Waveform Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y.; Zhu, L.; Helmberger, D.

    2003-12-01

    Retrieving source parameters of small earthquakes (Mw < 4.5), including mechanism, depth, location and origin time, relies on local and regional seismic data. Although source characterization for such small events achieves a satisfactory stage in some places with a dense seismic network, such as TriNet, Southern California, a worthy revisit to the historical events in these places or an effective, real-time investigation of small events in many other places, where normally only a few local waveforms plus some short-period recordings are available, is still a problem. To address this issue, we introduce a new type of approach that estimates location, depth, origin time and fault parameters based on 3-component waveform matching in terms of separated Pnl, Rayleigh and Love waves. We show that most local waveforms can be well modeled by a regionalized 1-D model plus different timing corrections for Pnl, Rayleigh and Love waves at relatively long periods, i.e., 4-100 sec for Pnl, and 8-100 sec for surface waves, except for few anomalous paths involving greater structural complexity, meanwhile, these timing corrections reveal similar azimuthal patterns for well-located cluster events, despite their different focal mechanisms. Thus, we can calibrate the paths separately for Pnl, Rayleigh and Love waves with the timing corrections from well-determined events widely recorded by a dense modern seismic network or a temporary PASSCAL experiment. In return, we can locate events and extract their fault parameters by waveform matching for available waveform data, which could be as less as from two stations, assuming timing corrections from the calibration. The accuracy of the obtained source parameters is subject to the error carried by the events used for the calibration. The detailed method requires a Green­_s function library constructed from a regionalized 1-D model together with necessary calibration information, and adopts a grid search strategy for both hypercenter and

  7. Making of the NSTX Facility

    SciTech Connect

    C. Neumeyer; M. Ono; S.M. Kaye

    1999-11-01

    The NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) facility located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is the newest national fusion science experimental facility for the restructured US Fusion Energy Science Program. The NSTX project was approved in FY 97 as the first proof-of-principle national fusion facility dedicated to the spherical torus research. On Feb. 15, 1999, the first plasma was achieved 10 weeks ahead of schedule. The project was completed on budget and with an outstanding safety record. This paper gives an overview of the NSTX facility construction and the initial plasma operations.

  8. Overview of Opportunities for Co-Location of Solar Energy Technologies and Vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, Jordan; Beatty, Brenda; Hill, Graham

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale solar facilities have the potential to contribute significantly to national electricity production. Many solar installations are large-scale or utility-scale, with a capacity over 1 MW and connected directly to the electric grid. Large-scale solar facilities offer an opportunity to achieve economies of scale in solar deployment, yet there have been concerns about the amount of land required for solar projects and the impact of solar projects on local habitat. During the site preparation phase for utility-scale solar facilities, developers often grade land and remove all vegetation to minimize installation and operational costs, prevent plants from shading panels, and minimizemore » potential fire or wildlife risks. However, the common site preparation practice of removing vegetation can be avoided in certain circumstances, and there have been successful examples where solar facilities have been co-located with agricultural operations or have native vegetation growing beneath the panels. In this study we outline some of the impacts that large-scale solar facilities can have on the local environment, provide examples of installations where impacts have been minimized through co-location with vegetation, characterize the types of co-location, and give an overview of the potential benefits from co-location of solar energy projects and vegetation. The varieties of co-location can be replicated or modified for site-specific use at other solar energy installations around the world. We conclude with opportunities to improve upon our understanding of ways to reduce the environmental impacts of large-scale solar installations.« less

  9. Music Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    The layouts and specifications in this booklet are intended to assist those involved in planning music facilities for elementary and secondary schools. Drawings, room plans, and text illustrate specifications for location; space relationship; combined and separate instrumental and vocal rooms; practice rooms; and auxiliary areas. Particular…

  10. 24 CFR 585.204 - Locational considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES YOUTHBUILD PROGRAM Youthbuild Planning Grants § 585.204... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Locational considerations. 585.204 Section 585.204 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  11. 24 CFR 585.204 - Locational considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES YOUTHBUILD PROGRAM Youthbuild Planning Grants § 585.204... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Locational considerations. 585.204 Section 585.204 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  12. Integrated approach to modeling long-term durability of concrete engineered barriers in LLRW disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Roy, D.M.; Mann, B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes an integrated approach to developing a predictive computer model for long-term performance of concrete engineered barriers utilized in LLRW and ILRW disposal facilities. The model development concept consists of three major modeling schemes: hydration modeling of the binder phase, pore solution speciation, and transport modeling in the concrete barrier and service environment. Although still in its inception, the model development approach demonstrated that the chemical and physical properties of complex cementitious materials and their interactions with service environments can be described quantitatively. Applying the integrated model development approach to modeling alkali (Na and K) leaching from amore » concrete pad barrier in an above-grade tumulus disposal unit, it is predicted that, in a near-surface land disposal facility where water infiltration through the facility is normally minimal, the alkalis control the pore solution pH of the concrete barriers for much longer than most previous concrete barrier degradation studies assumed. The results also imply that a highly alkaline condition created by the alkali leaching will result in alteration of the soil mineralogy in the vicinity of the disposal facility.« less

  13. Extending Geographic Weights of Evidence Models for Use in Location Based Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonwalkar, Mukul Dinkar

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the use and modeling of spatio-temporal data for the purposes of providing applications for location based services. One of the major issues in dealing with spatio-temporal data for location based services is the availability and sparseness of such data. Other than the hardware costs associated with collecting movement…

  14. Measuring and monitoring KIPT Neutron Source Facility Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yan; Gohar, Yousry; Zhong, Zhaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on developing and constructing a neutron source facility at Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven subcritical system. The accelerator has a 100 kW electron beam using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has k eff less than 0.98. To ensure the safe operation of this neutron source facility, the reactivity of the subcritical core has to be accurately determined and continuously monitored. A technique which combines the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method is purposed to determine themore » reactivity of the KIPT subcritical assembly at various conditions. In particular, the area-ratio method can determine the absolute reactivity of the subcritical assembly in units of dollars by performing pulsed-neutron experiments. It provides reference reactivities for the flux-to-current ratio method to track and monitor the reactivity deviations from the reference state while the facility is at other operation modes. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to simulate both methods using the numerical model of the KIPT subcritical assembly. It is found that the reactivities obtained from both the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method are spatially dependent on the neutron detector locations and types. Numerical simulations also suggest optimal neutron detector locations to minimize the spatial effects in the flux-to-current ratio method. The spatial correction factors are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for both measuring methods at the selected neutron detector locations. Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to verify the accuracy of the flux-to-current ratio method in monitoring the reactivity swing during a fuel burnup cycle.« less

  15. 47 CFR 73.6025 - Antenna system and station location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system and station location. 73.6025... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6025 Antenna system and station location. (a) Applications for modified Class A TV facilities proposing the use of directional antenna...

  16. 47 CFR 73.6025 - Antenna system and station location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system and station location. 73.6025... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6025 Antenna system and station location. (a) Applications for modified Class A TV facilities proposing the use of directional antenna...

  17. 47 CFR 73.6025 - Antenna system and station location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna system and station location. 73.6025... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6025 Antenna system and station location. (a) Applications for modified Class A TV facilities proposing the use of directional antenna...

  18. 47 CFR 73.6025 - Antenna system and station location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna system and station location. 73.6025... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6025 Antenna system and station location. (a) Applications for modified Class A TV facilities proposing the use of directional antenna...

  19. 47 CFR 73.6025 - Antenna system and station location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna system and station location. 73.6025... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6025 Antenna system and station location. (a) Applications for modified Class A TV facilities proposing the use of directional antenna...

  20. US Environmental rotection Agency's strategy for ground-water-quality monitoring at hazardous-waste land-disposal facilities located in karst terranes

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    Ground-water monitoring of hazardous-waste land-disposal units by a network of wells is ineffective when located in karstic terranes. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently proposing to modify its current ground-water-quality monitoring requirement of one upgradient well and three downgradient wells for disposal units located in karstic terranes. The convergent nature of subsurface flow to cave streams in karstic terranes requires that effective monitoring wells intercept the cave streams. Wells located around a hazardous-waste disposal unit, but not in the specific cave stream draining the site, are only providing irrelevant data and a false sense of security because themore » water samples from such wells are not necessarily from the hazardous-waste disposal unit. A case study is provided in this paper. EPA is drafting a guidance document that will allow monitoring by wells, only if the up- and down-gradient wells can be demonstrated to be hydraulically connected by means of dye-trace studies. If not, then the monitoring of springs shown to be hydraulically connected to the facility by dye-tracing studies would be required. Monitoring for sinkhole development will also be required to provide advance warning of sinkhole collapse. The investigation and determination of the probability of sinkhole collapse is given special treatment.« less

  1. X-ray spectroscopic diagnostics and modeling of polar-drive implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakel, P.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Tregillis, I. L.; Kanzleieter, R. J.; Batha, S. H.; Fontes, C. J.; Sherrill, M. E.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Regan, S. P.

    2014-06-01

    A series of experiments featuring laser-imploded plastic-shell targets filled with hydrogen or deuterium were performed on the National Ignition Facility. The shells (some deuterated) were doped in selected locations with Cu, Ga, and Ge, whose spectroscopic signals (indicative of local plasma conditions) were collected with a time-integrated, 1-D imaging, spectrally resolved, and absolute-intensity calibrated instrument. The experimental spectra compare well with radiation hydrodynamics simulations post-processed with a non-local thermal equilibrium atomic kinetics and spectroscopic-quality radiation-transport model. The obtained degree of agreement between the modeling and experimental data supports the application of spectroscopic techniques for the determination of plasma conditions, which can ultimately lead to the validation of theoretical models for thermonuclear burn in the presence of mix. Furthermore, the use of a lower-Z dopant element (e.g., Fe) is suggested for future experiments, since the ˜2 keV electron temperatures reached in mixed regions are not high enough to drive sufficient H-like Ge and Cu line emissions needed for spectroscopic plasma diagnostics.

  2. A STUDY OF HIERARCHICAL ORGANIZATION LOCATION MODEL FOR SERVICE INDUSTRY ENTERPRISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Makoto; Takada, Naoki; Okubo, Kazuaki

    The service industry has come to participate in many economic activities, but there are few studies, which analyze on the hierarchical organization location of a service industry enterprise that treats information. We propose a hierarchical organized location model, which endogenously determines the number of hierarchies. Furtheremore, We propose a MCMC based statistical method to obtain parameter distributions corresponding to the observed macro emplowment distribution as well as the saralies paid. By using our model, we analyzed the regional disparities about the number of employees and the wage. We found that the change of the regional disparities is caused by internal factors such as the industrial structural change, rather than external factors such as traffic condition changes.

  3. Robust speaker's location detection in a vehicle environment using GMM models.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jwu-Sheng; Cheng, Chieh-Cheng; Liu, Wei-Han

    2006-04-01

    Abstract-Human-computer interaction (HCI) using speech communication is becoming increasingly important, especially in driving where safety is the primary concern. Knowing the speaker's location (i.e., speaker localization) not only improves the enhancement results of a corrupted signal, but also provides assistance to speaker identification. Since conventional speech localization algorithms suffer from the uncertainties of environmental complexity and noise, as well as from the microphone mismatch problem, they are frequently not robust in practice. Without a high reliability, the acceptance of speech-based HCI would never be realized. This work presents a novel speaker's location detection method and demonstrates high accuracy within a vehicle cabinet using a single linear microphone array. The proposed approach utilize Gaussian mixture models (GMM) to model the distributions of the phase differences among the microphones caused by the complex characteristic of room acoustic and microphone mismatch. The model can be applied both in near-field and far-field situations in a noisy environment. The individual Gaussian component of a GMM represents some general location-dependent but content and speaker-independent phase difference distributions. Moreover, the scheme performs well not only in nonline-of-sight cases, but also when the speakers are aligned toward the microphone array but at difference distances from it. This strong performance can be achieved by exploiting the fact that the phase difference distributions at different locations are distinguishable in the environment of a car. The experimental results also show that the proposed method outperforms the conventional multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) technique at various SNRs.

  4. Energy Systems Integration Facility Overview

    ScienceCinema

    Arvizu, Dan; Chistensen, Dana; Hannegan, Bryan; Garret, Bobi; Kroposki, Ben; Symko-Davies, Martha; Post, David; Hammond, Steve; Kutscher, Chuck; Wipke, Keith

    2018-01-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is the right tool, at the right time... a first-of-its-kind facility that addresses the challenges of large-scale integration of clean energy technologies into the energy systems that power the nation.

  5. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset Download

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This downloadable data package consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in the FRS individual feature layers. The layers comprise the FRS major program databases, including:Assessment Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) : brownfields sites ; Air Facility System (AFS) : stationary sources of air pollution ; Air Quality System (AQS) : ambient air pollution data from monitoring stations; Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) : schools data on Indian land; Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) facilities; Clean Air Markets Division Business System (CAMDBS) : market-based air pollution control programs; Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) : hazardous waste sites; Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) : integrated enforcement and compliance information; National Compliance Database (NCDB) : Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) module of ICIS : NPDES surface water permits; Radiation Information Database (RADINFO) : radiation and radioactivity facilities; RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse (RBLC) : best available air pollution technology requirements; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information System (RCRAInfo) : tracks generators, transporters, treaters, storers, and disposers

  6. Location contexts of user check-ins to model urban geo life-style patterns.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Samiul; Ukkusuri, Satish V

    2015-01-01

    Geo-location data from social media offers us information, in new ways, to understand people's attitudes and interests through their activity choices. In this paper, we explore the idea of inferring individual life-style patterns from activity-location choices revealed in social media. We present a model to understand life-style patterns using the contextual information (e. g. location categories) of user check-ins. Probabilistic topic models are developed to infer individual geo life-style patterns from two perspectives: i) to characterize the patterns of user interests to different types of places and ii) to characterize the patterns of user visits to different neighborhoods. The method is applied to a dataset of Foursquare check-ins of the users from New York City. The co-existence of several location contexts and the corresponding probabilities in a given pattern provide useful information about user interests and choices. It is found that geo life-style patterns have similar items-either nearby neighborhoods or similar location categories. The semantic and geographic proximity of the items in a pattern reflects the hidden regularity in user preferences and location choice behavior.

  7. Location Contexts of User Check-Ins to Model Urban Geo Life-Style Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Samiul; Ukkusuri, Satish V.

    2015-01-01

    Geo-location data from social media offers us information, in new ways, to understand people's attitudes and interests through their activity choices. In this paper, we explore the idea of inferring individual life-style patterns from activity-location choices revealed in social media. We present a model to understand life-style patterns using the contextual information (e. g. location categories) of user check-ins. Probabilistic topic models are developed to infer individual geo life-style patterns from two perspectives: i) to characterize the patterns of user interests to different types of places and ii) to characterize the patterns of user visits to different neighborhoods. The method is applied to a dataset of Foursquare check-ins of the users from New York City. The co-existence of several location contexts and the corresponding probabilities in a given pattern provide useful information about user interests and choices. It is found that geo life-style patterns have similar items—either nearby neighborhoods or similar location categories. The semantic and geographic proximity of the items in a pattern reflects the hidden regularity in user preferences and location choice behavior. PMID:25970430

  8. 15 CFR 807.1 - Public Reference Facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 807.1 Public Reference Facility. The Public Reference Facility of the Bureau of Economic Analysis is located in room B7 of the Tower...

  9. 15 CFR 807.1 - Public Reference Facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 807.1 Public Reference Facility. The Public Reference Facility of the Bureau of Economic Analysis is located in room B7 of the Tower...

  10. 15 CFR 807.1 - Public Reference Facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 807.1 Public Reference Facility. The Public Reference Facility of the Bureau of Economic Analysis is located in room B7 of the Tower...

  11. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in the FRS individual feature layers. The layers comprise the FRS major program databases, including:Assessment Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) : brownfields sites ; Air Facility System (AFS) : stationary sources of air pollution ; Air Quality System (AQS) : ambient air pollution data from monitoring stations; Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) : schools data on Indian land; Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) facilities; Clean Air Markets Division Business System (CAMDBS) : market-based air pollution control programs; Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) : hazardous waste sites; Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) : integrated enforcement and compliance information; National Compliance Database (NCDB) : Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) module of ICIS : NPDES surface water permits; Radiation Information Database (RADINFO) : radiation and radioactivity facilities; RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse (RBLC) : best available air pollution technology requirements; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information System (RCRAInfo) : tracks generators, transporters, treaters, storers, and disposers of haz

  12. Centralization Versus Decentralization: A Location Analysis Approach for Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shishko, Robert; Raffel, Jeffrey

    One of the questions that seems to perplex many university and special librarians is whether to move in the direction of centralizing or decentralizing the library's collections and facilities. Presented is a theoretical approach, employing location theory, to the library centralization-decentralization question. Location theory allows the analyst…

  13. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  14. Pattern analysis of community health center location in Surabaya using spatial Poisson point process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumaningrum, Choriah Margareta; Iriawan, Nur; Winahju, Wiwiek Setya

    2017-11-01

    Community health center (puskesmas) is one of the closest health service facilities for the community, which provide healthcare for population on sub-district level as one of the government-mandated community health clinics located across Indonesia. The increasing number of this puskesmas does not directly comply the fulfillment of basic health services needed in such region. Ideally, a puskesmas has to cover up to maximum 30,000 people. The number of puskesmas in Surabaya indicates an unbalance spread in all of the area. This research aims to analyze the spread of puskesmas in Surabaya using spatial Poisson point process model in order to get the effective location of Surabaya's puskesmas which based on their location. The results of the analysis showed that the distribution pattern of puskesmas in Surabaya is non-homogeneous Poisson process and is approched by mixture Poisson model. Based on the estimated model obtained by using Bayesian mixture model couple with MCMC process, some characteristics of each puskesmas have no significant influence as factors to decide the addition of health center in such location. Some factors related to the areas of sub-districts have to be considered as covariate to make a decision adding the puskesmas in Surabaya.

