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Sample records for factor blocker-naive patients

  1. Incidence of tuberculosis among korean patients with ankylosing spondylitis who are taking tumor necrosis factor blockers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Uhm, Wan-Sik; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Yoo, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2011-10-01

    To assess the incidence and relative risk of new tuberculosis (TB) infections in Korean patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and patients with AS who are undergoing treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. New cases of TB were identified by reviewing the medical records of 919 patients with AS not treated with TNF blockers and those of 354 patients with AS treated with adalimumab (n = 66), infliximab (n = 78), or etanercept (n = 210) between 2002 and 2009. Reference data were obtained from the Korean National Tuberculosis Association. The mean incidence rate of TB was 69.8 per 100,000 person-years (PY) in the general population, 308 per 100,000 PY in the TNF blocker-naive AS cohort, and 561 per 100,000 PY in the TNF blocker-exposed AS cohort. The incidence rate of TB in the infliximab-treated AS cohort (540 per 100,000 PY) was higher than that in the adalimumab-treated AS cohort (490 per 100,000 PY). No cases of TB occurred in the etanercept-treated AS cohort. Comparing the relative risks of TB infections between the TNF blocker-exposed AS cohort and the TNF blocker-naive AS cohort, no statistically significant difference was identified (risk ratio 0.53; 95% CI 0.144-1.913). The risk of TB was higher in the TNF blocker-naive AS cohort than it was in the general population. However, the risk of TB was not increased in the TNF blocker-exposed AS cohort compared with the TNF blocker-naive AS cohort. Among patients with AS, etanercept is associated with a lower risk of TB compared with monoclonal antibodies.

  2. Support for hospital patients and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Elina; Kaunonen, Marja; Aalto, Pirjo; Ollikainen, Jyrki; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2010-12-01

    During hospitalization patients need support from nursing staff. To improve the delivery of support during hospitalization, it is necessary to know more about how patient background factors and organizational factors are associated with patients` perceived access to support. This study describes hospital patients' perceived access to emotional and informational support from nursing staff. A further concern is with the associations of patient background factors (e.g. age, education, mode of admission) and various organizational factors (e.g. nurse to bed ratio, skill mix) with support. A quantitative research approach was applied. The data were collected from patients (n = 731) at a Finnish university hospital using a specially developed scale. The sample of hospital patients was drawn from the population by stratified random sampling. In addition, data were retrieved from the hospital's electronic database. During their stay in hospital, patients felt they received more emotional than informational support. Outpatients and elective inpatients reported receiving more support than inpatients and emergency patients. Having a named nurse was also positively associated with access to support. Staffing levels showed a positive association with patient access to support. On the other hand, the availability of support deteriorated when the number of emergency inpatients and the unit workload increased. Steps are needed to improve the provision of informational support to nursing care patients and to assess the methods of support provision. Patient support can also be improved by adopting the named nurse system. There is a significant association between organizational factors and patient access to support, which warrants further investigation. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2010 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. Factors contributing to patient dumping in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Herng-Ching; Kao, Senyeong; Tang, Chao-Hsiun; Yang, Ming-Chin; Lee, Hong-Shen

    2006-06-01

    Little research has been carried out to explore the issues surrounding patient dumping outside of the US. This study, therefore, uses a national research survey to examine the factors contributing to patient dumping within Taiwan. A self-administered postal survey was undertaken to assess the prevalence of patient dumping in Taiwan, with the study subjects being superintendents of general hospitals. Data from the Bureau of Medical Affairs at the Department of Health in Taiwan were used in conjunction with the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) to obtain estimates of factors potentially contributing to patient dumping. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the relationships between the perceived extent of patient dumping occurring within the respondents' healthcare networks, as well as other factors, including the total number of hospitals, total number of hospital beds, the percentages of beds in public, for-profit and teaching hospitals (vis-à-vis all hospital beds), discharges, discharges covered under the case payment system, transferred inpatients, and the perceived degree of competition within each healthcare market. A total of 485 survey questionnaires were distributed, of which 251 were returned, giving a response rate of 51.75%. The responses from 29.9% of the sample group indicated that the perceived extent of patient dumping occurring in their service area was 'serious' or 'very serious'. The regression analysis showed that after controlling for other factors, the superintendents' perceived extent of the patient dumping occurring within their healthcare networks was positively related to the total number of patients covered under the case payment system, the total number of discharged patients, the extent of healthcare market competition and the number of respondent's hospital beds. We conclude from our findings that, under the National Health Insurance system, patient dumping is a widespread problem

  4. Human factors engineering and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Gosbee, J

    2002-01-01

    

 The case study and analyses presented here illustrate the crucial role of human factors engineering (HFE) in patient safety. HFE is a framework for efficient and constructive thinking which includes methods and tools to help healthcare teams perform patient safety analyses, such as root cause analyses. The literature on HFE over several decades contains theories and applied studies to help to solve difficult patient safety problems and design issues. A case study is presented which illustrates the vulnerabilities of human factors design in a transport monitor. The subsequent analysis highlights how to move beyond the more obvious contributing factors like training to design problems and the establishment of informal norms. General advice is offered to address these issues and design issues specific to this case are discussed. PMID:12468696

  5. Factors associated with hopelessness in epileptic patients

    PubMed Central

    Pompili, Maurizio; Serafini, Gianluca; Innamorati, Marco; Montebovi, Franco; Lamis, Dorian A; Milelli, Mariantonietta; Giuliani, Manuela; Caporro, Matteo; Tisei, Paolo; Lester, David; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo; Buttinelli, Carla

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate factors related to hopelessness in a sample of epileptic patients, including measures of depression and quality of life (QOL). METHODS: Sixty-nine participants were administered the following psychometric instruments: Beck Depression Inventory-II, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), and QOL in Epilepsy (QOLIE)-89. Patients were dichotomized into two categories: those affected by epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures vs those having epilepsy with partial seizures. RESULTS: The groups differed on the QOLIE Role Limitation/Emotional dimension. Patients with generalized seizures reported more limitations in common social/role activities related to emotional problems than patients with other types of epilepsy (89.57 ± 25.49 vs 72.86 ± 36.38; t63 = -2.16; P < 0.05). All of the respondents reported moderate to severe depression, and 21.7% of patients with generalized seizures and 28.6% of patients with other diagnoses had BHS total scores ≥ 9 indicating a higher suicidal risk. The study did not control for years of the illness. CONCLUSION: Patients with generalized seizures reported more limitations in common social/role activities related to emotional problems compared to patients with other types of seizures. Patients at increased suicide risk as evaluated by the BHS were older than those who had a lower suicidal risk. Future studies are required to further investigate the impact of hopelessness on the outcome of epileptic patients. PMID:25540729

  6. Factors Influencing Patient Experience in Pediatric Neurology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suprit C; Sheth, Raj D; Burrows, James F; Rosen, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Hospitals have begun to shift toward patient-centered care because of the pay-for-performance system that was established by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. In pediatrics, the needs of both the caregiver and the pediatric patient have to be taken into account. Pediatric practices have been shifting toward a family-centered approach, although the primary drivers have not been well defined. Identifying the key patient experiences that lead to higher patient satisfaction would enable a more meaningful clinical encounter. To better understand patient experience, we examined waiting time and the elements of the physician-patient interaction in pediatric neurology. We predict that the determining factor in patient satisfaction is the physician-patient interaction. Patient satisfaction surveys were sent to families via mail or e-mail after their ambulatory pediatric neurology visit. The visits took place between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, at one of multiple locations in a children's health system spanning four states. A Likert scale was used for these surveys, and a top-box method (measuring percent of survey questions were rated 5 out of 5) was used to filter data from this database. Statistical analysis using a Pearson correlation was used for data analysis, with likelihood to recommend practice as the dependent variable. The five survey questions that correlated most with overall likelihood to recommend the practice were cheerfulness of practice (r = 0.79); staff working together (r = 0.76); cleanliness of practice (r = 0.70); wait time at clinic, from entering to leaving (r = 0.66); and likelihood of recommending care provider (r = 0.65). Pediatric neurologists striving to enhance overall patient satisfaction in their practices should work toward providing an atmosphere that supports office staff cheerfulness, teamwork, and visit efficiency provided in a clean and friendly environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. Factors inducing falling in schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Yoko; Akezaki, Yoshiteru; Mori, Kohei; Yuri, Yoshimi; Katsumura, Hitomi; Hara, Tomihiro; Usui, Yuki; Fujino, Yoritaka; Nomura, Takuo; Hirao, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors causing falling among patients with schizophrenia hospitalized in psychiatric hospitals. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were divided into either those having experienced a fall within the past one year (Fall group, 12 patients) and those not having experienced a fall (Non-fall group, 7 patients), and we examined differences between the two groups. Assessment items measured included muscle strength, balance ability, flexibility, body composition assessment, Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF), the antipsychotic drug intake, and Drug Induced Extra-Pyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS). [Results] As a result, significant differences were observed in regard to One leg standing time with eyes open, Time Up and Go Test (TUGT), and DIEPSS Sialorrhea between the Fall group and the Non-fall group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that a decrease in balance ability was significantly correlated with falling in schizophrenia patients. PMID:28356628

  8. [Patient's Risk Factors for Perioperative Aspiration Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Teruhiko; Isono, Shiroh

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews patient's own risk factors for perioperative aspiration pneumonia. Maintaining the function of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), the airway protective reflex, and the oral hygiene are the most important to prevent the pneumonia. The LES is adversely affected by excessive stomach distention, some medication given in perioperative periods, and habitual smoking, as well as pathological status such as esophageal hiatus hernia and achalasia. Postapoplectic patients may have insufficient airway protective reflex including swallowing and laryngeal reflex. It is emphasized that the perioperative oral care is increasing in its importance for the prevention of aspiration pneumonia.

  9. Death ideation in cancer patients: contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Nuno; Albuquerque, Emília; Santos, Tiago; Mendes, Alexandre; Roque, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cancer research and therapy have improved prognosis and the quality of life of many patients. However, previous epidemiological studies in oncologic patients have shown an increased risk of suicide. Suicidal thoughts, relatively well known in those terminally ill, may be just as important for cancer patients who are survivors or are living with the disease. Nonetheless, there is a relative paucity of data about suicidality in this setting. The authors conducted a prospective observational study to identify death thoughts and to explore the factors associated with suicidal ideation in cancer patients. A sample of 130 patients referred for psychiatric consultation was obtained following informed consent and authorization from the local ethics committee. A semistructured interview assessed sociodemographic data, psychosocial support, and information regarding the cancer process and its treatment. Psychometric instruments were used to evaluate psychopathology, namely the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, and the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation. Psychiatric diagnoses were obtained through the application of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Death ideation was identified in 34.6% of patients, yet only 10% had active suicidal thoughts. Risk of suicide was associated with female gender, a psychiatric diagnosis (major depressive disorder, panic disorder, or dysthymia), difficult interpersonal relationships, associated pain, high hopelessness, and depressive and anxiety symptoms. Although suicidal thoughts are frequent in cancer patients at different stages of disease, most are transitory. Risk factors for suicidal ideation have been identified, such as depression, hopelessness, uncontrolled pain, and difficult interpersonal relationships. Further assessment is necessary to identify those at higher risk of attempting suicide, and underlying psychiatric disorders should be vigorously treated.

  10. Management of patients with risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Waldfahrer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses concomitant diseases and risk factors in patients treated for diseases of the ears, nose and throat in outpatient and hospital services. Besides heart disease, lung disease, liver disease and kidney disease, this article also covers disorders of coagulation (including therapy with new oral anticoagulants) and electrolyte imbalance. Special attention is paid to the prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of perioperative delirium. It is also intended to help optimise the preparation for surgical procedures and pharmacotherapy during the hospital stay. PMID:24403970

  11. Factors impacting patient cooperation during elective gastroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Pyo; Sung, In-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Sun-Young; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup

    2017-09-01

    Some people have difficulty tolerating upper endoscopy. The cause of and risk factors for this are not well known. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors involved in poor cooperation during screening upper endoscopy. A total of 4,422 subjects who underwent a health inspection with upper endoscopy carried out by a single experienced endoscopist were included. We retrospectively investigated subjects' self-reporting questionnaires and medical records, including endoscopic and histologic findings. The examinees' cooperation and the completeness of endoscopic examination were evaluated based on the operator's subjective judgment. Examinee cooperation during the endoscopic procedure was poor in 358 out of 4,422 subjects (8.1%). Of the subjects with poor cooperation, the endoscopic examination was incomplete in 36 subjects (10.1%). Multivariate analysis revealed that young age (< 40 years), female sex, high body mass index (≥ 25), hiatal hernia, and procedural sedation using midazolam were independent risk factors for poor cooperation. Cooperation during screening upper endoscopy was poor in a considerable number of examinees. Endoscopists must keep in mind that examinee cooperation is more likely to be poor in the young, obese people, women, patients with hiatal hernias, and those who receive procedural sedation.

  12. Personalized Predictive Modeling and Risk Factor Identification using Patient Similarity.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenney; Sun, Jimeng; Hu, Jianying; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Personalized predictive models are customized for an individual patient and trained using information from similar patients. Compared to global models trained on all patients, they have the potential to produce more accurate risk scores and capture more relevant risk factors for individual patients. This paper presents an approach for building personalized predictive models and generating personalized risk factor profiles. A locally supervised metric learning (LSML) similarity measure is trained for diabetes onset and used to find clinically similar patients. Personalized risk profiles are created by analyzing the parameters of the trained personalized logistic regression models. A 15,000 patient data set, derived from electronic health records, is used to evaluate the approach. The predictive results show that the personalized models can outperform the global model. Cluster analysis of the risk profiles show groups of patients with similar risk factors, differences in the top risk factors for different groups of patients and differences between the individual and global risk factors.

  13. Human factors and ergonomics as a patient safety practice

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Xie, Anping; Kianfar, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Human factors and ergonomics (HFE) approaches to patient safety have addressed five different domains: usability of technology; human error and its role in patient safety; the role of healthcare worker performance in patient safety; system resilience; and HFE systems approaches to patient safety. Methods A review of various HFE approaches to patient safety and studies on HFE interventions was conducted. Results This paper describes specific examples of HFE-based interventions for patient safety. Studies show that HFE can be used in a variety of domains. Conclusions HFE is a core element of patient safety improvement. Therefore, every effort should be made to support HFE applications in patient safety. PMID:23813211

  14. Predisposing and precipitating factors for delirium in hospitalized older patients.

    PubMed

    Inouye, S K

    1999-01-01

    Delirium is a common and serious problem for older hospitalized patients. This investigation proposes a multifactorial model of delirium etiology, involving a complex interrelationship of predisposing (vulnerability) factors and precipitating factors (acute insults). An overview of risk factors for delirium identified in 14 studies published since 1980 is provided. Although these studies identify key risk factors for delirium, they do not allow the examination of the interrelationship of predisposing and precipitating factors. Thus, we present two prospective cohort studies by our group which empirically examine: (1) predisposing (vulnerability) factors, (2) precipitating factors, and (3) the interrelationship of predisposing and precipitating factors. Understanding these risk factors is the key to developing appropriate preventive strategies and to target intermediate and high risk patients for intervention efforts.

  15. Factors influencing adherence among Irish haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mellon, Lisa; Regan, Daniel; Curtis, Ruth

    2013-07-01

    Adherence to dietary and fluid restrictions among haemodialysis patients with end stage renal failure (ESRD) is a multi-factorial concept. This study seeks to assess the predictive value of demographic and psychological variables in non-adherence. A multi-centre cross sectional design assessed 50 haemodialysis patients on self reported adherence, attitudes towards dietary restrictions, quality of life, depression and anxiety. Adherence to fluid and dietary restrictions was measured objectively using potassium (K), phosphorus (PO4) and inter-dialytic weight gain (IDWG) parameters. 62% of patients were non-adherent with at least one aspect of the treatment regime. Regression analysis revealed age as significantly associated with adherence, in particular IDWG, with younger patients displaying poorer adherence. Younger patients may experience greater difficulty integrating complex treatment demands into their lifestyles, and non-adherence may be a consequence of the severe lifestyle limitations imposed by the haemodialysis treatment regime. Individualised interventions may be more effective than traditional methods of adherence monitoring in reducing the non-adherent behaviour. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Physical Design Factors Contributing to Patient Falls.

    PubMed

    Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo; Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Freier, Patricia; Harvey, Thomas E; Lee, Jaehoon

    2017-02-03

    The aim of this study was to identify physical design elements that contribute to potential falls in patient rooms. An exploratory, physical simulation-based approach was adopted for the study. Twenty-seven subjects, older than 70 years (11 male and 16 female subjects), conducted scripted tasks in a mockup of a patient bathroom and clinician zone. Activities were captured using motion-capture technology and video recording. After biomechanical data processing, video clips associated with potential fall moments were extracted and then examined and coded by a group of registered nurses and health care designers. Exploratory analyses of the coded data were conducted followed by a series of multivariate analyses using regression models. In multivariate models with all personal, environmental, and postural variables, only the postural variables demonstrated statistical significance-turning, grabbing, pushing, and pulling in the bathroom and pushing and pulling in the clinician zone. The physical elements/attributes associated with the offending postures include bathroom configuration, intravenous pole, door, toilet seat height, flush, grab bars, over-bed table, and patient chair. Postural changes, during interactions with the physical environment, constitute the source of most fall events. Physical design must include simultaneous examination of postural changes in day-to-day activities in patient rooms and bathrooms. Among discussed testable recommendations in the article, the followings design strategies should be considered: (a) designing bathrooms to reduce turning as much as possible and (b) designing to avoid motions that involve 2 or more of the offending postures, such as turning and grabbing or grabbing and pulling, and so on.

  17. [Vigilance level for cardiovascular risk factors in schizophrenic patients].

    PubMed

    Rouillon, F; Van Ganse, E; Vekhoff, P; Arnaud, R; Depret-Bixio, L; Dillenschneider, A

    2015-02-01

    Schizophrenic patients have increased cardiovascular risk factors and morbi-mortality as compared with the general population. To assess the level of French psychiatrists vigilance regarding cardiovascular risk factors in schizophrenic patients. Prospective, transverse, multicentric observational study implemented in France in 2007 and conducted by psychiatrists with a liberal activity. The included patients had to meet the following selection criteria: patients ≥ 18 years old, fulfilling the DSM-IV-TR criteria for schizophrenia, treated or not treated for their schizophrenia, with an ambulatory follow-up, without schizophreniform, schizoaffective, or other psychotic disorder. The psychiatrists "vigilance level" for a given cardiovascular risk factor was defined as a systematic investigation of this cardiovascular risk factor for at least 75% of the schizophrenic patients included in the study by the psychiatrist. A total of 382 psychiatrists included 2242 patients, the data collected for 2222 patients were finally analysed. The mean age was 41 years old, 59% were men. The mean BMI was 27 kg/m(2), 34% of the patients were overweight, 23% were obese. The paranoid and residual schizophrenia were the most frequently described subtypes of the disease (41.3 and 25.0% respectively), 58% of the patients were moderately or markedly ill according to the CGI-S scale. Most of the patients were treated with atypical antipsychotics (77%). Only 58% of the psychiatrists were vigilant for the weight of their patients, 38% for the arterial tension, 25% for the family history of premature coronary disease, 14% for the glycemia, 12% for the triglycerides, 10% for HDL cholesterol, 6% for the waist measurement; 35% of the psychiatrists were vigilant for no cardiovascular risk factor. Less than 30% of the psychiatrists recommended their patients to other specialists to manage cardiovascular disorders. Similarly to other countries, French psychiatrists provide insufficient care of

  18. Factors influencing patients' choice of primary medical doctors.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Matthew E; Sadikman, Jesse C; Sadikman, Caren L

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated factors that influence adult patients' choice of primary care physicians and aimed to determine whether patients know the difference between internal medicine and family medicine. One thousand patients who had seen their primary care physician in either the family medicine or internal medicine department at Mayo Clinic in 2001 were sent a questionnaire to determine 1) the factors that influenced their choice of physician and 2) their knowledge of the characteristics of both specialties. Forty-six percent of the patients responded. Patients most often cited the doctor's "Approach to patient care" and "Interpersonal skills/communication" as affecting their choice of physician. Results also showed patient knowledge of the difference between family medicine and internal medicine was poor. The authors conclude that patients must be educated about the differences in the training of and care provided by different types of primary care physicians.

  19. Coronary risk factors in patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Nasser; Alikhah, Hossein; Abadan, Younes

    2011-01-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) risk increases with increasing number of risk factors. This study was aimed to assess different coronary risk factors among Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) surgery patients. A total of 700 patients younger than 45 or older than 65 years and underwent CABG in Tabriz Shahid Madani Heart Center since 2003 to 2007 were enrolled. We examined the probable differences of CAD risk factors between male and female groups and age groups. We also assessed the change of risk factors presentation in last 5 years. There was not significant difference between risk factor numbers in <45 and >65 years groups, but smoking and dyslipidemia was more prevalent in patients < 45 than > 65 years old. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus was more prevalent in patients > 65 old than < 45 years old; also differences were found between males and females patients, so that dyslipidemia, diabetes and hypertension were more prevalent in women than men. Some risk factors were recognized as acting more on one gender than the other. Also, the majority of patients have one or more risk factors, but different age and gender groups may have different risk factors that suggest the need for exact programming for appropriate prophylactic and therapeutic interventions in all groups.

  20. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Antonia; Reyes-García, Rebeca; García-Castro, José Miguel; Quesada-Charneco, Miguel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    Patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP), even asymptomatic, have an increased cardiovascular risk. However, data on reversibility or improvement of cardiovascular disorders with surgery are controversial. Our aims were to assess the prevalence of classic cardiovascular risk factors in patients with asymptomatic PHP, to explore their relationship with calcium and PTH levels, and analyze the effect of parathyroidectomy on those cardiovascular risk factors. A retrospective, observational study of two groups of patients with asymptomatic PHP: 40 patients on observation and 33 patients who underwent surgery. Clinical and biochemical data related to PHP and various cardiovascular risk factors were collected from all patients at baseline and one year after surgery in the operated patients. A high prevalence of obesity (59.9%), type 2 diabetes mellitus (25%), high blood pressure (47.2%), and dyslipidemia (44.4%) was found in the total sample, with no difference between the study groups. Serum calcium and PTH levels positively correlated with BMI (r=.568, P=.011, and r=.509, P=.026 respectively) in non-operated patients. One year after parathyroidectomy, no improvement occurred in the cardiovascular risk factors considered. Our results confirm the high prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, and dyslipidemia in patients with asymptomatic PHP. However, parathyroidectomy did not improve these cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors motivating dyspepsia patients to enter clinical research.

    PubMed

    Rojavin, Mikhail A; Downs, Pamela; Shetzline, Michael A; Chilingerian, Raffy; Cohard-Radice, Marielle

    2006-04-01

    One of the most influential factors in science and medicine has been the development of placebo-controlled clinical trials. However, recruitment of patients for clinical trials is sometimes a major problem in clinical research. Successful patient recruitment may be enhanced with a clear understanding of the motivating factors that determine a patient's decision to enter a study. We have developed the Patients' Expectations, Attitudes and Knowledge (PEAK) Program consisting of questionnaires designed to study the factors motivating patients to enter a clinical trial, as well as capturing the experiences of research participants. A total of 247 female patients with dyspepsia (mean age: 43.9; range: 18.0-78.0 years) who entered either of two prospective double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled multicenter trials in the USA completed PEAK Entry questionnaires during the first study visit. Based on their responses, the top three factors motivating patients to join the clinical trial were: interest in receiving investigational treatment with average score (AS) of 4.33 +/- 0.08 (M +/- SEM) on a 5-point scale, possibility of getting skilled professional care (AS = 4.07 +/- 0.09), and altruism expressed as an intention to help develop a new drug for the sake of other people (AS = 3.89 +/- 0.09). Age, ethnicity, and educational status significantly affected motivational factors of patients. These results indicate that recruitment can be enhanced by targeting these motivations in physician/patient communications, informed consent process and advertising for study participants.

  2. Adoption factors associated with patient safety-related information technology.

    PubMed

    Menachemi, Nir; Burke, Darrell; Brooks, Robert G

    2004-01-01

    Information technology (IT) that positively affects both quality of care and patient safety currently exists but is not used widely. This study identifies organizational and external factors associated with the adoption of patient safety-related IT (PSIT) in acute care hospitals in Florida. Factors found to be positively correlated with PSIT use included physicians' active involvement in clinical IT planning, the placement of strategic importance on IT by the organization, CIO involvement in patient safety planning, and the perception of an adequate selection of products from vendors. Other factors and implications are discussed as well.

  3. Human factors systems approach to healthcare quality and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Rivera-Rodriguez, A. Joy; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Hoonakker, Peter; Holden, Richard; Gurses, Ayse P.

    2013-01-01

    Human factors systems approaches are critical for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. The SEIPS (Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety) model of work system and patient safety is a human factors systems approach that has been successfully applied in healthcare research and practice. Several research and practical applications of the SEIPS model are described. Important implications of the SEIPS model for healthcare system and process redesign are highlighted. Principles for redesigning healthcare systems using the SEIPS model are described. Balancing the work system and encouraging the active and adaptive role of workers are key principles for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. PMID:23845724

  4. Understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction with ambulance services.

    PubMed

    Bogomolova, Svetlana; Tan, P J; Dunn, S P; Bizjak-Mikic, M

    2016-01-01

    The quality of ambulance services has an immense impact on patients' future well-being and quality of life. Patient satisfaction is one of the key metrics for evaluating the quality of this service. Yet, the patient satisfaction measurement may be limited in its ability to accurately reflect this service quality, and even reflect factors beyond the patient experiences. We analyze 10 years of survey data to reveal a number of factors that systematically bias ambulance satisfaction ratings. Taking into account these biases provides more robust comparison of ambulance performance over time or across different jurisdictions.

  5. Risk factors in young patients of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Abdul Wajid Khan; Ayub, Mohammad; Waseem, Tariq; Khan, Rao Shahzad Abdul Tawwab; Hasnain, Syed Sibitul

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of death throughout the world. CAD has been recognized among younger age group more frequently in recent years. Very limited data is available regarding the prevalence of various risk factors in our younger patients that is why this study was planed. Objectives of the study were to look for the risk factors most prevalent in our young patient of 1st Acute Myocardial Infarction. And to also look for the number of Risk Factors present in each patient. We studied 100 consecutive patients from 16-45 years of age presenting with first acute MI. Twelve risk factors were studied namely, gender, family history of premature CAD, smoking hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, mental stress (type A personality), alcohol, oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), physical activity, and diet. We divided the patients into two groups. Group A with patients 35 years of age or less and group B with patients 36-45 years of age. All risk factors were compared in both the groups. Smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and hypertension were statistically different between the two groups. Frequency wise risk factors were lined up as male sex (91%) Diet (66%), Dyslipidemia (62%), smoking (46%), Type A personality(46%), family history (32%), diabetes mellitus (28%), sedentary lifestyle (26%), hypertension (22%), obesity (17%), alcohol (3%), and OCPs (0%) Most of the patients that is 94% had 3 or more risk factors. Smoking, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia are the major modifiable risk factors in our young adults. If a young male who is smoker or a young female who is diabetic, presents in emergency room with chest pain, always suspect coronary artery disease. Other conventional risk factors are also prevalent but alcohol and OCPs are not a major health problem for us.

  6. Mortality-related Factors in Patients with Malignant Obstructive Jaundice.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Juferdy; Hasan, Irsan; Gani, Rino Alvani; Simadibrata, Marcellus

    2016-10-01

    to obtain survival rate and mortality-related factors of malignant obstructive jaundice patients. all medical records of obstructive jaundice inpatient at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta from January 2010 to December 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. The following factors were analyzed in terms of mortality: age, gender, sepsis, hypoalbumin, serum bilirubin level, serum CA 19-9 level, billiary drainage, non-ampulla Vateri carcinoma, and comorbid factors. total 181 out of 402 patients were enrolled in this study with male proportion was 58.6%, and patients aged 50 years or above was 57.5%. Multivariate analysis showed that only sepsis, unsuccessful or no prior biliary drainage and Charlson comorbid score ≥4 were independent predictors of mortality. Patients with significant prognostic factors had median survival 14 days compared with overall median survival 26 days. Score ≥2 identified as the highest prognostic score threshold with sensitivity 68%, specificity 75%, and AUC on ROC curve 0.769. sepsis, unsuccessful or no prior bilirary drainage, and Charlson comorbid score ≥4 are factors significantly associated with shortened survival in malignant obstructive jaundice patients. Prognostic score  ≥2 was determined to classify patients into high risk mortality group. Mortality of patients with those significant prognostic factors can be predicted in 76.9%.

  7. [Risk factors for development of hypomagnesemia in the burned patient].

    PubMed

    Durán-Vega, Héctor César; Romero-Aviña, Francisco Javier; Gutiérrez-Salgado, Jorge Eduardo; Silva-Díaz, Teresita; Ramos-Durón, Luis Ernesto; Carrera-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2004-01-01

    Electrolyte abnormalities are common in the severely burned patient. There is little information with regard to the frequency and magnitude of hypomagnesemia, as well as on risk factors for this condition. We performed an observational, retrospective analysis of 35 burned patients treated at the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service at the Hospital Central Sur PEMEX, Mexico City. We determined serum magnesium behavior and divided patients into two groups: the first included 11 patients with burns and hypomagnesemia, and the second, 24 patients with burns but without hypomagnesemia. Risk factor identification was performed. We found patient at risk was the one with more than 40% of 2nd or 3rd degree total burned body area, in day 4 or 10 after the burn, and with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, or both, and without intravenous (i.v.) supplementation of magnesium. The best way to prevent or avoid major complications is to identify the high-risk patient, or to diagnose earlier.

  8. [Prognostic factors in elderly patient meningioma].

    PubMed

    Villalpando-Navarrete, Edgar; Rosas-Peralta, Víctor Hugo; Sandoval-Balanzario, Miguel Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: frecuentemente debe tomarse una decisión terapéutica para el manejo del meningioma en el paciente geriátrico. El presente estudio analiza factores pronósticos, así como la escala Clinical- Radiological Grading Score (CRGS) como auxiliar para la decisión terapéutica. Métodos: se realizó un estudio retrospectivo entre 2009 y 2010. La población estudiada fue de 28 pacientes mayores de 65 años de edad. Se analizaron factores clínicos, imagenológicos e histopatológicos. Se utilizó la prueba chi cuadrada y la exacta de Fisher para variables cuantitativas y U de Mann-Whitney para variables cualitativas. Resultados: la mortalidad global a los 3, 6 y 12 meses de seguimiento fue del 7.14, 10.71 y 14.28 %, respectivamente. El análisis reveló que el estado funcional con la escala de Karnofsky (p = 0.02), la localización de la lesión (p = 0.002), el grado de malignidad histopatológico (p = 0.038) y una puntuación menor de 10 en la escala CRGS (p = 0.003) se asocian con un mal pronóstico. Conclusión: el manejo neuroquirúrgico del paciente geriátrico es una posibilidad terapéutica con un pronóstico favorable en pacientes con una puntuación igual o mayor de 10 y en aquellos con un adecuado estado funcional.

  9. Factors that impact patient outcome: nutrition assessment.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Christy M; Daley, Brian J; Sams, Valerie G; Martindale, Robert; Kudsk, Kenneth A; Miller, Keith R

    2013-09-01

    Defining malnutrition and nutrition risk has been a topic of many papers and discussions throughout the modern literature. Multiple definitions have been proposed, ranging from simple body weight measurements to a more all-encompassing concept looking at disease-specific inflammatory states. Biochemical markers, elements of a history examination, physical examination findings, calculations, and technical tests have all been proposed to help further characterize and delineate those who might be at risk for malnutrition, translating to an increased risk of adverse outcomes after major surgery. The purpose of this paper is to summarize some of the most utilized and most reliable ways to determine nutrition status within the scope of the North American Surgical Nutrition Summit (2012) and discuss how to incorporate these methods into the way that patients are screened preoperatively for elective surgery.

  10. High coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor in patients with lymphoma and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mohren, Martin; Jentsch-Ullrich, Kathleen; Koenigsmann, Michael; Kropf, Siegfried; Schalk, Enrico; Lutze, Gerd

    2016-02-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism is increased in patients with lymphoma and leukemia; however, little is known about the potential underlying hereditary or acquired thrombophilia. We prospectively analyzed procoagulant markers and gene mutations in patients with lymphoma (n = 35) and leukemia (n = 10) at diagnosis and over the course of treatment. Global coagulation tests were normal in all patients, as were antithrombin and protein S. Activated protein C resistance caused by the factor V Leiden mutation was found in four patients, one patient had the G20210A mutation of the prothrombin gene, and one patient had protein C deficiency. The most striking findings were sustained very high levels of factor VIII (>150 %) in 30 patients (68 %), which correlated with high von Willebrand factor. An acute phase response in these patients was ruled out by absence of fever and normal IL-6 and -α. Elevated factor VIII is an independent thrombophilic risk factor and may play an etiologic role in thromboembolic complications in patients with malignant lymphoma. Since high von Willebrand factor is most likely caused by endothelial cell injury, an additional, unknown pathophysiological association with malignant lymphoma and acute leukemia is possible.

  11. Factors influencing inclusion of patients with malignancies in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tournoux, Caroline; Katsahian, Sandrine; Chevret, Sylvie; Levy, Vincent

    2006-01-15

    Participation in clinical trials remains low and is a central issue in oncology. The authors identified, through a systematic review, 75 papers published up to August 2004 that report barriers to recruitment of patients in clinical trials. These barriers range from patient preference and concern about information/consent to clinical problems with protocols. Strategies to overcome barriers on the part of patients and clinicians are needed and should be carefully evaluated. Thirty-three (44%) papers reported factors related to patients as influencing the inclusion of patients, 28 (37%) reported clinician's related factors, and 37 (49%) other factors from either specific groups of patients (30 papers, 40%) and/or other scopes (13 papers, 17%). No differences in prevalence were found between papers dedicated to hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Factors related to clinicians as influential were more frequently reported before 1995 (70%) than thereafter (25%; P = 0.0009). Reporting specific groups of patients as influential was more frequent in North American articles (50%) than in others (14%, P = 0.008). Patients' barriers included mostly patient preference (12 papers), concern about information and/or consent (11 papers), worry about uncertainty (7 papers), and/or relationship with medical team (7 papers). Concerning clinicians, incompatibility of protocol with normal practice (nine papers), problems in complying with the protocol (eight papers), and/or consent procedure (eight papers) were the most reported factors. The remaining factors mostly relied on specific groups of patients (30 papers), notably age of patients (18 papers) and/or minority population (11 papers, all from the USA). Strategies to overcome these barriers are needed and should be carefully evaluated.

