Science.gov

Sample records for facility profile information

  1. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF FACILITIES INFORMATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    PERSONNEL OF THE FACILITIES INFORMATION SERVICE OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF JUNIOR COLLEGES COMPILED THIS LISTING OF BOOKS, ARTICLES, MONOGRAPHS, AND OTHER PRINTED MATERIALS RELEVANT TO JUNIOR COLLEGE FACILITIES PLANNING, DESIGN, AND CONSTRUCTION. IN ADDITION TO A "GENERAL" CATEGORY, REFERENCES ARE GROUPED UNDER HEADINGS OF AUDITORIUMS, COLLEGE…

  2. RCRA Facility Information

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This asset includes hazardous waste information, which is mostly contained in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo) System, a national program management and inventory system addressing hazardous waste handlers. In general, all entities that generate, transport, treat, store, and dispose of hazardous waste are required to provide information about their activities to state environmental agencies. These agencies pass on that information to regional and national EPA offices. This regulation is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984. RCRAInfo Search can be used to determine identification and location data for specific hazardous waste handlers and to find a wide range of information on treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regarding permit/closure status, compliance with Federal and State regulations, and cleanup activities. Categories of information in this asset include:-- Handlers-- Permit Information-- GIS information on facility location-- Financial Assurance-- Corrective Action-- Compliance Monitoring and Enforcement (CM&E)

  3. Profiling phylogenetic informativeness.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2007-04-01

    The resolution of four controversial topics in phylogenetic experimental design hinges upon the informativeness of characters about the historical relationships among taxa. These controversies regard the power of different classes of phylogenetic character, the relative utility of increased taxonomic versus character sampling, the differentiation between lack of phylogenetic signal and a historical rapid radiation, and the design of taxonomically broad phylogenetic studies optimized by taxonomically sparse genome-scale data. Quantification of the informativeness of characters for resolution of phylogenetic hypotheses during specified historical epochs is key to the resolution of these controversies. Here, such a measure of phylogenetic informativeness is formulated. The optimal rate of evolution of a character to resolve a dated four-taxon polytomy is derived. By scaling the asymptotic informativeness of a character evolving at a nonoptimal rate by the derived asymptotic optimum, and by normalizing so that net phylogenetic informativeness is equivalent for all rates when integrated across all of history, an informativeness profile across history is derived. Calculation of the informativeness per base pair allows estimation of the cost-effectiveness of character sampling. Calculation of the informativeness per million years allows comparison across historical radiations of the utility of a gene for the inference of rapid adaptive radiation. The theory is applied to profile the phylogenetic informativeness of the genes BRCA1, RAG1, GHR, and c-myc from a muroid rodent sequence data set. Bounded integrations of the phylogenetic profile of these genes over four epochs comprising the diversifications of the muroid rodents, the mammals, the lobe-limbed vertebrates, and the early metazoans demonstrate the differential power of these genes to resolve the branching order among ancestral lineages. This measure of phylogenetic informativeness yields a new kind of information

  4. 1983 Profiles of Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEFP Journal, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Features photographs, floor plans, and building descriptions of eight American educational facilities, three of which are at universities. Also included are plans for one of the six schools funded by the Southern Italy Earthquake Reconstruction Program, authorized by the United States Government after the 1980 earthquake. (MLF)

  5. 10 CFR 75.10 - Facility information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facility information. 75.10 Section 75.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and Location Information § 75.10 Facility information. (a) Each applicant, licensee, or...

  6. 10 CFR 75.10 - Facility information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facility information. 75.10 Section 75.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and Location Information § 75.10 Facility information. (a) Each applicant, licensee, or...

  7. 10 CFR 75.10 - Facility information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facility information. 75.10 Section 75.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and Location Information § 75.10 Facility information. (a) Each applicant, licensee, or...

  8. 10 CFR 75.10 - Facility information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facility information. 75.10 Section 75.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and Location Information § 75.10 Facility information. (a) Each applicant, licensee, or...

  9. 10 CFR 75.10 - Facility information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Facility information. 75.10 Section 75.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFEGUARDS ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL-IMPLEMENTATION OF US/IAEA AGREEMENT Facility and Location Information § 75.10 Facility information. (a) Each applicant, licensee, or...

  10. An Electronic Pressure Profile Display system for aeronautic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has installed an Electronic Pressure Profile Display system. This system provides for the real-time display of pressure readings on high resolution graphics monitors. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system will replace manometer banks currently used in aeronautic test facilities. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system consists of an industrial type Digital Pressure Transmitter (DPI) unit which interfaces with a host computer. The host computer collects the pressure data from the DPI unit, converts it into engineering units, and displays the readings on a high resolution graphics monitor in bar graph format. Software was developed to accomplish the above tasks and also draw facility diagrams as background information on the displays. Data transfer between host computer and DPT unit is done with serial communications. Up to 64 channels are displayed with one second update time. This paper describes the system configuration, its features, and its advantages over existing systems.

  11. An Electronic Pressure Profile Display system for aeronautic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has installed an Electronic Pressure Profile Display system. This system provides for the real-time display of pressure readings on high resolution graphics monitors. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system will replace manometer banks currently used in aeronautic test facilities. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system consists of an industrial type Digital Pressure Transmitter (DPI) unit which interfaces with a host computer. The host computer collects the pressure data from the DPI unit, converts it into engineering units, and displays the readings on a high resolution graphics monitor in bar graph format. Software was developed to accomplish the above tasks and also draw facility diagrams as background information on the displays. Data transfer between host computer and DPT unit is done with serial communications. Up to 64 channels are displayed with one second update time. This paper describes the system configuration, its features, and its advantages over existing systems.

  12. An electronic pressure profile display system for aeronautic test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has installed an Electronic Pressure Profile Display system. This system provides for the real-time display of pressure readings on high resolution graphics monitors. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system will replace manometer banks currently used in aeronautic test facilities. The Electronic Pressure Profile Display system consists of an industrial type Digital Pressure Transmitter (DPT) unit which interfaces with a host computer. The host computer collects the pressure data from the DPT unit, converts it into engineering units, and displays the readings on a high resolution graphics monitor in bar graph format. Software was developed to accomplish the above tasks and also draw facility diagrams as background information on the displays. Data transfer between host computer and DPT unit is done with serial communications. Up to 64 channels are displayed with one second update time. This paper describes the system configuration, its features, and its advantages over existing systems.

  13. 6 CFR 27.200 - Information regarding security risk for a chemical facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., quantities, volumes, properties, customers, major uses, and other pertinent information about specific... facilities that meet certain criteria, which the Department will use to determine risk profiles. Through...

  14. Ohio Information Technology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    This profile includes a comprehensive set of information technology competencies that are grounded in core academic subject areas and built around four occupational clusters (information services and support, network systems, programming and software development, and interactive media) that reflect the job opportunities and skills required for…

  15. Springfield Processing Plant (SPP) Facility Information

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, Janice; Torres, Teresa M.

    2012-10-01

    The Springfield Processing Plant is a hypothetical facility. It has been constructed for use in training workshops. Information is provided about the facility and its surroundings, particularly security-related aspects such as target identification, threat data, entry control, and response force data.

  16. Information Technology and the Human Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klee, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews how information technology supports the Human Research Facility (HRF) and specifically the uses that contractor has for the information. There is information about the contractor, the HRF, some of the experiments that were performed using the HRF on board the Shuttle, overviews of the data architecture, and software both commercial and specially developed software for the specific experiments.

  17. Computer Profile of School Facilities Energy Consumption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswalt, Felix E.

    This document outlines a computerized management tool designed to enable building managers to identify energy consumption as related to types and uses of school facilities for the purpose of evaluating and managing the operation, maintenance, modification, and planning of new facilities. Specifically, it is expected that the statistics generated…

  18. Applications for the University of Texas Neutron Depth Profiling Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Uenlue, K.; Wehring, B.W.

    1994-12-31

    A permanent neutron depth profiling (NDP) facility is operational at a tangential beam port of the 1-MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). This facility was developed to perform materials research, specifically measurements of interest to the microelectronics industry. After brief descriptions of the UT-NDP facility and its operation, this paper discusses applications we are planning that are not related to microelectronics materials.

  19. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1992-10-01

    The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

  20. Hospitality and Facility Care Services. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for hospitality and facility care occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and…

  1. FEDFacts: Information about the Federal Electronic Docket Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Cleanup status information related to Federal Facilities contained in EPA's Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket. Information includes maps, lists of facilities, dashboard view with graphs, links to community resources, and news items.

  2. Neutron depth profiling: Overview and description of NIST facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.G.; Lamaze, G.P.; Langland, J.K.; Hwang, S.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Cold Neutron Depth Profiling (CNDP) instrument at the NIST Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF) is now operational. The neutron beam originates from a 16 L D2O ice cold source and passes through a filter of 135 mm of single crystal sapphire. The neutron energy spectrum may be described by a 65 K Maxwellian distribution. The sample chamber configuration allows for remote controlled scanning of 150 x 150 mm sample areas including the varying of both sample and detector angle. The improved sensitivity over the current thermal depth profiling instrument has permitted the first nondestructive measurements of (17)O profiles. The paper describes the CNDP instrument, illustrates the neutron depth profiling (NDP) technique with examples, and gives a separate bibliography of NDP publications.

  3. Neutron Depth Profiling: Overview and Description of NIST Facilities.

    PubMed

    Downing, R G; Lamaze, G P; Langland, J K; Hwang, S T

    1993-01-01

    The Cold Neutron Depth Profiling (CNDP) instrument at the NIST Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF) is now operational. The neutron beam originates from a 16 L D2O ice cold source and passes through a filter of 135 mm of single crystal sapphire. The neutron energy spectrum may be described by a 65 K Maxwellian distribution. The sample chamber configuration allows for remote controlled scanning of 150 × 150 mm sample areas including the varying of both sample and detector angle. The improved sensitivity over the current thermal depth profiling instrument has permitted the first nondestructive measurements of (17)O profiles. This paper describes the CNDP instrument, illustrates the neutron depth profiling (NDP) technique with examples, and gives a separate bibliography of NDP publications.

  4. Neutron Depth Profiling: Overview and Description of NIST Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Downing, R. G.; Lamaze, G. P.; Langland, J. K.; Hwang, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    The Cold Neutron Depth Profiling (CNDP) instrument at the NIST Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF) is now operational. The neutron beam originates from a 16 L D2O ice cold source and passes through a filter of 135 mm of single crystal sapphire. The neutron energy spectrum may be described by a 65 K Maxwellian distribution. The sample chamber configuration allows for remote controlled scanning of 150 × 150 mm sample areas including the varying of both sample and detector angle. The improved sensitivity over the current thermal depth profiling instrument has permitted the first nondestructive measurements of 17O profiles. This paper describes the CNDP instrument, illustrates the neutron depth profiling (NDP) technique with examples, and gives a separate bibliography of NDP publications. PMID:28053461

  5. A mission profile life test facility. [for mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, E.; Vetrone, R.; Bechtel, R.

    1978-01-01

    A test facility is being prepared for a 16,000 hour mission profile life test of multiple electric propulsion thrust subsystems. The facility will be capable of simultaneously operating three 2.7 kW, 30 cm mercury ion thrusters and their power processing. The facility will permit conduction of a program of long-term tests to document thruster characteristics as a function of time and operating point to allow prediction of thruster performance for any mission profile. The thruster will be tested in a 7m by 10m vacuum chamber. Each thruster will be installed in a separate lock chamber so that it can be extended into, or extracted from the main chamber without violating the vacuum integrity of the other thruster. The thrusters will exhaust into a 3m by 5m frozen mercury target. The target and an array of cryopanels to collect sputtered target material will be liquid nitrogen chilled. Power processor units will be tested in an adjacent 1.5m by 2m vacuum chamber and will be temperature controlled by simulated heat pipes.

  6. Information security management system planning for CBRN facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lenaeu, Joseph D.; O'Neil, Lori Ross; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Landine, Guy P.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lewis, John; Mathers, Gemma; Rodger, Robert; Johnson, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this document is to provide guidance for the development of information security management system planning documents at chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) facilities. It describes a risk-based approach for planning information security programs based on the sensitivity of the data developed, processed, communicated, and stored on facility information systems.

  7. Turbulence profiling methods applied to ESO's adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Javier; Béchet, Clémentine; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Gonté, Frédéric; Kolb, Johann; Le Louarn, Miska; Neichel, Benoît; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Guesalaga, Andrés.

    2014-07-01

    Two algorithms were recently studied for C2n profiling from wide-field Adaptive Optics (AO) measurements on GeMS (Gemini Multi-Conjugate AO system). They both rely on the Slope Detection and Ranging (SLODAR) approach, using spatial covariances of the measurements issued from various wavefront sensors. The first algorithm estimates the C2n profile by applying the truncated least-squares inverse of a matrix modeling the response of slopes covariances to various turbulent layer heights. In the second method, the profile is estimated by deconvolution of these spatial cross-covariances of slopes. We compare these methods in the new configuration of ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF), a high-order multiple laser system under integration. For this, we use measurements simulated by the AO cluster of ESO. The impact of the measurement noise and of the outer scale of the atmospheric turbulence is analyzed. The important influence of the outer scale on the results leads to the development of a new step for outer scale fitting included in each algorithm. This increases the reliability and robustness of the turbulence strength and profile estimations.

  8. 10 CFR 60.47 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facility information and verification. 60.47 Section 60.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses Us/iaea Safeguards Agreement § 60.47 Facility information and verification. (a)...

  9. 10 CFR 60.47 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facility information and verification. 60.47 Section 60.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses Us/iaea Safeguards Agreement § 60.47 Facility information and verification. (a)...

  10. 10 CFR 60.47 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facility information and verification. 60.47 Section 60.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses Us/iaea Safeguards Agreement § 60.47 Facility information and verification. (a)...

  11. 10 CFR 60.47 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facility information and verification. 60.47 Section 60.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses Us/iaea Safeguards Agreement § 60.47 Facility information and verification. (a)...

  12. 10 CFR 60.47 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Facility information and verification. 60.47 Section 60.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses Us/iaea Safeguards Agreement § 60.47 Facility information and verification. (a)...

  13. 10 CFR 63.47 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facility information and verification. 63.47 Section 63.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Us/iaea Safeguards Agreement § 63.47 Facility information and...

  14. 10 CFR 63.47 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facility information and verification. 63.47 Section 63.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Us/iaea Safeguards Agreement § 63.47 Facility information and...

  15. 10 CFR 63.47 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facility information and verification. 63.47 Section 63.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Us/iaea Safeguards Agreement § 63.47 Facility information and...

  16. 10 CFR 63.47 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Facility information and verification. 63.47 Section 63.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Us/iaea Safeguards Agreement § 63.47 Facility information and...

  17. 10 CFR 63.47 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Facility information and verification. 63.47 Section 63.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Us/iaea Safeguards Agreement § 63.47 Facility information and...

  18. Business Information Systems. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for business information systems is an employer-verified competency list that evolved from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives throughout Ohio. The competency list consists of 10 units: (1) data…

  19. Development of Facility Type Information Packages for Design of Air Force Facilities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    uate s ;Per- 143 child care centers (FUNCTIONAL Outdoors (cont’d) IAREA Infants 2. Pornes and Decks. Consider the use of porches and decks as part of o...directions for incorporating site specific information. General guidelines for the preparation of *FTIP’s and an example for a Child Care Center are also...facility type information package for a Child Care Center so that it may be compared with previous methods for transmitting facility type information

  20. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Martinez, Derwin; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Sedillo, James Daniel; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H{sup +} LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  1. Risk-informed separation distances for hydrogen gas storage facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houf, William G.; Merilo, Erik; Winters, William Stanley, Jr.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Groethe, Mark; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Ruggles, Adam James; Moen, Christopher D.; Schefer, Robert W.; Keller, Jay O.; Zhang, Yao; Evans, Gregory Herbert

    2010-09-01

    The use of risk information in establishing code and standard requirements enables: (1) An adequate and appropriate level of safety; and (2) Deployment of hydrogen facilities are as safe as gasoline facilities. This effort provides a template for clear and defensible regulations, codes, and standards that can enable international market transformation.

  2. Redesigning Facilities Management Information Systems for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Fred; Lancaster, Michael; Graham, Mike

    1997-01-01

    Describes one Canadian school district's use of an integrated Facilities Management Information System (FMIS) to help address the effective and efficient planning, building, operating, and maintaining of their schools and other Board facilities. Development of the FMIS and its demands for organizational restructuring and change in the workplace…

  3. A flight test facility design for examining digital information transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on a flight test facility design for examining digital information transfer. Information is given on aircraft/ground exchange, data link research activities, data link display format, a data link flight test, and the flight test setup.

  4. Developing Facility Information for Combat Equipment Group -- Europe (CEGE) Sites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    Supplies and Equipment Data Literature User Experience 4 CEGE FACILITY INFORMATION DOCUMENT FORMAT ............ 12 5 SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS...problems and uncertainties required a 3. User experience information obtained comprehensi,’e collection of integrated informa- from USAREUR, 21st SUPCOM...inventory has been designated as User Experience relevant to POMCUS system facilities -- the in- ventory that is received, stored, maintained, and Since the

  5. Health Information Exchange Capabilities in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    PubMed

    Filipova, Anna A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the levels at which health information exchange is used by skilled nursing facilities for clinical functions, the benefits and barriers associated with health information exchange and telehealth/telemonitoring capabilities, and the facility characteristics associated with health information exchange capabilities. A cross-sectional design was implemented. Data were collected from nursing home administrators, using a mail and online survey approach. A total of 156 usable questionnaires were returned of 397 distributed—a 39.30% response rate. The highest level of electronic exchange for clinical functions was within the facility than within corporation/affiliated organization or with nonaffiliated providers. It was also more prevalent in for-profit skilled nursing facilities than nonprofit skilled nursing facilities. More than half of the facilities reported no electronic exchange for functions, such as public health reporting, diagnostic test orders/results, medical orders/e-prescribing, advance directives, lab orders/results, and radiology orders/ results. Similarly, telehealth/telemonitoring was not in wide use by facilities in the state. The greatest barriers to electronic exchange of clinical functions were financial barriers, technological barriers, and connectivity barriers. Faster and accurate billing, improved care planning, and improved quality of documentation were reported as benefits of electronic information exchange of clinical data with affiliated and nonaffiliated providers.

  6. Emergency Response Information for School Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Crisis planning includes making preparations for managing school buildings, grounds, occupants, and rescue and recovery personnel during and after a crisis. In "Practical Information on Crisis Planning: A Guide for Schools and Communities, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools" states: When a crisis…

  7. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-29

    The `Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application` is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (this document, DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit- Specific Portion. The scope of the General Information Portion includes information that could be used to discuss operating units, units undergoing closure, or units being dispositioned through other options. Documentation included in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the General Information Portion, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance documentation, is located in the Contents Section. The intent of the General Information Portion is: (1) to provide an overview of the Hanford Facility; and (2) to assist in streamlining efforts associated with treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific Part B permit application, preclosure work plan, closure work plan, closure plan, closure/postclosure plan, or postclosure permit application documentation development, and the `Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit` modification process. Revision 2 of the General Information Portion of the `Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application` contains information current as of May 1, 1996. This document is a complete submittal and supersedes Revision 1.

  8. Profiling characteristics of internet medical information users.

    PubMed

    Weaver, James B; Mays, Darren; Lindner, Gregg; Eroglu, Dogan; Fridinger, Frederick; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2009-01-01

    The Internet's potential to bolster health promotion and disease prevention efforts has attracted considerable attention. Existing research leaves two things unclear, however: the prevalence of online health and medical information seeking and the distinguishing characteristics of individuals who seek that information. This study seeks to clarify and extend the knowledge base concerning health and medical information use online by profiling adults using Internet medical information (IMI). Secondary analysis of survey data from a large sample (n = 6,119) representative of the Atlanta, GA, area informed this investigation. Five survey questions were used to assess IMI use and general computer and Internet use during the 30 days before the survey was administered. Five questions were also used to assess respondents' health care system use. Several demographic characteristics were measured. RESULTS Contrary to most prior research, this study found relatively low prevalence of IMI-seeking behavior. Specifically, IMI use was reported by 13.2% of all respondents (n = 6,119) and by 21.1% of respondents with Internet access (n = 3,829). Logistic regression models conducted among respondents accessing the Internet in the previous 30 days revealed that, when controlling for several sociodemographic characteristics, home computer ownership, online time per week, and health care system use are all positively linked with IMI-seeking behavior. The data suggest it may be premature to embrace unilaterally the Internet as an effective asset for health promotion and disease prevention efforts that target the public.

  9. Information Technology: Comments on Navy Facility Consolidation Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-03

    On July 24, 1992, the Under Secretary of the Navy submitted for our review his department’s Information Technology Facility (ITF) consolidation plan...House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. In your report, you are required to address the Navy’s needs for information technology support and

  10. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.B.

    1998-05-19

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needed by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in this report).

  11. Library and Information Services and Facilities in Prisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Jeffrey G.

    In this six part report on Prison Libraries and Information Services, emphasis is placed upon services, collections of materials, and facilities for inmates, particularly of Maximum and Medium Security Penal Institutions. Content includes: examination of past and present conditions using a survey of the literature, standards and objectives of…

  12. Using Executive Information Systems to Manage Capital Projects and Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaynor, Robert

    1993-01-01

    In higher education, facilities data are essential for long-term capital and financial planning and for testing assumptions underlying anticipated policy change. Executive information systems should incorporate life-cycle considerations (planning, construction, renovation, and management) and resource linkages (describing interrelationships of…

  13. Compilation of historical information of 300 Area facilities and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    This document is a compilation of historical information of the 300 Area activities and facilities since the beginning. The 300 Area is shown as it looked in 1945, and also a more recent (1985) look at the 300 Area is provided.

  14. 77 FR 74685 - Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) Chemical-Terrorism Vulnerability Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... SECURITY Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) Chemical- Terrorism Vulnerability Information... financial information, Chemical-terrorism Vulnerability Information (CVI), Sensitive Security Information... represents a national-level effort to minimize terrorism risk to such facilities. Its design...

  15. Velocity profile development for a poultry facility acid scrubber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Determination of the air velocity profile for 12 experimental configurations (ECs) of an acid scrubber was carried out using an equal area traverse method with a vane axial anemometer. Four velocity profile plots were created for each configuration to determine the four optimal ECs. ECs were selecte...

  16. Problem Severity Profiles of Substance Abusing Women in Therapeutic Treatment Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isralowitz, Richard; Reznik, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to examine specific substance use profiles among former Soviet Union (FSU) immigrant and native-born women in Israeli therapeutic treatment facilities. Individuals were sampled at drug treatment facilities and assessed using the Addiction Severity Index. ASI scores suggest differences between the two groups. Among the findings…

  17. Problem Severity Profiles of Substance Abusing Women in Therapeutic Treatment Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isralowitz, Richard; Reznik, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to examine specific substance use profiles among former Soviet Union (FSU) immigrant and native-born women in Israeli therapeutic treatment facilities. Individuals were sampled at drug treatment facilities and assessed using the Addiction Severity Index. ASI scores suggest differences between the two groups. Among the findings…

  18. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, general information. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The current Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (this document, number DOE/RL-91-28) and a treatment, storage, and/or disposal Unit-Specific Portion, which includes documentation for individual TSD units (e.g., document numbers DOE/RL-89-03 and DOE/RL-90-01). Both portions consist of a Part A division and a Part B division. The Part B division consists of 15 chapters that address the content of the Part B checklists prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information requirements mandated by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology checklist section numbers, in brackets, follow the chapter headings and subheadings. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion (i.e., this document, number DOE/RL-91-28) is broader in nature and applies to all treatment, storage, and/or disposal units for which final status is sought. Because of its broad nature, the Part A division of the General Information Portion references the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application (document number DOE/RL-88-21), a compilation of all Part A documentation for the Hanford Facility.

  19. Specific factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Potančok, Martin; Voříšek, Jiří

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare facilities use a number of information system/information and communication technologies. Each healthcare facility faces a need to choose sourcing strategies most suitable to ensure provision of information system/information and communication technology services, processes and resources. Currently, it is possible to observe an expansion of sourcing possibilities in healthcare informatics, which creates new requirements for sourcing strategies. Thus, the aim of this article is to identify factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities. The identification was based on qualitative research, namely, a case study. This study provides a set of internal and external factors with their impact levels. The findings also show that not enough attention is paid to these factors during decision-making. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Use of information technology for medication management in residential care facilities: correlates of facility characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Soumitra S; Chandak, Aastha; Powell, M Paige; Kim, Jungyoon; Shiyanbola, Olayinka; Zhu, He; Shiyanbola, Oyewale

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of information technology in resolving medication problems has been well documented. Long-term care settings such as residential care facilities (RCFs) may see the benefits of using such technologies in addressing the problem of medication errors among their resident population, who are usually older and have numerous chronic conditions. The aim of this study was two-fold: to examine the extent of use of Electronic Medication Management (EMM) in RCFs and to analyze the organizational factors associated with the use of EMM functionalities in RCFs. Data on RCFs were obtained from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. The association between facility, director and staff, and resident characteristics of RCFs and adoption of four EMM functionalities was assessed through multivariate logistic regression. The four EMM functionalities included were maintaining lists of medications, ordering for prescriptions, maintaining active medication allergy lists, and warning of drug interactions or contraindications. About 12% of the RCFs adopted all four EMM functionalities. Additionally, maintaining lists of medications had the highest adoption rate (34.5%), followed by maintaining active medication allergy lists (31.6%), ordering for prescriptions (19.7%), and warning of drug interactions or contraindications (17.9%). Facility size and ownership status were significantly associated with adoption of all four EMM functionalities. Medicaid certification status, facility director's age, education and license status, and the use of personal care aides in the RCF were significantly associated with the adoption of some of the EMM functionalities. EMM is expected to improve the quality of care and patient safety in long-term care facilities including RCFs. The extent of adoption of the four EMM functionalities is relatively low in RCFs. Some RCFs may strategize to use these functionalities to cater to the increasing demands from the market and also to

  1. 78 FR 16698 - Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) Chemical-Terrorism Vulnerability Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... SECURITY Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) Chemical- Terrorism Vulnerability Information... Collection Request, Chemical Facility Anti- Terrorism Standards (CFATS) Chemical-terrorism Vulnerability... minimize terrorism risk to such facilities. Its design and implementation balance maintaining...

  2. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  3. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  4. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  5. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  6. The Information Broker: A Modern Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Mick

    1987-01-01

    Describes the various roles and business-related concerns of independent information professionals. The impact of online databases is discussed, and several publications for information entrepreneurs are reviewed. (MES)

  7. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gonzales, Fermin; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin; Sedillo, James Daniel; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  8. Information on the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this report provides information related to the design of the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) test facility. Information provided in this report have been pulled from the following information sources: Reference 1: R. Nourgaliev and et.al, "Summary Report on NGSAC (Next-Generation Safety Analysis Code) Development and Testing," Idaho National Laboratory, 2011. Note that this is report has not been released as an external report. Reference 2: O. Stevens, Characterization of the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) Passive Residual Heat Removal System Heat Exchanger, Master Thesis, June 1996. Reference 3: J. Reyes, Jr., Q. Wu, and J. King, Jr., Scaling Assessment for the Design of the OSU APEX-1000 Test Facility, OSU-APEX-03001 (Rev. 0), May 2003. Reference 4: J. Reyes et al, Final Report of the NRC AP600 Research Conducted at Oregon State University, NUREG/CR-6641, July 1999. Reference 5: K. Welter et al, APEX-1000 Confirmatory Testing to Support AP1000 Design Certification (non-proprietary), NUREG-1826, August 2005.

  9. Control and Information Systems for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brunton, Gordon; Casey, Allan; Christensen, Marvin; Demaret, Robert; Fedorov, Mike; Flegel, Michael; Folta, Peg; Fraizer, Timothy; Hutton, Matthew; Kegelmeyer, Laura; Lagin, Lawrence; Ludwigsen, Pete; Reed, Robert; Speck, Douglas; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2015-11-03

    Orchestration of every National Ignition Facility (NIF) shot cycle is managed by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which uses a scalable software architecture running code on more than 1950 front-end processors, embedded controllers, and supervisory servers. The ICCS operates laser and industrial control hardware containing 66 000 control and monitor points to ensure that all of NIF’s laser beams arrive at the target within 30 ps of each other and are aligned to a pointing accuracy of less than 50 μm root-mean-square, while ensuring that a host of diagnostic instruments record data in a few billionths of a second. NIF’s automated control subsystems are built from a common object-oriented software framework that distributes the software across the computer network and achieves interoperation between different software languages and target architectures. A large suite of business and scientific software tools supports experimental planning, experimental setup, facility configuration, and post-shot analysis. Standard business services using open-source software, commercial workflow tools, and database and messaging technologies have been developed. An information technology infrastructure consisting of servers, network devices, and storage provides the foundation for these systems. This paper is an overview of the control and information systems used to support a wide variety of experiments during the National Ignition Campaign.

  10. Information architecture: Profile of adopted standards

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), like other Federal agencies, is under increasing pressure to use information technology to improve efficiency in mission accomplishment as well as delivery of services to the public. Because users and systems have become interdependent, DOE has enterprise wide needs for common application architectures, communication networks, databases, security, and management capabilities. Users need open systems that provide interoperability of products and portability of people, data, and applications that are distributed throughout heterogeneous computing environments. The level of interoperability necessary requires the adoption of DOE wide standards, protocols, and best practices. The Department has developed an information architecture and a related standards adoption and retirement process to assist users in developing strategies and plans for acquiring information technology products and services based upon open systems standards that support application software interoperability, portability, and scalability. This set of Departmental Information Architecture standards represents guidance for achieving higher degrees of interoperability within the greater DOE community, business partners, and stakeholders. While these standards are not mandatory, particular and due consideration of their applications in contractual matters and use in technology implementations Department wide are goals of the Chief Information Officer.

  11. Co-operative Care; Practice and Information Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Roger, Ed.; Derrick, Deborah, Ed.

    This paper outlines a number of different projects, organizations, and services which have been effective in developing an unusual amount of interprofessional cooperation between educators and social service workers. Case study profiles are presented for several of the projects. Each profile includes: (1) general information; (2) a brief…

  12. Information Profiles of Indian Reservations in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Based on information provided by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Agency Offices and by the Indian Health Service, this publication provides profiles of 46 Indian reservations located in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. These profiles include data on reservations that are: (1) located partially or totally in the adjoining States of Oregon, California,…

  13. Information Profiles of Indian Reservations in Arizona, Nevada, & Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Based on information provided by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Agency Offices and by the Indian Health Service, this publication provides profiles of 45 Indian reservations located in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. These profiles include data on reservations located partially or totally in the adjoining states of Oregon, Idaho, California, and New…

  14. Integration of User Profiles: Models and Experiments in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myaeng, Sung H.; Korfhage, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of the interpretation of user queries in information retrieval highlights theoretical models that utilize user characteristics maintained in the form of a user profile. Various query/profile interaction models are identified, and an experiment is described that tested the relevance of retrieved documents based on various models. (29…

  15. Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, J.

    1995-12-31

    This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

  16. Instructional Facilities for the Information Age. An ERIC Information Analysis Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knirk, Frederick G.

    Intended to assist educators and trainers who must make recommendations about facilities to architects and school authorities, this ERIC information analysis project summarizes research on the design of both classrooms and individualized learning spaces that will optimize learning. Six teaching/learning space topics are considered: (1) light and…

  17. The Energy Related Construction Information System ERCIS: Response to a Need for Information on Army Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanos, Vasso Apostolidis; Fittipaldi, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the development of a bibliographic information system designed to assist architecture/engineering firms under contract to the Army Corps of Engineers in locating regulations or guidelines for the planning, design, or construction of army facilities. A sample search of the system is appended. (Author/CLB)

  18. Accelerating Information Retrieval from Profile Hidden Markov Model Databases.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Ahmad; Ashhab, Yaqoub; Tamimi, Hashem

    2016-01-01

    Profile Hidden Markov Model (Profile-HMM) is an efficient statistical approach to represent protein families. Currently, several databases maintain valuable protein sequence information as profile-HMMs. There is an increasing interest to improve the efficiency of searching Profile-HMM databases to detect sequence-profile or profile-profile homology. However, most efforts to enhance searching efficiency have been focusing on improving the alignment algorithms. Although the performance of these algorithms is fairly acceptable, the growing size of these databases, as well as the increasing demand for using batch query searching approach, are strong motivations that call for further enhancement of information retrieval from profile-HMM databases. This work presents a heuristic method to accelerate the current profile-HMM homology searching approaches. The method works by cluster-based remodeling of the database to reduce the search space, rather than focusing on the alignment algorithms. Using different clustering techniques, 4284 TIGRFAMs profiles were clustered based on their similarities. A representative for each cluster was assigned. To enhance sensitivity, we proposed an extended step that allows overlapping among clusters. A validation benchmark of 6000 randomly selected protein sequences was used to query the clustered profiles. To evaluate the efficiency of our approach, speed and recall values were measured and compared with the sequential search approach. Using hierarchical, k-means, and connected component clustering techniques followed by the extended overlapping step, we obtained an average reduction in time of 41%, and an average recall of 96%. Our results demonstrate that representation of profile-HMMs using a clustering-based approach can significantly accelerate data retrieval from profile-HMM databases.

  19. Accelerating Information Retrieval from Profile Hidden Markov Model Databases

    PubMed Central

    Ashhab, Yaqoub; Tamimi, Hashem

    2016-01-01

    Profile Hidden Markov Model (Profile-HMM) is an efficient statistical approach to represent protein families. Currently, several databases maintain valuable protein sequence information as profile-HMMs. There is an increasing interest to improve the efficiency of searching Profile-HMM databases to detect sequence-profile or profile-profile homology. However, most efforts to enhance searching efficiency have been focusing on improving the alignment algorithms. Although the performance of these algorithms is fairly acceptable, the growing size of these databases, as well as the increasing demand for using batch query searching approach, are strong motivations that call for further enhancement of information retrieval from profile-HMM databases. This work presents a heuristic method to accelerate the current profile-HMM homology searching approaches. The method works by cluster-based remodeling of the database to reduce the search space, rather than focusing on the alignment algorithms. Using different clustering techniques, 4284 TIGRFAMs profiles were clustered based on their similarities. A representative for each cluster was assigned. To enhance sensitivity, we proposed an extended step that allows overlapping among clusters. A validation benchmark of 6000 randomly selected protein sequences was used to query the clustered profiles. To evaluate the efficiency of our approach, speed and recall values were measured and compared with the sequential search approach. Using hierarchical, k-means, and connected component clustering techniques followed by the extended overlapping step, we obtained an average reduction in time of 41%, and an average recall of 96%. Our results demonstrate that representation of profile-HMMs using a clustering-based approach can significantly accelerate data retrieval from profile-HMM databases. PMID:27875548

  20. Oblique view of Facility No. S362 showing the profile of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of Facility No. S362 showing the profile of the ramp. Note the mooring cleat fixed to the top edge of the curb at left - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Seaplane Ramps - World War II Type, Southwest and west shore of Ford Island, near Wasp Boulevard, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect

    Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L.

    1993-11-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R&D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R&D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action.

  2. Information profiles on potential occupational hazards: benzoin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Information on potential occupational hazards from exposure to benzoin was reviewed. Topics discussed included chemical and physical properties, production, uses, manufacturers and distributors, manufacturing processes, occupational exposure, and biological effects. The annual production of benzoin is approximately 90,000 pounds per year with an historical growth rate of about 6% per year. In carcinogenesis studies, the incidence of lymphomas and leukemia in dosed male rats increased with dose level, but not significantly. Mice demonstrated a significant increase in the incidence of lymphomas and leukemias at low dose levels. Bioassays have indicated that benzoin is not carcinogenic to male or female F344-rats or B6C3F1-mice. No evidence of mutagenicity, teratogenicity, or reproductive effects was found in animal studies. Allergic contact dermatitis has been reported in humans.

  3. An information theoretic synthesis and analysis of Compton profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Stephen B.; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    1981-11-01

    The information theoretic technique of entropy maximization is applied to Compton profile (CP) data, employing single and double distribution moments profile J(q). The quality of resulting maximum entropy profiles is judged by how well they predict familiar CP quantities—moments, the profiles' magnitude at the origin J(0), and the width at half-maximum q0.5. Information theoretic quantities—Shannon entropies, information contents, and surprisals—are also presented. Based upon the ''sum'' constraint information) results in generally improved Compton profiles. The average momentum constraint contains the most information of all moment expectation values, as judged by its predictive capacity and by the information theory measures.

  4. 40 CFR 270.300 - What container information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What container information must I keep at my facility? 270.300 Section 270.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Facility § 270.300 What container information must I keep at my facility? If you store or treat...

  5. Informing the Symptom Profile of Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Naomi M.; Wall, Melanie M.; Keshaviah, Aparna; Dryman, M. Taylor; LeBlanc, Nicole J.; Shear, M. Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Background Complicated Grief (CG) is under consideration as a new diagnosis in DSM5. We sought to add empirical support to the current dialogue by examining the commonly used Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG) scale completed by 782 bereaved individuals. Methods We employed IRT analyses, factor analyses, and sensitivity and specificity analyses utilizing our full sample (n=782), and also compared confirmed CG cases (n=288) to non-cases (n=377). Confirmed CG cases were defined as individuals bereaved at least 6 months who were seeking care for CG, had an ICG ≥ 30, and received a structured clinical interview for CG by a certified clinician confirming CG as their primary illness. Non-cases were bereaved individuals who did not present with CG as a primary complaint (including those with depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders and controls) and had an ICG<25. Results IRT analyses provided guidance about the most informative individual items and their association with CG severity. Factor analyses demonstrated a single factor solution when the full sample was considered, but within CG cases, six symptom clusters emerged: 1) yearning and preoccupation with the deceased, 2) anger and bitterness, 3) shock and disbelief, 4) estrangement from others, 5) hallucinations of the deceased, and 6) behavior change, including avoidance and proximity seeking. The presence of at least one symptom from three different symptom clusters optimized sensitivity (94.8%) and specificity (98.1%). Conclusions These data, derived from a diverse and predominantly clinical help seeking population, add an important perspective to existing suggestions for DSM5 criteria for CG. PMID:21284064

  6. Global Soil Information Facilities - Component Worldgrids.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, H. I.; Hengl, T.

    2012-04-01

    GSIF (Global Soil Information Facilities) is ISRIC's framework for production of open soil data. It has been inspired by global environmental data initiatives (e.g. oneGeology, GBIF). The main practical motivation for GSIF is to build cyber-infrastructure to collate legacy (i.e., historic) soil data currently under threat of being lost forever and to generate new soil information. The objective of the component worldgrids is a (de)-central repository for collecting, storing, accessing and interacting with gridded data sets of global soil covariate data for production mapping, while being part of a larger GSIF. It is the physical implementation of the expectation that ISRIC would lead and coordinate a project to assemble a core data set of global environmental covariates to (partly) support local efforts to produce global soil property maps. Currently over 100 layers with a 5 and 1 km resolution with a global coverage can be accessed via www.worldgrids.org. Three different functionalities are implemented to extract data in an OGC complained matter: i) single point overlay ii) mass point overlay; iii) zone grid overlay with reporting of different statistical parameters. The presentation will focus on datasets, functionalities, access via the R-project and ArcGIS globalsoilmap.net Toolbox as well on future enhancements to the worldgrids platform.

  7. 6 CFR 27.200 - Information regarding security risk for a chemical facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Chemical Facility Security Program § 27.200 Information... to complete and submit a Top-Screen process, which may be completed through a secure Department...

  8. Summary of informal workshop on state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Cocke, C.L.; Datz, S.; Kostroun, V.

    1984-11-13

    The present state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research in the United States is assessed by means of a questionnaire and informal workshop. Recommendations for future facilities are given. 3 refs.