  15. Health and climate benefits of offshore wind facilities in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Luckow, Patrick; Fisher, Jeremy; Kempton, Willett; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2016-07-01

    Electricity from fossil fuels contributes substantially to both climate change and the health burden of air pollution. Renewable energy sources are capable of displacing electricity from fossil fuels, but the quantity of health and climate benefits depend on site-specific attributes that are not often included in quantitative models. Here, we link an electrical grid simulation model to an air pollution health impact assessment model and US regulatory estimates of the impacts of carbon to estimate the health and climate benefits of offshore wind facilities of different sizes in two different locations. We find that offshore wind in the Mid-Atlantic is capable of producing health and climate benefits of between 54 and 120 per MWh of generation, with the largest simulated facility (3000 MW off the coast of New Jersey) producing approximately 690 million in benefits in 2017. The variability in benefits per unit generation is a function of differences in locations (Maryland versus New Jersey), simulated years (2012 versus 2017), and facility generation capacity, given complexities of the electrical grid and differences in which power plants are offset. This work demonstrates health and climate benefits of offshore wind, provides further evidence of the utility of geographically-refined modeling frameworks, and yields quantitative insights that would allow for inclusion of both climate and public health in benefits assessments of renewable energy.

  16. Health and climate benefits of offshore wind facilities in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    DOE PAGES

    Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Luckow, Patrick; Fisher, Jeremy; ...

    2016-07-14

    Electricity from fossil fuels contributes substantially to both climate change and the health burden of air pollution. Renewable energy sources are capable of displacing electricity from fossil fuels, but the quantity of health and climate benefits depend on site-specific attributes that are not often included in quantitative models. Here, we link an electrical grid simulation model to an air pollution health impact assessment model and US regulatory estimates of the impacts of carbon to estimate the health and climate benefits of offshore wind facilities of different sizes in two different locations. We find that offshore wind in the Mid-Atlantic ismore » capable of producing health and climate benefits of between $54 and $120 per MWh of generation, with the largest simulated facility (3000 MW off the coast of New Jersey) producing approximately $690 million in benefits in 2017. The variability in benefits per unit generation is a function of differences in locations (Maryland versus New Jersey), simulated years (2012 versus 2017), and facility generation capacity, given complexities of the electrical grid and differences in which power plants are offset. In the end, this work demonstrates health and climate benefits of off shore wind, provides further evidence of the utility of geographically-refined modeling frameworks, and yields quantitative insights that would allow for inclusion of both climate and public health in benefits assessments of renewable energy.« less

  17. Health and climate benefits of offshore wind facilities in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    SciTech Connect

    Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Luckow, Patrick; Fisher, Jeremy

    Electricity from fossil fuels contributes substantially to both climate change and the health burden of air pollution. Renewable energy sources are capable of displacing electricity from fossil fuels, but the quantity of health and climate benefits depend on site-specific attributes that are not often included in quantitative models. Here, we link an electrical grid simulation model to an air pollution health impact assessment model and US regulatory estimates of the impacts of carbon to estimate the health and climate benefits of offshore wind facilities of different sizes in two different locations. We find that offshore wind in the Mid-Atlantic ismore » capable of producing health and climate benefits of between $54 and $120 per MWh of generation, with the largest simulated facility (3000 MW off the coast of New Jersey) producing approximately $690 million in benefits in 2017. The variability in benefits per unit generation is a function of differences in locations (Maryland versus New Jersey), simulated years (2012 versus 2017), and facility generation capacity, given complexities of the electrical grid and differences in which power plants are offset. In the end, this work demonstrates health and climate benefits of off shore wind, provides further evidence of the utility of geographically-refined modeling frameworks, and yields quantitative insights that would allow for inclusion of both climate and public health in benefits assessments of renewable energy.« less

  18. New Location Improves Efficiency | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The physical proximity of the SAIC-Frederick Intellectual Property (IP) Office to the NCI Technology Transfer Center (NCI-TTC) is one of the many benefits of being at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), according to Courtney Silverthorn, Ph.D. Being in one location “has increased the effectiveness of both informal communication and

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): PCS_NPDES

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Permit Compliance System (PCS) or the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) module of the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS). PCS tracks NPDES surface water permits issued under the Clean Water Act. This system is being incrementally replaced by the NPDES module of ICIS. Under NPDES, all facilities that discharge pollutants from any point source into waters of the United States are required to obtain a permit. The permit will likely contain limits on what can be discharged, impose monitoring and reporting requirements, and include other provisions to ensure that the discharge does not adversely affect water quality. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to NPDES facilities once the PCS or ICIS-NPDES data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available

  20. Probabilistic Modeling of Settlement Risk at Land Disposal Facilities - 12304

    SciTech Connect

    Foye, Kevin C.; Soong, Te-Yang

    2012-07-01

    The long-term reliability of land disposal facility final cover systems - and therefore the overall waste containment - depends on the distortions imposed on these systems by differential settlement/subsidence. The evaluation of differential settlement is challenging because of the heterogeneity of the waste mass (caused by inconsistent compaction, void space distribution, debris-soil mix ratio, waste material stiffness, time-dependent primary compression of the fine-grained soil matrix, long-term creep settlement of the soil matrix and the debris, etc.) at most land disposal facilities. Deterministic approaches to long-term final cover settlement prediction are not able to capture the spatial variability in the wastemore » mass and sub-grade properties which control differential settlement. An alternative, probabilistic solution is to use random fields to model the waste and sub-grade properties. The modeling effort informs the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of land disposal facilities. A probabilistic method to establish design criteria for waste placement and compaction is introduced using the model. Random fields are ideally suited to problems of differential settlement modeling of highly heterogeneous foundations, such as waste. Random fields model the seemingly random spatial distribution of a design parameter, such as compressibility. When used for design, the use of these models prompts the need for probabilistic design criteria. It also allows for a statistical approach to waste placement acceptance criteria. An example design evaluation was performed, illustrating the use of the probabilistic differential settlement simulation methodology to assemble a design guidance chart. The purpose of this design evaluation is to enable the designer to select optimal initial combinations of design slopes and quality control acceptance criteria that yield an acceptable proportion of post-settlement slopes meeting some design minimum. For this

  1. Variation in Hospice Services by Location of Care: Nursing Home Versus Assisted Living Facility Versus Home.

    PubMed

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Bernard, Brittany; Stump, Timothy E; Tu, Wanzhu; Callahan, Christopher M

    2017-07-01

    To describe differences in hospice services for patients living at home, in nursing homes or in assisted living facilities, including the overall number and duration of visits by different hospice care providers across varying lengths of stay. Retrospective cohort study using hospice patient electronic medical record data. Large, national hospice provider. Data from 32,605 hospice patients who received routine hospice care from 2009 to 2014 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated for utilization measures for each type of provider and by location of care. Frequency and duration of service contacts were standardized to a 1 week period and pairwise comparisons were used to detect differences in care provided between the three settings. Minimal differences were found in overall intensity of service contacts across settings, however, the mix of services were different for patients living at home versus nursing home versus assisted living facility. Overall, more nurse care was provided at the beginning and end of the hospice episode; intensity of aide care services was higher in the middle portion of the hospice episode. Nearly 43% of the sample had hospice stays less than 2 weeks and up to 20% had stays greater than 6 months. There are significant differences between characteristics of hospice patients in different settings, as well as the mix of services they receive. Medicare hospice payment methodology was revised starting in 2016. While the new payment structure is in greater alignment with the U shape distribution of services, it will be important to evaluate the impact of the new payment methodology on length of stay and mix of services by different providers across settings of care. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. Cartographic modeling of snow avalanche path location within Glacier National Park, Montana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Brown, Daniel G.; Bian, Ling; Butler, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) techniques were applied to the study of snow-avalanche path location within Glacier National Park, Montana. Aerial photointerpretation and field surveys confirmed the location of 121 avalanche paths within the selected study area. Spatial and nonspatial information on each path were integrated using the ARC/INFO GIS. Lithologic, structural, hydrographic, topographic, and land-cover impacts on path location were analyzed. All path frequencies within variable classes were normalized by the area of class occurrence relative to the total area of the study area and were added to the morphometric information contained within INFO tables. The normalized values for each GIS coverage were used to cartographically model, by means of composite factor weightings, avalanche path locations.

  3. 9 CFR 307.1 - Facilities for Program employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION FACILITIES FOR INSPECTION § 307.1 Facilities for Program employees. Office space... employees assigned thereto. The space set aside for this purpose shall meet with approval of the circuit... facilities exist in a nearby convenient location. Laundry service for inspectors' outer work clothing shall...

  4. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  5. Race, Wealth, and Solid Waste Facilities in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Jennifer M.; Wing, Steve; Lipscomb, Hester J.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Cravey, Altha J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Concern has been expressed in North Carolina that solid waste facilities may be disproportionately located in poor communities and in communities of color, that this represents an environmental injustice, and that solid waste facilities negatively impact the health of host communities. Objective Our goal in this study was to conduct a statewide analysis of the location of solid waste facilities in relation to community race and wealth. Methods We used census block groups to obtain racial and economic characteristics, and information on solid waste facilities was abstracted from solid waste facility permit records. We used logistic regression to compute prevalence odds ratios for 2003, and Cox regression to compute hazard ratios of facilities issued permits between 1990 and 2003. Results The adjusted prevalence odds of a solid waste facility was 2.8 times greater in block groups with ≥50% people of color compared with block groups with < 10% people of color, and 1.5 times greater in block groups with median house values < $60,000 compared with block groups with median house values ≥$100,000. Among block groups that did not have a previously permitted solid waste facility, the adjusted hazard of a new permitted facility was 2.7 times higher in block groups with ≥50% people of color compared with block groups with < 10% people of color. Conclusion Solid waste facilities present numerous public health concerns. In North Carolina solid waste facilities are disproportionately located in communities of color and low wealth. In the absence of action to promote environmental justice, the continued need for new facilities could exacerbate this environmental injustice. PMID:17805426

  6. Evaluation of location and number of aid post for sustainable humanitarian relief using agent based modeling (ABM) and geographic information system (GIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khair, Fauzi; Sopha, Bertha Maya

    2017-12-01

    One of the crucial phases in disaster management is the response phase or the emergency response phase. It requires a sustainable system and a well-integrated management system. Any errors in the system on this phase will impact on significant increase of the victims number as well as material damage caused. Policies related to the location of aid posts are important decisions. The facts show that there are many failures in the process of providing assistance to the refugees due to lack of preparation and determination of facilities and aid post location. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the number and location of aid posts on Merapi eruption in 2010. This study uses an integration between Agent Based Modeling (ABM) and Geographic Information System (GIS) about evaluation of the number and location of the aid post using some scenarios. The ABM approach aims to describe the agents behaviour (refugees and volunteers) in the event of a disaster with their respective characteristics. While the spatial data, GIS useful to describe real condition of the Sleman regency road. Based on the simulation result, it shows alternative scenarios that combine DERU UGM post, Maguwoharjo Stadium, Tagana Post and Pakem Main Post has better result in handling and distributing aid to evacuation barrack compared to initial scenario. Alternative scenarios indicates the unmet demands are less than the initial scenario.

  7. Modeling Tool to Quantify Metal Sources in Stormwater Discharges at Naval Facilities (NESDI Project 455)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 2077 June 2014 Modeling Tool to Quantify Metal Sources in Stormwater Discharges at Naval Facilities (NESDI Project 455... Stormwater Discharges at Naval Facilities (NESDI Project 455) Final Report and Guidance C. Katz K. Sorensen E. Arias SSC Pacific R. Pitt L. Talebi...demonstration/validation project to assess the use of the urban stormwater model Windows Source Loading and Management Model (WinSLAMM) to characterize

  8. Optimizing location of manufacturing industries in the context of economic globalization: A bi-level model based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shanhua; Yang, Zhongzhen

    2018-07-01

    This paper aims to optimize the locations of manufacturing industries in the context of economic globalization by proposing a bi-level programming model which integrates the location optimization model with the traffic assignment model. In the model, the transport network is divided into the subnetworks of raw materials and products respectively. The upper-level model is used to determine the location of industries and the OD matrices of raw materials and products. The lower-level model is used to calculate the attributes of traffic flow under given OD matrices. To solve the model, the genetic algorithm is designed. The proposed method is tested using the Chinese steel industry as an example. The result indicates that the proposed method could help the decision-makers to implement the location decisions for the manufacturing industries effectively.

  9. 30 CFR 77.1608 - Dumping facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dumping facilities. 77.1608 Section 77.1608 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Haulage § 77.1608 Dumping facilities. (a) Dumping locations and haulage roads shall be kept reasonably...

  10. 27 CFR 24.41 - Office facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Office facilities. 24.41... § 24.41 Office facilities. The appropriate TTB officer may require the proprietor to furnish... performing Government duties whether or not such office space is located at the specific premises where...

  11. User Delay Cost Model and Facilities Maintenance Cost Model for a Terminal Control Area : Volume 1. Model Formulation and Demonstration

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1978-05-01

    The User Delay Cost Model (UDCM) is a Monte Carlo computer simulation of essential aspects of Terminal Control Area (TCA) air traffic movements that would be affected by facility outages. The model can also evaluate delay effects due to other factors...

  12. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset - Intranet Download

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This downloadable data package consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in the FRS individual feature layers. The layers comprise the FRS major program databases, including:Assessment Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) : brownfields sites ; Air Facility System (AFS) : stationary sources of air pollution ; Air Quality System (AQS) : ambient air pollution data from monitoring stations; Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) : schools data on Indian land; Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) facilities; Clean Air Markets Division Business System (CAMDBS) : market-based air pollution control programs; Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) : hazardous waste sites; Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) : integrated enforcement and compliance information; National Compliance Database (NCDB) : Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) module of ICIS : NPDES surface water permits; Radiation Information Database (RADINFO) : radiation and radioactivity facilities; RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse (RBLC) : best available air pollution technology requirements; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information System (RCRAInfo) : tracks generators, transporters, treaters, storers, and disposers

  13. High Temperature Test Facility Preliminary RELAP5-3D Input Model Description

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, Paul David

    A RELAP5-3D input model is being developed for the High Temperature Test Facility at Oregon State University. The current model is described in detail. Further refinements will be made to the model as final as-built drawings are released and when system characterization data are available for benchmarking the input model.

  14. Lipid bilayer thickness determines cholesterol's location in model membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A.; Greathouse, Denise V.

    Cholesterol is an essential biomolecule of animal cell membranes, and an important precursor for the biosynthesis of certain hormones and vitamins. It is also thought to play a key role in cell signaling processes associated with functional plasma membrane microdomains (domains enriched in cholesterol), commonly referred to as rafts. In all of these diverse biological phenomena, the transverse location of cholesterol in the membrane is almost certainly an important structural feature. Using a combination of neutron scattering and solid-state 2H NMR, we have determined the location and orientation of cholesterol in phosphatidylcholine (PC) model membranes having fatty acids of differentmore » lengths and degrees of unsaturation. The data establish that cholesterol reorients rapidly about the bilayer normal in all the membranes studied, but is tilted and forced to span the bilayer midplane in the very thin bilayers. The possibility that cholesterol lies flat in the middle of bilayers, including those made from PC lipids containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), is ruled out. Finally, these results support the notion that hydrophobic thickness is the primary determinant of cholesterol's location in membranes.« less

  15. Lipid bilayer thickness determines cholesterol's location in model membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A.; Greathouse, Denise V.; ...

    2016-10-11

    Cholesterol is an essential biomolecule of animal cell membranes, and an important precursor for the biosynthesis of certain hormones and vitamins. It is also thought to play a key role in cell signaling processes associated with functional plasma membrane microdomains (domains enriched in cholesterol), commonly referred to as rafts. In all of these diverse biological phenomena, the transverse location of cholesterol in the membrane is almost certainly an important structural feature. Using a combination of neutron scattering and solid-state 2H NMR, we have determined the location and orientation of cholesterol in phosphatidylcholine (PC) model membranes having fatty acids of differentmore » lengths and degrees of unsaturation. The data establish that cholesterol reorients rapidly about the bilayer normal in all the membranes studied, but is tilted and forced to span the bilayer midplane in the very thin bilayers. The possibility that cholesterol lies flat in the middle of bilayers, including those made from PC lipids containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), is ruled out. Finally, these results support the notion that hydrophobic thickness is the primary determinant of cholesterol's location in membranes.« less

  16. A model for manuscript submitted to the nth IIR conference on overview of the long-baseline neutrino facility cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Bremer, Johan

    2017-03-09

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) collaboration is developing a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located one mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, detectors will be located inside four cryostats filled with a total of 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon, at the level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) is developing the conventional facilities and cryogenics infrastructure supporting this experiment. The cryogenics system is composed of several sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity, and Internal cryogenics. It will bemore » engineered, manufactured, commissioned, and qualified by an international engineering team. This contribution highlights the main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. It presents its performance, functional requirements and modes of operations. As a result, it also details the status of the design, present and future needs.« less

  17. Production of medical radioactive isotopes using KIPT electron driven subcritical facility.

    PubMed

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2008-05-01

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a plan to construct an electron accelerator driven subcritical assembly. One of the facility objectives is the production of medical radioactive isotopes. This paper presents the ANL collaborative work performed for characterizing the facility performance for producing medical radioactive isotopes. First, a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Then, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes have been considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n, gamma), (n, 2n), (n, p), and (gamma, n). In the second part, the parent isotopes with high reaction rate were explicitly modeled in the calculations. Four irradiation locations were considered in the analyses to study the medical isotope production rate. The results show the self-shielding effect not only reduces the specific activity but it also changes the irradiation location that maximizes the specific activity. The axial and radial distributions of the parent capture rates have been examined to define the irradiation sample size of each parent isotope.