  12. Factors associated with patient preferences for communication of bad news.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Maiko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2017-06-01

    Communication based on patient preferences can alleviate their psychological distress and is an important part of patient-centered care for physicians who have the task of conveying bad news to cancer patients. The present study aimed to explore the demographic, medical, and psychological factors associated with patient preferences with regard to communication of bad news. Outpatients with a variety of cancers were consecutively invited to participate in our study after their follow-up medical visit. A questionnaire assessed their preferences regarding the communication of bad news, covering four factors-(1) how bad news is delivered, (2) reassurance and emotional support, (3) additional information, and (4) setting-as well as on demographic, medical, and psychosocial factors. A total of 529 outpatients with a variety of cancers completed the questionnaire. Multiple regression analyses indicated that patients who were younger, female, had greater faith in their physician, and were more highly educated placed more importance on "how bad news is delivered" than patients who were older, male, had less faith in their physician, and a lower level of education. Female patients and patients without an occupation placed more importance on "reassurance and emotional support." Younger, female, and more highly educated patients placed more importance on "additional information." Younger, female, and more highly educated patients, along with patients who weren't undergoing active treatment placed more importance on "setting." Patient preferences with regard to communication of bad news are associated with factors related to patient background. Physicians should consider these characteristics when delivering bad news and use an appropriate communication style tailored to each patient.

  13. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Methods Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn’s disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine. Results Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn’s disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p < 0.019). Levels of fibrinogen, D-dimer, protein C, factor VIII, total homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn’s disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Conclusions Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease. PMID:27942288

  14. Using mixed methods to identify factors influencing patient flow.

    PubMed

    Van Vaerenbergh, Cindy

    2009-11-01

    An effective method of identifying operational factors that influence patient flow can potentially lead to improvements and thus have huge benefits on the efficiency of hospital departments. This paper presents a new inductive mixed-method approach to identify operational factors that influence patient flow through an accident and emergency (A&E) department. Preliminary explorative observations were conducted, followed by semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders. A questionnaire survey of all medical, nursing, porter and clerical staff was then conducted. The observations provided factors for further exploration: skill-mix, long working hours, equipment availability, lack of orientation programmes, inefficient IT use and issues regarding communication structures. Interviewees highlighted several factors, including availability of medical supervision and senior nursing staff, nursing documentation issues, lack of morale due to overcrowding, personality differences and factors relating to the department layout. The questionnaire respondents strongly supported the importance of the previously identified factors. This paper demonstrates an effective mixed-method approach that can be replicated by other health-care managers to identify factors influencing patient flow. Further benefits include increased volume and quality of data, increased staff awareness for the influence of internal factors on patient flow and enhancing the evidence base for future decision making when prioritizing A&E projects.

  15. Risk Factors and Outcomes in Patients With Hypernatremia and Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hai-Bin; Hu, Xing-Xing; Huang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Ke-Qin; Yu, Chen-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Meng; Ke, Lu

    2016-06-01

    Hypernatremia is an uncommon but important electrolyte abnormality in intensive care unit patients. Sepsis is one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission, but few studies about the role of hypernatremia in sepsis has been published yet. In this study, we aimed to explore the risk factors for developing hypernatremia in patients with sepsis, and the prognosis of patients with sepsis with or without hypernatremia was also assessed. In this retrospective cohort study of 51 septic intensive care unit patients at a single center, we examined the risk factors for the development of hypernatremia and the association of hypernatremia with clinical outcomes using univariate and multivariable analyses. Clinical outcomes such as mortality and hospital duration of patients with or without hypernatremia were also compared. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (odds ratio = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.022-1.294) was found to be the only independent risk factor for hypernatremia in patients with sepsis. Moreover, patients developing hypernatremia during hospitalization showed significantly higher morbidity and mortality. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score may be an independent risk factor for hypernatremia in patients with sepsis. Moreover, hypernatremia is strongly associated with worse outcome in sepsis. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Factors of lonely living in old psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Druz, V F; Oleinikova, I N

    2000-01-01

    70 lonely patients 60-83 years old were examined. Loneliness in the disintegrated first group (54 patients) resulted from the disintegrated family (the patients were early married). The loneliness in the second group was determined by the absence of their own family (16 patients). The main factors leading to loneliness were such diseases as schizophrenia and epilepsy, paranoic disorders of persecutive character directed to the nearest family, hypochondric depression, psychopathic-like disturbances, mental defect, personality disorders in premorbid state. Among social-psychologic factors the following ones had a significance: underestimation of the mental disorders in patients by their relatives, conflicts in the family, the patient's negative orientation to marriage, their deep emotional interrelation with the parents in young and mature age, alcoholism of married couple and special psychopathic features of the relatives. The events relating with the old age (loss of elderly couple), separation with adult children and parents, bad domestic living conditions were of less significance.

  17. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    PubMed

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Risk Factors for Hypotension in Urgently Intubated Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    fold increase in the odds of death. The use of propofol for the induction of anesthesia for endotracheal intubation in critically ill burned patients...did not increase the odds of hypotension or death. In burn patients requiring emergent endotracheal intubation in the BICU, the care team should...01 DEC 2012 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Risk factors for hypotension in urgently intubated burn patients 5a

  19. Prognostic factors for gastrectomy in elderly patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Akiyama, Takashi; Shiotani, Akiko; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2017-03-11

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age-specific prognostic factors in patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The medical records of 366 patients with gastric cancer who underwent surgical resection at our hospital between January 2007 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 366 patients, 117 were aged 75 years or older and 249 were aged 74 years or younger. All factors that were identified as significant using univariate analysis were included in the multivariate analysis. The median follow-up duration was 52.9 months (range, 1.0-117.5 months). We found that in patients aged 75 years or older, postoperative complications and the extent of cancer were independent prognostic factors of overall survival and disease-free survival. In contrast, in patients aged 74 years or younger, only the lymph node status and postoperative chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors for overall survival and disease-free survival, respectively. Pathological outcomes and postoperative complications are important prognostic factors for survival in patients aged 75 years or older with gastric cancer, whereas pathological outcomes and postoperative chemotherapy are important prognostic factors for survival in patients aged 74 years or younger. Because the prevention of postoperative complications may contribute to improvements in the prognosis of elderly patients with gastric cancer, we suggest that it is necessary to consider limited surgery instead of radical surgery, depending on the patient's general condition and co-morbidities.

  20. Factors associated with patient reports of positive physician relational communication.

    PubMed

    Shay, L Aubree; Dumenci, Levent; Siminoff, Laura A; Flocke, Susan A; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the patient, physician, and visit-related factors associated with patient ratings of positive physician relational communication. Pre- and post-visit surveys were conducted with 485 patients attending a routine periodic health exam with one of 64 participating physicians. The audio-recorded visits were coded for elements of patient-physician communication including assertive responses, partnership building, question asking, supportive talk, and expressions of concern. Patient reports of positive physician relational communication were associated with patient perceptions of how well the physician understood the patient's health care preferences and values, a patient-physician interaction outside of the exam room, and physician-prompted patient expressions of concern. In addition to a patient's perception of their relationship with their physician going into the visit, relatively simple acts like extending the interaction beyond the exam room and ensuring that patients feel invited to express concerns they may have during the visit may influence patient perceptions of physician relational communication. This study offers preliminary support for the idea that relational communication and its associated benefits may be fostered through simple physician-driven acts such as interacting with patients outside of the exam room and encouraging patients to express concerns within the visit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carolino, Idalina Diair Regla; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Tasca, Raquel Soares; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the risk factors of type 2 diabetic patients through sociodemographic data, habits of health, anthropometric and biochemist profiles, assisted at a basic public health care unit in Maringá, Paraná. Sixty-six patients, 56 women aged over than 50 years-old were interviewed. High prevalence factors for cardiovascular risk were observed, such as: overweight and obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sedentariness and inadequate diet. Data suggested the need for multidisciplinary intervention programs in health care units associated to educative programs, adjusted diet intake and regular physical activity for these diabetic patients.

  2. Patient Safety: The Role of Human Factors and Systems Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Wood, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety is a global challenge that requires knowledge and skills in multiple areas, including human factors and systems engineering. In this chapter, numerous conceptual approaches and methods for analyzing, preventing and mitigating medical errors are described. Given the complexity of healthcare work systems and processes, we emphasize the need for increasing partnerships between the health sciences and human factors and systems engineering to improve patient safety. Those partnerships will be able to develop and implement the system redesigns that are necessary to improve healthcare work systems and processes for patient safety. PMID:20543237

  3. Patient safety - the role of human factors and systems engineering.

    PubMed

    Carayon, Pascale; Wood, Kenneth E

    2010-01-01

    Patient safety is a global challenge that requires knowledge and skills in multiple areas, including human factors and systems engineering. In this chapter, numerous conceptual approaches and methods for analyzing, preventing and mitigating medical errors are described. Given the complexity of healthcare work systems and processes, we emphasize the need for increasing partnerships between the health sciences and human factors and systems engineering to improve patient safety. Those partnerships will be able to develop and implement the system redesigns that are necessary to improve healthcare work systems and processes for patient safety.

  4. Sociodemographic factors responsible for blindness in diabetic Egyptian patients

    PubMed Central

    Abueleinen, Khaled Gamal Ibraheem; El-Mekawey, Hany; Saif, Yasser Sayed; Khafagy, Amr; Rizk, Hoda Ibrahim; Eltahlawy, Eman M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate factors behind the delay in diagnosis and treatment among Egyptian patients who present with complicated diabetic retinopathy. Methods Observational cross-sectional study of diabetic patients with advanced diabetic retinopathy. Patients were asked to answer a questionnaire to assess the impact of several sociodemographic factors. Results A total of 397 patients agreed to take the questionnaire. Diabetic vitreous hemorrhage was the most common ocular complication and was found in 359 patients (90.4%). A total of 158 (39.8%) patients knew that diabetes mellitus can be sight threatening, while 240 (60.2%) were not aware until they developed sight threatening complication. A total of 179 patients (45.1%) had early retirement because of visual loss related to diabetes mellitus. Multivariate logistic regression has shown that education, internist, contact with other patients, and media were respectively significant in predicting the awareness of patients about the sight-threatening effect of diabetic retinopathy. Conclusion Patient education regarding diabetes and diabetic eye disease is essential for early detection and compliance with treatment. Illiteracy has a significant impact on development of sight-threatening diabetic complications. The internist is the first line of prophylaxis. Media has to participate more in patient education. PMID:22125407

  5. Etiopathogenetic factors, thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in melasma patients

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Nimet; Kılıç, Arzu; Koparal, Suha; Artüz, Ferda; Çakmak, Atıl; Köse, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Melasma is a common chronic, acquired pigmentation disorder with a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Aim To investigate the etiopathogenetic factors, thyroid functions and thyroid autoimmunity in patients with melasma. Material and methods Forty-five women with melasma and 45 age-matched healthy women were included in the study group. A detailed history was taken from the patients including triggering factors of melasma. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroglobulin (AbTG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (Ab-TPO) were measured and thyroid ultrasonography was performed for each subject. Results In 26.7% of patients, pregnancy, in 17.8%, oral contraceptive use and in 13.3%, intense sunlight exposure were the triggering factors. 17.8% of patients had a family history of melasma. FT4, TSH and AbTG levels were significantly higher in the patient group. Conclusions The results suggest that a combination of factors including pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, sunlight and genetic factors often trigger melasma. Thyroid hormones and thyroid autoimmunity may also play a role in the pathogenesis which needs to be proven by further studies. PMID:26759539

  6. Human factors engineering approaches to patient identification armband design.

    PubMed

    Probst, C Adam; Wolf, Laurie; Bollini, Mara; Xiao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The task of patient identification is performed many times each day by nurses and other members of the care team. Armbands are used for both direct verification and barcode scanning during patient identification. Armbands and information layout are critical to reducing patient identification errors and dangerous workarounds. We report the effort at two large, integrated healthcare systems that employed human factors engineering approaches to the information layout design of new patient identification armbands. The different methods used illustrate potential pathways to obtain standardized armbands across healthcare systems that incorporate human factors principles. By extension, how the designs have been adopted provides examples of how to incorporate human factors engineering into key clinical processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  7. [Anxiety status and influential factors in patients with infertility].

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Liu, Yang; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the anxiety status of infertile patients and the influential factors.
 A questionnaire survey was performed in 306 infertile patients, who were consulted in Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, and Productive and Genetic Hospital of CITIC-Xiangya from June, 2013 to June, 2014. A self-designed questionnaire and general information on the anxiety due to infertility were used in the investigation.
 The anxiety incidence for the participants was 61.4%. The single factor analysis showed that some information about the patients, including ages, marriage age, duration of infertility, number of reproductive technological intervention, infertility sources, the cost of treatment and the number of infertility clinic visits, significantly affected the anxiety of infertile patients (P<0.05). The multivariate analysis showed that the number of reproductive technological intervention and infertile causes was related to the anxiety of infertile patients. Among them, the number of reproductive intervention more than 6 times was the risk factor for the low score of anxiety while the infertile causes from both spouses were the protective factor for low scores of anxiety.
 Infertility treatment are of complexity and long duration with the relatively low cure rate, which may cause and aggravate the patient's psychological burden, leading to the anxiety. As a result, infertility patients were the high-risk groups for anxiety symptoms.

  8. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients.

  9. Comorbidities and risk factors among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2015-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are charged with maintaining a holistic approach to their patients' health. While most patients with schizophrenia attend public mental health services and/or non-government organisations supporting people with mental illness, 88.2% of people with a psychotic illness (the majority being schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder) had visited a GP in the previous year. For at least 30-40% of people living with schizophrenia in Australia, ongoing management is provided by their GP alone. Moreover, there is evidence that patients with schizophrenia value the help provided by GPs. Patients with schizophrenia have reduced life expectancy. Overseas research (primarily from the UK and US) has found that the poor physical health of patients with schizophrenia can be attributed to a number of factors such as modifiable lifestyle risk factors and side effects of medication, compounded by causes intrinsic to the illness such as mental stress and loss of initiative.

  10. Evaluation of etiological factors in patients with chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Colgecen, Emine; Ozyurt, Kemal; Gul, Ali Irfan; Utas, Serap

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, increasing understanding of the pathomechanisms involved in chronic urticaria has highlighted the heterogeneity of different subtypes, and chronic urticaria is now classified as chronic spontaneous urticaria and inducible urticaria. Although many factors are thought to be involved in chronic urticaria, the etiology is yet to be clarified. The purpose of this study was to investigate etiological factors in patients with chronic urticaria. Five hundred patients with chronic urticaria, 351 women and 149 men, were studied for etiological factors. The autologous serum skin test was performed on 197 patients. Provocation testing for physical urticaria was performed on 354 patients. Patients with acute urticaria were excluded from the study. We determined at least one focus of infection that might be involved in the etiology of the disease in 18.8% of cases. Patients with infections were treated, and symptoms resolved after treatment in six cases (5.3%). Autologous serum skin tests were positive in 125 patients (63.5%). Provocation tests for physical urticaria were positive in 131 (37%) patients with urticaria. We suggest that physical stimuli and autoantibodies play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of urticaria.

  11. Risk factors for osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Carla Andrade; Lyra, Andre Castro; Rocha, Raquel; Santana, Genoile Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients exhibit higher risk for bone loss than the general population. The chronic inflammation causes a reduction in bone mineral density (BMD), which leads to osteopenia and osteoporosis. This article reviewed each risk factor for osteoporosis in IBD patients. Inflammation is one of the factors that contribute to osteoporosis in IBD patients, and the main system that is involved in bone loss is likely RANK/RANKL/osteoprotegerin. Smoking is a risk factor for bone loss and fractures, and many mechanisms have been proposed to explain this loss. Body composition also interferes in bone metabolism and increasing muscle mass may positively affect BMD. IBD patients frequently use corticosteroids, which stimulates osteoclastogenesis. IBD patients are also associated with vitamin D deficiency, which contributes to bone loss. However, infliximab therapy is associated with improvements in bone metabolism, but it is not clear whether the effects are because of inflammation improvement or infliximab use. Ulcerative colitis patients with proctocolectomy and ileal pouches and Crohn’s disease patients with ostomy are also at risk for bone loss, and these patients should be closely monitored. PMID:26600979

  12. Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infections in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Jacob R.; Isbell, James M.; Michaels, Alex D.; Lau, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Risk factors for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgical procedures have been well documented. However, the variables associated with CAUTIs in the cardiac surgical population have not been clearly defined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors associated with CAUTIs in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. Methods: All patients undergoing cardiac surgery at a single institution from 2006 through 2012 (4,883 patients) were reviewed. Patients with U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria for CAUTI were identified from the hospital's Quality Assessment database. Pre-operative, operative, and post-operative patient factors were evaluated. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to identify significant correlations between perioperative characteristics and CAUTIs. Results: There were 55 (1.1%) documented CAUTIs in the study population. On univariate analysis, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, cardiogenic shock, urgent or emergent operation, packed red blood cell (PRBC) units transfused, and intensive care unit length of stay (ICU LOS) were all significantly associated with CAUTI [p<0.05]. On multivariable logistic regression, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, and ICU LOS remained significantly associated with CAUTI. Additionally, there was a significant association between CAUTI and 30-d mortality on univariate analysis. However, when controlling for common predictors of operative mortality on multivariable analysis, CAUTI was no longer associated with mortality. Conclusions: There are several identifiable risk factors for CAUTI in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. CAUTI is not independently associated with increased mortality, but it does serve as a marker of sicker patients more likely to die from other comorbidities or complications. Therefore, awareness of the high-risk nature of these patients should lead to

  13. Factors affecting engagement of dual diagnosis patients in outpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Bogenschutz, M P; Siegfreid, S L

    1998-10-01

    This study examined factors associated with engagement in outpatient treatment of patients with dual diagnoses of psychiatric disorder and substance use disorder. The charts of all 57 patients referred to a dual diagnosis treatment program during a six-month period were reviewed, and data on patients' substance use diagnosis, psychiatric diagnosis, sex, ethnicity, and referral source were collected. Patients referred from inpatient treatment were more likely to attend three or more appointments at the dual diagnosis program than those referred from outpatient treatment. Substance of abuse interacted with both referral source and sex in predicting engagement.

  14. Factors associated with patient absenteeism for scheduled endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Victor K; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Enns, Robert

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors to help predict which patients are likely to fail to appear for an endoscopic procedure. METHODS: This was a retrospective, chart review, cohort study in a Canadian, tertiary care, academic, hospital-based endoscopy clinic. Patients included were: those undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy and patients who failed to appear were compared to a control group. The main outcome measure was a multivariate analysis of factors associated with truancy from scheduled endoscopic procedures. Factors analyzed included gender, age, waiting time, type of procedure, referring physician, distance to hospital, first or subsequent endoscopic procedure or encounter with gastroenterologist, and urgency of the procedure. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty-four patients did not show up for their scheduled appointment. Compared to a control group, factors statistically significantly associated with truancy in the multivariate analysis were: non-urgent vs urgent procedure (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.06, 2.450), referred by a specialist vs a family doctor (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.31, 5.52) and office-based consult prior to endoscopy vs consult and endoscopic procedure during the same appointment (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.33, 3.78). CONCLUSION: Identifying patients who are not scheduled for same-day consult and endoscopy, those referred by a specialist, and those with non-urgent referrals may help reduce patient truancy. PMID:19533810

  15. Factors associated with patient absenteeism for scheduled endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victor K; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Enns, Robert

    2009-06-21

    To identify risk factors to help predict which patients are likely to fail to appear for an endoscopic procedure. This was a retrospective, chart review, cohort study in a Canadian, tertiary care, academic, hospital-based endoscopy clinic. Patients included were: those undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy and patients who failed to appear were compared to a control group. The main outcome measure was a multivariate analysis of factors associated with truancy from scheduled endoscopic procedures. Factors analyzed included gender, age, waiting time, type of procedure, referring physician, distance to hospital, first or subsequent endoscopic procedure or encounter with gastroenterologist, and urgency of the procedure. Two hundred and thirty-four patients did not show up for their scheduled appointment. Compared to a control group, factors statistically significantly associated with truancy in the multivariate analysis were: non-urgent vs urgent procedure (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.06, 2.450), referred by a specialist vs a family doctor (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.31, 5.52) and office-based consult prior to endoscopy vs consult and endoscopic procedure during the same appointment (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.33, 3.78). Identifying patients who are not scheduled for same-day consult and endoscopy, those referred by a specialist, and those with non-urgent referrals may help reduce patient truancy.

  16. Burden on Caregivers of Patients with Schizophrenia and Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    YAZICI, Esra; KARABULUT, Ümit; YILDIZ, Mustafa; BASKAN TEKEŞ, Sinem; İNAN, Eda; ÇAKIR, Uğur; BOŞGELMEZ, Şükriye; TURGUT, Celaleddin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Caregivers of patients with schizophrenia are under the burden of continuous and difficult processes. Determination of the factors related to caregiver burden in schizophrenia may help find strategies to decrease the burden. This study aimed at investigating the factors associated with caregiver burden among relatives of patients with schizophrenia. Methods Eighty-eight caregivers of patients under treatment for schizophrenia for at least 1 year were included in the study. The Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview was used for the assessment of caregiver burden. Sociodemographical data, the level of knowledge about schizophrenia, clinical impression scale, and global assessment of functioning were used to evaluate the related factors. Results Caregiver burden was negatively correlated with income level and functionality of the patient and was positively correlated with the age of the caregiver, the daily time spent with the patient, and the number of hospitalizations of the patient (p<0.05). There was no significant correlation between the caregivers’ knowledge about schizophrenia and caregiver burden (p<0.05). Living in the same house with the patient was a positive predictor, whereas functionality and income level of the patient and education level of the caregiver were negative predictors (p<0.05). Conclusion This study highlighted the importance of setting targets for improving the functionality of patients in the design and implementation of rehabilitation and support programs for patients with schizophrenia. Additionally, providing higher income for patients, creating conditions for an independent life, and increasing incentives for younger caregivers with a higher educational level may help decrease caregiver burden. PMID:28360779

  17. [Prevalence of osteoporosis in male patients with risk factors].

    PubMed

    Audran, Maurice; Cortet, Bernard

    2011-11-01

    Male osteoporosis is often secondary to other conditions. However the causes of osteoporosis in men are dramatically variable according to the authors. The aim of this observational multicenter study was to assess the main risk factors and causes for male patients with low bone mineral density (LBM). The study was performed in a cohort of rheumatologists who usually prescribe bone mineral density assessment according to HAS criteria (one or more criteria) for bone mineral density (BMD) measurement as defined by: (a): vertebral fracture; (b): non traumatic non vertebral fracture; (c): corticosteroid therapy; (d): hypogonadism or GnRH agonist therapy; (e): endocrine disorders; (f): osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). BMD was measured by dual photon absorptiometry (DXA) at lumbar spine, femoral or total neck sites. Osteoporosis was defined as a T-score value less or equal to 2.5 at one of those region of interest (ROI); LBM as a T-score value between -1 and -2.5. A total of 431 rheumatologists included 1198 male patients (66.6 ± 12.2 years). According to DXA results, 888 patients (74.1 %) had osteoporosis and 231 (19.3 %) had osteopenia. BMD was considered as normal for 79 patients (6.6 %). A total of 1146 patients (95.7 %) satisfied to the criteria of reimbursement of DXA measurement. Six hundred and eighty-six patients (57.3 %) had suffered from vertebral fractures and 349 patients (29.2 %) from non vertebral fractures. Corticosteroids had been prescribed in 28.7 % of patients and 6.6 % were treated with GnRH agonists for prostate cancer. Hypogonadism was diagnosed in 27 %. Five patients suffered from OI. Other risk factors were detected: alcoholism and smoking in 28.1 % and 42.9 % respectively; rheumatoid arthritis or spondylarthropathy in 12.5 % of patients; chronic pulmonary disorders in 16.1 %. By contrast endocrinopathies were rare (2.5 %). Several risk factors were more frequently encountered for patients with osteoporosis as compared with osteopenia, i.e., smoking

  18. Factors leading to refractory asthma in patients from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Amal M.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.; Al Moamary, Mohamed S.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to study the clinical characteristic of patient with refractory asthma (RA) from Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This paper prospectively studied in a university hospital factors leading to RA in a cohort of patients who have inadequately controlled asthma or with frequent exacerbations despite optimum controller therapy. It also studied patients with asthma that requires extended periods of oral steroids to control. RESULTS: The mean age was 45.1 years (±9.1) where 74 patients were enrolled in this study with the age group (37–48 years) is having the highest percentage (64.8%). Female patients represented 62.2%. The two major comorbid conditions were allergic rhinitis (54.1%) and gastroesophageal reflux (33.8%). The vast majority (72 patients) had at least one trigger factor for asthma (97.3%). The asthma control test showed that 86.4% had an uncontrolled status. Spirometry showed mild disease in 9.5%, moderate in 47.3%, and severe in 43.2%. Eosinophilia was seen in only 16.2%. Immunoglobulin E level between 70 and 700 μg/L was found in 58.1% of patients. CONCLUSION: RA has certain clinical characteristics and associated comorbid conditions as well as precipitating factors that facilitate the identifications of these cases. PMID:28197221

  19. Modifiable Risk Factors in Patients With Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Shemory, Scott T; Pfefferle, Kiel J; Gradisar, Ian M

    2016-05-01

    Low back pain is one of the most common reasons for physician visits in the United States and is a chief complaint frequently seen by orthopedic surgeons. Patients with chronic low back pain can experience recurring debilitating pain and disability, decreasing their quality of life. A commercially available software platform, Explorys (Explorys, Inc, Cleveland, Ohio), was used to mine a pooled electronic health care database consisting of the medical records of more than 26 million patients. According to the available medical history data, 1.2 million patients had a diagnosis of low back pain (4.54%). The information was used to determine the incidence of low back pain in patients with a history of nicotine dependence, obesity (body mass index, >30 kg/m(2)), depressive disorders, and alcohol abuse. Relative risk was then calculated for the defined modifiable risk factors. Patients with nicotine dependence, obesity, depressive disorders, and alcohol abuse had a relative risk of 4.489, 6.007, 5.511, and 3.326 for low back pain, respectively, compared with patients without the defined risk factor. A statistically significant difference was found in the incidence of low back pain between all 4 groups with the risk factors evaluated and the general population (P<.05). By determining treatable patient risk factors for low back pain, physicians can monitor at-risk patients and focus on prevention and control of debilitating disease. These approaches can decrease the number of patients with isolated low back pain who are seen by orthopedic surgeons. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e413-e416.].

  20. Preoperative risk factors of malnutrition for cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Donata, Ringaitienė; Dalia, Gineitytė; Vaidas, Vicka; Tadas, Žvirblis; Jūratė, Šipylaitė; Algimantas, Irnius; Juozas, Ivaškevičius

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malnutrition (MN) is prevalent in cardiac surgery, but there are no specific preoperative risk factors of MN. The aim of this study is to assess the clinically relevant risk factors of MN for cardiac surgery patients. Materials and methods. The nutritional state of the patients was evaluated one day prior to surgery using a bioelectrical impedance analysis phase angle (PA). Two groups of patients were generated according to low PA: malnourished and well nourished. Risk factors of MN were divided into three clinically relevant groups: psychosocial and lifestyle factors, laboratory findings and disease-associated factors. Variables in each different group were entered into separate multivariate logistic regression models. Results. A total of 712 patients were included in the study. The majority of them were 65-year old men after a CABG procedure. Low PA was present in 22.9% (163) of patients. The analysis of disease-related factors of MN revealed the importance of heart functions (NYHA IV class OR: 3.073, CI95%: 1.416–6.668, p = 0.007), valve pathology (OR: 1.825, CI95%: 1.182–2.819, p = 0.007), renal insufficiency (OR: 4.091, CI95%: 1.995–8.389, p < 0.001) and body mass index (OR: 0.928, CI95%: 0.890–0.968, p < 0.001). Laboratory values related to MN were levels of haemoglobin (OR: 0.967, CI95%: 0.951–0.983, p < 0.001) and C-reactive protein (OR: 1.015, CI95%: 1.002–1.028, p = 0.0279). The lifestyle variables that qualified as risk factors concerned the intake of food (OR: 3.030, CI95%: 1.353–6.757, p = 0.007) and mobility (OR: 2.770, CI95%: 1.067–7.194, p = 0.036). Conclusions. MN risk factors comprise three different clinical groups: psychosocial and lifestyle factors, laboratory findings and disease-associated factors. The patients who are most likely to be malnourished are those with valve pathology, severe imparted heart function, insufficient renal function and high inflammatory markers. Also these patients have decreased mobility

  1. Exploring Contextual Factors and Patient Activation: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of Patients with Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie; Mortensen, Karoline; Bloodworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Patient activation has been considered as a "blockbuster drug of the century." Patients with mental disorders are less activated compared to patients with other chronic diseases. Low activation due to mental disorders can affect the efficiency of treatment of other comorbidities. Contextual factors are significantly associated with…

  2. Exploring Contextual Factors and Patient Activation: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of Patients with Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie; Mortensen, Karoline; Bloodworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Patient activation has been considered as a "blockbuster drug of the century." Patients with mental disorders are less activated compared to patients with other chronic diseases. Low activation due to mental disorders can affect the efficiency of treatment of other comorbidities. Contextual factors are significantly associated with…

  3. Predictive factors for relapse in patients on buprenorphine maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Michael; Finlayson, Alistair J Reid; Wang, Li; Martin, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence, clinical outcomes of this treatment approach continue to need evaluation. This study examines factors associated with relapse and retention during buprenorphine treatment in a sample of opioid dependent outpatients. In a retrospective chart review of 62 patients with opioid dependence, relapse was determined by self-report, urine toxicology screens, and by checking the state controlled substance monitoring database. Data was analyzed using two-way tests of association and logistic regression. Patients with comorbid anxiety disorders, active benzodiazepine use (contrary to clinic policy), or active alcohol abuse, were significantly more likely to relapse. Patients who relapsed were also more likely to be on a higher buprenorphine maintenance dose. This study identifies relapse risk factors during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. Future research is needed to determine whether modifying these factors may lead to improved treatment outcomes. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  4. Spine Surgeon Selection Criteria: Factors Influencing Patient Choice.

    PubMed

    Manning, Blaine T; Ahn, Junyoung; Bohl, Daniel D; Mayo, Benjamin C; Louie, Philip K; Singh, Kern

    2016-07-01

    A prospective questionnaire. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors that patients consider when selecting a spine surgeon. The rise in consumer-driven health insurance plans has increased the role of patients in provider selection. The purpose of this study is to identify factors that may influence a patient's criteria for selecting a spine surgeon. Two hundred thirty-one patients who sought treatment by one spine surgeon completed an anonymous questionnaire consisting of 26 questions. Four questions regarded demographic information; 16 questions asked respondents to rate the importance of specific criteria regarding spine surgeon selection (scale 1-10, with 10 being the most important); and six questions were multiple-choice regarding patient preferences toward aspects of their surgeon (age, training background, etc.). Patients rated board certification (9.26 ± 1.67), in-network provider status (8.10 ± 3.04), and friendliness/bedside manner (8.01 ± 2.35) highest among factors considered when selecting a spine surgeon. Most patients (92%) reported that 30 minutes or less should pass between check-in and seeing their surgeon during a clinic appointment. Regarding whether their spine surgeon underwent training as a neurosurgeon versus an orthopedic surgeon, 25% reported no preference, 52% preferred neurosurgical training, and 23% preferred orthopedic training. Our findings suggest that board certification and in-network health insurance plans may be most important in patients' criteria for choosing a spine surgeon. Advertisements were rated least important by patients. Patients expressed varying preferences regarding ideal surgeon age, training background, proximity, medical student/resident involvement, and clinic appointment availability. The surgeon from whom patients sought treatment completed an orthopedic surgery residency; hence, it is notable that 52% of patients preferred a spine surgeon with a neurosurgical background. In the context

  5. Factor analysis of nursing students' perception of patient safety education.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the factor structure of the Health Care Professionals Patient Safety Assessment Curriculum Survey (HPPSACS) when completed by a group of nursing students from one University in the UK. The quality, content and delivery of nursing education can have a significant impact on the future students' safety behaviours in clinical settings. The Health Care Professionals Patient Safety Assessment Curriculum Survey HPPSACS has been developed in the US to establish undergraduate nursing students' perceived awareness, skills, and attitudes toward patient safety education. The instrument has not been reported to be used elsewhere; therefore, some psychometric properties remain untested. Pre-registration nursing students (n=272) from three campuses of a university in East of England completed the HPPSACS in 2012. Principal component analysis was conducted to explore the factors emerging from the students' responses. 222 students (82%) returned the questionnaires. Constraining data to a 4-factor solution explained 52% of the variance. Factors identified were: "Willingness to disclose errors", "Recognition and management of medical errors", "The Perceived interprofessional context of patient safety" and "The perceived support and understanding for improving patient safety". The overall Cronbach's alpha was 0.64, indicating moderate internal consistency of the instrument. Some demographical and descriptive questions on the HPPSACS instrument were modified to accommodate the participants' educational context. However, all items in the HPPSACS which were included in the factor analysis remain identical to the original tool. The study offers empirical findings of how patient safety education is contextualised in the undergraduate, pre-registration nursing curriculum. Further research is required to refine and improve the overall reliability of the Health Care Professionals Patient Safety Assessment Curriculum Survey (HPPSACS' instrument

  6. [Prognostic factors of community acquired pneumonia in very old patients].