  9. Incorporating profile information in community detection for online social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Yeung, K. H.

    2014-07-01

    Community structure is an important feature in the study of complex networks. It is because nodes of the same community may have similar properties. In this paper we extend two popular community detection methods to partition online social networks. In our extended methods, the profile information of users is used for partitioning. We apply the extended methods in several sample networks of Facebook. Compared with the original methods, the community structures we obtain have higher modularity. Our results indicate that users' profile information is consistent with the community structure of their friendship network to some extent. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first to discuss how profile information can be used to improve community detection in online social networks.

  10. High Enthalpy Air Flows Radial Temperatures Profiles Measurements During on Ground Hypesonic Facilities Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippis, Federico; Cipullo, Alessio; Gerro, Paolo

    2012-12-01

    Aim of this paper is to present and discuss activities carried out in CIRA (Centro Italiano Ricerche Aerospaziali) relevant to on ground hypersonic flow experimental characterisation. In particular, valid and innovative results have been obtained not only in no- intrusive measurements at the jet centreline, but also in the reconstruction of radial profiles in axial-symmetric geometries. The test campaigns have been realised using the Scirocco Plasma Wind Tunnel huge power facility, 70 MW arc-jet plant. Emission spectroscopy good quality data have been acquired into the facility reservoir (arc heater column) and at the hypersonic nozzle exit. Opportune advanced mathematical treatment of these spectra allowed temperature measurements at the nozzle exit center-line and also the reconstruction of the temperature and total enthalpy profiles at the nozzle inlet. Abel inversion procedure allows also experimental temperature radial re-costruction at the nozzle exit. Data obtained seems to be coherent with respect the expectations.

  11. 40 CFR 270.300 - What container information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RCRA Standardized Permits for Storage and Treatment Units Information That Must Be Kept at Your Facility § 270.300 What container information must I keep at my facility? If you store or treat hazardous... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What container information must I...

  12. 40 CFR 270.300 - What container information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RCRA Standardized Permits for Storage and Treatment Units Information That Must Be Kept at Your Facility § 270.300 What container information must I keep at my facility? If you store or treat hazardous... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What container information must I...

  13. 40 CFR 270.305 - What tank information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RCRA Standardized Permits for Storage and Treatment Units Information That Must Be Kept at Your Facility § 270.305 What tank information must I keep at my facility? If you use tanks to store or treat... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What tank information must I keep...

  14. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Within Industry 3004.470 Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information...

  15. 12 CFR 555.300 - Must I inform OTS before I use electronic means or facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Must I inform OTS before I use electronic means... I inform OTS before I use electronic means or facilities? (a) General. A savings association (“you”) are not required to inform OTS before you use electronic means or facilities, except as provided in...

  16. 6 CFR 27.200 - Information regarding security risk for a chemical facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information regarding security risk for a chemical facility. 27.200 Section 27.200 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Chemical Facility Security Program § 27.200...

  17. 6 CFR 27.200 - Information regarding security risk for a chemical facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Information regarding security risk for a chemical facility. 27.200 Section 27.200 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Chemical Facility Security Program § 27.200...

  18. 17 CFR 37.8 - Information relating to transactions on derivatives transaction execution facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... transactions on derivatives transaction execution facilities. 37.8 Section 37.8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DERIVATIVES TRANSACTION EXECUTION FACILITIES § 37.8 Information relating to transactions on derivatives transaction execution facilities. (a) Special calls for...

  19. 17 CFR 37.8 - Information relating to transactions on derivatives transaction execution facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... transactions on derivatives transaction execution facilities. 37.8 Section 37.8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DERIVATIVES TRANSACTION EXECUTION FACILITIES § 37.8 Information relating to transactions on derivatives transaction execution facilities. (a) Special calls...

  20. 17 CFR 37.8 - Information relating to transactions on derivatives transaction execution facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... transactions on derivatives transaction execution facilities. 37.8 Section 37.8 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DERIVATIVES TRANSACTION EXECUTION FACILITIES § 37.8 Information relating to transactions on derivatives transaction execution facilities. (a) Special calls...

  1. Aerospace Technology: Technical Data and Information on Foreign Test Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-22

    Tunnel S-1 84 Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel Data Sheets 87 VKI Isentropic Light Piston Compression Tube CT-2 87 VKI Longshot Free Piston Tunnel ST-1 90 Air...Engine Test Facility 441 Appendix X 443 Aerospace Test Subsonic Wind Tunnel Data Sheets 444Facilities in West DLR Berlin Evacuable Free -jet...493 DLR Goettingen Rotating Cascades Wind Tunnel 497 (RGG) DLR Koln-Porz Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TMK) 501 DLR Koln-Porz Vertical Free -jet Test Chamber

  2. 40 CFR 270.315 - What air emissions control information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAM RCRA Standardized Permits for Storage and Treatment Units Information That Must Be Kept at Your Facility § 270.315 What air emissions control information must I keep at my facility? If you have air... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What air emissions control...

  3. 40 CFR 270.315 - What air emissions control information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAM RCRA Standardized Permits for Storage and Treatment Units Information That Must Be Kept at Your Facility § 270.315 What air emissions control information must I keep at my facility? If you have air... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What air emissions control...

  4. 24 CFR 960.205 - Drug use by applicants: Obtaining information from drug treatment facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug use by applicants: Obtaining information from drug treatment facility. 960.205 Section 960.205 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS... Admission § 960.205 Drug use by applicants: Obtaining information from drug treatment facility. (a)...

  5. 6 CFR 27.200 - Information regarding security risk for a chemical facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Chemical Facility Security Program § 27.200 Information..., funding, and other matters bearing on the effectiveness of the security, safety and emergency response... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Information regarding security risk for a...

  6. Techniques that acquire donor profiling information from fingermarks - A review.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Annemieke; van Beek, Fleur T; Aalders, Maurice C G; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Lambrechts, Saskia A G

    2016-03-01

    Fingermarks are among the most important types of evidence that can be encountered at the scene of a crime since the unique ridge pattern of a fingerprint can be used for individualization. But fingermarks contain more than the characteristic pattern of ridges and furrows, they are composed of a wide variety of different components that originate from endogenous and exogenous sources. The chemical composition can be used to obtain additional information from the donor of the fingermark, which in turn can be used to create a donor profile. Donor profiling can serve at least two purposes i) to enhance the evidential value of fingermarks and ii) to provide valuable tactical information during the crime scene investigation. Retrieving this additional information is not limited to fingermarks that have been used for individualization, but can also be applied on partial and/or distorted fingermarks. In this review we have summarized the types of information that can be obtained from fingermarks. Additionally, an overview is given of the techniques that are available addressing their unique characteristics and limitations. We expect that in the nearby future, donor profiling from contact traces, including fingermarks will be possible.

  7. Analysis of Ozone And CO2 Profiles Measured At A Diary Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunjemiyo, S. O.; Hasson, A. S.; Ashkan, S.; Steele, J.; Shelton, T.

    2015-12-01

    Ozone and carbon dioxide are both greenhouse gasses in the planetary boundary layer. Ozone is a harmful secondary pollutant in the troposphere produced mostly during the day when there is a photochemical reaction in which primary pollutant precursors such as nitrous oxide (NOx) or volatile organic compounds (VOC's) mix with sunlight. As with most pollutants in the lower troposphere, both ozone and carbon dioxide vary in spatial and temporal scale depending on sources of pollution, environmental conditions and the boundary layer dynamics. Among the several factors that influence ozone variation, the seasonal changes in meteorological parameters and availability of ozone precursors are crucial because they control ozone formation and decay. Understanding how the difference in emission sources affect vertical transport of ozone and carbon dioxide is considered crucial to the improvement of their regional inventory sources. The purpose of this study is to characterize vertical transport of ozone and carbon at a diary facility. The study was conducted in the summer of 2011 and 2012 at a commercial dairy facility in Central California and involved profile measurements of ozone and CO2 using electrochemical ozonesondes, meteorological sondes and CO2 probe tethered to a 9 cubic meters helium balloon. On each day of the data collection, multiple balloon launches were made over a period representing different stages of the boundary layer development. The results show ozone and CO2 profiles display different characteristics. Regardless of the time of the day, the CO2 concentration decreases with height with a sharp gradient near the surface that is strengthened by a stable atmospheric condition, a feature suggesting the surface as the source. On the other hand, ozone profiles show greater link to the evolution of the lower boundary layer. Ozone profiles display unique features indicating ozone destruction near the surface. This unusual near the surface, observed even in the

  8. On Using Shaped Honeycombs for Experimental Generation of Arbitrary Velocity Profiles in Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaripour, Alireza; Olson, David; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2016-11-01

    It is common to use a uniform approach flow in the study of most problems in aerodynamics. Motivated by situations where the approach flow is not uniform, the focus of the current work is on the experimental generation of arbitrary velocity profiles in a flow facility (water tunnel) using the shaped honeycomb technique originally proposed by Kotansky (1966). Employing further refinement of this approach, multiple honeycomb devices are designed and fabricated to produce prescribed velocity profiles. The performance of these devices is assessed in terms of their agreement with the desired velocity profiles and the level of turbulence they produce. Single-component molecular tagging velocimetry (1c-MTV) is used to characterize the resulting mean and fluctuating streamwise velocity profiles and their streamwise development. The shaped honeycomb technique is shown to be effective in producing the desired velocity profiles with high fidelity while maintaining velocity fluctuations level at or below that of the freestream prior to installation of the devices. This work was supported by AFOSR Award Number FA9550-15-1-0224.

  9. A facile analytical method for the identification of protease gene profiles from Bacillus thuringiensis strains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Chu; Shen, Li-Fen; Chak, Kin-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Five pairs of degenerate universal primers have been designed to identify the general protease gene profiles from some distinct Bacillus thuringiensis strains. Based on the PCR amplification patterns and DNA sequences of the cloned fragments, it was noted that the protease gene profiles of the three distinct strains of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD73, tenebrionis and israelensis T14001 are varied. Seven protease genes, neutral protease B (nprB), intracellular serine protease A (ispA), extracellular serine protease (vpr), envelope-associated protease (prtH), neutral protease F (nprF), thermostable alkaline serine protease and alkaline serine protease (aprS), with known functions were identified from three distinct B. thuringiensis strains. In addition, five DNA sequences with unknown functions were also identified by this facile analytical method. However, based on the alignment of the derived protein sequences with the protein domain database, it suggested that at least one of these unknown genes, yunA, might be highly protease-related. Thus, the proposed PCR-mediated amplification design could be a facile method for identifying the protease gene profiles as well as for detecting novel protease genes of the B. thuringiensis strains.

  10. The average mutual information profile as a genomic signature.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Mark; Schuster, Sheldon M; Sayood, Khalid

    2008-01-25

    Occult organizational structures in DNA sequences may hold the key to understanding functional and evolutionary aspects of the DNA molecule. Such structures can also provide the means for identifying and discriminating organisms using genomic data. Species specific genomic signatures are useful in a variety of contexts such as evolutionary analysis, assembly and classification of genomic sequences from large uncultivated microbial communities and a rapid identification system in health hazard situations. We have analyzed genomic sequences of eukaryotic and prokaryotic chromosomes as well as various subtypes of viruses using an information theoretic framework. We confirm the existence of a species specific average mutual information (AMI) profile. We use these profiles to define a very simple, computationally efficient, alignment free, distance measure that reflects the evolutionary relationships between genomic sequences. We use this distance measure to classify chromosomes according to species of origin, to separate and cluster subtypes of the HIV-1 virus, and classify DNA fragments to species of origin. AMI profiles of DNA sequences prove to be species specific and easy to compute. The structure of AMI profiles are conserved, even in short subsequences of a species' genome, rendering a pervasive signature. This signature can be used to classify relatively short DNA fragments to species of origin.

  11. 9 CFR 93.309 - Horse quarantine facilities; payment information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... care, feed, and handling of the horses from the time they arrive at the quarantine port to the time of... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS... transportation to the privately operated quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the...

  12. 9 CFR 93.309 - Horse quarantine facilities; payment information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... care, feed, and handling of the horses from the time they arrive at the quarantine port to the time of... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS... transportation to the privately operated quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the...

  13. 9 CFR 93.309 - Horse quarantine facilities; payment information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... care, feed, and handling of the horses from the time they arrive at the quarantine port to the time of... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS... transportation to the privately operated quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the...

  14. 9 CFR 93.309 - Horse quarantine facilities; payment information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... care, feed, and handling of the horses from the time they arrive at the quarantine port to the time of... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS... transportation to the privately operated quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the...

  15. 9 CFR 93.309 - Horse quarantine facilities; payment information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... care, feed, and handling of the horses from the time they arrive at the quarantine port to the time of... IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS... transportation to the privately operated quarantine facility and for the care, feed, and handling of the...

  16. Extraction of Profile Information from Cloud Contaminated Radiances. Appendixes 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Zhou, D. K.; Huang, H.-L.; Li, Jun; Liu, X.; Larar, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Clouds act to reduce the signal level and may produce noise dependence on the complexity of the cloud properties and the manner in which they are treated in the profile retrieval process. There are essentially three ways to extract profile information from cloud contaminated radiances: (1) cloud-clearing using spatially adjacent cloud contaminated radiance measurements, (2) retrieval based upon the assumption of opaque cloud conditions, and (3) retrieval or radiance assimilation using a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model which accounts for the absorption and scattering of the radiance observed. Cloud clearing extracts the radiance arising from the clear air portion of partly clouded fields of view permitting soundings to the surface or the assimilation of radiances as in the clear field of view case. However, the accuracy of the clear air radiance signal depends upon the cloud height and optical property uniformity across the two fields of view used in the cloud clearing process. The assumption of opaque clouds within the field of view permits relatively accurate profiles to be retrieved down to near cloud top levels, the accuracy near the cloud top level being dependent upon the actual microphysical properties of the cloud. The use of a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model enables accurate retrievals down to cloud top levels and below semi-transparent cloud layers (e.g., cirrus). It should also be possible to assimilate cloudy radiances directly into the model given a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model using geometric and microphysical cloud parameters retrieved from the radiance spectra as initial cloud variables in the radiance assimilation process. This presentation reviews the above three ways to extract profile information from cloud contaminated radiances. NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer radiance spectra and Aqua satellite AIRS radiance spectra are used to illustrate how cloudy radiances can be used

  17. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information April 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-05-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  18. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information March 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-04-19

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  19. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information February 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2010-03-25

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  20. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information December 2009

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2010-12-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  1. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information January 2010

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information October 2009

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. National Ignition Facility Control and Information System Operational Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, C D; Beeler, R G; Bowers, G A; Carey, R W; Fisher, J M; Foxworthy, C B; Frazier, T M; Mathisen, D G; Lagin, L J; Rhodes, J J; Shaw, M J

    2009-10-08

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) in Livermore, California, is the world's highest-energy laser fusion system and one of the premier large scale scientific projects in the United States. The system is designed to setup and fire a laser shot to a fusion ignition or high energy density target at rates up to a shot every 4 hours. NIF has 192 laser beams delivering up to 1.8 MJ of energy to a {approx}2 mm target that is planned to produce >100 billion atm of pressure and temperatures of >100 million degrees centigrade. NIF is housed in a ten-story building footprint the size of three football fields as shown in Fig. 1. Commissioning was recently completed and NIF will be formally dedicated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on May 29, 2009. The control system has 60,000 hardware controls points and employs 2 million lines of control system code. The control room has highly automated equipment setup prior to firing laser system shots. This automation has a data driven implementation that is conducive to dynamic modification and optimization depending on the shot goals defined by the end user experimenters. NIF has extensive facility machine history and infrastructure maintenance workflow tools both under development and deployed. An extensive operational tools suite has been developed to support facility operations including experimental shot setup, machine readiness, machine health and safety, and machine history. The following paragraphs discuss the current state and future upgrades to these four categories of operational tools.

  4. Nuclear Storage Facility Inventory and Information Management using the GraFIC Software.

    SciTech Connect

    Hickerson, T.W.

    1999-05-04

    Oak Ridge has developed an intelligent facility and information management system to provide near real time, verifiable status of safeguarded materials in a nuclear storage facility. The Graphical Facility Information System (GraFIC{trademark}) is a versatile software package designed to operate in a distributed computing environment. GraFIC{trademark} is integrated with a suite of rugged, low-cost sensors that remotely monitor the physical and/or assigned attributes associated with stored nuclear materials and reports item and facility activity to an unlimited number of authorized clients. The software also contains facility management tools to assist with space planning, record management, item location, and a variety of other facilities needs.

  5. Social network profiles as information sources for adolescents' offline relations.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Cédric; All, Anissa; Vanwynsberghe, Hadewijch

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the results of a study concerning the use of online profile pages by adolescents to know more about "offline" friends and acquaintances. Previous research has indicated that social networking sites (SNSs) are used to gather information on new online contacts. However, several studies have demonstrated a substantial overlap between offline and online social networks. Hence, we question whether online connections are meaningful in gathering information on offline friends and acquaintances. First, the results indicate that a combination of passive uncertainty reduction (monitoring a target's profile) and interactive uncertainty reduction (communication through the target's profile) explains a considerable amount of variance in the level of uncertainty about both friends and acquaintances. More specifically, adolescents generally get to know much more about their acquaintances. Second, the results of online uncertainty reduction positively affect the degree of self-disclosure, which is imperative in building a solid friend relation. Further, we find that uncertainty reduction strategies positively mediate the effect of social anxiety on the level of certainty about friends. This implies that socially anxious teenagers benefit from SNSs by getting the conditions right to build a more solid relation with their friends. Hence, we conclude that SNSs play a substantial role in today's adolescents' everyday interpersonal communication.

  6. 78 FR 66763 - Information Collection: Oil Spill Financial Responsibility for Offshore Facilities; Submitted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Information Collection: Oil Spill Financial Responsibility for Offshore... requirements for 30 CFR 553, Oil Spill Financial Responsibility for Offshore Facilities, as well as the revised... Financial Responsibility for Offshore Facilities. Forms: BOEM-1016 through 1023 and BOEM-1025....

  7. 21 CFR 1.235 - How and when do you cancel your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... providing food for consumption in the United States, or the facility is sold to a new owner). (b... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How and when do you cancel your facility's registration information? 1.235 Section 1.235 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  8. 24 CFR 960.205 - Drug use by applicants: Obtaining information from drug treatment facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... This section addresses a PHA's authority to request and obtain information from drug abuse treatment... household member. (2) Drug abuse treatment facility. An entity: (i) That holds itself out as providing, and... consent forms signed by such household member that: (i) Requests any drug abuse treatment facility to...

  9. 24 CFR 960.205 - Drug use by applicants: Obtaining information from drug treatment facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... This section addresses a PHA's authority to request and obtain information from drug abuse treatment... household member. (2) Drug abuse treatment facility. An entity: (i) That holds itself out as providing, and... consent forms signed by such household member that: (i) Requests any drug abuse treatment facility to...

  10. 40 CFR 370.60 - How does a person obtain MSDS information about a specific facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does a person obtain MSDS... obtain MSDS information about a specific facility? Any person may obtain an MSDS for a specific facility by writing to the LEPC and asking for it. (a) If the LEPC has the MSDS, it must provide it to the...

  11. 77 FR 33479 - Information Collection Activities: Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located Seaward...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Information Collection Activities: Oil-Spill Response... requirements in the regulations under Part 254, ``Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located... 254, Oil-Spill Response Requirements for Facilities Located Seaward of the Coast Line. OMB...

  12. 78 FR 13695 - Information Collection: Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Information Collection: Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing... requirements in the regulations under ``Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...: 1010-0176. Title: 30 CFR 585, Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

  13. 21 CFR 1.234 - How and when do you update your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... facility's registration within 60 calendar days of any change to any of the information previously submitted under § 1.232 (e.g., change of operator, agent in charge, or U.S. agent), except a change of the... registration. (b) Cancellation due to ownership changes. If the reason for the update is that the facility...

  14. 21 CFR 1.234 - How and when do you update your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... facility's registration within 60 calendar days of any change to any of the information previously submitted under § 1.232 (e.g., change of operator, agent in charge, or U.S. agent), except a change of the... registration. (b) Cancellation due to ownership changes. If the reason for the update is that the facility...

  15. 21 CFR 1.234 - How and when do you update your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... facility's registration within 60 calendar days of any change to any of the information previously submitted under § 1.232 (e.g., change of operator, agent in charge, or U.S. agent), except a change of the... registration. (b) Cancellation due to ownership changes. If the reason for the update is that the facility...

  16. 21 CFR 1.234 - How and when do you update your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... facility's registration within 60 calendar days of any change to any of the information previously submitted under § 1.232 (e.g., change of operator, agent in charge, or U.S. agent), except a change of the... registration. (b) Cancellation due to ownership changes. If the reason for the update is that the facility...

  17. 21 CFR 1.234 - How and when do you update your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... facility's registration within 60 calendar days of any change to any of the information previously submitted under § 1.232 (e.g., change of operator, agent in charge, or U.S. agent), except a change of the... registration. (b) Cancellation due to ownership changes. If the reason for the update is that the facility...

  18. 24 CFR 960.205 - Drug use by applicants: Obtaining information from drug treatment facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... This section addresses a PHA's authority to request and obtain information from drug abuse treatment... household member. (2) Drug abuse treatment facility. An entity: (i) That holds itself out as providing, and... consent forms signed by such household member that: (i) Requests any drug abuse treatment facility...

  19. 24 CFR 960.205 - Drug use by applicants: Obtaining information from drug treatment facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... This section addresses a PHA's authority to request and obtain information from drug abuse treatment... household member. (2) Drug abuse treatment facility. An entity: (i) That holds itself out as providing, and... consent forms signed by such household member that: (i) Requests any drug abuse treatment facility...

  20. Information profiles on potential occupational hazards: Nitroparaffins. Draft report (Second)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    Profiles of information are presented for the following nitroparaffins: nitroethane, nitromethane, l-nitropropane, 2-nitropropane, tetranitromethane, and trinitromethane. Oral and inhalation toxicities and the degree of histological damage increase with increasing molecular weight of the compounds. The primary effects include histological liver damage and central nervous system depression, both atactic and narcotic changes, regardless of the route of administration or the duration of exposure. Vapor exposures also cause respiratory tract and conjunctival irritation and pulmonary edema. Symptoms of exposure in humans include headache, nausea, damage to the respiratory tract, and liver damage. Most of the exposures to nitroparaffins resulting from occupational pursuits have been to 2-nitropropane.

  1. 10 CFR 61.32 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... associated forms and site information on DOC/NRC Form AP-A, and associated forms; (b) As required by the... location information described in § 75.11 of this chapter on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and...

  2. 10 CFR 61.32 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... associated forms and site information on DOC/NRC Form AP-A, and associated forms; (b) As required by the... location information described in § 75.11 of this chapter on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and...

  3. 10 CFR 61.32 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... associated forms and site information on DOC/NRC Form AP-A, and associated forms; (b) As required by the... location information described in § 75.11 of this chapter on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and...

  4. 10 CFR 61.32 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... associated forms and site information on DOC/NRC Form AP-A, and associated forms; (b) As required by the... location information described in § 75.11 of this chapter on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and...

  5. 10 CFR 61.32 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... associated forms and site information on DOC/NRC Form AP-A, and associated forms; (b) As required by the... location information described in § 75.11 of this chapter on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and...

  6. A Management Information System for Facilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Robert J.; And Others

    Goodwill Industries of America, Inc. developed a management information system designed to provide rehabilitation workshop managers with information needed to make sound administrative decisions, statistics to measure the outcome of these decisions in terms of service to the handicapped, and the financial resources needed to deliver the services.…

  7. Hospital to Post-Acute Care Facility Transfers: Identifying Targets for Information Exchange Quality Improvement.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christine D; Cumbler, Ethan; Honigman, Benjamin; Burke, Robert E; Boxer, Rebecca S; Levy, Cari; Coleman, Eric A; Wald, Heidi L

    2017-01-01

    Information exchange is critical to high-quality care transitions from hospitals to post-acute care (PAC) facilities. We conducted a survey to evaluate the completeness and timeliness of information transfer and communication between a tertiary-care academic hospital and its related PAC facilities. This was a cross-sectional Web-based 36-question survey of 110 PAC clinicians and staff representing 31 PAC facilities conducted between October and December 2013. We received responses from 71 of 110 individuals representing 29 of 31 facilities (65% and 94% response rates). We collapsed 4-point Likert responses into dichotomous variables to reflect completeness (sufficient vs insufficient) and timeliness (timely vs not timely) for information transfer and communication. Among respondents, 32% reported insufficient information about discharge medical conditions and management plan, and 83% reported at least occasionally encountering problems directly related to inadequate information from the hospital. Hospital clinician contact information was the most common insufficient domain. With respect to timeliness, 86% of respondents desired receipt of a discharge summary on or before the day of discharge, but only 58% reported receiving the summary within this time frame. Through free-text responses, several participants expressed the need for paper prescriptions for controlled pain medications to be sent with patients at the time of transfer. Staff and clinicians at PAC facilities perceive substantial deficits in content and timeliness of information exchange between the hospital and facilities. Such deficits are particularly relevant in the context of the increasing prevalence of bundled payments for care across settings as well as forthcoming readmissions penalties for PAC facilities. Targets identified for quality improvement include structuring discharge summary information to include information identified as deficient by respondents, completion of discharge summaries

  8. Neural information processing and self-organizing maps as a tool in safeguarding storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Fuyat, C.

    1993-08-01

    Storage facilities for nuclear materials and weapons dismantlement facilities could have a large number of sensors with the potential for generating large amounts of data. Because of the anticipated complexity and diversity of the data, efficient automatic algorithms are necessary to make interpretations and ensure secure and safe operation. New, advanced safeguards systems are needed to process the information gathered from monitors and make interpretations that are in the best interests of the facility or agency. In this paper we present a conceptual design for software to assist with processing these large quantities of data from storage facilities.

  9. 33 CFR 154.1041 - Specific response information to be maintained on mobile MTR facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... list of procedures to be followed in the event of a discharge. (2) Identity of response resources to... National Response Center. (b) The owner or operator of the mobile facility must also retain the information...

  10. Fuel-cycle facilities: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VII

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the mining and milling of uranium and thorium; uranium hexafluoride conversion; enrichment; fuel fabrication; reprocessing; storage options; waste disposal options; transportation; heavy-water-production facilities; and international fuel service centers.

  11. A reliable facility location design model with site-dependent disruption in the imperfect information context.

    PubMed

    Yun, Lifen; Wang, Xifu; Fan, Hongqiang; Li, Xiaopeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a reliable facility location design model under imperfect information with site-dependent disruptions; i.e., each facility is subject to a unique disruption probability that varies across the space. In the imperfect information contexts, customers adopt a realistic "trial-and-error" strategy to visit facilities; i.e., they visit a number of pre-assigned facilities sequentially until they arrive at the first operational facility or give up looking for the service. This proposed model aims to balance initial facility investment and expected long-term operational cost by finding the optimal facility locations. A nonlinear integer programming model is proposed to describe this problem. We apply a linearization technique to reduce the difficulty of solving the proposed model. A number of problem instances are studied to illustrate the performance of the proposed model. The results indicate that our proposed model can reveal a number of interesting insights into the facility location design with site-dependent disruptions, including the benefit of backup facilities and system robustness against variation of the loss-of-service penalty.

  12. A reliable facility location design model with site-dependent disruption in the imperfect information context

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Lifen; Wang, Xifu; Fan, Hongqiang; Li, Xiaopeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a reliable facility location design model under imperfect information with site-dependent disruptions; i.e., each facility is subject to a unique disruption probability that varies across the space. In the imperfect information contexts, customers adopt a realistic “trial-and-error” strategy to visit facilities; i.e., they visit a number of pre-assigned facilities sequentially until they arrive at the first operational facility or give up looking for the service. This proposed model aims to balance initial facility investment and expected long-term operational cost by finding the optimal facility locations. A nonlinear integer programming model is proposed to describe this problem. We apply a linearization technique to reduce the difficulty of solving the proposed model. A number of problem instances are studied to illustrate the performance of the proposed model. The results indicate that our proposed model can reveal a number of interesting insights into the facility location design with site-dependent disruptions, including the benefit of backup facilities and system robustness against variation of the loss-of-service penalty. PMID:28486564

  13. 10 CFR 72.79 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms; (b) Shall submit location information described in § 75.11 of this chapter on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and (c) Shall permit verification thereof...

  14. 10 CFR 72.79 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms; (b) Shall submit location information described in § 75.11 of this chapter on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and (c) Shall permit verification thereof...

  15. 10 CFR 50.78 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Form N-71, and associated forms and site information on DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms; (b) As... on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and (c) Shall permit verification thereof by...

  16. 10 CFR 50.78 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Form N-71, and associated forms and site information on DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms; (b) As... on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and (c) Shall permit verification thereof by...

  17. 10 CFR 50.78 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Form N-71, and associated forms and site information on DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms; (b) As... on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and (c) Shall permit verification thereof by...

  18. 10 CFR 50.78 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Form N-71, and associated forms and site information on DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms; (b) As... on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and (c) Shall permit verification thereof by...

  19. 10 CFR 72.79 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms; (b) Shall submit location information described in § 75.11 of this chapter on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and (c) Shall permit verification thereof...

  20. 10 CFR 72.79 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms; (b) Shall submit location information described in § 75.11 of this chapter on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and (c) Shall permit verification thereof...

  1. 10 CFR 72.79 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms; (b) Shall submit location information described in § 75.11 of this chapter on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and (c) Shall permit verification thereof...

  2. 10 CFR 50.78 - Facility information and verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Form N-71, and associated forms and site information on DOC/NRC Form AP-A and associated forms; (b) As... on DOC/NRC Form AP-1 and associated forms; and (c) Shall permit verification thereof by...

  3. Organizational factors influencing health information technology adoption in long-term-care facilities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiankai; Wang, Yangmei; Moczygemba, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Long-term care (LTC) is an important sector of the health care industry. However, the adoption of health information technology (HIT) systems in LTC facilities lags behind that in other sectors of health care. Previous literature has focused on the financial and technical barriers. This study examined the organizational factors associated with HIT adoption in LTC facilities. A survey of 500 LTC facilities in Texas enabled researchers to compile HIT indexes for further statistical analyses. A general linear model was used to study the associations between the clinical/administrative HIT indexes and organizational factors. The empirical outcomes show that the size of an LTC facility has a significant association with HIT adoption. Rural LTC facilities, especially freestanding ones, adopt less HIT than their urban counterparts, whereas freestanding LTC facilities have the lowest HIT adoption overall. There is not enough evidence to support ownership status as a significant factor in HIT adoption. Some implications are proposed, but further research is necessary.

  4. Hidden profiles and concealed information: strategic information sharing and use in group decision making.

    PubMed

    Toma, Claudia; Butera, Fabrizio

    2009-06-01

    Two experiments investigated the differential impact of cooperation and competition on strategic information sharing and use in a three-person group decision-making task. Information was distributed in order to create a hidden profile so that disconfirmation of group members' initial preferences was required to solve the task. Experiment 1 revealed that competition, compared to cooperation, led group members to withhold unshared information, a difference that was not significant for shared information. In competition, compared to cooperation, group members were also more reluctant to disconfirm their initial preferences. Decision quality was lower in competition than in cooperation, this effect being mediated by disconfirmation use and not by information sharing. Experiment 2 replicated these findings and revealed the role of mistrust in predicting strategic information sharing and use in competition. These results support a motivated information processing approach of group decision making.

  5. Computer/information security design approaches for Complex 21/Reconfiguration facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hunteman, W.J.; Zack, N.R.; Jaeger, C.D.

    1993-08-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories have been designated the technical lead laboratories to develop the design of the computer/information security, safeguards, and physical security systems for all of the DOE Complex 21/Reconfiguration facilities. All of the automated information processing systems and networks in these facilities will be required to implement the new DOE orders on computer and information security. The planned approach for a highly integrated information processing capability in each of the facilities will require careful consideration of the requirements in DOE Orders 5639.6 and 1360.2A. The various information protection requirements and user clearances within the facilities will also have a significant effect on the design of the systems and networks. Fulfilling the requirements for proper protection of the information and compliance with DOE orders will be possible because the computer and information security concerns are being incorporated in the early design activities. This paper will discuss the computer and information security addressed in the integrated design effort, uranium/lithium, plutonium, plutonium high explosive/assembly facilities.

  6. Modeling of information flows in natural gas storage facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbari, Leyla; Bahar, Arifah; Aziz, Zainal Abdul

    2013-09-01

    The paper considers the natural-gas storage valuation based on the information-based pricing framework of Brody-Hughston-Macrina (BHM). As opposed to many studies which the associated filtration is considered pre-specified, this work tries to construct the filtration in terms of the information provided to the market. The value of the storage is given by the sum of the discounted expectations of the cash flows under risk-neutral measure, conditional to the constructed filtration with the Brownian bridge noise term. In order to model the flow of information about the cash flows, we assume the existence of a fixed pricing kernel with liquid, homogenous and incomplete market without arbitrage.

  7. 75 FR 20811 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Produce Processor Profiles of Fish Processing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... Processor Profiles of Fish Processing Plants in Alaska AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Alaska community with a fish processing plant can increase significantly during peak processing seasons... processing facilities. The National Marine Fisheries Service's Alaska Fisheries Science Center proposes...

  8. Waste management facilities cost information for transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing transuranic waste. The report`s information on treatment and storage modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  9. Waste management facilities cost information for hazardous waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing hazardous waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  10. Waste Management Facilities cost information for low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  11. 30 CFR 250.1729 - After I remove a platform or other facility, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false After I remove a platform or other facility... Decommissioning Activities Removing Platforms and Other Facilities § 250.1729 After I remove a platform or other facility, what information must I submit? Within 30 days after you remove a platform or other facility, you...

  12. Information profiles on potential occupational hazards: nitrophenols. Draft report (Second)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Information profiles are presented for the following nitrophenols: 2-nitrophenol, 3-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol. The mononitrophenols were moderately toxic to animals, causing initial stimulation and subsequent depression of the respiratory and central nervous systems. Positive results were obtained in several mutagenicity assays for 3-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol. 2,4,-Dinitrophenol was far more acutely toxic than other important nitrophenol derivatives. It was able to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation by suppressing the coupling of electron flow to synthesis of adenosine triphosphatase. It caused weakness, intense thirst and sweating, increased body temperature and respiration rate, neuritis, convulsions, and the rapid onset of rigor mortis after death. It has also caused cataracts in humans when used as a weight-reducing aid. Inhalation of 2,4,6-trinitrophenol has caused considerable irritation to the eyes and to the mucous membrane of the respiratory tract. Dermal exposure has produced severe skin irritation and sensitization.

  13. Analyses in support of risk-informed natural gas vehicle maintenance facility codes and standards :

    SciTech Connect

    Ekoto, Isaac W.; Blaylock, Myra L.; LaFleur, Angela Christine; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Horne, Douglas B.

    2014-03-01

    Safety standards development for maintenance facilities of liquid and compressed gas fueled large-scale vehicles is required to ensure proper facility design and operation envelopes. Standard development organizations are utilizing risk-informed concepts to develop natural gas vehicle (NGV) codes and standards so that maintenance facilities meet acceptable risk levels. The present report summarizes Phase I work for existing NGV repair facility code requirements and highlights inconsistencies that need quantitative analysis into their effectiveness. A Hazardous and Operability study was performed to identify key scenarios of interest. Finally, scenario analyses were performed using detailed simulations and modeling to estimate the overpressure hazards from HAZOP defined scenarios. The results from Phase I will be used to identify significant risk contributors at NGV maintenance facilities, and are expected to form the basis for follow-on quantitative risk analysis work to address specific code requirements and identify effective accident prevention and mitigation strategies.

  14. Information and communication technologies in primary healthcare facilities in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Farahat, Taghreed M; Hegazy, Nagwa N; Mowafy, Maha

    2017-08-08

    The health sector has always relied on technologies. According to World Health Organization, they form the backbone of the services to prevent, diagnose, and treat illness and disease. It is increasingly viewed as the most promising tool for improving the overall quality, safety and efficiency of the health delivery system. Aim of the study This was to assess the current situation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in primary healthcare in the terms of describing and classifying the existing work, identify gaps and exploring the personal experiences and the challenges of ICTs application in the primary healthcare. Subjects and methods A mixed research method in the form of sequential explanatory design was applied. In the quantitative phase a cross-sectional study was conducted among 172 family physicians using a predesigned questionnaire. Followed by qualitative data collection among 35 participants through focused group discussions. Nearly half of the physicians have ICTs in their work and they were trained on it. None of them developed a community-based research using ICTs technology. Training on ICTs showed a statistically significant difference regarding the availability and the type of ICTs present in the workplace (P<0.05). Focused group discussion revealed that the majority of the participants believe that there is poor commitment of policymaker toward ICTs utilization in the primary care. Nearly 97% thinks that there is insufficient budget allocated for ICTs utilization in the workplace. Almost 88% of the participants demanded more incentives for ICTs users than non-user at the workplace. ICTs resources are underutilized by health information professionals. Lack of funds, risk of instability of the electric supply and lack of incentives for ICTs users were the most common barriers to ICTs implementation thus a steady steps toward budget allocation and continuous training is needed.

  15. Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

  16. 78 FR 17680 - Information Collection Request; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... SECURITY Information Collection Request; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety...-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) Personnel Surety Program pursuant to 6 CFR 27.230(a)(12)(iv). \\1\\ A 60-day... Register notice, the Department submitted an Information Collection Request about the CFATS Personnel...

  17. How to implement security controls for an information security program at CBRN facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lenaeus, Joseph D.; O'Neil, Lori Ross; Leitch, Rosalyn M.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Landine, Guy P.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lewis, John; Mathers, Gemma; Rodger, Robert; Johnson, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    This document was prepared by PNNL within the framework of Project 19 of the European Union Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear Risk Mitigation Centres of Excellence Initiative entitled, ''Development of procedures and guidelines to create and improve secure information management systems and data exchange mechanisms for CBRN materials under regulatory control.'' It provides management and workers at CBRN facilities, parent organization managers responsible for those facilities, and regulatory agencies (governmental and nongovernmental) with guidance on the best practices for protecting information security. The security mitigation approaches presented in this document were chosen because they present generally accepted guidance in an easy-to-understand manner, making it easier for facility personnel to grasp key concepts and envision how security controls could be implemented by the facility. This guidance is presented from a risk management perspective.

  18. Determinants of quality of shared sanitation facilities in informal settlements: case study of Kisumu, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Simiyu, Sheillah; Swilling, Mark; Cairncross, Sandy; Rheingans, Richard

    2017-01-11

    Shared facilities are not recognised as improved sanitation due to challenges of maintenance as they easily can be avenues for the spread of diseases. Thus there is need to evaluate the quality of shared facilities, especially in informal settlements, where they are commonly used. A shared facility can be equated to a common good whose management depends on the users. If users do not work collectively towards keeping the facility clean, it is likely that the quality may depreciate due to lack of maintenance. This study examined the quality of shared sanitation facilities and used the common pool resource (CPR) management principles to examine the determinants of shared sanitation quality in the informal settlements of Kisumu, Kenya. Using a multiple case study design, the study employed both quantitative and qualitative methods. In both phases, users of shared sanitation facilities were interviewed, while shared sanitation facilities were inspected. Shared sanitation quality was a score which was the dependent variable in a regression analysis. Interviews during the qualitative stage were aimed at understanding management practices of shared sanitation users. Qualitative data was analysed thematically by following the CPR principles. Shared facilities, most of which were dirty, were shared by an average of eight households, and their quality decreased with an increase in the number of households sharing. The effect of numbers on quality is explained by behaviour reflected in the CPR principles, as it was easier to define boundaries of shared facilities when there were fewer users who cooperated towards improving their shared sanitation facility. Other factors, such as defined management systems, cooperation, collective decision making, and social norms, also played a role in influencing the behaviour of users towards keeping shared facilities clean and functional. Apart from hardware factors, quality of shared sanitation is largely due to group behaviour of users

  19. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  20. Forum Guide to Facilities Information Management: A Resource for State and Local Education Agencies. NFES 2012-808

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Safe and secure facilities that foster learning are crucial to providing quality education services, and developing and maintaining these facilities requires considerable resources and organization. Facility information systems allow education organizations to collect and manage data that can be used to inform and guide decisionmaking about the…

  1. An Examination of Health Profile, Service Use and Care Needs of Older Adults in Residential Care Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminzadeh, F.; Salziel, William B.; Molnar, F. J.; Alie, J.