  18. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): Facility Interests Dataset - Intranet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service consists of location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for all sites that are available in the FRS individual feature layers. The layers comprise the FRS major program databases, including:Assessment Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) : brownfields sites ; Air Facility System (AFS) : stationary sources of air pollution ; Air Quality System (AQS) : ambient air pollution data from monitoring stations; Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) : schools data on Indian land; Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) facilities; Clean Air Markets Division Business System (CAMDBS) : market-based air pollution control programs; Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) : hazardous waste sites; Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) : integrated enforcement and compliance information; National Compliance Database (NCDB) : Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA); National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) module of ICIS : NPDES surface water permits; Radiation Information Database (RADINFO) : radiation and radioactivity facilities; RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse (RBLC) : best available air pollution technology requirements; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information System (RCRAInfo) : tracks generators, transporters, treaters, storers, and disposers of haz

  19. Floor vibration evaluations for medical facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmel, Chad N.

    2003-10-01

    The structural floor design for new medical facilities is often selected early in the design phase and in renovation projects, the floor structure already exists. Because the floor structure can often have an influence on the location of vibration sensitive medical equipment and facilities, it is becoming necessary to identify the best locations for equipment and facilities early in the design process. Even though specific criteria for vibration-sensitive uses and equipment may not always be available early in the design phase, it should be possible to determine compatible floor structures for planned vibration-sensitive uses by comparing conceptual layouts with generic floor vibration criteria. Relatively simple evaluations of planned uses and generic criteria, combined with on-site vibration and noise measurements early in design phase, can significantly reduce future design problems and expense. Concepts of evaluation procedures and analyses will be presented in this paper. Generic floor vibration criteria and appropriate parameters to control resonant floor vibration and noise will be discussed for typical medical facilities and medical research facilities. Physical, economic, and logistical limitations that affect implementation will be discussed through case studies.

  20. Implementation of a Person-Centered Medical Care Model in a Skilled Nursing Facility: A Pilot Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Myers, Jaclyn; Nazir, Arif

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and impact of implementing a person-centered medical care model for post-acute care residents within a skilled nursing facility (SNF). A mixed-method (qualitative and quantitative) pilot evaluation. An 89-bed SNF located within a large midwestern city. Forty SNF post-acute patients admitted to the facility during a 6-month period were enrolled in the pilot evaluation. The patients were 75% women, 57% African American, and had an average age of 73. To meet inclusion criteria, patients must have been admitted to the facility for rehabilitation with a plan for community discharge, and be cognitively able to consent as indicated by a cognitive screening tool or assent to participation with family member consent. The person-centered medical care model included (1) biweekly interdisciplinary care plan meetings, scheduled at a time of patients' preference and held in the patient's room; (2) patient selection of health-related goals that guide team discussions; (3) use of lay-language that facilitated patient understanding; (4) team accountability to the patient for patient care preferences; and (5) monthly care-team meetings to exchange feedback regarding the team's performance and the model. Evaluation data included admission and discharge Patient Activation Measure surveys; admission and discharge Care of Chronic Conditions surveys; admission and biweekly modified Castle Satisfaction Surveys; admission and discharge Patient and Caregiver Engagement surveys; and semistructured interviews with a sample of staff, family members, and patients. A significant (P < .01) improvement was noted between admission and discharge on both the Care for Chronic Conditions and the Patient Activation Measure surveys. Patient satisfaction surveys trended toward higher ratings over time on most questions, with significant improvement in 2 questions addressing satisfaction with their medical provider. Interviews revealed a

  1. Lightning and surge protection of large ground facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringfellow, Michael F.

    1988-04-01

    The vulnerability of large ground facilities to direct lightning strikes and to lightning-induced overvoltages on the power distribution, telephone and data communication lines are discussed. Advanced electrogeometric modeling is used for the calculation of direct strikes to overhead power lines, buildings, vehicles and objects within the facility. Possible modes of damage, injury and loss are discussed. Some appropriate protection methods for overhead power lines, structures, vehicles and aircraft are suggested. Methods to mitigate the effects of transients on overhead and underground power systems as well as within buildings and other structures are recommended. The specification and location of low-voltage surge suppressors for the protection of vulnerable hardware such as computers, telecommunication equipment and radar installations are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of commonly used grounding techniques, such as single point, multiple and isolated grounds are compared. An example is given of the expected distribution of lightning flashes to a large airport, its buildings, structures and facilities, as well as to vehicles on the ground.

  2. Quantification of Methane Source Locations and Emissions in AN Urban Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosson, E.; Richardson, S.; Tan, S. M.; Whetstone, J.; Bova, T.; Prasad, K. R.; Davis, K. J.; Phillips, N. G.; Turnbull, J. C.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The regulation of methane emissions from urban sources such as landfills and waste-water treatment facilities is currently a highly debated topic in the US and in Europe. This interest is fueled, in part, by recent measurements indicating that urban emissions are a significant source of Methane (CH4) and in fact may be substantially higher than current inventory estimates(1). As a result, developing methods for locating and quantifying emissions from urban methane sources is of great interest to industries such as landfill and wastewater treatment facility owners, watchdog groups, and the governmental agencies seeking to evaluate or enforce regulations. In an attempt to identify major methane source locations and emissions in Boston, Indianapolis, and the Bay Area, systematic measurements of CH4 concentrations and meteorology data were made at street level using a vehicle mounted cavity ringdown analyzer. A number of discrete sources were detected at concentration levels in excess of 15 times background levels. Using Gaussian plume models as well as tomographic techniques, methane source locations and emission rates will be presented. In addition, flux chamber measurements of discrete sources such as those found in natural gas leaks will also be presented. (1) Wunch, D., P.O. Wennberg, G.C. Toon, G. Keppel-Aleks, and Y.G. Yavin, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from a North American Megacity, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 36, L15810, doi:10.1029/2009GL)39825, 2009.

  3. 10 CFR 1.5 - Location of principal offices and Regional Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of principal offices and Regional Offices. 1.5 Section 1.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Introduction § 1.5 Location of principal offices and Regional Offices. (a) The principal NRC offices are located in the Washington, DC, area. Facilities...

  4. Modelling and operation strategies of DLR's large scale thermocline test facility (TESIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenthal, Christian; Breidenbach, Nils; Bauer, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    In this work an overview of the TESIS:store thermocline test facility and its current construction status will be given. Based on this, the TESIS:store facility using sensible solid filler material is modelled with a fully transient model, implemented in MATLAB®. Results in terms of the impact of filler site and operation strategies will be presented. While low porosity and small particle diameters for the filler material are beneficial, operation strategy is one key element with potential for optimization. It is shown that plant operators have to ponder between utilization and exergetic efficiency. Different durations of the charging and discharging period enable further potential for optimizations.

  5. Fluids and Combustion Facility: Combustion Integrated Rack Modal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Otten, Kim D.; Akers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a modular, multi-user, two-rack facility dedicated to combustion and fluids science in the US Laboratory Destiny on the International Space Station. FCF is a permanent facility that is capable of accommodating up to ten combustion and fluid science investigations per year. FCF research in combustion and fluid science supports NASA's Exploration of Space Initiative for on-orbit fire suppression, fire safety, and space system fluids management. The Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) is one of two racks in the FCF. The CIR major structural elements include the International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR), Experiment Assembly (optics bench and combustion chamber), Air Thermal Control Unit (ATCU), Rack Door, and Lower Structure Assembly (Input/Output Processor and Electrical Power Control Unit). The load path through the rack structure is outlined. The CIR modal survey was conducted to validate the load path predicted by the CIR finite element model (FEM). The modal survey is done by experimentally measuring the CIR frequencies and mode shapes. The CIR model was test correlated by updating the model to represent the test mode shapes. The correlated CIR model delivery is required by NASA JSC at Launch-10.5 months. The test correlated CIR flight FEM is analytically integrated into the Shuttle for a coupled loads analysis of the launch configuration. The analysis frequency range of interest is 0-50 Hz. A coupled loads analysis is the analytical integration of the Shuttle with its cargo element, the Mini Payload Logistics Module (MPLM), in the Shuttle cargo bay. For each Shuttle launch configuration, a verification coupled loads analysis is performed to determine the loads in the cargo bay as part of the structural certification process.

  6. NACA Zero Power Reactor Facility Hazards Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    The Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics proposes to build a zero power research reactor facility which will be located in the laboratory grounds near Clevelaurd, Ohio. The purpose of this report is to inform the Advisory Commit tee on Reactor Safeguards of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission in re gard to the design of the reactor facility, the cha,acteristics of th e site, and the hazards of operation at this location, The purpose o f this reactor is to perform critical experiments, to measure reactiv ity effects, to serve as a neutron source, and to serve as a training tool. The reactor facility is described. This is followed by a discu ssion of the nuclear characteristics and the control system. Site cha racteristics are then discussed followed by a discussion of the exper iments which may be conducted in the facility. The potential hazards of the facility are then considered, particularly, the maximum credib le accident. Finally, the administrative procedure is discussed.

  7. Western Canada study of animal health effects associated with exposure to emissions from oil and natural gas field facilities. Study design and data collection II. Location of study herds relative to the oil and gas industry in Western Canada.

    PubMed

    Waldner, Cheryl L

    2008-01-01

    During the late part of 2000 and early months of 2001, project veterinarians recruited 205 beef herds to participate in a study of the effects of emissions from the upstream oil and gas industry on cattle reproduction and health. Researchers developed herd-selection criteria to optimize the range of exposure to facilities, including oil and gas wells, battery sites, and gas-gathering and gas-processing facilities across the major cattle-producing areas of Western Canada. Herds were initially selected on the basis of a ranking system of exposure potential on the basis of herd-owner reports of the locations of their operations in relation to oil and gas industry facilities. At the end of the study, researchers summarized data obtained from provincial regulatory agencies on facility location and reported flaring and venting volumes for each herd and compared these data to the original rankings of herd-exposure potential. Through this selection process, the researchers were successful in obtaining statistically significant differences in exposure to various types of oil and gas facility types and reported emissions among herds recruited for the study.

  8. EPA Facility Locations and Regional Boundaries - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This downloadable package contains the following layers: EPA facility points, EPA region boundary polygons and EPA region boundary polygons extended to the 200nm Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Included in this package are a file geodatabase (v. 10.0), Esri ArcMap map document (v. 10.0) and XML files for this record and the layer level metadata. This dataset was produced by EPA Office of Environmental Information (OEI).

  9. Fluids and Combustion Facility: Fluids Integrated Rack Modal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Otten, Kim D.; Akers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) is one of two racks in the Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station. The FIR is dedicated to the scientific investigation of space system fluids management supporting NASA s Exploration of Space Initiative. The FIR hardware was modal tested and FIR finite element model updated to satisfy the International Space Station model correlation criteria. The final cross-orthogonality results between the correlated model and test mode shapes was greater than 90 percent for all primary target modes.

  10. RCRA Facility Information

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This asset includes hazardous waste information, which is mostly contained in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo) System, a national program management and inventory system addressing hazardous waste handlers. In general, all entities that generate, transport, treat, store, and dispose of hazardous waste are required to provide information about their activities to state environmental agencies. These agencies pass on that information to regional and national EPA offices. This regulation is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984. RCRAInfo Search can be used to determine identification and location data for specific hazardous waste handlers and to find a wide range of information on treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regarding permit/closure status, compliance with Federal and State regulations, and cleanup activities. Categories of information in this asset include:-- Handlers-- Permit Information-- GIS information on facility location-- Financial Assurance-- Corrective Action-- Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement (CM&E)

  11. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  12. 37 CFR 102.2 - Public reference facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public reference facilities. 102.2 Section 102.2 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... thereto. The public reference facility is located in the Public Search Room, Madison Building East, First...

  13. 37 CFR 102.2 - Public reference facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Public reference facilities. 102.2 Section 102.2 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... thereto. The public reference facility is located in the Public Search Room, Madison Building East, First...

  14. 37 CFR 102.2 - Public reference facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Public reference facilities. 102.2 Section 102.2 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... thereto. The public reference facility is located in the Public Search Room, Madison Building East, First...

  15. 37 CFR 102.2 - Public reference facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public reference facilities. 102.2 Section 102.2 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... thereto. The public reference facility is located in the Public Search Room, Madison Building East, First...

  16. 37 CFR 102.2 - Public reference facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public reference facilities. 102.2 Section 102.2 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... thereto. The public reference facility is located in the Public Search Room, Madison Building East, First...

  17. Robust optimization model and algorithm for railway freight center location problem in uncertain environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing-Cai; He, Shi-Wei; Song, Rui; Sun, Yang; Li, Hao-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Railway freight center location problem is an important issue in railway freight transport programming. This paper focuses on the railway freight center location problem in uncertain environment. Seeing that the expected value model ignores the negative influence of disadvantageous scenarios, a robust optimization model was proposed. The robust optimization model takes expected cost and deviation value of the scenarios as the objective. A cloud adaptive clonal selection algorithm (C-ACSA) was presented. It combines adaptive clonal selection algorithm with Cloud Model which can improve the convergence rate. Design of the code and progress of the algorithm were proposed. Result of the example demonstrates the model and algorithm are effective. Compared with the expected value cases, the amount of disadvantageous scenarios in robust model reduces from 163 to 21, which prove the result of robust model is more reliable.

  18. Airport offsite passenger service facilities : an option for improving landside access. Volume II, Access characteristics and travel demand.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    Offsite airport facilities provide ground transportation, baggage and passenger check in, and other transportation services to departing air passengers from a remote location. The purpose of this study was to develop models to determine the airports ...

  19. CFD modelling of sampling locations for early detection of spontaneous combustion in long-wall gob areas.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liming; Smith, Alex C

    In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was conducted to optimize gas sampling locations for the early detection of spontaneous heating in longwall gob areas. Initial simulations were carried out to predict carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations at various regulators in the gob using a bleeder ventilation system. Measured CO concentration values at these regulators were then used to calibrate the CFD model. The calibrated CFD model was used to simulate CO concentrations at eight sampling locations in the gob using a bleederless ventilation system to determine the optimal sampling locations for early detection of spontaneous combustion.

  20. Wave Action and Breakwater Location, Taconite Harbor (Two Islands), Lake Superior, Minnesota: Hydraulic Model Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-05-01

    president, Taconite Contractors, Erie. Mining Company, Duluth, Minnesota The model study was conducted in the Hydraulics Division of the Waterways...CORPS OF ENGINEERS. U. S. ARMY WAVE ACTION AND BREAKWATER LOCATION TACONITE HARBOR (TWO ISLANDS) LAKE SUPERIOR, MINNESOTA ARIIIY-MRC VICKSBURG...Breakwater Location, Taconite Harbor (Two Islands), Lake Superior, Minnesota : Hydraulic Model Investigation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  1. Plum Brook Reactor Facility Control Room during Facility Startup

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-02-21

    Operators test the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Reactor Facility systems in the months leading up to its actual operation. The “Reactor On” signs are illuminated but the reactor core was not yet ready for chain reactions. Just a couple weeks after this photograph, Plum Brook Station held a media open house to unveil the 60-megawatt test reactor near Sandusky, Ohio. More than 60 members of the print media and radio and television news services met at the site to talk with community leaders and representatives from NASA and Atomic Energy Commission. The Plum Brook reactor went critical for the first time on the evening of June 14, 1961. It was not until April 1963 that the reactor reached its full potential of 60 megawatts. The reactor control room, located on the second floor of the facility, was run by licensed operators. The operators manually operated the shim rods which adjusted the chain reaction in the reactor core. The regulating rods could partially or completely shut down the reactor. The control room also housed remote area monitoring panels and other monitoring equipment that allowed operators to monitor radiation sensors located throughout the facility and to scram the reactor instantly if necessary. The color of the indicator lights corresponded with the elevation of the detectors in the various buildings. The reactor could also shut itself down automatically if the monitors detected any sudden irregularities.

  2. Modelling and Optimization of Nannochloropsis and Chlorella Growth for Various Locations and Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharagozloo, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil providing domestic renewable energy. Algae-based biofuels are attractive for their large oil yield potential despite decreased land use and natural-resource requirements compared to terrestrial energy crops. Important factors controlling algal-lipid productivity include temperature, nutrient availability, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational approaches allow for inexpensive predictions of algae-growth kinetics for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without multiple, expensive measurement systems. In this work, we parameterize our physics-based computational algae growth model for the marine Nannochloropsis oceanica and freshwater Chlorella species. We then compare modelling results with experiments conducted in identical raceway ponds at six geographical locations in the United States (Hawaii, California, Arizona, Ohio, Georgia, and Florida) and three seasons through the Algae Testbed Public Private Partnership - Unified Field Studies. Results show that the computational model effectively predicts algae growth in systems across varying environments and identifies the causes for reductions in algal productivities. The model is then used to identify improvements to the cultivation system to produce higher biomass yields. This model could be used to study the effects of scale-up including the effects of predation, depth-decay of light (light extinction), and optimized nutrient and CO2 delivery. As more multifactorial data are accumulated for a variety of algal strains, the model could be used to select appropriate algal species for various geographic and climatic locations and seasons. Applying the model facilitates optimization of pond designs based on location and season.