    PubMed

    Cabré, Mateu; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Pallarés, Román

    2006-07-08

    To determine whether there are differences between the prognostic factors associated with 30-days mortality in patients 65-84 year-old and patients over 84 years hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). An observational study with retrospective data collection was carried out in a representative sample of all CAP in-patients of 27 general hospitals. Data regarding comorbidities, signs and symptoms on admission, radiological and laboratory examinations, and complications during hospitalization were recorded. 1,191 CAP patients were studied, 80.1% in the 65-84 age group and 19.9% in the over 84 age group. Mortality during the first 30 days was 11.9% in the younger group and 20.7% in the older (p < 0.001). In the younger group, the multivariate analysis showed the following independent prognostic factors: general discomfort (odds ratio [OR] = 3.93), respiratory rate > 30/min (OR = 5.02), atrial fibrillation (OR = 3.57), dementia (OR = 9.18), and hospitalization during the previous year (OR = 3.74). In the older group, independent prognostic factors were cancer (OR = 8.4) and renal failure (3.32). Age significantly modified the effect of altered mental state, tachypnea, tachycardia, hyperglycemia, and dementia on mortality. In people over 84 years, except cancer and renal failure, classic CAP prognostic factors used in severity indexes do not distinguish those who will die from those who will not. Therefore, these factors must be interpreted with caution.

  7. Risk factors for erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Rakesh Kumar; Shamsi, Bilal Haider; Chen, Hui-Ming; Tan, Tan; Tang, Kai-Fa; Xing, Jun-Ping

    2016-06-01

    To examine the relationship between risk factors for cardiac disease and erectile dysfunction (ED) in men from Xi'an, China. Participants were patients with cardiovascular disease who visited the Cardiovascular Medicine Department of Xi'an Jiaotong University First Affiliated Hospital between September 2011 and March 2012. Two hundred and fifty patients were issued with questionnaires and underwent a physical examination and blood test.Risk factors for ED were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 222 participants returned valid questionnaires (89% response rate), underwent a physical examination and blood test, and were included in the study. The most common cardiovascular diseases were hypertension (n = 142; 64%), coronary heart disease (n = 90; 41%) and angina pectoris (n = 78; 35%). Most patients (n = 144; 65%) had two or more cardiovascular diseases. Age, smoking, body mass index, total cholesterol level, hypertension and the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly associated with ED. Domestic location, level of education, participation in physical activity, diabetes and drinking alcohol were not associated with ED. Common risk factors for cardiovascular disease are associated with ED in patients with cardiovascular disease. This study furthers understanding of the risk factors for ED in Chinese patients with cardiovascular disease and paves the way for further research into the prevention of ED. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Environmental Risk Factors for Pneumocystis Pneumonia Hospitalizations in HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Djawe, Kpandja; Levin, Linda; Swartzman, Alexandra; Fong, Serena; Roth, Brenna; Subramanian, Anuradha; Grieco, Katherine; Jarlsberg, Leah; Miller, Robert F.; Huang, Laurence; Walzer, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) is the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients in the United States. Although the host risk factors for the development of PcP are well established, the environmental (climatological, air pollution) risk factors are poorly understood. The major goal of this study was to determine the environmental risk factors for admissions of HIV-positive patients with PcP to a single medical center. Methods. Between 1997 and 2008, 457 HIV-positive patients with microscopically confirmed PcP were admitted to the San Francisco General Hospital. A case-crossover design was applied to identify environmental risk factors for PcP hospitalizations. Climatological and air pollution data were collected from the Environmental Protection Agency and Weather Warehouse databases. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of each environmental factor and PcP hospital admission. Results. Hospital admissions were significantly more common in the summer than in the other seasons. Increases in temperature and sulfur dioxide levels were independently associated with hospital admissions for PcP, but the effects of sulfur dioxide were modified by increasing carbon monoxide levels. Conclusions. This study identifies both climatological and air pollution constituents as independent risk factors for hospitalization of HIV-positive patients with PcP in San Francisco. Thus, the environmental effects on PcP are more likely complex than previously thought. Further studies are needed to understand how these factors exert their effects and to determine if these factors are associated with PcP in other geographic locations. PMID:23042978

  9. Discordance between patient report and chart review of risk factors for antimicrobial resistance in ED patients.

    PubMed

    Caterino, Jeffrey M; Graham, Lauren; King, Andrew; Hoppes, Tyler

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the level of agreement between patient self-report and chart review for presence of antimicrobial resistance (AR) risk factors in emergency department (ED) patients. This is a cross-sectional analysis of adult ED patients from July 2010 to January 2011. All ED patients 18 years or older were eligible. Exclusion criteria included pregnant women, prisoners, altered mental status, non-English speakers, traumas, and patients unable to provide consent. Data were obtained by ED patient interview and review of the preceding 3 months of the medical record. We report the difference between patient self-report and chart review of identifying 1 or more AR risk factors using McNemar's χ(2). The test statistic was also calculated for individual risk factors and significance adjusted for multiple comparisons (P < .003). Agreement was calculated using κ with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Risk factor domains assessed included nursing home residence, recent health care utilization, current indwelling devices, and medical history. Among 289 patients, 1 or more risk factors were reported by 68% (95% CI, 63%-74%) of patients and found in 59% (95% CI, 53%-65%) of charts, a difference of 9.7% (95% CI, 5.3%-14%) (P < .001; κ = 0.72). Patients were more likely to report recent antibiotic use (42% vs 29%; P < .001; κ = 0.52) and recent surgery (17% vs 11%; P < .001; κ = 0.64). There is disagreement between ED patient self-report and medical record review for many AR risk factors. This could affect both clinical care and results of ED research studies relying on chart reviews. Patient self-report identifies a greater number of AR risk factors than chart review. © 2013.

  10. [Predictive factors for readmission in heart failure patients].

    PubMed

    Galofré, Nuria; San Vicente, Ludmila; González, Josep Anton; Planas, Francesc; Vila, Joaquim; Grau, Jordi

    2005-03-05

    Heart failure (HF) is a prevalent and increasing disease and represents one of the main causes of hospital admission. It is associated with an important morbi-mortality and a high rate of readmission. The objective of this study was to know the clinical characteristics of admitted patients with HF and to detect any valuable prognosis factors. Prospective study of admitted HF patients between May'99 and May'00. Readmission rate was evaluated six months later. 204 patients were included with an average age of 78 (9.9) years. 66% were women. Diabetes mellitus (DM) (36.4%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (23.4%) were the most outstanding associated pathologies. Ischemic heart disease (IHD) was the most frequent etiology in 33.4% cases. Mean time of admission was 10 days. 34% patients had systolic dysfunction (SD). Men with IHD presented a higher rate of SD (p < 0.001). Mortality was 12.4%, especially in COPD patients (p < 0.011). IECAs were prescribed in 71.2% in the SD group. Readmission rate at 6 months was about 43%. Patients with renal failure (p < 0.04) and those with a more impaired functional class (p < 0.02) displayed a higher readmission rate. Several clinical factors determine the morbi-mortality and prognosis including an older age, associated comorbility, type of cardiopathy and presence of systolic dysfunction. All these factors are detected at the time of hospital admission.

  11. Factors that influence treatment delay in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zarcos-Pedrinaci, Irene; Fernández-López, Alberto; Téllez, Teresa; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Rueda A, Antonio; Suarez-Varela, María Manuela Morales; Briones, Eduardo; Baré, Marisa; Escobar, Antonio; Sarasqueta, Cristina; de Larrea, Nerea Fernández; Aguirre, Urko; Quintana, José María; Redondo, Maximino

    2017-01-01

    A prospective study was performed of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC), distinguishing between colonic and rectal location, to determine the factors that may provoke a delay in the first treatment (DFT) provided. 2749 patients diagnosed with CRC were studied. The study population was recruited between June 2010 and December 2012. DFT is defined as time elapsed between diagnosis and first treatment exceeding 30 days. Excessive treatment delay was recorded in 65.5% of the cases, and was more prevalent among rectal cancer patients. Independent predictor variables of DFT in colon cancer patients were a low level of education, small tumour, ex-smoker, asymptomatic at diagnosis and following the application of screening. Among rectal cancer patients, the corresponding factors were primary school education and being asymptomatic. We conclude that treatment delay in CRC patients is affected not only by clinicopathological factors, but also by sociocultural ones. Greater attention should be paid by the healthcare provider to social groups with less formal education, in order to optimise treatment attention. PMID:27888636

  12. Factors that influence treatment delay in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zarcos-Pedrinaci, Irene; Fernández-López, Alberto; Téllez, Teresa; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Rueda A, Antonio; Suarez-Varela, María Manuela Morales; Briones, Eduardo; Baré, Marisa; Escobar, Antonio; Sarasqueta, Cristina; de Larrea, Nerea Fernández; Aguirre, Urko; Quintana, José María; Redondo, Maximino; Study Group, On Behalf Of The Caress-Ccr

    2016-11-24

    A prospective study was performed of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC), distinguishing between colonic and rectal location, to determine the factors that may provoke a delay in the first treatment (DFT) provided.2749 patients diagnosed with CRC were studied. The study population was recruited between June 2010 and December 2012. DFT is defined as time elapsed between diagnosis and first treatment exceeding 30 days.Excessive treatment delay was recorded in 65.5% of the cases, and was more prevalent among rectal cancer patients. Independent predictor variables of DFT in colon cancer patients were a low level of education, small tumour, ex-smoker, asymptomatic at diagnosis and following the application of screening. Among rectal cancer patients, the corresponding factors were primary school education and being asymptomatic.We conclude that treatment delay in CRC patients is affected not only by clinicopathological factors, but also by sociocultural ones. Greater attention should be paid by the healthcare provider to social groups with less formal education, in order to optimise treatment attention.

  13. Macroergonomic factors in the patient work system: examining the context of patients with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Valdez, Rupa S; Schubert, Christiane C; Thompson, Morgan J; Hundt, Ann S

    2017-01-01

    Human factors/ergonomics recognises work as embedded in and shaped by levels of social, physical and organisational context. This study investigates the contextual or macroergonomic factors present in the health-related work performed by patients. We performed a secondary content analysis of findings from three studies of the work of chronically ill patients and their informal caregivers. Our resulting consolidated macroergonomic patient work system model identified 17 factors across physical, social and organisational domains and household and community levels. These factors are illustrated with examples from the three studies and discussed as having positive, negative or varying effects on health and health behaviour. We present three brief case studies to illustrate how macroergonomic factors combine across domains and levels to shape performance in expected and unexpected ways. Findings demonstrate not only the importance of context for patients' health-related activities but also specific factors to consider in future research, design and policy efforts. Practitioner Summary: Health-related activities of patients are embedded in and shaped by levels of social, physical and organisational context. This paper combined findings from three studies to specify 17 contextual or macroergonomic factors in home- and community-based work systems of chronically ill patients. These factors have research, design and policy implications.

  14. Factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Hitoshi; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Asai, Atsushi; Kanda, Shigeru; Maeda, Keiko; Shimojima, Takuya; Nomura, Hideki; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2017-08-08

    Polypharmacy, which is often observed in elderly patients, has been associated with several unfavorable outcomes, including an increased risk of potentially inappropriate medications, medication non-adherence, drug duplication, drug-drug interactions, higher healthcare costs and adverse drug reactions. A significant association between polypharmacy and adverse outcomes among older people living in the community has also been confirmed. A reduction in the number of medications should thus be pursued for many older individuals. Nevertheless, the factors associated with polypharmacy in elderly home-care patients have not been reported. Here, we investigated those factors in elderly home-care patients in Japan. We used the data of the participants in the Observational Study of Nagoya Elderly with Home Medical investigation. Polypharmacy was defined as the current use of six or more different medications. We carried out univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the associations between polypharmacy and each of several factors. A total of 153 home-care patients were registered. The mean number of medications used per patient was 5.9, and 51.5% of the patients belonged to the polypharmacy group. The multivariate model showed that the patients' scores on the Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Mini-Nutrition Assessment Short Form were inversely associated with polypharmacy, and potentially inappropriate medication was most strongly associated with polypharmacy (odds ratio 4.992). The present findings showed that polypharmacy was quite common among the elderly home-care patients, and they suggest that home-care physicians should prescribe fewer medications in accord with the deterioration of home-care patients' general condition. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Factors associated with prolonged length of stay in older patients

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Hui Jin; Lim, Zhen Yu; Yap, Philip; Tang, Terence

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Prolonged stay in acute hospitals increases the risk of hospital-acquired infections in older patients, and disrupts patient flow and access to care due to bed shortages. We aimed to investigate the factors associated with prolonged length of stay (pLOS) among older patients (aged ≥ 78 years) in a tertiary hospital, to identify the potentially modifiable risk factors that could direct interventions to reduce length of stay (LOS). METHODS During a three-month period from January 2013 to March 2013, we identified 72 patients with pLOS (LOS ≥ 21 days) and compared their demographic and clinical variables with that of 281 randomly selected control patients (LOS < 21 days) using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 85.30 ± 5.34 years; 54% of them were female and 72% were of Chinese ethnicity. Logistic regression revealed the following significant factors for increased LOS: discharge to intermediate and long-term care services (odds ratio [OR] 9.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.56–23.89; p < 0.001); increased severity of illness (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.12–5.21; p = 0.025); and presence of caregiver stress (OR 3.85, 95% CI 1.67–8.91; p = 0.002). CONCLUSION Presence of caregiver stress and nursing home placement are potential modifiable risk factors of pLOS among older patients. Early identification and management of caregiver stress, as well as expediting discharge planning, may help to reduce the length of stay for this cohort. PMID:27609507

  16. Risk factors of patients with and without postoperative nausea (PON).

    PubMed

    Dienemann, Jacqueline; Hudgens, Amanda N; Martin, Dana; Jones, Holly; Hunt, Ronald; Blackwell, Richard; Norton, H James; Divine, George

    2012-08-01

    This purpose of this analysis was to study risk factors of postoperative nausea (PON) and their strength. Data were obtained during the screening phase of a controlled clinical trial of aromatherapy for PON. In a sample of 1151 postsurgical subjects, 301 (26.2%) reported PON. Significant risk factors identified in the order of odds ratios for nausea were female gender, gastrointestinal surgery, use of volatile anesthesia gases, history of PON, history of motion sickness, and use of opioids after surgery. Although still over 1.0, the risk factors of length of surgery over 1 hour and gynecologic surgery had the lowest odds ratios. Likelihood of nausea increased significantly with the number of significant risk factors (P<.0001). Administration of preventive antiemetic medication also increased with the number of significant risk factors (P<.0001). Among 301 subjects reporting nausea, 49 (16.28%) received preventive medication. Despite prevention efforts, PON remains a substantial side effect for many surgical patients.

  17. Labeled factor IX kinetics in patients with hemophilia-B

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.J.; Thompson, A.R.

    1981-09-01

    Labeled factor IX was infused five time into four patients with hemophilia-B. Ten-minute plasma recovery average 35% (SD +/- 2) and the mean T 1/2 beta-phase elimination was 23 hr (+/- 5). No alteration in the postinfusion 125I-factor-IX could be detected by radioautography of plasma samples run on polyacrylamide gels or on crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Label was excreted into the urine as free 125I-iodide. Kinetics were similar when the labeled preparation was infused alone or with a commercial concentrate containing unlabeled factor IX. Infusion of factor IX in man is best described by a two-compartment open pharmacokinetic model where factor IX is distributed in a space larger than the plasma volume.

  18. Risk factors for mortality in patients with mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Spellberg, Brad; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios; Fredricks, David; Morris, Michele; Perfect, John; Chin-Hong, Peter; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Brass, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal clinical care and clinical investigation of patients with mucormycosis are limited by absence of controlled trials and predictors of mortality or clinical response. The Deferasirox-AmBisome Therapy for mucormycosis (DEFEAT Mucor) study was the first randomized clinical trial conducted for patients with mucormycosis, and demonstrated that adjunctive deferasirox therapy did not improve outcomes of the disease. The current study describes clinical factors from the 20 patients enrolled to identify those associated with 90-day mortality. Eleven (55%) patients died. Age, diabetes mellitus, transplant status, and antifungal therapy were not associated with mortality. However, active malignancy or neutropenia at enrollment were associated with increased mortality. Pulmonary infection was associated with worse Kaplan-Meier survival compared to non-pulmonary infection. Higher baseline serum iron and ferritin concentrations were also associated with mortality. No patient who progressed clinically during the first 14 days of study therapy survived, however many patients who clinically improved during that time did not survive to 90 days. In contrast, day 30 clinical response was predictive of 90-day survival. These factors may be useful in defining enrollment criteria and in randomization stratification for future clinical trials, and in supporting clinical care of patients with mucormycosis. PMID:22435877

  19. Risk factors for mortality in patients with mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Spellberg, Brad; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Fredricks, David; Morris, Michele I; Perfect, John R; Chin-Hong, Peter V; Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Brass, Eric P

    2012-08-01

    Optimal clinical care and clinical investigation of patients with mucormycosis are limited by absence of controlled trials, and absence of well-defined predictors of mortality or clinical response. The Deferasirox-AmBisome Therapy for mucormycosis (DEFEAT Mucor) study was the first randomized clinical trial conducted on patients with mucormycosis, and demonstrated that adjunctive deferasirox therapy did not improve outcomes of the disease. The current study describes clinical factors from the 20 patients enrolled to identify those associated with 90-day mortality of the 11 (55%) patients who died by day 90. Age, diabetes mellitus, transplant status, or antifungal therapy were not associated with mortality. However, active malignancy or neutropenia at enrollment were associated with increased mortality. Pulmonary infection was linked with lower Kaplan-Meier survival compared to non-pulmonary infection. Higher baseline serum concentrations of iron and ferritin were also associated with mortality. No patient who progressed clinically during the first 14 days of study therapy survived; however, many patients who clinically improved during that time did not survive to 90 days. In contrast, day 30 clinical response was predictive of 90-day survival. These factors may be useful in defining enrollment randomization stratification critieria for future clinical trials, and in supporting clinical care of patients with mucormycosis.

  20. Predictive factors for stone disease in patients with renal colic.

    PubMed

    Türk, Hakan; Ün, Sıtkı

    2017-06-30

    Many patients present to urology and emergency departments for acute renal colic complaints. There are many different imaging studies that can be used in patients with a pre-diagnosis of acute renal colic. In this study, we would like to assess the efficacy of using clinical and laboratory results in patients with flank pain complaint as a predictive factor of urinary system stone disease. All patients were assessed using spinal non-contrast complete abdominal computerized tomography and urine analysis. Presence of stones and their number and size were recorded. 516 patients who were included in the study were divided into 2 groups according to urinary stone presence. Group 1 (n = 388) consisted of patients with stones meanwhile patients in Group 2 (n = 128) were stone-free. According to these results, male sex, presence of microscopic hematuria, stone history in the family, nausea and emesis in addition to pain and accompanying urinary symptoms were detected as predictive factors in diagnosing urinary stone disease by multivariate analysis. From our study results, we can conclude that uroflowmetry is a very useful tool in monitoring lower urinary system complaints.

  1. Exploratory factor analysis: strategies used by patients to promote health.

    PubMed

    Lev, Elise L; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Kolassa, John; Gejerman, Glen; Colella, Joan; Lane, Patricia; Scrofine, Suzanne; Esposito, Michael; Lanteri, Vincent; Scheuch, John; Munver, Ravi; Galli, Bernadette; Watson, Richard A; Sawczuk, Ihor

    2007-03-01

    Strategies used by patients to promote health (SUPPH) was used to measure self-care self-efficacy in patients with cancer. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the extent to which self-efficacy theory explained the factor structure of the SUPPH and (2) to determine the relationship of demographic data with factors of the SUPPH. Subjects were diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) and treated with either: (a) radical prostatectomy, (b) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) + radioactive seed implantation, or (c) IMRT + high dose rate. Subjects completed a demographic questionnaire and the SUPPH. Exploratory factor analysis of the SUPPH was performed using a varimax rotation. Subjects (n = 265) were predominately white and averaged 68 years of age. The model explained 81.3% of the total sum of eigenvalues. Two factors of the SUPPH were identified: physiological efficacy information and performance efficacy information. Younger subjects who were fully employed and earning more money had significantly higher performance self-efficacy than older subjects who were working part time and earning less money. Results are congruent with Bandura's (1997) description of self-efficacy. Use of the SUPPH may facilitate research validating Bandura's (1997) assertion that an individual's self-efficacy is related to quality of life (QOL) during chronic illness. Additional research focusing on self-efficacy and PCa patients' QOL may lead to efficacy enhancing interventions that will improve QOL of patients with PCa.

  2. Human factors in the management of the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Bion, J F; Abrusci, T; Hibbert, P

    2010-07-01

    Unreliable delivery of best practice care is a major component of medical error. Critically ill patients are particularly susceptible to error and unreliable care. Human factors analysis, widely used in industry, provides insights into how interactions between organizations, tasks, and the individual worker impact on human behaviour and affect systems reliability. We adopt a human factors approach to examine determinants of clinical reliability in the management of critically ill patients. We conducted a narrative review based on a Medline search (1950-March 2010) combining intensive/critical care (units) with medical errors, patient safety, or delivery of healthcare; keyword and Internet search 'human factors' or 'ergonomics'. Critical illness represents a high-risk, complex system spanning speciality and geographical boundaries. Substantial opportunities exist for improving the safety and reliability of care of critically ill patients at the level of the task, the individual healthcare provider, and the organization or system. Task standardization (best practice guidelines) and simplification (bundling or checklists) should be implemented where scientific evidence is strong, or adopted subject to further research ('dynamic standardization'). Technical interventions should be embedded in everyday practice by the adjunctive use of non-technical (behavioural) interventions. These include executive 'adoption' of clinical areas, systematic methods for identifying hazards and reflective learning from error, and a range of techniques for improving teamworking and communication. Human factors analysis provides a useful framework for understanding and rectifying the causes of error and unreliability, particularly in complex systems such as critical care.

  3. Prognostic Factors for Visual Outcome in Traumatic Cataract Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan F.; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Ming G.; Du, Shan S.; Yue, Zhen Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the prognostic factors for visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients. Methods. The demographic features of traumatic cataract patients in Central China were studied. The factors that might influence the visual outcome were analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of OTS (ocular trauma score) in predicting VA were calculated. Results. The study enrolled 480 cases. 65.5% of patients achieved VA at >20/60. The factors associated with the final VA were initial VA, injury type, wound location, the way of cataract removal, and IOL implantation. The sensitivities of OTS in predicting the VA at NLP (nonlight perception), LP/HM (light perception/hand motion), and ≥20/40 were 100%. The specificity of OTS to predict the final VA at 1/200-19/200 and 20/200-20/50 was 100%. Conclusion. The prognostic factors were initial VA, injury type, wound location, cataract removal procedure, and the way of IOL implantation. The OTS has good sensitivity and specificity in predicting visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients in long follow-up. PMID:27595014

  4. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  5. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  6. Selecting a provider: what factors influence patients' decision making?

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jean; Sick, Brian; Anderson, Joseph; Berg, Andrea; Dehmer, Chad; Tufano, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Each year consumers make a variety of decisions relating to their healthcare. Some experts argue that stronger consumer engagement in decisions about where to obtain medical care is an important mechanism for improving efficiency in healthcare delivery and financing. Consumers' ability and motivation to become more active decision makers are affected by several factors, including financial incentives and access to information. This study investigates the set of factors that consumers consider when selecting a provider, including attributes of the provider and the care experience and the reputation of the provider. Additionally, the study evaluates consumers awareness and use of formal sources of provider selection information. Our results from analyzing data from a survey of 467 patients at four clinics in Minnesota suggest that the factors considered of greatest importance include reputation of the physician and reputation of the healthcare organization. Contractual and logistical factors also play a role, with respondents highlighting the importance of seeing a provider affiliated with their health plan and appointment availability. Few respondents indicated that advertisements or formal sources of quality information affected their decision making. The key implication for provider organizations is to carefully manage referral sources to ensure that they consistently meet the needs of referrers. Excellent service to existing patients and to the network of referring physicians yields patient and referrer satisfaction that is critical to attracting new patients. Finally, organizations more generally may want to explore the capabilities of new media and social networking sites for building reputation.

  7. Factors Influencing Patient Selection of a Foot and Ankle Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Manning, Blaine T; Bohl, Daniel D; Wang, Kevin C; Hamid, Kamran S; Holmes, George B; Lee, Simon

    2017-09-01

    An increasingly consumer-centric health insurance market has empowered patients to select the providers of their choice. There is a lack of studies investigating the rationale by which patients select a foot and ankle surgeon. In the present study, 824 consecutive new patients seeking treatment from 3 foot-ankle surgeons were consecutively administered an anonymous questionnaire prior to their first appointment. It included rating the importance of 15 factors regarding specialist selection on a 1 to 10 scale, with 10 designated " Very important" and 1 designated " Not important at all." The remaining questions were multiple choice regarding patient perspectives on other surgeon aspects (appointment availability, waiting room times, clinic proximity, etc). Of 824 consecutive patients administered the survey, 305 (37%) responded. Patients rated board certification (9.24 ± 1.87) and on-site imaging availability (8.48 ± 2.37)-on a 1 to 10 scale, with 10 designated "Very important- as the 2 most important criteria in choosing a foot and ankle surgeon. Patients rated advertisements as least important. Among the patients, 91% responded that a maximum of 30 minutes should elapse between clinic check-in and seeing their physician; 61% responded that a maximum of 20 minutes should elapse between clinic check-in and seeing their physician. In the context of an increasingly consumer-driven paradigm of health care delivery and reimbursement, it is important to understand patients' preferences in specialist selection. Level III: Prospective questionnaire.

  8. Prognostic factors for recovery in Portuguese patients with Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Margarida; Firmino-Machado, João; Marques, Elisa A; Santos, Paula C; Simões, Ana Daniela; Duarte, José A

    2016-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to identify the prognostic factors that contribute to complete recovery at 6 weeks and 6 months in patients with Bell's palsy. This is a prospective, longitudinal, and descriptive study that included 123 patients diagnosed with facial nerve palsy (FNP) at a hospital in Guimarães, Portugal. However, only 73 patients with Bell's palsy (BP) were included in the assessment of recovery at 6 weeks and 6 months. We analyzed the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, including sex, age, paralyzed side, occupation, previous and associated symptoms, seasonal occurrence, familial facial palsy, patient perception, intervention options, and baseline grade according to the House-Brackmann facial grading system (HB-FGS). Of the 123 cases with FNP, 79 (64.2%) patients had BP. Age, sex, and baseline HB-FGS grades were significant predictors of complete recovery at 6 weeks. Patients with HB-FGS grade III or lower (6 weeks baseline) had significant recovery of function at 6 months. Baseline severity of BP, elderly patients, and male sex were early predictors of poor prognosis. Patients with mild and moderate dysfunction according to the HB-FGS achieved significant normal facial function at 6 months. Further prospective studies with longer observation periods and larger samples are needed to verify the results.

  9. Associations between patient factors and medication adherence: A Jordanian experience.

    PubMed

    Basheti, Iman A; Hait, Sami Saqf El; Qunaibi, Eyad A; Aburuz, Salah; Bulatova, Nailya

    2016-01-01

    To explore the effect of patient characteristics and health beliefs on their medication adherence. Patients (n=167) with chronic conditions (mean age 58.9; SD=13.54, 53% males) were recruited from March 2009- to March 2010 using a cross sectional study design. Data collected included patients' demographics, medical conditions, medications therapeutic regimen, frequency of physician visits and health beliefs. Patient self-reported adherence to medications was assessed by the researcher using a validated and published scale. Treatment related problems (TRPs) were evaluated for each patient by competent clinical pharmacists. Associations between patient characteristics/health beliefs with adherence were explored. About half of the patients (46.1%) were non-adherent. A significant association was found between lower adherence and higher number of disease states (p<0.001), higher number of medications (p=0.001), and higher number of identified TRPs (p = 0.003). Patient adherence was positively affected by older age, higher educational level, and higher number of physician visits per month, while it was negatively affected by reporting difficulties with getting prescription refills on time. This study identified different factors that may negatively affect adherence, including higher number of medications and disease states, higher number of identified TRPs and inability to getting prescription refills on time. Hence, more care needs to be provided to patients with complex therapeutic regimens in order to enhance adherence.

  10. Factors Influencing Patient Selection of an Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Physician.

    PubMed

    Manning, Blaine T; Bohl, Daniel D; Saltzman, Bryan M; Cotter, Eric J; Wang, Kevin C; Epley, Chad T; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2017-08-01

    The rise in consumer-centric health insurance plans has increased the importance of the patient in choosing a provider. There is a paucity of studies that examine how patients select an orthopaedic sports medicine physician. To evaluate factors that patients consider when choosing an orthopaedic sports medicine physician. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 1077 patients who sought treatment by 3 sports medicine physicians were administered an anonymous questionnaire. The questionnaire included 19 questions asking respondents to rate the importance of specific factors regarding the selection of orthopaedic sports medicine physicians on a scale of 1 (not important at all) to 10 (very important). The remaining 6 questions were multiple-choice and regarded the following criteria: preferred physician age, appointment availability, clinic waiting room times, travel distance, and medical student/resident involvement. Of the 1077 consecutive patients administered the survey, 382 (35%) responded. Of these, 59% (n = 224) were male, and 41% (n = 158) were female. In ranking the 19 criteria in terms of importance, patients rated board certification (9.12 ± 1.88), being well known for a specific area of expertise (8.27 ± 2.39), and in-network provider status (8.13 ± 2.94) as the 3 most important factors in selecting an orthopaedic sports medicine physician. Radio, television, and Internet advertisements were rated the least important. Regarding physician age, 63% of patients would consider seeking a physician who is ≤65 years old. Approximately 78% of patients would consider seeking a different physician if no appointments were available within 4 weeks. The study results suggest that board certification, being well known for a specific area of expertise, and health insurance in-network providers may be the most important factors influencing patient selection of an orthopaedic sports medicine physician. Advertisements were least important to patients. Patient

  11. Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor is present in most pleural effusion fluids from cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Eagles, G.; Warn, A.; Ball, R. Y.; Baillie-Johnson, H.; Arakaki, N.; Daikuhara, Y.; Warn, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Pleural effusion samples were obtained from 55 patients with malignant disease, including patients with primary lung cancers and those with a variety of other tumours metastatic to the pleura. The effusions were assayed for the presence of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), by both ELISA and bioassay. The presence of malignant cells in the effusions was also assessed. Detectable amounts of the factor, as judged by both criteria, were found in over 90% of all the effusions, including those from patients with a wide variety of carcinomas and also lymphomas. A wide range of HGF/SF levels were found for all tumour classes, some effusions containing high levels above 4 ng ml-1. It is concluded that tumours within the pleura and adjacent lung tissue are usually exposed to biologically significant levels of HGF/SF. PMID:8562345

  12. Environmental Risk Factors in Patients with Noninvasive Fungal Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Badr Eldin; El Sharnoubi, Mohammed M. K.; El-Sersy, Hesham A. A.; Mahmoud, Mohammed S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to try to determine the possible environmental risk factors for noninvasive fungal sinusitis in Egyptian patients. Methods. This is a prospective epidemiological case control study on the environmental risk factors of noninvasive fungal sinusitis. It included 60 patients and 100 age and sex matched controls. Results. There was a statistically significant relation between apartment floor, surface area, exposure to dust, exposure to cockroaches, poor air conditioning, and fungal sinusitis. Yet, no statistical significance was found between allergy related occupations, exposure to animals or plants, although their percentages were higher among cases, smoking, and urban or rural residence. Conclusion. We suggest that for patients with noninvasive fungal sinusitis a change in their living environment must be implied with better exposure to sunlight, larger well ventilated homes, proper cleaning of dust and cockroach extermination, and if possible the judicious use of air conditioners. PMID:27274885

  13. Pain related factors in newly diagnosed Generalized Anxiety Disorder patients.

    PubMed

    García-Campayo, Javier; Caballero, Fernando; Perez, María; López, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and factors associated to painful physical symptoms (PPS), pain as presentation, and neuropathic pain in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) at primary care setting. Multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study conducted on 404 Spanish primary care centers with 2,232 patients. Data was collected at once and included demographic data, main reason for visit, psychiatric and medical illnesses, healthcare resource utilization. Validated scales used for GAD diagnosis were the MINI interview and GAD-7 scale. Depression was measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, sleep disturbances with the MOS-Sleep Scale, and pain with the Brief Pain Inventory, short version. Most patients reported PPS (93.5%). The main associated factors of PPS were consultation for gastrointestinal disease (OR=3.9) or for depression (OR=2.2), and being women (OR=1.5). PPS were the reason for visiting in 72.4 % of the sample. The main associated factors of PPS as the reason for consultation were clinical discomfort due to anxiety (OR=2.0), being female (OR=1.6), comorbid social anxiety (OR=1.4), and high Body Mass Index (OR=1.04). Neuropathic pain was present in 59.4% of all patients. Patients with diabetes (OR=2.6), social anxiety (OR=1.6), and depression (OR=1,6) suffered more frequently from neuropathic pain. This is the first study to establish the associated factors of PPS, neuropathic pain and pain as main reason for visiting in primary care patients with newly diagnosed GAD. Better knowledge factors associated to GAD could help to reduce its underdiagnosis and undertreatment at the primary care level.