    2004-01-01

    Private, unregulated residential care facilities have become an increasingly important component of the continuum of housing and care for frail older adults in Canada. To date, this growing segment of the older population has received very little research attention. This study involved an in-depth examination of the functional/health profile,…

  2. The social profile of victims of suicide in major Greek correctional facilities.

    PubMed

    Sakelliadis, E I; Goutas, N D; Vlachodimitropoulos, D G; Logiopoulou, A-P I; Panousi, P I; Delicha, E M; Spiliopoulou, C A

    2013-08-01

    Suicide rates in correctional institutions have been increasing during the last decades. The reasons for this increase remain unclear, yet a lot of contradictory explanations were stated: the increase might be due to mass incarceration and overcrowding of small cells resulting in high psychosocial stress, changes in psychiatric health policy which might have transferred the care for patients from mental hospitals to custodial institutions, or legislation changes that might have led to a selection of offenders at higher risk (e.g. offenders who committed high violent offences or suffered from mental disorders without being referred to psychiatric hospitals). In Greece the situation is not described in details, at least during the last few years. By law, every death of prisoner is subject to medicolegal investigation. Our study consists of the meticulous research of the data records of major Greek correctional facilities, for the time period 1999-2010. An official permission was obtained from the Hellenic Ministry of Justice, which gave us access to these restricted records. Data was also collected from the Piraeus Forensic Service, from the Department of Pathological Anatomy of the University of Athens and finally from our own records. Measures were taken to respect the anonymity of the cases. Data was collected for the social, penal, medical history as well as for the medicolegal investigation. A total of 339 cases were collected, only 259 of which had available full data records, due to weaknesses in the prison records. From the 259 cases, 70 incidents of suicide were collected. Victims of suicide in major Greek correctional facilities, appear to fulfill the expected profile, as in the general population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  4. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS) for high throughput screening facilities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS) facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. Results We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS), to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. Conclusions The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities. PMID:20482787

  5. Typology of injection profiles of clients of a supervised drug consumption facility in Geneva, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Dubois-Arber, Françoise; Benninghoff, Fabienne; Jeannin, André

    2008-01-01

    The use of a supervised drug consumption room (DCR) in a newly established low threshold facility in Geneva, Switzerland, in 2002 is analyzed. Two sources of routine data were used: data collected at the first visit by any new client (entry questionnaire) which included some personal details, and data collected on the substances injected at each visit to the DCR. A typology of injection profiles was constructed. Overall, the mean number of injections and days of visits per client over the year was low and cocaine was the main substance injected. However, an important heterogeneity in the use of the DCR was found and five types of clients identified: 1-day clients; standard clients; heroin-oriented clients; high cocaine consumption clients, and newcomers. Typology was associated with some characteristics at the first visit and the drug consumption pattern in the month preceding the first visit was in accordance with the subsequent use of the DCR. This heterogeneity in the use of the DCR highlights the diverse roles of the DCRs in harm reduction.

  6. Assessing the effects of the HIPAA privacy rule on release of patient information by healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Houser, Shannon H; Houser, Howard W; Shewchuk, Richard M

    2007-03-23

    The HIPAA privacy rule (HIPAA) has had both positive and negative effects on the release of patient information by healthcare facilities. Although the intention of HIPAA was to protect patient privacy and to promote security and confidentiality of patient information, it has had unintended consequences for facilities. To identify some of these unintended effects, two expert panels of health information management directors from healthcare facilities participated in the nominal group technique meetings. They identified 70 barriers related to release of patient information associated with the implementation of HIPAA. The perceived biggest barriers were increases in the public's misunderstanding about release of patient information, lack of an umbrella policy or regulation defining infractions and enforcement that allows individual institutions to make their own interpretations, and challenges to health information management professionals in controlling safeguards related to release of information given the transition to electronic health records and the increased involvement of information technology. The findings from this study suggest there is a need for additional clarification of the regulations governing HIPAA, standardized instructions, and extensive training of healthcare workers.

  7. Information profiles on potential occupational hazards: Phthalates. Draft report (Second)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    Information profiles are presented for these phthalates: butyl benzyl phthalate, diallyl phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate, diisodecyl phthalate, diisononyl phthalate, dimethyl phthalate, ditridecyl phthalate, diundecyl phthalate, N-dexy-N-decyl phthalate and mixed dialkyl (C7 to C11) phthalates. In general, the phthalates had a low order of acute toxicity. Histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys was associated with acute oral and/or intraperitoneal exposures to some of the compounds. Others have caused slight skin and eye irritation. Repeated oral exposure to many of the esters resulted in liver and/or kidney damage. Ingestion of di-n-butyl phthalate in humans caused nausea, dizziness, photophobia, lacrimation and conjunctivitis. Patients receiving blood stored in polyvinvyl chloride bags that contained residual di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate suffered a respiratory distress syndrome called shock lung. Neurological effects have been reported in workers exposed to a mixture of phthalate esters in production vapors. Epidemiological studies of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate showed no adverse health effects.

  8. Validation through simulations of a C_n^2 profiler for the ESO/VLT Adaptive Optics Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rissmann, A.; Guesalaga, A.; Kolb, J.; Le Louarn, M.; Madec, P.-Y.; Neichel, B.

    2015-04-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) project envisages transforming one of the VLT units into an adaptive telescope and providing its ESO (European Southern Observatory) second generation instruments with turbulence-corrected wavefronts. For MUSE and HAWK-I this correction will be achieved through the GALACSI and GRAAL AO modules working in conjunction with a 1170 actuators deformable secondary mirror (DSM) and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF). Multiple wavefront sensors will enable GLAO (ground layer adaptive optics) and LTAO (laser tomography adaptive optics) capabilities, whose performance can greatly benefit from a knowledge about the stratification of the turbulence in the atmosphere. This work, totally based on end-to-end simulations, describes the validation tests conducted on a C_n^2 profiler adapted for the AOF specifications. Because an absolute profile calibration is strongly dependent on a reliable knowledge of turbulence parameters r0 and L0, the tests presented here refer only to normalized output profiles. Uncertainties in the input parameters inherent to the code are tested as well as the profiler response to different turbulence distributions. It adopts a correction for the unseen turbulence, critical for the GRAAL mode, and highlights the effects of masking out parts of the corrected wavefront on the results. Simulations of data with typical turbulence profiles from Paranal were input to the profiler, showing that it is possible to identify reliably the input features for all the AOF modes.

  9. 78 FR 25472 - Information Collection: Oil Spill Financial Responsibility for Offshore Facilities; Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... Oil-Spill Removal Costs and Damages Subpart F Claims: BOEM is not 0 involved in the claims process... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Information Collection: Oil Spill Financial Responsibility for Offshore... requirements for 30 CFR 553, Oil Spill Financial Responsibility for Offshore Facilities. DATES: Submit written...

  10. [The experience of medical information system implementation into multi-field outpatient facility].

    PubMed

    Eloev, M S; Klipak, V M; Zherebko, O A; Belyshev, D V; Borisov, D N

    2014-09-01

    The main prospective line of development of information technologies implemented into medical facilities is working out and approbation of complex solutions for work automatiozation. It is necessary to mention the experience of implementation of industrial integrated medical information system into the 9h diagnostic and treatment centre of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. In 2008 implementation of the information systems was funded by extra budgetary accounts of the facility. The basis of medical information system for the diagnostic and treatment centre was "Interin PROMIS". The article presents the main tasks, stages and difficulties that emerged in the process of implementation. One of the main tasks was to create the database of attached contingents. Conducted work allowed to increase access to healthcare, to develop transparent technologies for providing the healthcare to patients in different subunits. Implemented system is a very prospective for other military-medical facilities and has a unique functional capacity, system customizability, provides access to all activities of the medical facility.

  11. 75 FR 34441 - Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools; Overview Information; Educational Facilities Clearinghouse...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ...: Development and Dissemination of Information on Green Building Practices. Under this priority, applicants may... maintaining environmentally sound educational facilities using green building practices. For the purposes of this competition the term ``green building,'' as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection...

  12. Information Retrieval in an Office Filing Facility and Future Work in Project Minstrel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeaton, A. F.; van Rijsbergen, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Review of office filing facility filing and retrieval mechanisms for unstructured and mixed media information focuses on free text methods. Also discussed are the state of the art in handling voice and image data, problems with searching text surrogates to implement free text content retrieval, and work of Project Minstrel. (Author/MBR)

  13. Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools: New Facilities Management Information System Promising, but Improved Data Accuracy Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    A General Accounting Office (GAO) study evaluated the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) new facilities management information system (FMIS). Specifically, the study examined whether the new FMIS addresses the old system's weaknesses and meets BIA's management needs, whether BIA has finished validating the accuracy of data transferred from the old…

  14. Implementing Trauma-Informed Treatment for Youth in a Residential Facility: First-Year Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Ricky; Siradas, Lynn; Schmitt, Thomas A.; Reslan, Summar; Fierle, Julia; Sande, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Training in the Fairy Tale model of trauma-informed treatment was provided to clinical and direct care staff working with 53 youth in a residential treatment facility. Compared to the year prior to training, in the year of the training the average improvement in presenting problems was increased by 34%, time to discharge was reduced by 39%, and…

  15. Library Information Service Programs in Residential Facilities for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Geraldine M.

    The directory lists approximately 120 library information service programs in residential facilities for the mentally retarded. Each program is described in terms of its collection (journals, books, films, and tapes), space, services (story hours, reference questions, bibliographies, and translation services), budget, clientele, and program…

  16. 30 CFR 585.912 - After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline... facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit? Within 60 days after you remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, you must submit a written report to BOEM that includes the following: (a) A...

  17. 30 CFR 250.1729 - After I remove a platform or other facility, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false After I remove a platform or other facility... CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Activities Removing Platforms and Other Facilities § 250.1729 After I remove a platform or other facility, what information must I submit? Within 30 days after you remove a...

  18. 30 CFR 250.1729 - After I remove a platform or other facility, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false After I remove a platform or other facility... CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Activities Removing Platforms and Other Facilities § 250.1729 After I remove a platform or other facility, what information must I submit? Within 30 days after you remove a...

  19. 30 CFR 250.1729 - After I remove a platform or other facility, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false After I remove a platform or other facility... CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Activities Removing Platforms and Other Facilities § 250.1729 After I remove a platform or other facility, what information must I submit? Within 30 days after you remove a...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1729 - After I remove a platform or other facility, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false After I remove a platform or other facility... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Activities Removing Platforms and Other Facilities § 250.1729 After I remove a platform or other facility, what information must I submit? Within 30 days...

  1. REPORT OF THE WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR FACILITY DESIGN INFORMATION EXAMINATION AND VERIFICATION FOR SAFEGUARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf; Robert Bean

    2009-10-01

    Executive Summary The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) implements nuclear safeguards and verifies countries are compliant with their international nuclear safeguards agreements. One of the key provisions in the safeguards agreement is the requirement that the country provide nuclear facility design and operating information to the IAEA relevant to safeguarding the facility, and at a very early stage. , This provides the opportunity for the IAEA to verify the safeguards-relevant features of the facility and to periodically ensure that those features have not changed. The national authorities (State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material - SSAC) provide the design information for all facilities within a country to the IAEA. The design information is conveyed using the IAEA’s Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ) and specifies: (1) Identification of the facility’s general character, purpose, capacity, and location; (2) Description of the facility’s layout and nuclear material form, location, and flow; (3) Description of the features relating to nuclear material accounting, containment, and surveillance; and (4) Description of existing and proposed procedures for nuclear material accounting and control, with identification of nuclear material balance areas. The DIQ is updated as required by written addendum. IAEA safeguards inspectors examine and verify this information in design information examination (DIE) and design information verification (DIV) activities to confirm that the facility has been constructed or is being operated as declared by the facility operator and national authorities, and to develop a suitable safeguards approach. Under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), the National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Office of Non-Proliferation and International Security identified the need for more effective and efficient verification of design information by the IAEA for improving international safeguards

  2. Human resource capacity for information management in selected public healthcare facilities in Meru County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kiilu, Elizabeth Mueke; Okero, Dominic Charles; Muiruri, Lillian; Owuondo, Pacific Akinyi

    2015-01-01

    Reliable health information is essential for decision making in the healthcare system. Information management in Kenya was considered the weakest area under the Health Information System pillar mainly due to inadequate health workers capacity. The study therefore aimed at assessing health workers skills and current training needs for information management in the selected healthcare facilities. Cross-section research design was adopted and both purposive sampling technique and censuses were used to establish the study participants. Analysis was done using SPSS version 20 and results were presented in tables, charts and graphs. It was established that capacity building was usually undertaken through on-job trainings i.e. 85.1% (103) health workers had on-job training on filling of data collection tools and only 10% (13) had received formal classroom training on the same. Further, only 9.1% (11) health workers had received information management training while 90.9% (110) had not received such training. Health workers demonstrated below average skills on information management i.e. only 17.4% (21) could check for data accuracy, only 16.5% (20) could compute trends from bar charts and only 16.5% (20) could transform the data they collected into meaningful information for use. The researcher recommended that healthcare facilities management teams develop a competency based framework for defining the desired skill mix for information management and have a yearly Training Needs Assessment for assessing training needs for information management among the health workers.

  3. A Review of Avian Monitoring and Mitigation Information at Existing Utility-Scale Solar Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, Leroy J.; Rollins, Katherine E.; Smith, Karen P.; LaGory, Kirk E.; Sinclair, Karin; Turchi, Craig; Wendelin, Tim; Souder, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    There are two basic types of solar energy technology: photovoltaic and concentrating solar power. As the number of utility-scale solar energy facilities using these technologies is expected to increase in the United States, so are the potential impacts on wildlife and their habitats. Recent attention is on the risk of fatality to birds. Understanding the current rates of avian mortality and existing monitoring requirements is an important first step in developing science-based mitigation and minimization protocols. The resulting information also allows a comparison of the avian mortality rates of utility-scale solar energy facilities with those from other technologies and sources, as well as the identification of data gaps and research needs. This report will present and discuss the current state of knowledge regarding avian issues at utility-scale solar energy facilities.

  4. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS) that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/. PMID:21385349

  5. Summary of Information and Resources Related to Energy Use in Healthcare Facilities - Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Coughlin, Jennifer L.; Mathew, Paul A.

    2009-09-08

    This document presents the results of a review of publicly available information on energy use in health care facilities. The information contained in this document and in the sources cited herein provides the background and context for efforts to reduce energy use and costs in health care. Recognizing the breadth and diversity of relevant information, the author acknowledges that the report is likely not comprehensive. It is intended only to present a broad picture of what is currently known about health care energy use. This review was conducted as part of a 'High Performance Health Care Buildings' research study funded by the California Energy Commission. The study was motivated by the recognition that health care facilities collectively account for a substantial fraction of total commercial building energy use, due in large part to the very high energy intensity of hospitals and other inpatient care facilities. The goal of the study was to develop a roadmap of research, development and deployment (RD&D) needs for the health care industry. In addition to this information review, the road map development process included interviews with industry experts and a full-day workshop at LBNL in March 2009. This report is described as 'Version 1' with the intent that it will be expanded and updated as part of an ongoing LBNL program in healthcare energy efficiency. The document is being released in this form with the hope that it can assist others in finding and accessing the resources described within.

  6. Microbial Indicator Profiling of Fresh Produce and Environmental Samples from Farms and Packing Facilities in Northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Norma; Caballero, Cindy; Cárdenas, Carmen; Molina, Karina; García, Rafael; Solís, Luisa; Burrowes, Vanessa; Bartz, Faith E; de Aceituno, Anna Fabiszewski; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; García, Santos; Leon, Juan

    2016-07-01

    To compare microbiological indicator and pathogen contamination among different types of fresh produce and environmental samples along the production chain, 636 samples of produce (rinsates from cantaloupe melons, jalapeño peppers, and tomatoes) and environmental samples (rinsates from hands of workers, soil, and water) were collected at four successive steps in the production process (from the field before harvest through the packing facility) on 11 farms in northern Mexico during 2011 and 2012. Samples were assayed for enteric pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, other Shiga toxigenic E. coli, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes) and microbial indicators (coliforms, other E. coli strains, and Enterococcus spp.). Salmonella was the only pathogen detected; it was found in one preharvest jalapeño sample (detection limits: 0.0033 CFU/ml in produce and hand samples, 0.0013 CFU/ml in water, and 0.04 CFU/g in soil). Microbial indicator profiles for produce, worker hands, and soil from jalapeño and tomato farms were similar, but cantaloupe farm samples had higher indicator levels (P < 0.05 for all comparisons) on fruit (6.5, 2.8, and 7.2 log CFU per fruit) and hands (6.6, 3.1, and 7.1 log CFU per hand) for coliforms, E. coli, and Enterococcus, respectively, and lower E. coli levels in soil (<1 CFU/g). In water from tomato farms, E. coli indicators were significantly more prevalent (70 to 89% of samples were positive; P = 0.01 to 0.02), and geometric mean levels were higher (0.3 to 0.6 log CFU/100 ml) than those in cantaloupe farm water (32 to 38% of samples were positive, geometric mean <1 CFU/100 ml). Microbial indicators were present during all production steps, but prevalence and levels were generally highest at the final on-farm production step (the packing facility) (P < 0.03 for significant comparisons). The finding that microbial contamination on produce farms is influenced by produce type and production step can inform the design of effective approaches to

  7. Decentralised information management in facility management using radio frequency identification technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Zixiang; Manzoor, Farhan; Yin, Hang; Menzel, Karsten

    2009-07-01

    Facility Management (FM) is a critical component of the operational phase of a building's life cycle, which includes management of building systems and its services. A large quantity of data is collected from maintaining a building through FM. One question that arises is how can this data be distributed between different systems? A solution to this problem is important for facility managers and maintenance staff. This paper discusses the merits of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and its potential use in applications within the FM sector. The paper also reports a prototypical demonstrator implementation of an RFID based information management system for FM-scenarios. The prototype was deployed and tested in an office room at University College Cork (UCC), Ireland. The applicability of RFID for Decentralised Information Management (DIM) was applied and specific results for demonstration outputs were achieved.

  8. Wastewater Land Application Permit LA-000141 Renewal Information for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Laboratory, Idaho National

    1999-02-01

    On July 25, 1994, the State ofldaho Division of Environmental Quality (DEQ) issued a Wastewater Land Application Permit (WLAP) for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL, now the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory [INEEL]) Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Treatment Plant (STP). The permit expires August 7, 1999. In addition to the renewal application, this report was prepared to provide the following information as requested by DEQ.

  9. Techniques for Updating Pedestrian Network Data Including Facilities and Obstructions Information for Transportation of Vulnerable People

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seula; Bang, Yoonsik; Yu, Kiyun

    2015-01-01

    Demand for a Pedestrian Navigation Service (PNS) is on the rise. To provide a PNS for the transportation of vulnerable people, more detailed information of pedestrian facilities and obstructions should be included in Pedestrian Network Data (PND) used for PNS. Such data can be constructed efficiently by collecting GPS trajectories and integrating them with the existing PND. However, these two kinds of data have geometric differences and topological inconsistencies that need to be addressed. In this paper, we provide a methodology for integrating pedestrian facilities and obstructions information with an existing PND. At first we extracted the significant points from user-collected GPS trajectory by identifying the geometric difference index and attributes of each point. Then the extracted points were used to make an initial solution of the matching between the trajectory and the PND. Two geometrical algorithms were proposed and applied to reduce two kinds of errors in the matching: on dual lines and on intersections. Using the final solution for the matching, we reconstructed the node/link structure of PND including the facilities and obstructions information. Finally, performance was assessed with a test site and 79.2% of the collected data were correctly integrated with the PND. PMID:26404307

  10. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1997-08-21

    For purposes of the Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, the US Department of Energy`s contractors are identified as ``co-operators`` and sign in that capacity (refer to Condition I.A.2. of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit). Any identification of these contractors as an ``operator`` elsewhere in the application is not meant to conflict with the contractors` designation as co-operators but rather is based on the contractors` contractual status with the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. The Dangerous Waste Portion of the initial Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit, which incorporated five treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, was based on information submitted in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application and in closure plan and closure/postclosure plan documentation. During 1995, the Dangerous Waste Portion was modified twice to incorporate another eight treatment, storage, and/or disposal units; during 1996, the Dangerous Waste Portion was modified once to incorporate another five treatment, storage, and/or disposal units. The permit modification process will be used at least annually to incorporate additional treatment, storage, and/or disposal units as permitting documentation for these units is finalized. The units to be included in annual modifications are specified in a schedule contained in the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit. Treatment, storage, and/or disposal units will remain in interim status until incorporated into the Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (this document, DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to individual operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units for which

  11. Human resource capacity for information management in selected public healthcare facilities in Meru County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kiilu, Elizabeth Mueke; Okero, Dominic Charles; Muiruri, Lillian; Owuondo, Pacific Akinyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reliable health information is essential for decision making in the healthcare system. Information management in Kenya was considered the weakest area under the Health Information System pillar mainly due to inadequate health workers capacity. The study therefore aimed at assessing health workers skills and current training needs for information management in the selected healthcare facilities. Methods Cross-section research design was adopted and both purposive sampling technique and censuses were used to establish the study participants. Analysis was done using SPSS version 20 and results were presented in tables, charts and graphs. Results It was established that capacity building was usually undertaken through on-job trainings i.e. 85.1% (103) health workers had on-job training on filling of data collection tools and only 10% (13) had received formal classroom training on the same. Further, only 9.1% (11) health workers had received information management training while 90.9% (110) had not received such training. Health workers demonstrated below average skills on information management i.e. only 17.4% (21) could check for data accuracy, only 16.5% (20) could compute trends from bar charts and only 16.5% (20) could transform the data they collected into meaningful information for use. Conclusion The researcher recommended that healthcare facilities management teams develop a competency based framework for defining the desired skill mix for information management and have a yearly Training Needs Assessment for assessing training needs for information management among the health workers. PMID:26175824

  12. Citizen perceptions of information flow around a nuclear facility: A study in risk communication

    SciTech Connect

    Price, M.O.

    1997-08-01

    Responses of focus group members from the region around a Nuclear Facility provide the data for this qualitative study concerning citizen perceptions of available site information. Analyses of three of the focus group discussion questions and the answers they elicited showed a dominant perception among participants of insufficient easily available information about the site. These respondents also indicated that most of them obtain site information through mass media and hearsay, that many lack trust in the information they have and would trust only an independent entity to provide accurate information. A new area in communication studies, variously called environmental risk communication, risk communication and health risk communication, continues to evolve among those working in various allied disciplines, some far removed from communication. As science attempts to solve environmental problems caused by technological advances, this field acquires numerous practitioners. Some of these risk communication experts may however, be overlooking basic and necessary components of effective communication, because their expertise is in another discipline. One result of this can be communication breakdown in which those involved, assume that meaning is shared, when in fact the opposite is true. This paper seeks to clarify a necessary ingredient of effective interpersonal risk communication, using data obtained from citizens living around one of the nation`s nuclear facilities as an example.

  13. MicroArray Facility: a laboratory information management system with extended support for Nylon based technologies

    PubMed Central

    Honoré, Paul; Granjeaud, Samuel; Tagett, Rebecca; Deraco, Stéphane; Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Rougemont, Jacques; Debono, Stéphane; Hingamp, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Background High throughput gene expression profiling (GEP) is becoming a routine technique in life science laboratories. With experimental designs that repeatedly span thousands of genes and hundreds of samples, relying on a dedicated database infrastructure is no longer an option. GEP technology is a fast moving target, with new approaches constantly broadening the field diversity. This technology heterogeneity, compounded by the informatics complexity of GEP databases, means that software developments have so far focused on mainstream techniques, leaving less typical yet established techniques such as Nylon microarrays at best partially supported. Results MAF (MicroArray Facility) is the laboratory database system we have developed for managing the design, production and hybridization of spotted microarrays. Although it can support the widely used glass microarrays and oligo-chips, MAF was designed with the specific idiosyncrasies of Nylon based microarrays in mind. Notably single channel radioactive probes, microarray stripping and reuse, vector control hybridizations and spike-in controls are all natively supported by the software suite. MicroArray Facility is MIAME supportive and dynamically provides feedback on missing annotations to help users estimate effective MIAME compliance. Genomic data such as clone identifiers and gene symbols are also directly annotated by MAF software using standard public resources. The MAGE-ML data format is implemented for full data export. Journalized database operations (audit tracking), data anonymization, material traceability and user/project level confidentiality policies are also managed by MAF. Conclusion MicroArray Facility is a complete data management system for microarray producers and end-users. Particular care has been devoted to adequately model Nylon based microarrays. The MAF system, developed and implemented in both private and academic environments, has proved a robust solution for shared facilities and

  14. A profile of residents admitted to long-term care facilities for end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Porock, Davina; Oliver, Debra Parker; Zweig, Steven C; Rantz, Marilyn; Petroski, Gregory F

    2003-01-01

    Permanent placement in a Long-Term-Care (LTC) facility following hospitalization or when staying at home is no longer a viable option is the reality for a growing number of Americans. When death is imminent, the specialized knowledge and skill of the hospice team is required and accepted as an important component of end-of-life (EOL) care. The provision of appropriate care at the EOL is contingent on accurate identification of those residents who are approaching the final stage of life. This study describes the prevalence, profile, and survivorship of residents admitted to LTC facilities, using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) designation of being at the EOL. A descriptive, correlational, retrospective cohort design was used to analyze all residents admitted to certified LTC facilities with hospice contracts in Missouri in 1999. Variables for analysis were selected from the MDS items that are clinically relevant for those residents at the EOL, for example, pain, incontinence, skin condition, activities of daily living (ADLs), depression, and weight loss. In addition, items regarding advance directives, use of special treatments, and diagnoses were selected because they are important to the care of residents at the EOL. Of 492 eligible facilities, 159 were confirmed as providing hospice care. Of 9615 admissions to these facilities, 432 (4.5%) met the EOL care definition; half of these were receiving specialist hospice care. The EOL residents were distinguishable in terms of symptoms. Median survival time for EOL admissions was 33 days. At 6 months, only 17% of EOL admissions remained in the facility. Residents designated as EOL who are admitted to LTC are a distinct group from other new residents, with identifiable needs requiring specialist attention. Accurate recognition that EOL is imminent is required for the development of appropriate strategies and resources for care.

  15. Profile of medical waste management in two healthcare facilities in Lagos, Nigeria: a case study.

    PubMed

    Idowu, Ibijoke; Alo, Babajide; Atherton, William; Al Khaddar, Rafid

    2013-05-01

    Proper management and safe disposal of medical waste (MW) is vital in the reduction of infection or illness through contact with discarded material and in the prevention of environmental contamination in hospital facilities. The management practices for MW in selected healthcare facilities in Lagos, Nigeria were assessed. The cross-sectional study involved the use of questionnaires, in-depth interviews, focused group discussions and participant observation strategies. It also involved the collection, segregation, identification and weighing of waste types from wards and units in the representative facilities in Lagos, Nigeria, for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the MW streams. The findings indicated that the selected Nigerian healthcare facilities were lacking in the adoption of sound MW management (MWM) practices. The average MW ranged from 0.01 kg/bed/day to 3.98 kg/bed/day. Moreover, about 30% of the domestic waste from the healthcare facilities consisted of MW due to inappropriate co-disposal practices. Multiple linear regression was applied to predict the volume of waste generated giving a correlation coefficient (R(2)) value of 0.99 confirming a good fit of the data. This study revealed that the current MWM practices and strategies in Lagos are weak, and suggests an urgent need for review to achieve vital reversals in the current trends.

  16. Assessment of Clinical Profile of the Patients Treated at Ayurvedic Health Facilities in North India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dinesh; Quasmi, Nafis Ahmed; Chandel, Jameer Khan; Bhardwaj, Ashok Kumar; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Y. K.

    2013-01-01

    Since a very long time, a significant number of patients have been seeking treatment at Complementary and Alternative Medicine health facilities, but the disease burden at these facilities has never been assessed and documented. Present cross-sectional study was carried out at Ayurvedic tertiary care hospital to document and to assess the rationale of disease reporting at Ayurvedic institutions of the northern state of India from January 2011 to October 2011. Almost half of the patients’ morbidities were not classified at all into any of the disease categories. The common reported morbidities at study hospital were: Respiratory (10.5%), neuromuscular (9.5%), digestive (9.2%) and circulatory (9.1%) disorders. As the majority of diseases were unclassified, so mainstreaming of the effective disease surveillance would be required to understand the morbidity pattern and successful treatment practices at health facilities. PMID:24130953

  17. Information on commercial disposal facilities that may have received offshore drilling wastes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gasper, J. R.; Veil, J. A.; Ayers, R. C., Jr.

    2000-08-25

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing regulations that would establish requirements for discharging synthetic-based drill cuttings from offshore wells into the ocean. Justification for allowing discharges of these cuttings is that the environmental impacts from discharging drilling wastes into the ocean may be less harmful than the impacts from hauling them to shore for disposal. In the past, some onshore commercial facilities that disposed of these cuttings were improperly managed and operated and left behind environmental problems. This report provides background information on commercial waste disposal facilities in Texas, Louisiana, California, and Alaska that received or may have received offshore drilling wastes in the past and are now undergoing cleanup.

  18. Strategic planning for information services at multi-facility health systems.

    PubMed

    Bridle, J G

    1990-12-01

    Without benefit of an up-to-date, in-depth appraisal of any specific multi-facility's organization, the healthcare facility's mission statement and philosophy, and a detailed understanding of the current situation within each of the IS divisions and/or Data Processing departments, it is merely possible to generically assess the needs in light of today's readily available technology, and to subjectively and logically apply ones past experience to determine a preferred approach. Therefore, this overview of strategic planning considerations ought to be used with caution. A workable plan requires extensive on-going effort, and comes alive only when it is adopted by management. In the event that no previous information services planning activity has occurred within the organization, or where a prior strategic plan is more than three years old, prudent advice would include a strong recommendation to begin such a process without delay.

  19. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 3, Supplemental information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. It is organized into seven parts. Part I - Design Concept describes the selected solution. Part III - Supplemental Information contains calculations for the various disciplines as well as other supporting information and analyses.

  20. Toxics Release Inventory Chemical Hazard Information Profiles (TRI-CHIP) Dataset

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Chemical Hazard Information Profiles (TRI-CHIP) dataset contains hazard information about the chemicals reported in TRI. Users can use this XML-format dataset to create their own databases and hazard analyses of TRI chemicals. The hazard information is compiled from a series of authoritative sources including the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The dataset is provided as a downloadable .zip file that when extracted provides XML files and schemas for the hazard information tables.

  1. Information Security: A Scientometric Study of the Profile, Structure, and Dynamics of an Emerging Scholarly Specialty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olijnyk, Nicholas Victor

    2014-01-01

    The central aim of the current research is to explore and describe the profile, dynamics, and structure of the information security specialty. This study's objectives are guided by four research questions: 1. What are the salient features of information security as a specialty? 2. How has the information security specialty emerged and evolved from…

  2. Information Security: A Scientometric Study of the Profile, Structure, and Dynamics of an Emerging Scholarly Specialty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olijnyk, Nicholas Victor

    2014-01-01

    The central aim of the current research is to explore and describe the profile, dynamics, and structure of the information security specialty. This study's objectives are guided by four research questions: 1. What are the salient features of information security as a specialty? 2. How has the information security specialty emerged and evolved from…

  3. Examining the Relationships among User Involvement, Profile Quality, and Information Filtering Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Junliang; Mostafa, Javed

    2002-01-01

    Discusses Web information searches and identifies three types of user profile acquisition modes used in filtering systems: a rule-base, user-driven mode; an explicit learning mode; and an implicit learning mode. Describes a study of undergraduates that examined the influence of user involvement in these modes and their impact on profile accuracy…

  4. 30 CFR 285.912 - After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit? 285.912 Section 285.912 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER...

  5. 30 CFR 585.912 - After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline..., cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit? Within 60 days after you remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, you must submit a written report to BOEM that includes the following: (a) A summary...

  6. 30 CFR 585.912 - After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline..., cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit? Within 60 days after you remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, you must submit a written report to BOEM that includes the following: (a) A summary...

  7. Information technology systems in public sector health facilities in developing countries: the case of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The public healthcare sector in developing countries faces many challenges including weak healthcare systems and under-resourced facilities that deliver poor outcomes relative to total healthcare expenditure. Global references demonstrate that information technology has the ability to assist in this regard through the automation of processes, thus reducing the inefficiencies of manually driven processes and lowering transaction costs. This study examines the impact of hospital information systems implementation on service delivery, user adoption and organisational culture within two hospital settings in South Africa. Methods Ninety-four interviews with doctors, nurses and hospital administrators were conducted in two public sector tertiary healthcare facilities (in two provinces) to record end-user perceptions. Structured questionnaires were used to conduct the interviews with both qualitative and quantitative information. Results Noteworthy differences were observed among the three sample groups of doctors, nurses and administrators as well as between our two hospital groups. The impact of automation in terms of cost and strategic value in public sector hospitals is shown to have yielded positive outcomes with regard to patient experience, hospital staff workflow enhancements, and overall morale in the workplace. Conclusion The research provides insight into the reasons for investing in system automation, the associated outcomes, and organisational factors that impact the successful adoption of IT systems. In addition, it finds that sustainable success in these initiatives is as much a function of the technology as it is of the change management function that must accompany the system implementation. PMID:23347433

  8. Information profiles on potential occupational hazards: sulfur tetrafluoride. Second draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Information on the potential occupational hazards from sulfur tetrafluoride was reviewed. Topics discussed included chemical and physical properties, production, use, manufacturers and distributors, manufacturing processes, occupational exposures, and biological effects. A national survey indicated that approximately 1,200 workers are potentially exposed to sulfur tetrafluoride. Studies have indicated that sulfur tetrafluoride is highly toxic, irritating, and corrosive to skin, eyes and the respiratory system. Studies in rats showed that sulfur tetrafluoride at 19 parts per million was lethal to one of two rats exposed for 4 hours. A subchronic study showed that rats exposed to 4 parts per million for 4 hours/day for 10 days developed labored breathing, weakness and nasal discharge; after a 14 day recovery period, no significant pathological changes were seen on autopsy. No information was found on carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, or teratogenicity.

  9. Social Circles Detection from Ego Network and Profile Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-19

    way of organizing contacts in personal networks. They are therefore currently implemented in the major social net- working systems, such as Facebook ...inadequate for the task. The corpus is composed of 110 egonets retrieved from Facebook , with their Social Circles manually labelled by the egos. They are...representation contains information of the three levels of friendship , giving a value of 1 to the 1st rank relationship, 0.5 to the 2nd rank

  10. Evaluation of Plume Divergence and Facility Effects on Far-Field Faraday Probe Current Density Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    elevated background pressure, compared nude Faraday probe designs, and evaluated design modifications to minimize uncertainty due to charge exchange...evaluated Faraday probe design and facility background pressure on collected ion current. A comparison of two nude Faraday probe designs concluded...140.5 Plasma potential in the region surrounding a nude Faraday probe has been measured to study the possibility of probe bias voltage acting as a

  11. [A quantitative and qualitative study on effective information flow for infectious disease control in welfare facilities for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Koshida, Mihoko; Inaoka, Yumiko; Iwatsuki, Masakazu; Okayama, Miho; Takehara, Megumi; Tomita, Yasuko; Hironaka, Megumi; Miwa, Satoshi; Sone, Tomofumi; Morita, Takae

    2004-12-01

    To clarify factors associated with effective information tranges among staff of welfare facilities for the elderly, and to propose measures for an appropriate information flow system in welfare facilities and public health centers, communication channels and methods, and encouraging factors and barriers were investigated in terms of a printed medium on the control and management of scabies infections. A self-administered questionnaire survey and an interview survey were conducted with the staff of welfare facilities for the elderly where "Control and management manual of scabies infection" had been distributed by the Tama-Tachikawa Public Health Center in Tokyo. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to managers and chief practitioners of 66 facilities. Respondents were obtained from 66 managers and chief practitioners (response rate: 84.8%), and 831 practitioners (response rate: 53.1%). The questionnaire consisted of 20 items for managers and 18 items for chief practitioners, including experience of scabies epidemics in facilities, training experience for the use of "Control and management manual of scabies infection," measures for information gathering, and current information flow within the facility. A semi-structured interview survey was conducted with the manager and/or chief practitioner and practitioners in five facilities. The number of respondents was 10. The interview questions included job description, scabies control measures, dissemination of the manual to the staff, use of the manual, flows of health-related information, and factors associated with information flows. Summarized codes were extracted from the transcriptions from tape recording and were categorized repeatedly according to similarity. In the questionnaire survey, differences of Community information flow by types of facilities and professional backgrounds were found. Variation was detected in measures for information gathering and focuses in information management between managers

  12. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 4 - Freedom of Information Public Inspection Facilities, and Addresses for Requests for Records Under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freedom of Information Public... Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce DISCLOSURE OF GOVERNMENT INFORMATION Pt. 4...) Department of Commerce Freedom of Information Central Reference and Records Inspection Facility,...