  3. Two-MILP models for scheduling elective surgeries within a private healthcare facility.

    PubMed

    Khlif Hachicha, Hejer; Zeghal Mansour, Farah

    2016-11-05

    This paper deals with an Integrated Elective Surgery-Scheduling Problem (IESSP) that arises in a privately operated healthcare facility. It aims to optimize the resource utilization of the entire surgery process including pre-operative, per-operative and post-operative activities. Moreover, it addresses a specific feature of private facilities where surgeons are independent service providers and may conduct their surgeries in different private healthcare facilities. Thus, the problem requires the assignment of surgery patients to hospital beds, operating rooms and recovery beds as well as their sequencing over a 1-day period while taking into account surgeons' availability constraints. We present two Mixed Integer Linear Programs (MILP) that model the IESSP as a three-stage hybrid flow-shop scheduling problem with recirculation, resource synchronization, dedicated machines, and blocking constraints. To assess the empirical performance of the proposed models, we conducted experiments on real-world data of a Tunisian private clinic: Clinique Ennasr and on randomly generated instances. Two criteria were minimised: the patients' average length of stay and the number of patients' overnight stays. The computational results show that the proposed models can solve instances with up to 44 surgical cases in a reasonable CPU time using a general-purpose MILP solver.

  4. 78 FR 46560 - Pipeline Safety: Class Location Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part... class location requirements for gas transmission pipelines. Section 5 of the Pipeline Safety, Regulatory... and, with respect to gas transmission pipeline facilities, whether applying IMP requirements to...

  5. 75 FR 77954 - Transfer of Federally Assisted Facility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... of Charlottesville (City) intends to transfer a facility and land located at 315 4th Street, NW... parcel, and is located at 315 4th Street, NW., in Charlottesville, Virginia. The building is within an...

  6. Dramatic Arts Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This booklet begins by explaining the function, the common planning errors, some location specifications, and the general requirements for any dramatic arts area. Facilities for (1) a single classroom, (2) a double classroom, (3) a specifically designed studio, and (4) a specifically designed studio complex are then described and illustrated.…

  7. Results of tests performed on the Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel: Report on the Modified D.S.M.A. Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous tests were performed on the original Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel, scaled down from the full-scale plans. Results of tests performed on the original scale model tunnel were reported in April 1995, which clearly showed that this model was lacking in performance. Subsequently this scale model was modified to attempt to possibly improve the tunnel performance. The modifications included: (a) redesigned diffuser; (b) addition of a collector; (c) addition of a Nozzle-Diffuser; (d) changes in location of vent-air. Tests performed on the modified tunnel showed a marked improvement in performance amounting to a nominal increase of pressure recovery in the diffuser from 34 percent to 54 percent. Results obtained in the tests have wider application. They may also be applied to other tunnels operating with an open test section not necessarily having similar geometry as the model under consideration.

  8. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): CERCLIS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data provides location and attribute information on Facilities regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) for a intranet web feature service . The data provided in this service are obtained from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS). The FRS is an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities, sites or places. This service connects directly to the FRS database to provide this data as a feature service. FRS creates high-quality, accurate, and authoritative facility identification records through rigorous verification and management procedures that incorporate information from program national systems, state master facility records, data collected from EPA's Central Data Exchange registrations and data management personnel. Additional Information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  9. A NEW, SMALL DRYING FACILITY FOR WET RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Oldiges, Olaf; Blenski, Hans-Juergen

    2003-02-27

    Due to the reason, that in Germany every Waste, that is foreseen to be stored in a final disposal facility or in a long time interim storage facility, it is necessary to treat a lot of waste using different drying technologies. In Germany two different drying facilities are in operation. The GNS Company prefers a vacuum-drying-technology and has built and designed PETRA-Drying-Facilities. In a lot of smaller locations, it is not possible to install such a facility because inside the working areas of that location, the available space to install the PETRA-Drying-Facility is too small. For that reason, GNS decidedmore » to design a new, small Drying-Facility using industrial standard components, applying the vacuum-drying-technology. The new, small Drying-Facility for wet radioactive waste and liquids is presented in this paper. The results of some tests with a prototype facility are shown in chapter 4. The main components of that new facility are described in chapter 3.« less

  10. A Versatile Rocket Engine Hot Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of a versatile rocket engine facility, located in the Rocket Laboratory at the NASA Lewis Research Center, are presented. The gaseous hydrogen/oxygen facility can be used for thermal shock and hot gas testing of materials and structures as well as rocket propulsion testing. Testing over a wide range of operating conditions in both fuel and oxygen rich regimes can be conducted, with cooled or uncooled test specimens. The size and location of the test cell provide the ability to conduct large amounts of testing in short time periods with rapid turnaround between programs.

  11. Comparative analysis of bleeding risk by the location and shape of arachnoid cysts: a finite element model analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Han, In Seok; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kim, Seung-Ki; Kim, Young-Eun; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Although arachnoid cysts (ACs) are observed in various locations, only sylvian ACs are mainly regarded to be associated with bleeding. The reason for this selective association of sylvian ACs with bleeding is not understood well. This study is to investigate the effect of the location and shape of ACs on the risk of bleeding. A developed finite element model of the head/brain was modified for models of sylvian, suprasellar, and posterior fossa ACs. A spherical AC was placed at each location to compare the effect of AC location. Bowl-shaped and oval-shaped AC models were developed to compare the effect by shape. The shear force on the spot-weld elements (SFSW) was measured between the dura and the outer wall of the ACs or the comparable arachnoid membrane in the normal model. All AC models revealed higher SFSW than comparable normal models. By location, sylvian AC displayed the highest SFSW for frontal and lateral impacts. By shape, small outer wall AC models showed higher SFSW than large wall models in sylvian area and lower SFSW than large ones in posterior fossa. In regression analysis, the presence of AC was the only independent risk of bleeding. The bleeding mechanism of ACs is very complex, and the risk quantification failed to show a significant role of location and shape of ACs. The presence of AC increases shear force on impact condition and may be a risk factor of bleeding, and sylvian location of AC may not have additive risks of AC bleeding.

  12. On the potential of models for location and scale for genome-wide DNA methylation data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With the help of epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS), increasing knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation in disease processes is obtained. In addition, EWAS aid the understanding of behavioral and environmental effects on DNA methylation. In terms of statistical analysis, specific challenges arise from the characteristics of methylation data. First, methylation β-values represent proportions with skewed and heteroscedastic distributions. Thus, traditional modeling strategies assuming a normally distributed response might not be appropriate. Second, recent evidence suggests that not only mean differences but also variability in site-specific DNA methylation associates with diseases, including cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare different modeling strategies for methylation data in terms of model performance and performance of downstream hypothesis tests. Specifically, we used the generalized additive models for location, scale and shape (GAMLSS) framework to compare beta regression with Gaussian regression on raw, binary logit and arcsine square root transformed methylation data, with and without modeling a covariate effect on the scale parameter. Results Using simulated and real data from a large population-based study and an independent sample of cancer patients and healthy controls, we show that beta regression does not outperform competing strategies in terms of model performance. In addition, Gaussian models for location and scale showed an improved performance as compared to models for location only. The best performance was observed for the Gaussian model on binary logit transformed β-values, referred to as M-values. Our results further suggest that models for location and scale are specifically sensitive towards violations of the distribution assumption and towards outliers in the methylation data. Therefore, a resampling procedure is proposed as a mode of inference and shown to diminish type I

  13. Regional intensity attenuation models for France and the estimation of magnitude and location of historical earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.; Scotti, O.

    2006-01-01

    Intensity assignments for 33 calibration earthquakes were used to develop intensity attenuation models for the Alps, Armorican, Provence, Pyrenees and Rhine regions of France. Intensity decreases with ?? most rapidly in the French Alps, Provence and Pyrenees regions, and least rapidly in the Armorican and Rhine regions. The comparable Armorican and Rhine region attenuation models are aggregated into a French stable continental region model and the comparable Provence and Pyrenees region models are aggregated into a Southern France model. We analyse MSK intensity assignments using the technique of Bakun & Wentworth, which provides an objective method for estimating epicentral location and intensity magnitude MI. MI for the 1356 October 18 earthquake in the French stable continental region is 6.6 for a location near Basle, Switzerland, and moment magnitude M is 5.9-7.2 at the 95 per cent (??2??) confidence level. MI for the 1909 June 11 Trevaresse (Lambesc) earthquake near Marseilles in the Southern France region is 5.5, and M is 4.9-6.0 at the 95 per cent confidence level. Bootstrap resampling techniques are used to calculate objective, reproducible 67 per cent and 95 per cent confidence regions for the locations of historical earthquakes. These confidence regions for location provide an attractive alternative to the macroseismic epicentre and qualitative location uncertainties used heretofore. ?? 2006 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2006 RAS.

  14. Should I stay or should I go?: consistency and switching of delivery locations among new mothers in 39 Sub-Saharan African and South/Southeast Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Benova, Lenka; Macleod, David; Radovich, Emma; Lynch, Caroline A; Campbell, Oona M R

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this article is to assess the extent and determinants of switching delivery location between women’s first and second deliveries. We used Demographic and Health Survey data from 39 low- and middle-income countries on delivery locations from >30 000 women who had their first two deliveries in the 5-year survey recall period. Each delivery was characterized as occurring at home or in a health facility, facilities were classified as public- or private-sector. The extent of switching was estimated for each country, region and overall. Multivariable logistic regression models assessed determinants of switching (home to facility or facility to home), using four dimensions (perceived/biological need, socioeconomic characteristics, utilization of care and availability of care). Overall, 49.0% of first and 44.5% of second deliveries occurred in health facilities. Among women who had their first delivery at home, 11.8% used a facility for their second (7.0% public-sector and 4.8% private-sector). Among women who had their first delivery in a facility, 21.6% switched to a home location for their second. The extent of switching varied by country; but the overall net effect was either non-existent (n = 20) or away from facilities (n = 17) in all but two countries—Cambodia and Burkina Faso. Four factors were associated with switching to a facility after a home delivery: higher education, urban residence, non-poor household status and multiple gestation. Majority of women consistently used the same delivery location for their first two deliveries. We found some evidence that where switching occurred, women were being lost from facility care during this important transition, and that all four included dimensions were important determinants of women’s pattern of delivery care use. The relative importance of these factors should be understood in each specific context to improve retention in and provision of quality intrapartum care for women

  15. Should I stay or should I go?: consistency and switching of delivery locations among new mothers in 39 Sub-Saharan African and South/Southeast Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Benova, Lenka; Macleod, David; Radovich, Emma; Lynch, Caroline A; Campbell, Oona M R

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this article is to assess the extent and determinants of switching delivery location between women's first and second deliveries. We used Demographic and Health Survey data from 39 low- and middle-income countries on delivery locations from >30 000 women who had their first two deliveries in the 5-year survey recall period. Each delivery was characterized as occurring at home or in a health facility, facilities were classified as public- or private-sector. The extent of switching was estimated for each country, region and overall. Multivariable logistic regression models assessed determinants of switching (home to facility or facility to home), using four dimensions (perceived/biological need, socioeconomic characteristics, utilization of care and availability of care). Overall, 49.0% of first and 44.5% of second deliveries occurred in health facilities. Among women who had their first delivery at home, 11.8% used a facility for their second (7.0% public-sector and 4.8% private-sector). Among women who had their first delivery in a facility, 21.6% switched to a home location for their second. The extent of switching varied by country; but the overall net effect was either non-existent (n = 20) or away from facilities (n = 17) in all but two countries-Cambodia and Burkina Faso. Four factors were associated with switching to a facility after a home delivery: higher education, urban residence, non-poor household status and multiple gestation. Majority of women consistently used the same delivery location for their first two deliveries. We found some evidence that where switching occurred, women were being lost from facility care during this important transition, and that all four included dimensions were important determinants of women's pattern of delivery care use. The relative importance of these factors should be understood in each specific context to improve retention in and provision of quality intrapartum care for women and their

  16. A Sketch of the Taiwan Zebrafish Core Facility.

    PubMed

    You, May-Su; Jiang, Yun-Jin; Yuh, Chiou-Hwa; Wang, Chien-Ming; Tang, Chih-Hao; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Lin, Bo-Hung; Wu, Jen-Leih; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L

    2016-07-01

    In the past three decades, the number of zebrafish laboratories has significantly increased in Taiwan. The Taiwan Zebrafish Core Facility (TZCF), a government-funded core facility, was launched to serve this growing community. The Core Facility was built on two sites, one located at the National Health Research Institutes (NHRI, called Taiwan Zebrafish Core Facility at NHRI or TZeNH) and the other is located at the Academia Sinica (Taiwan Zebrafish Core Facility at AS a.k.a. TZCAS). The total surface area of the TZCF is about 180 m(2) encompassing 2880 fish tanks. Each site has a separate quarantine room and centralized water recirculating systems, monitoring key water parameters. To prevent diseases, three main strategies have been implemented: (1) imported fish must be quarantined; (2) only bleached embryos are introduced into the main facilities; and (3) working practices were implemented to minimize pathogen transfer between stocks and facilities. Currently, there is no health program in place; however, a fourth measure for the health program, specific regular pathogen tests, is being planned. In March 2015, the TZCF at NHRI has been AAALAC accredited. It is our goal to ensure that we provide "disease-free" fish and embryos to the Taiwanese research community.

  17. Validation of a model for ranking aquaculture facilities for risk-based disease surveillance.

    PubMed

    Diserens, Nicolas; Falzon, Laura Cristina; von Siebenthal, Beat; Schüpbach-Regula, Gertraud; Wahli, Thomas

    2017-09-15

    A semi-quantitative model for risk ranking of aquaculture facilities in Switzerland with regard to the introduction and spread of Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (VHS) and Infectious Haematopoietic Necrosis (IHN) was developed in a previous study (Diserens et al., 2013). The objective of the present study was to validate this model using data collected during field visits on aquaculture sites in four Swiss cantons compared to data collected through a questionnaire in the previous study. A discrepancy between the values obtained with the two different methods was found in 32.8% of the parameters, resulting in a significant difference (p<0.001) in the risk classification of the facilities. As data gathered exclusively by means of a questionnaire are not of sufficient quality to perform a risk-based surveillance of aquaculture facilities a combination of questionnaires and farm inspections is proposed. A web-based reporting system could be advantageous for the factors which were identified as being more likely to vary over time, in particular for factors considering fish movements, which showed a marginally significant difference in their risk scores (p≥0.1) within a six- month period. Nevertheless, the model proved to be stable over the considered period of time as no substantial fluctuations in the risk categorisation were observed (Kappa agreement of 0.77).Finally, the model proved to be suitable to deliver a reliable risk ranking of Swiss aquaculture facilities according to their risk of getting infected with or spreading of VHS and IHN, as the five facilities that tested positive for these diseases in the last ten years were ranked as medium or high risk. Moreover, because the seven fish farms that were infected with Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis (IPN) during the same period also belonged to the risk categories medium and high, the classification appeared to correlate with the occurrence of this third viral fish disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  18. Detecting and Locating Seismic Events Without Phase Picks or Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrowsmith, S.; Young, C. J.; Ballard, S.; Slinkard, M.

    2015-12-01

    The standard paradigm for seismic event monitoring is to scan waveforms from a network of stations and identify the arrival time of various seismic phases. A signal association algorithm then groups the picks to form events, which are subsequently located by minimizing residuals between measured travel times and travel times predicted by an Earth model. Many of these steps are prone to significant errors which can lead to erroneous arrival associations and event locations. Here, we revisit a concept for event detection that does not require phase picks or travel time curves and fuses detection, association and location into a single algorithm. Our pickless event detector exploits existing catalog and waveform data to build an empirical stack of the full regional seismic wavefield, which is subsequently used to detect and locate events at a network level using correlation techniques. Because the technique uses more of the information content of the original waveforms, the concept is particularly powerful for detecting weak events that would be missed by conventional methods. We apply our detector to seismic data from the University of Utah Seismograph Stations network and compare our results with the earthquake catalog published by the University of Utah. We demonstrate that the pickless detector can detect and locate significant numbers of events previously missed by standard data processing techniques.

  19. Do slums matter? Location and early childhood preventive care choices among urban residents of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lauren R

    2013-10-01

    Upward trends in the relative proportions of slum residents in developing countries have led to widespread concern regarding the impact of slum residency on health behaviors. Measurement of these impacts requires recognizing that unobservable household characteristics that affect the location decision may also affect health care choices and outcomes. To address the potential for bias, this paper models the location decision and the household's demand for maternal and child health services simultaneously using a flexible, semi-parametric approach. It uses a unique urban data set from Bangladesh that incorporates sophisticated geographical mapping techniques to carefully delineate between slum and non-slum areas at a particular point in time. The results suggest that accounting for the endogenous location decision of a family substantially reduces bias in estimated marginal effects of slum residence on preventive care demand. While community infrastructure variables appear correlated with preventive care demand, the causal effect of the availability of primary health care facilities is indistinguishable from zero when unobserved heterogeneity is taken into account. The findings suggest that improvements in community infrastructure in urban areas of developing countries are a more favorable health policy solution at the margin than the construction of additional health care facilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A cost-benefit/cost-effectiveness analysis of proposed supervised injection facilities in Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Jozaghi, Ehsan; Reid, Andrew A; Andresen, Martin A

    2013-07-09

    This paper will determine whether expanding Insite (North America's first and only supervised injection facility) to more locations in Canada such as Montreal, cost less than the health care consequences of not having such expanded programs for injection drug users. By analyzing secondary data gathered in 2012, this paper relies on mathematical models to estimate the number of new HIV and Hepatitis C (HCV) infections prevented as a result of additional SIF locations in Montreal. With very conservative estimates, it is predicted that the addition of each supervised injection facility (up-to a maximum of three) in Montreal will on average prevent 11 cases of HIV and 65 cases of HCV each year. As a result, there is a net cost saving of CDN$0.686 million (HIV) and CDN$0.8 million (HCV) for each additional supervised injection site each year. This translates into a net average benefit-cost ratio of 1.21: 1 for both HIV and HCV. Funding supervised injection facilities in Montreal appears to be an efficient and effective use of financial resources in the public health domain.