  14. Clinicopathological factors predictive of postoperative seizures in patients with gliomas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei; Liang, Tingyu; Zhang, Chuanbao; Cai, Jinquan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Baoshi; Qiu, Xiaoguang; Yao, Kun; Li, Guilin; Wang, Haoyuan; Jiang, Chuanlu; You, Gan; Jiang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common manifestations in gliomas and has a severe effect on the life expectancy and quality of life of patients. The aim of our study was to assess the potential connections between clinicopathological factors and postoperative seizure. We retrospectively investigated a group of 147 Chinese high-grade glioma (HGG) patients with preoperative seizure to examine the correlation between postoperative seizure and clinicopathological factors and prognosis. Univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with postoperative seizures. Survival function curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. 53 patients (36%) were completely seizure-free (Engel class I), and 94 (64%) experienced a postoperative seizure (Engel classes II, III, and IV). A Chi-squared analysis showed that anaplastic oligodendroglioma/anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AO/AOA) (P=0.05), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression (P=0.0004), O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression (P=0.011), and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression (P=0.045) were all significantly different. A logistic regression analysis showed that MGMT expression (P=0.05), EGFR expression (P=0.001), and AO/AOA (P=0.038) are independent factors of postoperative seizure. Patients with lower MGMT and EGFR expression and AO/AOA showed more frequent instances of postoperative seizure. Postoperative seizure showed no statistical significance on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Our study identified clinicopathological factors related to postoperative seizure in HGGs and found two predictive biomarkers of postoperative seizure: MGMT and EGFR. These findings provided insight treatment strategies aimed at prolonging survival and improving quality of life. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Positive psychosocial factors and NKT cells in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lamkin, Donald M; Lutgendorf, Susan K; McGinn, Stephanie; Dao, Minh; Maiseri, Heena; DeGeest, Koen; Sood, Anil K; Lubaroff, David M

    2008-01-01

    Psychosocial factors are known to be associated with properties of both NK cells and T cells in cancer patients. Less is known about the relationship between psychosocial factors and NKT cells, a rare group of lymphocytes that have known relevance for tumor control. We examined four psychosocial factors and percentage and number of CD3+CD56+ NKT cells, CD3-CD56+ NK cells, and CD3+CD56- T cells in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), ascites, and tumor of 35 ovarian cancer patients and 28 patients with benign pelvic masses. Patients awaiting surgery for a suspected cancerous mass completed questionnaires and gave a pre-surgical blood sample. Ascites and tumor were taken during surgery. After lymphocyte isolation, subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Benign and cancer patients did not differ on PBL subpopulations. Among cancer patients, NKT cell percentage was significantly higher in tumor and ascites than in PBL; T cell percentage was significantly higher in PBL than tumor. NKT, NK, and T cell number were significantly higher in peripheral blood than in ascites. Positive reframing was related to significantly higher NKT cell percentage and number in PBL. Social support was related to significantly higher NKT cell percentage in tumor. Vigor was related to significantly higher NKT cell percentage in PBL. Total mood disturbance was not related to NKT cell percentage or number. No significant relationships were found between psychosocial factors and NK cell percentage and number and T cell percentage and number. Given the anti-tumor activity of CD3+CD56+ cells, these relationships may have relevance for cancer control.

  16. Positive psychosocial factors and NKT cells in ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lamkin, Donald M.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; McGinn, Stephanie; Dao, Minh; Maiseri, Heena; DeGeest, Koen; Sood, Anil K.; Lubaroff, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Psychosocial factors are known to be associated with properties of both NK cells and T cells in cancer patients. Less is known about the relationship between psychosocial factors and NKT cells, a rare group of lymphocytes that have known relevance for tumor control. We examined four psychosocial factors and percentage and number of CD3+CD56+ NKT cells, CD3−CD56+ NK cells, and CD3+CD56− T cells in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), ascites, and tumor of 35 ovarian cancer patients and 28 patients with benign pelvic masses. Patients awaiting surgery for a suspected cancerous mass completed questionnaires and gave a pre-surgical blood sample. Ascites and tumor were taken during surgery. After lymphocyte isolation, subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Benign and cancer patients did not differ on PBL subpopulations. Among cancer patients, NKT cell percentage was significantly higher in tumor and ascites than in PBL; T cell percentage was significantly higher in PBL than tumor. NKT, NK, and T cell number were significantly higher in peripheral blood than in ascites. Positive reframing was related to significantly higher NKT cell percentage and number in PBL. Social support was related to significantly higher NKT cell percentage in tumor. Vigor was related to significantly higher NKT cell percentage in PBL. Total mood disturbance was not related to NKT cell percentage or number. No significant relationships were found between psychosocial factors and NK cell percentage and number and T cell percentage and number. Given the anti-tumor activity of CD3+CD56+ cells, these relationships may have relevance for cancer control. PMID:17643954

  17. Patients Visiting Multiple Emergency Departments: Patterns, Costs and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Todd W; Olson, Karen L; Palmer, Nathan P; Horwitz, Reed; Mandl, Kenneth D; Fine, Andrew M

    2017-09-01

    We sought to characterize the population of patients seeking care at multiple EDs and to quantify the proportion of all ED visits and costs accounted for by these patients. We performed a retrospective, cohort study of de-identified insurance claims for privately insured patients with ≥ 1 ED visit between 2010 and 2016. We measured the number of EDs visited by each patient and determined the overall proportion of all ED visits and ED costs accounted for by patients who visit multiple EDs. We identified factors associated with visiting multiple EDs. 8,651,716 patients made 16,390,676 ED visits over the study period, accounting for $26,102,831,740 in ED costs. A significant minority (20.5%) of patients visited more than one ED over the study period. However, these patients accounted for a disproportionate amount of all ED visits (41.4%) and all ED costs (39.2%). A small proportion (0.4%) of patients visited 5 of more EDs but accounted for 2.8% of ED visits and costs. Among patients with two ED visits within 30-days, 32% were to different EDs. Having at least one ED visit for mental health or substance abuse related diagnosis was associated with increased odds of visiting multiple EDs. A substantial minority of patients visit multiple EDs, but account for a disproportionate burden of overall ED utilization and costs. Future work should evaluate the impact of visiting multiple EDs on care utilization and outcomes and explore systems for improving access to patient records across care centers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Considering Factors of and Knowledge About Patients in Handover Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Meth, Sharon; Bass, Ellen J.; Hoke, George

    2014-01-01

    The healthcare system is moving from one primary physician who assumes responsibility for each patient to a more team-based approach. Thus, assessing team communication is critical. This study characterizes and assesses the quality of hospitalist handover communications at shift change using the literature recommended content and language form elements. Quality handovers should contain the following content: patient identifiers, active issues, and care plans. Quality handovers also should include utterances in the following language forms: explanations, rationales, and directives. Interviews, observation, recording, and conversation analysis of hospitalist handover communications were used. Hospitalist handover utterances were assigned both content and language form codes. The proportion of quality element verbalization across all patient handovers was calculated. In addition, the impact of patient factors (new admission, new problem, acuity level) and handover receiver knowledge on the inclusion of quality elements was examined. The 106 individual patient handovers across 16 handover sessions were recorded. 39% contained all six quality elements. While the majority of handovers contained five out of six quality elements, only 48% included directives. There was also no difference in the inclusion of quality elements based on patient factors or handover receiver knowledge. Hospitalist handovers are lacking in directives. Efforts to improve handovers through enhanced electronic medical record systems and training may need to expand to hospitalists and other attending level physicians. PMID:24851196

  19. Risk Factors for Inpatient Hospital Admission in Pediatric Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient admission of pediatric burn patients. Materials & methods This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the years of 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient admission for pediatric patients who sustained a burn injury. Patients who sustained a burn between the ages of 1 and 18 years were included. Results A total of 43,453 patients met inclusion criteria. Of those, 42.3% were Caucasian, 20.1% were African American, and 19.3% were Hispanic. Males comprised 63.5% of the studied population. The month of July was associated with a 31.8% increased chance (p=.011) of being admitted to hospital for a pediatric burn. It was found that patients being admitted had a 32.2% increased chance (p=.002) of a fluid and electrolyte abnormality and a 61.0% increased chance (p=.027) of drug abuse.  Conclusions Pediatric burn patients are more likely to be admitted to the hospital having a fluid and electrolyte abnormality, having a drug abuse status, and/or during the month of July. PMID:27335714

  20. How well do doctors know their patients? Factors affecting physician understanding of patients' health beliefs.

    PubMed

    Street, Richard L; Haidet, Paul

    2011-01-01

    An important feature of patient-centered care is physician understanding of their patients' health beliefs and values. Determine physicians' awareness of patients' health beliefs as well as communication, relationship, and demographic factors associated with better physician understanding of patients' illness perspectives. Cross-sectional, observational study. RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of 207 patients and 29 primary care physicians from 10 outpatient clinics. APPROACH AND MEASURES: After their consultation, patients and physicians independently completed the CONNECT instrument, a measure that assesses beliefs about the degree to which the patient's condition has a biological cause, is the patient's fault, is one the patient can control, has meaning for the patient, can be treated with natural remedies, and patient preferences for a partnership with the physician. Physicians completed the measure again on how they thought the patient responded. Active patient participation (frequency of questions, concerns, acts of assertiveness) was coded from audio-recordings of the consultations. Physicians' answers for how they thought the patient responded to the health belief measure were compared to their patients' actual responses. Degree of physician understanding of patients' health beliefs was computed as the absolute difference between patients' health beliefs and physicians' perception of patients' health beliefs. Physicians' perceptions of their patients' health beliefs differed significantly (P<0.001) from patients' actual beliefs. Physicians also thought patients' beliefs were more aligned with their own. Physicians had a better understanding of the degree to which patients believed their health conditions had personal meaning (p=0.001), would benefit from natural remedies (p=0.049), were conditions the patient could control (p=0.001), and wanted a partnership with the doctor (p=0.014) when patients more often asked questions, expressed concerns

  1. Patient factors may predict anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Dana M.; Mora Pinzon, Maria C.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Saclarides, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Anastomotic complications following rectal cancer surgery occur with varying frequency. Preoperative radiation, BMI, and low anastomoses have been implicated as predictors in previous studies, but their definitive role is still under review. The objective of our study was to identify patient and operative factors that may be predictive of anastomotic complications. Methods A retrospective review was performed on patients who had sphincter-preservation surgery performed for rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2011. Results 123 patients were included in this study, mean age was 59 (26–86), 58% were male. There were 33 complications in 32 patients (27%). Stenosis was the most frequent complication (24 of 33). 11 patients required mechanical dilatation, and 4 had operative revision of the anastomosis. Leak or pelvic abscess were present in 9 patients (7.3%); 4 were explored, 2 were drained and 3 were managed conservatively. 4 patients had permanent colostomy created due to anastomotic complications. Laparoscopy approach, BMI, age, smoking and tumor distance from anal verge were not significantly associated with anastomotic complications. After a multivariate analysis chemoradiation was significantly associated with overall anastomotic complications (Wall = 0.35, p = 0.05), and hemoglobin levels were associated with anastomotic leak (Wald = 4.09, p = 0.04). Conclusion Our study identifies preoperative anemia as possible risk factor for anastomotic leak and neoadjuvant chemoradiation may lead to increased risk of complications overall. Further prospective studies will help to elucidate these findings as well as identify amenable factors that may decrease risk of anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery. PMID:25685338

  2. Successful Pregnancy in a Patient with Combined Deficiency of Factor V and Factor VIII.

    PubMed

    El Adib, Ahmed Ghassan; Majdi, Farah; Dilai, Mohamed Othmane; Asmouki, Hamid; Bassir, Ahlam; Harou, Karam; Soumani, Abderraouf; Younous, Said; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2014-01-01

    Inherited combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency (F5F8D) is autosomal recessive transmission disorder. Epistaxis, postsurgical bleeding, and menorrhagia are the most common symptoms. The risk of miscarriage and placental abruption is consequent. We report a case of successful pregnancy in a patient with F5F8D. 20-year-old woman, born of consanguineous parents, third gestate, first parity, two miscarriages, admitted for child birth of a spontaneous pregnancy estimated at 38 weeks and was diagnosed with F5F8D. At admission, patient was hemodynamically stable, with good obstetric conditions. The biologic results showed low levels of PT (52%), factor V (7%), and factor VIII (5%), and the activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged (68,6%). Parturient was admitted in intensive care unit, maternal and fetal monitoring was performed. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and factor VIII concentrates were perfused at the induction of labor. Analgesia used fentanyl titration. The delivery gave birth to a newborn male, with Apgar 10/10 and 3000 g. The puerperium was simple without any important bleeding. Laboratory tests for the newborn were acceptable. Little literature is available on this subject and there are no guidelines available concerning pregnancy; we chose to prescribe a combination of factor VIII concentrate and FFP in pre-, per- and postpartum. The same protocol was successfully used in a patient before dental extraction and prostatectomy. Vaginal delivery is possible, as our case. Management by multidisciplinary team is recommended.

  3. Quality of Life in Cancer Patients and its Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahzadeh, Farahnaz; Sadat Aghahossini, Shima; Rahmani, Azad; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the importance of quality of life (QOL) in outcomes of cancer pa-tients, there have been a few Iranian studies investigating the Iranian patients’ quality of life. The present study aimed to assess the cancer patients’ QOL and its related factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study conducted in Shahid Ghazi Tabatabaei Hospital affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2009. The samples included 150 cancer patients aged more than 18 years who were aware of their own diagnosis. They were selected through convenient sampling method and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Quality of life questionnaire (EORTC–QOL 30) were completed. Results: Our findings showed that 44.1% of the patients had moderate QOL. QOL had a significant correlation with the level of family support (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Many of cancer patients have a moderate QOL. However, confirmation of such finding requires further investigations. PMID:25276684

  4. Factors determining discharge destination for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sharareh, Behnam; Le, Natasha B; Hoang, Melinda T; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2014-07-01

    Discharge destination to skilled nursing facilities (SNF) following total joint arthroplasty (TJA) plays an important role in healthcare costs. The pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors of 50 consecutive patients discharged to an SNF following TJA were compared to that of 50 consecutive patients discharged to home. Patients discharged to SNFs had slower pre-operative Get Up and Go scores (TGUG), lower pre-operative EQ-5D scores, higher ASA scores, increased hospital length of stay, increased self-reported post-operative pain, and decreased physical therapy achievements. We believe that the results of this study indicate that patients who get discharged to SNFs fit a certain criteria and this may be used to guide post-operative discharge destination during pre-operative planning, which can help lower costs while helping decrease the length of inpatient stay.

  5. Factors that interfere the medication compliance in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Ana Carolina Queiroz Godoy; Veiga, Eugenia Velludo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To characterize the factors that interfere in drug treatment compliance in a group of individuals with arterial hypertension. Methods: A non-experimental descriptive study that analyzed a sample of 80 patients diagnosed with arterial hypertension, who underwent medical treatment and were admitted to a university hospital during the period from March to May 2009. To collect data, the Instrument for Evaluation of Attitudes Regarding Taking Medication was applied. Results: In the studied population, 45.1% had sufficient degree of compliance to drug therapy. Individuals with controlled blood pressure, females, white, single, married or widowed, retired, aged between 40 and 59 years, and those aged above 80 years were the interviewees who answered positively regarding compliance and follow-up of drug therapy. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the number of factors that facilitate the process of compliance to drug treatment is greater than the number of complicating factors, we found that more than half of the patients surveyed had an insufficient degree of compliance with drug treatment for high blood pressure, which demonstrates the need to develop studies aimed to identify these factors and their contribution to the promotion of patient autonomy, acceptance, awareness and adaptation regarding their illness. PMID:24136760

  6. Risk factors for coronary artery calcification in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Shikada, Tomoki; Washio, Masakazu; Nishizaki, Akiko; Kakino, Takamori; Ooe, Kensuke; Ishibashi, Yuuji; Sagara, Shuuichirou; Morishige, Kunio; Tashiro, Hideki

    2015-07-01

    Because the prevalence of coronary artery calcification is lower among Japanese than among Western individuals, aspects of the Japanese lifestyle might be related to the development of calcification. We aimed to clarify the relationship between coronary artery calcium scores in Japanese patients and various lifestyle factors among the Japanese population. Study subjects were patients aged ≥20 years who underwent multidetector-row computed tomography. A total of 201 patients agreed to take part in this study and answered a questionnaire regarding lifestyle, medical history, and other factors. Old age, current and former smoking, sedentary work, short sleep time, coronary artery stenosis, treatment with statins, medical history of cerebrovascular disease, medical history of angina pectoris, medical history of ischemic heart disease, and medical history of dyslipidemia were associated with higher odds ratios than the other factors examined, while the Japanese-style breakfast (e.g. boiled rice, miso soup, grilled fish) was associated with lower odds ratios. In this study, smoking, sedentary work, short sleep time, and the Japanese-style breakfast were lifestyle factors related to coronary artery calcification. The lifestyle of Japanese people may be related to coronary calcification. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiovascular risk factor management in patients with RA compared to matched non-RA patients.

    PubMed

    Alemao, Evo; Cawston, Helene; Bourhis, Francois; Al, Maiwenn; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Liao, Katherine P; Solomon, Daniel H

    2016-05-01

    RA is associated with a 50-60% increase in risk of cardiovascular (CV) death. This study aimed to compare management of CV risk factors in RA and matched non-RA patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using UK clinical practice data. Patients presenting with an incident RA diagnosis were matched 1:4 to non-RA patients based on a propensity score for RA, entry year, CV risk category and treatment received at index date (date of RA diagnosis). Patients tested and treated for CV risk factors as well as those attaining CV risk factor management goals were evaluated in both groups. Between 1987 and 2010, 24 859 RA patients were identified and matched to 87 304 non-RA patients. At index date, groups had similar baseline characteristics. Annual blood pressure, lipids and diabetes-related testing were similar in both groups, although CRP and ESR were higher in RA patients at diagnosis and decreased over time. RA patients prescribed antihypertensives increased from 38.2% at diagnosis to 45.7% at 5 years, from 14.0 to 20.6% for lipid-lowering treatments and from 5.1 to 6.4% for antidiabetics. Similar treatment percentages were observed in non-RA patients, although slightly lower for antihypertensives. Modest (2%) but significantly lower attainment of lipid and diabetes goals at 1 year was observed in RA patients. There were no differences between groups in the frequency of testing and treatment of CV risk factors. Higher CV risk in RA patients seems unlikely to be driven by differences in traditional CV risk factor management. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

  8. Cardiovascular risk factor management in patients with RA compared to matched non-RA patients

    PubMed Central

    Cawston, Helene; Bourhis, Francois; Al, Maiwenn; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P. M. H.; Liao, Katherine P.; Solomon, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. RA is associated with a 50–60% increase in risk of cardiovascular (CV) death. This study aimed to compare management of CV risk factors in RA and matched non-RA patients. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using UK clinical practice data. Patients presenting with an incident RA diagnosis were matched 1:4 to non-RA patients based on a propensity score for RA, entry year, CV risk category and treatment received at index date (date of RA diagnosis). Patients tested and treated for CV risk factors as well as those attaining CV risk factor management goals were evaluated in both groups. Results. Between 1987 and 2010, 24 859 RA patients were identified and matched to 87 304 non-RA patients. At index date, groups had similar baseline characteristics. Annual blood pressure, lipids and diabetes-related testing were similar in both groups, although CRP and ESR were higher in RA patients at diagnosis and decreased over time. RA patients prescribed antihypertensives increased from 38.2% at diagnosis to 45.7% at 5 years, from 14.0 to 20.6% for lipid-lowering treatments and from 5.1 to 6.4% for antidiabetics. Similar treatment percentages were observed in non-RA patients, although slightly lower for antihypertensives. Modest (2%) but significantly lower attainment of lipid and diabetes goals at 1 year was observed in RA patients. Conclusion. There were no differences between groups in the frequency of testing and treatment of CV risk factors. Higher CV risk in RA patients seems unlikely to be driven by differences in traditional CV risk factor management. PMID:26705329

  9. Patient-based radiographic exposure factor selection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ching, William; Robinson, John; McEntee, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Digital technology has wider exposure latitude and post-processing algorithms which can mask the evidence of underexposure and overexposure. Underexposure produces noisy, grainy images which can impede diagnosis and overexposure results in a greater radiation dose to the patient. These exposure errors can result from inaccurate adjustment of exposure factors in response to changes in patient thickness. This study aims to identify all published radiographic exposure adaptation systems which have been, or are being, used in general radiography and discuss their applicability to digital systems. Studies in EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS were systematically reviewed. Some of the search terms used were exposure adaptation, exposure selection, exposure technique, 25% rule, 15% rule, DuPont™ Bit System and radiography. A manual journal-specific search was also conducted in The Radiographer and Radiologic Technology. Studies were included if they demonstrated a system of altering exposure factors to compensate for variations in patients for general radiography. Studies were excluded if they focused on finding optimal exposures for an 'average' patient or focused on the relationship between exposure factors and dose. The database search uncovered 11 articles and the journal-specific search uncovered 13 articles discussing systems of exposure adaptation. They can be categorised as simple one-step guidelines, comprehensive charts and computer programs. Only two papers assessed the efficacy of exposure adjustment systems. No literature compares the efficacy of exposure adaptations system for film/screen radiography with digital radiography technology nor is there literature on a digital specific exposure adaptation system.

  10. [Cardiovascular risk factors prevalence among patients with dyslipidemia in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Machado-Alba, Jorge E; Machado-Duque, Manuel E

    2013-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and the ten years risk of cardio-cerebrovascular event in patients with dyslipidemia who were affiliated to the Colombian health system. A retrospective study was carried out in a random and stratified sample of 551 patients with dyslipidemia, from a population of 41,201 people with lipid-lowering therapy in ten Colombian cities between January 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. Sociodemographic, anthropometric and biochemical variables were taken from medical records, as well as risk factors. To establish the 10-year cardiovascular risk was used Framingham algorithm. 311 patients were included, 56.4% of them were women, mean age 64.9 ± 10.8 years. The mean probability of developing a cardiovascular event at 10 years was 14%. Other cardiovascular risk factors found were hypertension (93.2%), male older than 55 years (35.8%), women older than 65 years (28.1%), diabetes mellitus (28.5%), family history of coronary heart disease (17.2%), personal history of heart disease or stroke (16.7%) and smoking (6.4%). The types of dyslipidemia by frequency were: mixed (46.6%), isolated hypercholesterolemia (29.4%) and hypertriglyceridaemia (20.3%). Patients were men and women older than 65 years, mainly suffering mixed dyslipidemia, and have a 14.0% probability of suffering a cardiovascular event in the next 10 years. It should promote healthy public policies to reduce the presence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  11. Patient-based radiographic exposure factor selection: a systematic review

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, William; Robinson, John; McEntee, Mark

    2014-09-15

    Digital technology has wider exposure latitude and post-processing algorithms which can mask the evidence of underexposure and overexposure. Underexposure produces noisy, grainy images which can impede diagnosis and overexposure results in a greater radiation dose to the patient. These exposure errors can result from inaccurate adjustment of exposure factors in response to changes in patient thickness. This study aims to identify all published radiographic exposure adaptation systems which have been, or are being, used in general radiography and discuss their applicability to digital systems. Studies in EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS were systematically reviewed. Some of the search terms used were exposure adaptation, exposure selection, exposure technique, 25% rule, 15% rule, DuPont™ Bit System and radiography. A manual journal-specific search was also conducted in The Radiographer and Radiologic Technology. Studies were included if they demonstrated a system of altering exposure factors to compensate for variations in patients for general radiography. Studies were excluded if they focused on finding optimal exposures for an ‘average’ patient or focused on the relationship between exposure factors and dose. The database search uncovered 11 articles and the journal-specific search uncovered 13 articles discussing systems of exposure adaptation. They can be categorised as simple one-step guidelines, comprehensive charts and computer programs. Only two papers assessed the efficacy of exposure adjustment systems. No literature compares the efficacy of exposure adaptations system for film/screen radiography with digital radiography technology nor is there literature on a digital specific exposure adaptation system.

  12. Delirium in hospitalized older patients: recognition and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Inouye, S K

    1998-01-01

    Delirium, or acute confusional state, represents a common, serious, potentially preventable and increasing problem for older hospitalized patients. This study is intended to improve overall understanding of the problem of delirium and thus to lessen its adverse impact on the older population. The specific aims of this study are (1) to examine the epidemiology of delirium in older patients; (2) to evaluate barriers to recognition; (3) to present the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) simplified algorithm to improve recognition; (4) to elucidate predisposing and precipitating factors for delirium; and (5) to propose preventive strategies. Delirium occurs in 10-60% of the older hospitalized population and is unrecognized in 32-66% of cases. The CAM algorithm provides a sensitive (94-100%), specific (90-95%), reliable, and easy to use means for identification of delirium. Four predisposing and five precipitating factors were identified and validated to identify patients at high risk for development of delirium. Primary prevention of delirium should address important delirium risk factors and target patients at intermediate to high risk for delirium at admission.

  13. Risk Factors Associated with Psychiatric Hospitalization Among Iranian Schizophrenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Nader; Chimeh, Narges; Dehghani, Mohsen; Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Taherkhani, Hamid; Abarashi, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric hospitalization of patients imposes heavy burdens on caregivers, but little is known about this issue in Iran. The present cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with psychiatric hospitalization of patients with schizophrenia who were the regular clients for the educational programs of The Iranian Society for Supporting Individuals with Schizophrenia (ISSIS) in Tehran, Iran. Methods: 231 male and female study subjects and 231 of their caregivers participated in the study. The study subjects were independently assessed in demographics, clinical and symptom-related characteristics and basic life skills domains. Their caregivers were assessed in domains of knowledge on schizophrenia, burden, social support, family function, and the patterns of relationships with their patients and the role of health and supportive services. Data were analyzed by performing logistic regression model. Results: Old age, low level of education, unemployment, greater severity of positive and negative symptoms, poor basic life skills among subjects, and objective family burden, inadequate knowledge on schizophrenia, low perceived social support and lack of medical insurance among caregivers were the most important factors associated with psychiatric hospitalization among the clients. Conclusions: Some factors originated in Iranian patients and their caregivers could cause patients’ pathways to psychiatric hospitalization. Although the study results did not establish causation, based on the findings, psychoeducational interventions may reduce schizophrenia referral and lower the rate of need to inpatient services in Iran. Declaration of interest: None. PMID:24644506

  14. Correspondence of patient word choice with psychologic factors in patients with upper extremity illness.

    PubMed

    Bot, Arjan G J; Vranceanu, Ana-Maria; Herndon, James H; Ring, David C

    2012-11-01

    Studies of patients with back pain, cancer, and in a general medical practice note that the use of certain phrases by a patient when communicating with their health provider can indicate greater disability and distress than expected for patients with a given disorder. However, it is unclear whether such phrases apply to patients with hand and arm disorders. We assessed whether specific patient phrases are associated with symptoms, disability, and psychologic factors in patients with hand and arm disorders. We recorded and coded 61 interviews of new patients. Specific expressions of patients were listed and categorized into six phrase categories: "I can't", "Find it and fix it", "Something is wrong", "It's serious", "Deemphasis (hoping)", and "Protective mindset". Patients completed questionnaires for arm-specific disability (DASH), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-9]), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS]), and heightened illness concern (Whiteley Index). Patients who endorsed phrases in the category "I can't" had higher scores on the PCS, Whiteley, DASH, and pain; they also had longer visits. Patients expressing "Something is wrong" had higher scores for the PCS, pain, and duration of visit. Patients using "It's serious" had a higher score for pain. Finally, patients using "Protective mindset" had lower PHQ-9 scores and younger age. Patient word choice may indicate underlying distress or ineffective coping strategies that represent important opportunities for empathy and support, including evidence-based cognitive and behavioral interventions. Level III, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  15. Factors Affecting Patients Undergoing Cosmetic Surgery in Bushehr, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Salehahmadi, Zeinab; Rafie, Seyyed Reza

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although, there have been extensive research on the motivations driving patient to undergo cosmetic procedures, there is still a big question mark on the persuasive factors which may lead individuals to undergo cosmetic surgery. The present study evaluated various factors affecting patients undergoing cosmetic surgery in Bushehr, Southern Iran. METHODS From 24th March 2011 to 24th March 2012, eighty-one women and 20 men who wished to be operated in Fatemeh Zahra Hospital in Bushehr, Southern Iran and Pars Clinic, Iran were enrolled by a simple random sampling method. They all completed a questionnaire to consider reasons for cosmetic procedures. The collected data were statistically analyzed. RESULTS Demographical, sociological and psychological factors such as age, gender, educational level, marital status, media, perceived risks, output quality, depression and self-improvement were determined as factors affecting tendency of individuals to undergo cosmetic surgery in this region. Trend to undergo cosmetic surgery was more prevalent in educational below bachelor degree, married subjects, women population of 30-45 years age group. Education level, age, marital status and gender were respectively the influential factors in deciding to undergo cosmetic surgery. Among the socio-psychological factors, self-improvement, finding a better job opportunity, rivalry, media, health status as well as depression were the most persuasive factors to encourage people to undergo cosmetic surgery too. Cost risk was not important for our samples in decision making to undergo cosmetic surgery. CONCLUSION We need to fully understand the way in which the combination of demographic, social and psychological factors influence decision-making to undergo cosmetic surgery. PMID:25734051

  16. Risk factors associated with xerostomia in haemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    López-Pintor, Lucía; Casañas, Elisabeth; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Hernández, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of xerostomia and hyposalivation in Haemodialysis (HD) patients, to clarify risk factors, assess patient´s quality of life, and to establish a possible correlation among interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) and xerostomia. Material and Methods This study was performed on a group of 50 HD patients. Data were collected using a questionnaire containing demographic and clinical variables, a visual analogue scale (VAS) for xerostomia, IDWG, and an oral health impact profile questionnaire (OHIP-14). Unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) and stimulated whole saliva (SWS) were collected. Results A total of 28 HD patients (56%) suffered xerostomia. Dry mouth was associated with hypertension (OR, 5.24; 95% CI, 1.11-24.89) and benzodiazepine consumption (OR, 5.96; 95% CI, 1.05-33.99). The mean xerostomia VAS and OHIP-14 scores were 31.74±14.88 and 24.38±11.98, respectively. No significant correlation was observed between IDWG% and VAS and OHIP total score. Nonetheless, a positive correlation between VAS level of thirst and IDWG% was found (r=0.48 p=0.0001). UWS and SWS means (determined in 30 patients) were 0.16±0.17 and 1.12±0.64, respectively. Decreased values of UWS and SWS were reported in 53.33% and 36.66% of HD patients. Conclusions Xerostomia in HD has a multifactorial aetiology due to accumulative risks as advanced age, systemic disorders, drugs, fluid intake restriction, and salivary parenchymal fibrosis and atrophy. Therefore, it is important to detect possible xerostomia risk factors to treat correctly dry mouth in HD patients and avoid systemic complications. Key words:Haemodialysis patients, xerostomia, salivary flow rate, hyposalivation, interdialytic weight gain, oral health-related quality of life. PMID:28160594

  17. Risk and protective factors for suicide in patients with alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Sher, Leo

    2006-10-31

    Alcoholism is associated with a high risk for suicidal behavior. Up to 40% of persons with alcoholism attempt suicide at some time and 7% end their lives by committing suicide. Risk factors include being male, older than 50 years of age, living alone, being unemployed, poor social support, interpersonal losses, continued drinking, consumption of a greater amount of alcohol when drinking, a recent alcohol binge, previous alcohol treatment, a family history of alcoholism, a history of comorbid substance abuse (especially cocaine), a major depressive episode, serious medical illness, suicidal communication, and prior suicidal behavior. Suicidal behavior is especially frequent in patients with comorbid alcoholism and major depression. However, all patients with alcoholism should be evaluated for suicide risk. Understanding of risk and vulnerability to suicidal behavior in alcoholism still outweighs our knowledge of protective factors and resilience. Knowledge of protective factors for suicide may help to prevent and/or predict suicidal behavior. Protective factors for suicide in alcoholism are quite varied and include an individual's biological and behavioral characteristics, as well as attributes of the environment and culture. Protective factors include effective clinical care for psychiatric (including alcoholism and drug abuse) and physical disorders, easy access to a variety of clinical interventions and support for seeking help, restricted access to highly lethal means of suicide, strong connections to family and community support, skills in problem solving and conflict resolution, cultural and religious beliefs that discourage suicide and support self-preservation. Future studies are necessary to determine which interventions may reduce suicidal behavior in alcoholism.

  18. Prognostic factors and survival in patients with gastric stump cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hua; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zhong; Jin, Jie-Jie; Long, Zi-Wen; Cai, Hong; Liu, Xiao-Wen; Zhou, Ye; Wang, Ya-Nong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the clinicopathological characteristics and prognostic factors of gastric stump cancer (GSC). METHODS: The clinical data for 92 patients with GSC were collected at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. The prognostic factors were analyzed with Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: GSC tended to occur within 25 years following the primary surgery, when the initial disease is benign, whereas it primarily occurred within the first 15 years post-operation for gastric cancer. Patients with regular follow-up after primary surgery had a better survival rate. The multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that Borrmann type I/II (HR = 3.165, 95%CI: 1.055-9.500, P = 0.040) and radical resection (HR = 1.780, 95%CI: 1.061-2.987, P = 0.029) were independent prognostic factors for GSC. The overall 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates of the 92 patients were 78.3%, 45.6% and 27.6%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates of those undergoing radical resection were 79.3%, 52.2%, and 37.8%, respectively. The 5-year survival rates for stages I, II, III, and IV were 85.7%, 47.4%, 16.0%, and 13.3%, respectively (P = 0.005). CONCLUSION: The appearance of GSC occurs sooner in patients with primary malignant cancer than in patients with a primary benign disease. Therefore, close follow-up is necessary. The overall survival of patients with GSC is poor, and curative resection can improve their prognosis. PMID:25684953

  19. Patients' knowledge of risk and protective factors for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wartak, Siddharth A; Friderici, Jennifer; Lotfi, Amir; Verma, Ashish; Kleppel, Reva; Naglieri-Prescod, Deborah; Rothberg, Michael B

    2011-05-15

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. The American Heart Association has proposed improving overall cardiovascular health by promoting 7 components of ideal cardiovascular health, including health behaviors (not smoking, regular exercise, and healthy diet) and health factors (ideal body mass index, cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood glucose). The patients' knowledge of these 7 components is unknown. We performed a cross-sectional survey of patients at 4 primary care and 1 cardiology clinic. The survey measured demographic data, personal behaviors/health factors, cardiovascular disease history, and knowledge about these 7 components. A multivariate model was developed to assess patient characteristics associated with high knowledge scores. Of the 2,200 surveys distributed, 1,702 (77%) were returned with sufficient responses for analysis. Of these, 49% correctly identified heart disease as the leading cause of death, and 37% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35% to 39%) correctly identified all 7 components. The average respondent identified 4.9 components (95% CI 4.7 to 5.0). The lowest recognition rates were for exercise (57%), fruit/vegetable consumption (58%), and diabetes (63%). In a multivariate model, knowledge of all 7 components was positively associated with high school education or greater (odds ratio 2.43, 95% CI 1.68 to 3.52) and white ethnicity (odds ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.27 to 2.50), and negatively associated with attending an urban neighborhood clinic (odds ratio 0.60, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.82). In conclusion, just >1/3 of patients could identify all 7 components of ideal cardiovascular health. Educational efforts should target patients in low socioeconomic strata and focus on improving knowledge about healthy diet and regular exercise. Although patients with diabetes were more likely than those without diabetes to recognize their risk, 1 in 5 were not aware that diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

  20. Factors predicting language lateralization in patients with perisylvian vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Darrin J.; Pouratian, Nader; Bookheimer, Susan Y.; Martin, Neil A.