  13. Oxygen Profile. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooley, John F.

    The oxygen profile procedure is a means of measuring the oxygen concentration at various locations in a basin. By dividing the surface of a basin into sections and then establishing sample points on the surface, at mid-depth, and near the bottom, a waste water treatment plant operator can measure and plot dissolved oxygen data which can be plotted…

  14. Medication errors in residential aged care facilities: a distributed cognition analysis of the information exchange process.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amina; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna

    2013-05-01

    Medication safety is a pressing concern for residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Retrospective studies in RACF settings identify inadequate communication between RACFs, doctors, hospitals and community pharmacies as the major cause of medication errors. Existing literature offers limited insight about the gaps in the existing information exchange process that may lead to medication errors. The aim of this research was to explicate the cognitive distribution that underlies RACF medication ordering and delivery to identify gaps in medication-related information exchange which lead to medication errors in RACFs. The study was undertaken in three RACFs in Sydney, Australia. Data were generated through ethnographic field work over a period of five months (May-September 2011). Triangulated analysis of data primarily focused on examining the transformation and exchange of information between different media across the process. The findings of this study highlight the extensive scope and intense nature of information exchange in RACF medication ordering and delivery. Rather than attributing error to individual care providers, the explication of distributed cognition processes enabled the identification of gaps in three information exchange dimensions which potentially contribute to the occurrence of medication errors namely: (1) design of medication charts which complicates order processing and record keeping (2) lack of coordination mechanisms between participants which results in misalignment of local practices (3) reliance on restricted communication bandwidth channels mainly telephone and fax which complicates the information processing requirements. The study demonstrates how the identification of these gaps enhances understanding of medication errors in RACFs. Application of the theoretical lens of distributed cognition can assist in enhancing our understanding of medication errors in RACFs through identification of gaps in information exchange. Understanding

  15. Compressor Research Facility F100 High Pressure Compressor Inlet Total Pressure and Swirl Profile Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    SECTION I INTRODUCTION 1. GENERAL -.The F100 gas turbine engine currently powers the Air Force F-15 and F-16 aircraft . The compression section of this... Aircraft in designing these vanes and screens to provide the measured engine profiles. lata acquisition system was defined and transported to Pratt and...WILLIAM W. COEHVRWALKER H. MITCHELL Compressor Test Group Chief, Technology Branch Technology Branch Turbine Engine Division Turbine Engine Division

  16. Profiling Living Bacteria Informs Preparation of Fecal Microbiota Transplantations

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Nathaniel D.; Smith, Mark B.; Perrotta, Allison R.; Kassam, Zain; Alm, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is a compelling treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, with potential applications against other diseases associated with changes in gut microbiota. But variability in fecal bacterial communities—believed to be the therapeutic agent—can complicate or undermine treatment efficacy. To understand the effects of transplant preparation methods on living fecal microbial communities, we applied a DNA-sequencing method (PMA-seq) that uses propidium monoazide (PMA) to differentiate between living and dead fecal microbes, and we created an analysis pipeline to identify individual bacteria that change in abundance between samples. We found that oxygen exposure degraded fecal bacterial communities, whereas freeze-thaw cycles and lag time between donor defecation and transplant preparation had much smaller effects. Notably, the abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii—an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium whose absence is linked to inflammatory bowel disease—decreased with oxygen exposure. Our results indicate that some current practices for preparing microbiota transplant material adversely affect living fecal microbial content and highlight PMA-seq as a valuable tool to inform best practices and evaluate the suitability of clinical fecal material. PMID:28125667

  17. Profiling Living Bacteria Informs Preparation of Fecal Microbiota Transplantations.

    PubMed

    Chu, Nathaniel D; Smith, Mark B; Perrotta, Allison R; Kassam, Zain; Alm, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is a compelling treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, with potential applications against other diseases associated with changes in gut microbiota. But variability in fecal bacterial communities-believed to be the therapeutic agent-can complicate or undermine treatment efficacy. To understand the effects of transplant preparation methods on living fecal microbial communities, we applied a DNA-sequencing method (PMA-seq) that uses propidium monoazide (PMA) to differentiate between living and dead fecal microbes, and we created an analysis pipeline to identify individual bacteria that change in abundance between samples. We found that oxygen exposure degraded fecal bacterial communities, whereas freeze-thaw cycles and lag time between donor defecation and transplant preparation had much smaller effects. Notably, the abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii-an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium whose absence is linked to inflammatory bowel disease-decreased with oxygen exposure. Our results indicate that some current practices for preparing microbiota transplant material adversely affect living fecal microbial content and highlight PMA-seq as a valuable tool to inform best practices and evaluate the suitability of clinical fecal material.

  18. Divided by a Common Degree Program? Profiling Online and Face-to-Face Information Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haigh, Maria

    2007-01-01

    This study examines profiles of online and face-to-face students in a single information science school: the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Information Studies. A questionnaire was administered to 76 students enrolled in online course sections and 72 students enrolled in face-to-face course sections. The questionnaire examined student…

  19. An Information Needs Profile of Israeli Older Adults, regarding the Law and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Irith; Weissman, Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    Based on Nicholas' framework for assessing information needs, this research aims to construct a profile of both Israeli older adults and their information needs regarding laws and social services. Data were collected by questionnaires answered by 200 older adults, born in Europe, Asia and Africa, who attended social clubs for older adults. The…

  20. An Information Needs Profile of Israeli Older Adults, regarding the Law and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Irith; Weissman, Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    Based on Nicholas' framework for assessing information needs, this research aims to construct a profile of both Israeli older adults and their information needs regarding laws and social services. Data were collected by questionnaires answered by 200 older adults, born in Europe, Asia and Africa, who attended social clubs for older adults. The…

  1. 77 FR 4731 - Review and Submittal of a Tribe's Facility License Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... facility license to be submitted before the opening of any new place, facility, or location on Indian lands... is terminated, expires, or if a gaming place, facility, or location closes or reopens, unless the... separate license issued by the Indian tribe shall be required for each place, facility, or location on...

  2. Development of an inventory and temporal allocation profiles of emissions from power plants and industrial facilities in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Bich Thao; Manomaiphiboon, Kasemsan; Vongmahadlek, Chatchawan

    2008-07-01

    An emission inventory (EI) of power plants and industrial (i.e., non-power plant) facilities in Thailand was developed. Emissions considered are those from fuel consumption (i.e., combustion) for power plants and those from both fuel consumption and industrial processes (i.e., non-combustion) for industrial facilities. For power plants, total annual emissions due to fuel consumption are 107.9 x 10(3) ton NOx (as NO2), 146.2 x 10(3) ton SO2, 6.1 x 10(3) ton NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compounds), 47.0 x 10(3) ton CO, 1.8 x 10(3) ton NH3, 1.5 x 10(3) ton OC (organic carbon), and 1.5 x 10(3) ton BC (black carbon). For industrial facilities, total annual emissions due to fuel consumption are 111.4 x 10(3) ton NOx (as NO2), 476.9 x 10(3) ton SO2, 33.4 x 10(3) ton NMVOC, 193.1 x 10(3) ton CO, 1.6 x 10(3) ton NH3, 8.5 x 10(3) ton OC, and 8.0 x 10(3) ton BC. Among various industrial types, Food and Beverage, Chemical, and Non-Metal industries are dominant emitters. Total annual emissions due to industrial processes are 79.2 x 10(3) ton SO2, 76.0 x 10(3) ton NMVOC, and 4.8 x 10(3) ton CO. The Central and Eastern regions combined contribute considerably to total emissions for most emission species. Emission estimates found here show fair agreement with those in some selected past studies. A crude estimation of potential fugitive NMVOC emissions specifically from petroleum industry was also made, and the estimates found could be considered significant (nearly half of NMVOC emissions from industrial processes). Several temporal allocation profiles of emissions were also developed and suggested for power plants and industrial facilities, including monthly, daily, and hourly profiles.

  3. Assessing the primary data hosted by the Spanish node of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).

    PubMed

    Otegui, Javier; Ariño, Arturo H; Encinas, María A; Pando, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    In order to effectively understand and cope with the current 'biodiversity crisis', having large-enough sets of qualified data is necessary. Information facilitators such as the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) are ensuring increasing availability of primary biodiversity records by linking data collections spread over several institutions that have agreed to publish their data in a common access schema. We have assessed the primary records that one such publisher, the Spanish node of GBIF (GBIF.ES), hosts on behalf of a number of institutions, considered to be a highly representative sample of the total mass of available data for a country in order to know the quantity and quality of the information made available. Our results may provide an indication of the overall fitness-for-use in these data. We have found a number of patterns in the availability and accrual of data that seem to arise naturally from the digitization processes. Knowing these patterns and features may help deciding when and how these data can be used. Broadly, the error level seems low. The available data may be of capital importance for the development of biodiversity research, both locally and globally. However, wide swaths of records lack data elements such as georeferencing or taxonomical levels. Although the remaining information is ample and fit for many uses, improving the completeness of the records would likely increase the usability span for these data.

  4. Assessing the Primary Data Hosted by the Spanish Node of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF)

    PubMed Central

    Otegui, Javier; Ariño, Arturo H.; Encinas, María A.; Pando, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    In order to effectively understand and cope with the current ‘biodiversity crisis’, having large-enough sets of qualified data is necessary. Information facilitators such as the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) are ensuring increasing availability of primary biodiversity records by linking data collections spread over several institutions that have agreed to publish their data in a common access schema. We have assessed the primary records that one such publisher, the Spanish node of GBIF (GBIF.ES), hosts on behalf of a number of institutions, considered to be a highly representative sample of the total mass of available data for a country in order to know the quantity and quality of the information made available. Our results may provide an indication of the overall fitness-for-use in these data. We have found a number of patterns in the availability and accrual of data that seem to arise naturally from the digitization processes. Knowing these patterns and features may help deciding when and how these data can be used. Broadly, the error level seems low. The available data may be of capital importance for the development of biodiversity research, both locally and globally. However, wide swaths of records lack data elements such as georeferencing or taxonomical levels. Although the remaining information is ample and fit for many uses, improving the completeness of the records would likely increase the usability span for these data. PMID:23372828

  5. Towards an Enhancement of Organizational Information Security through Threat Factor Profiling (TFP) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidi, Fatimah; Daud, Maslina; Ahmad, Sabariah; Zainuddin, Naqliyah; Anneisa Abdullah, Syafiqa; Jabar, Marzanah A.; Suriani Affendey, Lilly; Ishak, Iskandar; Sharef, Nurfadhlina Mohd; Zolkepli, Maslina; Nur Majdina Nordin, Fatin; Amat Sejani, Hashimah; Ramadzan Hairani, Saiful

    2017-09-01

    Information security has been identified by organizations as part of internal operations that need to be well implemented and protected. This is because each day the organizations face a high probability of increase of threats to their networks and services that will lead to information security issues. Thus, effective information security management is required in order to protect their information assets. Threat profiling is a method that can be used by an organization to address the security challenges. Threat profiling allows analysts to understand and organize intelligent information related to threat groups. This paper presents a comparative analysis that was conducted to study the existing threat profiling models. It was found that existing threat models were constructed based on specific objectives, thus each model is limited to only certain components or factors such as assets, threat sources, countermeasures, threat agents, threat outcomes and threat actors. It is suggested that threat profiling can be improved by the combination of components found in each existing threat profiling model/framework. The proposed model can be used by an organization in executing a proactive approach to incident management.

  6. Privacy and senior willingness to adopt smart home information technology in residential care facilities.

    PubMed

    Courtney, K L

    2008-01-01

    With large predicted increases of the older adult (65 years and older) population, researchers have been exploring the use of smart home information technologies (IT) in residential care (RC) facilities to enhance resident quality of life and safety. Older adults' perceptions of privacy can inhibit their acceptance and subsequent adoption of smart home IT. This qualitative study, guided by principles of grounded theory research, investigated the relationship between privacy, living environment and willingness of older adults living in residential care facilities to adopt smart home IT through focus groups and individual interviews. The findings from this study indicate that privacy can be a barrier for older adults' adoption of smart home IT; however their own perception of their need for the technology may override their privacy concerns. Privacy concerns, as a barrier to technology adoption, can be influenced by both individual-level and community-level factors. Further exploration of the factors influencing older adults' perceptions of smart home IT need is necessary.

  7. Silicon detectors for the neutron flux and beam profile measurements of the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumarra, Agatino; Cosentino, Luigi; Barbagallo, Massimo; Colonna, Nicola; Damone, Lucia; Pappalardo, Alfio; Piscopo, Massimo; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The demand of new and high precision cross section data for neutron-induced reactions is continuously growing, driven by the requirements from several fields of fundamental physics, as well as from nuclear technology, medicine, etc. Several neutron facilities are operational worldwide, and new ones are being built. In the coming years, neutron beam intensities never reached up to now will be available, thus opening new scientific and technological frontiers. Among existing facilities, n_TOF at CERN provides a high intensity pulsed neutron beam in a wide energy range (thermal to GeV) and with an extremely competitive energy resolution that also allows spectroscopy studies. In order to ensure high quality measurements, the neutron beams must be fully characterized as a function of the neutron energy, in particular by measuring the neutron flux and the beam transverse profile with high accuracy. In 2014 a new experimental area (EAR2), with a much higher neutron flux, has been completed and commissioned at n_TOF. In order to characterize the neutron beam in the newly built experimental area at n_TOF, two suitable diagnostics devices have been built by the INFN-LNS group. Both are based on silicon detectors coupled with 6Li converter foils, in particular Single Pad for the flux measurement and Position Sensitive (strips and others) for the beam profile. The devices have been completely characterized with radioactive sources and with the n_TOF neutron beam, fulfilling all the specifications and hence becoming immediately operational. The performances of these devices and their high versatility, in terms of neutron beam intensity, make them suitable to be used in both n_TOF experimental areas. A description of the devices and the main results obtained so far will be presented.

  8. BIDDSAT: visualizing the content of biodiversity data publishers in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility network.

    PubMed

    Otegui, Javier; Ariño, Arturo H

    2012-08-15

    In any data quality workflow, data publishers must become aware of issues in their data so these can be corrected. User feedback mechanisms provide one avenue, while global assessments of datasets provide another. To date, there is no publicly available tool to allow both biodiversity data institutions sharing their data through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility network and its potential users to assess datasets as a whole. Contributing to bridge this gap both for publishers and users, we introduce BIoDiversity DataSets Assessment Tool, an online tool that enables selected diagnostic visualizations on the content of data publishers and/or their individual collections. The online application is accessible at http://www.unav.es/unzyec/mzna/biddsat/ and is supported by all major browsers. The source code is licensed under the GNU GPLv3 license (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-3.0.txt) and is available at https://github.com/jotegui/BIDDSAT.

  9. 30 CFR 250.256 - What related facilities and operations information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What related facilities and operations information must accompany the DPP or DOCD? 250.256 Section 250.256 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT... SHELF Plans and Information Contents of Development and Production Plans (dpp) and...

  10. The Argonne boundary layer experiments facility : using minisodars to complement a wind profiler network.

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R. L.

    1998-06-05

    The Argonne Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility, located in south central Kansas, east of Wichita, is devoted primarily to investigations of and within the planetary boundary layer (PBL), including the dynamics of the mixed layer during both day and night; effects of varying land use and land form; the interactive role of precipitation, runoff, and soil moisture; storm development; and energy budgets on scales of 10 to 100 km. Located entirely within the Walnut River watershed, ABLE provides intense measurements within the northeast quadrant (Fig. 1) of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (Stokes and Schwarz, 1994). By combining the continuous measurements of ABLE with ancillary continuous measurements of, for example, the ARM and the Global Energy Water cycle Experiment (GEWEX) (Kinster and Shukla, 1990) programs, ABLE provides a platform within which shorter, more intensive studies, such as those conducted by the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Studies (CASES) Program, can realize the full benefit of a wide variety of atmospheric measurements on many scales; this allows the study of hypothesized features of PBL development and dynamics, including frontal dynamics, nocturnal boundary development and breakdown, urban heat island effects, precipitation enhancement, and modification of the surface energy budget partitioning.

  11. The role of Facilities in Engaging and Informing the Public of EarthScope Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Taber, J. J.; Berg, M.; Dorr, P. M.; McQuillan, P.; Olds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The IRIS and UNAVCO facilities play an important role in support of EarthScope through joint and independent education and outreach activities. These activities are focused on providing data and data products to a wide range of audiences, disseminating EarthScope science results through formal and informal venues, and informing the public of the broader impacts of EarthScope. The facilities are particularly well-suited for sustained engagement of multiple audiences over the decade-long course of EarthScope. One such example of a long-term effort was the Transportable Array student siting program, where over an 8 year period, students from about 55 institutions across the US and Canada conducted site reconnaissance and talked to landowners about EarthScope. Another activity focused on students was the development of a student intern program to support field engineering efforts during the construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory. Other ongoing activities include developing and maintaining relationships with media representatives and annual training of National Parks staff throughout the western U.S. The UNAVCO-IRIS partnership has been particularly valuable for EarthScope-related activities, where UNAVCO and IRIS work closely with the EarthScope National Office (ESNO) to bring EarthScope science to national, regional and local audiences within the EarthScope footprint. Collaborations have ranged across each group's products and services, including: EarthScope-focused teacher workshops, participation in EarthScope interpretive workshops for informal educators (led by ESNO), development of content for the IRIS Active Earth Monitor, preparing PBO-, USArray- and EarthScope-focused materials on topics such as Episodic Tremor and Slip for wider distribution through print, web, and mobile information technologies, and organizing research experiences for undergraduates on EarthScope-related topics. Other collaborations have focused on social media, and the development

  12. Profile Rating Wheel: An Instrument To Evaluate School Facilities. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of School Planning.

    This document is designed to inform architects and school administrators of performance standards for new school construction. It can determine the worth of design proposals during the preliminary design stage and assist in evaluating existing schools. Evaluators can rate buildings against certain criteria in each of ten categories on the scale of…

  13. 40 CFR 270.290 - What general types of information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... analyses of the hazardous waste and hazardous debris handled at the facility. At a minimum, these analyses..., sanitary, and process sewerage systems, loading and unloading areas, fire control facilities, etc.)...

  14. 40 CFR 270.290 - What general types of information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... analyses of the hazardous waste and hazardous debris handled at the facility. At a minimum, these analyses..., sanitary, and process sewerage systems, loading and unloading areas, fire control facilities, etc.)...

  15. A Generalized Management Information System for Computer Facilities at Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Patrick Awalt

    The problem of managing computer facilities at educational institutions is examined. User categories are defined, and the interrelations between user requirements and the goals/objectives of the facility are discussed. Enumerations of the factors that influence computer facility operations is also accomplished. In addition, management information…

  16. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macintosh, Henry G.

    An introduction to profiles is presented with examples provided to permit an overall appraisal of the potential of profiles, of the principles upon which they might be based, and of the problems that will have to be overcome if their potential is to be realized in practice. The larger scale examples of profiles discussed are the Scottish Pupil…

  17. Comprehensive Molecular Profiling of African-American Prostate Cancer to Inform on Prognosis and Disease Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Biology PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Scott A. Tomlins, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Regents of the University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109...Cancer to Inform on Prognosis and Disease Biology 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0661 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...169,574/yr Comprehensive Molecular Profiling of African-American Prostate Cancer to Inform on Prognosis and Disease Biology Goal(s): Perform

  18. Examining the role of information exchange in residential aged care work practices-a survey of residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The provision of residential aged care is underpinned by information, and is reliant upon systems that adequately capture and effectively utilise and communicate this information. The aim of this study was to explicate and quantify the volume and method by which information is collected, exchanged within facilities and with external providers, and retrieved from facility information systems and hospitals. Methods A survey of staff (n = 119), including managers, health informatics officers (HIOs), quality improvement staff, registered nurses (RNs), enrolled nurses (ENs)/endorsed enrolled nurses (EENs) and assistants in nursing (AINs) was carried out in four residential aged care facilities in New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. Sites varied in size and displayed a range of information technology (IT) capabilities. The survey investigated how and by whom information is collected, retrieved and exchanged, and the frequency and amount of time devoted to these tasks. Descriptive analysis was performed using SPSS, and open responses to questions were coded into key themes. Results Staff completed a median of six forms each, taking a median of 30 min per shift. 68.8% of staff reported transferring information from paper to a computer system, which took a median of 30 min per shift. Handover and face-to-face communication was the most frequently used form of information exchange within facilities. There was a large amount of faxing and telephone communication between facility staff and General Practitioners and community pharmacists, with staff reporting sending a median of 2 faxes to pharmacy and 1.5 faxes to General Practitioners, and initiating 2 telephone calls to pharmacies and 1.5 calls to General Practitioners per shift. Only 38.5% of respondents reported that they always had information available at the point-of-care and only 35.4% of respondents reported that they always had access to hospital stay information of residents after hospital

  19. Occupational Competency Profile for Health Occupations Education Program: Health Agency Assessment. Information Series: Report No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Norma J.

    This assessment instrument is intended to provide health occupations teachers and state departments of education with information needed to revise and improve the curriculum used in training prospective health occupations teachers and in updating certification requirements for practicing health care professionals. The profile lists the…

  20. Empirical Evaluation of Explicit versus Implicit Acquisition of User Profiles in Information Filtering Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiroga, Luz Marina; Mostafa, Javed

    2000-01-01

    Compares three different approaches of user profile acquisition in a filtering system for customizing information acquisition on the World Wide Web. Explains the SIFTER system designed at Indiana University and discusses results of an analysis of variance that showed exclusive reliance on relevance feedback led to inferior filtering performance.…

  1. Hypertext Browsing: A New Model for Information Filtering Based on User Profiles and Data Clustering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapira, Bracha; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of hypertext browsing proposes a filtering algorithm which restricts the amount of information made available to the user by calculating the set of most relevant hypertext nodes for the user, utilizing the user profile and data clustering technique. An example is provided of an optimal cluster of relevant data items. (Author/LRW)

  2. Occupational Competency Profile for Health Occupations Education Program: Health Agency Assessment. Information Series: Report No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Norma J.

    This assessment instrument is intended to provide health occupations teachers and state departments of education with information needed to revise and improve the curriculum used in training prospective health occupations teachers and in updating certification requirements for practicing health care professionals. The profile lists the…

  3. Validation of aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles from routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Ferrare, Richard; Clayton, Marian F.; Ogren, John A.; Russell, P. B.; Gore, W.; Dominguez, Roseanne

    2009-11-26

    The accuracy with which vertical profiles of aerosol extinction σep(λ) can be retrieved from ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) routine measurements was assessed using data from two airborne field campaigns, the ARM Aerosol Intensive Operation Period (AIOP, May 2003), and the Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE, September 2005). This assessment pertains to the aerosol at its ambient concentration and thermodynamic state (i.e. σep(λ) either free of or corrected for sampling artifacts) and includes the following ACRF routine methods: Raman Lidar, Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) and in-situ aerosol profiles (IAP) with a small aircraft. Profiles of aerosol optical depth τp(λ), from which the profiles of σep(λ)are derived through vertical differentiation, were measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel Sunphotometer (AATS-14); these data were used as truth in this evaluation. The ACRF IAP σep(550 nm) were lower by 16% (during AIOP) and higher by 10% (during ALIVE) when compared to AATS-14. The ACRF MPL σep(523 nm) were higher by 24% (AIOP) and 19%-21% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14 but the correlation improved significantly during ALIVE. In the AIOP a second MPL operated by NASA showed a smaller positive bias (13%) with respect to AATS-14. The ACRF Raman Lidar σep(355 nm) were higher by 54% (AIOP) and higher by 6% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14. The large bias in AIOP stemmed from a gradual loss of the sensitivity of the Raman Lidar starting about the end of 2001 going unnoticed until after AIOP. A major refurbishment and upgrade of the instrument and improvements to a data-processing algorithm led to the significant improvement and very small bias in ALIVE. Finally we find that during ALIVE the Raman Lidar water vapor densities ρw are higher by 8% when compared to AATS-14, whereas comparisons between AATS-14 and in-situ measured ρw aboard two different aircraft showed small negative biases (0 to

  4. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information report for Greater-Than-Class C and DOE equivalent special case waste

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1993-07-01

    This Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) report for Greater-Than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW) and DOE equivalent special case waste contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities needed for management of GTCC LLW and DOE equivalent waste. The report contains information on 16 facilities (referred to as cost modules). These facilities are treatment facility front-end and back-end support functions (administration support, and receiving, preparation, and shipping cost modules); seven treatment concepts (incineration, metal melting, shredding/compaction, solidification, vitrification, metal sizing and decontamination, and wet/air oxidation cost modules); two storage concepts (enclosed vault and silo); disposal facility front-end functions (disposal receiving and inspection cost module); and four disposal concepts (shallow-land, engineered shallow-land, intermediate depth, and deep geological cost modules). Data in this report allow the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also included in this report.

  5. Use of a geographic information system to assess accessibility to health facilities providing emergency obstetric and newborn care in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Mahbub E; Biswas, Taposh K; Rahman, Monjur; Pasha, Kamal; Hossain, Mollah A

    2017-08-01

    To use a geographic information system (GIS) to determine accessibility to health facilities for emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) and compare coverage with that stipulated by UN guidelines (5 EmONC facilities per 500 000 individuals, ≥1 comprehensive). A cross-sectional study was undertaken of all public facilities providing EmONC in 24 districts of Bangladesh from March to October 2012. Accessibility to each facility was assessed by applying GIS to estimate the proportion of catchment population (comprehensive 500 000; basic 100 000) able to reach the nearest facility within 2 hours and 1 hour of travel time, respectively, by existing road networks. The minimum number of public facilities providing comprehensive and basic EmONC services (1 and 5 per 500 000 individuals, respectively) was reached in 16 and 3 districts, respectively. However, after applying GIS, in no district did 100% of the catchment population have access to these services. A minimum of 75% and 50% of the population had accessibility to comprehensive services in 11 and 5 districts, respectively. For basic services, accessibility was much lower. Assessing only the number of EmONC facilities does not ensure universal coverage; accessibility should be assessed when planning health systems. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  6. Use of information systems in Air Force medical treatment facilities in strategic planning and decision-making.

    PubMed

    Yap, Glenn A; Platonova, Elena A; Musa, Philip F

    2006-02-01

    An exploratory study used Ansoff's strategic planning model as a framework to assess perceived effectiveness of information systems in supporting strategic business plan development at Air Force medical treatment facilities (MTFs). Results showed information systems were most effective in supporting historical trend analysis, strategic business plans appeared to be a balance of operational and strategic plans, and facilities perceived a greater need for new clinical, vice administrative, information systems to support strategic planning processes. Administrators believed information systems should not be developed at the local level and perceived information systems have the greatest impact on improving clinical quality outcomes, followed by ability to deliver cost effective care and finally, ability to increase market share.

  7. Facile method for modulating the profiles and periods of self-ordered three-dimensional alumina taper-nanopores.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Congshan; Chen, Cheng; Hao, Qingli; Wang, Zhijia; Zhu, Jie; Gao, Xuefeng

    2012-10-24

    We report a facile nanofabrication method, one-step hard anodizing and etching peeling (OS-HA-EP) of aluminum foils followed by multistep mild anodizing and etching pore-widening (MS-MA-EW), for the controllable tailoring of hexagonally packed three-dimensional alumina taper-nanopores. Their profiles can be precisely tailored by the synergistic control of anodizing time, etching time and cyclic times at the MS-MA-EW stage, exemplified by linear cones, whorl-embedded cones, funnels, pencils, parabolas, and trumpets. Meantime, their periods can also be modulated in the range of 70-370 nm by choosing matched anodizing electrolytes (e.g., H(2)C(2)O(4), H(2)SO(4), H(2)C(2)O(4)-H(2)SO(4), and H(2)C(2)O(4)-C(2)H(5)OH mixture) and anodizing voltages at the OS-HA-EP stage. We also demonstrated that the long-range ordering of nanopits and the peak voltage of stable self-ordered HA, which are unachievable in a single H(2)C(2)O(4) electrolyte system, can be effectively tuned by simply adding tiny quantity of H(2)SO(4) and C(2)H(5)OH to keep an appropriate HA current density, respectively. This method of using the combination of simple pure chemical nanofabrication technologies is very facile and efficient in realizing the controllable tailoring of large-area alumina membranes containing self-ordered taper-nanopores. Our work opens a door for exploring the novel physical and chemical properties of different materials of nanotaper arrays.

  8. Using GIS to develop socio-economic profiles of areas adjacent to DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.C.; Saraswatula, S.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of the research addressed in this paper is to identify and analyze the offsite effects of DOE activities at the Savannah River Site. The paper presents the socio-economic conditions of the areas surrounding the site in order to evaluate the possible effects of DOE activities. The study employed a geographic information system (GIS) in order to evaluate spatial relationships between otherwise unrelated factors. Socio-economic data used in the study are publicly available and were obtained mainly from the Bureau of the Census. The Department of Energy (DOE), currently dealing with the environmental management of a large number of sites throughout the United States, must consider the effects of its activities on surrounding populations and ensure compliance with the various federal regulations, such as the executive order on environmental justice. Environmental justice is the process of studying and achieving equal distribution of the effects of environmental pollution on populations across social and economic lines. An executive order signed by the President has directed federal agencies, including the Department of Energy, to make achieving environmental justice a part of the agency`s mission by identifying and addressing disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects of its programs, policies, and activities on minority and low-income populations.

  9. Understanding the online health information user profiles in Korea: from a psychological perspective.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung Hee; Yun, Eun Kyoung

    2011-06-01

    This study was conducted to explore the profiles of online health information users in terms of certain psychological characteristics and to suggest guidelines for the provision of better user-oriented health information service. The cross-sectional study design was used with convenient sampling by Web-based questionnaire survey in Korea. To analyze health information user profiles on the Internet, a two-step cluster analysis was conducted. The results reveal that online health information users can be classified into four groups according to their level of subjective knowledge and health concern. The findings also suggest that four clusters that exhibit distinct profile patterns exist. The findings of this study would be useful for health portal developers who would like to understand users' characteristics and behaviors and to provide more user-oriented service in a satisfactory manner. It is suggested that to develop a full understanding of users' behaviors regarding Internet health information service, further research would be needed to explore users' various needs, their preferences, and relevant factors among users across a variety of health problem-addressing Web sites at different professional levels.

  10. A new perspective on consumer health Web use: "valuegraphic" profiles of health information seekers.

    PubMed

    Navarro, F H; Wilkins, S T

    2001-01-01

    Only one half of adults in the United States place a high priority on seeking health information. An examination of today's health information seeker based upon health behavioral intentions, values, and priorities (valuegraphics) reveals that an individual's level of health information seeking corresponds to the value he or she places or the quality of health desired, and current level of personal health involvement. The relationship between valuegraphics and health status and health care use is also examined. Findings from a study that identified significant variance in Web use and satisfaction based upon the valuegraphic profiles of visitors to a hospital system-sponsored consumer Web site are also examined. The implications of consumer health valuegraphic profiling to future Web development by health care organizations are discussed.

  11. The Impact of Health Information Technology Adoption by Outpatient Facilities on Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deily, Mary E; Hu, Tianyan; Terrizzi, Sabrina; Chou, Shin-Yi; Meyerhoefer, Chad D

    2013-01-01

    Objective Examine whether health information technology (HIT) at nonhospital facilities (NHFs) improves health outcomes and decreases resource use at hospitals within the same heath care network, and whether the impact of HIT varies as providers gain experience using the technologies. Data Sources Administrative claims data on 491,832 births in Pennsylvania during 1998–2004 from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council and HIT applications data from the Dorenfest Institute. Study Design Fixed-effects regression analysis of the impact of HIT at NHFs on adverse birth outcomes and resource use. Principal Findings Greater use of clinical HIT applications by NHFs is associated with reduced incidence of obstetric trauma and preventable complications, as well as longer lengths of stay. In addition, the beneficial effects of HIT increase the longer that technologies have been in use. However, we find no consistent evidence on whether or how nonclinical HIT in NHFs affects either resource use or health outcomes. Conclusions Clinical HIT applications at NHFs may reduce the likelihood of adverse birth outcomes, particularly after physicians and staff gain experience using the technologies. PMID:22742682

  12. Developing a profile of consumer intention to seek our health information beyond a doctor.

    PubMed

    Dutta-Bergman, Moham J

    2003-01-01

    The health care consumer of the new millennium is becoming increasingly involved in his/her health choices. The explosion in the number of media outlets offering health-specific information has further propelled the growth in active health orientation. The goal of this research is to understand the profile of the actively oriented health care consumer. It constructs a psychographic plot of additional health information seeking by investigating variables such as health consciousness, environmental consciousness, and consumerism. Based on the study results, strategic recommendations are made for health information targeting and delivery.

  13. 10 CFR 76.119 - Security facility approval and safeguarding of National Security Information and Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security facility approval and safeguarding of National Security Information and Restricted Data. 76.119 Section 76.119 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.119 Security...

  14. 10 CFR 76.119 - Security facility approval and safeguarding of National Security Information and Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Security facility approval and safeguarding of National Security Information and Restricted Data. 76.119 Section 76.119 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.119 Security...

  15. 10 CFR 76.119 - Security facility approval and safeguarding of National Security Information and Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Security facility approval and safeguarding of National Security Information and Restricted Data. 76.119 Section 76.119 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.119 Security...

  16. 10 CFR 76.119 - Security facility approval and safeguarding of National Security Information and Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Security facility approval and safeguarding of National Security Information and Restricted Data. 76.119 Section 76.119 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.119 Security...

  17. 10 CFR 76.119 - Security facility approval and safeguarding of National Security Information and Restricted Data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Security facility approval and safeguarding of National Security Information and Restricted Data. 76.119 Section 76.119 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Safeguards and Security § 76.119 Security...

  18. Report to the Higher Education Policy Commission. West Virginia Higher Education Facilities Information System Statewide Institution Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The West Virginia Higher Education Facilities Information System was formed as a method for instituting statewide standardization of space use and classification; to serve as a vehicle for statewide data acquisition; and to provide statistical data that contributes to detailed institutional planning analysis. The result thus far is the production…

  19. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 4 - Freedom of Information Public Inspection Facilities, and Addresses for Requests for Records Under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., App. A Appendix A to Part 4—Freedom of Information Public Inspection Facilities, and Addresses for... Department's “FOIA Home Page” link found at the Department's World Wide Web site (http://www.doc.gov)), as... Department's “FOIA Home Page” link found at the Department's World Wide Web site (http://www.doc.gov)....

  20. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 4 - Freedom of Information Public Inspection Facilities, and Addresses for Requests for Records Under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., App. A Appendix A to Part 4—Freedom of Information Public Inspection Facilities, and Addresses for... Department's “FOIA Home Page” link found at the Department's World Wide Web site (http://www.doc.gov)), as... Department's “FOIA Home Page” link found at the Department's World Wide Web site (http://www.doc.gov)....

  1. 15 CFR Appendix A to Part 4 - Freedom of Information Public Inspection Facilities, and Addresses for Requests for Records Under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., App. A Appendix A to Part 4—Freedom of Information Public Inspection Facilities, and Addresses for... Department's “FOIA Home Page” link found at the Department's World Wide Web site (http://www.doc.gov)), as... Department's “FOIA Home Page” link found at the Department's World Wide Web site (http://www.doc.gov)....

  2. Feasibility study for Zaporozhye Nuclear Power Plant spent fuel dry storage facility in Ukraine. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This document reports the results of a Feasibility Study sponsored by a TDA grant to Zaporozhye Nuclear Power Plant (ZNPP) in Ukraine to study the construction of storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel. It provides pertinent information to U.S. companies interested in marketing spent fuel storage technology and related business to countries of the former Soviet Union or Eastern Europe.

  3. 47 CFR 90.607 - Supplemental information to be furnished by applicants for facilities under this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations... Application for Authorizations § 90.607 Supplemental information to be furnished by applicants for facilities...) Specify the number of mobile units to be placed in operation upon grant of the authorization and...

  4. Inventory of College and University Physical Facilities. Higher Education General Information Survey (HEGIS) [machine-readable data file].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    The "Inventory of College and University Physical Facilities" machine-readable data file (MRDF) is a subfile of the larger Higher Education General Information Survey (HEGIS). It includes basic data on the number of square feet of physical plant space, by type of room, function of room, organizational unit, and instructional program.…

  5. 47 CFR 90.607 - Supplemental information to be furnished by applicants for facilities under this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations... Application for Authorizations § 90.607 Supplemental information to be furnished by applicants for facilities...) Specify the number of mobile units to be placed in operation upon grant of the authorization and the...

  6. Developing Livestock Facility Type Information from USDA Agricultural Census Data for Use in Epidemiological and Economic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C; Robertson, A; Hullinger, P

    2006-10-24

    types used by the epidemiological and economic model. Comparison of the resulting database with an independent survey of farms in central California shows excellent agreement between the numbers of farms for the various facility types. This suggests that the NASS data are well suited for providing a consistent set of county-level information on facility numbers and sizes that can be used in epidemiological and economic models.

  7. The Influence of Organizational Systems on Information Exchange in Long-Term Care Facilities: An Institutional Ethnography.

    PubMed

    Caspar, Sienna; Ratner, Pamela A; Phinney, Alison; MacKinnon, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Person-centered care is heavily dependent on effective information exchange among health care team members. We explored the organizational systems that influence resident care attendants' (RCAs) access to care information in long-term care (LTC) settings. We conducted an institutional ethnography in three LTC facilities. Investigative methods included naturalistic observations, in-depth interviews, and textual analysis. Practical access to texts containing individualized care-related information (e.g., care plans) was dependent on job classification. Regulated health care professionals accessed these texts daily. RCAs lacked practical access to these texts and primarily received and shared information orally. Microsystems of care, based on information exchange formats, emerged. Organizational systems mandated written exchange of information and did not formally support an oral exchange. Thus, oral information exchanges were largely dependent on the quality of workplace relationships. Formal systems are needed to support structured oral information exchange within and between the microsystems of care found in LTC.

  8. Modules and Information Retrieval Facilities of the Human Use Regulatory Affairs Advisor (HURAA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Arthur C.; Person, Natalie K.; Jackson, G. Tanner; Toth, Jozsef A.

    2004-01-01

    The Human Use Regulatory Affairs Advisor (HURAA) is an Internet facility that provides help and training on the ethical use of human subjects in research, based on documents and regulations in United States Federal agencies. HURAA has a number of standard features of conventional web facilities and computer-based training, such as hypertext,…

  9. Do K-12 School Facilities Affect Education Outcomes? Staff Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ed; Green, Harry A.; Roehrich-Patrick, Lynnisse; Joseph, Linda; Gibson, Teresa

    This report explains that there is growing evidence of a correlation between the adequacy of a school facility and student behavior and performance. In general, students attending school in newer, betterfacilities score 5 to 17 points higher on standardized tests than those attending in substandard buildings. School facility factors such as…

  10. 40 CFR 270.310 - What equipment information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... number and hazardous waste management unit identification. (2) Approximate locations within the facility (e.g., identify the hazardous waste management unit on a facility plot plan). (3) Type of equipment (e.g., a pump or a pipeline valve). (4) Percent by weight of total organics in the hazardous...

  11. 40 CFR 270.310 - What equipment information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... number and hazardous waste management unit identification. (2) Approximate locations within the facility (e.g., identify the hazardous waste management unit on a facility plot plan). (3) Type of equipment (e.g., a pump or a pipeline valve). (4) Percent by weight of total organics in the hazardous...

  12. 78 FR 55282 - Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Healthcare Facility Documents: Notice of Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Housing Administration (FHA) Healthcare Facility Documents: Notice of... published in the Federal Register a notice that announced that FHA's healthcare facility documents completed... concluded a 10-month process through which HUD solicited public comment to update 115 healthcare...

  13. Modules and Information Retrieval Facilities of the Human Use Regulatory Affairs Advisor (HURAA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Arthur C.; Person, Natalie K.; Jackson, G. Tanner; Toth, Jozsef A.

    2004-01-01

    The Human Use Regulatory Affairs Advisor (HURAA) is an Internet facility that provides help and training on the ethical use of human subjects in research, based on documents and regulations in United States Federal agencies. HURAA has a number of standard features of conventional web facilities and computer-based training, such as hypertext,…

  14. 40 CFR 270.290 - What general types of information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... description of the security procedures and equipment required by 40 CFR 267.14. (e) A copy of the general... arrow). (7) Legal boundaries of your facility site. (8) Access control (fences, gates). (9) Injection...) Barriers for drainage or flood control. (12) Location of operational units within your facility,...

  15. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  16. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  17. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume I, Chapters 2 through 5

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.; White, B.B.

    1999-09-01

    The Facilities Business Unit, which includes the Operations and Engineering Center (7800) and the Facilities Management Center (7900), coordinates decisions about the management of facilities, infrastructure, and sites. These decisions include the following: New construction, including siting; Rehabilitation, and renovation; Relocation; Mothballing; Decontamination and decommissioning; and Demolition. Decisions on these matters flow from a corporate decision process in which SNL directors and vice presidents identify the facility and infrastructure requirements for carrying out work for DOE and other customers. DOE and any non-DOE owners of real estate that is leased or permitted to DOE for SNL/NM use must concur with this identification of requirements. Decision-making follows procedures required by DOE and requirements defined by SNL/NM program executives. See Sandia National Laboratories (1997e), Part II, ''Desired Future State and Strategy,'' and appendices to Sandia National Laboratories (1997e) for more information about planning and decision processes. Decisions on siting take surrounding land uses into account and draw on environmental baseline information maintained at SNL/NM. For environmental baseline and land use information, see Sandia National Laboratories (1999).

  18. Data on multicultural education and diagnostic information profiling: Culture, learning styles and creativity.

    PubMed

    Maseleno, Andino; Hardaker, Glenn; Sabani, Noraisikin; Suhaili, Nabilah

    2016-12-01

    This article contains data related to multicultural education and diagnostic information profiling preliminary findings. It includes the responses of 253 students. The data consists of six sections, i) culture: race, ethnicity, language and identity; ii) learning preferences: physiological and perceptual; iii) cognitive learning styles: physical, emotional and mental; iv) creativity skills and problem solving skills; v) motivation; and vi) students' background knowledge. The data may be used as part of data analytics for specific personalized e-learning platform.