  1. Geographic information system-based healthcare waste management planning for treatment site location and optimal transportation routeing.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Soulalay, Vongdeuane; Chettiyappan, Visvanathan

    2012-06-01

    In Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), a growth of healthcare centres, and the environmental hazards and public health risks typically accompanying them, increased the need for healthcare waste (HCW) management planning. An effective planning of an HCW management system including components such as the treatment plant siting and an optimized routeing system for collection and transportation of waste is deemed important. National government offices at developing countries often lack the proper tools and methodologies because of the high costs usually associated with them. However, this study attempts to demonstrate the use of an inexpensive GIS modelling tool for healthcare waste management in the country. Two areas were designed for this study on HCW management, including: (a) locating centralized treatment plants and designing optimum travel routes for waste collection from nearby healthcare facilities; and (b) utilizing existing hospital incinerators and designing optimum routes for collecting waste from nearby healthcare facilities. Spatial analysis paved the way to understand the spatial distribution of healthcare wastes and to identify hotspots of higher waste generating locations. Optimal route models were designed for collecting and transporting HCW to treatment plants, which also highlights constraints in collecting and transporting waste for treatment and disposal. The proposed model can be used as a decision support tool for the efficient management of hospital wastes by government healthcare waste management authorities and hospitals.

  2. View of camera station located northeast of Building 70022, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of camera station located northeast of Building 70022, facing northwest - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, Randsburg Wash Facility Target Test Towers, Tower Road, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  3. Experimental Fuels Facility Re-categorization Based on Facility Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, Troy P.; Andrus, Jason

    The Experimental Fuels Facility (EFF) (MFC-794) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site was originally constructed to provide controlled-access, indoor storage for radiological contaminated equipment. Use of the facility was expanded to provide a controlled environment for repairing contaminated equipment and characterizing, repackaging, and treating waste. The EFF facility is also used for research and development services, including fuel fabrication. EFF was originally categorized as a LTHC-3 radiological facility based on facility operations and facility radiological inventories. Newly planned program activities identified the need to receive quantities of fissionable materials in excessmore » of the single parameter subcritical limit in ANSI/ANS-8.1, “Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors” (identified as “criticality list” quantities in DOE-STD-1027-92, “Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports,” Attachment 1, Table A.1). Since the proposed inventory of fissionable materials inside EFF may be greater than the single parameter sub-critical limit of 700 g of U-235 equivalent, the initial re-categorization is Hazard Category (HC) 2 based upon a potential criticality hazard. This paper details the facility hazard categorization performed for the EFF. The categorization was necessary to determine (a) the need for further safety analysis in accordance with LWP-10802, “INL Facility Categorization,” and (b) compliance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830, Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.” Based on the segmentation argument presented in this paper, the final hazard categorization for the facility is LTHC-3. Department of Energy Idaho (DOE-ID) approval of the final hazard categorization determined by this hazard assessment document (HAD) was required

  4. Modeling Analysis for NASA GRC Vacuum Facility 5 Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yim, J. T.; Herman, D. A.; Burt, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    A model of the VF5 test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center was developed using the direct simulation Monte Carlo Hypersonic Aerothermodynamics Particle (HAP) code. The model results were compared to several cold flow and thruster hot fire cases. The main uncertainty in the model is the determination of the effective sticking coefficient -- which sets the pumping effectiveness of the cryopanels and oil diffusion pumps including baffle transmission. An effective sticking coefficient of 0.25 was found to provide generally good agreement with the experimental chamber pressure data. The model, which assumes a cold diffuse inflow, also fared satisfactorily in predicting the pressure distribution during thruster operation. The model was used to assess other chamber configurations to improve the local effective pumping speed near the thruster. A new configuration of the existing cryopumps is found to show more than 2x improvement over the current baseline configuration.

  5. Force Measurement Improvements to the National Transonic Facility Sidewall Model Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodliff, Scott L.; Balakrishna, Sundareswara; Butler, David; Cagle, C. Mark; Chan, David; Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II

    2016-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility is a transonic pressurized cryogenic facility. The development of the high Reynolds number semi-span capability has advanced over the years to include transonic active flow control and powered testing using the sidewall model support system. While this system can be used in total temperatures down to -250Â F for conventional unpowered configurations, it is limited to temperatures above -60Â F when used with powered models that require the use of the high-pressure air delivery system. Thermal instabilities and non-repeatable mechanical arrangements revealed several data quality shortfalls by the force and moment measurement system. Recent modifications to the balance cavity recirculation system have improved the temperature stability of the balance and metric model-to-balance hardware. Changes to the mechanical assembly of the high-pressure air delivery system, particularly hardware that interfaces directly with the model and balance, have improved the repeatability of the force and moment measurement system. Drag comparisons with the high-pressure air system removed will also be presented in this paper.

  6. 21 CFR 110.37 - Sanitary facilities and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN FOOD Buildings and Facilities § 110.37 Sanitary facilities and controls. Each plant shall be... water to required locations throughout the plant. (2) Properly convey sewage and liquid disposable waste from the plant. (3) Avoid constituting a source of contamination to food, water supplies, equipment, or...

  7. 21 CFR 110.37 - Sanitary facilities and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN FOOD Buildings and Facilities § 110.37 Sanitary facilities and controls. Each plant shall be... water to required locations throughout the plant. (2) Properly convey sewage and liquid disposable waste from the plant. (3) Avoid constituting a source of contamination to food, water supplies, equipment, or...

  8. 21 CFR 110.37 - Sanitary facilities and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN FOOD Buildings and Facilities § 110.37 Sanitary facilities and controls. Each plant shall be... water to required locations throughout the plant. (2) Properly convey sewage and liquid disposable waste from the plant. (3) Avoid constituting a source of contamination to food, water supplies, equipment, or...

  9. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Coenenberg, J.G.

    1997-08-15

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit applicationmore » guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than

  10. 75 FR 33198 - Co-Location/Proximity Hosting Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Execution Facilities (DTEFs), and Exempt Commercial Markets (ECMs) that list significant price discovery..., DTEFs, and ECMs with SPDCs, that offer co-location and/ or proximity hosting services, to disclose.... Finally, the Proposal would require DCMs, DTEFs, and ECMs with SPDCs, that approve third-parties to...

  11. Language and memory for object location.

    PubMed

    Gudde, Harmen B; Coventry, Kenny R; Engelhardt, Paul E

    2016-08-01

    In three experiments, we investigated the influence of two types of language on memory for object location: demonstratives (this, that) and possessives (my, your). Participants first read instructions containing demonstratives/possessives to place objects at different locations, and then had to recall those object locations (following object removal). Experiments 1 and 2 tested contrasting predictions of two possible accounts of language on object location memory: the Expectation Model (Coventry, Griffiths, & Hamilton, 2014) and the congruence account (Bonfiglioli, Finocchiaro, Gesierich, Rositani, & Vescovi, 2009). In Experiment 3, the role of attention allocation as a possible mechanism was investigated. Results across all three experiments show striking effects of language on object location memory, with the pattern of data supporting the Expectation Model. In this model, the expected location cued by language and the actual location are concatenated leading to (mis)memory for object location, consistent with models of predictive coding (Bar, 2009; Friston, 2003). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of Spatial Impact of Particles Emitted from a Cement Material Production Facility on Outdoor Particle Deposition in the Surrounding Community.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Fan, Zhihua Tina; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Stern, Alan H; Lioy, Paul J

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the contribution of a facility that processes steel production slag into raw material for cement production to local outdoor particle deposition in Camden, NJ. A dry deposition sampler that can house four 37-mm quartz fiber filters was developed and used for the collection of atmospheric particle deposits. Two rounds of particle collection (3-4 weeks each) were conducted in 8-11 locations 200-800 m downwind of the facility. Background samples were concurrently collected in a remote area located ∼2 km upwind from the facility. In addition, duplicate surface wipe samples were collected side-by-side from each of the 13 locations within the same sampling area during the first deposition sampling period. One composite source material sample was also collected from a pile stored in the facility. Both the bulk of the source material and the <38 μm fraction subsample were analyzed to obtain the elemental source profile. The particle deposition flux in the study area was higher (24-83 mg/m 2 ·day) than at the background sites (13-17 mg/m 2 ·day). The concentration of Ca, a major element in the cement source production material, was found to exponentially decrease with increasing downwind distance from the facility (P < 0.05). The ratio of Ca/Al, an indicator of Ca enrichment due to anthropogenic sources in a given sample, showed a similar trend. These observations suggest a significant contribution of the facility to the local particle deposition. The contribution of the facility to outdoor deposited particle mass was further estimated by three independent models using the measurements obtained from this study. The estimated contributions to particle deposition in the study area were 1.8-7.4% from the regression analysis of the Ca concentration in particle deposition samples against the distance from the facility, 0-11% from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) source-receptor model, and

  13. Potential Coastal Pumped Hydroelectric Energy Storage Locations Identified using GIS-based Topographic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, R.; Barnhart, C. J.; Benson, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale electrical energy storage could accommodate variable, weather dependent energy resources such as wind and solar. Pumped hydroelectric energy storage (PHS) and compressed energy storage area (CAES) have life cycle energy and financial costs that are an order of magnitude lower than conventional electrochemical storage technologies. However PHS and CAES storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Conventional PHS requires an upper and lower reservoir separated by at least 100 m of head, but no more than 10 km in horizontal distance. Conventional PHS also impacts fresh water supplies, riparian ecosystems, and hydrologic environments. A PHS facility that uses the ocean as the lower reservoir benefits from a smaller footprint, minimal freshwater impact, and the potential to be located near off shore wind resources and population centers. Although technologically nascent, today one coastal PHS facility exists. The storage potential for coastal PHS is unknown. Can coastal PHS play a significant role in augmenting future power grids with a high faction of renewable energy supply? In this study we employ GIS-based topographic analysis to quantify the coastal PHS potential of several geographic locations, including California, Chile and Peru. We developed automated techniques that seek local topographic minima in 90 m spatial resolution shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM) digital elevation models (DEM) that satisfy the following criteria conducive to PHS: within 10 km from the sea; minimum elevation 150 m; maximum elevation 1000 m. Preliminary results suggest the global potential for coastal PHS could be very significant. For example, in northern Chile we have identified over 60 locations that satisfy the above criteria. Two of these locations could store over 10 million cubic meters of water or several GWh of energy. We plan to report a global database of candidate coastal PHS locations and to estimate their energy storage capacity.

  14. 31. DETAIL OF OVERHEAD TENSIONER DEVICE LOCATED ABOVE SOUTHERN DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. DETAIL OF OVERHEAD TENSIONER DEVICE LOCATED ABOVE SOUTHERN DOOR OF BUILDING 1. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Transmitter Building, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  15. Port Sivad: A Locational Decision Game for a Noxious Public Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakubs, John F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Described is a simulation game concerned with the expeditious location of a sewage plant in a hypothetical urban area. Over 15 college or high school students can play the game, which involves government bargaining, citizen reaction, and side payments. (Author/AV)

  16. The Methodology of Interactive Parametric Modelling of Construction Site Facilities in BIM Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovská, Mária; Čabala, Jozef; Struková, Zuzana

    2014-11-01

    Information technology is becoming a strong tool in different industries, including construction. The recent trend of buildings designing is leading up to creation of the most comprehensive virtual building model (Building Information Model) in order to solve all the problems relating to the project as early as in the designing phase. Building information modelling is a new way of approaching to the design of building projects documentation. Currently, the building site layout as a part of the building design documents has a very little support in the BIM environment. Recently, the research of designing the construction process conditions has centred on improvement of general practice in planning and on new approaches to construction site layout planning. The state of art in field of designing the construction process conditions indicated an unexplored problem related to connection of knowledge system with construction site facilities (CSF) layout through interactive modelling. The goal of the paper is to present the methodology for execution of 3D construction site facility allocation model (3D CSF-IAM), based on principles of parametric and interactive modelling.

  17. Radar Training Facility initial validation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-05-01

    The Radar Training Facility (RTF), part of the Federal Aviation Administration Academy located at the Oklahoma City Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, is designed to identify, as early as possible, air traffic control specialists who do not demonstra...

  18. Factors Influencing Health Facility Delivery in Predominantly Rural Communities across the Three Ecological Zones in Ghana: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Enuameh, Yeetey Akpe Kwesi; Okawa, Sumiyo; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Kikuchi, Kimiyo; Mahama, Emmanuel; Ansah, Evelyn; Tawiah, Charlotte; Adjei, Kwame; Shibanuma, Akira; Nanishi, Keiko; Yeji, Francis; Agyekum, Enoch Oti; Yasuoka, Junko; Gyapong, Margaret; Oduro, Abraham Rexford; Quansah Asare, Gloria; Hodgson, Abraham; Jimba, Masamine; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Background Maternal and neonatal mortality indicators remain high in Ghana and other sub-Saharan African countries. Both maternal and neonatal health outcomes improve when skilled personnel provide delivery services within health facilities. Determinants of delivery location are crucial to promoting health facility deliveries, but little research has been done on this issue in Ghana. This study explored factors influencing delivery location in predominantly rural communities in Ghana. Methods Data were collected from 1,500 women aged 15–49 years with live or stillbirths that occurred between January 2011 and April 2013. This was done within the three sites operating Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems, i.e., the Dodowa (Greater Accra Region), Kintampo (Brong Ahafo Region), and Navrongo (Upper-East Region) Health Research Centers in Ghana. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of delivery location, controlling for covariates that were statistically significant in univariable regression models. Results Of 1,497 women included in the analysis, 75.6% of them selected health facilities as their delivery location. After adjusting for confounders, the following factors were associated with health facility delivery across all three sites: healthcare provider’s influence on deciding health facility delivery, (AOR = 13.47; 95% CI 5.96–30.48), place of residence (AOR = 4.49; 95% CI 1.14–17.68), possession of a valid health insurance card (AOR = 1.90; 95% CI 1.29–2.81), and socio-economic status measured by wealth quintiles (AOR = 2.83; 95% CI 1.43–5.60). Conclusion In addition to known factors such as place of residence, socio-economic status, and possession of valid health insurance, this study identified one more factor associated with health facility delivery: healthcare provider’s influence. Ensuring care provider’s counseling of clients could improve the uptake of health facility delivery in rural communities in

  19. Survey of solar thermal test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Masterson, K.

    The facilities that are presently available for testing solar thermal energy collection and conversion systems are briefly described. Facilities that are known to meet ASHRAE standard 93-77 for testing flat-plate collectors are listed. The DOE programs and test needs for distributed concentrating collectors are identified. Existing and planned facilities that meet these needs are described and continued support for most of them is recommended. The needs and facilities that are suitable for testing components of central receiver systems, several of which are located overseas, are identified. The central contact point for obtaining additional details and test procedures for these facilitiesmore » is the Solar Thermal Test Facilities Users' Association in Albuquerque, N.M. The appendices contain data sheets and tables which give additional details on the technical capabilities of each facility. Also included is the 1975 Aerospace Corporation report on test facilities that is frequently referenced in the present work.« less

  20. Health facilities at the district level in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Heywood, Peter; Harahap, Nida P

    2009-01-01

    Background At Independence the Government of Indonesia inherited a weak and unevenly distributed health system to which much of the population had only limited access. In response, the government decided to increase the number of facilities and to locate them closer to the people. To staff these health facilities the government introduced obligatory government service for all new graduates in medicine, nursing and midwifery. Most of these staff also established private practices in the areas in which they were located. The health information system contains little information on the health care facilities established for private practice by these staff. This article reports on the results of enumerating all health facilities in 15 districts in Java. Methods We enumerated all healthcare facilities, public and private, by type in each of 15 districts in Java. Results The enumeration showed a much higher number of healthcare facilities in each district than is shown in most reports and in the health information system which concentrates on public, multi-provider facilities. Across the 15 districts: 86% of facilities were solo-provider facilities for outpatient services; 13% were multi-provider facilities for outpatient services; and 1% were multi-provider facilities offering both outpatient and inpatient services. Conclusion The relatively good distribution of health facilities in Indonesia was achieved through establishing public health centers at the sub-district level and staffing them through a system of compulsory service for doctors, nurses and midwives. Subsequently, these public sector staff also established solo-provider facilities for their own private practice; these solo-provider facilities, of which those for nurses are almost half, comprise the largest category of outpatient care facilities, most are not included in official statistics. Now that Indonesia no longer has mandatory service for newly graduated doctors, nurses and midwives, it will have

  1. Hohlraum modeling for opacity experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; DeVolder, B. G.; Martin, M. E.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Tregillis, I. L.; Perry, T. S.; Heeter, R. F.; Opachich, Y. P.; Moore, A. S.; Kline, J. L.; Johns, H. M.; Liedahl, D. A.; Cardenas, T.; Olson, R. E.; Wilde, B. H.; Urbatsch, T. J.

    2018-06-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of experiments that measure iron opacity in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) using laser-driven hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A previous set of experiments fielded at Sandia's Z facility [Bailey et al., Nature 517, 56 (2015)] have shown up to factors of two discrepancies between the theory and experiment, casting doubt on the validity of the opacity models. The purpose of the new experiments is to make corroborating measurements at the same densities and temperatures, with the initial measurements made at a temperature of 160 eV and an electron density of 0.7 × 1022 cm-3. The X-ray hot spots of a laser-driven hohlraum are not in LTE, and the iron must be shielded from a direct line-of-sight to obtain the data [Perry et al., Phys. Rev. B 54, 5617 (1996)]. This shielding is provided either with the internal structure (e.g., baffles) or external wall shapes that divide the hohlraum into a laser-heated portion and an LTE portion. In contrast, most inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are simple cylinders lacking complex gold walls, and the design codes are not typically applied to targets like those for the opacity experiments. We will discuss the initial basis for the modeling using LASNEX, and the subsequent modeling of five different hohlraum geometries that have been fielded on the NIF to date. This includes a comparison of calculated and measured radiation temperatures.