    2017-01-01

    Object The authors conducted a study to determine the factors associated with right-sided language dominance in patients with cerebrovascular malformations. Methods Twenty-two patients with either arteriovenous malformations (AVMs [15 cases]) or cavernous malformations (7 cases) underwent functional MR (fMR) imaging studies of language function; a 3.0-T head-only unit was used. Lateralization indices were calculated separately for Broca and Wernicke areas. Lesion size, Spetzler-Martin grade, and the distance between the lesion and anatomically defined language cortex were calculated for each patient. Results Right-sided language dominance occurred in 5 patients, all of whom had AVMs within 10 mm of canonical language areas. Three patients had right-sided language dominance in the Wernicke area alone whereas 2 had right-sided language dominance in both Broca and Wernicke areas. Wada testing and intraoperative electrocortical stimulation were performed as clinically indicated to corroborate fMR imaging findings. Conclusions The primary factor associated with right-sided language dominance was the AVM being within 10 mm of anatomically defined language areas. The lesion size and the Spetzler-Martin grade were not significant factors. Anomalous fMR imaging laterality was typically confined to the language area proximate to the lesion, with the distal language area remaining in the left hemisphere dominant. This study emphasizes the need to map each case individually in patients with left perisylvian AVMs. Assumptions about eloquent cortex based on anatomical landmarks (a key component of Spetzler-Martin grading) may have to be reconsidered. PMID:20302390

  1. Suicidal ideation and risk factors in Korean migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Young; Park, Sung-Pa

    2014-10-01

    Population-based studies have reported an increased risk of suicidal ideation in patients with migraine. However, there is some controversy as to whether migraine itself is a risk factor for suicidal ideation after adjusting for psychiatric comorbidities. We calculated the frequency of suicidal ideation among patients with migraine visiting a tertiary care hospital and determined its risk factors. Patients with migraine and healthy controls completed self-report questionnaires to assess depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation, and the frequency of suicidal ideation. Risk factors for suicidal ideation were investigated in terms of demographic, clinical, and psychiatric variables. One hundred eighty-five patients with migraine (156 females and 29 males; mean age 39.1 years) and 53 age and education-matched healthy controls participated in the study. The frequency of suicidal ideation was significantly greater in patients with migraine than healthy controls (odds ratio [OR]=5.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-22.10, p=0.003), but this significance was not sustained after adjusting for comorbid depression and anxiety. The risk of suicidal ideation in patients with migraine was associated with lower education levels, higher frequency of migraine attacks, stronger intensity of headaches, and presence of phonophobia, chronic migraine, depression, and anxiety. The strongest predictor was depression (OR=15.36, 95% CI 5.39-43.78, p<0.001), followed by the intensity of headache while completing the questionnaire (OR=1.293, 95% CI 1.077-1.553; p=0.006). The contribution of migraine-specific variables to suicidal ideation is trivial compared to that of depression and headache intensity.

  2. Risk factors for death in patients with severe asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Andréia Guedes Oliva; Souza-Machado, Carolina; Coelho, Renata Conceição Pereira; Franco, Priscila Abreu; Esquivel, Renata Miranda; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro Augusto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for death among patients with severe asthma. METHODS: This was a nested case-control study. Among the patients with severe asthma treated between December of 2002 and December of 2010 at the Central Referral Outpatient Clinic of the Bahia State Asthma Control Program, in the city of Salvador, Brazil, we selected all those who died, as well as selecting other patients with severe asthma to be used as controls (at a ratio of 1:4). Data were collected from the medical charts of the patients, home visit reports, and death certificates. RESULTS: We selected 58 cases of deaths and 232 control cases. Most of the deaths were attributed to respiratory causes and occurred within a health care facility. Advanced age, unemployment, rhinitis, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, long-standing asthma, and persistent airflow obstruction were common features in both groups. Multivariate analysis showed that male gender, FEV1 pre-bronchodilator < 60% of predicted, and the lack of control of asthma symptoms were significantly and independently associated with mortality in this sample of patients with severe asthma. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of outpatients with severe asthma, the deaths occurred predominantly due to respiratory causes and within a health care facility. Lack of asthma control and male gender were risk factors for mortality. PMID:25210958

  3. Geographic Tongue and Associated Risk Factors among Iranian Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    HONARMAND, Marieh; FARHAD MOLLASHAHI, Leila; SHIRZAIY, Masomeh; SEHHATPOUR, Marziye

    2013-01-01

    Background Geographic Tongue is a benign disorder involving the dorsal surface of the tongue characterized by depapillated areas with leading and folded edges in yellowish or grayish white color and sometimes with unclear borders. Many studies have reported a relationship between such condition and different risk factors. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence rate and the risk factors of geographic tongue in the patients referring to the Department of Oral Medicine of Zahedan Dental School, in 2012. Methods: Using Poisson regression model, 2000 patients referred to the Department were selected for this cross-sectional study. Data collection method included an investigation into the medical history as well as doing intraoral examinations. Using SPSS 17 software and Chi-square statistical test, the collected data were analyzed. Result: Among the 2000 patients selected, 7.8% (156 persons) suffered from geographic tongue. The results of our study show that there is a significant relationship between the occurrence of geographic tongue and a history of allergy and fissured tongue (P<0.001). There was no significant statistical relationship between the occurrence of geographic tongue and gender, smoking and medication. Conclusion: The geographic tongue is more frequently in the patients suffering from atopy or allergy as well as the patients with fissured tongue. PMID:23515238

  4. Factors Related to Gait Function in Post-stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ki Hun; Lee, Joo Young; Lee, Kun Jae; Kang, Eun Kyoung

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] Gait function after a stroke is an important factor for determining a patient's ability to independently perform activities of daily living (ADL). The objective of this study was to elucidate the factors associated with gait function in post-stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty-nine stroke patients (16 females and 23 males; average age 67.82 ± 10.96 years; post-onset duration: 200.18 ± 27.14 days) participated in this study. [Methods] Their gait function, motor function (Manual Muscle Test [MMT] and Brünnstrom stage), level of cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination score [MMSE], and the Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment for the Geriatric Population [LOTCA-G]), and ADL (Korean modified Barthel index [K-MBI]) were assessed. [Results] The degree of gait function showed significant positive correlations with the following variables: MMT of the elbow, knee, ankle and wrist; Brünnstrom stage; MMSE; LOTCA-G subscores except motor praxis; K-MBI. Stepwise linear regression analysis revealed the Brünnstrom stage was the only explanatory variable closely associated with gait level. [Conclusion] Gait function of post-stroke patients was related to motor function, cognition, and ADL. In particular, there is a significant association between gait level and the Brünnstrom stages, reflecting the importance of monitoring the motor recovery of gait function in post-stroke patients.

  5. [Survival pronostic factors in Mexican patients with multiforme glioblastoma].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Reyna, Ricardo; Medellín-Sánchez, Roberto; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura

    2010-01-01

    To study the pre- and transoperative factors that influence patients' survival with GM. Clinical and pathological records of all confirmed cases of GM diagnosed between 2000 and 2006 were included. Postoperative survival was divided in less or more than 8 months. χ2 test was used. One hundred and twenty patients (45 women and 75 men) were studied. Age range was from 7 to 85 years, 3.3% were 16 years old or younger and 12.5% were 70 years old or older. Headache was the most frequent complain, 40 patients developed hemiparesia and 6 had parestesias. Predominance of white matter hemispheric lesions was observed: right hemispheric tumors 65 (54%), left lesions 30 (25%) and bilateral tumors 7%. Histologically, 1.6% of GM had a sarcomatous component; 35% of patients survived less than 8 months. A difference between patients survival was the preoperative Karnofsky Performance Scale Score and the degree of cerebral edema during the surgical procedure. Pre-operative Karnofsky evaluation and edema during the surgical procedure were significant prognostic factors for survival.

  6. Predictive factors of open globe injury in patients requiring vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Pimolrat, Weeraya; Choovuthayakorn, Janejit; Watanachai, Nawat; Patikulsila, Direk; Kunavisarut, Paradee; Chaikitmongkol, Voraporn; Ittipunkul, Nimitr

    2014-01-01

    To determine the outcomes and predictive factors of patients with open globe injury requiring pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). The medical records of 114 patients age 10 years or older who had undergone PPV due to ocular trauma, with at least 6 months follow up, were retrospectively reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 42 (SD14) years, with males accounting for 89% of the cases. Penetrating eye injury was the most common injury mechanism (43%) with most injuries occurring secondary to work related incidents (54%). After surgical interventions, 78% of the patients had visual improvement of one or more Snellen lines, while no light perception occurred in 10%. Anatomical attachment was achieved in 87% of eyes at the final follow up. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of a relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) was a significant predictive factor of visual outcome, while initial retinal detachment was a significant predictor of anatomical outcome. Pupillary reaction is an important presenting ocular sign in estimating the post-vitrectomy poor visual outcome for open globe injury. Vision was restored and improved in more than half of the patients in this study; however, long-term sequelae should be monitored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Polymorphism of clotting factors in Hungarian patients with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Shemirani, Amir-Houshang; Szomják, Edit; Balogh, Emese; András, Csilla; Kovács, Dóra; Acs, Judit; Csiki, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon may have a genetically determined risk for clotting factors that predispose them to aberrant microvascular thrombosis. We investigated the prevalence of factor V substitution of G to A at position 1691 (FVLeiden), prothrombin G20210A, and methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutations in these patients. Two hundred (158 women, 42 men, mean age of 42.4 ± 13.7 years) consecutive patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and 200 age-sex-matched healthy controls of Hungarian origin were included in a case-control study. The prevalence of methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T homozygous among patients was significantly lower than in the control group (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.9, P < 0.05). The prevalence of other thrombosis-associated alleles did not differ between patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and control subjects. FVLeiden, prothrombin G20210A, and polymorphism, prothrombin G20210A mutations have no apparent effect on the etiology of primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

  8. Barriers to diabetes management: patient and provider factors.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soohyun; Chesla, Catherine; Stotts, Nancy A; Kroon, Lisa; Janson, Susan L

    2011-07-01

    Despite significant advances in diagnosis and treatment, the persistence of inadequate metabolic control continues. Poor glycemic control may be reflected by both the failure of diabetes self-management by patients as well as inadequate intervention strategies by clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize existing knowledge regarding various barriers of diabetes management from the perspectives of both patients and clinicians. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, and PsycINFO identified 1454 articles in English published between 1990 and 2009, addressing type 2 diabetes, patient's barriers, clinician's barriers, and self-management. Patients' adherence, attitude, beliefs, and knowledge about diabetes may affect diabetes self-management. Culture and language capabilities influence the patient's health beliefs, attitudes, health literacy, thereby affecting diabetes self-management. Other influential factors include the patient's financial resources, co-morbidities, and social support. Clinician's attitude, beliefs and knowledge about diabetes also influence diabetes management. Clinicians may further influence the patient's perception through effective communication skills and by having a well-integrated health care system. Identifying barriers to diabetes management is necessary to improve the quality of diabetes care, including the improvement of metabolic control, and diabetes self-management. Further research that considers these barriers is necessary for developing interventions for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  9. Comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis*

    PubMed Central

    Baeta, Isabela Guimarães Ribeiro; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques; Gontijo, Bernardo; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease and its pathogenesis involves an interaction between genetic, environmental, and immunological factors. Recent studies have suggested that the chronic inflammatory nature of psoriasis may predispose to an association with other inflammatory diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. OBJECTIVES To describe the demographic, clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory characteristics of a sample of psoriasis patients; to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities in this group of patients; and to identify the cardiovascular risk profile using the Framingham risk score. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study involving the assessment of 190 patients. Participants underwent history and physical examination. They also completed a specific questionnaire about epidemiological data, past medical history, and comorbidities. The cardiovascular risk profile was calculated using the Framingham risk score. RESULTS Patients' mean age was 51.5 ± 14 years, and the predominant clinical presentation was plaque psoriasis (78.4%). We found an increased prevalence of systemic hypertension, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. Increased waist circumference was also found in addition to a considerable prevalence of depression, smoking, and regular alcohol intake. Patients' cardiovascular risk was high according to the Framingham risk score, and 47.2% of patients had moderate or high risk of fatal and non-fatal coronary events in 10 years. CONCLUSIONS Patients had high prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities, and high cardiovascular risk according to the Framingham risk score. Further epidemiological studies are needed in Brazil for validation of our results. PMID:25184912

  10. Risk factors associated with xerostomia in haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    López-Pintor, R-M; López-Pintor, L; Casañas, E; de Arriba, L; Hernández, G

    2017-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of xerostomia and hyposalivation in Haemodialysis (HD) patients, to clarify risk factors, assess patient's quality of life, and to establish a possible correlation among interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) and xerostomia. This study was performed on a group of 50 HD patients. Data were collected using a questionnaire containing demographic and clinical variables, a visual analogue scale (VAS) for xerostomia, IDWG, and an oral health impact profile questionnaire (OHIP-14). Unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) and stimulated whole saliva (SWS) were collected. A total of 28 HD patients (56%) suffered xerostomia. Dry mouth was associated with hypertension (OR, 5.24; 95% CI, 1.11-24.89) and benzodiazepine consumption (OR, 5.96; 95% CI, 1.05-33.99). The mean xerostomia VAS and OHIP-14 scores were 31.74±14.88 and 24.38±11.98, respectively. No significant correlation was observed between IDWG% and VAS and OHIP total score. Nonetheless, a positive correlation between VAS level of thirst and IDWG% was found (r=0.48 p=0.0001). UWS and SWS means (determined in 30 patients) were 0.16±0.17 and 1.12±0.64, respectively. Decreased values of UWS and SWS were reported in 53.33% and 36.66% of HD patients. Xerostomia in HD has a multifactorial aetiology due to accumulative risks as advanced age, systemic disorders, drugs, fluid intake restriction, and salivary parenchymal fibrosis and atrophy. Therefore, it is important to detect possible xerostomia risk factors to treat correctly dry mouth in HD patients and avoid systemic complications.

  11. Needs of Hemodialysis Patients and Factors Affecting Them

    PubMed Central

    Xhulia, Dhima; Gerta, Jaku; Dajana, Zefaj; Koutelekos, Ioannis; Vasilopoulou, Chrysoula; Skopelitou, Margitsa; Polikandrioti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Of this study was to explore the needs of hemodialysis patients and the factors that affect them. Material & Methods: The sample of the study included 141 patients undergoing hemodialysis. Data collection was performed by the method of interview using a specially designed questionnaire which served the purposes of the study. The needs were grouped into six categories. Patients were asked to answer how important was for them each of the statements in the questionnaire. Furthermore, there were collected socio-demographic characteristics, information on health status and relations with the physicians and nurses, as well as data on the incidence of the disease in their social life. Results: The results of this study showed that patients evaluated as fairly important all six categories of their needs, with similar results in both sexes. Age was found to be statistically significantly associated with ’the need for support and guidance’, ’the need to be informed’ and ’the need to meet the emotional and physical needs’, (p=0.023, p=0.012, p=0.028 respectively). Education level was found to be statistically significantly associated with all patients’ needs with the exception of ’the need to trust the medical and nursing staff’, (p=<0.05). Place of residence was statistically significantly associated with ’the need for support and guidance’, (p=0.029). Furthermore, difficulties in relations with family members was found to be statistically significantly associated with ’the need for support, the need for communication and individualization of care’, (p=0.014, p=0.040, p=0.041). After multivariate analysis, however, it was shown that the only independent factor affecting ’the need for support and guidance’, ’the need for individualized care’ and ’the need to meet the emotional and physical needs’, was if the patients reported themselves as anxious or not (p=0,024, p=0,012 and p=0,004, respectively). In particular, patients who

  12. Human Factors in Patient Safety as an Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    The use of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) tools, methods, concepts and theories has been advocated by many experts and organizations to improve patient safety. To facilitate and support the spread of HFE knowledge and skills in health care and patient safety, we propose to conceptualize HFE as innovations whose diffusion, dissemination, implementation and sustainability need to be understood and specified. Using Greenhalgh et al. (2004) model of innovation, we identified various factors that can either hinder or facilitate the spread of HFE innovations in healthcare organizations. Barriers include lack of systems thinking, complexity of HFE innovations and lack of understanding about the benefits of HFE innovations. Positive impact of HFE interventions on task performance and the presence of local champions can facilitate the adoption, implementation and sustainability of HFE innovations. This analysis concludes with a series of recommendations for HFE professionals, researchers and educators. PMID:20106468

  13. Functional state of knee arthritis patients and related factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyeon; Kim, Jung-Hee; Chung, EunJung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study is to provide a direction for efficient management of arthritis through the analysis of multiple factors related to the functional state of patients. [Subjects and Methods] The Visual Analog Scale, Knee Society Knee Score & Function Score, Hospital for Special Surgery, Short Form-36 Health Survey and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index for a total of 135 patients with knee arthritis were determined with a survey. [Results] There is a significant correlation between age, pain, Knee Society Knee Score, Hospital for Special Surgery, Knee Society Function Score, and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score. [Conclusion] It is necessary to improve the factors that affect knee function and quality of life, and a study on knee joint muscle strength is suggested as a follow-up study. PMID:28265166

  14. Patient related factors in frequent readmissions: the influence of condition, access to services and patient choice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background People use emergency department services for a wide variety of health complaints, many of which could be handled outside hospitals. Many frequent readmissions are due to problems with chronic disease and are preventable. We postulated that patient related factors such as the type of condition, demographic factors, access to alternative services outside hospitals and patient preference for hospital or non-hospital services would influence readmissions for chronic disease. This study aimed to explore the link between frequent readmissions in chronic disease and these patient related factors. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on emergency department data collected from a regional hospital in NSW Australia in 2008. Frequently readmitted patients were defined as those with three or more admissions in a year. Clinical, service usage and demographic patient characteristics were examined for their influence on readmissions using multivariate analysis. Results The emergency department received about 20,000 presentations a year involving some 16,000 patients. Most patients (80%) presented only once. In 2008 one hundred and forty four patients were readmitted three or more times in a year. About 20% of all presentations resulted in an admission. Frequently readmitted patients were more likely to be older, have an urgent Triage classification, present with an unplanned returned visit and have a diagnosis of neurosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dyspnoea or chronic heart failure. The chronic ambulatory care sensitive conditions were strongly associated with frequent readmissions. Frequent readmissions were unrelated to gender, time, day or season of presentation or country of birth. Conclusions Multivariate analysis of routinely collected hospital data identified that the factors associated with frequent readmission include the type of condition, urgency, unplanned return visit and age. Interventions to improve patient uptake of chronic

  15. Factors associated with sustained remission in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Martire, María Victoria; Marino Claverie, Lucila; Duarte, Vanesa; Secco, Anastasia; Mammani, Marta

    2015-01-01

    To find out the factors that are associated with sustained remission measured by DAS28 and boolean ACR EULAR 2011 criteria at the time of diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Medical records of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in sustained remission according to DAS28 were reviewed. They were compared with patients who did not achieved values of DAS28<2.6 in any visit during the first 3 years after diagnosis. We also evaluated if patients achieved the boolean ACR/EULAR criteria. Variables analyzed: sex, age, smoking, comorbidities, rheumatoid factor, anti-CCP, ESR, CRP, erosions, HAQ, DAS28, extra-articular manifestations, time to initiation of treatment, involvement of large joints, number of tender joints, number of swollen joints, pharmacological treatment. Forty five patients that achieved sustained remission were compared with 44 controls. The variables present at diagnosis that significantly were associated with remission by DAS28 were: lower values of DAS28, HAQ, ESR, NTJ, NSJ, negative CRP, absence of erosions, male sex and absence of involvement of large joints. Only 24.71% achieved the boolean criteria. The variables associated with sustained remission by these criteria were: lower values of DAS28, HAQ, ESR, number of tender joints and number of swollen joints, negative CRP and absence of erosions. The factors associated with sustained remission were the lower baseline disease activity, the low degree of functional disability and lower joint involvement. We consider it important to recognize these factors to optimize treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Missed Appointments in a Breast Clinic: Patient-Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Knolhoff, Joshua B; Djenic, Brano; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Bouton, Marcia E; Komenaka, Ian K

    2016-10-01

    Missed appointments are problematic because they occupy an appointment that could have been used by another patient and represent lost resources for the hospital system. The objective of this study was to determine patient-related factors associated with missed appointments. Totally, 1,624 patients were seen from January 14, 2010 to January 16, 2012. Sociodemographic variables were collected including health literacy assessment, electronic medical record system-collected scheduled appointments and missed appointments for each patient. Patients were also asked for their preferred method of contact. From January 1, 2009 to January 16, 2012 the 1,624 patients had 21,648 scheduled appointments in the hospital system. Overall 3,633 (16.8%) of the appointments were missed. Insurance status, income, education and primary language were not significant predictors for missed appointments. Limited health literacy was associated with increased rate of missed appointments (adequate health literacy 13.4% versus limited health literacy 17.2%, P = 0.0009). Current smokers had higher rates of missed appointments than nonsmokers (18.5% versus 16.1%, P = 0.025). Patients who underwent screening mammography were also less likely to miss appointments (odds ratio = 0.78, P < 0.0001). The preferred method of contact was via mobile phone; however, this was only 42%. Patients with limited health literacy and current smokers had higher rates of missed appointments. In addition, patients who were compliant with screening mammography were also more likely to be compliant with appointments. Appointment reminders should be kept simple to accommodate the rapidly growing population with limited health literacy. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors associated with regular dental visits among hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Masami; Shirayama, Yasuhiko; Imoto, Issei; Hinode, Daisuke; Yanagisawa, Shizuko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Bando, Takashi; Yokota, Narushi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate awareness and attitudes about preventive dental visits among dialysis patients; to clarify the barriers to visiting the dentist. METHODS Subjects included 141 dentate outpatients receiving hemodialysis treatment at two facilities, one with a dental department and the other without a dental department. We used a structured questionnaire to interview participants about their awareness of oral health management issues for dialysis patients, perceived oral symptoms and attitudes about dental visits. Bivariate analysis using the χ2 test was conducted to determine associations between study variables and regular dental check-ups. Binominal logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with regular dental check-ups. RESULTS There were no significant differences in patient demographics between the two participating facilities, including attitudes about dental visits. Therefore, we included all patients in the following analyses. Few patients (4.3%) had been referred to a dentist by a medical doctor or nurse. Although 80.9% of subjects had a primary dentist, only 34.0% of subjects received regular dental check-ups. The most common reasons cited for not seeking dental care were that visits are burdensome and a lack of perceived need. Patients with gum swelling or bleeding were much more likely to be in the group of those not receiving routine dental check-ups (χ2 test, P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that receiving dental check-ups was associated with awareness that oral health management is more important for dialysis patients than for others and with having a primary dentist (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Dialysis patients should be educated about the importance of preventive dental care. Medical providers are expected to participate in promoting dental visits among dialysis patients. PMID:27648409

  18. Risk factors and underlying cardiovascular diseases in incident ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, Attilio; Marcelli, Daniele; D'Andrea, Antonello; Cice, Gennaro; D'Isa, Salvatore; Cappabianca, Fabio; Pacchiano, Giulia; D'Amato, Roberta; Oggero, Anna Rita; Bonanno, Domenico; Pergamo, Ornella; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in dialysis patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and of CVD on admission to hemodialysis. Data were collected in 31 Italian clinics belonging to a clinic network using a prospective database (EuCliD), the main purpose of which is the support of quality assurance. Six hundred and thirty-six patients, mean age 63.9+/-15.4 years, admitted between January 1, 2000 and September 30, 2003, were separated into two groups on the basis of presence of CVD and observed for a median follow-up period of 16 months. In the CVD group, patients were significantly older and the percentage of diabetics and smokers was significantly greater than in the CVD-free group. There were no significant differences between the groups in term of uremia-related risk factors. According to logistic regression analysis evaluating the impact of traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors, only smoking habit (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.25-2.79) and diabetes (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.19-2.95) were associated with a higher relative risk for the presence of CVD at baseline. At the time of admission, CVD was present in 27% of patients. The following de novo development of CVD was observed: hypertensive disease (0.28 new cases/100 pt-years), ischemic heart disease (0.71 new cases/100 pt-years), other forms of heart disease (1.57 new cases/100 pt-years), disease of arteries, arterioles, etc. (1.85 new cases/100 pt-years) and cerebrovascular disease (0.71 new cases/100 pt-years). The rate of developing de novo CVD events was 3.70 per 100 patient-years. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is already high at admission to dialysis. Despite the care provided to dialysis patients, a significant proportion of patients develop de novo CVD.

  19. Factors associated with temporary work disability in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rivera, J; Esteve-Vives, J; Vallejo, M A; Rejas, J

    2011-11-01

    Temporary work disability (TWD) is more common in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) than among the rest of the workers. To describe the differences between patients who take sick leave (TWD group) and those who continue to work regularly (control group). To determine what factors are associated with TWD. Multicentre, cross-sectional study with a cohort of patients with FM seen in rheumatology clinics throughout Spain. The following information was recorded: demographic data, clinical manifestations, comorbidities, health self-perception, emotional issues, functional capacity, physical function tests, utilization of healthcare resources, TWD during the past 12 months, and quitting paid employment due to the disease. Descriptive statistics was used to compare variables between the TWD group and the control group. A logistic regression analysis was done to determine which factors are associated with TWD. The study cohort was composed of 301 patients with FM (women: 96.7%) with a mean age of 48.7 ± 8.5 years and a disease duration of 11.5 ± 9.1 years. There were 56.8% active workers, of whom 67.8% had had some TWD. The mean TWD length was 44 ± 69.6 days/year. TWD correlated significantly with sedentary work, clinical manifestations, comorbidities, self-perceived health, poor functional capacity, physical function, and healthcare resource utilization. The factors independently associated with TWD are sedentary work, more clinical manifestations, fatigue, and poor flexibility. Of the cases of people who quit their jobs, 66.9% were associated with FM. TWD in patients with FM is associated with sedentary work, a worse clinical situation, and worse functional capacity.

  20. Risk factors for hypothermia in EMS-treated burn patients.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Matthew D; Rittenberger, Jon C; Patterson, P Daniel; McEntire, Serina J; Corcos, Alain C; Ziembicki, Jenny A; Hostler, David

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia has been associated with increased mortality in burn patients. We sought to characterize the body temperature of burn patients transported directly to a burn center by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and identify the factors independently associated with hypothermia. We utilized prospective data collected by a statewide trauma registry to carry out a nested case-control study of burn patients transported by EMS directly to an accredited burn center between 2000 and 2011. Temperature at hospital admission ≤36.5°C was defined as hypothermia. We utilized registry data abstracted from prehospital care reports and hospital records in building a multivariable regression model to identify the factors associated with hypothermia. Forty-two percent of the sample was hypothermic. Burns of 20-39% total body surface area (TBSA) (OR 1.44; 1.17-1.79) and ≥40% TBSA (OR 2.39; 1.57-3.64) were associated with hypothermia. Hypothermia was also associated with age > 60 (OR 1.50; 1.30-1.74), polytrauma (OR 1.58; 1.19-2.09), prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale <8 (OR 2.01; 1.46-2.78), and extrication (OR 1.49; 1.30-1.71). Hypothermia was also more common in the winter months (OR 1.54; 1.33-1.79) and less prevalent in patients weighing over 90 kg (OR 0.63; 0.46-0.88). A substantial proportion of burn patients demonstrate hypothermia at hospital arrival. Risk factors for hypothermia are readily identifiable by prehospital providers. Maintenance of normothermia should be stressed during prehospital care.

  1. Factors related to orthodontic treatment time in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ana Camila Esteves de Oliveira; Carneiro, Lilianne Oliveira Thiers; Pontes, Luana Farias; Cecim, Rodolpho Lobão; de Mattos, José Nazareno Rufino; Normando, David

    2013-01-01

    The length of time that it takes an orthodontist to treat adult patients varies widely. The aim of this study was to investigate how different variables influence treatment time. Seventy clinical case reports of successfully treated adult patients were examined. The patients were selected from 4,723 records held by three experienced orthodontists. The influence exerted by the following variables on treatment time was assessed: age, sex, facial pattern, severity of malocclusion (measured by the PAR index), sagittal relationship of canines, type of brackets (ceramic or metal), tooth extractions, missed appointments and orthodontic appliance issues/breakages, the latter being the dependent variable. Assessment was performed by multiple linear regression analysis, followed by the stepwise method with p < 0.05. The number of times a patient missed their appointment (no-show) (R² = 14.4%, p < 0.0001) and the number of appliance issues/breakages (R² = 29.71%, p = 0.0037) significantly affected variability in treatment time, and these two variables together can predict 43.75% (R² total) of the overall variability in treatment time. Other factors, such as canine relationship at the beginning of treatment, bracket type (metal or ceramic), tooth extractions, age at start of treatment, severity of the initial malocclusion, sex and facial pattern had no significant bearing on treatment time. The duration of orthodontic treatment in adults, when performed by experienced orthodontists, is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. However, several factors which were not included in this study may contribute to variability in orthodontic treatment time.

  2. Risk factors for agitation in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Thiago Miranda Lopes; de Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Nosé, Paulo Maurício Garcia; de Freitas, Flavio Geraldo Resende; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of agitation in the first 7 days after intensive care unit admission, its risk factors and its associations with clinical outcomes. Methods This single-center prospective cohort study included all patients older than 18 years with a predicted stay > 48 hours within the first 24 hours of intensive care unit admission. Agitation was defined as a Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale score ≥ +2, an episode of agitation or the use of a specific medication recorded in patient charts. Results Agitation occurred in 31.8% of the 113 patients. Multivariate analysis showed that delirium [OR = 24.14; CI95% 5.15 - 113.14; p < 0.001], moderate or severe pain [OR = 5.74; CI95% 1.73 - 19.10; p = 0.004], mechanical ventilation [OR = 10.14; CI95% 2.93 - 35.10; p < 0.001], and smoking habits [OR = 4.49; CI95% 1.33 - 15.17; p = 0.015] were independent factors for agitation, while hyperlactatemia was associated with a lower risk [OR = 0.169; CI95% 0.04 - 0.77; p = 0.021]. Agitated patients had fewer mechanical ventilation-free days at day 7 (p = 0.003). Conclusion The incidence of agitation in the first 7 days after admission to the intensive care unit was high. Delirium, moderate/severe pain, mechanical ventilation, and smoking habits were independent risk factors. Agitated patients had fewer ventilator-free days in the first 7 days. PMID:28099638

  3. Understanding Patient, Provider, and System Factors Related to Medicaid Readmissions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H Joanna; Boutwell, Amy E; Maxwell, James; Bourgoin, Angel; Regenstein, Marsha; Andres, Ellie

    2016-03-01

    Efforts on reducing hospital readmissions, which are intended to improve quality and reduce costs, tend to focus on elderly Medicare beneficiaries without recognition of another high-risk population--adult nonmaternal Medicaid patients. This study was undertaken to understand the complexity of Medicaid readmission issues at the patient, provider, and system levels. Multiple qualitative methods, including site visits to nine safety-net hospitals, patient/family/caregiver inter views, and semistructured interviews with health plans and state Medicaid agencies, were used in 2012 and 2013 to obtain information on patient, provider, and system issues related to Medicaid readmissions; strategies considered or currently used to address those issues; and any perceived financial, regulatory or, other policy factors inhibiting or facilitating readmission reduction efforts. Significant risk factors for Medicaid readmissions included financial stress, high prevalence of mental health and substance abuse disorders, medication nonadherence, and housing instability. Lacking awareness on Medicaid patients' high risk, a sufficient business case, and proven strategies for reducing readmissions were primary barriers for providers. Major hurdles at the system level included shortage of primary care and mental health providers, lack of coordination among providers, lack of partnerships between health plans and providers, and limited data capacity for realtime monitoring of readmissions. The intertwining of behavioral, socioeconomic, and health factors; the difficulty of accessing appropriate care in the outpatient setting; the lack of clear financial incentives for health care providers to reduce readmissions; and the fragmentation of the current health care system warrant greater attention and more concerted efforts from all stakeholders to reduce Medicaid readmissions.

  4. [Associated factors to quality of life of patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Souza, Leonardo Araújo de; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire

    2006-03-01

    Treatment of individuals with schizophrenia in Brazil has been gradually shifting from an almost exclusively hospital-based approach to a community-based treatment. These patients have received treatments focused less on symptoms reduction, and more on social reintegration and improvement of their life conditions. Thus, it is necessary to evaluate the quality of life of these patients living in the community. A review of studies was carried out to describe the distribution of sociodemographic and clinical factors that may influence quality of life of individuals with schizophrenia. Twenty-five studies were selected, most of them from European countries. The majority of these studies was developed in the 90's. Almost all studies were cross-sectional, and most of them evaluated samples of individuals living in the community. Sociodemographic factors, other than monthly income, were not associated to quality of life. However, some studies found associations between quality of life and gender, age, marital status and educational level. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were related to worse quality of life in several studies. Such finding was also true for negative and positive symptoms of schizophrenia, but without an homogeneous pattern. Generally, studies were not consistent regarding association between sociodemographic and clinical factors and quality of life of patients with schizophrenia. These lack of homogeneity may be due to either disease-related issues or design aspects of these studies, not adequate for causal inference.