  19. Dissecting signal and noise in diatom chloroplast protein encoding genes with phylogenetic information profiling.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Edward C; Ashworth, Matt P; Nakov, Teofil; Ruck, Elizabeth; Jansen, Robert K

    2015-08-01

    Previous analyses of single diatom chloroplast protein-encoded genes recovered results highly incongruent with both traditional phylogenies and phylogenies derived from the nuclear encoded small subunit (SSU) gene. Our analysis here of six individual chloroplast genes (atpB, psaA, psaB, psbA, psbC and rbcL) obtained similar anomalous results. However, phylogenetic noise in these genes did not appear to be correlated, and their concatenation appeared to effectively sum their collective signal. We empirically demonstrated the value of combining phylogenetic information profiling, partitioned Bremer support and entropy analysis in examining the utility of various partitions in phylogenetic analysis. Noise was low in the 1st and 2nd codon positions, but so was signal. Conversely, high noise levels in the 3rd codon position was accompanied by high signal. Perhaps counterintuitively, simple exclusion experiments demonstrated this was especially true at deeper nodes where the 3rd codon position contributed most to a result congruent with morphology and SSU (and the total evidence tree here). Correlated with our empirical findings, probability of correct signal (derived from information profiling) increased and the statistical significance of substitutional saturation decreased as data were aggregated. In this regard, the aggregated 3rd codon position performed as well or better than more slowly evolving sites. Simply put, direct methods of noise removal (elimination of fast-evolving sites) disproportionately removed signal. Information profiling and partitioned Bremer support suggest that addition of chloroplast data will rapidly improve our understanding of the diatom phylogeny, but conversely also illustrate that some parts of the diatom tree are likely to remain recalcitrant to addition of molecular data. The methods based on information profiling have been criticized for their numerous assumptions and parameter estimates and the fact that they are based on quartets of

  20. Into the unknown: expression profiling without genome sequence information in CHO by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Birzele, Fabian; Schaub, Jochen; Rust, Werner; Clemens, Christoph; Baum, Patrick; Kaufmann, Hitto; Weith, Andreas; Schulz, Torsten W; Hildebrandt, Tobias

    2010-07-01

    The arrival of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has led to novel opportunities for expression profiling and genome analysis by utilizing vast amounts of short read sequence data. Here, we demonstrate that expression profiling in organisms lacking any genome or transcriptome sequence information is feasible by combining Illumina's mRNA-seq technology with a novel bioinformatics pipeline that integrates assembled and annotated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) sequences with information derived from related organisms. We applied this pipeline to the analysis of CHO cells which were chosen as a model system owing to its relevance in the production of therapeutic proteins. Specifically, we analysed CHO cells undergoing butyrate treatment which is known to affect cell cycle regulation and to increase the specific productivity of recombinant proteins. By this means, we identified sequences for >13,000 CHO genes which added sequence information of approximately 5000 novel genes to the CHO model. More than 6000 transcript sequences are predicted to be complete, as they covered >95% of the corresponding mouse orthologs. Detailed analysis of selected biological functions such as DNA replication and cell cycle control, demonstrated the potential of NGS expression profiling in organisms without extended genome sequence to improve both data quantity and quality.

  1. 40 CFR 270.310 - What equipment information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mechanical seals). (b) For facilities that cannot install a closed-vent system and control device to comply... Gaseous Emissions” (incorporated by reference as specified in 40 CFR 260.11) or other engineering texts...

  2. [IHE ITI-ATNA profile-based solution for the security of regional healthcare information sharing].

    PubMed

    Yao, Ye-hong; Zhang, Jian-guo

    2008-09-01

    In designing and implementing regional healthcare information sharing systems, the security problem is a very important issue. According to the Audit Trail and Node Authentication (ATNA) Profile of Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) and the practical experiences in several hospitals in Shanghai, a Proxy/Server based security solution for the integration of regional healthcare information sharing systems is proposed, which can solve the cross-platform security problems of integration, providing some security measures such as Central User Authentication, Audit Trail and Node Authentication.

  3. Selected waste minimization opportunities for the Koziarske Zavody Leather Tanning facility. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-28

    The report, written by ICF, Inc., was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of the Slovak Ministry of Economy. This volume of the report discusses the possibilities for waste minimization at the Koziarske Zavody Leather Tanning Facility. It is divided into the following sections: (1) Introduction; (2) Description of the Processes and Current Status of the Facility; (3) Waste Minimization Options and Recommendations; (4) Potential Suppliers of Required Equipment and Materials; (5) Establishing a Waste Minimization Program.

  4. The state of emergency obstetric care services in Nairobi informal settlements and environs: Results from a maternity health facility survey

    PubMed Central

    Ziraba, Abdhalah K; Mills, Samuel; Madise, Nyovani; Saliku, Teresa; Fotso, Jean-Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa remains a challenge with estimates exceeding 1,000 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in some countries. Successful prevention of maternal deaths hinges on adequate and quality emergency obstetric care. In addition to skilled personnel, there is need for a supportive environment in terms of essential drugs and supplies, equipment, and a referral system. Many household surveys report a reasonably high proportion of women delivering in health facilities. However, the quality and adequacy of facilities and personnel are often not assessed. The three delay model; 1) delay in making the decision to seek care; 2) delay in reaching an appropriate obstetric facility; and 3) delay in receiving appropriate care once at the facility guided this project. This paper examines aspects of the third delay by assessing quality of emergency obstetric care in terms of staffing, skills equipment and supplies. Methods We used data from a survey of 25 maternity health facilities within or near two slums in Nairobi that were mentioned by women in a household survey as places that they delivered. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Kenya Medical Research Institute. Permission was also sought from the Ministry of Health and the Medical Officer of Health. Data collection included interviews with the staff in-charge of maternity wards using structured questionnaires. We collected information on staffing levels, obstetric procedures performed, availability of equipment and supplies, referral system and health management information system. Results Out of the 25 health facilities, only two met the criteria for comprehensive emergency obstetric care (both located outside the two slums) while the others provided less than basic emergency obstetric care. Lack of obstetric skills, equipment, and supplies hamper many facilities from providing lifesaving emergency obstetric procedures. Accurate estimation of burden of morbidity and

  5. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rigsby V.P.

    2009-02-12

    ], roofing, structural steel supports, interior walls, and exterior walls) and support system components including the recirculation cooling water (RCW); electrical; communication; fire protection; ventilation; process coolant; process lube oil; utilities such as steam, water and drain lines; (2) Process Piping; (3) Seal Exhaust Headers; (4) Seal Exhaust Traps; (5) Process Valves; (6) Differential Blind Multipliers (DBM)/Partial Blind Multipliers (PBM); and (7) Aftercoolers (also known as Intercell coolers). Converters and compressors while components of the process gas system, are not included in this commingled waste lot. On January 6, 2009, a meeting was held with EPA, TDEC, DOE and the team for the sole purpose of finalizing the objectives, format, and content of WPXL 6.999. The objective of WPXL 6.999 was to provide a crosswalk to the building structure and the PGE components profiles. This was accomplished by providing tables with references to the specific section of the individual profiles for each of the WLs. There are two building profiles and eight PGE profiles. All of the waste identified in the individual profiles will be commingled, shipped, and disposed exclusively under WPXL 6.999. The individual profiles were provided to the EPA and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for information purposes only. This summary WPXL 6.999 will be submitted to EPA, TDEC, and DOE for review and approval. The format agreed upon by the regulators and DOE form the basis for WPXL 6.999. The agreed format is found on pages v and vi of the CONTENTS section of this profile. The disposal of this waste will be executed in accordance with the Action Memorandum for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2002), Removal Action Work Plan for the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, Process Equipment Removal and Demolition, K-25/K-27 Project, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge

  6. Evaluating A Priori Ozone Profile Information Used in TEMPO Tropospheric Ozone Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Sullivan, J. T.; Liu, X.; Newchurch, M.; Kuang, S.; McGee, T. J.; Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Leblanc, T.; Berkoff, T.; Gronoff, G.; Chen, G.; Strawbridge, K. B.

    2016-12-01

    Ozone (O3) is a greenhouse gas and toxic pollutant which plays a major role in air quality. Typically, monitoring of surface air quality and O3 mixing ratios is primarily conducted using in situ measurement networks. This is partially due to high-quality information related to air quality being limited from space-borne platforms due to coarse spatial resolution, limited temporal frequency, and minimal sensitivity to lower tropospheric and surface-level O3. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) satellite is designed to address these limitations of current space-based platforms and to improve our ability to monitor North American air quality. TEMPO will provide hourly data of total column and vertical profiles of O3 with high spatial resolution to be used as a near-real-time air quality product. TEMPO O3 retrievals will apply the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory profile algorithm developed based on work from GOME, GOME-2, and OMI. This algorithm uses a priori O3 profile information from a climatological data-base developed from long-term ozone-sonde measurements (tropopause-based (TB) O3 climatology). It has been shown that satellite O3 retrievals are sensitive to a priori O3 profiles and covariance matrices. During this work we investigate the climatological data to be used in TEMPO algorithms (TB O3) and simulated data from the NASA GMAO Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Forward Processing (FP) near-real-time (NRT) model products. These two data products will be evaluated with ground-based lidar data from the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) at various locations of the US. This study evaluates the TB climatology, GEOS-5 climatology, and 3-hourly GEOS-5 data compared to lower tropospheric observations to demonstrate the accuracy of a priori information to potentially be used in TEMPO O3 algorithms. Here we present our initial analysis and the theoretical impact on TEMPO retrievals in the lower troposphere.

  7. Evaluating A Priori Ozone Profile Information Used in TEMPO Tropospheric Ozone Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Sullivan, John T.; Liu, Xiong; Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; McGee, Thomas J.; Langford, Andrew O'Neil; Senff, Christoph J.; Leblanc, Thierry; Berkoff, Timothy; Gronoff, Guillaume; Chen, Gao; Strawbridge, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is a greenhouse gas and toxic pollutant which plays a major role in air quality. Typically, monitoring of surface air quality and O3 mixing ratios is primarily conducted using in situ measurement networks. This is partially due to high-quality information related to air quality being limited from space-borne platforms due to coarse spatial resolution, limited temporal frequency, and minimal sensitivity to lower tropospheric and surface-level O3. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) satellite is designed to address these limitations of current space-based platforms and to improve our ability to monitor North American air quality. TEMPO will provide hourly data of total column and vertical profiles of O3 with high spatial resolution to be used as a near-real-time air quality product. TEMPO O3 retrievals will apply the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory profile algorithm developed based on work from GOME, GOME-2, and OMI. This algorithm uses a priori O3 profile information from a climatological data-base developed from long-term ozone-sonde measurements (tropopause-based (TB) O3 climatology). It has been shown that satellite O3 retrievals are sensitive to a priori O3 profiles and covariance matrices. During this work we investigate the climatological data to be used in TEMPO algorithms (TB O3) and simulated data from the NASA GMAO Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Forward Processing (FP) near-real-time (NRT) model products. These two data products will be evaluated with ground-based lidar data from the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) at various locations of the US. This study evaluates the TB climatology, GEOS-5 climatology, and 3-hourly GEOS-5 data compared to lower tropospheric observations to demonstrate the accuracy of a priori information to potentially be used in TEMPO O3 algorithms. Here we present our initial analysis and the theoretical impact on TEMPO retrievals in the lower troposphere.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume I, Chapter 1

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.; White, B.B.

    1999-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) began in 1945 as the ''Z'' Division of what was then Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on Oxnard Field, which was owned by the Air Technical Service Command, as a base of operations to store materials and house personnel. Oxnard Field was transferred to the U.S. Engineers, Manhattan District, on July 21, 1945, who converted several wood frame structures to serve functions that were transferred from Los Alamos. Development of the SNL/New Mexico (SNL/NM) site began in 1946 and 1947 with construction of the first four buildings in what is now Tech Area I. Construction of another 14 permanent buildings in Tech Area I began in 1948. SNL constructed a high-explosive assembly area in Tech Area II, a half mile south of Tech Area I, and started plans for several outdoor testing facilities for Tech Area III, about seven miles to the south of Tech Area I, in 1952. By 1953, SNL completed and put into operation the first group of Tech Area III facilities, which included a rocket sled track, a large centrifuge, a vibration facility, and an instrument control center. Tech Area IV and Tech Area V were developed later to provide facilities for pulsed power and high-energy experiments. As the need developed for outdoor testing facilities remote from the public and other work areas, SNL added many facilities on U.S. Air Force and other federal property in the area known as Coyote Test Field (Sandia National Laboratories, 1997b). Most recently, DOE leased U.S. Air Force facilities in the Manzano Area for SNL to use for storage of low-level radioactive waste, mixed waste (a combination of radioactive and hazardous waste), and transuranic waste (Sandia National Laboratories, 1997a).

  9. Electronic Information Systems Use in Residential Care Facilities: The Differential Effect of Ownership Status and Chain Affiliation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jullet A; Zakoscielna, Karolina; Jacobs, Lindsey

    2016-03-01

    The use of electronic information systems (EISs) including electronic health records continues to increase in all sectors of the health care industry. Research shows that EISs may be useful for improving care delivery and decreasing medical errors. The purpose of this project is twofold: First, we describe the prevalence of EIS use among residential care facilities (RCFs), and second, we explore utilization differences by ownership status and chain affiliation. We anticipate that RCFs that are non-profit and non-chain will use more EIS than other categories of RCFs. Data for this project come from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. The sample consists of 2,300 facilities. Overall use of EIS was greatest among RCFs that are non-profit and chain-affiliated. Conversely, the use was lowest among for-profit RCFs that were also non-chain affiliated. This may suggest that these facilities lack the necessary resources or motivation to invest in information systems.

  10. Informal proposal for an Atomic Physics Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.

    1986-01-01

    An Atomic Physics Facility (APF) for experiments that will use radiation from a superconducting wiggler on the NSLS X-13 port is described. The scientific justification for the APF is given and the elements of the facility are discussed. It is shown that it will be possible to conduct a uniquely varied set of experiments that can probe most aspects of atomic physics. A major component of the proposal is a heavy-ion storage ring capable of containing ions with energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon. The ring can be filled with heavy ions produced at the BNL MP Tandem Laboratory or from independent ion-source systems. A preliminary cost estimate for the facility is presented.

  11. An internet-based communication network for information transfer during patient transitions from skilled nursing facility to the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Hustey, Fredric M; Palmer, Robert M

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether the implementation of an Internet-based communication system improves the amount of essential information conveyed between a skilled nursing facility (SNF) and the emergency department (ED) during patient care transitions. Interventional; before and after. ED of an urban teaching hospital with approximately 55,000 visits per year and a 55-bed subacute free-standing rehabilitation facility (the SNF). All patients transferred from the SNF to the ED over 16 months. An Internet-based communication network with SNF-ED transfer form for communication during patient care transitions. Nine elements of patient information assessed before and after intervention through chart review. changes in efficiency of information transfer and staff satisfaction. Two hundred thirty-four of 237 preintervention and all 276 postintervention care transitions were reviewed. The Internet communication network was used in 78 (26%) of all care transitions, peaking at 40% by the end of the study. There was more critical patient information (1.85 vs 4.29 of 9 elements; P<.001) contained within fewer pages of transfer documents (24.47 vs 5.15; P<.001) after the intervention. Staff satisfaction with communication was higher among ED physicians after the intervention. The use of an Internet-based system increased the amount of information communicated during SNF-ED care transitions and significantly reduced the number of pages in which this information was contained.

  12. The Integrated Epidemiologic Profile: Using Multiple Data Sources in Developing Profiles to Inform HIV Prevention and Care Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmore, Suzanne K.; Zaidi, Irum F.; Dean, Hazel D.

    2005-01-01

    HIV/AIDS epidemiologic profiles describe the HIV/AIDS epidemic among state and local populations. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Health Resources Services Administration collaborated to develop one set of guidelines for developing epidemiologic profiles that would serve as the basis for both prevention and care planning.…

  13. The Integrated Epidemiologic Profile: Using Multiple Data Sources in Developing Profiles to Inform HIV Prevention and Care Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmore, Suzanne K.; Zaidi, Irum F.; Dean, Hazel D.

    2005-01-01

    HIV/AIDS epidemiologic profiles describe the HIV/AIDS epidemic among state and local populations. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Health Resources Services Administration collaborated to develop one set of guidelines for developing epidemiologic profiles that would serve as the basis for both prevention and care planning.…

  14. Use of Information Technology for Management of U.S. Postal Service Facilities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    the FMS to approve 4209 forms and to look at existing facility inventory data. Reviews new construction projects (owned and leased) in the planning...often tedious activities. For instance, most new construction projects require generating various forms and letters, such as the notice to proceed and

  15. 76 FR 62818 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Critical Facility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... collection. OMB Control Number: 1652-0050. Forms(s): Critical Facility Security Review (CFSR). Affected... Security Contingency Planning Guidance.'' With OMB approval (OMB Control Number 1652-0050), TSA reached out... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  16. 21 CFR 1.235 - How and when do you cancel your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and faxed cancellations into its registration system, along with CD-ROM cancellations, as soon as... a confirmation. (e) Cancellation by CD-ROM for multiple submissions. If, for example, you do not... cancel your facilities' registrations using a CD-ROM. (1) Registrants submitting their cancellations...

  17. 21 CFR 1.235 - How and when do you cancel your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and faxed cancellations into its registration system, along with CD-ROM cancellations, as soon as... a confirmation. (e) Cancellation by CD-ROM for multiple submissions. If, for example, you do not... cancel your facilities' registrations using a CD-ROM. (1) Registrants submitting their cancellations...

  18. 21 CFR 1.235 - How and when do you cancel your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and faxed cancellations into its registration system, along with CD-ROM cancellations, as soon as... a confirmation. (e) Cancellation by CD-ROM for multiple submissions. If, for example, you do not... cancel your facilities' registrations using a CD-ROM. (1) Registrants submitting their cancellations...

  19. 21 CFR 1.235 - How and when do you cancel your facility's registration information?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and faxed cancellations into its registration system, along with CD-ROM cancellations, as soon as... a confirmation. (e) Cancellation by CD-ROM for multiple submissions. If, for example, you do not... cancel your facilities' registrations using a CD-ROM. (1) Registrants submitting their cancellations...

  20. Barrier-Free School Facilities for Handicapped Students. ERS Information Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunder, Linda H.

    The purpose of this document is to assemble and summarize suggestions, recommendations, and regulations--most of which have been made in the light of increasing local, state, and federal mandates--that might be helpful to school officials in making educational facilities barrier-free for handicapped students. Three survey forms are included to…

  1. A Distribution-Free Multi-Factorial Profiler for Harvesting Information from High-Density Screenings

    PubMed Central

    Besseris, George J.

    2013-01-01

    Data screening is an indispensable phase in initiating the scientific discovery process. Fractional factorial designs offer quick and economical options for engineering highly-dense structured datasets. Maximum information content is harvested when a selected fractional factorial scheme is driven to saturation while data gathering is suppressed to no replication. A novel multi-factorial profiler is presented that allows screening of saturated-unreplicated designs by decomposing the examined response to its constituent contributions. Partial effects are sliced off systematically from the investigated response to form individual contrasts using simple robust measures. By isolating each time the disturbance attributed solely to a single controlling factor, the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney rank stochastics are employed to assign significance. We demonstrate that the proposed profiler possesses its own self-checking mechanism for detecting a potential influence due to fluctuations attributed to the remaining unexplainable error. Main benefits of the method are: 1) easy to grasp, 2) well-explained test-power properties, 3) distribution-free, 4) sparsity-free, 5) calibration-free, 6) simulation-free, 7) easy to implement, and 8) expanded usability to any type and size of multi-factorial screening designs. The method is elucidated with a benchmarked profiling effort for a water filtration process. PMID:24009744

  2. Evaluating Alternative Methodologies for Capturing As-Built Building Information Models (BIM) For Existing Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    enables users to work with large point clouds, directly using AutoCAD tools and commands to create 2D drawings and 3D models. • Leica Cyclone...COBIE, 2D and 3D Technology Services/Vendors H. Survey Equipment Listing I. 2D Floor Plan Sample Plans 1 Evaluating Alternative Methodologies...overlain onto the point clouds and model, all of which are represented and navigable in 3D . • 2D Drawings. 2D drawings of facility floor plans

  3. Detailed information on the FGD retrofit project in Jaenschwalde and the FGD facility in Schwarze Pumpe

    SciTech Connect

    Friede, H.; Nass, K.H.; Breuer, H.

    1995-06-01

    VEAG, the newly founded company for supraregional power generation and distribution in eastern Germany, is retrofitting certain power plants with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) facilities. Lignite is used almost exclusively as fuel in these power plants. Following German unification, the pollution control regulations in force in the Federal Republic of Germany also apply to the power plants operated by VEAG. The decision was made in principle to only build FGDs which are based on the proven limestone scrubbing process and produce recyclable gypsum as the end product. Experience accumulated with FGDs in lignite-fired power plants resulted in a new concept, which elaborated in cooperation with the commissioned consultants (including Siemens/KWU). This paper will present using the example of a new power plant project with FGD - the 2 x 800-MW power plant Schwarze Pumpe - and an FGD retrofit - the 3 x 1000-MW power plant Janschwalde - the salient features of these facilities (full-metal scrubbers, slurry-carrying pipework and treated-flue-gas ducts made of FRP, flue-gas heat recovery, fine-grained solids separation to improve gypsum quality, use of FGD wastewater for ash moistening and gypsum recycling), an overview of the design as well as construction progress and scheduling. The two FGD facilities are being supplied by KRC/Noell and operate on a two-circuit principle.

  4. Adaptive use of prior information in inverse problems: an application to neutron depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson, Mark S.; Coakley, Kevin J.

    2000-03-01

    A flexible class of Bayesian models is proposed to solve linear inverse problems. The models generalize linear regularization methods such as Tikhonov regularization and are motivated by the ideas of the image restoration model of Johnson et al (1991 IEEE Trans. Pattern Anal. Machine Intell. 13 413-25). The models allow for the existence of sharp boundaries between regions of different intensities in the signal, as well as the incorporation of prior information on the locations of the boundaries. The use of the prior boundary information is adaptive to the data. The models are applied to data collected to study a multilayer diamond-like carbon film sample using a nondestructive testing procedure known as neutron depth profiling.

  5. Protein Signaling Networks from Single Cell Fluctuations and Information Theory Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F.; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R.D.; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network. PMID:21575571

  6. Protein signaling networks from single cell fluctuations and information theory profiling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2011-05-18

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network.

  7. Long-term care facilities in Utah: a description of human and information technology resources applied to infection control practice.

    PubMed

    Jones, Makoto; Samore, Matthew H; Carter, Marjorie; Rubin, Michael A

    2012-06-01

    Little is known about the implementation of infection control (IC) programs and information technology (IT) infrastructure in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). We assessed the IC human resources, IT infrastructure, and IC scope of practice at LTCFs in Utah. All LTCFs throughout Utah (n = 80) were invited to complete a written survey in 2005 regarding IC staffing, policies and practices, and IT infrastructure and capacity. Responses were received from 62 facilities (77.5%). Most infection preventionists (IPs) were registered nurses (71%) with on-the-job training (81.7%). Most had other duties besides their IC work (93.5%), which took up the majority of their time. Most facilities provided desktop computers (96.8%) and all provided Internet access, but some of the infrastructure was not current. A minority (14.5%) used sophisticated software packages to support their IC activities. Less than 20% of the facilities had integrated radiology, diagnostic laboratory, or microbiology data with their facility computer system. The Internet was used primarily as a reference tool (77.4%). Most IPs reported taking responsibility for routine surveillance and monitoring tasks, but a substantial number did not perform all queried tasks. They may have difficulty with feedback of specific unit and physician infection rates (43.2% and 67.7%, respectively). Our findings underscore what has previously been reported about LTCFs' IC human resources and IP scope of practice. We also found that some IT infrastructure was outdated, and that existing resources were underutilized for IC purposes. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  8. Information needs for siting new, and evaluating current, nuclear facilities: ecology, fate and transport, and human health.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Clarke, James; Gochfeld, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The USA is entering an era of energy diversity, and increasing nuclear capacity and concerns focus on accidents, security, waste, and pollution. Physical buffers that separate outsiders from nuclear facilities often support important natural ecosystems but may contain contaminants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licenses nuclear reactors; the applicant provides environmental assessments that serve as the basis for Environmental Impact Statements developed by NRC. We provide a template for the types of information needed for safe siting of nuclear facilities with buffers in three categories: ecological, fate and transport, and human health information that can be used for risk evaluations. Each item on the lists is an indicator for evaluation, and individual indicators can be selected for specific region. Ecological information needs include biodiversity (species, populations, communities) and structure and functioning of ecosystems, habitats, and landscapes, in addition to common, abundant, and unique species and endangered and rare ones. The key variables of fate and transport are sources of release for radionuclides and other chemicals, nature of releases (atmospheric vapors, subsurface liquids), features, and properties of environmental media (wind speed, direction and atmospheric stability, hydraulic gradient, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater chemistry). Human health aspects include receptor populations (demography, density, dispersion, and distance), potential pathways (drinking water sources, gardening, fishing), and exposure opportunities (lifestyle activities). For each of the three types of information needs, we expect that only a few of the indicators will be applicable to a particular site and that stakeholders should agree on a site-specific suite.

  9. A method for development of efficient 3D models for neutronic calculations of ASTRA critical facility using experimental information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanin, A. L.; Boyarinov, V. F.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Moroz, N. P.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Timoshinov, A. V.; Volkov, Yu. N.

    2016-12-01

    The application of experimental information on measured axial distributions of fission reaction rates for development of 3D numerical models of the ASTRA critical facility taking into account azimuthal asymmetry of the assembly simulating a HTGR with annular core is substantiated. Owing to the presence of the bottom reflector and the absence of the top reflector, the application of 2D models based on experimentally determined buckling is impossible for calculation of critical assemblies of the ASTRA facility; therefore, an alternative approach based on the application of the extrapolated assembly height is proposed. This approach is exemplified by the numerical analysis of experiments on measurement of efficiency of control rods mockups and protection system (CPS).

  10. A method for development of efficient 3D models for neutronic calculations of ASTRA critical facility using experimental information

    SciTech Connect

    Balanin, A. L.; Boyarinov, V. F.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nevinitsa, V. A. Moroz, N. P.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Timoshinov, A. V.; Volkov, Yu. N.

    2016-12-15

    The application of experimental information on measured axial distributions of fission reaction rates for development of 3D numerical models of the ASTRA critical facility taking into account azimuthal asymmetry of the assembly simulating a HTGR with annular core is substantiated. Owing to the presence of the bottom reflector and the absence of the top reflector, the application of 2D models based on experimentally determined buckling is impossible for calculation of critical assemblies of the ASTRA facility; therefore, an alternative approach based on the application of the extrapolated assembly height is proposed. This approach is exemplified by the numerical analysis of experiments on measurement of efficiency of control rods mockups and protection system (CPS).

  11. Skylign: a tool for creating informative, interactive logos representing sequence alignments and profile hidden Markov models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Logos are commonly used in molecular biology to provide a compact graphical representation of the conservation pattern of a set of sequences. They render the information contained in sequence alignments or profile hidden Markov models by drawing a stack of letters for each position, where the height of the stack corresponds to the conservation at that position, and the height of each letter within a stack depends on the frequency of that letter at that position. Results We present a new tool and web server, called Skylign, which provides a unified framework for creating logos for both sequence alignments and profile hidden Markov models. In addition to static image files, Skylign creates a novel interactive logo plot for inclusion in web pages. These interactive logos enable scrolling, zooming, and inspection of underlying values. Skylign can avoid sampling bias in sequence alignments by down-weighting redundant sequences and by combining observed counts with informed priors. It also simplifies the representation of gap parameters, and can optionally scale letter heights based on alternate calculations of the conservation of a position. Conclusion Skylign is available as a website, a scriptable web service with a RESTful interface, and as a software package for download. Skylign’s interactive logos are easily incorporated into a web page with just a few lines of HTML markup. Skylign may be found at http://skylign.org. PMID:24410852

  12. An exploration of the socio-economic profile of women and costs of receiving abortion services at public health facilities of Madhya Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sushanta K; Kumar, Rakesh; Warvadekar, Janardan; Manning, Vinoj; Andersen, Kathryn Louise

    2017-03-21

    Maternal mortality, which primarily burdens developing countries, reflects the greatest health divide between rich and poor. This is especially pronounced for access to safe abortion services which alone avert 1 of every 10 maternal deaths in India. Primarily due to confidentiality concerns, poor women in India prefer private services which are often offered by untrained providers and may be expensive. In 2006 the state government of Madhya Pradesh (population 73 million) began a concerted effort to ensure access to safe abortion services at public health facilities to both rural and urban poor women. This study aims to understand the socio-economic profile of women seeking abortion services in public health facilities across this state and out of pocket cost accessing abortion services. In particular, we examine the level of access that poor women have to safe abortion services in Madhya Pradesh. This study consisted of a cross-sectional client follow-up design. A total of 19 facilities were selected using two-stage random sampling and 1036 women presenting to chosen facilities with abortion and post-abortion complications were interviewed between May and December 2014. A structured data collection tool was developed. A composite wealth index computed using principal component analysis derived weights from consumer durables and asset holding and classified women into three categories, poor, moderate, and rich. Findings highlight that overall 57% of women who received abortion care at public health facilities were poor, followed by 21% moderate and 22% rich. More poor women sought care at primary level facilities (58%) than secondary level facilities and among women presenting for postabortion complications (67%) than induced abortion. Women reported spending no money to access abortion services as abortion services are free of cost at public facilities. However, poor women spend INR 64 (1 USD) while visiting primary level facilities and INR 256 (USD 4) while

  13. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume II, Chapter 12

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.

    1999-08-01

    Operations in Tech Area IV commenced in 1980 with the construction of Buildings 980 and 981 and the Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator, which at the time was a major facility in SNL's Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. The Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator was a third-generation fusion accelerator that followed Proto I and Proto II, which were operated in Tech Area V. Another accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator I, was constructed in Tech Area IV because there was not enough room in Tech Area V, a highly restricted area that contains SNL's reactor facilities. In the early 1980s, more fusion-related facilities were constructed in Tech Area IV. Building 983 was built to house a fourth-generation fusion accelerator, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II, now called Z Machine, and Buildings 960 and 961 were built to house office space, electrical and mechanical laboratories, and highbay space for pulsed power research and development. In the mid 1980s, Building 970 was constructed to house the Simulation Technology Laboratory. The main facility in the Simulation Technology Laboratory is the High-Energy Radiation Megavolt Electron Source (HERMES) III, a third-generation gamma ray accelerator that is used primarily for the simulation of gamma rays produced by nuclear weapons. The previous generations, HERMES I and HERMES II, had been located in Tech Area V. In the late 1980s, Proto II was moved from Tech Area V to the Simulation Technology Laboratory and modified to function as an x-ray simulation accelerator, and construction of Buildings 962 and 963 began. These buildings comprised the Strategic Defense Facility, which was initially intended to support the nation's Strategic Defense Initiative or ''Star Wars'' program. It was to house a variety of pulsed power-related facilities to conduct research in such areas as directed-energy weapons (electron beams, lasers, and microwaves) and an earth-to-orbit launcher. With the reduction of the Strategic Defense

  14. Wastewater Land Application Permit LA-000141 Renewal Information for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    On July 25, 1994, the State of ldaho Division of Environmental Quality issued a Wastewater Land Application Permit, #LA-000141-01, for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant. The permit expires August 7, 1999. This report is being submitted with the renewal application and specifically addresses; Wastewater flow; Wastewater characteristics; Impacts to vegetation in irrigation area; Impacts to soil in irrigation area; Evaluation of groundwater monitoring wells for Wastewater Land Application Permit purposes; Summary of trends observed during the 5-year reporting period; and Projection of changes and new processes.

  15. 76 FR 48859 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Facility Ground...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... approved Information Collection Request (ICR) concerning groundwater monitoring reporting and recordkeeping... hazardous contaminants to groundwater, and to establish a program whereby any contamination is expeditiously...

  16. Comparison of the measured and calculated time profiles of the leakage current in the magnetically insulated transmission line of the angara-5-1 facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grabovski, E. V.; Gribov, A. N.; Samokhin, A. A.; Shishlov, A. O.

    2013-10-15

    One of the factors limiting the transmission of the electromagnetic pulse to the load in high-power electrophysical facilities is the current leakage in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). In this paper, the Angara-5-1 eight-module facility with an output power up to 6 TW is considered. The experimental and calculated time profiles of the leakage current for eight-module shots with a dynamic load (cylindrical arrays made of 40 tungsten wires) and single-module shots with a solid cylindrical metal load are compared. When interpreting the results, the contribution of vacuum electrons to the leakage current at the transition from the cylindrical to the conical section of the MITL is taken into account.

  17. Comparison of the measured and calculated time profiles of the leakage current in the magnetically insulated transmission line of the angara-5-1 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovski, E. V.; Gribov, A. N.; Samokhin, A. A.; Shishlov, A. O.

    2013-10-01

    One of the factors limiting the transmission of the electromagnetic pulse to the load in high-power electrophysical facilities is the current leakage in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). In this paper, the Angara-5-1 eight-module facility with an output power up to 6 TW is considered. The experimental and calculated time profiles of the leakage current for eight-module shots with a dynamic load (cylindrical arrays made of 40 tungsten wires) and single-module shots with a solid cylindrical metal load are compared. When interpreting the results, the contribution of vacuum electrons to the leakage current at the transition from the cylindrical to the conical section of the MITL is taken into account.

  18. Using geographical information systems for defining the accessibility to health care facilities in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Murad, Abdulkader A

    2014-12-01

    Spatial data play an important role in the planning of health care facilities and their allocation. Today, geographical information systems (GIS) provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analysing health care spatial data; indeed health geoinformatics is an emerging discipline that uses innovative geospatial technology to investigate health issues. The purpose of this paper is to define how GIS can be used for assessing the level of accessibility to health care. The paper identifies the advantages of using GIS in health care planning and covers GIS-based international accessibility with a focus on GIS applications for health care facilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A geodatabase that includes location of health services, road networks, health care demand and population districts was created using ArcGIS software. The geodatabase produced is based on collected data and covers issues, such as defining the spatial distribution of health care facilities, evaluating health demand types and modelling health service areas based on analysis of driving-time and straight-line distances.

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ER_EPLAN

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry System (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Emergency Response Information System (E-PLAN) provides first responders and other emergency response personnel with on-site hazardous chemical information for facilities across the us. It provides EPA's tier II reporting data along with other important information including maps of all facilities with a specified hazardous material, chemical hazards response information system (CHRIS) data, material safety data sheets (MSDS), chemical profiles, emergency response guidebook (ERG) pages, national fire protection association (NPA) codes, and facility risk management plans (RMPs). Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to E-PLAN facilities once the E-PLAN data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  20. RPFdb: a database for genome wide information of translated mRNA generated from ribosome profiling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shang-Qian; Nie, Peng; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hongwei; Li, Hongyu; Yang, Zhilong; Liu, Yizhi; Ren, Jian; Xie, Zhi

    2016-01-04

    Translational control is crucial in the regulation of gene expression and deregulation of translation is associated with a wide range of cancers and human diseases. Ribosome profiling is a technique that provides genome wide information of mRNA in translation based on deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments (RPF). RPFdb is a comprehensive resource for hosting, analyzing and visualizing RPF data, available at www.rpfdb.org or http://sysbio.sysu.edu.cn/rpfdb/index.html. The current version of database contains 777 samples from 82 studies in 8 species, processed and reanalyzed by a unified pipeline. There are two ways to query the database: by keywords of studies or by genes. The outputs are presented in three levels. (i) Study level: including meta information of studies and reprocessed data for gene expression of translated mRNAs; (ii) Sample level: including global perspective of translated mRNA and a list of the most translated mRNA of each sample from a study; (iii) Gene level: including normalized sequence counts of translated mRNA on different genomic location of a gene from multiple samples and studies. To explore rich information provided by RPF, RPFdb also provides a genome browser to query and visualize context-specific translated mRNA. Overall our database provides a simple way to search, analyze, compare, visualize and download RPF data sets. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Concentrations, profiles, and estimated human exposures for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans from electronic waste recycling facilities and a chemical industrial complex in Eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Kannan, K.; Cheng, J.; Horii, Y.; Wu, Q.; Wang, W.

    2008-11-15

    Electronic shredder waste and dust from e-waste facilities, and leaves and surface soil collected in the vicinity of a large scale e-waste recycling facility in Taizhou, Eastern China, were analyzed for total dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) including 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners. We also determined PCDD/Fs in surface agricultural soils from several provinces in China for comparison with soils from e-waste facilities. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs were high in all of the matrices analyzed and ranged from 30.9 to 11,400 pg/g for shredder waste, 3460 to 9820 pg/g dry weight for leaves, 2560 to 148,000 pg/g dry weight for workshop-floor dust, and 854 to 10200 pg/g dry weight for soils. We also analyzed surface soils from a chemical industrial complex (a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) in Shanghai. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs in surface soil from the chemical industrial complex were lower than the concentrations found in soils from e-waste recycling plants, but higher than the concentrations found in agricultural soils. Agricultural soils from six cities in China contained low levels of total PCDD/Fs. Profiles of dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs in soils from e-waste facilities in Taizhou differed from the profiles found in agricultural soils. The estimated daily intakes of TEQs of PCDD/Fs via soil/dust ingestion and dermal exposure were 2 orders of magnitude higher in people at e-waste recycling facilities than in people at the chemical industrial site, implying greater health risk for humans from dioxin exposures at e-waste recycling facilities. The calculated TEQ exposures for e-waste workers from dust and soil ingestion alone were 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the exposures from soils in reference locations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Industrial sector-based volatile organic compound (VOC) source profiles measured in manufacturing facilities in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Yu, Yufan; Mo, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Xinming; Yin, Shasha; Peng, Kang; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Cai, Huihua

    2013-07-01

    Industrial sector-based VOC source profiles are reported for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, based source samples (stack emissions and fugitive emissions) analyzed from sources operating under normal conditions. The industrial sectors considered are printing (letterpress, offset and gravure printing processes), wood furniture coating, shoemaking, paint manufacturing and metal surface coating. More than 250 VOC species were detected following US EPA methods TO-14 and TO-15. The results indicated that benzene and toluene were the major species associated with letterpress printing, while ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol were the most abundant compounds of other two printing processes. Acetone and 2-butanone were the major species observed in the shoemaking sector. The source profile patterns were found to be similar for the paint manufacturing, wood furniture coating, and metal surface coating sectors, with aromatics being the most abundant group and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) as the second largest contributor in the profiles. While OVOCs were one of the most significant VOC groups detected in these five industrial sectors in the PRD region, they have not been reported in most other source profile studies. Such comparisons with other studies show that there are differences in source profiles for different regions or countries, indicating the importance of developing local source profiles. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Economic assessment of the epidemiological profile change: information for health care reforms].

    PubMed

    Arredondo, A

    1997-02-01

    Taking into account the information needed to implement the reform process of the health sector, we present the results of an analysis of costs and the financial consequences of the epidemiological change of four tracer diseases in Mexico, two chronic (diabetes and hypertension) and two infectious diseases (pneumonias and diarrheas). The hospital cost-case management of diabetes expected for 1998 represents the same amount of hospital and ambulatory case management of diarrheas and pneumonias for the same year. The internal competition for resource allocations that is expected, among other factors, is one of the results that permits the argument that changes in the epidemiological profile generate relevant financial consequences in the planning and implementing of structural reforms of the health systems, particularly with regards to the patterns of resource allocation for specific health programs.