  2. Urban retail location: Insights from percolation theory and spatial interaction modeling

    PubMed Central

    Molinero, Carlos; Wilson, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Characterising road networks has been the focus of a large body of research due to it being the main driver of activities in an urban ecosystem and the structuring factor in the dynamics of the city. One of these activities, and one with the largest economical impact in a city, is retail dynamics and its evolution. Therefore, the mathematical modeling of the location of retail activities and of the emergence of clustering in retail centers has as well generated a large number of works. Despite these two interwoven components strongly depending on one another and their fundamental importance in understanding cities, little work has been done in order to compare their local and global properties. Here we compare the road network’s hierarchical structure, unveiled through a percolation analysis of the network, with the retail location distribution defined by exploiting a gravity-based retail model. We interpret the great agreement in the city’s organizations as it emerges from both methodologies as new evidence of the interdependence of these two crucial dimensions of a city’s life. PMID:28977032

  3. Urban retail location: Insights from percolation theory and spatial interaction modeling.

    PubMed

    Piovani, Duccio; Molinero, Carlos; Wilson, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Characterising road networks has been the focus of a large body of research due to it being the main driver of activities in an urban ecosystem and the structuring factor in the dynamics of the city. One of these activities, and one with the largest economical impact in a city, is retail dynamics and its evolution. Therefore, the mathematical modeling of the location of retail activities and of the emergence of clustering in retail centers has as well generated a large number of works. Despite these two interwoven components strongly depending on one another and their fundamental importance in understanding cities, little work has been done in order to compare their local and global properties. Here we compare the road network's hierarchical structure, unveiled through a percolation analysis of the network, with the retail location distribution defined by exploiting a gravity-based retail model. We interpret the great agreement in the city's organizations as it emerges from both methodologies as new evidence of the interdependence of these two crucial dimensions of a city's life.

  4. Evaluating Past and Future USCG Use of Ohmsett Test Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    and Renewable Energy Test Facility, that was previously known as a fully capitalized acronym, Ohmsett. This facility is located on the U.S. Naval...Oil Spill Response Research and Renewable Energy Test Facility, that was previously known as a fully capitalized acronym, Ohmsett. This facility is...Incident Management Systems NSF National Strike Force NWS Naval Weapons Station Ohmsett National Oil Spill Response Research and Renewable Energy

  5. Optimising the location of antenatal classes.

    PubMed

    Tomintz, Melanie N; Clarke, Graham P; Rigby, Janette E; Green, Josephine M

    2013-01-01

    To combine microsimulation and location-allocation techniques to determine antenatal class locations which minimise the distance travelled from home by potential users. Microsimulation modeling and location-allocation modeling. City of Leeds, UK. Potential users of antenatal classes. An individual-level microsimulation model was built to estimate the number of births for small areas by combining data from the UK Census 2001 and the Health Survey for England 2006. Using this model as a proxy for service demand, we then used a location-allocation model to optimize locations. Different scenarios show the advantage of combining these methods to optimize (re)locating antenatal classes and therefore reduce inequalities in accessing services for pregnant women. Use of these techniques should lead to better use of resources by allowing planners to identify optimal locations of antenatal classes which minimise women's travel. These results are especially important for health-care planners tasked with the difficult issue of targeting scarce resources in a cost-efficient, but also effective or accessible, manner. (169 words). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Facility shows benefit of staying single.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Construction of the new 513-bed PFI-funded hospital in Pembury near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, a pound 227 million acute healthcare facility that, on its completion in the autumn of 2011, will be the UK's first to offer 100% single-bed en suite accommodation, is ahead of schedule, "thanks to excellent teamwork and careful planning". During a visit to the now rapidly emerging healthcare facility, located in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) in a wooded hillside location in the Weald of Kent which Nigel Keen, general manager for the PFI project company, described as "the most attractive site for a hospital I have ever worked on", HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie met key project personnel and discussed the impressive progress made to date.

  7. Efficient Location Uncertainty Treatment for Probabilistic Modelling of Portfolio Loss from Earthquake Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingraber, Christoph; Käser, Martin; Allmann, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Probabilistic seismic risk analysis (PSRA) is a well-established method for modelling loss from earthquake events. In the insurance industry, it is widely employed for probabilistic modelling of loss to a distributed portfolio. In this context, precise exposure locations are often unknown, which results in considerable loss uncertainty. The treatment of exposure uncertainty has already been identified as an area where PSRA would benefit from increased research attention. However, so far, epistemic location uncertainty has not been in the focus of a large amount of research. We propose a new framework for efficient treatment of location uncertainty. To demonstrate the usefulness of this novel method, a large number of synthetic portfolios resembling real-world portfolios is systematically analyzed. We investigate the effect of portfolio characteristics such as value distribution, portfolio size, or proportion of risk items with unknown coordinates on loss variability. Several sampling criteria to increase the computational efficiency of the framework are proposed and put into the wider context of well-established Monte-Carlo variance reduction techniques. The performance of each of the proposed criteria is analyzed.

  8. Predicting Aspergillus fumigatus exposure from composting facilities using a dispersion model: A conditional calibration and validation.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Philippa; Tyrrel, Sean F; Kinnersley, Robert P; Whelan, Michael; Longhurst, Philip J; Hansell, Anna L; Walsh, Kerry; Pollard, Simon J T; Drew, Gillian H

    2017-01-01

    Bioaerosols are released in elevated quantities from composting facilities and are associated with negative health effects, although dose-response relationships are unclear. Exposure levels are difficult to quantify as established sampling methods are costly, time-consuming and current data provide limited temporal and spatial information. Confidence in dispersion model outputs in this context would be advantageous to provide a more detailed exposure assessment. We present the calibration and validation of a recognised atmospheric dispersion model (ADMS) for bioaerosol exposure assessments. The model was calibrated by a trial and error optimisation of observed Aspergillus fumigatus concentrations at different locations around a composting site. Validation was performed using a second dataset of measured concentrations for a different site. The best fit between modelled and measured data was achieved when emissions were represented as a single area source, with a temperature of 29°C. Predicted bioaerosol concentrations were within an order of magnitude of measured values (1000-10,000CFU/m 3 ) at the validation site, once minor adjustments were made to reflect local differences between the sites (r 2 >0.7 at 150, 300, 500 and 600m downwind of source). Results suggest that calibrated dispersion modelling can be applied to make reasonable predictions of bioaerosol exposures at multiple sites and may be used to inform site regulation and operational management. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  9. Varicella infection modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Katherine A.; Finley, Patrick D.; Moore, Thomas W.

    2013-09-01

    Infectious diseases can spread rapidly through healthcare facilities, resulting in widespread illness among vulnerable patients. Computational models of disease spread are useful for evaluating mitigation strategies under different scenarios. This report describes two infectious disease models built for the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) motivated by a Varicella outbreak in a VA facility. The first model simulates disease spread within a notional contact network representing staff and patients. Several interventions, along with initial infection counts and intervention delay, were evaluated for effectiveness at preventing disease spread. The second model adds staff categories, location, scheduling, and variable contact rates tomore » improve resolution. This model achieved more accurate infection counts and enabled a more rigorous evaluation of comparative effectiveness of interventions.« less

  10. Race, ethnicity, and noxious facilities: Environmental racism re- examined

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, A.L.; Nieves, L.A.

    1992-10-01

    The charge has been made that hazardous facilities tend to be located in proximity to minority populations. This study uses a facility density measure for three categories of noxious facilities to examine the relationship between facilities and minority population concentrations. County-level data are used in a correlation analysis for African Americans, Hispanics, and Asians in the four major regions of the US. Even controlling for income and housing value, and limiting the data set to urban areas, consistent patterns of moderate to strong association of facility densities with minority population percentages are found.

  11. Pre-end-stage renal disease care not associated with dialysis facility neighborhood poverty in the United States.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Laura C; Kim, Min; Goetz, Margarethe; Kleinbaum, David G; McClellan, William; Patzer, Rachel E

    2014-01-01

    Receipt of nephrology care prior to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a strong predictor of decreased mortality and morbidity, and neighborhood poverty may influence access to care. Our objective was to examine whether neighborhood poverty is associated with lack of pre-ESRD care at dialysis facilities. In a multi-level ecological study using geospatially linked 2007-2010 Dialysis Facility Report and 2006-2010 American Community Survey data, we examined whether high neighborhood poverty (≥20% of households in census tract living below poverty) was associated with dialysis facility-level lack of pre-ESRD care (percentage of patients with no nephrology care prior to dialysis start) in mixed-effects models, adjusting for facility and neighborhood confounders and allowing for neighborhood and regional random effects. Among the 5,184 facilities examined, 1,778 (34.3%) were located in a high-poverty area. Lack of pre-ESRD care was similar in poverty areas (30.8%) and other neighborhoods (29.6%). With adjustment, the absolute increase in percentage of patients at a facility with no pre-ESRD care associated with facility location in a poverty area versus other neighborhood was only 0.08% (95% CI -1.32, 1.47; p = 0.9). Potential effect modification by race and income inequality was detected. Despite previously reported detrimental effects of neighborhood poverty on health, facility neighborhood poverty was not associated with receipt of pre-ESRD care, suggesting no need to target interventions to increase access to pre-ESRD care at facilities in poorer geographic areas.

  12. Pre-end-stage renal disease care not associated with dialysis facility neighborhood poverty in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Laura C.; Kim, Min; Goetz, Margarethe; Kleinbaum, David G.; McClellan, William; Patzer, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Receipt of nephrology care prior to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a strong predictor of decreased mortality and morbidity, and neighborhood poverty may influence access to care. Our objective was to examine whether neighborhood poverty is associated with lack of pre-ESRD care at dialysis facilities. Methods In a multi-level ecological study using geospatially linked 2007-2010 Dialysis Facility Report and 2006-2010 American Community Survey data, we examined whether high neighborhood poverty (≥20% of households in census tract living below poverty) was associated with dialysis facility-level lack of pre-ESRD care (percentage of patients with no nephrology care prior to dialysis start) in mixed-effects models, adjusting for facility and neighborhood confounders and allowing for neighborhood and regional random effects. Results Among the 5184 facilities examined, 1778 (34.3%) were located in a high poverty area. Lack of pre-ESRD care was similar in poverty areas (30.8%) and other neighborhoods (29.6%). With adjustment, the absolute increase in percentage of patients at a facility with no pre-ESRD care associated with facility location in a poverty area vs. other neighborhood was only 0.08% (95% CI: -1.32%, 1.47%; P=0.9). Potential effect modification by race and income inequality was detected. Conclusion Despite previously reported detrimental effects of neighborhood poverty on health, facility neighborhood poverty was not associated with receipt of pre-ESRD care, suggesting no need to target interventions to increase access to pre-ESRD care at facilities in poorer geographic areas. PMID:24434854

  13. GIS Modeling of Air Toxics Releases from TRI-Reporting and Non-TRI-Reporting Facilities: Impacts for Environmental Justice

    PubMed Central

    Dolinoy, Dana C.; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2004-01-01

    The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) requires facilities with 10 or more full-time employees that process > 25,000 pounds in aggregate or use > 10,000 pounds of any one TRI chemical to report releases annually. However, little is known about releases from non-TRI-reporting facilities, nor has attention been given to the very localized equity impacts associated with air toxics releases. Using geographic information systems and industrial source complex dispersion modeling, we developed methods for characterizing air releases from TRI-reporting as well as non-TRI-reporting facilities at four levels of geographic resolution. We characterized the spatial distribution and concentration of air releases from one representative industry in Durham County, North Carolina (USA). Inclusive modeling of all facilities rather than modeling of TRI sites alone significantly alters the magnitude and spatial distribution of modeled air concentrations. Modeling exposure receptors at more refined levels of geographic resolution reveals localized, neighborhood-level exposure hot spots that are not apparent at coarser geographic scales. Multivariate analysis indicates that inclusive facility modeling at fine levels of geographic resolution reveals exposure disparities by income and race. These new methods significantly enhance the ability to model air toxics, perform equity analysis, and clarify conflicts in the literature regarding environmental justice findings. This work has substantial implications for how to structure TRI reporting requirements, as well as methods and types of analysis that will successfully elucidate the spatial distribution of exposure potentials across geographic, income, and racial lines. PMID:15579419

  14. Unsteady loads due to propulsive lift configurations. Part D: The development of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects on propulsive lift configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Herling, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design and construction of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects in propulsive lift configurations are described. The facility was modeled after an existing full size NASA facility which consisted of a coaxial turbofan jet engine with a rectangular nozzle in a blown surface configuration. The flow field of the model facility was examined with and without a simulated wing surface in place at several locations downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Emphasis was placed on obtaining pressure measurements which were made with static probes and surface pressure ports connected via plastic tubing to condenser microphones for fluctuating measurements. Several pressure spectra were compared with those obtained from the NASA facility, and were used in a preliminary evaluation of scaling laws.

  15. 29. SATURN ROCKET ENGINE LOCATED ON NORTH SIDE OF STATIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. SATURN ROCKET ENGINE LOCATED ON NORTH SIDE OF STATIC TEST STAND - DETAILS OF THE EXPANSION NOZZLE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  16. Design study of advanced model support systems for the National Transonic Facility (NTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the sting (or support system) is a very critical part of the model system. The designer is frequently faced with the tradeoff of minimizing sting size, thereby compromising facility and model safety, against a larger sting and the subsequent problems of sting interference effects. In the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility (NTF), this problem is accentuated by the severe environment of high pressure/low temperature, designed into the facility to provide the desired high Reynolds number. Compromises in the configuration geometry and/or limiting the test envelope are therefore contrary to the purposes and goals of the NTF and are unacceptable. The results of an investigation aimed at improvements of 25% in both strength and Young's modulus of elasticity as compared to high strength cryogenically acceptable steels currently being used are presented. Various materials or combinations of materials were studied along with different design approaches. Design concepts were developed which included conventional material stings, advanced composites, and hybrid configurations. Candidate configurations are recommended.

  17. Strategic planning and marketing research for older, inner-city health care facilities: a case study.

    PubMed

    Wood, V R; Robertson, K R

    1992-01-01

    Numerous health care facilities, located in downtown metropolitan areas, now find themselves surrounded by a decaying inner-city environment. Consumers may perceive these facilities as "old," and catering to an "urban poor" consumer. These same consumers may, therefore, prefer to patronize more modern facilities located in suburban areas. This paper presents a case study of such a health care facility and how strategic planning and marketing research were conducted in order to identify market opportunities and new strategic directions.

  18. 30 CFR 75.1712-7 - Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of... § 75.1712-7 Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of requirements. If it has been determined by the... application by the operator, waive the location requirements for underground sanitary facilities with respect...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1712-7 - Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of... § 75.1712-7 Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of requirements. If it has been determined by the... application by the operator, waive the location requirements for underground sanitary facilities with respect...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1712-7 - Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of... § 75.1712-7 Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of requirements. If it has been determined by the... application by the operator, waive the location requirements for underground sanitary facilities with respect...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1712-7 - Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of... § 75.1712-7 Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of requirements. If it has been determined by the... application by the operator, waive the location requirements for underground sanitary facilities with respect...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1712-7 - Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of... § 75.1712-7 Underground sanitary facilities; waiver of requirements. If it has been determined by the... application by the operator, waive the location requirements for underground sanitary facilities with respect...

  3. Feasibility Investigation for a Solar Power Generation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, Lakshmi

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 states that by fiscal year 2013, at least 7.5% of the energy consumed by the government must be renewable energy. In an effort to help meet this goal, Johnson Space Center (JSC) is considering installing a solar power generation facility. The purpose of this project is to conduct a feasibility investigation for such a facility. Because Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a solar power generation facility, the first step in this investigation is to learn about KSC's facility and obtain information on how it was constructed. After collecting this information, the following must be determined: the amount of power desired, the size of the facility, potential locations for it, and estimated construction and maintenance costs. Contacts with JSC's energy provider must also be established to determine if a partnership would be agreeable to both parties. Lastly, all of this data must be analyzed to decide whether or not JSC should construct the facility. The results from analyzing the data collected indicate that a 200 kW facility would provide enough energy to meet 1% of JSC's energy demand. This facility would require less than 1 acre of land. In the map below, potential locations are shown in green. The solar power facility is projected to cost $2 M. So far, the information collected indicates that such a facility could be constructed. The next steps in this investigation include contacting JSC's energy provider, CenterPoint Energy, to discuss entering a partnership; developing a life cycle cost analysis to determine payback time; developing more detailed plans; and securing funding.

  4. A Programming System for School Location & Facility Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    A linear program model designed to aid in site selection and the development of pupil assignment plans is illustrated in terms of a hypothetical school system. The model is designed to provide the best possible realization of any single stated objective (for example, "Minimize the distance that pupils must travel") given any number of specified…

  5. Israel: Possible Military Strike Against Iran’s Nuclear Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-27

    centrifuge facility and a larger commercial facility located at this site. The commercial facility is reportedly hardened by steel-reinforced concrete , buried...prime minister has had to contemplate. A strike against Iran’s nuclear facilities could lead to regional conflagration , tens of thousands of...high explosives, and can penetrate more than 6 feet of reinforced concrete . The GBU-28 5000-lb class weapon penetrates at least 20 feet of concrete

  6. SuperCDMS Underground Detector Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Platt, M.; Mahapatra, R.; Bunker, Raymond A.