  5. What factors determine patients' preference for tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in ankylosing spondylitis?

    PubMed

    Fajri, Dessy W; Brand, Caroline A; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Martin, Belinda J; Buchanan, Russell R C; Schachna, Lionel

    2009-05-01

    Tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy, either intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SQ), demonstrates similar efficacy in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The objective of this study was to examine factors influencing patient preference of TNFi. Fifty-nine (79.7%) participants were male with mean age 43.9 years and disease duration of 22.0 years. Fifty-nine patients (79.7%) agreed with the statement 'My doctor gave me a choice and I made a decision based on my personal preference'. Patients commenced first on IV TNFi most commonly cited reduced frequency of injections (96.6%), administration by a trained professional (89.7%) and use of infusion time for leisure activities (86.2%). Patients commenced on SQ TNFi cited flexibility with timing of treatment (80%), shortened administration time (73.3%) and the convenience of home therapy (73.3%). Shared clinical decision-making between clinicians and patients may be desirable for AS patients commencing TNFi therapy.

  6. Risk factors for hypotension in urgently intubated burn patients.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Christopher J; Chung, Kevin K; Holland, Seth R; Yoon, Brian S; Milligan, Daun J; Nitzschke, Stephanie L; Maani, Christopher V; Hansen, Jacob J; Aden, James K; Renz, Evan M

    2012-12-01

    When urgently intubating patient in the burn intensive care unit (BICU), various induction agents, including propofol, are utilized that may induce hemodynamic instability. A retrospective review was performed of consecutive critically ill burn patients who underwent urgent endotracheal intubation in BICU. Basic burn-related demographic data, indication for intubation, and induction agents utilized were recorded. The primary outcomes of interest were clinically significant hypotension requiring immediate fluid resuscitation, initiation or escalation of vasopressors immediately after intubation. Secondary outcomes included ventilator days, stay length, and in-hospital mortality. Between January 2003 and August 2010, we identified 279 urgent intubations in 204 patients. Of these, the criteria for presumed sepsis were met in 60% (n=168) of the intubations. After intubation, 117 patients (42%) experienced clinically significant hypotension. Propofol (51%) was the most commonly utilized induction agent followed by etomidate (23%), ketamine (15%), and midazolam (11%). On multiple logistic regression, %TBSA (OR 1.016, 95% CI 1.004-1.027, p<0.001) and presumed sepsis (OR 1.852, 95% CI 1.100-3.117, p=0.02) were the only significant predictors of hypotension. None of the induction agents, including propofol, were significantly associated with hypotension in patients with or without presumed sepsis. In critically ill burn patients undergoing urgent endotracheal intubation, specific induction agents, including propofol, were not associated with clinically significant hypotension. Presumed sepsis and %TBSA were the most important risk factors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Clinical factors affecting quality of life of patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Bartosz; Panaszek, Bernard; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been increased interest in the subjective quality of life (QoL) of patients with bronchial asthma. QoL is a significant indicator guiding the efforts of professionals caring for patients, especially chronically ill ones. The identification of factors affecting the QoL reported by patients, despite their existing condition, is important and useful to provide multidisciplinary care for these patients. Aim To investigate the clinical factors affecting asthma patients’ QoL. Methods The study comprised 100 patients (73 female, 27 male) aged 18–84 years (mean age was 45.7) treated in the Allergy Clinic of the Wroclaw Medical University Department and Clinic of Internal Diseases, Geriatrics and Allergology. All asthma patients meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to participate. Data on sociodemographic and clinical variables were collected. In this study, we used medical record analysis and two questionnaires: the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) to assess the QoL of patients with asthma and the Asthma Control Test to measure asthma control. Results Active smokers were shown to have a significantly lower QoL in the “Symptoms” domain than nonsmokers (P=0.006). QoL was also demonstrated to decrease significantly as the frequency of asthma exacerbations increased (R=−0.231, P=0.022). QoL in the domain “Activity limitation” was shown to increase significantly along with the number of years of smoking (R=0.404; P=0.004). Time from onset and the dominant symptom of asthma significantly negatively affected QoL in the “Activity limitation” domain of the AQLQ (R=−0.316, P=0.001; P=0.029, respectively). QoL scores in the “Emotional function” and “Environmental stimuli” subscale of the AQLQ decreased significantly as time from onset increased (R=−0.200, P=0.046; R=−0.328, P=0.001, respectively). Conclusion Patients exhibiting better symptom control have higher QoL scores. Asthma patients’ Qo

  8. Evaluation of some psychological factors in psoriatic patients.

    PubMed

    Noormohammadpour, Pedram; Fakour, Yousef; Nazemei, Mohammad Javad; Ehsani, Amirhooshang; Gholamali, Fatemeh; Morteza, Afsaneh; Mokhtari, Leila; Khosrovanmehr, Najmeh

    2015-01-01

    vulnerability score. PASI score as a representing factor of skin involvement has a limited role in predicting the effect of psoriasis on mental status and illness perception of psoriatic patients. Psychological vulnerability of the patients is the main predicting factor of illness perception and coping strategies (representing patients approach to their disease or their treatment beliefs).

  9. Hepatitis C risk factor for patients submitted to dialysis.

    PubMed

    Baldessar, Maria Zélia; Bettiol, Jane; Foppa, Fabrício; Oliveira, Lúcia Helena das Chagas

    2007-02-01

    This article reports the results of the research which has evaluated the prevalence and factors associated to the presence of Hepatitis C in patients submitted to dialysis at the Clinica de Doenças Renais (Clinic of Renal Diseases) in Tubarao city (CRDT), Santa Catarina State, Brazil, in the period between January 1st, 2004 to December 31st in the same year. The prevalence of 16.8% of Hepatitis C in the studied population and the time-length of dialysis as significative risk factor have become evident. The non-correlation of seropositivity of the followings factors is also indicated: age, gender, base diseases, infrastructures, the type of clinic machines, the type of dialyser, used membranes, the machine sterilisation and substances for this process as well as the number of times of the dialyser reutilization. The data represented in this project suggest that the Hepatitis C presents high prevalence in patients in dialysis and the time-length of the treatment is a risky factor to acquire the infection.

  10. Factors associated with strain in informal caregivers of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jen-Wen; Huang, Yu-Ching; Chen, Jin-Hua; Liao, Li-Na; Lin, Chun-Ju; Chuo, Chia-Ying; Chang, Ku-Chou

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most prevalent causes of adult disability and handicap. Informal caregivers play an important role in poststroke care. However, informal caregivers may experience strain, which threatens the recovery of stroke subjects. This study aimed to describe changes in strain experienced by informal caregivers from 3 to 6 months after the stroke, and identify the predicting factors. We recruited pairs of inpatients with ischemic stroke and informal caregivers from a tertiary referral hospital and interviewed them at 3 and 6 months after the stroke. Caregiver strain was evaluated using the Caregiver Strain Index (CSI), with a CSI ≥ 7 indicating considerable caregiver strain. Various factors associated with caregiver strain were analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Eighty-nine stroke patients and caregivers completed the study. Considerable strain was reported in 46% and 43% of the caregivers at the 3rd and 6th month, respectively. Patient factors such as severe disabilities (Barthel Index ≤ 60), poor cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination ≤ 23), depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] ≥ 10), and recurrent stroke were predictors for caregiver strain. Caregiver factors, such as changed employment status, help from formal caregivers, and depression (BDI ≥ 10) were also associated with considerable caregiver strain. Nearly 50% of caregivers experienced considerable strain. Interventions aimed at reducing the caregivers' strain should focus on enhancing the functional and emotional status of stroke subjects, prevention of recurrent stroke, and efficient management of depression symptoms in caregivers.

  11. Economics of psychosocial factors in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Benjamin A; Spruill, Tanya M; Ladapo, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a causal relationship between cardiovascular disease and psychosocial factors such as mental health and behavioral disorders, acute and chronic stress, and low socioeconomic status. While this has enriched our understanding of the interaction between cardiovascular risk factors, much less is known about its economic implications. In this review, we evaluate the economic impact of psychosocial factors in persons at risk for or diagnosed with cardiovascular disease. Most studies have focused on depression and almost uniformly conclude that patients with cardiovascular disease and comorbid depression use a greater number of ambulatory and hospital services and incur higher overall costs. Additionally, comorbid depression may also reduce employment productivity in patients with cardiovascular disease, further magnifying its economic impact. Recent randomized trials have demonstrated that innovative care delivery models that target depression may reduce costs or at least be cost neutral while improving quality of life. The growing population burden and overlap of cardiovascular disease, comorbid mental illness, and other psychosocial factors suggest that future research identifying cost-effective or cost-saving treatment models may have significant health and economic implications.

  12. Risk factors for asymptomatic ventricular dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P < 0.0001). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients.

  13. Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Ventricular Dysfunction in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P < 0.0001). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients. PMID:24368945

  14. Factors influencing LVM in hypertensive type-1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Gerdts, E; Myking, O L; Lund-Johansen, P; Omvik, P

    1997-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with a high prevalence of hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and a causative relationship with abnormal sodium metabolism in diabetic patients has been suggested. Factors influencing left ventricular mass (LVM) were assessed in 30 hypertensive type-1 diabetic patients, mean age 46 +/- 9 (range 24-67) years, with a mean duration of diabetes and hypertension of 19 +/- 10 and 6 +/- 5 years, respectively. In the total study population, casual blood pressure was 163/94 +/- 24/10 mmHg and 24 h blood pressure was 155/87 +/- 17/8 mmHg. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were obtained to measure daily albumin excretion (0.77 +/- 1.06 g) and dietary sodium intake was assessed as 24 h sodium excretion (173 +/- 77 mmol). Creatinine clearance averaged 1.41 +/- 0.53 ml/s. LVM determined by echocardiography was 221 +/- 74 g (range 104-408 g) and 33% of the patients had LVH. Multiple regression analysis identified dietary sodium intake and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide as independent predictors of LVM (R2 = 0.52, p < 0.001). No significant association was found between LVM and blood pressure or albuminuria. The results propose dietary sodium intake as an important factor in the development of LVH in hypertensive type-1 diabetic patients.

  15. Prevalence and factors associated with lipodystrophy in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Justina, Lunara Basqueroto Della; Luiz, Magali Chaves; Maurici, Rosemeri; Schuelter-Trevisol, Fabiana

    2014-01-01

    The published literature shows an increased occurrence of adverse events, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome, that are associated with the continuous use of antiretroviral therapy. This study was performed to estimate the prevalence and factors associated with lipodystrophy in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study between October 2012 and February 2013. The sample consisted of patients with AIDS who attended the Outpatient Treatment Center for Infectious Diseases at Nereu Ramos Hospital, Florianópolis, State of Santa Catarina, Brazil. We collected information on demographics, lifestyle, HIV infection, and clinical aspects of the disease. Self-reported signs of lipodystrophy and body measurements were used for lipodystrophy diagnosis. We studied 74 patients (mean age 44.3±9.2 years; 60.8% men). Among the patients, 45.9% were smokers, 31.1% consumed alcoholic beverages, and 55.4% were sedentary. The prevalence of lipodystrophy was 32.4%, and sedentary subjects had a higher prevalence of lipodystrophy compared with physically active individuals. The prevalence of lipodystrophy was 32.4%. Physical activity was considered an independent protective factor against the onset of HIV-associated lipodystrophy.

  16. Bacterial colonization and associated factors in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Borekci, Sermin; Halis, Ayse Nigar; Aygun, Gokhan; Musellim, Benan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the bacterial colonization and associated risk factors in patients with bronchiectasis. A total of 121 patients followed at the Bronchiectasis Unit, between 1996 and 2013 and diagnosed as having noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis with high resolution computed tomography or multi-slice computed tomography were included in this retrospective study. The following definition of colonization was used for study purposes: Detection of at least two isolates of an organism separated by at least 3 months in a year. Of these 121 patients, 65 (54%) were female and 56 (46%) were male. Mean age was 50.6 ± 16.1 years. Mean duration of illness was 20.3 ± 15.5 years. 43 (35.5%) cases had colonization. The major pathogens responsible for colonization were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 25; 20.6%) and Haemophilus influenzae (n = 14, 11.5%). The stepwise logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between colonization and a low percentage of forced vital capacity (FVC%) and the presence of cystic bronchiectasis (P < 0.05). The following factors have been found to be associated with colonization in patients with bronchiectasis: Low FVC% and the presence of cystic bronchiectasis.

  17. Materials characterization of explanted polypropylene hernia mesh: Patient factor correlation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah E; Cozad, Matthew J; Grant, David A; Ramshaw, Bruce J; Grant, Sheila A

    2016-02-01

    This study quantitatively assessed polypropylene (PP) hernia mesh degradation and its correlation with patient factors including body mass index, tobacco use, and diabetes status with the goal of improving hernia repair outcomes through patient-matched mesh. Thirty PP hernia mesh explants were subjected to a tissue removal process followed by assessment of their in vivo degradation using Fourier transform infrared, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis analyses. Results were then analyzed with respect to patient factors (body mass index, tobacco use, and diabetes status) to determine their influence on in vivo hernia mesh oxidation and degradation. Twenty of the explants show significant surface oxidation. Tobacco use exhibits a positive correlation with modulated differential scanning calorimetry melt temperature and exhibits significantly lower TGA decomposition temperatures than non-/past users. Chemical and thermal characterization of the explanted meshes indicate measurable degradation while in vivo regardless of the patient population; however, tobacco use is correlated with less oxidation and degradation of the polymeric mesh possibly due to a reduced inflammatory response.

  18. What factors are associated with impacted canines in cleft patients?

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Anna; Sjöström, Mats; Björnström, Lena; Ransjö, Maria

    2014-11-01

    It is important to predict and prevent the impaction of canines. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of impacted canines in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and to identify factors associated with impaction. This retrospective cohort study included patients with nonsyndromic UCLP. The predictors were pre-eruptive inclination angle, deviation in tooth number (agenesis or supernumerary lateral incisors), and reoperation of bone transplant. The outcome variable was impacted and surgically exposed canines. The prevalence of impacted and surgically exposed canines in the 68 consecutive patients with UCLP was 20.6%. The pre-eruptive inclination angle was significantly larger (34.4°) for the impacted canines on the cleft side compared with the spontaneously erupted canines on the cleft and non-cleft sides (25.5° vs 15.4; P < .05). Reoperation of the bone transplant significantly increased canine impaction (50%; P < .05). The eruption of maxillary canines needs to be supervised carefully in patients with UCLP, because the prevalence of impaction is 10 times higher compared with the general population. Factors associated with canine impaction are a pre-eruptive inclination larger than 30° and reoperation of the bone transplant. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Presence and Risk Factors for Glaucoma in Patients with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Song, Brian J; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus represents a growing international public health issue with a near quadrupling in its worldwide prevalence since 1980. Though it has many known microvascular complications, vision loss from diabetic retinopathy is one of the most devastating for affected individuals. In addition, there is increasing evidence to suggest that diabetic patients have a greater risk for glaucoma as well. Though the pathophysiology of glaucoma is not completely understood, both diabetes and glaucoma appear to share some common risk factors and pathophysiologic similarities with studies also reporting that the presence of diabetes and elevated fasting glucose levels are associated with elevated intraocular pressure-the primary risk factor for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. While no study has completely addressed the possibility of detection bias, most recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that diabetic populations are likely enriched with glaucoma patients. As the association between diabetes and glaucoma becomes better defined, routine evaluation for glaucoma in diabetic patients, particularly in the telemedicine setting, may become a reasonable consideration to reduce the risk of vision loss in these patients.

  20. Factors Related to Gait Function in Post-stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ki Hun; Lee, Joo Young; Lee, Kun Jae; Kang, Eun Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Gait function after a stroke is an important factor for determining a patient’s ability to independently perform activities of daily living (ADL). The objective of this study was to elucidate the factors associated with gait function in post-stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty-nine stroke patients (16 females and 23 males; average age 67.82 ± 10.96 years; post-onset duration: 200.18 ± 27.14 days) participated in this study. [Methods] Their gait function, motor function (Manual Muscle Test [MMT] and Brünnstrom stage), level of cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination score [MMSE], and the Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment for the Geriatric Population [LOTCA-G]), and ADL (Korean modified Barthel index [K-MBI]) were assessed. [Results] The degree of gait function showed significant positive correlations with the following variables: MMT of the elbow, knee, ankle and wrist; Brünnstrom stage; MMSE; LOTCA-G subscores except motor praxis; K-MBI. Stepwise linear regression analysis revealed the Brünnstrom stage was the only explanatory variable closely associated with gait level. [Conclusion] Gait function of post-stroke patients was related to motor function, cognition, and ADL. In particular, there is a significant association between gait level and the Brünnstrom stages, reflecting the importance of monitoring the motor recovery of gait function in post-stroke patients. PMID:25540503

  1. Presence and Risk Factors for Glaucoma in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Brian J.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus represents a growing international public health issue with a near quadrupling in its worldwide prevalence since 1980. Though it has many known microvascular complications, vision loss from diabetic retinopathy is one of the most devastating for affected individuals. In addition, there is increasing evidence to suggest that diabetic patients have a greater risk for glaucoma as well. Though the pathophysiology of glaucoma is not completely understood, both diabetes and glaucoma appear to share some common risk factors and pathophysiologic similarities with studies also reporting that the presence of diabetes and elevated fasting glucose levels are associated with elevated intraocular pressure – the primary risk factor for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. While no study has completely addressed the possibility of detection bias, most recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that diabetic populations are likely enriched with glaucoma patients. As the association between diabetes and glaucoma becomes better-defined, routine evaluation for glaucoma in diabetic patients, particularly in the telemedicine setting, may become a reasonable consideration to reduce the risk of vision loss in these patients. PMID:27766584

  2. Predictive factors of septic shock and mortality in neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Ramzi, Jeddi; Mohamed, Zarrouk; Yosr, Benabdennebi; Karima, Kacem; Raihane, Benlakhal; Lamia, Aissaoui; Hela, Ben Abid; Zaher, Belhadjali; Balkis, Meddeb

    2007-12-01

    Neutropenia is a major risk factor for developing a serious infection. Bacteremia still causes significant mortality among neutropenic patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for septic shock and for mortality in neutropenic patients with leukemia and bacteremia. Consecutive samples from 20 patients with acute myeloid leukemia and bacteremia were studied during a 1 year period (January-December 2003). All patients received empirical antibiotic therapies for febrile episodes using ceftazidime plus amikacin. About 110 neutropenic febrile episodes were noted: clinically documented 14.54%, microbiologically documented 16.36% and fever of unknown origin 69.09%. Gram-negative organism caused eight febrile episodes: Pseudomonas (5), Klebsiella (3). Gram-positive organism caused 10 episodes: Staphylococcus (6), Streptococci (2), Enterococci (2). Pulmonary infection accounted for 25% of clinically documented infections. About 14 of the 110 febrile episodes were associated with septic shock causing mortality in 7 patients. In a univariate analysis variables associated with septic shock were: pulmonary infection (OR = 17, p = 0.001), serum bicarbonate < 17 mmol/l (OR = 68, p < 0.001) and serum lactate >3 mmol/l (OR = 62, p < 0.001). Variables associated with mortality were: pulmonary infection (OR = 83, p < 0.001) and serum bicarbonate < 17 mmol/l (OR = 61, p < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis two variables were associated with septic shock: pulmonary infection (OR = 5, p = 0.043) and serum lactate >3 mmol/l (OR = 10, p = 0.003). An elevated serum lactate (>3 mmol/l) and low serum bicarbonate ( < 17 mmol/l) at the onset of bacteremia are useful biomarkers in predicting septic shock and mortality in neutropenic patients.

  3. Risk factors for cardiac events in patients with Brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenqing; Tian, Li; Ke, Jinshan; Sun, Yi; Wu, Ruixia; Zhu, Jianfang; Ke, Qinmei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Inconsistent results have been reported about the risk stratification of patients with Brugada syndrome. We have summarized the evidence regarding the strength of association between 6 risk factors (family history of sudden cardiac death [SCD] or syncope, inducible ventricular arrhythmias on electrophysiology study [EPS], spontaneous type 1 Brugada electrocardiogram [ECG], male sex, family history of SCD, and sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 5 [SCN5A] gene mutation) and subsequent cardiac events in Brugada syndrome patients. Methods: Pubmed, Ovid, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies published between January 1992 and March 2016. Only prospective studies (27 studies, 4494 patients) that reported estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cardiac events for the 6 risk factors were included. Results: Family history of SCD or syncope (risk ratio [RR] 4.97, 95% CI 3.96–6.23, P < 0.001), inducible ventricular arrhythmia on EPS (RR 3.56, 95% CI 1.30–9.74, P = 0.01), and spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG (RR 4.07, 95% CI 2.23–7.41, P < 0.001) were associated with an increased risk of future cardiac events. Spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG was associated with an elevated risk of future cardiac events in patients without a family history of SCD. Conclusions: Inducible ventricular arrhythmias on EPS, spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG, and family history of SCD or syncope indicate a high risk of future cardiac events in patients with Brugada syndrome. Spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG significantly increased the risk of future cardiac events in patients without family history of SCD. PMID:27472692

  4. Factors Influencing Chemotherapy Goal Perception in Newly Diagnosed Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Gumusay, Ozge; Cetin, Bulent; Benekli, Mustafa; Gurcan, Gamze; Ilhan, Mustafa N; Bostankolu, Basak; Ozet, Ahmet; Uner, Aytug; Coskun, Ugur; Buyukberber, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    Cancer patients who start receiving chemotherapy have difficulty in understanding the state of their disease, the prognosis, and the purpose of treatment. We used a survey to evaluate the extent of perception of chemotherapy goal among cancer patients. Two hundred sixteen cancer patients who received chemotherapy for the first time participated in the study. The presence of depression and anxiety was assessed using the "Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale" (HAD). The consistency between the patients' perception of the chemotherapy goal and the physician's perception was described as "right," and the inconsistency was described as "wrong." Among the patients who participated in the survey, 53.2 % (n = 115) were receiving adjuvant treatment and 46.8 % (n = 101) were receiving palliative treatment for metastatic disease. The rate of right and wrong perception of the chemotherapy goal was 51.9 % (n = 108) and 32.2 % (n = 67), respectively, and the rate of confused patients was 18.9 % (n = 41). The level of education was shown to be the only parameter involved in accurate perception of the treatment purpose (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.444, p = 0.025, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.219-0.903). In this study, there was a 51.9 % consistency between the physician's perception and that of the patient regarding the purpose of treatment. We demonstrated that the level of education was the unique factor in accurate perception of chemotherapy goal among cancer patients.

  5. Factors that affect the flow of patients through triage

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Melinda; Brown, Ruth; Wears, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Objective To use observational methods to objectively evaluate the organisation of triage and what issues may affect the effectiveness of the process. Design A two‐phase study comprising observation of 16 h of triage in a London hospital emergency department and interviews with the triage staff to build a qualitative task analysis and study protocol for phase 2; observation and timing in triage for 1870 min including 257 patients and for 16 different members of the triage staff. Results No significant difference was found between grades of staff for the average triage time or the fraction of time absent from triage. In all, 67% of the time spent absent from triage was due to escorting patients into the department. The average time a patient waited in the reception before triage was 13 min 34 s; the average length of time to triage for a patient was 4 min 17 s. A significant increase in triage time was found when patients were triaged to a specialty, expected by a specialty, or were actively “seen and treated” in triage. Protocols to prioritise patients with potentially serious conditions to the front of the queue had a significantly positive effect on their waiting time. Supplementary tasks and distractions had varying effects on the timely assessment and triage of patients. Conclusions The human factors method is applicable to the triage process and can identify key factors that affect the throughput at triage. Referring a patient to a specialty at triage affects significantly the triage workload; hence, alternative methods or management should be suggested. The decision to offer active treatment at triage increases the time taken, and should be based on clinical criteria and the workload determined by staffing levels. The proportion of time absent from triage could be markedly improved by support from porters or other non‐qualified staff, as well as by proceduralised handovers from triage to the main clinical area. Triage productivity could be

  6. Factor structure of the SOCRATES questionnaire in hospitalized medical patients.

    PubMed

    Bertholet, Nicolas; Dukes, Kim; Horton, Nicholas J; Palfai, Tibor P; Pedley, Alison; Saitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), a 19-item instrument developed to assess readiness to change alcohol use among individuals presenting for specialized alcohol treatment, has been used in various populations and settings. Its factor structure and concurrent validity has been described for specialized alcohol treatment settings and primary care. The purpose of this study was to determine the factor structure and concurrent validity of the SOCRATES among medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use not seeking help for specialized alcohol treatment. The subjects were 337 medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use, identified during their hospital stay. Most of them had alcohol dependence (76%). We performed an Alpha Factor Analysis (AFA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 19 SOCRATES items, and forced 3 factors and 2 components, in order to replicate findings from Miller and Tonigan (Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S., (1996). Assessing drinkers' motivations for change: The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Psychology of Addictive Behavior, 10, 81-89.) and Maisto et al. (Maisto, S. A., Conigliaro, J., McNeil, M., Kraemer, K., O'Connor, M., & Kelley, M. E., (1999). Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients. Addictive Behavior, 24(6), 879-892.). Our analysis supported the view that the 2 component solution proposed by Maisto et al. (Maisto, S.A., Conigliaro, J., McNeil, M., Kraemer, K., O'Connor, M., & Kelley, M.E., (1999). Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients. Addictive Behavior, 24(6), 879-892.) is more appropriate for our data than the 3 factor solution proposed by Miller and Tonigan (Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S., (1996). Assessing drinkers' motivations for change: The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Psychology of Addictive Behavior, 10, 81-89.). The first component measured

  7. Renal Preservation and Partial Nephrectomy: Patient and Surgical Factors.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Lorenzo; Desai, Mihir M; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Porpiglia, Francesco; Van Poppel, Hendrik

    2016-12-15

    Optimization of the partial nephrectomy (PN) procedure in terms of preservation of functional outcomes is of special importance. To review the most important patient and surgical factors that may influence the three elements that ultimately define the preservation of renal function (RF) after PN: preoperative RF, quantity of parenchyma preserved, and nephron recovery from ischemic insult. A nonsystematic review of the literature was conducted. Relevant databases were searched for studies providing data on surgical, patient, and tumour factors predictive of RF preservation after PN. Many renal cell carcinoma patients have low RF at baseline or are at risk of rapid progression of chronic kidney disease. A glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of ≤45ml/min/1.73m(2) after PN is associated with higher risk of a 50% drop in GFR or dialysis. Greater tumor size and complexity are nonmodifiable factors that predict worse postoperative RF, longer warm ischemia time (IT), and greater healthy parenchymal volume loss (HPVL). Global renal ischemic injury can be minimized using off-clamp or selective minimal renal ischemia techniques that vary from simple regional ischemia to more complex techniques such as tertiary or higher-order renal arterial branch clamping. However, the quality and quantity of parenchymal mass preserved are the main predictors of RF after PN, and IT seems to have a secondary role, as long as warm IT is limited or ischemia is hypothermic. HPVL is minimized using enucleation techniques (oncologically equivalent to traditional PN for low-grade tumors in retrospective studies) and reduction of the parenchyma incorporated in renorrhaphy. Evidence on the comparative effectiveness of the various PN surgical approaches (open, laparoscopic, robotic, and thermoablation) in terms of functional outcomes is characterized by low overall quality. Efforts should be made to optimize the modifiable surgical factors identified for maximum RF preservation after PN. The low

  8. Factors related to the nursing student-patient relationship: the patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Suikkala, Arja; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Katajisto, Jouko

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe patients' perceptions of factors related to three types of student-patient relationship identified in an earlier study: mechanistic (MR), authoritative (AR) and facilitative (FR). A further aim was to identify which factors predict the type of relationship. A convenience sample of Finnish-speaking internal medicine patients was recruited. The data were collected by using a five-point Likert-type questionnaire developed for this study. Data analysis used the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, one-way analysis of variance and multinomial logistic regression. Formal ethical approval for the study was obtained according to national and local directives. The results showed that a number of patients' background variables as well as contextual factors and consequences of the relationship were related to the type of relationship. In AR and FR patients had a named nursing student, a student who had enough time for the patient, and a positive perception of students' personal and professional attributes and of patients' improved health and commitment to self-care significantly more often than in MRs. A FR was also more common among patients in two-patient rooms than among patients in rooms of other sizes. Multinomial regression analysis revealed six significant predictors of FRs; university level education, several previous hospitalizations, admission to hospital for a medical problem, experience of caring for ill family member, positive perception of atmosphere during collaboration, and of student's personal and professional growth. The results provide important clues for promoting facilitative student-patient relationships and thus for enhancing the quality of nursing care.

  9. Patient-based radiographic exposure factor selection: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ching, William; Robinson, John; McEntee, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Digital technology has wider exposure latitude and post-processing algorithms which can mask the evidence of underexposure and overexposure. Underexposure produces noisy, grainy images which can impede diagnosis and overexposure results in a greater radiation dose to the patient. These exposure errors can result from inaccurate adjustment of exposure factors in response to changes in patient thickness. This study aims to identify all published radiographic exposure adaptation systems which have been, or are being, used in general radiography and discuss their applicability to digital systems. Methods Studies in EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS were systematically reviewed. Some of the search terms used were exposure adaptation, exposure selection, exposure technique, 25% rule, 15% rule, DuPont™ Bit System and radiography. A manual journal-specific search was also conducted in The Radiographer and Radiologic Technology. Studies were included if they demonstrated a system of altering exposure factors to compensate for variations in patients for general radiography. Studies were excluded if they focused on finding optimal exposures for an ‘average’ patient or focused on the relationship between exposure factors and dose. Results The database search uncovered 11 articles and the journal-specific search uncovered 13 articles discussing systems of exposure adaptation. They can be categorised as simple one-step guidelines, comprehensive charts and computer programs. Conclusion Only two papers assessed the efficacy of exposure adjustment systems. No literature compares the efficacy of exposure adaptations system for film/screen radiography with digital radiography technology nor is there literature on a digital specific exposure adaptation system. PMID:26229654

  10. Evaluation of risk factors for advanced glaucoma in Ghanaian patients.

    PubMed

    Ntim-Amponsah, C T; Amoaku, W M K; Ewusi, R K; Idirisuriya-Khair, R; Nyatepe-Coo, E; Ofosu-Amaah, S

    2005-05-01

    This study was to determine factors associated with individuals presenting late with advanced glaucomatous optic nerve damage. A case-control study recruiting 123 patients with early features of primary open angle glaucoma (control) and 93 patients with advanced glaucoma (cases) was carried out for risk-factor analysis. Exposures of interest included those already established as major risk factors for glaucoma. These were initial intraocular pressure (IOP), age, and family history. In addition, occupation, ethnic origin, history of diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, sickle cell disease, and previous eye examination were of interest. Univariate analysis showed that initial IOP>31 mmHg, age of > 60 years, absence of family history of glaucoma, occupational grouping, ethnicity, and male sex were associated with advanced glaucoma at presentation. Adjusted odds ratio or by multiple logistic regression model showed that initial IOP>31 mmHg in a patient was more likely to present with advanced glaucoma (OR 2.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.45, 4.91; P-value 0.0017) than lower pressures. Patients aged 60-69 years (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.01, 6.31; P-value 0.0473) and 70-90 years (OR 5.16, 95% CI 1.97, 13.51; P-value 0.0008) were more likely to present with advanced glaucoma than younger ones Subjects with initial IOP>31 mmHg were nearly three times more likely to present with advanced glaucoma than those with IOP<32 mmHg. Subjects over the age of 60 years were more than two times likely to present with advanced glaucoma than younger subjects.