  4. Information profiles on potential occupational hazards: Inorganic chromium compounds. Draft report (Second)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    Information profiles are presented for the following inorganic chromium compounds: chromic(VI) acid, chromic(III) hydroxide, chromic(III) oxide, chromic(III) sulfate, chromic(III) sulfate (basic), chromium dioxide, potassium dichromate(VI), lead chromate, sodium-chromate(VI), sodium-dichromate(VI), and zinc-yellow-chromate(VI). Biological effects of hexavalent chromium in humans included skin ulceration, dermatitis, nasal membrane irritation and ulceration, nasal septal perforation, rhinitis, nosebleed, nephritis, liver damage, epigastric pain, pulmonary congestion and edema, and erosion and discoloration of teeth. Chromium(VI) compounds caused mutations in a variety of systems. Exposure to trivalent chromium in the work place has caused contact dermatitis and chrome ulcers. Epidemiological studies indicated respiratory carcinogenicity among workers occupationally exposed during chromate production.

  5. 77 FR 31017 - Office of Facilities Management and Program Services; Information Collection; Background...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... a Basic National Agency Check Criminal History, GSA Form 176; and 2. Two sets of fingerprints on FBI Fingerprint Cards, for FD-258. This is not a request to collect new information, this is a request to...

  6. 12 CFR 555.300 - Must I inform OTS before I use electronic means or facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... transactional web site. A transactional web site is an Internet site that enables users to conduct financial... services. (c) Other procedures. If the OTS Regional Office informs you of any supervisory or compliance...

  7. 12 CFR 555.300 - Must I inform OTS before I use electronic means or facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... transactional web site. A transactional web site is an Internet site that enables users to conduct financial... services. (c) Other procedures. If the OTS Regional Office informs you of any supervisory or compliance...

  8. Information for Importers and Receiving Facilities of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information for importers of hazardous waste from Canada, Chile, Mexico, or non-OECD countries who are subject to the hazardous waste generator and importer requirements described in 40 CFR Part 262 Subpart A – D and F, under RCRA

  9. 40 CFR 355.20 - If this subpart applies to my facility, what information must I provide, who must I submit it to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., what information must I provide, who must I submit it to, and when is it due? 355.20 Section 355.20....20 If this subpart applies to my facility, what information must I provide, who must I submit it to, and when is it due? Use this table to determine the information you must provide, who to provide it to...

  10. Work Smarter Not Harder: Utilizing an Environmental Management Information System to Meet Regulatory Compliance and Reporting Requirements for a Major Source Title V Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-10

    Environmental Management Information System to Meet Regulatory Compliance and Reporting Requirements for a Major Source Title V Facility. Tannis Danley...AND SUBTITLE Work Smarter Not Harder: Utilizing an Environmental Management Information System to Meet Regulatory Compliance and Reporting...Carson) – EMS (Hawaii Garrison, West Virginia National Guard) Environmental Management Information System (EMIS) National Defense Center for Energy and

  11. 40 CFR 355.20 - If this subpart applies to my facility, what information must I provide, who must I submit it to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., what information must I provide, who must I submit it to, and when is it due? 355.20 Section 355.20....20 If this subpart applies to my facility, what information must I provide, who must I submit it to, and when is it due? Use this table to determine the information you must provide, who to provide it...

  12. Entropic Profiler – detection of conservation in genomes using information theory

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Francisco; Freitas, Ana T; Almeida, Jonas S; Vinga, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Background In the last decades, with the successive availability of whole genome sequences, many research efforts have been made to mathematically model DNA. Entropic Profiles (EP) were proposed recently as a new measure of continuous entropy of genome sequences. EP represent local information plots related to DNA randomness and are based on information theory and statistical concepts. They express the weighed relative abundance of motifs for each position in genomes. Their study is very relevant because under or over-representation segments are often associated with significant biological meaning. Findings The Entropic Profiler application here presented is a new tool designed to detect and extract under and over-represented DNA segments in genomes by using EP. It allows its computation in a very efficient way by recurring to improved algorithms and data structures, which include modified suffix trees. Available through a web interface and as downloadable source code, it allows to study positions and to search for motifs inside the whole sequence or within a specified range. DNA sequences can be entered from different sources, including FASTA files, pre-loaded examples or resuming a previously saved work. Besides the EP value plots, p-values and z-scores for each motif are also computed, along with the Chaos Game Representation of the sequence. Conclusion EP are directly related with the statistical significance of motifs and can be considered as a new method to extract and classify significant regions in genomes and estimate local scales in DNA. The present implementation establishes an efficient and useful tool for whole genome analysis. PMID:19416538

  13. An evaluation of phylogenetic informativeness profiles and the molecular phylogeny of diplazontinae (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae).

    PubMed

    Klopfstein, Seraina; Kropf, Christian; Quicke, Donald L J

    2010-03-01

    How to quantify the phylogenetic information content of a data set is a longstanding question in phylogenetics, influencing both the assessment of data quality in completed studies and the planning of future phylogenetic projects. Recently, a method has been developed that profiles the phylogenetic informativeness (PI) of a data set through time by linking its site-specific rates of change to its power to resolve relationships at different timescales. Here, we evaluate the performance of this method in the case of 2 standard genetic markers for phylogenetic reconstruction, 28S ribosomal RNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) mitochondrial DNA, with maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses of relationships within a group of parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae, Diplazontinae). Retrieving PI profiles of the 2 genes from our own and from 3 additional data sets, we find that the method repeatedly overestimates the performance of the more quickly evolving CO1 compared with 28S. We explore possible reasons for this bias, including phylogenetic uncertainty, violation of the molecular clock assumption, model misspecification, and nonstationary nucleotide composition. As none of these provides a sufficient explanation of the observed discrepancy, we use simulated data sets, based on an idealized setting, to show that the optimum evolutionary rate decreases with increasing number of taxa. We suggest that this relationship could explain why the formula derived from the 4-taxon case overrates the performance of higher versus lower rates of evolution in our case and that caution should be taken when the method is applied to data sets including more than 4 taxa.

  14. Innovation information seeking and innovation adoption: Facilities and plant managers' energy outlook comparing linear to nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Joseph J.

    One focal point of concern, policy and a new research will involve identifying individual and organizational facilitative and obstructive factors within the context of energy innovation diffusion in the U.S. This interdisciplinary intersection of people, technology and change is one of serious consequence and has broad implications that span national security, energy infrastructure, the economy, organizational change, education and the environment. This study investigates facilities and plant managers' energy innovation information seeking and energy adoption evolution. The participants are managers who consume more electrical energy than all other groups in the world and are among the top users of natural gas and oil in the United States. The research calls upon the Theory of Planned Behavior, the Diffusion of Innovations and nonlinear dynamics in a study of adoption patterns for 13 energy-related innovations. Cusp catastrophe models and power laws were compared to linear multiple regression to examine and characterize data. Findings reveal that innovation adoption and information seeking differences are slight between private and public sector facilities and plant managers and that the group as a whole may resist change. Of the 13 innovations, some exhibit very strong cusp catastrophe distributions while support for multiple linear regression and the power law were found.

  15. Integrating multi-criteria techniques with geographical information systems in waste facility location to enhance public participation.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Gary

    2006-04-01

    Despite recent U.K. Government commitments' to encourage public participation in environmental decision making, those exercises conducted to date have been largely confined to 'traditional' modes of participation such as the dissemination of information and in encouraging feedback on proposals through, for example, questionnaires or surveys. It is the premise of this paper that participative approaches that use IT-based methods, based on combined geographical information systems (GIS) and multi-criteria evaluation techniques that could involve the public in the decision-making process, have the potential to build consensus and reduce disputes and conflicts such as those arising from the siting of different types of waste facilities. The potential of these techniques are documented through a review of the existing literature in order to highlight the opportunities and challenges facing decision makers in increasing the involvement of the public at different stages of the waste facility management process. It is concluded that there are important lessons to be learned by researchers, consultants, managers and decision makers if barriers hindering the wider use of such techniques are to be overcome.

  16. Formal and informal payments in health care facilities in two Russian cities, Tyumen and Lipetsk.

    PubMed

    Aarva, Pauliina; Ilchenko, Irina; Gorobets, Pavel; Rogacheva, Anastasiya

    2009-09-01

    Informal payments for health care services are common in many transition countries, including Russia. While the Russian government proclaims its policy goal of improving access to and quality of free-of-charge health services, it has approved regulations that give local authorities the right to provide services against payment. This paper reports the results of a population-based survey (n = 2001) examining the prevalence of the use of medical services for which people pay formally or informally in two regional capitals of different economic status. The purpose of the study was to reveal any differences in the forms of and reasons for payments between the two cities and between socio-economic groups. The results indicate that formal payments were more common in the capital of the wealthier region, Tyumen, while the prevalence of informal payments was higher in the capital of the poorer region, Lipetsk. Around 15% of respondents had made informal payments in the past 3 years. Being a female (OR = 1.57), having a chronic disease (OR = 1.62), being a pensioner (OR = 2.8) and being willing to pay for additional medical information (OR = 2.48) increased the probability of informal payments. The survey demonstrates that in Russia access to and quality of publicly funded health care services may be under serious threat due to the current unclear, non-transparent financial rules. The practice of informal payments exists along with the introduction of formal chargeable government services, which may hamper the government's efforts to enhance equality among health service users.

  17. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Undergraduate Education and Research Programs, Facilities, and Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) GRIDVIEW: Recent Improvements in Research and Education Software for Exploring Mars Topography; 2) Software and Hardware Upgrades for the University of North Dakota Asteroid and Comet Internet Telescope (ACIT); 3) Web-based Program for Calculating Effects of an Earth Impact; 4) On-Line Education, Web- and Virtual-Classes in an Urban University: A Preliminary Overview; 5) Modelling Planetary Material's Structures: From Quasicrystalline Microstructure to Crystallographic Materials by Use of Mathematica; 6) How We Used NASA Lunar Set in Planetary and Material Science Studies: Textural and Cooling Sequences in Sections of Lava Column from a Thin and a Thick Lava-Flow, from the Moon and Mars with Terrestrial Analogue and Chondrule Textural Comparisons; 7) Classroom Teaching of Space Technology and Simulations by the Husar Rover Model; 8) New Experiments (In Meteorology, Aerosols, Soil Moisture and Ice) on the New Hunveyor Educational Planetary Landers of Universities and Colleges in Hungary; 9) Teaching Planetary GIS by Constructing Its Model for the Test Terrain of the Hunveyor and Husar; 10) Undergraduate Students: An Untapped Resource for Planetary Researchers; 11) Analog Sites in Field Work of Petrology: Rock Assembly Delivered to a Plain by Floods on Earth and Mars; 12) RELAB (Reflectance Experiment Laboratory): A NASA Multiuser Spectroscopy Facility; 13) Full Text Searching and Customization in the NASA ADS Abstract Service.

  18. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Undergraduate Education and Research Programs, Facilities, and Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) GRIDVIEW: Recent Improvements in Research and Education Software for Exploring Mars Topography; 2) Software and Hardware Upgrades for the University of North Dakota Asteroid and Comet Internet Telescope (ACIT); 3) Web-based Program for Calculating Effects of an Earth Impact; 4) On-Line Education, Web- and Virtual-Classes in an Urban University: A Preliminary Overview; 5) Modelling Planetary Material's Structures: From Quasicrystalline Microstructure to Crystallographic Materials by Use of Mathematica; 6) How We Used NASA Lunar Set in Planetary and Material Science Studies: Textural and Cooling Sequences in Sections of Lava Column from a Thin and a Thick Lava-Flow, from the Moon and Mars with Terrestrial Analogue and Chondrule Textural Comparisons; 7) Classroom Teaching of Space Technology and Simulations by the Husar Rover Model; 8) New Experiments (In Meteorology, Aerosols, Soil Moisture and Ice) on the New Hunveyor Educational Planetary Landers of Universities and Colleges in Hungary; 9) Teaching Planetary GIS by Constructing Its Model for the Test Terrain of the Hunveyor and Husar; 10) Undergraduate Students: An Untapped Resource for Planetary Researchers; 11) Analog Sites in Field Work of Petrology: Rock Assembly Delivered to a Plain by Floods on Earth and Mars; 12) RELAB (Reflectance Experiment Laboratory): A NASA Multiuser Spectroscopy Facility; 13) Full Text Searching and Customization in the NASA ADS Abstract Service.

  19. Formation of a spatial laser-beam profile in a channel of high-power neodymium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'kov, S A; Voronich, I N; Garanin, S G; Zimalin, B G; Savkin, A V; Sharov, O A

    2015-06-30

    A system for one-dimensional spatial profiling of a laser beam is suggested, capable of compensating for the spatial laserbeam distortions that arise due to a nonuniform gain distribution over the aperture in the amplifying channel of high-power Nd:glass lasers with wide-aperture stages on disk active elements. The principle of operation, the approach to calculation of the key element parameters, and calculation and experimental results of studying the formation of spatial profiles of the laser beam intensity at the output from the system in question are described. Possible applications of the system both in single-beam and multi-beam optical schemes are considered. (lasers)

  20. Building an interoperable regional health information network today with IHE integration profiles.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, John; Mussi, José; Parisot, Charles; Russler, Dan

    2006-01-01

    One of the key challenges of architecting electronic record sharing solutions that are scalable and can provide acceptable performance is how to create a longitudinal record for a patient when the desired data will be stored in several distributed point-of-service systems. This paper will review the design and standards selection process that has been made by Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise, a multi-national collaborative of care providers and developers that analyzed a variety of approaches. In particular, the requirements, issues, and alternative solutions for scalable, standards-based data locating services supporting regional and national health information exchange solutions will be discussed. Guidance will be offered to architects of regional health information organizations to take advantage of this experience and leverage the IHE Technical Framework, its testing processes, and tools to accelerate their projects and facilitate the interfacing of EHR systems serving different care settings from different vendors or developers. The implementation experience in 2005-2006 of the IHE Integration Profile specifications supporting an interoperable RHIO solution among various EHR systems from more than 30 vendors will be analyzed, with key lessons summarized.

  1. 40 CFR 270.305 - What tank information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RCRA Standardized Permits for Storage and Treatment Units Information That Must Be Kept at Your... and 267.192. (b) Dimensions and capacity of each tank. (c) Description of feed systems, safety cutoff... process flow for each tank system. (e) A description of materials and equipment used to provide...

  2. 40 CFR 270.305 - What tank information must I keep at my facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RCRA Standardized Permits for Storage and Treatment Units Information That Must Be Kept at Your... and 267.192. (b) Dimensions and capacity of each tank. (c) Description of feed systems, safety cutoff... process flow for each tank system. (e) A description of materials and equipment used to provide...

  3. 78 FR 79008 - Proposed Information Collection; Application for Waiver of Surface Sanitary Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... information in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A). This program helps to assure that requested data can be provided in the desired format, reporting burden (time and... collection requirements on respondents can be properly assessed. Currently, the Mine Safety and...

  4. Institutional Profile: The Sheffield RNAi screening facility: a service for high-throughput, genome-wide Drosophila RNAi screens.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF) was established in November 2008, as Britain's first Drosophila RNAi screening centre, funded by the University of Sheffield, Biomedical Sciences Department and the Wellcome Trust. The SRSF was formed to service the needs of research groups wanting to carry out high-throughput RNAi screens with Drosophila cells. The rationale for the SRSF is to provide RNAi libraries and the specialist equipment and expertise to do such screens. The facility supports both plate reader assays, high-content microscopy as well as the equipment needed to process these samples in a high-throughput fashion. The SRSF can either be used to identify genes involved in disease representing future drug targets, or to identify genes involved in drug resistance and efficacy.

  5. 43 CFR 3276.12 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for facility operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... facilities, include in your monthly report of facility operations: (1) Mass of steam and/or hot water, in klbs, used or brought into the facility. For facilities using both steam and hot water, you must report the mass of each; (2) The temperature of the steam or hot water in deg. F; (3) The pressure of...

  6. 43 CFR 3276.12 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for facility operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... facilities, include in your monthly report of facility operations: (1) Mass of steam and/or hot water, in klbs, used or brought into the facility. For facilities using both steam and hot water, you must report the mass of each; (2) The temperature of the steam or hot water in deg. F; (3) The pressure of...

  7. 43 CFR 3276.12 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for facility operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... facilities, include in your monthly report of facility operations: (1) Mass of steam and/or hot water, in klbs, used or brought into the facility. For facilities using both steam and hot water, you must report the mass of each; (2) The temperature of the steam or hot water in deg. F; (3) The pressure of...

  8. 43 CFR 3276.12 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for facility operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... facilities, include in your monthly report of facility operations: (1) Mass of steam and/or hot water, in klbs, used or brought into the facility. For facilities using both steam and hot water, you must report the mass of each; (2) The temperature of the steam or hot water in deg. F; (3) The pressure of...

  9. Patterns of ownership and accessibility to information and media facilities in democratizing the media in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okwudishu, C

    1988-01-01

    Nigeria needs to embrace technology and pursue private media ownership in order to achieve a democratic media. In recent years, mass media in Africa has become a force with augmenting power that has influenced government and regimes. A democratization of the African media is reliant on media ownership and accessibility of information. Within Nigeria, there is a government monopoly of the media and therefore a road block in the free flow of information. As well, Nigeria's current economic situation has made media accessibility an extravagance. The electronic media is far from effective as many areas have poor reception, no electricity, or face a language barrier. Because most of the print media is written in English, many Nigerians cannot comprehend the printed news.

  10. Interim report: Waste management facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1994-03-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for treating alpha and nonalpha mixed low-level radioactive waste. This report contains information on twenty-seven treatment, storage, and disposal modules that can be integrated to develop total life cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also summarized in this report.

  11. Building Information Modeling (BIM) Primer. Report 1: Facility Life-Cycle Process and Technology Innovation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Information and Technology Services was the first customer to use Evolve FM. The software has a modern platform, only uses space, and is user...Mississippi, to research the benefits of BIM throughout the life-cycle process with the aim of improving the quality of its services and provide a...ii Abstract The architecture, engineering, and construction industries are pursuing process and technological innovations to save time and money

  12. Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  13. Subject Compatibility between "Chemical Abstracts" Subject Sections and Search Profiles Used for Computerized Information Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Inge Berg

    1972-01-01

    Analysis of the distribution of relevant answers to 41 search profiles among the 80 subject sections of Chemical Abstracts" revealed that the average profile requires 10 CA-subject sections for adequate coverage. The average printing expense could be reduced 25 percent by searching the individual profiles in the appropriate subject sections. (5…

  14. Subject Compatibility between "Chemical Abstracts" Subject Sections and Search Profiles Used for Computerized Information Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Inge Berg

    1972-01-01

    Analysis of the distribution of relevant answers to 41 search profiles among the 80 subject sections of Chemical Abstracts" revealed that the average profile requires 10 CA-subject sections for adequate coverage. The average printing expense could be reduced 25 percent by searching the individual profiles in the appropriate subject sections. (5…

  15. Space Station Furnace Facility Management Information System (SSFF-MIS) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the chronology, results, and lessons learned from the development of the SSFF-MIS. This system has been nearly two years in development and has yielded some valuable insights into specialized MIS development. General: In December of 1994, the Camber Corporation and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) were contracted to design, develop, and implement a MIS for Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Station Furnace Facility Project. The system was to be accessible from both EBM-Compatible PC and Macintosh platforms. The system was required to contain data manually entered into the MIS as well as data imported from other MSFC sources. Electronic interfaces were established for each data source and retrieval was to be performed at prescribed time intervals. The SOW requirement that predominantly drove the development software selection was the dual-platform (IBM-PC and Macintosh) requirement. The requirement that the system would be maintained by Government personnel influenced the selection of Commercial Off-the-shelf software because of its inherent stability and readily available documentation and support. Microsoft FoxPro Professional 2.6 for Windows and Macintosh was selected as the development tool. This is a software development tool that has been in use for many years. It is stable and powerful. Microsoft has since released the replacement for this product, Microsoft Visual FoxPro, but at the time of this development, it was only available on the Windows platform. The initial contract included included the requirement for capabilities relating to the Work- and Organizational Breakdown Structures, cost (plan and actuals), workforce (plan and actuals), critical path scheduling, trend analysis, procurements and contracts, interface to manufacturing, Safety and Mission Assurance, risk analysis, and technical performance indicators. It also required full documentation of the system and training of users. During the course of

  16. FY 1997 Hanford telecommunication and informations system user profile, milestone IRM-097-003

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, T.T.

    1997-09-22

    This document reports survey data collected from the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) companies, and the PHMC enterprise companies for purposes of characterizing the Hanford Local Area Network (HLAN) user profile. Telephone, radio, and pager data are also provided. The data reveal that job tasks of the 8,500 Hanford Site workers who use the HLAN are highly, if not completely, computer dependent. Employees use their computers as their pens and paper, calculators, drafting tables and communication devices. Fifty eight percent of the survey respondents predict 90 to 100% loss in productivity if they had no access to a computer. Additionally, 30% of the users felt they would have a 50 to 80% loss in productivity without computers; and more than 68 % use their computers between 4 and 8 hours per day. The profile also shows th at the software packages used most heavily are cc:Mail` the Windows version, Hanford Information, WordPerfece, Site Forms and Look-up. Use of Windows-based products is very high. Regarding the productivity tools that are seldom used, 49 % of the respondents say they ``never use`` the Hanford Help and Hints (HUH). The use of the external intemet by Hanford has shown a large increase. The survey indicates that users rate the intranet and the ability to access other sources of information as the fourth most important computer application. The Microsoft System Management Server (SMS 4) data show that more than 60% of the computers on the HLAN need replacement or upgrades to run the Windows 95 Operating System, which has been selected as the PHMC standard. Although data also show that 77% of the PHMC machines are running the current standard Windows for Workgroup version 3. 1 1, they do not have the memory and/or the hard disk space to upgrade to Windows 95. The survey results indicate that telephone system use is also high and regarded as a useful tool. Pager use is very high and

  17. Improved assessment of aviation hazards to ground facilities using a geographical information system

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M.; Kimura, C.Y.

    1996-06-03

    A computer based system for performing probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) of aircraft crashes to ground structures is under development. The system called ACRA (aircraft crash risk assessment) employs a GIS (geographical information system) for locating, mapping, and characterizing ground structures; and a multiparameter data base system that supports the analytical PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) model for determining PSAs for aircraft crashes. The Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC) is being employed as the base case for study and application of ACRA and evaluation of the projected safety assessment.

  18. Waste management facilities cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.; Burton, D.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains cost information on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex waste streams that will be addressed by DOE in the programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) project. It describes the results of the task commissioned by DOE to develop cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste. It contains transportation costs for most types of DOE waste streams: low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), alpha LLW and alpha MLLW, Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) LLW and DOE equivalent waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and hazardous waste. Unit rates for transportation of contact-handled (<200 mrem/hr contact dose) and remote-handled (>200 mrem/hr contact dose) radioactive waste are estimated. Land transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste is subject to regulations promulgated by DOE, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies. The cost estimates in this report assume compliance with applicable regulations.

  19. Inter-facility transfer of patient information before and after HIPAA privacy measures.

    PubMed

    Boockvar, Kenneth S; Fridman, Bella

    2005-01-01

    The study objectives were (1) to test whether interfacility communication of health information at the time of patient transfer changed as a result of implementation of US privacy protection measures (HIPAA) in April 2003, and (2) to examine patient, transfer, and illness characteristics correlated with interfacility transfer document completion. Observational study. Individuals transferred between a 514-bed urban nursing home and a 1171-bed academic hospital in New York City. Research staff reviewed medical records of patients transferred both ways between nursing home and hospital, examining interfacility transfer documents for 12 items important for continuity of care. Transfer document completeness equaled the percentage of items recorded and legible in transfer documents. Transfers were classified by direction (nursing home-to-hospital [NH-to-H] or hospital-to-nursing home [H-to-NH]), urgency (urgent or not), timing (weekday 9 am to 6 pm or other), and by whether they occurred before 12 am April 14, 2003 (pre-HIPAA), or after (post-HIPAA). Seventy-eight nursing home residents experienced 100 hospital admissions. NH-to-H transfer documents were more complete than H-to-NH documents (86.7% vs 69.0%; P = .002). There were no significant differences between content of transfer documents between pre- and post-HIPAA transfers in either direction of transfer, with and without controlling for patient and illness characteristics. Older age, female gender, dementia diagnosis, shorter duration of nursing home residence, and off-hours hospital transfer were associated with less complete NH-to-H transfer documents, and shorter hospital length of stay was associated with less complete H-to-NH transfer documents. There was no change in written health information communicated during patient transfer between an urban nursing home and an academic hospital before and after HIPAA privacy protection measures were implemented. This suggests that the rule's intent to not restrict the

  20. Does the Systemic Plasma Profile Inform the Liver Profile? Analysis Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model and Individual Compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Maurer, Tristan S; Sweeney, Kevin; Barton, Hugh A

    2016-05-01

    The physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for liver transporter substrates has been established previously and used for predicting drug-drug interactions (DDI) and for clinical practice guidance. So far, nearly all the published PBPK models for liver transporter substrates have one or more hepatic clearance processes (i.e., active uptake, passive diffusion, metabolism, and biliary excretion) estimated by fitting observed systemic data. The estimated hepatic clearance processes are then used to predict liver concentrations and DDI involving either systemic or liver concentration. However, the accuracy and precision of such predictions are unclear. In this study, we try to address this question by using the PBPK model to generate simulated compounds for which we know both systemic and liver profiles. We then developed an approach to assess the accuracy and precision of predicted liver concentration. With hepatic clearance processes estimated using plasma data, model predictions of liver are typically accurate (i.e., true value is bounded by predicted maximum and minimum); however, only for a few compounds are predictions also precise. The results of the current study indicate that extra attention is required when using the current PBPK approach to predict liver concentration and DDI for transporter substrates dependent upon liver concentrations.

  1. Implementation and operational experience of an integrated fuel information service at the BNFL THORP facility

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, D.N.; Ramsden, P.N.

    1995-12-31

    An integrated data management service for the fuel storage areas of British Nuclear Fuel Limited`s (BNFL`s) Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) Division has been implemented to replace several independent systems. This fuel information service (FIS) has brought the nuclear materials accountancy and safeguards records together with the operating records into one database from which all safeguards reports are made. The BNFL`s contractual and commercial and technical data on the stored fuel, required to plan reprocessing campaigns, has also been brought into the common database. A commercially available software package, widely used in warehousing applications and the food and drugs industries, has been used as the basis of FIS. System enhancements and customization have been developed in partnership between THORP Division, BNFL IT Services, and the software supplier. The FIS is the first stage in a project to integrate the materials management systems throughout the THORP nuclear recycling business, including irradiated fuel receipt and storage, reprocessing and storage of products, mixed-oxide fuel manufacture, and the conditioning and storage of wastes.

  2. 40 CFR 370.62 - What information may a State or local official request from a facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... local official request from a facility? The LEPC may ask a facility owner or operator to submit an MSDS... operator must provide the MSDS (unless the owner or operator has already submitted an MSDS to the LEPC for...

  3. 30 CFR 285.912 - After I remove a facility, cable, or pipeline, what information must I submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Decommissioning Decommissioning Report § 285... facility were consistent with those in the approved decommissioning application. Compliance With an Approved Decommissioning Application ...

  4. US tda infrastructure opportunities in South America. Project profile updates, June-December 1995. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This study, conducted by CG/LA Infrastructure, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report provides project profile updates to a study conducted for the TDA Conference on Infrastructure Opportunities held in June, 1995. The updates are organized first by sectors with specific project information including: Energy, Telecommunications, Environment, Industrial, and Transportation. The second section of the report contains an extensive profile of surface transportation projects related to Highways Tunnels and Bridges, Inland Waterways, Ports, Rail and Urban Mass Transit. Each profile provides a technical description, site information, timing, equipment and services demand, nature of demand, and a project assessment. Countries included in the study are: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

  5. High-Frequency Vertical Profiling of Meteorological Parameters Using AMF1 Facility during RAWEX?GVAX at ARIES, Nainital

    SciTech Connect

    Naja, Manish; Bhardwaj, Piyush; Singh, Narendra; Kumar, Phani; Kumar, Rajesh; Ojha, N.; Sagar, Ram; Satheesh, S. K.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2016-07-10

    An extensive field study, RAWEX-GVAX, was carried out during a 10-month (June 2011-March 2012) campaign at ARIES, Nainital and observations on a wide range of parameters like physical and optical properties of aerosols, meteorological parameters and boundary layer evolution were made. This work presents results obtained from high-frequency (four launches per day), balloon-borne observations of meteorological parameters (pressure, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction). These observations show wind speed as high as 84 m/s near the subtropical jet. It is shown that reanalysis wind speeds are in better agreement at 250 hPa (altitude of subtropical jet) than those above or below this value (100 hPa or 500 hPa). These observations also demonstrate that AIRS-derived temperature profiles are negatively biased in the lower altitude region, whereas they are positively biased near the tropopause. WRF simulated results are able to capture variations in temperature, humidity and wind speed profile reasonable well. WRF and AIRS-derived tropopause height, tropopause pressure and tropopause temperature also show agreement with radiosonde estimates.

  6. Concentrations, profiles, and estimated human exposures for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans from electronic waste recycling facilities and a chemical industrial complex in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Cheng, Jinping; Horii, Yuichi; Wu, Qian; Wang, Wenhua

    2008-11-15

    Environmental pollution arising from electronic waste (e-waste) disposal and recycling has received considerable attention in recent years. Treatment, at low temperatures, of e-wastes that contain polyvinylchloride and related polymers can release polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Although several studies have reported trace metals and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) released from e-waste recycling operations, environmental contamination and human exposure to PCDD/Fs from e-waste recycling operations are less well understood. In this study, electronic shredder waste and dust from e-waste facilities, and leaves and surface soil collected in the vicinity of a large scale e-waste recycling facility in Taizhou, Eastern China, were analyzed for total PCDD/ Fs including 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners. We also determined PCDD/Fs in surface agricultural soils from several provinces in China for comparison with soils from e-waste facilities. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs were high in all of the matrices analyzed and ranged from 30.9 to 11400 pg/g for shredder waste, 3460 to 9820 pg/g dry weight for leaves, 2560 to 148000 pg/g dry weight for workshop-floor dust, and 854 to 10200 pg/g dry weight for soils. We also analyzed surface soils from a chemical industrial complex (a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) in Shanghai. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs in surface soil (44.5-531 pg/g dry wt) from the chemical industrial complex were lower than the concentrations found in soils from e-waste recycling plants, but higher than the concentrations found in agricultural soils. Agricultural soils from six cities in China contained low levels (3.44-33.8 pg/g dry wt) of total PCDD/Fs. Profiles of dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs in soils from e-waste facilities in Taizhou differed from the profiles found in agricultural soils. The estimated daily intakes of TEQs of PCDD/ Fs via soil/dust ingestion

  7. Investing in Post-Acute Care Transitions: Electronic Information Exchange Between Hospitals and Long-Term Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Cross, Dori A; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health information exchange (HIE) is expected to help improve care transitions from hospitals to long-term care (LTC) facilities. We know little about the prevalence of hospital LTC HIE in the United States and what contextual factors may motivate or constrain this activity. Cross-sectional analysis of U.S. acute-care hospitals responding to the 2014 AHA IT Supplement survey and with available readmissions data (n = 1,991). We conducted multivariate logistic regression to explore the relationship between hospital LTC HIE and selected IT and policy characteristics. Over half of the hospitals in our study (57.2%) reported engaging in some form of HIE with LTC providers: 33.9% send-only, 0.5% receive-only, and 22.8% send and receive. Hospitals that engaged in some form of LTC HIE were more likely than those that did not engage to have attested to meaningful use (odds ratio [OR], 1.87; P = .01 for stage 1 and OR, 2.05; P < .01 for stage 2), participate in a regional HIE effort (OR, 1.34; P = .021), and exchange information electronically with other hospitals or ambulatory providers (OR, 4.54; P < .01). Organizational affiliation with a skilled nursing facility (OR, 1.29; P = .041) and higher 30-day readmission rates (OR, 1.19; P = .016) were also associated with LTC HIE, but not accountable care organization nor bundled payment participation. As payment to LTC providers and hospitals increasingly emphasizes total patient care and paying for value, those leading these organizations have new incentives to pursue collaborative relationships. Hospitals appear to be investing in electronic information exchange with LTCs as part of a general strategy to adopt EHRs and engage in HIE, but also potentially to strengthen ties to LTC providers and to reduce readmissions. To achieve widespread connectivity, continued focus on adoption of related health IT infrastructure and greater emphasis on aligning incentives for hospital-LTC care transitions would

  8. Strategy for Improving Measurement Uncertainty and Data Quality Information for Observations at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Research Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comstock, J. M.; Sisterson, D.; Kehoe, K.

    2015-12-01

    Quantified uncertainty estimates on measured quantities are required for providing prior information for cloud property retrieval algorithms and constraining model parameterizations and simulations. Methodologies for determining uncertainty can be complex and can include instrument accuracy and precision estimates, and random and systematic errors. Measurement uncertainty is also impacted by environmental and field factors that can be introduced when operating instruments outside the laboratory setting, which impacts both uncertainty and data quality. The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program operates over 100 unique instruments at fixed, mobile, and aerial facilities in diverse climatic regimes around the world. The ARM program is in the process of standardizing how it currently reports measurement uncertainty and developing a new strategy for improving the determination of measurement uncertainty and communicating both the uncertainty and data quality information to users. We will present ARMs plan to standardize the method of reporting measurement uncertainty, as well as share ARMs overall strategies to standardize uncertainty assessment across instrument classes, improving calibration approaches, and providing more consistent data quality assessments to specifically address measurement bias corrections. Our goal is to provide an open forum for discussing the necessary and sufficient elements needed to meet the requirements for retrieval algorithm and model simulation development activities.

  9. Specialized Information Processing Deficits and Distinct Metabolomic Profiles Following TM-Domain Disruption of Nrg1.

    PubMed

    O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Mathur, Naina; O'Callaghan, Matthew J; MacIntyre, Lynsey; Harvey, Richard; Lai, Donna; Waddington, John L; Pickard, Benjamin S; Watson, David G; Moran, Paula M

    2017-09-01

    Although there is considerable genetic and pathologic evidence for an association between neuregulin 1 (NRG1) dysregulation and schizophrenia, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Mutant mice containing disruption of the transmembrane (TM) domain of the NRG1 gene constitute a heuristic model for dysregulation of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling in schizophrenia. The present study focused on hitherto uncharacterized information processing phenotypes in this mutant line. Using a mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach, we also quantified levels of unique metabolites in brain. Across 2 different sites and protocols, Nrg1 mutants demonstrated deficits in prepulse inhibition, a measure of sensorimotor gating, that is, disrupted in schizophrenia; these deficits were partially reversed by acute treatment with second, but not first-, generation antipsychotic drugs. However, Nrg1 mutants did not show a specific deficit in latent inhibition, a measure of selective attention that is also disrupted in schizophrenia. In contrast, in a "what-where-when" object recognition memory task, Nrg1 mutants displayed sex-specific (males only) disruption of "what-when" performance, indicative of impaired temporal aspects of episodic memory. Differential metabolomic profiling revealed that these behavioral phenotypes were accompanied, most prominently, by alterations in lipid metabolism pathways. This study is the first to associate these novel physiological mechanisms, previously independently identified as being abnormal in schizophrenia, with disruption of NRG1 function. These data suggest novel mechanisms by which compromised neuregulin function from birth might lead to schizophrenia-relevant behavioral changes in adulthood. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  10. Classifying Cognitive Profiles Using Machine Learning with Privileged Information in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Alahmadi, Hanin H; Shen, Yuan; Fouad, Shereen; Luft, Caroline Di B; Bentham, Peter; Kourtzi, Zoe; Tino, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of dementia is critical for assessing disease progression and potential treatment. State-or-the-art machine learning techniques have been increasingly employed to take on this diagnostic task. In this study, we employed Generalized Matrix Learning Vector Quantization (GMLVQ) classifiers to discriminate patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) from healthy controls based on their cognitive skills. Further, we adopted a "Learning with privileged information" approach to combine cognitive and fMRI data for the classification task. The resulting classifier operates solely on the cognitive data while it incorporates the fMRI data as privileged information (PI) during training. This novel classifier is of practical use as the collection of brain imaging data is not always possible with patients and older participants. MCI patients and healthy age-matched controls were trained to extract structure from temporal sequences. We ask whether machine learning classifiers can be used to discriminate patients from controls and whether differences between these groups relate to individual cognitive profiles. To this end, we tested participants in four cognitive tasks: working memory, cognitive inhibition, divided attention, and selective attention. We also collected fMRI data before and after training on a probabilistic sequence learning task and extracted fMRI responses and connectivity as features for machine learning classifiers. Our results show that the PI guided GMLVQ classifiers outperform the baseline classifier that only used the cognitive data. In addition, we found that for the baseline classifier, divided attention is the only relevant cognitive feature. When PI was incorporated, divided attention remained the most relevant feature while cognitive inhibition became also relevant for the task. Interestingly, this analysis for the fMRI GMLVQ classifier suggests that (1) when overall fMRI signal is used as inputs to the classifier, the post

  11. Information-theoretic measures for a solitonic profile mass Schrödinger equation with a squared hyperbolic cosecant potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, F. A.; Falaye, B. J.; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-03-01

    Entropic measures provide analytic tools to help us understand the stability of quantum systems. The spreading of the quantum-mechanical probability cloud for solitonic profile mass Schrödinger equation with a potential V(ax) = -V0csch2(ax) is studied in position and momentum space by means of global (Shannon's information entropy) information-theoretic measures. The position information entropy is considered only for x > 0 due to the singular point at x = 0. The entropy densities ρs(x) and ρs(p) are demonstrated and the BBM inequality is saturated.