    The SuperCDMS SNOLAB dark matter experiment processes Ge and Si crystals into fully tested phonon and ionization detectors at surface fabrication and test facilities. If not mitigated, it is anticipated that trace-level production of radioisotopes in the crystals due to exposure to cosmic rays at (or above) sea level will result in the dominant source of background events in future dark matter searches using the current SuperCDMS detector technology. Fabrication and testing of detectors in underground facilities shielded from cosmic radiation is one way to directly reduce production of trace levels of radioisotopes, thereby improving experimental sensitivity for the discoverymore » of dark matter beyond the level of the current experiment. In this report, we investigate the cost and feasibility to establish a complete detector fabrication processing chain in an underground location to mitigate cosmogenic activation of the Ge and Si detector substrates. For a specific and concrete evaluation, we explore options for such a facility located at SNOLAB, an underground laboratory in Sudbury, Canada hosting the current and future experimental phases of SuperCDMS.« less

  7. Indian LSSC (Large Space Simulation Chamber) facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brar, A. S.; Prasadarao, V. S.; Gambhir, R. D.; Chandramouli, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Indian Space Agency has undertaken a major project to acquire in-house capability for thermal and vacuum testing of large satellites. This Large Space Simulation Chamber (LSSC) facility will be located in Bangalore and is to be operational in 1989. The facility is capable of providing 4 meter diameter solar simulation with provision to expand to 4.5 meter diameter at a later date. With such provisions as controlled variations of shroud temperatures and availability of infrared equipment as alternative sources of thermal radiation, this facility will be amongst the finest anywhere. The major design concept and major aspects of the LSSC facility are presented here.

  8. ART Attrition across Health Facilities Implementing Option B+ in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Myrtil, Martine Pamphile; Puttkammer, Nancy; Gloyd, Stephen; Robinson, Julia; Yuhas, Krista; Domercant, Jean Wysler; Honoré, Jean Guy; Francois, Kesner

    2018-01-01

    Describing factors related to high attrition is important in order to improve the implementation of the Option B+ strategy in Haiti. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to describe the variability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) retention across health facilities among pregnant and lactating women and assess for differences in ART retention between Option B+ clients and other ART patients. There were 1989 Option B+ clients who initiated ART in 45 health facilities. The percentage of attrition varied from 9% to 81% across the facilities. The largest health facilities had 38% higher risk of attrition (relative risk [RR]: 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-1.77, P = .009). Private institutions had 18% less risk of attrition (RR: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.70-0.96, P = .020). Health facilities located in the West department and the South region had lower risk of attrition. Being on treatment in a large or public health facility or a facility located in the North region was a significant risk factor associated with high attrition among Option B+ clients. The implementation of the Option B+ strategy must be reevaluated in order to effectively eliminate mother-to-child HIV transmission.

  9. Facility Design and Health Management Program at the Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Carrie L.; Johnson, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The number of researchers and institutions moving to the utilization of zebrafish for biomedical research continues to increase because of the recognized advantages of this model. Numerous factors should be considered before building a new or retooling an existing facility. Design decisions will directly impact the management and maintenance costs. We and others have advocated for more rigorous approaches to zebrafish health management to support and protect an increasingly diverse portfolio of important research. The Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory (SARL) is located ∼3 miles from the main Oregon State University campus in Corvallis, Oregon. This facility supports several research programs that depend heavily on the use of adult, larval, and embryonic zebrafish. The new zebrafish facility of the SARL began operation in 2007 with a commitment to build and manage an efficient facility that diligently protects human and fish health. An important goal was to ensure that the facility was free of Pseudoloma neurophilia (Microsporidia), which is very common in zebrafish research facilities. We recognize that there are certain limitations in space, resources, and financial support that are institution dependent, but in this article, we describe the steps taken to build and manage an efficient specific pathogen-free facility. PMID:26981844

  10. Facility Design and Health Management Program at the Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Barton, Carrie L; Johnson, Eric W; Tanguay, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    The number of researchers and institutions moving to the utilization of zebrafish for biomedical research continues to increase because of the recognized advantages of this model. Numerous factors should be considered before building a new or retooling an existing facility. Design decisions will directly impact the management and maintenance costs. We and others have advocated for more rigorous approaches to zebrafish health management to support and protect an increasingly diverse portfolio of important research. The Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory (SARL) is located ∼3 miles from the main Oregon State University campus in Corvallis, Oregon. This facility supports several research programs that depend heavily on the use of adult, larval, and embryonic zebrafish. The new zebrafish facility of the SARL began operation in 2007 with a commitment to build and manage an efficient facility that diligently protects human and fish health. An important goal was to ensure that the facility was free of Pseudoloma neurophilia (Microsporidia), which is very common in zebrafish research facilities. We recognize that there are certain limitations in space, resources, and financial support that are institution dependent, but in this article, we describe the steps taken to build and manage an efficient specific pathogen-free facility.

  11. Survey of aircraft icing simulation test facilities in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.

    1981-01-01

    A survey was made of the aircraft icing simulation facilities in North America: there are 12 wind tunnels, 28 engine test facilities, 6 aircraft tankers and 14 low velocity facilities, that perform aircraft icing tests full or part time. The location and size of the facility, its speed and temperature range, icing cloud parameters, and the technical person to contact are surveyed. Results are presented in tabular form. The capabilities of each facility were estimated by its technical contact person. The adequacy of these facilities for various types of icing tests is discussed.

  12. Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University of Minnesota Facilities Management Office, Minneapolis). EAST ELEVATION - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  13. Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University of Minnesota Facilities Management Office, Minneapolis). BASEMENT PLAN - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  14. Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University of Minnesota Facilities Management Office, Minneapolis). WEST ELEVATION - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  15. LLNL Location and Detection Research

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S C; Harris, D B; Anderson, M L

    2003-07-16

    We present two LLNL research projects in the topical areas of location and detection. The first project assesses epicenter accuracy using a multiple-event location algorithm, and the second project employs waveform subspace Correlation to detect and identify events at Fennoscandian mines. Accurately located seismic events are the bases of location calibration. A well-characterized set of calibration events enables new Earth model development, empirical calibration, and validation of models. In a recent study, Bondar et al. (2003) develop network coverage criteria for assessing the accuracy of event locations that are determined using single-event, linearized inversion methods. These criteria are conservative andmore » are meant for application to large bulletins where emphasis is on catalog completeness and any given event location may be improved through detailed analysis or application of advanced algorithms. Relative event location techniques are touted as advancements that may improve absolute location accuracy by (1) ensuring an internally consistent dataset, (2) constraining a subset of events to known locations, and (3) taking advantage of station and event correlation structure. Here we present the preliminary phase of this work in which we use Nevada Test Site (NTS) nuclear explosions, with known locations, to test the effect of travel-time model accuracy on relative location accuracy. Like previous studies, we find that the reference velocity-model and relative-location accuracy are highly correlated. We also find that metrics based on travel-time residual of relocated events are not a reliable for assessing either velocity-model or relative-location accuracy. In the topical area of detection, we develop specialized correlation (subspace) detectors for the principal mines surrounding the ARCES station located in the European Arctic. Our objective is to provide efficient screens for explosions occurring in the mines of the Kola Peninsula (Kovdor

  16. A passive cold storage device economic model to evaluate selected immunization location scenarios.

    PubMed

    Norman, Bryan A; Nourollahi, Sevnaz; Chen, Sheng-I; Brown, Shawn T; Claypool, Erin G; Connor, Diana L; Schmitz, Michelle M; Rajgopal, Jayant; Wateska, Angela R; Lee, Bruce Y

    2013-10-25

    The challenge of keeping vaccines cold at health posts given the unreliability of power sources in many low- and middle-income countries and the expense and maintenance requirements of solar refrigerators has motivated the development of passive cold storage devices (PCDs), containers that keep vaccines cold without using an active energy source. With different PCDs under development, manufacturers, policymakers and funders need guidance on how varying different PCD characteristics may affect the devices' cost and utility. We developed an economic spreadsheet model representing the lowest two levels of a typical Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) vaccine supply chain: a district store, the immunization locations that the district store serves, and the transport vehicles that operate between the district store and the immunization locations. The model compares the use of three vaccine storage device options [(1) portable PCDs, (2) stationary PCDs, or (3) solar refrigerators] and allows the user to vary different device (e.g., size and cost) and scenario characteristics (e.g., catchment area population size and vaccine schedule). For a sample set of select scenarios and equipment specification, we found the portable PCD to generally be better suited to populations of 5,000 or less. The stationary PCD replenished once per month can be a robust design especially with a 35L capacity and a cost of $2,500 or less. The solar device was generally a reasonable alternative for most of the scenarios explored if the cost was $2,100 or less (including installation). No one device type dominated over all explored circumstances. Therefore, the best device may vary from country-to-country and location-to-location within a country. This study introduces a quantitative model to help guide PCD development. Although our selected set of explored scenarios and device designs was not exhaustive, future explorations can further alter model input values to represent additional scenarios

  17. The Role of Experience in Location Estimation: Target Distributions Shift Location Memory Biases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipinski, John; Simmering, Vanessa R.; Johnson, Jeffrey S.; Spencer, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Research based on the Category Adjustment model concluded that the spatial distribution of target locations does not influence location estimation responses [Huttenlocher, J., Hedges, L., Corrigan, B., & Crawford, L. E. (2004). Spatial categories and the estimation of location. "Cognition, 93", 75-97]. This conflicts with earlier results showing…

  18. Dialysis Facility and Patient Characteristics Associated with Utilization of Home Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, David R.; Inglese, Gary W.; Sloand, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Nonmedical factors influencing utilization of home dialysis at the facility level are poorly quantified. Home dialysis is comparably effective and safe but less expensive to society and Medicare than in-center hemodialysis. Elimination of modifiable practice variation unrelated to medical factors could contribute to improvements in patient outcomes and use of scarce resources. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Prevalent dialysis patient data by facility were collected from the 2007 ESRD Network’s annual reports. Facility characteristic data were collected from Medicare’s Dialysis Facility Compare file. A multivariate regression model was used to evaluate associations between the use of home dialysis and facility characteristics. Results: The utilization of home dialysis was positively associated with facility size, percent patients employed full- or part-time, younger population, and years a facility was Medicare certified. Variables negatively associated include an increased number of hemodialysis patients per hemodialysis station, chain association, rural location, more densely populated zip code, a late dialysis work shift, and greater percent of black patients within a zip code. Conclusions: Improved understanding of factors affecting the frequency of use of home dialysis may help explain practice variations across the United States that result in an imbalanced use of medical resources within the ESRD population. In turn, this may improve the delivery of healthcare and extend the ability of an increasingly overburdened medical financing system to survive. PMID:20634324

  19. Dialysis facility and patient characteristics associated with utilization of home dialysis.

    PubMed

    Walker, David R; Inglese, Gary W; Sloand, James A; Just, Paul M

    2010-09-01

    Nonmedical factors influencing utilization of home dialysis at the facility level are poorly quantified. Home dialysis is comparably effective and safe but less expensive to society and Medicare than in-center hemodialysis. Elimination of modifiable practice variation unrelated to medical factors could contribute to improvements in patient outcomes and use of scarce resources. Prevalent dialysis patient data by facility were collected from the 2007 ESRD Network's annual reports. Facility characteristic data were collected from Medicare's Dialysis Facility Compare file. A multivariate regression model was used to evaluate associations between the use of home dialysis and facility characteristics. The utilization of home dialysis was positively associated with facility size, percent patients employed full- or part-time, younger population, and years a facility was Medicare certified. Variables negatively associated include an increased number of hemodialysis patients per hemodialysis station, chain association, rural location, more densely populated zip code, a late dialysis work shift, and greater percent of black patients within a zip code. Improved understanding of factors affecting the frequency of use of home dialysis may help explain practice variations across the United States that result in an imbalanced use of medical resources within the ESRD population. In turn, this may improve the delivery of healthcare and extend the ability of an increasingly overburdened medical financing system to survive.

  20. Redirecting Under-Utilised Computer Laboratories into Cluster Computing Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, John S.; Spenneman, Dirk H. R.; Cornforth, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To provide administrators at an Australian university with data on the feasibility of redirecting under-utilised computer laboratories facilities into a distributed high performance computing facility. Design/methodology/approach: The individual log-in records for each computer located in the computer laboratories at the university were…

  1. Concentrating Solar Power Projects - National Solar Thermal Power Facility

    Science.gov Websites

    | Concentrating Solar Power | NREL National Solar Thermal Power Facility Status Date: February 13, 2014 Project Overview Project Name: National Solar Thermal Power Facility Country: India Location Capacity (Net): 1.0 MW Output Type: Steam Rankine Thermal Storage Storage Type: None

  2. Aeroacoustic Characteristics of Model Jet Test Facility Flow Conditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; Henderson, Brenda S.; Haskin, Harry H.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of flow conditioning devices used to suppress internal rig noise in high speed, high temperature experimental jet facilities is discussed. The aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of a number of devices including pressure loss and extraneous noise generation are measured. Both aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics are strongly dependent on the porosity of the flow conditioner and the closure ratio of the duct system. For unchoked flow conditioners, the pressure loss follows conventional incompressible flow models. However, for choked flow conditioners, a compressible flow model where the duct and flow conditioner system is modeled as a convergent-divergent nozzle can be used to estimate pressure loss. Choked flow conditioners generate significantly more noise than unchoked conditioners. In addition, flow conditioners with small hole diameters or sintered metal felt material generate less self-noise noise compared to flow conditioners with larger holes.

  3. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showingmore » the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and

  4. Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University of Minnesota Facilities Management Office, Minneapolis). SUB BASEMENT PLAN - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  5. Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University of Minnesota Facilities Management Office, Minneapolis). FIRST FLOOR PLAN - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  6. Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University of Minnesota Facilities Management Office, Minneapolis). EXTERIOR MASONRY DETAILS - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  7. Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University of Minnesota Facilities Management Office, Minneapolis). SECOND FLOOR PLAN - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  8. 6. Photocopy of engineering drawing. AETR DIGS FACILITY THEODOLITE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of engineering drawing. AETR DIGS FACILITY THEODOLITE AND PRISM SHELTER: MONUMENT LOCATION AND LINE-OF-SIGHT PLAN, 1972. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28413, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. The emergence of care facilities in Thailand for older German-speaking people: structural backgrounds and facility operators as transnational actors.

    PubMed

    Bender, Désirée; Hollstein, Tina; Schweppe, Cornelia

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents findings from an ethnographic study of old age care facilities for German-speaking people in Thailand. It analyses the conditions and processes behind the development and specific designs of such facilities. It first looks at the intertwinement, at the socio-structural level, of different transborder developments in which the facilities' emergence is embedded. Second, it analyses the processes that accompany the emergence, development and organisation of these facilities at the local level. In this regard, it points out the central role of the facility operators as transnational actors who mediate between different frames of reference and groups of actors involved in these facilities. It concludes that the processes of mediation and intertwining are an important and distinctive feature of the emergence of these facilities, necessitated by the fact that, although the facilities are located in Thailand, their 'markets' are in the German-speaking countries of their target groups.

  10. Study of emergency setting for urban facility using microsimulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campisi, Tiziana; Canale, Antonino; Tesoriere, Giovanni

    2017-11-01

    Today Public transport is growing not only in terms of high passenger capacity but also considering high efficiency and it has become one of the preferred alternatives to automobile travel. This is evident, as for example, in the case of airport terminal working and management. The same could be for Bus Transport station considering roadway. As a result, many railway stations experience high levels of pedestrian congestion especially during the morning and afternoon peak periods. Traditional design and evaluation procedures for pedestrian transit facilities aim to maintain a desirable Pedestrian Level-Of-Service (PLOS) for the individual pedestrian areas or sub precincts. More in general, transit facilities and their sub-precincts interact with one another so that pedestrian circulation might be better assessed from a broader systems perspective. Microsimulation packages that can model pedestrians (e.g. VISSIM-VISWALK) can be employed to assess these interactions. This research outlines a procedure for the potential implementation of pedestrian flow analysis in a bus/rail transit station using micro-simulation. Base model data requirements are identified which include static (facility layout and locations of temporary equipment) and dynamic data (pedestrian demand and public transport services). Possible model calibration criteria would be also identified. A VISSIM micro-simulation base model would be developed for one of the main Airport terminal in Sicily (Italy) for investigating proposed station operational and infrastructure changes. This case study provided a good example for the potential implementation of micro-simulation models in the analysis of pedestrian circulation.

  11. 5 CFR 2604.201 - Public reading room facility and Web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public reading room facility and Web site... DISCLOSURE REPORTS FOIA Public Reading Room Facility and Web Site; Index Identifying Information for the Public § 2604.201 Public reading room facility and Web site. (a)(1) Location of public reading room...

  12. 5 CFR 2604.201 - Public reading room facility and Web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public reading room facility and Web site... DISCLOSURE REPORTS FOIA Public Reading Room Facility and Web Site; Index Identifying Information for the Public § 2604.201 Public reading room facility and Web site. (a)(1) Location of public reading room...

  13. NASA Reactor Facility Hazards Summary. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration proposes to build a nuclear research reactor which will be located in the Plum Brook Ordnance Works near Sandusky, Ohio. The purpose of this report is to inform the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission in regard to the design Lq of the reactor facility, the characteristics of the site, and the hazards of operation at this location. The purpose of this research reactor is to make pumped loop studies of aircraft reactor fuel elements and other reactor components, radiation effects studies on aircraft reactor materials and equipment, shielding studies, and nuclear and solid state physics experiments. The reactor is light water cooled and moderated of the MTR-type with a primary beryllium reflector and a secondary water reflector. The core initially will be a 3 by 9 array of MTR-type fuel elements and is designed for operation up to a power of 60 megawatts. The reactor facility is described in general terms. This is followed by a discussion of the nuclear characteristics and performance of the reactor. Then details of the reactor control system are discussed. A summary of the site characteristics is then presented followed by a discussion of the larger type of experiments which may eventually be operated in this facility. The considerations for normal operation are concluded with a proposed method of handling fuel elements and radioactive wastes. The potential hazards involved with failures or malfunctions of this facility are considered in some detail. These are examined first from the standpoint of preventing them or minimizing their effects and second from the standpoint of what effect they might have on the reactor facility staff and the surrounding population. The most essential feature of the design for location at the proposed site is containment of the maximum credible accident.