  11. Factor structure of the SOCRATES questionnaire in hospitalized medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Nicolas; Dukes, Kim; Horton, Nicholas J.; Palfai, Tibor P.; Pedley, Alison; Saitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), a 19-item instrument developed to assess readiness to change alcohol use among individuals presenting for specialized alcohol treatment, has been used in various populations and settings. Its factor structure and concurrent validity has been described for specialized alcohol treatment settings and primary care. The purpose of this study was to determine the factor structure and concurrent validity of the SOCRATES among medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use not seeking help for specialized alcohol treatment. The subjects were 337 medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use, identified during their hospital stay. Most of them had alcohol dependence (76%). We performed an Alpha Factor Analysis (AFA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 19 SOCRATES items, and forced 3 factors and 2 components, in order to replicate findings from Miller & Tonigan (1996) and Maisto et al (1999). Our analysis supported the view that the 2 component solution proposed by Maisto et al (1999) is more appropriate for our data than the 3 factor solution proposed by Miller & Tonigan (1996). The first component measured Perception of Problems and was more strongly correlated with severity of alcohol related consequences, presence of alcohol dependence, and alcohol consumption levels (average number of drinks per day and total number of binge drinking days over the past 30 days)compared to the second component measuring Taking Action. Our findings support the view that the SOCRATES is comprised of two important readiness constructs in general medical patients identified by screening PMID:19395177

  12. Factors related to the absence of anemia in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Verdalles, Ursula; Abad, Soraya; Vega, Almudena; Ruiz Caro, Caridad; Ampuero, Jara; Jofre, Rosa; Lopez-Gomez, Juan Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A small number of hemodialysis (HD) patients have normal hemoglobin (Hb) levels without the need for erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). The factors associated with this condition have been little studied. The objective of this prospective study was to determine these factors in a prevalent population of HD patients. All patients who had normal Hb levels and who had not received ESAs in the last 6 months (non-ESA group) were included. Epidemiological and laboratory data were collected and we performed an abdominal ultrasound to assess hepatic and renal cysts. This group was compared to a control group of 205 prevalent HD patients on ESA therapy (control group). We included 45 patients (16% from the whole group) in the non-ESA group. In this group, there was a higher proportion of men (76.5 vs. 61%), patients were younger (61.1 ± 14.7 vs. 67.5 ± 15.2 years), had a longer duration of renal replacement therapy (RRT) (9.4 ± 8.3 vs. 5.3 ± 5.8 years) and had a higher prevalence of adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) liver disease (42.2 vs. 10.2%), p < 0.01. In the non-ESA group, HCV+ patients had a lower prevalence of APKD (2.2 vs. 38.4%) and hepatic cysts (2.2 vs. 19.2%), but significantly higher endogenous erythropoietin levels (55.8 ± 37.1 vs. 30.9 ± 38.4 mU/ml). No significant differences in anemia, iron metabolism, insulin, IGF-1 and renin were found between non-ESA and control groups. Non-ESA patients had a significantly higher number of renal (90.6 vs. 36.5%) and hepatic cysts (12.5 vs. 3.4%), and these were also larger in size (3.3 ± 2.4 vs. 1.5 ± 0.8 cm). In the multivariate Cox analysis, independent predictor factors for absence of anemia in HD patients were number of renal cysts >10 cysts (95% CI 1.058-1.405; p = 0.00), HCV+ liver disease (95% CI 1.147-1.511; p = 0.05) and time on RRT (95% CI 1.002-1.121; p = 0.05). The absence of anemia in HD patients is not infrequent. Its frequency is higher in men and younger

  13. Patient factors influencing dermal filler complications: prevention, assessment, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    De Boulle, Koenraad; Heydenrych, Izolda

    2015-01-01

    While rare, complications do occur with the esthetic use of dermal fillers. Careful attention to patient factors and technique can do much to avoid these complications, and a well-informed practitioner can mitigate problems when they do occur. Since cosmetic surgery is usually an elective process, requested by the patient, clinical trials are complex to organize and run. For this reason, an international group of practicing physicians in the field of esthetics came together to share knowledge and to try and produce some informed guidance for their colleagues, considering the literature and also pooling their own extensive clinical experience. This manuscript aims to summarize the crucial aspects of patient selection, including absolute contraindications as well as situations that warrant caution, and also covers important considerations for the pre- and posttreatment periods as well as during the procedure itself. Guidance is given on both immediate and long-term management of adverse reactions. The majority of complications are related to accepting patients inappropriate for treatment or issues of sterility, placement, volume, and injection technique. It is clear that esthetic practitioners need an in-depth knowledge of all aspects of treatment with dermal fillers to achieve optimal outcomes for their patients. PMID:25926750

  14. Risk factors for fatigue in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Song; Wu, Yuanbin; Deng, Yanchun; Liu, Yonghong; Zhao, Jingjing; Ma, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Fatigue is highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy and has a major impact on quality of life, but little data is available on its effects and management in epilepsy. To identify the incidence and risk factors of fatigue in patients with epilepsy, 105 epilepsy patients (45 women and 60 men) were enrolled in our study. Demographic and clinical data were collected and psychological variables including fatigue, sleep quality, excess daytime sleepiness, anxiety, and depression were measured by Fatigue Severity Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, respectively. Of 105 patients, 29.5% exhibited fatigue (FSS score ⩾4). We found no correlation between the occurrence of fatigue and any of our demographic or clinical variables. Fatigue is correlated with low sleep quality, anxiety, and depression, but not with excess daytime sleepiness. Thus, we concluded that fatigue is highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy, and that low sleep quality, anxiety, and depression are significantly correlated with fatigue in epileptics, while excess daytime sleepiness not.

  15. Difficult mask ventilation in obese patients: analysis of predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Leoni, A; Arlati, S; Ghisi, D; Verwej, M; Lugani, D; Ghisi, P; Cappelleri, G; Cedrati, V; El Tantawi Ali Alsheraei, A; Pocar, M; Ceriani, V; Aldegheri, G

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the accuracy of commonly used preoperative difficult airway indices as predictors of difficult mask ventilation (DMV) in obese patients (BMI >30 kg/m2). In 309 consecutive obese patients undergoing general surgery, the modified Mallampati test, patient's Height/Thyromental distance ratio, Inter-Incisor Distance, Protruding Mandible (PM), history of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Neck Circumference (NC) were recorded preoperatively. DMV was defined as Grade 3 mask ventilation (MV) by the Han's scale (MV inadequate, unstable or requiring two practitioners). Data are shown as means±SD or number and proportions. Independent DMV predictors were identified by multivariate analysis. The discriminating capacity of the model (ROC curve area) and adjusted weights for the risk factors (odds ratios) were also determined. BMI averaged 42.5±8.3 kg/m2. DMV was reported in 27 out of 309 patients (8.8%; 95%CI 5.6-11.9%). The multivariate analysis retained NC (OR 1.17; P<0.0001), limited PM (1.99; P=0.046) and Mallampati test (OR 2.12; P=0.009) as risk predictors for DMV. Male gender was also included in the final model (OR 1.87; P=0.06) as biologically important variable albeit the borderline statistical significance. The model yielded a good discriminating capacity (ROC curve 0.85). The four parameters were used to create an unweighted prediction score (ROC curve 0.84) with >2 associated factors as the best discriminating point for DMV. Obese patients show increased incidence of DMV with respect to the undifferentiated surgical population. Limited PM, Mallampati test and NC are important DMV predictors.

  16. Factors affecting ventriculoperitoneal shunt survival in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Farid; Rehman, Abdul; Shamim, Muhammad S.; Bari, Muhammad E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion remains the mainstay of treatment for hydrocephalus despite a high rate of complications. The predictors of shunt malfunction have been studied mostly in pediatric patients. In this study, we report our 11-year experience with VP shunts in adult patients with hydrocephalus. We also assess the various factors affecting shunt survival in a developing country setting. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted for all adult patients who had undergone shunt placement between the years 2001 and 2011. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to determine the duration from shunt placement to first malfunction and log-rank (Cox–Mantel) tests were used to determine the factors affecting shunt survival. Results: A total of 227 patients aged 18–85 years (mean: 45.8 years) were included in the study. The top four etiologies of hydrocephalus included post-cranial surgery (23.3%), brain tumor or cyst (22.9%), normal pressure hydrocephalus (15%), and intracranial hemorrhage (13.7%). The overall incidence of shunt malfunction was 15.4% with the median time to first shunt failure being 120 days. Etiology of hydrocephalus (P = 0.030) had a significant association with the development of shunt malfunction. Early shunt failure was associated with age (P < 0.001), duration of hospital stay (P < 0.001), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score less than 13 (P = 0.010), excision of brain tumors (P = 0.008), and placement of extra-ventricular drains (P = 0.033). Conclusions: Patients with increased age, prolonged hospital stay, GCS score of less than 13, extra-ventricular drains in situ, or excision of brain tumors were more likely to experience early shunt malfunction. PMID:25722930

  17. [Prognostic factors for mortality in elderly patients with hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Reguant, F; Bosch, J; Montesinos, J; Arnau, A; Ruiz, C; Esquius, P

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the population of patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture, to assess the incidence of mortality and identify associated prognostic factors, and to evaluate functionality at one year after surgery. A retrospective cohort study, with follow-up during the first year after hospital discharge, of patients over 64 years old undergoing surgery for non-traumatic hip fracture during 2008. Variables studied were sociodemographic parameters, clinical complications, functionality and mortality. A total of 240 patients were included, with a mean age of 83.8 years (SD 7.3), of whom 75.8% were women, 51.7% were ASA III-IV and 28.3% had a Charlson index greater than 2. Surgical delay was greater than 48 h in 61.7% of patients, and the mean hospital stay was 19.6 days (SD 15.9). Over three-quarters (76.3%) of the patients had some postoperative complications, the most frequent being cardiovascular and the cognitive disorders. At one year from surgery, 38.4% were able to walk on their own. In hospital mortality was 7.9%, and was 16.7, 20.4 and 24.6% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. Independent prognostic factors of mortality at one year after surgery were: age, ASA score, Charlson index and post-operative cardiovascular and renal complications. Hip fracture is associated with a high post-operative morbidity and mortality rate with important limitations in gait and functional status at one year after surgery. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Incidence and predictive factors of delirium in hospitalised neurological patients.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Bajo, B; Roche Bueno, J C; Seral Moral, M; Martín Martínez, J

    2013-01-01

    Delirium is a condition with a high prevalence in hospitalised patients (10%-30%), and it has important prognostic implications. There are few prospective studies of the incidence of delirium in Spain, and most of these were carried out in surgical wards or intensive care units. Our objective is to calculate the incidence of delirium in a neurological department and describe characteristics of affected patients. Longitudinal descriptive study including all patients admitted to the neurology department in an 8-week period. The CAM score for diagnosing delirium was recorded on the first, second and fifth day of hospitalisation and we recorded demographic data, medical history, analytical data (including inflammatory markers), use of anticholinergic treatments, cognitive and functional state at admission, reason for admission, length of stay, and other events during hospitalisation. We studied 115 patients and found an incidence of delirium of 16.52%. There was a significant correlation between delirium and age, cognitive state at admission according to the Pfeiffer test, functional situation at admission according to the Canadian Neurological Scale, kidney failure, history of stroke, anticholinergic treatment, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein. These patients were also hospitalised for longer periods of time. These results confirm a high incidence of delirium in our geographical area. Although additional studies with larger samples are needed, we would like to emphasise the importance of several risk factors which may enable early detection of patients who are at risk for developing delirium during hospitalisation. This would permit preventive action and early treatment for these patients. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Using qualitative methods to understand factors contributing to patient satisfaction among dermatology patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Caitlin; Singh, Sanminder; Gibbons, Brittany; Clark, Caitlin; Torres, Josefina; Cheng, Michelle Y; Wang, Elizabeth A; Armstrong, April W

    2017-09-11

    In this systematic review, we aimed to synthesize data that identify factors contributing to patient satisfaction in dermatology care using qualitative methods. We performed a comprehensive search of the literature using the PubMed database for articles published between January 1, 2000 and February 9, 2015. The initial search yielded 186 articles, of which 13 were included after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. The systematic review of 13 articles included a total of 330 patients. Using in-field observations and semistructured interviews, studies found that qualitative methods and analysis increased the provider's sensitivity to patient needs and enhanced patient care. Analyses using qualitative methods found increased patient satisfaction in their healthcare provider is associated with (1) confidence in the provider's diagnosis, (2) perception of patient-centered, individualized recommendations and (3) quality of patient education and provider explanation during a visit. Patient satisfaction is measured using either quantitative or qualitative methods. Quantitative methods result in standardized data that often does not capture the nuances of patient experience. In contrast, qualitative methodology is integral to gathering patient perspectives on patient care and satisfaction and should be included in future research models.

  20. [Patient satisfaction-subjective quality assessment by patients and success factor for clinics].

    PubMed

    Olandt, H; Krentz, H

    1998-12-01

    In the field of measuring patient satisfaction (in other words, the quality perceived subjectively by hospital patients) there is still a great need for more knowledge. Therefore, the Institute of Medical Computer Science and Biometry of the University of Rostock carried out a questioning of 497 patients at the Hospital for Internal Medicine of the University Rostock to measure the patient satisfaction with the hospital. In addition, an employee questioning was performed in order to gain further information. In addition to univariate and bivariate analyses a special focus was set on the analysis of the hospitals' competitive situation, to take into account the importance of patient satisfaction as strategic success factor within the competitive situation. A competition analysis and a Key-Issue Analysis were performed. Finally, focus is on the problems of external hospital comparison and a comparison of trends of patient satisfaction at hospitals in Hamburg and Rostock was made.

  1. Cardiometabolic factors and disease duration in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cassani, Erica; Cereda, Emanuele; Barichella, Michela; Madio, Carmen; Cancello, Raffaella; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Zini, Michela; Cilia, Roberto; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a favorable cardiometabolic risk profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cardiometabolic risk factors and the duration of disease. One hundred and fifty patients with PD (56.7% men) were studied, measuring body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), body fat percentage (BF%) by impedance, fasting glucose, serum lipids, and transaminases. In sex- and age-adjusted correlation models, duration of PD was inversely related to BMI (r = -0.20; P < 0.05) and BF% (r = -0.29; P < 0.005). Using multivariable regression models (adjustments: age, gender, smoking status, levodopa dose and, alternatively, BMI, WC, or BF%), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were positively correlated with disease duration (P < 0.01 for all). In models adjusted for WC and BF%, total HDL-cholesterol ratio was also inversely associated with duration of PD (P < 0.05 for both). No other association between biochemical variables and the duration of PD was found. Moreover, no dose-response effect of levodopa on metabolic risk factors was observed. HDL levels and total HDL-cholesterol ratio were favorably associated with duration of PD. This factor may contribute to cardiometabolic protection in PD. The mechanisms underlying this association deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk factors for peripheral intravenous catheter infection in hospitalized patients: a prospective study of 3165 patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ling; Chen, Hsiao-Lien; Tsai, Tzung-Yi; Lai, I-Chen; Chang, Wen-Ching; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Fang, Chi-Tai

    2009-10-01

    We conducted a prospective study of 6538 polyurethane peripheral intravenous (IV) catheters in 3165 hospitalized adult patients using semiquantitative culture techniques. We found that extending the scheduled catheter replacement interval from 48 to 72 hours to 72 to 96 hours was not a risk factor for local catheter infection, but that catheter insertion by personnel other than IV therapists and the use of continuous infusion to maintain catheter patency were 2 independent risk factors for infection.

  3. Coagulation factor XI gene analysis in three factor XI deficient Austrian patients.

    PubMed

    Dossenbach-Glaninger, Astrid; Hopmeier, Pierre

    2006-04-01

    Hereditary factor XI deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder with worldwide distribution. In Austrian patients only one mutation leading to congenital factor XI deficiency has been reported. In the present study, we identified the molecular basis of factor XI deficiency in three Austrian patients. Patients attended hospital for other reasons than bleeding disorders. Routine laboratory tests revealed prolonged APTTs due to decreased factor XI levels. We performed automated fluorescent sequencing of the promotor region, exons 1-15 and the flanking intronic regions of the factor XI gene. The mutations found were confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis or sequencing of the non-coding strand. Fluorescent sequencing revealed two novel mutations, the nonsense mutation Gln116X (443C>T) in exon 5 and a deletion of Ile197 and Asp198 (687_692delTCGACA) in exon 7. Furthermore, we detected a heterozygous A>G exchange at the third nucleotide of IVS6 (IVS 6 +3A>G), which had already been reported in a FXI deficient individual of French Basque origin. While the IVS 6 +3A>G decreases the calculated splice consensus score from 0.98 in the wild type to 0.56 in the altered sequence and therefore interferes with the consensus splice sequence, the complete loss of the two amino acids Ile197 and Asp198 is expected to interfere with the steric structure and hence the functions of the third apple domain. The Gln116X leads to a premature termination codon resulting in a lack of the light as well as parts of the heavy chain of the FXI protein, most likely resulting in rapid degradation of the truncated mRNA.

  4. Assessment of patients' awareness and factors influencing patients' demands for sedation in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yoo Kyeom; Montagnese, Thomas A; Harding, Jarrod; Aminoshariae, Anita; Mickel, Andre

    2015-02-01

    Endodontic therapy is perceived by many as a procedure to be feared. Many studies have reported that fear and anxiety are major deterrents to seeking dental care in general, but only a few deal with the use of sedation in endodontic therapies. The purpose of this study was to assess patients' awareness of and factors influencing the potential demand for sedation in endodontics. We hypothesized that there is an association between demographic factors and the demand for sedation in endodontics. A survey consisting of 24 questions was given to patients 18 years and older who presented to the graduate endodontic clinic. Results were collected and statistically analyzed. Thirty-six percent of patients reported that their perception of sedation was being put to sleep, and 27% perceived it as related to or reducing pain. Concerns associated with endodontic therapy were the fear of pain (35%), fear of needles (16%), difficulty getting numb (10%), and anxiety (7%). The 2 major demographic factors that influenced the demand for sedation were cost and the level of anxiety (P < .05). Fifty-one percent showed a positive interest in sedation for endodontic therapy if the option of sedation was available. The demand for sedation in endodontics is high. Patients' understanding of sedation varies. More patients would consider having endodontic procedures if sedation was available. The provision of sedation by endodontists could result in more patients accepting endodontic therapies. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pulmonary hypertension in hemodialysis patients: Prevalence and associated factors].

    PubMed

    Reque, Javier; Quiroga, Borja; Ruiz, Caridad; Villaverde, Maria Teresa; Vega, Almudena; Abad, Soraya; Panizo, Nayara; López-Gómez, J Manuel

    2016-02-19

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disorder that can be caused by several underlying conditions or an intrinsic alteration of the pulmonary vasculature. Chronic increased pressure in the pulmonary vasculature leads to changes in the architecture of the vessels that can perpetuate PH and produce right ventricular dysfunction. These structural and functional alterations can decrease survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis; however, there is a lack of evidence about this problem in this population. The aim of this study is to establish the prevalence of PH in patients on hemodialysis and its association with specific factors related to this patient population. We included 202 prevalent patients on hemodialysis for at least 6 months and who were clinically stable. We collected demographic data, routine laboratory parameters and data of 2D Doppler-echocardiography. PH was defined as a systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) estimated by Doppler ultrasound above 35mmHg. Hydration status was assessed by determining the plasma concentration of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP). PH prevalence was 37.1% (75 patients). The average SPAP in the entire study population was 32±12mmHg and in the group with PH it was 45±11mmHg. We found a direct and statistically significant correlation between the presence of PH and age (P=.001), time on renal replacement therapy (P=.04), the presence of systolic dysfunction (P=.007), diastolic dysfunction (P= 01), mitral valve disease (P=.01) and double mitral and aortic disease (P=.007). Volume overload was closely associated with PH, as demonstrated by the correlation between the SPAP and Nt-proBNP levels (P=.001). We conclude that prevalence of PH in hemodialysis patients is high. And one of the most important associated factors is volume overload. More studies are needed to establish the impact of PH on morbidity and mortality of patients and to assess whether a better volume control improves

  6. [Transfer factor effectiveness patients with persistent genital human papillomavirus infection].

    PubMed

    Morfin-Maciel, Blanca María; Sotelo-Ortiz, Julieta Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Most HPV infections are cleared within two years by the immune system. Only in 5% to 10% of infected women the infection persists determining a high risk of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The transfer factor (TF) or dialyzable leukocyte extract is an immunomodulator that has been successfully used as an adjuvant in the treatment of intracelular infections such as recurrent herpes virus diseases. One daily dose of transfer factor was given for five days and subsequently each week for five weeks to a group of women with persistent genital papillomavirus infection. We included 13 patients, aged 19 to 45 years, with first intercourse between the ages of 14 to 23, and a mean of three sexual partners in their lifetime. All of them had persistent HPV that had been treated before with local and ablative therapeutic options, including cervical freezing, cervical conization, cauterizing loop, imiquimod and podophyllin. Transfer factor was administered daily for 5 days, and subsequently at 7-day intervals for 5 weeks. We found a clinical significant improvement in the gynaecological evaluation of cervical, vaginal, vulvar and perineal lesions. No recurrences have developed for at least 1 year of follow-up. The use of transfer factor in women with HPV showed resolution of genital lesions, without recurrences for at least one year after the treatment was ended.

  7. Factors for tumor progression in patients with skull base chordoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Tian, Kaibing; Wang, Ke; Ma, Junpeng; Ru, Xiaojuan; Du, Jiang; Jia, Guijun; Zhang, Liwei; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting

    2016-09-01

    Skull base chordoma is a rare and fatal disease, recurrence of which is inevitable, albeit variable. We aimed to investigate the clinicopathologic features of disease progression, identify prognostic factors, and construct a nomogram for predicting progression in individual patients. Data of 229 patients with skull base chordoma treated by one institution between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved and grouped as primary and recurrent. Kaplan-Meier survival of progression was estimated, taking competing risks into account. Multivariable Cox regression was used to investigate survival predictors. The primary group consisted by 183 cases, gained more benefits on 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) (51%) and mean PFS time (66.9 months) than the recurrent group (46 cases), in which 5-year postrecurrent PFS was 14%, and mean postrecurrent PFS time was 29.5 months. In the primary group, visual deficits, pathological subtypes, extent of bone invasion, preoperative Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, and variation in perioperative KPS were identified as independent predictors of PFS. A nomogram to predict 3-year and 5-year PFS consisted of these factors, was well calibrated and had good discriminative ability (adjusted Harrell C statistic, 0.68). In the recurrent group, marginal resection (P = 0.018) and adjuvant radiotherapy (P = 0.043) were verified as protective factors associated with postrecurrent PFS. Factors for tumor progression demonstrated some differences between primary and recurrent cases. The nomogram appears useful for risk stratification of tumor progression in primary cases. Further studies will be necessary to identify the rapid-growth histopathological subtype as an independent predictor of rapid progression.

  8. Factors associated with caregiver burden in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyo Shin; Myung, Woojae; Na, Duk L; Kim, Seong Yoon; Lee, Jae-Hong; Han, Seol-Heui; Choi, Seong Hye; Kim, SangYun; Kim, Seonwoo; Kim, Doh Kwan

    2014-04-01

    Caregivers for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) suffer from psychological and financial burdens. However, the results of the relationship between burden and cognitive function, performance of activities of daily living, and depressive symptoms have remained inconsistent. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine which factors are more significant predictors of heightened burden, cognitive impairment or functional decline, besides neuropsychiatric symptoms. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample comprised of 1,164 pairs of patients with AD and caregivers from the Clinical Research of Dementia of South Korea study cohorts. The cognitive function of each sub-domain, functional impairments, depressive symptoms, and caregiver burden were assessed using the dementia version of Seoul Neuropsychological Screening Battery (SNSB-D), Barthel Index for Daily Living Activities (ADL), Seoul-Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (S-IADL), the Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Box (CDR-SB), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the Korean version of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (K-NPI), and the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. We found that higher severity (higher CDR-SB and GDS scores) and more functional impairment (lower ADL and higher S-IADL scores) were significantly associated with higher caregiver burden. In addition, depressive symptoms of patients (higher Geriatric Depression Scale scores) were associated with higher caregiver burden. Therefore, interventions to help maintain activities of daily living in patients with AD may alleviate caregiver burden and improve caregiver well-being.

  9. Risk factors for hospital readmission of elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Carlotta; Nobili, Alessandro; Mari, Daniela; Tettamanti, Mauro; Djade, Codjo D; Pasina, Luca; Salerno, Francesco; Corrao, Salvatore; Marengoni, Alessandra; Iorio, Alfonso; Marcucci, Maura; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify which factors were associated with a risk of hospital readmission within 3 months after discharge of a sample of elderly patients admitted to internal medicine and geriatric wards. Of the 1178 patients aged 65 years or more and discharged from one of the 66 wards of the 'Registry Politerapie SIMI (REPOSI)' during 2010, 766 were followed up by phone interview 3 months after discharge and were included in this analysis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of several variables with rehospitalization within 3 months from discharge. Nineteen percent of patients were readmitted at least once within 3 months after discharge. By univariate analysis in-hospital clinical adverse events (AEs), a previous hospital admission, number of diagnoses and drugs, comorbidity and severity index (according to Cumulative Illness Rating Scale-CIRS), vascular and liver diseases with a level of impairment at discharge of 3 or more at CIRS were significantly associated with risk of readmission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that only AEs during hospitalization, previous hospital admission, and vascular and liver diseases were significantly associated with the likelihood of readmission. The results demonstrate the need for increased medical attention towards elderly patients discharged from hospital with characteristics such as AEs during the hospitalization, previous admission, vascular and liver diseases. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Patients' experiences managing cardiovascular disease and risk factors in prison.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Emily H; Wang, Emily A; Curry, Leslie A; Chen, Peggy G

    Despite greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in patients with a history of incarceration, little is known about how prisons manage CVD risk factors (CVD-RF) to mitigate this risk. We conducted in-depth interviews with individuals with CVD-RF who had been recently released from prison (n = 26). These individuals were recruited through community flyers and a primary care clinic in Connecticut. Using a grounded theory approach and the constant comparative method, we inductively generated themes about CVD-RF care in prisons. Data collection and analysis occurred iteratively to refine and unify emerging themes. Four themes emerged about care in prison: (1) Participants perceive that their CVD-RFs are managed through acute, rather than chronic, care processes; (2) Prison providers' multiple correctional and medical roles can undermine patient-centered care; (3) Informal support systems can enhance CVD-RF self-management education and skills; and (4) The trade-off between prisoner security and patient autonomy influences opportunities for self-management. Patients develop self-management skills through complex processes that may be compromised by the influence of correctional policies on medical care. Our findings support interventions to engage peers, medical providers, care delivery systems, and correctional staff in cultivating effective self-management strategies tailored to prison settings.

  11. Mass gathering medicine: event factors predicting patient presentation rates.

    PubMed

    Locoh-Donou, Samuel; Yan, Guofen; Berry, Thomas; O'Connor, Robert; Sochor, Mark; Charlton, Nathan; Brady, William

    2016-08-01

    medical care, we note that several factors are strongly associated with an increased patient census, including outside (external) or unbounded venues, the absence of fee water (i.e., without cost), no climate control, percent (occupied) seating, and increasing heat index. Although the presence of alcohol is noted to increase patient needs, it does not do so significantly. Regarding event type, collegiate football games have the highest patient census among the range of other events studied. These findings should be considered during the process of EMS resource planning for mass gatherings.

  12. Handgrip strength and associated factors in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Rita S; Fonseca, Isabel; Pichel, Fernando; Restivo, Maria T; Amaral, Teresa F

    2015-03-01

    Handgrip strength (HGS) is a marker of nutrition status. Many factors are associated with HGS. Age, height, body mass index, number of diagnoses, and number and type of drugs have been shown to modify the association between undernutrition and HGS. Nevertheless, other patient characteristics that could modify this association and its joint modifier effect have not been studied yet. To evaluate the association of inpatients' HGS and undernutrition considering the potential modifier effect of cognitive status, functional activity, disease severity, anthropometrics, and other patient characteristics on HGS. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a university hospital. Sex, age, abbreviated mental test score, functional activity score, Charlson index, number of drugs, Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) score, body weight, mid-arm muscle circumference, adductor pollicis muscle thickness, body height, wrist circumference, hand length, and palm width were included in a linear regression model to identify independent factors associated with HGS (dependent variable). The study sample was composed of 688 inpatients (18-91 years old). All variables included in the model were associated with HGS (β, -0.16 to 0.38; P ≤ .049) and explained 68.5% of HGS. Age, functional activity decline, Charlson index, number of drugs, PG-SGA score, body weight, and wrist circumference had a negative association with HGS. All other studied variables were positively associated with HGS. Nutrition status evaluated by PG-SGA was still associated with HGS after considering the joint effect of other patient characteristics, which reinforces the value of HGS as an indicator of undernutrition. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  13. Risk factors for pulmonary cavitation in tuberculosis patients from China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqun; Pang, Yu; Yu, Xia; Wang, Yufeng; Lu, Jie; Gao, Mengqiu; Huang, Hairong; Zhao, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary cavitation is one of the most frequently observed clinical characteristics in tuberculosis (TB). The objective of this study was to investigate the potential risk factors associated with cavitary TB in China. A total of 385 smear-positive patients were enrolled in the study, including 192 (49.9%) patients with cavitation as determined by radiographic findings. Statistical analysis revealed that the distribution of patients with diabetes in the cavitary group was significantly higher than that in the non-cavitary group (adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)):12.08 (5.75–25.35), P<0.001). Similarly, we also found that the proportion of individuals with multidrug-resistant TB in the cavitary group was also higher than that in the non-cavitary group (adjusted OR (95% CI): 2.48 (1.52–4.07), P<0.001). Of the 385 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, 330 strains (85.7%) were classified as the Beijing genotype, which included 260 strains that belonged to the modern Beijing sublineage and 70 to the ancient Beijing sublineage. In addition, there were 80 and 31 strains belonging to large and small clusters, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that cavitary disease was observed more frequently among the large clusters than the small clusters (P=0.037). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that diabetes and multidrug resistance are risk factors associated with cavitary TB. In addition, there was no significant difference in the cavitary presentation between patients infected with the Beijing genotype strains and those infected with the non-Beijing genotype strains. PMID:27729644

  14. Factors associated with smoking among tuberculosis patients in Spain.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Fuentes, María Ángeles; Rodrigo, Teresa; Altet, María Neus; Jiménez-Ruiz, Carlos A; Casals, Martí; Penas, Antón; Mir, Isabel; Solano Reina, Segismundo; Riesco-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Caylá, Joan A

    2016-09-14

    To determine the prevalence of smoking and analyze associated factors in a cohort of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) in Spain between 2006 and 2013. Multicenter, cross-sectional, descriptive, observational study using a national database of TB patients, using logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI). We analyzed 5,846 cases (62 % men, mean age 39 years, 33 % foreigners). 23.4 % were alcohol abuser, 1.3 % were injected drug users (IDU), 4.6 % were co-infected with HIV, and 7.5 % had a history of TB treatment. 6.6 % and 0.8 % showed resistance to one and multiple drugs, respectively. The predominant clinical presentation was pulmonary (71 %) with a cavitary radiological pattern in 32.8 % of cases. 82 % of cases were confirmed microbiologically, and 54 % were smear-positive microscopy. 2,300 (39.3 %) patients were smokers. The following factors were associated with smoking: male sex (OR = 2.26;CI:1.97;2.60), Spanish origin (OR = 2.79;CI:2.40-3.24), alcoholism (OR = 2.85;CI:2.46;3.31), IDU (OR = 2.78;CI:1.48;5.52), homelessness (OR = 1.99;CI:1.14-3.57), pulmonary TB (OR = 1.61;CI:1.16;2.24), cavitary radiological pattern (OR = 1.99;CI:1.43;2.79) and a smear-positive microscopy at the time of diagnosis (OR = 1.39;CI:1.14;1.17). The prevalence of smoking among TB patients is high. Smokers with TB have a distinct sociodemographic, clinical, radiological and microbiological profile to non-smokers.

  15. Glaucoma Patient-Reported Concerns and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Mogil, Rachel S; Tirsi, Andrew; Lee, Jung Min; Tello, Celso; Park, Sung Chul

    2017-06-01

    To assess the character and degree of concerns of glaucoma patients and identify demographic/clinical factors affecting the concerns. Prospective cross-sectional study. A questionnaire that addressed patients' concerns was administered to consecutive glaucoma patients. Severity of concern was scored with a scale of 0-5 in order of increasing severity. Age, sex, intraocular pressure, visual field (VF) mean deviation (MD), number of antiglaucoma medications, history of glaucoma surgery, and employment status were recorded. Questionnaire results of 152 patients (mean VF MD, -8.03 ± 7.86 dB [better eye] and -16.06 ± 10.22 dB [worse eye]; mean age, 69 ± 14 years) were analyzed. Severity of concern was greatest for general eyesight (2.92/5.00) and visual symptoms (2.78/5.00), followed by activities (2.20/5.00) and socioeconomic factors (2.13/5.00), and then ocular symptoms (1.69/5.00) (P < .001). The most common concerns within each domain were blurry vision (32%), reading small print (34%), medical costs (26%), and dryness (32%). Concern about visual symptoms correlated with VF MD of the better eye (r = -0.258; P = .001) and worse eye (r = -0.233; P = .004). Concern about activities correlated with history of glaucoma surgery (r = 0.148; P = .023) and VF MD of the better eye (r = -0.284; P < .001) and worse eye (r = -0.295; P < .001). Concern about socioeconomic factors correlated with VF MD of the better eye (r = -0.245; P = .003) and age (r = -0.260; P = .001). Glaucoma patients reported varied degrees of concern regarding items associated with quality of life. Certain items may be more concerning than others. Severity of some concerns increased with more severe VF loss, prior glaucoma surgery, or younger age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors associated with various arterial calcifications in haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Gelev, S; Spasovski, G; Trajkovski, Z; Damjanovski, G; Amitov, V; Selim, Gj; Dzekova, P; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2008-12-01

    Haemodialysis (HD) patients are at increased risk of the development of arterial intimal (AIC) and medial calcification (AMC). The aim of our study was to analyze the association between the pre-defined potential risk factors and the status of various arterial calcifications in our HD patients. In a cross-sectional study of 150 patients (91 male, mean age 54.55 +/- 12.46 yrs, HD duration 104.77 +/- 68.02 mths) we first determined the presence of AIC and AMC using plain radiography of the pelvis. We then compared the percentages of different radiogram findings in patients stratified according to various cut-off levels or the codes of each clinical and biochemical parameter (mean value of one year laboratory data recorded in the files). We determined arterial calcifications in 77.3% of our patients (AIC in 45.3%, AMC in 32%). The significantly higher frequencies of arterial calcifications of both groups (AIC and/or AMC) and isolated AIC presence were found in patients older than 55 at inclusion and 45 at the start of treatment with HD, with a serum C-reactive protein (CRP) > 4.5 mg/L, predominantly of male gender with diabetes. The patients with a significantly higher occurrence of arterial calcifications had lower percentages of total serum calcium (Ca) levels but within the K/DOQI guideline recommendations. Also, we found a significantly higher proportion of isolated AIC presence in the group of patients with corrected total serum Ca levels > 2.35 mmol/L and serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels out of the range proposed by K/DOQI guidelines. In parallel, a significantly higher percentage of absence of arterial calcifications (ACA) was obtained in the patients with corrected total serum Ca levels < 2.35 mmol/L, body mass index (BMI) < 23 kg/m(2), mean pulse pressure < 60 mmHg, blood leucocytes < 6.5 x 10(9)L and serum triglycerides < 1.8 mmol/L. Finally, we found a significantly higher presence of isolated AMC in patients with mean Kt/V < 1.3 (poor

  17. Proxy ratings of patient quality of life--factors related to patient-proxy agreement.

    PubMed

    von Essen, Louise

    2004-01-01

    It is generally agreed that patients are the best raters of their quality of life (QL). Where it is not possible to obtain information from the patient the use of proxies can be an alternative. The proxy can be a significant other or a healthcare provider. The use of a proxy offers a solution to non-response. The accuracy of proxy reports is most typically determined by examining the extent to which patient and proxy ratings agree. A literature overview shows that agreement depends on several factors. Methodological limitations may have an impact on agreement. Agreement also varies according to the QL domains under study; the highest agreement is usually found for concrete domains. In addition, patient and proxy characteristics are related to agreement. When designing QL studies the threat of selection bias due to exclusion of patients has to be balanced against the threat of information bias due to proxy ratings.