  12. Evaluating a Priori Ozone Profile Information Used in TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) Tropospheric Ozone Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Matthew Stephen

    2017-01-01

    A primary objective for TOLNet is the evaluation and validation of space-based tropospheric O3 retrievals from future systems such as the Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) satellite. This study is designed to evaluate the tropopause-based O3 climatology (TB-Clim) dataset which will be used as the a priori profile information in TEMPO O3 retrievals. This study also evaluates model simulated O3 profiles, which could potentially serve as a priori O3 profile information in TEMPO retrievals, from near-real-time (NRT) data assimilation model products (NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Forward Processing (FP) and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications version 2 (MERRA2)) and full chemical transport model (CTM), GEOS-Chem, simulations. The TB-Clim dataset and model products are evaluated with surface (0-2 km) and tropospheric (0-10 km) TOLNet observations to demonstrate the accuracy of the suggested a priori dataset and information which could potentially be used in TEMPO O3 algorithms. This study also presents the impact of individual a priori profile sources on the accuracy of theoretical TEMPO O3 retrievals in the troposphere and at the surface. Preliminary results indicate that while the TB-Clim climatological dataset can replicate seasonally-averaged tropospheric O3 profiles observed by TOLNet, model-simulated profiles from a full CTM (GEOS-Chem is used as a proxy for CTM O3 predictions) resulted in more accurate tropospheric and surface-level O3 retrievals from TEMPO when compared to hourly (diurnal cycle evaluation) and daily-averaged (daily variability evaluation) TOLNet observations. Furthermore, it was determined that when large daily-averaged surface O3 mixing ratios are observed (65 ppb), which are important for air quality purposes, TEMPO retrieval values at the surface display higher correlations and less bias when applying CTM a priori profile information

  13. Guide to research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  14. "Cloud Slicing" : A New Technique to Derive Tropospheric Ozone Profile Information from Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Chandra, S.; Bhartia, P. K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new technique denoted cloud slicing has been developed for estimating tropospheric ozone profile information. All previous methods using satellite data were only capable of estimating the total column of ozone in the troposphere. Cloud slicing takes advantage of the opaque property of water vapor clouds to ultraviolet wavelength radiation. Measurements of above-cloud column ozone from the Nimbus 7 total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instrument are combined together with Nimbus 7 temperature humidity and infrared radiometer (THIR) cloud-top pressure data to derive ozone column amounts in the upper troposphere. In this study tropical TOMS and THIR data for the period 1979-1984 are analyzed. By combining total tropospheric column ozone (denoted TCO) measurements from the convective cloud differential (CCD) method with 100-400 hPa upper tropospheric column ozone amounts from cloud slicing, it is possible to estimate 400-1000 hPa lower tropospheric column ozone and evaluate its spatial and temporal variability. Results for both the upper and lower tropical troposphere show a year-round zonal wavenumber 1 pattern in column ozone with largest amounts in the Atlantic region (up to approx. 15 DU in the 100-400 hPa pressure band and approx. 25-30 DU in the 400-1000 hPa pressure band). Upper tropospheric ozone derived from cloud slicing shows maximum column amounts in the Atlantic region in the June-August and September-November seasons which is similar to the seasonal variability of CCD derived TCO in the region. For the lower troposphere, largest column amounts occur in the September-November season over Brazil in South America and also southern Africa. Localized increases in the tropics in lower tropospheric ozone are found over the northern region of South America around August and off the west coast of equatorial Africa in the March-May season. Time series analysis for several regions in South America and Africa show an anomalous increase in ozone in the lower

  15. Classifying Cognitive Profiles Using Machine Learning with Privileged Information in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Alahmadi, Hanin H.; Shen, Yuan; Fouad, Shereen; Luft, Caroline Di B.; Bentham, Peter; Kourtzi, Zoe; Tino, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of dementia is critical for assessing disease progression and potential treatment. State-or-the-art machine learning techniques have been increasingly employed to take on this diagnostic task. In this study, we employed Generalized Matrix Learning Vector Quantization (GMLVQ) classifiers to discriminate patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) from healthy controls based on their cognitive skills. Further, we adopted a “Learning with privileged information” approach to combine cognitive and fMRI data for the classification task. The resulting classifier operates solely on the cognitive data while it incorporates the fMRI data as privileged information (PI) during training. This novel classifier is of practical use as the collection of brain imaging data is not always possible with patients and older participants. MCI patients and healthy age-matched controls were trained to extract structure from temporal sequences. We ask whether machine learning classifiers can be used to discriminate patients from controls and whether differences between these groups relate to individual cognitive profiles. To this end, we tested participants in four cognitive tasks: working memory, cognitive inhibition, divided attention, and selective attention. We also collected fMRI data before and after training on a probabilistic sequence learning task and extracted fMRI responses and connectivity as features for machine learning classifiers. Our results show that the PI guided GMLVQ classifiers outperform the baseline classifier that only used the cognitive data. In addition, we found that for the baseline classifier, divided attention is the only relevant cognitive feature. When PI was incorporated, divided attention remained the most relevant feature while cognitive inhibition became also relevant for the task. Interestingly, this analysis for the fMRI GMLVQ classifier suggests that (1) when overall fMRI signal is used as inputs to the classifier, the post

  16. Combining evolutionary information extracted from frequency profiles with sequence-based kernels for protein remote homology detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Deyuan; Xu, Ruifeng; Xu, Jinghao; Wang, Xiaolong; Chen, Qingcai; Dong, Qiwen; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2014-02-15

    Owing to its importance in both basic research (such as molecular evolution and protein attribute prediction) and practical application (such as timely modeling the 3D structures of proteins targeted for drug development), protein remote homology detection has attracted a great deal of interest. It is intriguing to note that the profile-based approach is promising and holds high potential in this regard. To further improve protein remote homology detection, a key step is how to find an optimal means to extract the evolutionary information into the profiles. Here, we propose a novel approach, the so-called profile-based protein representation, to extract the evolutionary information via the frequency profiles. The latter can be calculated from the multiple sequence alignments generated by PSI-BLAST. Three top performing sequence-based kernels (SVM-Ngram, SVM-pairwise and SVM-LA) were combined with the profile-based protein representation. Various tests were conducted on a SCOP benchmark dataset that contains 54 families and 23 superfamilies. The results showed that the new approach is promising, and can obviously improve the performance of the three kernels. Furthermore, our approach can also provide useful insights for studying the features of proteins in various families. It has not escaped our notice that the current approach can be easily combined with the existing sequence-based methods so as to improve their performance as well. For users' convenience, the source code of generating the profile-based proteins and the multiple kernel learning was also provided at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/main/~binliu/remote/

  17. Formatting modifications in GRADE evidence profiles improved guideline panelists comprehension and accessibility to information. A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Vandvik, Per Olav; Santesso, Nancy; Akl, Elie A; You, John; Mulla, Sohail; Spencer, Frederick A; Johnston, Bradley C; Brozek, Jan; Kreis, Julia; Brandt, Linn; Zhou, Qi; Schünemann, Holger J; Guyatt, Gordon

    2012-07-01

    To determine the effects of formatting alternatives in Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) evidence profiles on guideline panelists' preferences, comprehension, and accessibility. We randomized 116 antithrombotic therapy guideline panelists to review one of two table formats with four formatting alternatives. After answering relevant questions, panelists reviewed the other format and reported their preferences for specific formatting alternatives. Panelists (88 of 116 invited [76%]) preferred presentation of study event rates over no study event rates (median 1 [interquartile range (IQR) 1] on 1-7 scale), absolute risk differences over absolute risks (median 2 [IQR 3]), and additional information in table cells over footnotes (median 1 [IQR 2]). Panelists presented with time frame information in the tables, and not only in footnotes, were more likely to correctly answer questions regarding time frame (58% vs. 11%, P<0.0001), and those presented with risk differences and not absolute risks were more likely to correctly interpret confidence intervals for absolute effects (95% vs. 54%, P<0.0001). Information was considered easy to find, easy to comprehend, and helpful in making recommendations regardless of table format (median 6, IQR 0-1). Panelists found information in GRADE evidence profiles accessible. Correct comprehension of some key information was improved by providing additional information in table and presenting risk differences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping

  19. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping accurate inventory control procedures

  20. Borehole Geologic Data for the 216-Z Crib Facilities, A Status of Data Assembled through the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Lanigan, David C.

    2006-09-25

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assembling existing borehole geologic information to aid in determining the distribution and potential movement of contaminants released to the environment and to aid selection of remedial alternatives. This information is being assembled via the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS), which is being developed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, managed by PNNL, and the Remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this particular study was to assemble the existing borehole geologic data pertaining to sediments underlying the 216-Z Crib Facilities and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Zone. The primary objective for Fiscal Year 2006 was to assemble the data, complete log plots, and interpret the location of major geologic contacts for each major borehole in and around the primary disposal facilities that received carbon tetrachloride. To date, 154 boreholes located within or immediately adjacent to 19 of the 216-Z crib facilities have been incorporated into HBGIS. Borehole geologic information for the remaining three Z-crib facilities is either lacking (e.g. 216-Z-13, -14, and -15), or has been identified as a lesser priority to be incorporated at a later date.

  1. Using Geographic Information Systems to Determine Site Suitability for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Storage Facility.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Charles A; Matthews, Kennith; Pulsipher, Allan; Wang, Wei-Hsung

    2016-02-01

    Radioactive waste is an inevitable product of using radioactive material in education and research activities, medical applications, energy generation, and weapons production. Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) makes up a majority of the radioactive waste produced in the United States. In 2010, over two million cubic feet of LLW were shipped to disposal sites. Despite efforts from several states and compacts as well as from private industry, the options for proper disposal of LLW remain limited. New methods for quickly identifying potential storage locations could alleviate current challenges and eventually provide additional sites and allow for adequate regional disposal of LLW. Furthermore, these methods need to be designed so that they are easily communicated to the public. A Geographic Information Systems (GIS) based method was developed to determine suitability of potential LLW disposal (or storage) sites. Criteria and other parameters of suitability were based on the Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) requirements as well as supporting literature and reports. The resultant method was used to assess areas suitable for further evaluation as prospective disposal sites in Louisiana. Criteria were derived from the 10 minimum requirements in 10 CFR Part 61.50, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 0902, and studies at existing disposal sites. A suitability formula was developed permitting the use of weighting factors and normalization of all criteria. Data were compiled into GIS data sets and analyzed on a cell grid of approximately 14,000 cells (covering 181,300 square kilometers) using the suitability formula. Requirements were analyzed for each cell using multiple criteria/sub-criteria as well as surrogates for unavailable datasets. Additional criteria were also added when appropriate. The method designed in this project proved to be sufficient for initial screening tests in determining the most suitable areas for prospective disposal (or storage

  2. Facility Planning in the Construction Grants Program. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskirk, E. Drannon, Jr.; Cole, Charles A.

    Wastewater facility planning is an essential component of the federal construction grants process. Presented in this instructor's guide is a one-hour presentation on facility planning intended for citizen advisory groups. The guide is part of the Working for Clean Water Project, which also includes a supplementary audiovisual presentation.…

  3. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile 155.5 for K-1015-A Laundry Pit, East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Jacobs, Raymer J.E.

    2008-06-12

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2003. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, to resolve ORR milestone issues, and to establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. The disposal of the K-1015 Laundry Pit waste will be executed in accordance with the 'Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone, 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOB/ORAH-2161&D2) and the 'Waste Handling Plan for the Consolidated Soil and Waste Sites with Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2328&D1). This waste lot consists of a total of approximately 50 cubic yards of waste that will be disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as non-containerized waste. This material will be sent to the EMWMF in dump trucks. This profile is for the K-1015-A Laundry Pit and includes debris (e.g., concrete, metal rebar, pipe), incidental soil, plastic and wood, and secondary waste (such as plastic sheeting, hay bales and other erosion control materials, wooden pallets

  4. Using the surface profiles of modern ice masses to inform palaeo-glacier reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Felix S. L.; Barr, Iestyn D.; Clark, Chris D.

    2010-11-01

    Morphometric study of modern ice masses is useful because many reconstructions of glaciers traditionally draw on their shape for guidance. Here we analyse data derived from the surface profiles of 200 modern ice masses—valley glaciers, icefields, ice caps, and ice sheets with length scales from 10 0 to 10 3 km—from different parts of the world. Four profile-attributes are investigated: relief, span, and two parameters C∗ and C˜ that result from using Nye's (1952) theoretical parabola as a profile descriptor. C∗ and C˜ respectively measure each profile's aspect ratio and steepness, and are found to decrease in size and variability with span. This dependence quantifies the competing influences of unconstrained spreading behaviour of ice flow and bed topography on the profile shape of ice masses, which becomes more parabolic as span increases (with C∗ and C˜ tending to low values of 2.5-3.3 m 1/2). The same data reveal coherent minimum bounds in C∗ and C˜ for modern ice masses that we develop into two new methods of palaeo-glacier reconstruction. In the first method, glacial limits are known from moraines, and the bounds are used to constrain the lowest palaeo ice surface consistent with modern profiles. We give an example of applying this method over a three-dimensional glacial landscape in Kamchatka. In the second method, we test the plausibility of existing reconstructions by comparing their C∗ and C˜ against the modern minimum bounds. Of the 86 published palaeo ice masses that we put to this test, 88% are found to be plausible. The search for other morphometric constraints will help us formalise glacier reconstructions and reduce their uncertainty and subjectiveness.

  5. State Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State-Federal Information Clearinghouse for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA.

    State-by-state public policy profiles are provided by the Council for Exceptional Children's State-Federal Information Clearinghouse. These profiles summarize the present legal base for the delivery of educational services to handicapped children in the United States. Included in each profile is information from various avenues used to establish…

  6. A profile of inactive information seekers on influenza prevention: a survey of health care workers in Central Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sujin; Real, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    This study developed a profile of inactive information seekers by characterising how they are different from active seekers, identifying possible determinants of inactive seekers and understanding characteristics of frequently asked influenza-related questions. A survey and follow-up interviews were conducted between December 2010 and January 2011. A total of 307 health care workers in three hospitals in Central Kentucky (USA) are included. Four study groups were formed based on their information-seeking and vaccination uptake status: (1) Inactive Seekers with Vaccination (N = 141); (2) Inactive Seekers without Vaccination (N = 49); (3) Active Seekers with Vaccination (N = 107); and (4) Active Seekers without Vaccination (N = 10). Inactive Seekers without Vaccination are found to be least responsive to health outcomes. Inactive Seeker groups do not prefer to use sources such as Internet or family/friends. In predicting inactive seekers, Information Needs and Knowledge Perception made significant contributions to prediction. The most frequently asked questions included information about survival duration of influenza virus (N = 25) followed by the incubation period for influenza (N = 24). Profiling inactive seekers can serve as a way to better design customised influenza information sources and services for health care workers, thus giving hospitals through medical libraries additional tools to reduce the spread of influenza. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  7. Identification of Multiple Nonreturner Profiles to Inform the Development of Targeted College Retention Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattern, Krista D.; Marini, Jessica P.; Shaw, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the college retention literature, there is a recurring theme that students leave college for a variety of reasons making retention a difficult phenomenon to model. In the current study, cluster analysis techniques were employed to investigate whether multiple empirically based profiles of nonreturning students existed to more fully…

  8. Identification of Multiple Nonreturner Profiles to Inform the Development of Targeted College Retention Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattern, Krista D.; Marini, Jessica P.; Shaw, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the college retention literature, there is a recurring theme that students leave college for a variety of reasons making retention a difficult phenomenon to model. In the current study, cluster analysis techniques were employed to investigate whether multiple empirically based profiles of nonreturning students existed to more fully…

  9. Integrating Milk Metabolite Profile Information for the Prediction of Traditional Milk Traits Based on SNP Information for Holstein Cows

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Nina; Wittenburg, Dörte; Repsilber, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    In this study the benefit of metabolome level analysis for the prediction of genetic value of three traditional milk traits was investigated. Our proposed approach consists of three steps: First, milk metabolite profiles are used to predict three traditional milk traits of 1,305 Holstein cows. Two regression methods, both enabling variable selection, are applied to identify important milk metabolites in this step. Second, the prediction of these important milk metabolite from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) enables the detection of SNPs with significant genetic effects. Finally, these SNPs are used to predict milk traits. The observed precision of predicted genetic values was compared to the results observed for the classical genotype-phenotype prediction using all SNPs or a reduced SNP subset (reduced classical approach). To enable a comparison between SNP subsets, a special invariable evaluation design was implemented. SNPs close to or within known quantitative trait loci (QTL) were determined. This enabled us to determine if detected important SNP subsets were enriched in these regions. The results show that our approach can lead to genetic value prediction, but requires less than 1% of the total amount of (40,317) SNPs., significantly more important SNPs in known QTL regions were detected using our approach compared to the reduced classical approach. Concluding, our approach allows a deeper insight into the associations between the different levels of the genotype-phenotype map (genotype-metabolome, metabolome-phenotype, genotype-phenotype). PMID:23990900

  10. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program Consumer Information (MQSA) Search for a Certified Facility Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on Search ...

  11. Geochemical information for the West Chestnut Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility for low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

    1984-06-01

    Geochemical support activities for the Central Waste Disposal Facility (CWDF) project included characterization of site materials, as well as measurement of radionuclide sorption and desorption isotherms and apparent concentration limit values under site-relevant laboratory test conditions. The radionuclide sorption and solubility information is needed as input data for the pathways analysis calculations to model expected radioactivity releases from emplaced waste to the accessible environment under various release scenarios. Batch contact methodology was used to construct sorption and desorption isotherms for a number of radionuclides likely to be present in waste to be disposed of at the site. The sorption rates for uranium and europium were rapid (> 99.8% of the total radionuclide present was adsorbed in approx. 30 min). With a constant-pH isotherm technique, uranium, strontium, cesium, and curium exhibited maximum Rs values of 4800 to > 30,000 L/kg throughout the pH range 5 to 7. Sorption ratios were generally lower at higher or lower pH levels. Retardation factors for uranium, strontium, and cesium, explored by column chromatographic tests, were consistent with the high sorption ratios measured in batch tests for these radionuclides. The addition of as little as 0.01 M organic reagent capable of forming strong soluble complexes with metals (e.g., ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or citric acid) was found to reduce the sorption ratio for uranium by as much as two orders of magnitude. Substitution of an actual low-level waste site trench water for groundwater in these tests was found to give a similar reduction in the sorption ratio.

  12. Profile of e-patients: analysis of their cancer information-seeking from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghye; Kwon, Nahyun

    2010-10-01

    Researchers have yet to fully understand how competent e-patients are in selecting and using health information sources, or, more importantly, who e-patients are. This study attempted to uncover how cancer e-patients differ from other cancer information seekers in terms of their sociodemographic background, social networks, information competence, and selection of cancer information sources. We analyzed data from the National Cancer Institute's 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey, and a series of chi-square tests showed that factors that distinguished cancer e-patients from other cancer information seekers were age, gender, education, employment status, health insurance, and membership in online support groups. They were not different in the other factors measured by the survey. Our logistic regression analysis revealed that the e-patients were older and talked about their health issues with friends or family more frequently compared with online health information seekers without cancer. While preferring information from their doctors over the Internet, e-patients used the Internet as their primary source. In contrast to previous literature, we found little evidence that e-patients were savvy health information consumers who could make informed decisions on their own health. The findings of this study addressed a need for a better design and delivery of health information literacy programs for cancer e-patients.

  13. Understanding claims-based quality profiles in primary care practice: the role of office system tools and health information technology.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mark A; Pavur, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Claims-based quality profiles are increasingly used by third-party payers as a means of monitoring and remunerating physician performance. As traditional approaches to assessing performance yield to electronically generated data, identifying practice tools capable of influencing the behavior of these measures becomes essential to effectively managing medical practices. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of using office system tools (i.e., patient registries, physician reminders, and flow sheets) and health information technology (HIT) on claims-based quality profile scores in primary care practices. We analyzed survey responses from primary care physicians (n = 191) regarding their use of office system tools and HIT. These responses were linked to quality profile scores obtained from a Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas claims-based data set. Elevated quality profile scores were associated with physicians who reported higher use of HIT. In addition, the influence of one office system tool, physician reminders, was contingent upon the availability and use of HIT. Our findings indicate that primary care practices that fail to implement or use HIT appropriately will fare poorly in systems that monitor and reward performance based on measures derived from claims data. Linking prompts or reminders directly to clinical actions that influence quality indicators endorsed by payers should be a component of quality assurance programs.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document [NOTE: Volume 1, Chapters 6 through 10

    SciTech Connect

    March, F.; Guerrero, J.V.; Johns, W.H.; Schetnan, R.; Bayliss, L.S.; Kuzio, K.A.; White, B.B.

    1999-09-01

    Operations at the Neutron Generator Facility include fabrication of war reserve neutron generators and prototype switch tubes. Neutron generators initiate nuclear fission in a nuclear weapon by providing a flux of neutrons at the proper time. The mission of the Neutron Generator Facility is to support U.S. nuclear deterrent capabilities by fabricating war reserves of the following: Neutron generators (external initiators for nuclear weapons); Neutron tubes; and Prototype switch tubes (expanded scenario only).

  15. The Technological Imperative: Information Systems and Racial Profiling from Nazi Germany to the War on Terror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Howard A.

    2005-01-01

    Both parts of the author's past--a concern with terrorism and with the education of future agents of the state who will be expected to curb, if not to eliminate, it--contribute to what he wants to say in this essay. He seeks to make six points: (1) Racial profiling is not a discrete issue but an instance of a more pervasive racism that is evident…

  16. Use of geographic information systems technology to track critical health code violations in retail facilities available to populations of different socioeconomic status and demographics.

    PubMed

    Darcey, Valerie L; Quinlan, Jennifer J

    2011-09-01

    Research shows that community socioeconomic status (SES) predicts, based on food service types available, whether a population has access to healthy food. It is not known, however, if a relationship exists between SES and risk for foodborne illness (FBI) at the community level. Geographic information systems (GIS) give researchers the ability to pinpoint health indicators to specific geographic locations and detect resulting environmental gradients. It has been used extensively to characterize the food environment, with respect to access to healthy foods. This research investigated the utility of GIS in determining whether community SES and/or demographics relate to access to safe food, as measured by food service critical health code violations (CHV) as a proxy for risk for FBI. Health inspection records documenting CHV for 10,859 food service facilities collected between 2005 and 2008 in Philadelphia, PA, were accessed. Using an overlay analysis through GIS, CHV were plotted over census tracts of the corresponding area. Census tracts (n = 368) were categorized into quintiles, based on poverty level. Overall, food service facilities in higher poverty areas had a greater number of facilities (with at least one CHV) and had more frequent inspections than facilities in lower poverty areas. The facilities in lower poverty areas, however, had a higher average number of CHV per inspection. Analysis of CHV rates in census tracts with high concentrations of minority populations found Hispanic facilities had more CHV than other demographics, and Hispanic and African American facilities had fewer days between inspections. This research demonstrates the potential for utilization of GIS mapping for tracking risks for FBI. Conversely, it sheds light on the subjective nature of health inspections, and indicates that underlying factors might be affecting inspection frequency and identification of CHV, such that CHV might not be a true proxy for risk for FBI.

  17. 77 FR 27779 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Voluntary Submission of Food/Feed Facility Profile Information AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is...

  18. The Information Professional's Profile: An Analysis of Brazilian Job Vacancies on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Cunha, Miriam Vieira

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Report of a study to discover and describe job vacancies for information professionals available online at specific sites and discussion lists between January 2005 and February 2008. Method: The study uses Bardin's content analysis technique and the following analysis criteria: information source, institutional type, professional…

  19. Assessing health consumerism on the Web: a demographic profile of information-seeking behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lorence, Daniel P; Park, Heeyoung; Fox, Susannah

    2006-08-01

    The growing diversity of the online health information community is increasingly cited as a limiting factor related to the potential of the Internet as an effective health communication channel and information resource. Public-access Internet portals and decreasing costs of personal computers have created a consensus that unequal access to information, or a "Digital Divide," presents a like problem specific to health care consumers. Access to information, however, is an essential part of the consumer-centric framework outlined in the recently proposed U.S. National Health Information Infrastructure (NHII) and Health Architecture initiatives. To date little research has been done to differentiate the types of health information sought on the Web by different subgroups, linking user characteristics and health-seeking behaviors. Data from a study of consumer Web search activity in a post-intervention era serves as a natural experiment, and can identify whether a "digitally underserved group" persists in the United States. Such an environment would serve to exclude traditionally underserved groups from the benefits of the planned national heath information infrastructure. This exploratory technology assessment study seeks to differentiate and delineate specific behaviors, or lack of desired behaviors, across targeted health care subgroups. Doing so allows the design of more effective strategies to promote the use of the Web as a health education and health promotion tool, under the envisioned shared decision-making, consumer-centric health information model.

  20. 77 FR 70833 - Comment Request for Information Collection on the ETA 9048, Worker Profiling and Reemployment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ...: Submit written comments to Scott Gibbons, Office of Unemployment Insurance, Employment and Training...-877-889-5627 (TTY/TDD). Email: gibbons.scott@dol.gov . A copy of the proposed information collection request (ICR) can be obtained by contacting Mr. Gibbons. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The...

  1. The Environmental Protection Agency: A Profile of Its Information Collection and Dissemination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadec, Sarah T.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an overview of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its publication distribution programs. Topics discussed include information collection, vehicles for dissemination, the application of information technologies, and primary users. The relationship of the EPA to the Government Printing Office (GPO) and the National Technical…

  2. The Environmental Protection Agency: A Profile of Its Information Collection and Dissemination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadec, Sarah T.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an overview of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its publication distribution programs. Topics discussed include information collection, vehicles for dissemination, the application of information technologies, and primary users. The relationship of the EPA to the Government Printing Office (GPO) and the National Technical…

  3. Information Security: A Scientometric Study of the Profile, Structure, and Dynamics of an Emerging Scholarly Specialty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Elizabeth K. Hawthorne, Karl J. Klee , Andrea Lawrence, and Susanne Wetzel. 2010b. “Towards Information Assurance (IA) Curricular Guidelines.” Proceedings...Impagliazzo, Youry Khmelevsky, Karl Klee , Margaret Leary, Amelia Philips, Norbert Pohlmann, Blair Taylor, and Shambhu Upadhyaya. 2011. “Information Assurance

  4. Paleohydrological Information from Profiles in Pore Water of Holocene Low-Permeability Cores and Groundwater Flow Simulation, Lake Kasumigaura, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamoto, N.; Shimada, J.

    2014-12-01

    The paleohydrological information can become important to predict hydrological conditions in the future. In Japan, which hydrologically is characterized by relatively small catchment scales with steep relief of topography under humid temperate climatic conditions, the residence time of the groundwater should be relatively short. Thus the paleohydrological information preserved in the groundwater aquifer should also be limited compared with the continental aquifer. However, regarding groundwater in clay and silt sediments have low-permeability characteristic, archiving the paleohydrologic information at the time of deposition is expected.  Therefore, in this study, cores were drilled into Holocene clay and silt deposits (Site K-1 and Site K-2) in the Lake Kasumigaurain Japan, where the depositional rate 10,000 years ago was rapid and it has been affected strongly by sea level changes including transgression and regression. By using the obtained core samples and extracted pore water from the cores, paleohydrologic information was investigated, and it was tried to understand hydrologic environments at the study area during a Holocene. In addition, groundwater flow and solute transport simulation were conducted to reproduce profiles of pore water.  Results of investigation show that the profiles of pore water contents reflect sea level change and the difference in hydrological environment at that time at each site. The content of the paleo-brackish water in the culmination of transgression was about 14,000 mg/l in Cl-, -13.0‰ in δD and -2.6‰ in δ18O. It is allowed better understanding paleohydrological information by studying not only inorganic chemistry contents and stable isotopes of pore water and also the diatom fossils and groundwater flow and solute transport simulation. We will characterize the paleohydrological information of the study area acquired by those investigations and analysis.

  5. The utility of a geographic information system in facility/land use-related opportunities and constraints analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.

    1994-12-31

    Facility/land use-related opportunities and constraints analysis, which is indispensable for the evaluation of potential future uses for a site, is essentially spatial in nature. Spatial analysis is best accomplished using a geographic information system (GIS), as a GIS allows the identification and reporting or mapping of complex relationships among multiple data layers such as geology, soils, vegetation, contamination, and facilities. GIS-based maps and reports are valuable tools for communicating facility/land use-related opportunities and constraints to decision makers. This paper defines the term {open_quotes}GIS,{close_quotes}, provides an example of how a GIS could be used to conduct opportunities and constraints analysis at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and summarizes the benefits of using a GIS for this analysis. Because a GIS is often seen as a {open_quotes}black box{close_quotes} shrouded in technical jargon, this paper attempts to describe the concepts and benefits of a GIS in language understandable to decision makers who are not GIS experts but who migth profit from the use of GIS products. The purpose of this paper is to alert DOE decision makers to a valuable source of facility/land use-related information that already exists at many sites and that should not be overlook during the analysis of future use options.

  6. Developing Poultry Facility Type Information from USDA Agricultural Census Data for Use in Epidemiological and Economic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C

    2007-12-05

    The epidemiological and economic modeling of poultry diseases requires knowing the size, location, and operational type of each poultry type operation within the US. At the present time, the only national database of poultry operations that is available to the general public is the USDA's 2002 Agricultural Census data, published by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, herein referred to as the 'NASS data'. The NASS data provides census data at the county level on poultry operations for various operation types (i.e., layers, broilers, turkeys, ducks, geese). However, the number of farms and sizes of farms for the various types are not independent since some facilities have more than one type of operation. Furthermore, some data on the number of birds represents the number sold, which does not represent the number of birds present at any given time. In addition, any data tabulated by NASS that could identify numbers of birds or other data reported by an individual respondent is suppressed by NASS and coded with a 'D'. To be useful for epidemiological and economic modeling, the NASS data must be converted into a unique set of facility types (farms having similar operational characteristics). The unique set must not double count facilities or birds. At the same time, it must account for all the birds, including those for which the data has been suppressed. Therefore, several data processing steps are required to work back from the published NASS data to obtain a consistent database for individual poultry operations. This technical report documents data processing steps that were used to convert the NASS data into a national poultry facility database with twenty-six facility types (7 egg-laying, 6 broiler, 1 backyard, 3 turkey, and 9 others, representing ducks, geese, ostriches, emus, pigeons, pheasants, quail, game fowl breeders and 'other'). The process involves two major steps. The first step defines the rules used to estimate the data that is suppressed

  7. Florida Educational Facilities, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 1999, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are: Buchholz High School (Alachua County); Gator Run Elementary School (Broward); Corkscrew Elementary School (Collier); The 500 Role Models Academy of Excellence (Miami-Dade); Caribbean…

  8. Florida Educational Facilities, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This publication describes Florida school and community college facilities completed in 2000, including photographs and floor plans. The facilities profiled are:J. R. Arnold High School (Bay County); Falcon Cove Middle School (Broward); Floranada Elementary School (Broward); Lyons Creek Middle School (Broward); Parkside Elementary School…

  9. Information profiles on potential occupational hazards: Inorganic azides. Draft report (Second)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    Information is presented for these inorganic azides: barium azide, cesium azide, hydrazoic acid, lead azide, lithium azide, potassium azide, rubidium azide, silver azide, and sodium azide. The data given for each compound includes chemical structure, synonyms, chemical and physical properties, production information, uses, manufacturers and distributors, manufacturing processes, impurities and additives, occupational exposures, control technology and work practices, biological effects, ongoing studies, exposure standards, and sources of additional information. Humans who have suffered accidental exposures experienced inflammation of the mucous membranes and eye irritation. Necrosisan demyelination of nerve fibers were reported among mice and monkeys following acute intraperitoneal and subchronic intramuscular exposures, respectively. Subchronic oral exposure to rats caused histological cerebral and liver damage. Mutagenicity testing was positive for sodium azide in a variety of assays.

  10. Wastewater Facilities Operation and Management. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, David A.

    Local communities must be willing to spend funds to assure the proper operation and management of wastewater treatment facilities. Designed for citizen advisory groups, the one-hour learning session described in this instructor's manual covers problem areas, federal requirements, and responsibilities for wastewater plant operations and management.…

  11. 30 CFR 250.225 - What information on the onshore support facilities you will use must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... onshore support facilities you will use. (c) Unusual solid and liquid wastes. A description of the quantity, composition, and method of disposal of any unusual solid and liquid wastes (attributable to your... store and dispose of solid and liquid wastes generated by your proposed exploration activities (see...

  12. 30 CFR 250.225 - What information on the onshore support facilities you will use must accompany the EP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Unusual solid and liquid wastes. A description of the quantity, composition, and method of disposal of any unusual solid and liquid wastes (attributable to your proposed exploration activities) likely to be.... A description of the onshore facilities you will use to store and dispose of solid and liquid wastes...

  13. The World Bank Credit Facility to Nigerian Universities: Impact on Information Supply in Third-Generation University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozowa, V. N.; Sule, N. N.

    1997-01-01

    The Federal Government of Nigeria was granted US $120 million by the World Bank for solving long-standing university library problems, like small and poor quality of library collections, lack of library equipment, and training of staff. Recommends fiscal measures and asserts the credit facility serves as a palliative for the problem of information…

  14. Wastewater Facilities Operation and Management. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, David A.

    Local communities must be willing to spend funds to assure the proper operation and management of wastewater treatment facilities. Designed for citizen advisory groups, the one-hour learning session described in this instructor's manual covers problem areas, federal requirements, and responsibilities for wastewater plant operations and management.…

  15. 77 FR 68104 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Socio-Economic Profile of Small-Scale...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... invasive species. The data gathered will be used to describe U.S. Caribbean fisheries, assess socio... Management Act (U.S.C. 1801 et seq.), the Regulatory Flexibility Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the... is for a new information collection. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) proposes to collect...

  16. Beef consumer segment profiles based on information source usage in Poland.

    PubMed

    Żakowska-Biemans, Sylwia; Pieniak, Zuzanna; Gutkowska, Krystyna; Wierzbicki, Jerzy; Cieszyńska, Katarzyna; Sajdakowska, Marta; Kosicka-Gębska, Małgorzata

    2017-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to identify market segments based on consumers' usage of information sources about beef and to investigate whether the use of information sources was associated with the type of information consumers were searching for, factors guiding their decision processes to buy beef and motives related to beef consumption. Data were collected in 2014 through a self-administered survey of 501 regular beef consumers. Three distinct clusters were identified: Enthusiast (38.5%), Conservative (43.1%) and Ultra Conservative (18.4%). This study revealed that culinary and personal sources of information on beef were the most frequently used. Taste, perceived healthiness and suitability to prepare many dishes were reported as primary motives to eat beef. These results show that communication channels such as culinary programs and opportunities provided by the development of labelling systems to guarantee beef quality should be considered when developing policies and strategies to increase beef consumption in Poland. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Expertomica metabolite profiling: getting more information from LC-MS using the stochastic systems approach.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jan; Vanek, Jan; Soukup, Jirí; Stys, Dalibor

    2009-10-15

    Mass spectrometers are sophisticated, fine instruments which are essential in a variety applications. However, the data they produce are usually interpreted in a rather primitive way, without considering the accuracy of this data and the potential errors in identifying peaks. Our new approach corrects this situation by dividing the LC-MS output into three components: (i) signature of the analyte, (ii) random noise and (iii) systemic noise. The systemic noise is related to the instrument and to the particular experiment; its characteristics change in time and depend on the analyzed substance. Working with these components allows us to quantify the probability of peak errors and, at the same time, to retrieve some peaks which get lost in the noise when using the existing methods. Our software tool, Expertomica metabolite profiling, automatically evaluates the given instrument, detects compounds and calculates the probability of individual peaks. It does not need any artificial user-defined parameters or thresholds. MATLAB scripts with a simple graphical user interface are free to download from http://sourceforge.net/projects/expertomica-eda/. The software reads data exported by most Thermo and Agilent spectrometers, and it can also read the more general JCAMP-DX ASCII format. Other formats will be supported on request, assuming that the user can provide representative data samples.

  18. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project. Executive summary: Volume 1, Program summary information; Volume 2, Waste stream technical summary: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. The engineering studies, initiated in July 1991, identified 37 mixed waste streams, and 55 low-level waste streams. This report documents the waste stream information and potential treatment strategies, as well as the regulatory requirements for the Department of Energy-owned treatment facility option. The total report comprises three volumes and two appendices. This report consists of Volume 1, which explains the overall program mission, the guiding assumptions for the engineering studies, and summarizes the waste stream and regulatory information, and Volume 2, the Waste Stream Technical Summary which, encompasses the studies conducted to identify the INEL`s waste streams and their potential treatment strategies.

  19. Resampling soil profiles can constrain large-scale changes in the C cycle: obtaining robust information from radiocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, W. T.; Prior, C.; Lambie, S.; Tate, K.; Bruhn, F.; Parfitt, R.; Schipper, L.; Wilde, R. H.; Ross, C.

    2006-12-01

    , 1 kg C m-2 or more may be reactive on decadal timescales, supporting evidence of soil C losses from throughout the soil profiles. Information from resampled soil profiles can be combined with additional contemporary measurements to test hypotheses about mechanisms for soil C changes. For example, Δ14C in excess of 200‰ in water extractable dissolved organic C (DOC) from surface soil horizons supports the hypothesis that decadal movement of DOC represents an important translocation of soil C. These preliminary results demonstrate that resampling whole soil profiles can support substantial progress in C cycle science, ranging from updating operational C accounting systems to the frontiers of research. Resampling can be complementary or superior to fixed-depth interval sampling of surface soil layers. Resampling must however be undertaken with relative urgency to maximize the potential interpretive power of bomb-derived radiocarbon.

  20. Cost effective operations through informed risk taking at the DuPage County wastewater facility Knollwood WWTP phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Rafter, J.C.; Palmer, R.A.; Bowles, B.

    1998-07-01

    Using a proactive approach to responsible wastewater collection and treatment, DuPage County, Illinois in conjunction with CTE identified and presented adverse compliance challenges to the IEPA regarding the capabilities of the Region IX-East collection and treatment facilities. This approach contained an element of risk on the County's part, knowing that the IEPA's non-compliance penalties regarding these issues were severe and that a resolution within a court ordered time schedule. A careful plan was developed to involve all the parties, the County, the regulatory agencies, the engineer and the contractor to solve the potential challenges facing the County based on anticipated increases in wastewater flow due to population growth in the Region. Regional IX-Easts' customers are served by the Knollwood Wastewater Treatment Plant (Knollwood). The Knollwood site is located just north of forest preserve property along the Des Plaines River in Burr Ridge, Illinois. The surrounding area to the west consists of a commercial industrial park. A residential development is located to the north of the plant approximately 1000 feet from the nearest treatment plant processing unit. The Knollwood Plant was rated to treat an average daily flow of 8.3 mgd prior to the construction of the new facilities. The new facilities allow the plant to treat an average daily flow of 10 mgd and peak flows up to 50 mgd.

  1. National and sub-national under-five mortality profiles in Peru: a basis for informed policy decisions

    PubMed Central

    Huicho, Luis; Trelles, Miguel; Gonzales, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Background Information on profiles for under-five causes of death is important to guide choice of child-survival interventions. Global level data have been published, but information at country level is scarce. We aimed at defining national and departmental trends and profiles of under-five mortality in Peru from 1996 through 2000. Methods We used the Ministry of Health registered under-five mortality data. For correction of under-registration, a model life-table that fitted the age distribution of the population and of registered deaths was identified for each year. The mortality rates corresponding to these model life-tables were then assigned to each department in each particular year. Cumulative reduction in under-five mortality rate in the 1996–2000 period was estimated calculating the annual reduction slope for each department. Departmental level mortality profiles were constructed. Differences in mortality profiles and in mortality reduction between coastal, andean and jungle regions were also assessed. Results At country level, only 4 causes (pneumonia, diarrhoea, neonatal diseases and injuries) accounted for 68% of all deaths in 1996, and for 62% in 2000. There was 32.7% of under-five death reduction from 1996 to 2000. Diarrhoea and pneumonia deaths decreased by 84.5% and 41.8%, respectively, mainly in the andean region, whereas deaths due to neonatal causes and injuries decreased by 37.2% and 21.7%. For 1996–2000 period, the andean, coast and jungle regions accounted for 52.4%, 33.1% and 14.4% of deaths, respectively. These regions represent 41.0%, 46.4% and 12.6% of under-five population. Both diarrhoea and pneumonia constitute 30.6% of under-five deaths in the andean region. As a proportion, neonatal deaths remained stable in the country from 1996 to 2000, accounting for about 30% of under-five deaths, whereas injuries and "other" causes, including congenital anomalies, increased by about 5%. Conclusion Under-five mortality declined substantially in

  2. Safety Profile of Finasteride: Distribution of Adverse Effects According to Structural and Informational Dichotomies of the Mind/Brain.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G; Rowland, David L; Manea, Mirela; Georgescu, Simona R; Păunică, Ioana; Sinescu, Ioanel

    2017-02-04

    Finasteride is currently used extensively for male androgenic alopecia and benign prostatic hyperplasia; however, some adverse effects are severe and even persistent after treatment cessation, the so-called 'post-finasteride syndrome'. The following most severe adverse effects-sexual dysfunction and depression-often occur together and may potentiate one other, a fact that could explain (at least in part) the magnitude and persistence of finasteride adverse effects. This paper presents the pharmacological action of finasteride and the corresponding adverse effects, the biological base explaining the occurrence, persistence and distribution of these adverse effects, and a possible therapeutic solution for post-finasteride syndrome. The distribution of finasteride adverse effects is presented within a comprehensive and modern neuro-endocrine perspective related to structural and informational dichotomies of the brain. Understanding the variation of finasteride side effects among different populations would be necessary not only to delineate the safety profile of finasteride for different subgroups of men (a subject may or may not be affected by a certain anti-hormonal compound dependent on the individual neuro-endocrine profile), but also as a possible premise for a therapeutic approach of finasteride adverse effects. Such therapeutic approach should include administration of exogenous hormones, which are deficient in men with post-finasteride syndrome, namely dihydrotestosterone (in right-handed men) or progesterone/dihydroprogesterone (in left-handed subjects).