  14. Evaluation of intermodal passenger transfer facilities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1994-09-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Transportation has initiated a study into the feasibility of locating an intermodal passenger transportation facility in downtown Milwaukee. That feasibilty study requires an evaluation of a very wide range of alternatives...

  15. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    None

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. The 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility (3718-F Facility), located in the 300 Area, was used to store and treat alkali metal wastes. Therefore, it is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Closure will be conducted pursuant tomore » the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989) and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy the thermal treatment facility closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the 3718-F Facility, the history of wastes managed, and the approach that will be followed to close the facility. Only hazardous constituents derived from 3718-F Facility operations will be addressed.« less

  16. Facility and market factors affecting transitions from nursing home to community.

    PubMed

    Arling, Greg; Abrahamson, Kathleen A; Cooke, Valerie; Kane, Robert L; Lewis, Teresa

    2011-09-01

    Research into nursing home transitions has given limited attention to the facility or community contexts. To identify facility and market factors affecting transitions of nursing home residents back to the community. Multilevel models were used to estimate effects of facility and market factors on facility-level community discharge rates after controlling for resident demographic, health, and functional conditions. Facility discharge rates were adjusted using Empirical Bayes estimation. Annual cohort of first-time admissions (N=24,648) to 378 Minnesota nursing facilities in 75 nursing home markets from July 2005 to June 2006. Community discharge within 90 days of admission; facility occupancy, payer mix, ownership, case-mix acuity, size, admissions from hospitals, nurse staffing level, and proportion of admissions preferring or having support to return to the community; and nursing market population size, average occupancy, market concentration, and availability of home and community-based services. Rates of community discharge (Empirical Bayes residual) were highest in facilities with more residents preferring community discharge, more Medicare days, higher nurse staffing levels, and higher occupancy. In addition, facilities had higher community discharge rates if they were located in markets with a greater ratio of home and community-based services recipients to nursing home residents and with larger populations. State Medicaid programs should undertake system-level interventions that encourage nursing facilities to reduce unused bed capacity, balance the mix of payers, invest in nurse staffing, and take other steps to promote community discharges. In addition, states should increase home and community-based services, particularly in markets with low community discharge rates.

  17. NPDES Permit for Riverview Estates Wastewater Treatment Facility in North Dakota

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit number ND-0031143, the Riverview Estates Wastewater Treatment Facility is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility in designated locations as described in the permit.

  18. Engine component instrumentation development facility at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; Buggele, Alvin E.; Lepicovsky, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The Engine Components Instrumentation Development Facility at NASA Lewis is a unique aeronautics facility dedicated to the development of innovative instrumentation for turbine engine component testing. Containing two separate wind tunnels, the facility is capable of simulating many flow conditions found in most turbine engine components. This facility's broad range of capabilities as well as its versatility provide an excellent location for the development of novel testing techniques. These capabilities thus allow a more efficient use of larger and more complex engine component test facilities.

  19. Patella Fracture in US Servicemember in an Austere Location.

    PubMed

    Schermerhorn, Sophia M; Auchincloss, Paul J; Kraft, Kyle; Nelson, Kenneth J; Pamplin, Jeremy C

    Review the management of a patient with acute patella fracture supported by telemedical consultation. Clinical Context: Regionally Aligned Forces (RAF) supporting US Army Africa/Southern European Task Force (USARAF/ SETAF) in Africa Command area of responsibility. Care was provided by a Role I facility on the compound. Organic Expertise: Three 68W combat medics; one Special Operations Combat Medic (SOCM). Closest Medical Support: Organic battalion physician assistant (PA) located in the United States; USARAF PA located in a European country; French Role II located in nearby West African country; telemedical consults via e-mail, phone, or videoteleconsultation. Earliest Evacuation: Estimated at 12 to 24 hours with appropriate clearances. 2018.

  20. New Location Improves Efficiency | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The physical proximity of the SAIC-Frederick Intellectual Property (IP) Office to the NCI Technology Transfer Center (NCI-TTC) is one of the many benefits of being at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), according to Courtney Silverthorn, Ph.D. Being in one location “has increased the effectiveness of both informal communication and formal meetings. We have already brainstormed solutions for several issues in the hallway during an informal chat,” said Silverthorn, an SAIC-Frederick IP specialist.

  1. A GUIDE FOR PLANNING PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETIC FACILITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton.

    THIS STUDY EXAMINES PHYSICAL EDUCATION FACILITIES, THEIR PHYSICAL NEEDS, AND RELATED DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS. A SYSTEM OF DETERMINING THE TOTAL NUMBER OF TEACHING STATIONS NEEDED IS GIVEN TO AID INITIAL REQUIREMENT ANALYSIS. INDOOR FACILITIES ANALYZED INCLUDE--(1) THE GYMNASIUM, IN TERMS OF LOCATION, SIZE, DESIGN FEATURES, AND RELATED COMPONENTS,…

  2. Root location in random trees: a polarity property of all sampling consistent phylogenetic models except one.

    PubMed

    Steel, Mike

    2012-10-01

    Neutral macroevolutionary models, such as the Yule model, give rise to a probability distribution on the set of discrete rooted binary trees over a given leaf set. Such models can provide a signal as to the approximate location of the root when only the unrooted phylogenetic tree is known, and this signal becomes relatively more significant as the number of leaves grows. In this short note, we show that among models that treat all taxa equally, and are sampling consistent (i.e. the distribution on trees is not affected by taxa yet to be included), all such models, except one (the so-called PDA model), convey some information as to the location of the ancestral root in an unrooted tree. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University of Minnesota Facilities Management Office, Minneapolis). BIN TOWER SECTIONS AND PLAN - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  4. Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University of Minnesota Facilities Management Office, Minneapolis). EXTERIOR ENTRANCE AND WINDOW BAY - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  5. Simulation of the neutron flux in the irradiation facility at RA-3 reactor.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Pinto, J M; Thorp, S I; Farias, R O; Soto, M S; Sztejnberg, M; Pozzi, E C C; Gonzalez, S J; Gadan, M A; Bellino, A N; Quintana, J; Altieri, S; Miller, M

    2011-12-01

    A facility for the irradiation of a section of patients' explanted liver and lung was constructed at RA-3 reactor, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Argentina. The facility, located in the thermal column, is characterized by the possibility to insert and extract samples without the need to shutdown the reactor. In order to reach the best levels of security and efficacy of the treatment, it is necessary to perform an accurate dosimetry. The possibility to simulate neutron flux and absorbed dose in the explanted organs, together with the experimental dosimetry, allows setting more precise and effective treatment plans. To this end, a computational model of the entire reactor was set-up, and the simulations were validated with the experimental measurements performed in the facility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Job attitudes of airway facilities personnel.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1977-08-01

    A total of 2,366 employees of the Airway Facilities (AF) Service responded to a detailed questionnaire concerning job satisfaction and such factors as salary, shift schedule, workload, and geographic location. : In general, AF employees reported sati...

  7. Novel SHM method to locate damages in substructures based on VARX models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugalde, U.; Anduaga, J.; Martínez, F.; Iturrospe, A.

    2015-07-01

    A novel damage localization method is proposed, which is based on a substructuring approach and makes use of Vector Auto-Regressive with eXogenous input (VARX) models. The substructuring approach aims to divide the monitored structure into several multi-DOF isolated substructures. Later, each individual substructure is modelled as a VARX model, and the health of each substructure is determined analyzing the variation of the VARX model. The method allows to detect whether the isolated substructure is damaged, and besides allows to locate and quantify the damage within the substructure. It is not necessary to have a theoretical model of the structure and only the measured displacement data is required to estimate the isolated substructure's VARX model. The proposed method is validated by simulations of a two-dimensional lattice structure.

  8. Options for Optimal Coverage of Free C-Section Services for Poor Mothers in Indian State of Gujarat: Location Allocation Analysis Using GIS.

    PubMed

    Vora, Kranti Suresh; Yasobant, Sandul; Sengupta, Raja; De Costa, Ayesha; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mavalankar, Dileep V

    2015-01-01

    Gujarat, a western state of India, has seen a steep rise in the proportion of institutional deliveries over the last decade. However, there has been a limited access to cesarean section (C-Section) deliveries for complicated obstetric cases especially for poor rural women. C-section is a lifesaving intervention that can prevent both maternal and perinatal mortality. Poor women bear a disproportionate burden of maternal mortality, and lack of access to C-section, especially for these women, is an important contributor for high maternal and perinatal mortality in resource limited settings. To improve access for this underserved population in the context of inadequate public provision of emergency obstetric services, the state government of Gujarat initiated a public private partnership program called "Chiranjeevi Yojana" (CY) in 2005 to increase the number of facilities providing free C-section services. This study aimed to analyze the current availability of these services in three districts of Gujarat and to identify the best locations for additional service centres to optimize access to free C-section services using Geographic Information System technology. Supply and demand for obstetric care were calculated using secondary data from sources such as Census and primary data from cross-sectional facility survey. The study is unique in using primary data from facilities, which was collected in 2012-13. Information on obstetric beds and functionality of facilities to calculate supply was collected using pretested questionnaire by trained researchers after obtaining written consent from the participating facilities. Census data of population and birth rates for the study districts was used for demand calculations. Location-allocation model of ArcGIS 10 was used for analyses. Currently, about 50 to 84% of populations in all three study districts have access to free C-section facilities within a 20km radius. The model suggests that about 80-96% of the population can be

  9. Location for the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This diagram shows the planned locations of the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory (SERPL) and the Space Station Commerce Park at Kennedy Space Center. The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for the planned 400- acre commerce park.

  10. EPM - The European Facility for human physiology research on ISS.

    PubMed

    Rieschel, Mats; Nasca, Rosario; Junk, Peter; Gerhard, Ingo

    2002-07-01

    The European Physiology Modules (EPM) Facility is one of the four major Space Station facilities being developed within the framework of ESA's Microgravity Facilities for Columbus (MFC) programme. In order to allow a wide spectrum of physiological studies in weightlessness conditions, the facility provides the infrastructure to accommodate a variable set of scientific equipment. The initial EPM configuration supports experiments in the fields of neuroscience, bone & muscle research, cardiovascular research and metabolism. The International Space Life Science Working Group (ISLSWG) has recommended co-locating EPM with the 2 NASA Human Research Facility racks.

  11. Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of architectural drawing, 1921 (original located at University of Minnesota Facilities Management Office, Minneapolis). SOUTH ELEVATION, TRANSVERSE SECTION, NORTH ELEVATION - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  12. Astronomic Telescope Facility: Preliminary systems definition study report. Volume 2: Technical description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobeck, Charlie (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Astrometric Telescope Facility (AFT) is to be an earth-orbiting facility designed specifically to measure the change in relative position of stars. The primary science investigation for the facility will be the search for planets and planetary systems outside the solar system. In addition the facility will support astrophysics investigations dealing with the location or motions of stars. The science objective and facility capabilities for astrophysics investigations are discussed.

  13. Development of an Uncertainty Model for the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Joel A.; Lawrence, William R.; Elder, David W.; Treece, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces an uncertainty model being developed for the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The model uses a Monte Carlo technique to propagate standard uncertainties of measured values through the NTF data reduction equations to calculate the combined uncertainties of the key aerodynamic force and moment coefficients and freestream properties. The uncertainty propagation approach to assessing data variability is compared with ongoing data quality assessment activities at the NTF, notably check standard testing using statistical process control (SPC) techniques. It is shown that the two approaches are complementary and both are necessary tools for data quality assessment and improvement activities. The SPC approach is the final arbiter of variability in a facility. Its result encompasses variation due to people, processes, test equipment, and test article. The uncertainty propagation approach is limited mainly to the data reduction process. However, it is useful because it helps to assess the causes of variability seen in the data and consequently provides a basis for improvement. For example, it is shown that Mach number random uncertainty is dominated by static pressure variation over most of the dynamic pressure range tested. However, the random uncertainty in the drag coefficient is generally dominated by axial and normal force uncertainty with much less contribution from freestream conditions.

  14. The care of Filipino juvenile offenders in residential facilities evaluated using the risk-need-responsivity model.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Anouk; Wissink, Inge B; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2016-01-01

    According to the risk-need-responsivity model of offender, assessment and rehabilitation treatment should target specific factors that are related to re-offending. This study evaluates the residential care of Filipino juvenile offenders using the risk-need-responsivity model. Risk analyses and criminogenic needs assessments (parenting style, aggression, relationships with peers, empathy, and moral reasoning) have been conducted using data of 55 juvenile offenders in four residential facilities. The psychological care has been assessed using a checklist. Statistical analyses showed that juvenile offenders had a high risk of re-offending, high aggression, difficulties in making pro-social friends, and a delayed socio-moral development. The psychological programs in the residential facilities were evaluated to be poor. The availability of the psychological care in the facilities fitted poorly with the characteristics of the juvenile offenders and did not comply with the risk-need-responsivity model. Implications for research and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Longitudinal variation in pressure injury incidence among long-term aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Mikaela; Siette, Joyce; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2018-05-04

    To examine variation in pressure injury (PI) incidence among long-term aged care facilities and identify resident- and facility-level factors that explain this variation. Longitudinal incidence study using routinely-collected electronic care management data. A large aged care service provider in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory, Australia. About 6556 people aged 65 years and older who were permanent residents in 60 long-term care facilities between December 2014 and November 2016. Risk-adjusted PI incidence rates over eight study quarters. Incidence density over the study period was 1.33 pressure injuries per 1000 resident days (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.29-1.37). Funnel plots were used to identify variation among facilities. On average, 14% of facilities had risk-adjusted PI rates that were higher than expected in each quarter (above 95% funnel plot control limits). Ten percent of facilities had persistently high rates in any three or more consecutive quarters (n = 6). The variation between facilities was only partly explained by resident characteristics in multilevel regression models. Residents were more likely to have higher-pressure injury rates in facilities in regional areas compared with major city areas (adjusted incidence rate ratio = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.04-1.51), and facilities with persistently high rates were more likely to be located in areas with low socioeconomic status (P = 0.038). There is considerable variation among facilities in PI incidence. This study demonstrates the potential of routinely-collected care management data to monitor PI incidence and to identify facilities that may benefit from targeted intervention.

  16. Stroke Location and Brain Function in an Embolic Rabbit Stroke Model

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aliza T.; Skinner, Robert D.; Flores, Rene; Hennings, Leah; Borrelli, Michael J.; Lowery, John; Culp, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Current rabbit stroke models often depend on symptoms as endpoints for embolization and produce wide variation in location, size, and severity of strokes. To further refine our angiographic embolic stroke model we correlated localized infarctions to neurological deficits. Our goal is a rabbit model for long term studies of therapies after stroke. Materials and Methods New Zealand White rabbits (4–5 kg) (n=71) had selective internal carotid artery (ICA) angiography and a single clot was injected. At 24 hours neurological assessment scores (NAS) were measured on a 0=normal to 10=dead scale. Brains were removed and stained to identify stroke areas. All animals with single strokes, N=31, were analyzed by specific brain structure involvement and NAS values were correlated. Results Stroke incidence differed by location with cortex, subcortical, and basal ganglia regions highest. Distributions of middle cerebral artery (MCA) at 52% and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) at 29% were most commonly involved with largest stroke volumes in the ACA distribution. Brain stem and cerebellum strokes had disproportionately severe neurological deficits, scoring 2.25±1.0 vs. cortex (0.5±0.2), subcortical (1.3±0.4) and basal ganglia (0.5±0.3) all in the frontal or parietal regions on NAS (P≤0.02). Conclusions MCA and ACA distributions included 81% of strokes. These sites were relatively silent (potentially allowing longer term survival studies) while others in the posterior circulation produced disproportionately severe symptoms. Symptoms were not reliable indicators of stroke occurrence and other endpoints such as imaging may be required. These are important steps towards refinement of the rabbit stroke model. PMID:20417119

  17. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPFmore » to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.« less

  18. An improved model for teaching use of electronic apex locators.

    PubMed

    Tchorz, J P; Hellwig, E; Altenburger, M J

    2012-04-01

    To develop a simple, practical and inexpensive model, which enables the use of electronic apex locators (EALs) during pre-clinical and continuing education. Extracted teeth were placed in a mould and embedded in acrylic resin. The resin was applied in two consecutive steps to form a cavity around the root apices. A closable plastic tube serves as a valve, and a steel wire connects to the EAL. With its semi-closed reservoir for conductive fluids surrounding the root apices, the new model enables working length measurements of root canals using EALs. The model simulates the clinical situation for endodontic teaching purposes, as it allows working length determination of root canals as recommended. The measuring results of the EAL can be verified by radiography. At the same time, the roots are not directly visible and accessible to the user, allowing a precise evaluation and grading of the treatment. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  19. Not in whose backyard? Minority population concentrations and noxious facility sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.

    1992-04-01

    The NIMBY (not in may backyard) syndrome has become the nemesis of facility siting efforts in the USA. Given people`s reluctance to live near noxious facilities, in whose backyard are such facilities located? This study employs US county-level data to examine relative concentrations of minorities living near noxious facilities. Facility types analyzed include electric generating plants, manufacturing plants, Superfund sites, and radioactive waste disposal sites. While this study does not address which cam first, the minority population concentration or the noxious facilities, it documents their current degree of association.

  20. Not in whose backyard Minority population concentrations and noxious facility sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    The NIMBY (not in may backyard) syndrome has become the nemesis of facility siting efforts in the USA. Given people's reluctance to live near noxious facilities, in whose backyard are such facilities located This study employs US county-level data to examine relative concentrations of minorities living near noxious facilities. Facility types analyzed include electric generating plants, manufacturing plants, Superfund sites, and radioactive waste disposal sites. While this study does not address which cam first, the minority population concentration or the noxious facilities, it documents their current degree of association.