  3. Manifestations of personality in Online Social Networks: self-reported Facebook-related behaviors and observable profile information.

    PubMed

    Gosling, Samuel D; Augustine, Adam A; Vazire, Simine; Holtzman, Nicholas; Gaddis, Sam

    2011-09-01

    Despite the enormous popularity of Online Social Networking sites (OSNs; e.g., Facebook and Myspace), little research in psychology has been done on them. Two studies examining how personality is reflected in OSNs revealed several connections between the Big Five personality traits and self-reported Facebook-related behaviors and observable profile information. For example, extraversion predicted not only frequency of Facebook usage (Study 1), but also engagement in the site, with extraverts (vs. introverts) showing traces of higher levels of Facebook activity (Study 2). As in offline contexts, extraverts seek out virtual social engagement, which leaves behind a behavioral residue in the form of friends lists and picture postings. Results suggest that, rather than escaping from or compensating for their offline personality, OSN users appear to extend their offline personalities into the domains of OSNs.

  4. Manifestations of Personality in Online Social Networks: Self-Reported Facebook-Related Behaviors and Observable Profile Information

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Adam A; Vazire, Simine; Holtzman, Nicholas; Gaddis, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Despite the enormous popularity of Online Social Networking sites (OSNs; e.g., Facebook and Myspace), little research in psychology has been done on them. Two studies examining how personality is reflected in OSNs revealed several connections between the Big Five personality traits and self-reported Facebook-related behaviors and observable profile information. For example, extraversion predicted not only frequency of Facebook usage (Study 1), but also engagement in the site, with extraverts (vs. introverts) showing traces of higher levels of Facebook activity (Study 2). As in offline contexts, extraverts seek out virtual social engagement, which leaves behind a behavioral residue in the form of friends lists and picture postings. Results suggest that, rather than escaping from or compensating for their offline personality, OSN users appear to extend their offline personalities into the domains of OSNs. PMID:21254929

  5. Information content of MOPITT CO profile retrievals: Temporal and geographical variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeter, M. N.; Edwards, D. P.; Gille, J. C.; Worden, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite measurements of tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) enable a wide array of applications including studies of air quality and pollution transport. The MOPITT (Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere) instrument on the Earth Observing System Terra platform has been measuring CO concentrations globally since March 2000. As indicated by the Degrees of Freedom for Signal (DFS), the standard metric for trace-gas retrieval information content, MOPITT retrieval performance varies over a wide range. We show that both instrumental and geophysical effects yield significant geographical and temporal variability in MOPITT DFS values. Instrumental radiance uncertainties, which describe random errors (or "noise") in the calibrated radiances, vary over long time scales (e.g., months to years) and vary between the four detector elements of MOPITT's linear detector array. MOPITT retrieval performance depends on several factors including thermal contrast, fine-scale variability of surface properties, and CO loading. The relative importance of these various effects is highly variable, as demonstrated by analyses of monthly mean DFS values for the United States and the Amazon Basin. An understanding of the geographical and temporal variability of MOPITT retrieval performance is potentially valuable to data users seeking to limit the influence of the a priori through data filtering. To illustrate, it is demonstrated that calculated regional-average CO mixing ratios may be improved by excluding observations from a subset of pixels in MOPITT's linear detector array.

  6. Source apportionment of urban air pollutants using constrained receptor models with a priori profile information.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ho-Tang; Yau, Yu-Chen; Huang, Chun-Sheng; Chen, Nathan; Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Tsai, Shih-Wei; Chou, Charles C-K; Wu, Chang-Fu

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) are associated with adverse health effects. This study applied multiple time resolution data of hourly VOCs and 24-h PM2.5 to a constrained Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model for source apportionment in Taipei, Taiwan. Ninety-two daily PM2.5 samples and 2208 hourly VOC measurements were collected during four seasons in 2014 and 2015. With some a priori information, we used different procedures to constrain retrieved factors toward realistic sources. A total of nine source factors were identified as: natural gas/liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) leakage, solvent use/industrial process, contaminated marine aerosol, secondary aerosol/long-range transport, oil combustion, traffic related, evaporative gasoline emission, gasoline exhaust, and soil dust. Results showed that solvent use/industrial process was the largest contributor (19%) to VOCs while the largest contributor to PM2.5 mass was secondary aerosol/long-range transport (57%). A robust regression analysis showed that secondary aerosol was mostly contributed by regional transport related factor (25%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Common Criteria for Information Technology Security Evaluation: Department of Defense Public Key Infrastructure and Key Management Infrastructure Token Protection Profile (Medium Robustness)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Common Criteria for Information Technology Security Evaluation Department of Defense Public Key Infrastructure and Key Management ...for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and...Infrastructure and Key Management Infrastructure Token Protection Profile (Medium Reobustness) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  8. Informed consumer or unlucky visitor? A profile of German patients who received dental services abroad.

    PubMed

    Panteli, Dimitra; Augustin, Uta; Röttger, Julia; Struckmann, Verena; Verheyen, Frank; Wagner, Caroline; Busse, Reinhard

    2015-10-01

    A common characteristic of sending countries in cross-border dental care is that of high costs and/or high copayments for dental services. This study aims to provide an insight into the characteristics of German patients receiving planned and emergency (unplanned) dental care abroad and their satisfaction with received services. The Europabefragung is a postal survey carried out by Techniker Krankenkasse for patients who are treated in EU/EEA countries. This study uses data from the Europabefragung 2012. The survey was sent to 45 189 individuals; descriptive statistics for the subset of respondents who received emergency (unplanned) or planned dental treatment are presented. There were 18 339 responses to the questionnaire, out of which 17 543 were deemed valid; 1416 respondents had received emergency (unplanned) (78%) or planned (22%) dental care and were included in the analysis. There were clear differences between unplanned and planned treatments regarding country and type of treatment as well as satisfaction with different aspects of treatment and the need for follow-up care. Overall, satisfaction with treatment was high for both groups; individuals who had received planned treatment were more satisfied on all aspects of care and reported a need for follow-up care less frequently. While German patients who received both emergency (unplanned) and planned services abroad are mostly satisfied with their experience, some concerns arise with regard to continuity of care. Types of information provided to patients seeking care abroad and dissemination modalities should be carefully planned. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (center) gets information about the facility while on a tour of KSC. Behind the group is the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM)/pressurized module. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of JEM.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, Executive Director of NASDA Koji Yamamoto (center) gets information about the facility while on a tour of KSC. Behind the group is the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM)/pressurized module. Mr. Yamamoto is at KSC for a welcome ceremony involving the arrival of JEM.

  10. "Measuring Operational Effectiveness of Information Technology Infrastructure Library (IIL) and the Impact of Critical Facilities Inclusion in the Process."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodell, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) professionals use the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) process to better manage their business operations, measure performance, improve reliability and lower costs. This study examined the operational results of those data centers using ITIL against those that do not, and whether the results change…

  11. 43 CFR 3276.14 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for direct use facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Reports: Utilization Operations § 3276.14 What information must... of hours that geothermal heat was used; and (d) Any other information we may require....

  12. 43 CFR 3276.14 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for direct use facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Reports: Utilization Operations § 3276.14 What information must... of hours that geothermal heat was used; and (d) Any other information we may require....

  13. 43 CFR 3276.14 - What information must I give BLM in the monthly report for direct use facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Reports: Utilization Operations § 3276.14 What information must... of hours that geothermal heat was used; and (d) Any other information we may require....

  14. "Measuring Operational Effectiveness of Information Technology Infrastructure Library (IIL) and the Impact of Critical Facilities Inclusion in the Process."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodell, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) professionals use the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) process to better manage their business operations, measure performance, improve reliability and lower costs. This study examined the operational results of those data centers using ITIL against those that do not, and whether the results change…

  15. Facilities maintenance handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This handbook is a guide for facilities maintenance managers. Its objective is to set minimum facilities maintenance standards. It also provides recommendations on how to meet the standards to ensure that NASA maintains its facilities in a manner that protects and preserves its investment in the facilities in a cost-effective manner while safely and efficiently performing its mission. This handbook implements NMI 8831.1, which states NASA facilities maintenance policy and assigns organizational responsibilities for the management of facilities maintenance activities on all properties under NASA jurisdiction. It is a reference for facilities maintenance managers, not a step-by-step procedural manual. Because of the differences in NASA Field Installation organizations, this handbook does not assume or recommend a typical facilities maintenance organization. Instead, it uses a systems approach to describe the functions that should be included in any facilities maintenance management system, regardless of its organizational structure. For documents referenced in the handbook, the most recent version of the documents is applicable. This handbook is divided into three parts: Part 1 specifies common definitions and facilities maintenance requirements and amplifies the policy requirements contained in NMI 8831. 1; Part 2 provides guidance on how to meet the requirements of Part 1, containing recommendations only; Part 3 contains general facilities maintenance information. One objective of this handbook is to fix commonality of facilities maintenance definitions among the Centers. This will permit the application of uniform measures of facilities conditions, of the relationship between current replacement value and maintenance resources required, and of the backlog of deferred facilities maintenance. The utilization of facilities maintenance system functions will allow the Centers to quantitatively define maintenance objectives in common terms, prepare work plans, and

  16. Profile-based autonomous data feeding: an approach to the information retrieval problem in a high communications latency environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes the use of user profiles for data selection and prioritization for transmission. This approach has three parts. First, a profile can be created for an individual user. This may provide the best results; however, it requires transmitting a separate profile up for each prospective user. Second, user correspondence with a set of profiles can be tracked. Finally, this can be extended to match a user not just with a single profile but with (possibly different) profiles for each dimension tracked. The benefits of each of these approaches are discussed and the implementation pathway is considered.

  17. 12 CFR 155.300 - Must I inform the OCC before I use electronic means or facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... establish a transactional web site. A transactional web site is an Internet site that enables users to... other authorized products or services. (c) Other procedures. If the OCC informs you of any supervisory...

  18. 12 CFR 155.300 - Must I inform the OCC before I use electronic means or facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... establish a transactional web site. A transactional web site is an Internet site that enables users to... other authorized products or services. (c) Other procedures. If the OCC informs you of any supervisory...

  19. Coping with information silos: an examination of the medication management process in residential aged care facilities (RACFs).

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amina; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the actions of geographically dispersed process stakeholders (doctors, community pharmacists and RACFs) in order to cope with the information silos that exist within and across different settings. The study setting involved three metropolitan RACFs in Sydney, Australia and employed a qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews, non-participant observations and artefact analysis. Findings showed that medication information was stored in silos which required specific actions by each setting to translate this information to fit their local requirements. A salient example of this was the way in which community pharmacists used the RACF medication charts to prepare residents' pharmaceutical records. This translation of medication information across settings was often accompanied by telephone or face-to-face conversations to cross-check, validate or obtain new information. Findings highlighted that technological interventions that work in silos can negatively impact the quality of medication management processes in RACF settings. The implementation of commercial software applications like electronic medication charts need to be appropriately integrated to satisfy the collaborative information requirements of the RACF medication process.

  20. Deconvolution analysis of 24-h serum cortisol profiles informs the amount and distribution of hydrocortisone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Peters, Catherine J; Hill, Nathan; Dattani, Mehul T; Charmandari, Evangelia; Matthews, David R; Hindmarsh, Peter C

    2013-03-01

    Hydrocortisone therapy is based on a dosing regimen derived from estimates of cortisol secretion, but little is known of how the dose should be distributed throughout the 24 h. We have used deconvolution analysis of 24-h serum cortisol profiles to determine 24-h cortisol secretion and distribution to inform hydrocortisone dosing schedules in young children and older adults. Twenty four hour serum cortisol profiles from 80 adults (41 men, aged 60-74 years) and 29 children (24 boys, aged 5-9 years) were subject to deconvolution analysis using an 80-min half-life to ascertain total cortisol secretion and distribution throughout the 24-h period. Mean daily cortisol secretion was similar between adults (6.3 mg/m(2) body surface area/day, range 5.1-9.3) and children (8.0 mg/m(2) body surface area/day, range 5.3-12.0). Peak serum cortisol concentration was higher in children compared with adults, whereas nadir serum cortisol concentrations were similar. Timing of the peak serum cortisol concentration was similar (07.05-07.25), whereas that of the nadir concentration occurred later in adults (midnight) compared with children (22.48) (P = 0.003). Children had the highest percentage of cortisol secretion between 06.00 and 12.00 (38.4%), whereas in adults this took place between midnight and 06.00 (45.2%). These observations suggest that the daily hydrocortisone replacement dose should be equivalent on average to 6.3 mg/m(2) body surface area/day in adults and 8.0 mg/m(2) body surface area/day in children. Differences in distribution of the total daily dose between older adults and young children need to be taken into account when using a three or four times per day dosing regimen. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Polarimetric remote sensing in oxygen A and B bands: sensitivity study and information content analysis for vertical profile of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shouguo; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical analysis is conducted to reveal the information content of aerosol vertical profile in space-borne measurements of the backscattered radiance and degree of linear polarization (DOLP) in oxygen (O2) A and B bands. Assuming a quasi-Gaussian shape for aerosol vertical profile characterized by peak height H and half width γ (at half maximum), the Unified Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model (UNL-VRTM) is used to simulate the Stokes four-vector elements of upwelling radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and their Jacobians with respect to H and γ. Calculations for different aerosol types and different combinations of H and γ values show that the wide range of gas absorption optical depth in O2 A and B band enables the sensitivity of backscattered DOLP and radiance at TOA to the aerosol layer at different altitudes. Quantitatively, DOLP in O2 A and B bands is found to be more sensitive to H and γ than radiance, especially over the bright surfaces (with large visible reflectance). In many O2 absorption wavelengths, the degree of freedom of signal (DFS) for retrieving H (or γ) generally increases with H (and γ) and can be close to unity in many cases, assuming that the composite uncertainty from surface and aerosol scattering properties as well as measurements is less than 5 %. Further analysis demonstrates that DFS needed for simultaneous retrieval of H and γ can be obtained from a combined use of DOLP measurements at ˜ 10-100 O2 A and B absorption wavelengths (or channels), depending on the specific values of H. The higher the aerosol layer, the fewer number of channels for DOLP measurements in O2 A and B bands are needed for characterizing H and γ. Future hyperspectral measurements of DOLP in O2 A and B bands are needed to continue studying their potential and their combination with radiance and DOLP in atmospheric window channels for retrieving the vertical profiles of aerosols, especially highly scattering aerosols, over land.

  2. Facilities | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  3. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile for the K-770 Scrap Yard Soils and Miscellaneous Debris, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - EMWMF Waste Lot 4.12

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport M.

    2009-04-15

    Waste Lot 4.12 consists of approximately 17,500 yd{sup 3} of low-level, radioactively contaminated soil, concrete, and incidental metal and debris generated from remedial actions at the K-770 Scrap Metal Yard and Contaminated Debris Site (the K-770 Scrap Yard) at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The excavated soil will be transported by dump truck to the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). This profile provides project-specific information to demonstrate compliance with Attainment Plan for Risk/Toxicity-based Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2001). The K-770 Scrap Yard is an approximately 36-acre storage area located southwest of the main portion of ETTP, outside the security perimeter fence in the Powerhouse Area adjacent to the Clinch River. The K-770 area was used to store radioactively contaminated or suspected contaminated materials during and previous to the K-25 Site cascade upgrading program. The waste storage facility began operation in the 1960s and is estimated to at one time contain in excess of 40,000 tons of low-level, radioactively contaminated scrap metal. Scrap metal was taken to the site when it was found to contain alpha or beta/gamma activity on the surface or if the scrap metal originated from a process building. The segregated metal debris was removed from the site as part of the K-770 Scrap Removal Action (RA) Project that was completed in fiscal year (FY) 2007 by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). An area of approximately 10 acres is located in EUs 29 and 31 where the scrap was originally located in the 100-year floodplain. In the process of moving the materials around and establishing segregated waste piles above the 100-year floodplain, the footprint of the site was expanded by 10-15 acres in EUs 30 and 32. The area in EUs 29 and 31 that was cleared of metallic debris in the floodplain was sown with grass. The areas in EUs 30 and 32 have some scattered

  4. 30 CFR 550.256 - What related facilities and operations information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... information must accompany the DPP or DOCD? 550.256 Section 550.256 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL... proposed development and production activities: (1) Drilling units; (2) Production platforms; (3)...

  5. 30 CFR 550.256 - What related facilities and operations information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... information must accompany the DPP or DOCD? 550.256 Section 550.256 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL... proposed development and production activities: (1) Drilling units; (2) Production platforms; (3)...

  6. 30 CFR 550.256 - What related facilities and operations information must accompany the DPP or DOCD?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... information must accompany the DPP or DOCD? 550.256 Section 550.256 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL... proposed development and production activities: (1) Drilling units; (2) Production platforms; (3)...

  7. The effect of the research setting on the emotional and sensory profiling under blind, expected, and informed conditions: A study on premium and private label yogurt products.

    PubMed

    Schouteten, Joachim J; De Steur, Hans; Sas, Benedikt; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Gellynck, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Although sensory and emotional evaluation of food products mostly occurs in a controlled laboratory environment, it is often criticized as it may not reflect a realistic situation for consumers. Moreover, products are mainly blind evaluated by participants, whereas external factors such as brand are often considered as key drivers of food choice. This study aims to examine the role of research setting (central location test versus home-use test) and brand information on the overall acceptance, and sensory and emotional profiling of 5 strawberry-flavored yogurts. Thereby, private label and premium brands are compared under 3 conditions: blind, expected, and informed (brand information). A total of 99 adult subjects participated in 3 sessions over 3 consecutive weeks. Results showed that overall liking for 2 yogurt samples was higher in the laboratory environment under the informed evaluation condition, whereas no effect of research setting was found under the blind and expected conditions. Although emotional profiles of the products differed depending on the research setting, this was less the case for the sensory profiles. Furthermore, brand information clearly affected the sensory perception of certain attributes but had less influence on overall liking and emotional profiling. These results indicate that both scientists and food companies should consider the effect of the chosen methodology on ecological validity when conducting sensory research with consumers because the laboratory context could lead to a more positive evaluation compared with a home-use test.

  8. An Analytical Impact Assessment Framework for Wildlife to Inform the Siting and Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Jesse D.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States overall electrical generation capacity is expected to increase by 10-25 gigawatts (GW) per year to meet increases in demand. Wind energy is a key component of state and federal renewable energy standards, and central to the Department of Energy’s 20% by 2030 wind production goals. Increased wind energy development may present increased resource conflict with avian wildlife, and environmental permitting has been identified as a potential obstacle to expansion in the sector. ICF developed an analytical framework to help applicants and agencies examine potential impacts in support of facility siting and permitting. A key objective of our work was to develop a framework that is scalable from the local to the national level, and one that is generalizable across the different scales at which biological communities operate – from local influences to meta-populations. The intent was to allow natural resource managers to estimate the cumulative impacts of turbine strikes and habitat changes on long-term population performance in the context of a species demography, genetic potential, and life history. We developed three types of models based on our literature review and participation in the scientific review processes. First, the conceptual model was developed as a general description of the analytical framework. Second, we developed the analytical framework based on the relationships between concepts, and the functions presented in the scientific literature. Third, we constructed an application of the model by parameterizing the framework using data from and relevant to the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA), and an existing golden eagle population model. We developed managed source code, database create statements, and written documentation to allow for the reproduction of each phase of the analysis. ICF identified a potential template adaptive management system in the form of the US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Adaptive Harvest

  9. Energy Facility Siting by Means of Environmental Modelling with LANDSAT, Thematic Mapper and Geographic Information System (GIS) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Currently based on ground and aerial surveys, the land cover data base of the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company is routinely used for modelling the effects of alternative generating plant and transmission line sites on the local and regional environment. The development of a satellite-based geographic information system would facilitate both the preparation of environmental impact statements by power companies and assessment of the data by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A cooperative project is planned to demonstrate the methodology for integrating satellite data into an existing geographic information system, d to further evaluate the ability of satellite data in modeling environmental conditions that would be applied in the preparation and assessment of environmental impact statements.

  10. Energy Facility Siting by Means of Environmental Modelling with LANDSAT, Thematic Mapper and Geographic Information System (GIS) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Currently based on ground and aerial surveys, the land cover data base of the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company is routinely used for modelling the effects of alternative generating plant and transmission line sites on the local and regional environment. The development of a satellite-based geographic information system would facilitate both the preparation of environmental impact statements by power companies and assessment of the data by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A cooperative project is planned to demonstrate the methodology for integrating satellite data into an existing geographic information system, d to further evaluate the ability of satellite data in modeling environmental conditions that would be applied in the preparation and assessment of environmental impact statements.

  11. Critical Evaluation of 0-30 km Profile Information in Ground-Based Zenith-Sky and Satellite-Measured Backscattered UV Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan; Petropavlovskikh, Irina; Deluishi, John; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We now have several decades of experience in deriving vertical ozone profiles from the measurements of diffuse ultraviolet radiation by both ground and satellite-based instruments using Umkehr and BUV techniques. Continuing technological advances are pushing the state-of-the-art of these measurements to high spectral resolution and broader wavelength coverage. These modern instruments include the ground-based Brewer and satellite-based Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instruments, as well as advanced instruments being developed by ESA(SCIAMACHY), Netherlands(OMI) and Japan(ODUS). However, one of the issues that remains unresolved is the 0-30 km ozone profile information retrievable from these measurements. Though it is commonly believed that both the Umkehr and the satellite-based BUV techniques have very limited profile information below 30 km, there are those who argue that the data from these instruments should continue to be reported in this altitude range for they compare well with ozonesondes and hence there is useful scientific information. Others claim that the limitations of the Umkehr and BUV techniques are largely due to their low spectral resolution, and that the profile information below 30 km can be greatly improved by going to high spectral resolution instruments, such as Brewer and GOME. The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical evaluation of the 0-30 km ozone profile information in the various UV remote sensing techniques. We use a database of individual ozone profiles created using ozonesondes and SAGE and 4D ozone fields generated by data assimilation techniques to simulate radiances measured by the various techniques. We then apply a common inversion approach to all the methods to systematically examine how much profile information is available simply from the knowledge of total ozone, how much additional profile information is added by the traditional Dobson Umkehr and satellite buv techniques, and how much better one can do

  12. Facility Management's Role in Organizational Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gregory K.

    2013-01-01

    Facility managers have questions about sustainability. How do an organization's physical facilities--its built environment--and the management of them, influence the sustainability of the organization or institution as a whole? How important is Facility Management (FM) to the overall sustainability profile of an organization? Facility managers…

  13. Facility Management's Role in Organizational Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gregory K.

    2013-01-01

    Facility managers have questions about sustainability. How do an organization's physical facilities--its built environment--and the management of them, influence the sustainability of the organization or institution as a whole? How important is Facility Management (FM) to the overall sustainability profile of an organization? Facility managers…

  14. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teach, Beverly; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents profiles of two leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Carolyn Guss and Mendel Sherman, both retired professors from Indiana University's program in Information Systems Technology. (KRN)

  15. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teach, Beverly; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents profiles of two leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Carolyn Guss and Mendel Sherman, both retired professors from Indiana University's program in Information Systems Technology. (KRN)

  16. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  17. Science Facilities Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    A bibliographic collection on science buildings and facilities is cited with many different reference sources for those concerned with the design, planning, and layout of science facilities. References are given covering a broad scope of information on--(1) physical plant planning, (2) management and safety, (3) building type studies, (4) design…

  18. PUREX facility preclosure work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, R.H.

    1997-04-24

    This preclosure work plan presents a description of the PUREX Facility, the history of the waste managed, and addresses transition phase activities that position the PUREX Facility into a safe and environmentally secure configuration. For purposes of this documentation, the PUREX Facility does not include the PUREX Storage Tunnels (DOE/RL-90/24). Information concerning solid waste management units is discussed in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Appendix 2D).

  19. [A guide to good practice for information security in the handling of personal health data by health personnel in ambulatory care facilities].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Henarejos, Ana; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio; Hernández-Hernández, Isabel; Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Carrillo de Gea, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The appearance of electronic health records has led to the need to strengthen the security of personal health data in order to ensure privacy. Despite the large number of technical security measures and recommendations that exist to protect the security of health data, there is an increase in violations of the privacy of patients' personal data in healthcare organizations, which is in many cases caused by the mistakes or oversights of healthcare professionals. In this paper, we present a guide to good practice for information security in the handling of personal health data by health personnel, drawn from recommendations, regulations and national and international standards. The material presented in this paper can be used in the security audit of health professionals, or as a part of continuing education programs in ambulatory care facilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. The Out-of-State Placement of Children: Northeast State Profiles. Major Issues in Juvenile Justice Information and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, John C.; And Others

    This document, 1 in a series of 10, presents state profiles of the results of a systematic examination of child care agencies and their involvement with out-of-state residential care for children. This volume contains profiles of the Northeastern states of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York,…

  1. The Out-of-State Placement of Children: Western State Profiles. Major Issues in Juvenile Justice Information and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, John C.; And Others

    This document, 1 in a series of 10, presents state profiles of the results of a systematic examination of child care agencies and their involvement with out-of-state residential care for children. This volume contains profiles of the Western states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and…

  2. The Out-of-State Placement of Children: Southeast State Profiles. Major Issues in Juvenile Justice Information and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, John C.; And Others

    This document, 1 in a series of 10, presents state profiles of the results of a systematic examination of child care agencies and their involvement with out-of-state residential care centers for children. This volume contains profiles of the Southeastern states of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina,…

  3. The Out-of-State Placement of Children: North Central State Profiles. Major Issues in Juvenile Justice Information and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, John C.; And Others

    This document, 1 in a series of 10, presents state profiles of the results of a systematic examination of child care agencies and their involvement with out-of-state residential care for children. This volume contains profiles of the North Central states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota,…

  4. The Out-of-State Placement of Children: South Central State Profiles. Major Issues in Juvenile Justice Information and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, John C.; And Others

    This document, 1 in a series of 10, presents state profiles of the results of a systematic examination of child care agencies and their involvement with out-of-state residential care for children. This volume contains profiles of the South Central states of Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and…

  5. Profiling of energy deposition fields in a modular HTHR with annular core: Computational/experimental studies at the ASTRA critical facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Garin, V. P.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Polyakov, D. N.; Ponomarev, A. S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Smirnov, O. N.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Chunyaev, E. I.; Marova, E. V.; Sukharev, Yu. P.

    2010-12-15

    The paper presents the results obtained from the computational/experimental studies of the spatial distribution of the {sup 235}U fission reaction rate in a critical assembly with an annular core and poison profiling elements inserted into the inner graphite reflector. The computational analysis was carried out with the codes intended for design computation of an HTHR-type reactor.

  6. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products Radiation-Emitting Products Home Radiation-Emitting Products Mammography Quality Standards Act and Program Consumer Information (MQSA) ... it Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on ...

  7. Normalization to specific gravity prior to analysis improves information recovery from high resolution mass spectrometry metabolomic profiles of human urine.

    PubMed

    Edmands, William M B; Ferrari, Pietro; Scalbert, Augustin

    2014-11-04

    Extraction of meaningful biological information from urinary metabolomic profiles obtained by liquid-chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) necessitates the control of unwanted sources of variability associated with large differences in urine sample concentrations. Different methods of normalization either before analysis (preacquisition normalization) through dilution of urine samples to the lowest specific gravity measured by refractometry, or after analysis (postacquisition normalization) to urine volume, specific gravity and median fold change are compared for their capacity to recover lead metabolites for a potential future use as dietary biomarkers. Twenty-four urine samples of 19 subjects from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort were selected based on their high and low/nonconsumption of six polyphenol-rich foods as assessed with a 24 h dietary recall. MS features selected on the basis of minimum discriminant selection criteria were related to each dietary item by means of orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis models. Normalization methods ranked in the following decreasing order when comparing the number of total discriminant MS features recovered to that obtained in the absence of normalization: preacquisition normalization to specific gravity (4.2-fold), postacquisition normalization to specific gravity (2.3-fold), postacquisition median fold change normalization (1.8-fold increase), postacquisition normalization to urinary volume (0.79-fold). A preventative preacquisition normalization based on urine specific gravity was found to be superior to all curative postacquisition normalization methods tested for discovery of MS features discriminant of dietary intake in these urinary metabolomic datasets.

  8. A model-based information sharing protocol for profile Hidden Markov Models used for HIV-1 recombination detection.

    PubMed

    Bulla, Ingo; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Chesneau, Christophe; Mark, Tanya; Serea, Florin

    2014-06-19

    In many applications, a family of nucleotide or protein sequences classified into several subfamilies has to be modeled. Profile Hidden Markov Models (pHMMs) are widely used for this task, modeling each subfamily separately by one pHMM. However, a major drawback of this approach is the difficulty of dealing with subfamilies composed of very few sequences. One of the most crucial bioinformatical tasks affected by the problem of small-size subfamilies is the subtyping of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) sequences, i.e., HIV-1 subtypes for which only a small number of sequences is known. To deal with small samples for particular subfamilies of HIV-1, we introduce a novel model-based information sharing protocol. It estimates the emission probabilities of the pHMM modeling a particular subfamily not only based on the nucleotide frequencies of the respective subfamily but also incorporating the nucleotide frequencies of all available subfamilies. To this end, the underlying probabilistic model mimics the pattern of commonality and variation between the subtypes with regards to the biological characteristics of HI viruses. In order to implement the proposed protocol, we make use of an existing HMM architecture and its associated inference engine. We apply the modified algorithm to classify HIV-1 sequence data in the form of partial HIV-1 sequences and semi-artificial recombinants. Thereby, we demonstrate that the performance of pHMMs can be significantly improved by the proposed technique. Moreover, we show that our algorithm performs significantly better than Simplot and Bootscanning.

  9. A model-based information sharing protocol for profile Hidden Markov Models used for HIV-1 recombination detection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In many applications, a family of nucleotide or protein sequences classified into several subfamilies has to be modeled. Profile Hidden Markov Models (pHMMs) are widely used for this task, modeling each subfamily separately by one pHMM. However, a major drawback of this approach is the difficulty of dealing with subfamilies composed of very few sequences. One of the most crucial bioinformatical tasks affected by the problem of small-size subfamilies is the subtyping of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) sequences, i.e., HIV-1 subtypes for which only a small number of sequences is known. Results To deal with small samples for particular subfamilies of HIV-1, we introduce a novel model-based information sharing protocol. It estimates the emission probabilities of the pHMM modeling a particular subfamily not only based on the nucleotide frequencies of the respective subfamily but also incorporating the nucleotide frequencies of all available subfamilies. To this end, the underlying probabilistic model mimics the pattern of commonality and variation between the subtypes with regards to the biological characteristics of HI viruses. In order to implement the proposed protocol, we make use of an existing HMM architecture and its associated inference engine. Conclusions We apply the modified algorithm to classify HIV-1 sequence data in the form of partial HIV-1 sequences and semi-artificial recombinants. Thereby, we demonstrate that the performance of pHMMs can be significantly improved by the proposed technique. Moreover, we show that our algorithm performs significantly better than Simplot and Bootscanning. PMID:24946781

  10. Estimation of surface O3 from lower-troposphere partial-column information: Vertical correlations and covariances in ozonesonde profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Esswein, Robert F.

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of the spatial correlation of ozone mixing ratio in the vertical provides information useful for several purposes: (a) it aids description of the degree of regionality of the ozone transport-transformation processes, (b) the information provided in the form of a priori covariance matrices for remote retrieval algorithms can simplify and sharpen accuracy of the resulting estimates, and most importantly, (c) it allows a first evaluation of the improvement that remote retrievals can give over boundary-layer climatology. Vertical profiles of mean, variance, and vertical autocovariance, and vertical autocorrelation of ozone mixing ratios were estimated and given parameterizations. The WOUDC ozonesonde network database was used. During the years 2004-2006, these were considerably augmented by sondes taken by NASA, NOAA, and Canadian agencies during recent summertime intensive periods in North America. There are large differences across the North American continent in the patterns and magnitudes of correlation, especially in the lowest 2-3 km of the troposphere. This is especially significant for the near-surface layers (100's of meters deep) which determine actual surface O3 smog exposure and phytotoxicity, since satellite retrievals typically characterize at best a thick layer extending 3 km or more from the surface. The relative variation of O3 decreases in the vertical, particularly for the somewhat polluted launch stations, and this affects inference of surface O3 significantly. We outline a simple synthesis of mixed-layer and ozone-chemistry behavior to aid discussion of this and similar phenomena. Regional differences suggest broad if qualitative explanations in terms of larger-scale (interstate-transport) and local-scale phenomena (lake and sea breezes, degree/frequency of subsidence), inviting future study. The character of near-surface-to-full-layer covariance suggests that remote retrieval can describe surface ozone surprisingly well using 0-3 km

  11. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RADINFO

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Radiation Information Database (RADINFO). RADINFO contains information about facilities that are regulated by EPA for radiation and radioactivity. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to RADINFO facilities once the RADINFO data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs

  12. Rendezvous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

    1988-11-01

    The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

  13. Phylogenetic Profiles of In-House Microflora in Drains at a Food Production Facility: Comparison and Biocontrol Implications of Listeria-Positive and -Negative Bacterial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Katie; Moore, John E.; Wall, Patrick G.; Fanning, Séamus

    2014-01-01

    Listeria species experience complex interactions with other microorganisms, which may promote growth and colonization of the organism in local environments or negatively affect them. This study investigated the microbial community at a food production facility, examining interactions between Listeria and the associated microbiome. Listeria species can be transferred between zones in the production environment by individuals or equipment, and drains may act as a reservoir for the organism, reflecting the microbial flora potentially in the production environment. Drains that were colonized by Listeria species and those determined to be free of Listeria were examined. In each case, 16S rRNA gene analysis was performed using the PhyloChip platform. Some general similarities in bacterial population structure were observed when Listeria-negative and -positive drain communities were compared, with some distinct differences also noted. These included increased populations of the genera Prevotella and Janthinobacterium associated with the absence of Listeria species, whereas Enterococcus and Rhodococcus were in higher abundance in drains colonized by Listeria species. Based on these results, a selection of bacterial species were grown in coculture biofilm with a Listeria monocytogenes strain identified as having colonized a drain at the facility. Mixed-species biofilm experiments showed that Janthinobacterium inhibited attachment and subsequent biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes; however, Enterococcus gallinarum significantly increased it. The results of this study suggest the microbial community in food processing facilities can impact the colonization of Listeria species and that influencing the microbiome in favor of antilisterial species may reduce the colonization of Listeria species and limit the likelihood of product/process contamination. PMID:24657862

  14. A Pilot Health Information Technology-Based Effort to Increase the Quality of Transitions From Skilled Nursing Facility to Home: Compelling Evidence of High Rate of Adverse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Jennifer L; Kanaan, Abir O; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Tjia, Jennifer; Cutrona, Sarah L; Garber, Lawrence; Preusse, Peggy; Field, Terry S

    2016-04-01

    Older adults are often transferred from hospitals to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for post-acute care. Patients may be at risk for adverse outcomes after SNF discharges, but little research has focused on this period. Assessment of the feasibility of a transitional care intervention based on a combination of manual information transmission and health information technology to provide automated alert messages to primary care physicians and staff; pre-post analysis to assess potential impact. A multispecialty group practice. Adults aged 65 and older, discharged from SNFs to home; comparison group drawn from SNF discharges during the previous 1.5 years, matched on facility, patient age, and sex. For the pre-post analysis, we tracked rehospitalization within 30 days after discharge and adverse drug events within 45 days. The intervention was developed and implemented with manual transmission of information between 8 SNFs and the group practice followed by entry into the electronic health record. The process required a 5-day delay during which a large portion of the adverse events occurred. Over a 1-year period, automated alert messages were delivered to physicians and staff for the 313 eligible patients discharged from the 8 SNFs to home. We compared outcomes to those of individually matched discharges from the previous 1.5 years and found similar percentages with 30-day rehospitalizations (31% vs 30%, adjusted HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.80-1.4). Within the adverse drug event (ADE) study, 30% of the discharges during the intervention period and 30% of matched discharges had ADEs within 45 days. Older adults discharged from SNFs are at high risk of adverse outcomes immediately following discharge. Simply providing alerts to outpatient physicians, especially if delivered multiple days after discharge, is unlikely to have any impact on reducing these rates. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  15. Wallace Community College, Selma: 1992-1993 Institutional Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace Community Coll., Selma, AL. Office of Institutional Research and Data Management.

    Focusing on data for 1992-93, this institutional profile provides information on students, faculty, staff, finance, facilities, and services at Wallace Community College Selma (WCCS), in Alabama. Following an introductory section providing a history of WCCS and reviewing the college's mission and goals, the report provides detailed student data…

  16. Wallace Community College, Selma. Institutional Profile, 1997-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Robby

    Focusing on data for 1997-1998, this institutional profile provides information on students, faculty, staff, finance, facilities, and services at Alabama's Wallace Community College, Selma (WCCS). An introduction provides a history of WCCS, reviews the college's mission and goals, presents maps of WCCS' service area and campus, and provides…

  17. Wallace Community College, Selma: 1993-1994 Institutional Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace Community Coll., Selma, AL. Office of Institutional Research and Data Management.

    Focusing on data for 1993-94, this institutional profile provides information on students, faculty, staff, finance, facilities, and services at Wallace Community College Selma (WCCS), in Alabama. Following an introductory section providing a history of WCCS and reviewing the college's mission and goals, the report provides detailed student data on…

  18. Wallace Community College, Selma, 1994-1996 Institutional Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace Community Coll., Selma, AL. Office of Institutional Research and Data Management.

    Focusing on data for 1994-96, this institutional profile provides information on students, faculty, staff, finance, facilities, and services at Alabama's Wallace Community College Selma (WCCS). An introduction provides a history of WCCS, reviews the college's mission and goals, presents maps of WCCS' service area and campus, and provides…

  19. An Overview of Worldwide Chemical Information Facilities and Resources; "A Precis." Prepared...for the Joint Study on the Communication of Scientific Information and on the Feasibility of a Worldwide Science Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council of Scientific Unions, Paris (France).

    The first section of this precis summarizes the general nature of the present chemical information systems of the world. The discussion is presented in four parts: (1) the primary literature, (2) secondary sources and services, (3) libraries and information centers and (4) other elements categorized as informal communications. The second section…

  20. Canonical Discrimination of the Effect of a New Broiler Production Facility on Soil Chemical Profiles as Related to Current Management Practices

    PubMed Central

    Sheffield, Cynthia L.; Crippen, Tawni L.; Byrd, J. Allen; Beier, Ross C.; Yeater, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The effect dirt-floored broiler houses have on the underlying native soil, and the potential for contamination of the ground water by leaching under the foundation, is an understudied area. This study examines alterations in fifteen quantitative soil parameters (Ca, Cu, electrical conductivity, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, NO3, organic matter, P, pH, S, soil moisture and Zn) in the underlayment of a newly constructed dirt-floored broiler house over the first two years of production (Native through Flock 11). The experiment was conducted near NW Robertson County, Texas, where the native soil is a fine, smectitic thermic Udertic Paleustalfs and the slopes range from zero to three percent. Multiple samples were collected from under each of three water and three feed lines the length of the house, in a longitudinal study during February 2008 through August 2010. To better define the relationship between the soil parameters and sampling times, a canonical discriminant analysis approach was used. The soil profiles assembled into five distinctive clusters corresponding to time and management practices. Results of this work revealed that the majority of parameters increased over time. The management practices of partial and total house clean-outs markedly altered soil profiles the house underlayment, thus reducing the risk of infiltration into the ground water near the farm. This is important as most broiler farms consist of several houses within a small area, so the cumulative ecological impact could be substantial if not properly managed. PMID:26029909