  18. Identifying Causal Risk Factors for Violence among Discharged Patients.

    PubMed

    Coid, Jeremy W; Kallis, Constantinos; Doyle, Mike; Shaw, Jenny; Ullrich, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Structured Professional Judgement (SPJ) is routinely administered in mental health and criminal justice settings but cannot identify violence risk above moderate accuracy. There is no current evidence that violence can be prevented using SPJ. This may be explained by routine application of predictive instead of causal statistical models when standardising SPJ instruments. We carried out a prospective cohort study of 409 male and female patients discharged from medium secure services in England and Wales to the community. Measures were taken at baseline (pre-discharge), 6 and 12 months post-discharge using the Historical, Clinical and Risk-20 items version 3 (HCR-20v3) and Structural Assessment of Protective Factors (SAPROF). Information on violence was obtained via the McArthur community violence instrument and the Police National Computer. In a lagged model, HCR-20v3 and SAPROF items were poor predictors of violence. Eight items of the HCR-20v3 and 4 SAPROF items did not predict violent behaviour better than chance. In re-analyses considering temporal proximity of risk/ protective factors (exposure) on violence (outcome), risk was elevated due to violent ideation (OR 6.98, 95% CI 13.85-12.65, P<0.001), instability (OR 5.41, 95% CI 3.44-8.50, P<0.001), and poor coping/ stress (OR 8.35, 95% CI 4.21-16.57, P<0.001). All 3 risk factors were explanatory variables which drove the association with violent outcome. Self-control (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.08-0.24, P<0.001) conveyed protective effects and explained the association of other protective factors with violence. Using two standardised SPJ instruments, predictive (lagged) methods could not identify risk and protective factors which must be targeted in interventions for discharged patients with severe mental illness. Predictive methods should be abandoned if the aim is to progress from risk assessment to effective risk management and replaced by methods which identify factors causally associated with violence.

  19. Identifying Causal Risk Factors for Violence among Discharged Patients

    PubMed Central

    Coid, Jeremy W.; Kallis, Constantinos; Doyle, Mike; Shaw, Jenny; Ullrich, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Background Structured Professional Judgement (SPJ) is routinely administered in mental health and criminal justice settings but cannot identify violence risk above moderate accuracy. There is no current evidence that violence can be prevented using SPJ. This may be explained by routine application of predictive instead of causal statistical models when standardising SPJ instruments. Methods We carried out a prospective cohort study of 409 male and female patients discharged from medium secure services in England and Wales to the community. Measures were taken at baseline (pre-discharge), 6 and 12 months post-discharge using the Historical, Clinical and Risk-20 items version 3 (HCR-20v3) and Structural Assessment of Protective Factors (SAPROF). Information on violence was obtained via the McArthur community violence instrument and the Police National Computer. Results In a lagged model, HCR-20v3 and SAPROF items were poor predictors of violence. Eight items of the HCR-20v3 and 4 SAPROF items did not predict violent behaviour better than chance. In re-analyses considering temporal proximity of risk/ protective factors (exposure) on violence (outcome), risk was elevated due to violent ideation (OR 6.98, 95% CI 13.85–12.65, P<0.001), instability (OR 5.41, 95% CI 3.44–8.50, P<0.001), and poor coping/ stress (OR 8.35, 95% CI 4.21–16.57, P<0.001). All 3 risk factors were explanatory variables which drove the association with violent outcome. Self-control (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.08–0.24, P<0.001) conveyed protective effects and explained the association of other protective factors with violence. Conclusions Using two standardised SPJ instruments, predictive (lagged) methods could not identify risk and protective factors which must be targeted in interventions for discharged patients with severe mental illness. Predictive methods should be abandoned if the aim is to progress from risk assessment to effective risk management and replaced by methods which identify factors

  20. Patient and Provider Factors Affecting Clinical Inertia in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes on Metformin Monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mahabaleshwarkar, Rohan; Gohs, Frank; Mulder, Holly; Wilkins, Nick; DeSantis, Andrea; Anderson, William E; Ejzykowicz, Flavia; Rajpathak, Swapnil; Norton, H James

    2017-08-01

    Our aim was to determine the extent of clinical inertia and the associated patient and provider factors in patients with type 2 diabetes on metformin monotherapy (MM) at a large integrated health care system in the United States. The study cohort included patients with type 2 diabetes aged 18 to 85 years, on MM between January 2009 and September 2013, who experienced MM failure (had an uncontrolled glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] reading (≥8.0% [64 mmol/mol]) after at least 90 days of MM). Clinical inertia was defined as absence of treatment intensification with an add-on therapy within 180 days after the MM failure (index date). The impact of patient and provider factors on clinical inertia was determined using generalized estimating equations. The study cohort consisted of 996 patients; 58% were men and 59% were white, with a mean age of 53 (11.8) years. Of these, 49.8% experienced clinical inertia. Lower HbA1c at index date, absence of liver diseases, absence of renal diseases, and greater provider age were associated with clinical inertia. The clinical inertia rate in a secondary analysis considering HbA1c <7.0% (53 mmol/mol) as glycemic control was 67.9%. Greater patient age, lower HbA1c at index date, greater provider age, and being a primary care physician were associated with clinical inertia. Considerable clinical inertia rates were observed in our real-world patient population, suggesting the need of interventions to reduce clinical inertia in clinical practice. Information about patient and provider factors affecting clinical inertia provided by this study could help healthcare policymakers plan and implement such interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors in Patient Empowerment: A Survey of an Online Patient Research Network.

    PubMed

    Chiauzzi, Emil; DasMahapatra, Pronabesh; Cochin, Elisenda; Bunce, Mikele; Khoury, Raya; Dave, Purav

    2016-12-01

    Providers and healthcare organizations have begun recognizing the importance of patient empowerment as a driver of patient-centered care. Unfortunately, most studies have investigated empowerment with single diseases. Identifying factors of empowerment across conditions and populations would enable a greater understanding of this construct. The purpose of this study was to understand empowerment in relation to health information-seeking, interactions with providers and peers, and healthcare access in chronic disease patients. This study also sought to identify key empowerment factors and their association with patient characteristics. Participants were recruited through PatientsLikeMe, an online research platform where patients share their personal and medical history data. Patients completed an online survey that assessed self-reported health behavior (e.g. knowledge-seeking, experiences with healthcare providers, and peer interactions) and healthcare access. An exploratory factor analysis identified key empowerment domains. Domain level sum scores and sum of all domains (total score) were compared across patient characteristics and diseases. Overall, 3988 participants were included in the study, with the majority actively involved in their healthcare, but many cited difficulties with matching their treatment goals with those of their physician (34 %) and spending sufficient time with the physician (36 %). Factor analysis identified two domains-Positive Patient-Provider Interaction, and Knowledge and Personal Control-that explained >60 % of the overall variance in the observed variables. Mean total empowerment scores for patients with a primary complaint of Parkinson's disease (61.8) and multiple sclerosis (60.3) were significantly greater than fibromyalgia (55.3) and chronic fatigue syndrome (54.8). Patients who were older, male, more educated, and insured also reported significantly greater levels of empowerment. The two domains of empowerment identified in

  2. [Management of vascular risk factors in patients older than 80].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Formiga, Francesc; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Camafort, Miguel; Galve, Enrique; Gil, Pedro; Lobos, José María

    2014-08-04

    The number of patients older than 80 years is steadily increasing and it represents the main basis for increasing population figures in developed countries. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of mortality and disability causes result in a huge burden of disease in elderly people. However, available scientific evidence to support decision-making on cardiovascular prevention in elderly patients is scarce. Currently available risk assessment scales cannot be applied to elderly people. They are focused on cardiovascular mortality risk and do not provide information on factors with a proven prognostic value in the very old (functioning disability, dementia). Elderly people are a highly heterogeneous population, with a variety of co-morbidities, as well as several functional and cognitive impairment degrees. Furthermore, aging-associated physiological changes and common use of multiple drugs result in an increased risk of adverse drug reactions. Thus, drug use should always be based on a risk/benefit assessment in the elderly. Therefore, therapeutic decision-making in the very old must be an individually tailored and based on an appropriate clinical judgement and a comprehensive geriatric assessment. The current consensus report aims to present a proposal for clinical practices in the primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention in the very old and to provide a number of recommendations on lifestyle changes and drug therapy for the management of major cardiovascular risk factors.

  3. Elevated circulating leukemia inhibitory factor in patients with extensive burns.

    PubMed

    Akita, Sadanori; Akino, Kozo; Ren, Song Guang; Melmed, Shlomo; Imaizumi, Toshifumi; Hirano, Akiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To investigate circulating cytokine responsiveness in major burns in association with the systemic stress response system, we tested hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis markers in extensive burn cases treated in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Nagasaki University. The HPA axis is a major stress response system, and the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) may be a potent mediator of the HPA axis; therefore, circulating LIF levels in burn patients were studied. Twenty extensively burned patients (burn surface area, >20%), ie, 10 women and 10 men, 37 to 77 years of age (average: 59.1 +/- 12.10 years), were assessed. Circulating LIF, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), other inflammatory markers, and 24-hour urinary free cortisol excretion levels were investigated. LIF levels were greater in patients who died than in those who survived (186.1 +/- 80.41, 83.5 +/- 64.49 pg/ml, respectively, P < .001) at 36 hours after injury. ACTH levels were more significantly elevated in fatal cases than in those who survived. (41.3 +/- 8.28, 25.2 +/- 7.84 pg/ml, respectively, P < .0001). Twenty-four hour (24 to 48 hours after injury) pooled urinary free cortisol excretion levels also were significantly greater in fatal cases than in the surviving patient group (235.0 +/- 36.49 microg/day, 69.0 +/- 18.04 microg/day, respectively, P < .0001). The correlation between serum LIF and urine free cortisol was significant (r = .30; P < .01) as was the correlation of serum LIF with plasma ACTH (r = .24; P < .01). Serum LIF as well as HPA axis activity markers is a good marker of disease severity and prognosis in patients with extensive burns.

  4. Blood transfusions in severe burn patients: Epidemiology and predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guosheng; Zhuang, Mingzhu; Fan, Xiaoming; Hong, Xudong; Wang, Kangan; Wang, He; Chen, Zhengli; Sun, Yu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2016-12-01

    Blood is a vital resource commonly used in burn patients; however, description of blood transfusions in severe burns is limited. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of blood transfusions and determine factors associated with increased transfusion quantity. This is a retrospective study of total 133 patients with >40% total body surface area (TBSA) burns admitted to the burn center of Changhai hospital from January 2008 to December 2013. The study characterized blood transfusions in severe burn patients. Univariate and Multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of clinical variables with blood transfusions. The overall transfusion rate was 97.7% (130 of 133). The median amount of total blood (RBC and plasma), RBC and plasma transfusions was 54 units (Interquartile range (IQR), 20-84), 19 units (IQR, 4-37.8) and 28.5 units (IQR, 14.8-51.8), respectively. The number of RBC transfusion in and outside operation room was 7 (0, 14) and 11 (2, 20) units, and the number of plasma was 6 (0.5, 12) and 21 (11.5, 39.3) units. A median of one unit of blood was transfused per TBSA and an average of 4 units per operation was given in the series. The consumption of plasma is higher than that of RBC. On multivariate regression analysis, age, full-thickness TBSA and number of operations were significant independent predictors associated with the number of RBC transfusion, and coagulopathy and ICU length showed a trend toward RBC consumption. Predictors for increased plasma transfusion were female, high full-thickness TBSA burn and more operations. Severe burn patients received an ample volume of blood transfusions. Fully understanding of predictors of blood transfusions will allow physicians to better optimize burn patients during hospitalization in an effort to use blood appropriately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk factors target in patients with post-thyroidectomy bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Endong; Cai, Yefeng; Li, Quan; Cheng, Pu; Ni, Chunjue; Jin, Langping; Ji, Qianqing; Zhang, Xiaohua; Jin, Chun

    2014-01-01

    As the highly blood flow of thyroid gland post-thyroidectomy bleeding (PTB) is a serious and life-threatening complication. Our aim was to investigate factors that influenced bleeding after thyroidectomy. Between February 2008 and September 2012, the data of 4449 consecutive patients with thyroid diseases undergoing thyroidectomy were collected and analysed from the department of surgical oncology retrospectively. During the study period, 88 (2.0%) patients were identified to have clinically PTB. 6 risk factors were significantly related to PTB: gender (OR 3.243; 95% CI 2.078-5.061; P < 0.001), age (OR 1.025; 95% CI 1.006-1.043; P = 0.009), tumor size (OR 4.495; 95% CI 2.462-8.208; P < 0.001), postoperative hypertension (OR 2.195; 95% CI 1.006-1.043; P = 0.035), lymph node dissection (OR 3.384; 95% CI 2.146-5.339; P < 0.001) and Graves’ disease (OR 3.744; 95% CI 1.920-7.303; P < 0.001). We addressed the most common explicit source of bleeding by reexploration: infrahyoid muscles (30/88), beside the laryngeal recurrent nerve (22/88), subcutaneous tissue (10/88) and superior pole (10/88). In our study, male gender, older age, tumor size > 3 cm, postoperative hypertension (SP > 150 mmHg), lymph node dissection and Graves’ disease were independent risk factors for PTB. The sources of bleeding were identified more frequently in the infrahyoid muscles and beside the laryngeal recurrent nerve. It is helpful for surgeons to decide the potential bleeding points during the reexploration of PTB. PMID:25126188

  6. Risk Factors for Anxiety in Major Depressive Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Li-Min; Chen, Lin; Ji, Zhen-Peng; Zhang, Suo-Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Yan-Hong; Chen, Da-Fang; Yang, Fu-De; Wang, Gang; Fang, Yi-Ru; Lu, Zheng; Yang, Hai-Chen; Hu, Jian; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Yi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Hui-Chun; Zhang, Jin-Bei; Si, Tian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the sociodemographic and clinical factors related to anxiety in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods This study involved a secondary analysis of data obtained from the Diagnostic Assessment Service for People with Bipolar Disorders in China (DASP), which was initiated by the Chinese Society of Psychiatry (CSP) and conducted from September 1, 2010 to February 28, 2011. Based on the presence or absence of anxiety-related characteristics, 1,178 MDD patients were classified as suffering from anxious depression (n=915) or non-anxious depression (n=263), respectively. Results Compared with the non-anxious group, the anxious-depression group had an older age at onset (t=−4.39, p<0.001), were older (t=−4.69, p<0.001), reported more lifetime depressive episodes (z=−3.24, p=0.001), were more likely to experience seasonal depressive episodes (χ2=6.896, p=0.009) and depressive episodes following stressful life events (χ2=59.350, p<0.001), and were more likely to have a family history of psychiatric disorders (χ2=6.091, p=0.014). Their positive and total scores on the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) and the 32-item Hypomania Checklist (HCL-32) (p<0.05) were also lower. The logistic regression analysis indicated that age (odds ratio [OR]=1.03, p<0.001), a lower total MDQ score (OR=0.94, p=0.011), depressive episodes following stressful life events (OR=3.04, p<0.001), and seasonal depressive episodes (OR=1.75, p=0.039) were significantly associated with anxious depression. Conclusion These findings indicate that older age, fewer subclinical bipolar features, an increased number of depressive episodes following stressful life events, and seasonal depressive episodes may be risk factors for anxiety-related characteristics in patients with MDD. PMID:26598584

  7. Risk Factors for Anxiety in Major Depressive Disorder Patients.

    PubMed

    Xin, Li-Min; Chen, Lin; Ji, Zhen-Peng; Zhang, Suo-Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Yan-Hong; Chen, Da-Fang; Yang, Fu-De; Wang, Gang; Fang, Yi-Ru; Lu, Zheng; Yang, Hai-Chen; Hu, Jian; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Yi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Hui-Chun; Zhang, Jin-Bei; Si, Tian-Mei

    2015-12-31

    To analyze the sociodemographic and clinical factors related to anxiety in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This study involved a secondary analysis of data obtained from the Diagnostic Assessment Service for People with Bipolar Disorders in China (DASP), which was initiated by the Chinese Society of Psychiatry (CSP) and conducted from September 1, 2010 to February 28, 2011. Based on the presence or absence of anxiety-related characteristics, 1,178 MDD patients were classified as suffering from anxious depression (n=915) or non-anxious depression (n=263), respectively. Compared with the non-anxious group, the anxious-depression group had an older age at onset (t=-4.39, p<0.001), were older (t=-4.69, p<0.001), reported more lifetime depressive episodes (z=-3.24, p=0.001), were more likely to experience seasonal depressive episodes (χ(2)=6.896, p=0.009) and depressive episodes following stressful life events (χ2=59.350, p <0.001), and were more likely to have a family history of psychiatric disorders (χ(2)=6.091, p=0.014). Their positive and total scores on the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) and the 32-item Hypomania Checklist (HCL-32) (p<0.05) were also lower. The logistic regression analysis indicated that age (odds ratio [OR]=1.03, p<0.001), a lower total MDQ score (OR=0.94, p=0.011), depressive episodes following stressful life events (OR=3.04, p<0.001), and seasonal depressive episodes (OR=1.75, p=0.039) were significantly associated with anxious depression. These findings indicate that older age, fewer subclinical bipolar features, an increased number of depressive episodes following stressful life events, and seasonal depressive episodes may be risk factors for anxiety-related characteristics in patients with MDD.

  8. Risk factors for complications in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Manser, Christine N; Borovicka, Jan; Seibold, Frank; Vavricka, Stephan R; Lakatos, Peter L; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis may develop extraintestinal manifestations like erythema nodosum or primary sclerosing cholangitis or extraintestinal complications like anaemia, malabsorption or they may have to undergo surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate potential risk factors for complications like anaemia, malabsorption or surgery in ulcerative colitis. Data on 179 patients with ulcerative colitis were retrieved from our cross-sectional and prospective Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Study data base for a median observational time of 4.2 years. Data were compared between patients with (n = 140) or without (n = 39) complications. Gender, age at diagnosis, smoking status, disease extent, delay of diagnosis or therapy, mesalamine (5-ASA) systemic and topical therapy, as well as other medication were analysed as potential impact factors. In the multivariate regression analysis a delay of 5-ASA treatment by at least two months (odds ratio (OR) 6.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.13-18.14), p = 0.001) as well as a delay with other medication with thiopurines (OR 6.48 (95% CI 2.01-20.91), p = 0.002) were associated with a higher risk for complications. This significant impact of a delay of 5-ASA therapy was demonstrated for extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) as well as extraintestinal complications (EICs). Extensive disease as well as therapy with methotrexate showed a significantly increased risk for surgery (extensive disease: OR 2.62 (1.02-6.73), p = 0.05, methotrexate: OR 5.36 (1.64-17.58), p = 0.006). A delay of 5-ASA therapy of more than two months in the early stage of ulcerative colitis (UC) constitutes a risk for complications during disease course. Extensive disease is associated with a higher risk for surgery.

  9. Risk factors for complications in patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Borovicka, Jan; Seibold, Frank; Vavricka, Stephan R; Lakatos, Peter L; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with ulcerative colitis may develop extraintestinal manifestations like erythema nodosum or primary sclerosing cholangitis or extraintestinal complications like anaemia, malabsorption or they may have to undergo surgery. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate potential risk factors for complications like anaemia, malabsorption or surgery in ulcerative colitis. Methods Data on 179 patients with ulcerative colitis were retrieved from our cross-sectional and prospective Swiss Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Study data base for a median observational time of 4.2 years. Data were compared between patients with (n = 140) or without (n = 39) complications. Gender, age at diagnosis, smoking status, disease extent, delay of diagnosis or therapy, mesalamine (5-ASA) systemic and topical therapy, as well as other medication were analysed as potential impact factors. Results In the multivariate regression analysis a delay of 5-ASA treatment by at least two months (odds ratio (OR) 6.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.13–18.14), p = 0.001) as well as a delay with other medication with thiopurines (OR 6.48 (95% CI 2.01–20.91), p = 0.002) were associated with a higher risk for complications. This significant impact of a delay of 5-ASA therapy was demonstrated for extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) as well as extraintestinal complications (EICs). Extensive disease as well as therapy with methotrexate showed a significantly increased risk for surgery (extensive disease: OR 2.62 (1.02–6.73), p = 0.05, methotrexate: OR 5.36 (1.64–17.58), p = 0.006). Conclusions A delay of 5-ASA therapy of more than two months in the early stage of ulcerative colitis (UC) constitutes a risk for complications during disease course. Extensive disease is associated with a higher risk for surgery. PMID:27087958

  10. [Human factors and crisis resource management: improving patient safety].

    PubMed

    Rall, M; Oberfrank, S

    2013-10-01

    A continuing high number of patients suffer harm from medical treatment. In 60-70% of the cases the sources of harm can be attributed to the field of human factors (HFs) and teamwork; nevertheless, those topics are still neither part of medical education nor of basic and advanced training even though it has been known for many years and it has meanwhile also been demonstrated for surgical specialties that training in human factors and teamwork considerably reduces surgical mortality.Besides the medical field, the concept of crisis resource management (CRM) has already proven its worth in many other industries by improving teamwork and reducing errors in the domain of human factors. One of the best ways to learn about CRM and HFs is realistic simulation team training with well-trained instructors in CRM and HF. The educational concept of the HOTT (hand over team training) courses for trauma room training offered by the DGU integrates these elements based on the current state of science. It is time to establish such training for all medical teams in emergency medicine and operative care. Accompanying safety measures, such as the development of a positive culture of safety in every department and the use of effective critical incident reporting systems (CIRs) should be pursued.

  11. [Risk factors related to homicide in Moroccan patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Kachouchi, A; Sebbani, M; Salim, S; Adali, I; Manoudi, F; Amine, M; Asri, F

    2017-09-01

    Persons with schizophrenia are thought to be at increased risk of committing violent crime - 4 to 6 times the level of general population individuals without this disorder. The relationship between schizophrenia and homicide is complex and cannot be reduced to a simple causal link. The objectives of this study were to describe the characteristics of homicide in Moroccan patients suffering from schizophrenia and to determine the correlated sociodemographic, clinical and toxic variables. The study included two groups of patients with a DSM IV diagnosis of schizophrenia who attended the "Ibn Nafis" university psychiatric hospital of Marrakech in Morocco. The first group was composed of 30 patients hospitalized for homicide in the forensic unit between 1 January 2005 and 31 August 2015. The second group included 90 patients without any criminal record. These two groups have been matched according to age and gender. Demographic, clinical and therapeutic variables were analyzed and compared between the two groups. Data analysis has objectified the following results: the mean of age in the first group was 37.03 (±9.09) and in the second group was 31.4 (±8.76). No significant differences were found between the two groups regarding the different sociodemographic variables and the age of onset of disease. Significant differences were found between the two groups regarding: personal antecedents of attempt of homicide (P=0.003), personal antecedents of attempt of suicide (P<0.001), a history of previous violence (P=0.005), untreated psychosis before the act (P<0.001), poor medication compliance and a low familial support (P<0.001), antisocial behavior (P<0.001) and addictive behavior (P=0.005). Several studies identified some possible predictor factors for violent behavior: poor compliance, lack of insight impulsivity and paranoid-hallucinatory symptoms, systematized delusions and addictive behavior seem to considerably increase the risk of turning to violence. Demographic

  12. Factors predicting rehabilitation outcomes of elderly patients with hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Chin, Raymond P H; Ng, Bobby H P; Cheung, Lydia P C

    2008-06-01

    To identify predictors of rehabilitation outcomes for the development of a case-mix system to rehabilitate patients suffering from hip fractures. Prospective cohort study. Two hospitals in Hong Kong. A cohort of hip fracture patients in 2005 (n=303) with a mean age of 82 years was studied. Rehabilitation outcomes were defined as: mortality, length of stay, placement, ambulation status, activity of daily living at the time of discharge and at 6-month follow-up. A comparison between groups and multivariate analysis was conducted to validate the best predictors. Potential predictors and rehabilitation outcomes. Two predictors, the Abbreviated Mental Test score of lower than 6 (odds ratio=0.19, P<0.05) and the Functional Independence Measures score of lower than 75 (odds ratio=38.0, P<0.05), at the time of admission to the rehabilitation setting were found to be related to outcomes. Our findings provided further support for a case-mix system based on these two factors, as they could correctly assign patients into three groups with different baseline characteristics and outcomes. A review of the possible limitations of the existing service with respect to each case-mix group was also conducted. A case-mix system utilising the cognition and activity of daily living function is recommended. Revisions of respective care plans are advocated with more realistic outcome expectations and specific actions for the respective case-mix groups. An evaluation study on the usefulness of this case-mix classification could then follow.

  13. Utilization Patterns of Coagulation Factor Consumption for Patients with Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yu, Su-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a serious rare disease that requires continuous management and treatment for which the medicine is costly at the annual average of 100 million KRW for an individual. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the utilization of coagulation factor (CF) used for hemophilia treatment using the National Health Insurance database from 2010 to 2013 in Korea and compare the utilization of CF with other countries. The consumption of CF per capita (IU) in Korea was not more than other countries with similar income to Korea. However, CF usage per patient IU was higher because the prevalence rate of hemophilia in Korea was lower than in other countries while the number of serious patients was much more. Therefore, it is difficult to say that the consumption of hemophilia medicine in Korea is higher than that in other countries. The consumption and cost of hemophilia medicine in Korea is likely to increase due to the increased utilization of expensive bypassing agents and the widespread use of prophylaxis for severe hemophilia. Even during the research period, it increased slightly and other countries show a similar trend. Thus, hemophilia patient management should accompany active monitoring on the health and cost outcomes of pharmaceutical treatment in the future. This study is expected to contribute to further insight into drug policies for other countries that face similar challenges with high price pharmaceuticals.

  14. Anxiety symptoms in allergic patients: identification and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Stauder, Adrienne; Kovács, Mónika

    2003-01-01

    Multiple relationships between anxiety, allergic symptoms, and treatment difficulties have been observed. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of anxiety disorders in outpatients with various allergic diseases, to identify diagnostic cues or possible risk factors, and to test the usefulness of self-administered questionnaire screening at the allergy clinic. Six hundred forty-six (646) consecutive patients with rhinoconjunctivitis (59.3%), asthma (26.8%), or "other" allergy (13.9%), aged 16 to 65 years, completed self-administered questionnaires in six outpatient allergy clinics; 60 of the respondents also participated in structured psychiatric interviews. Anxiety was measured with the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety. According to the interviews, STAI-T > 52 predicted with 86% accuracy a current psychiatric diagnosis, without differentiating between anxiety and depression. Using this threshold, the rate of anxiety and/or depressive disorders is estimated as 19% (95% CI: 15.9-22.1) in our unselected allergic outpatient sample; 46% of these patients never received any psychopharmacological treatment, indicating that anxiety related disorders are underdiagnosed and undertreated. Risk indicators were female gender; asthma; perennial symptoms; sleep problems; nonspecific allergy triggers like strong emotions; stressful situations; and considerable limitation in everyday activities attributed to the allergic symptoms. Our findings confirm a high rate of anxiety and/or depressive disorders in patients visiting the allergy clinic. Self-administered questionnaires such as STAI-T provide reliable help for the identification of these frequent psychiatric problems.

  15. Factors influencing intercultural doctor-patient communication: a realist review.

    PubMed

    Paternotte, Emma; van Dulmen, Sandra; van der Lee, Nadine; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Scheele, Fedde

    2015-04-01

    Due to migration, doctors see patients from different ethnic backgrounds. This causes challenges for the communication. To develop training programs for doctors in intercultural communication (ICC), it is important to know which barriers and facilitators determine the quality of ICC. This study aimed to provide an overview of the literature and to explore how ICC works. A systematic search was performed to find literature published before October 2012. The search terms used were cultural, communication, healthcare worker. A realist synthesis allowed us to use an explanatory focus to understand the interplay of communication. In total, 145 articles met the inclusion criteria. We found ICC challenges due to language, cultural and social differences, and doctors' assumptions. The mechanisms were described as factors influencing the process of ICC and divided into objectives, core skills and specific skills. The results were synthesized in a framework for the development of training. The quality of ICC is influenced by the context and by the mechanisms. These mechanisms translate into practical points for training, which seem to have similarities with patient-centered communication. Training for improving ICC can be developed as an extension of the existing training for patient-centered communication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors associated with orthostatic hypotension in hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Aline; Bureau, Marie-Laure; Ghazali, Nisrin; Gervais, Raphaëlle; Liuu, Evelyne; Seité, Florent; Bellarbre, Fabienne; Ingrand, Pierre; Paccalin, Marc

    2016-06-01

    To assess the factors associated with orthostatic hypotension (OH) in hospitalized elderly patients. Prospective observational single center study. A French academic center. One hundred and thirty-one patients without OH symptoms who underwent OH testing. The OH test was performed when the patient was able to get out of the bed and was no longer receiving parenteral fluids. The blood pressure was measured after a 10-min rest while the patients were sitting and then standing at 1 and 3 min. Demographic data, co-morbidities, current medications and biological parameters were recorded. The mean patient age was 84.3 ± 7 years. The mean CIRS-G score was 10.6 ± 3.8. The OH test was performed 6.3 ± 3.9 days after admission and was positive in 39 (29.8 %) patients (95 % confidence interval (CI) 22, 38) and positive at 1 min in 87.2 % of the cases. Multivariate analysis showed that OH prevalence correlated with diabetes (odds ratio (OR) = 4.23; 95 % CI 1.10, 16.24; P = 0.03), serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D <20 ng/ml (OR = 3.38; 95 % CI 1.36, 8.42; P = 0.008), use of tranquilizers (anxiolytic and hypnotic) (OR = 2.96; 95 % CI 1.18, 7.4; P = 0.02), CIRS-G score (OR = 1.15; 95 % CI 1.01, 1.31; P = 0.03) and lack of diuretics (OR = 0.20; 95 % CI 0.06, 0.63; P = 0.005). In older adults, OH is often misdiagnosed because it is asymptomatic. As practitioners may be reluctant to perform the OH test because of time constraints, targeting a subgroup of patients with a higher risk of OH should be worthwhile to prevent further OH complications.

  17. [Risk factors for nosocomial pneumonia in patients with abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Evaristo-Méndez, Gerardo; Rocha-Calderón, César Haydn

    2016-01-01

    The risk of post-operative pneumonia is a latent complication. A study was conducted to determine its risk factors in abdominal surgery. A cross-sectional study was performed that included analysing the variables of age and gender, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and smoking, serum albumin, type of surgery and anaesthesia, emergency or elective surgery, incision site, duration of surgery, length of hospital stay, length of stay in the intensive care unit, and time on mechanical ventilation. The adjusted odds ratio for risk factors was obtained using multivariate logistic regression. The study included 91 (9.6%) patients with pneumonia and 851 (90.4%) without pneumonia. Age 60 years or over (OR=2.34), smoking (OR=9.48), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR=3.52), emergency surgery (OR=2.48), general anaesthesia (OR=3.18), surgical time 120 minutes or over (OR=5.79), time in intensive care unit 7 days or over (OR=1.23), time on mechanical ventilation greater than or equal to 4 days (OR=5.93) and length of post-operative hospital stay of 15 days or over (OR=1.20), were observed as independent predictors for the development of postoperative pneumonia. Identifying risk factors for post-operative pneumonia may prevent their occurrence. The length in the intensive care unit of greater than or equal to 7 days (OR=1.23; 95% CI 1.07 - 1.42) and a length postoperative hospital stay of 15 days or more (OR=1.20; 95% CI 1.07 - 1.34) were the predictive factors most strongly associated with lung infection in this study. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors associated with access to rheumatologists for Medicare patients

    PubMed Central

    Schmajuk, Gabriela; Tonner, Chris; Yazdany, Jinoos

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite looming rheumatologist shortages and a growing number of patients with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions, nationwide estimates of access to rheumatology care have never been reported. We aimed to measure travel times as a proxy to access to care and to determine the individual and area-level factors associated with long travel times to rheumatologists in the U.S. Methods We used Medicare Part B claims for the 2009 Medicare Chronic Condition Warehouse 5% rheumatoid arthritis/osteoarthritis cohort. Using Google Maps we estimated driving time from the center of a beneficiary’s home ZIP code to the center of their rheumatologist’s office ZIP code. We examined predictors of travel time ≥ 90 minutes in a series of generalized linear mixed models adjusting for rheumatologist supply, rurality, and individual patient characteristics including age, race, gender, and income. Results We included 41,693 Medicare beneficiaries with one or more visits to a rheumatologist in 2009. The median estimated beneficiary travel time to a rheumatologist was 22 minutes (interquartile range (IQR) 12–40 minutes). Seven percent of beneficiaries travelled 90 minutes or longer to visit a rheumatologist. Even after adjusting for covariates, independent predictors of long travel times included living in areas with no or low supply of rheumatologists and living in the Mountain region of the U.S. Conclusions A small but significant proportion of patients in the U.S. travelled very long distances to visit a rheumatologist, and most of these individuals resided in areas with no or low supplies of rheumatologists. These data suggest that addressing shortages in rheumatology care for patients in low-supply areas is a key target for improving access to rheumatologists. PMID:26319646

  19. Patient Outcomes and Factors Associated with Healing in Calciphylaxis Patients Undergoing Adjunctive Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Norman; Wojcik, Susan M; Heyboer, Marvin

    2015-12-01

    Calcific uremic arteriolopathy, also known as calciphylaxis, is a rare syndrome of small vessel calcification of unknown etiology causing painful, violaceous skin lesions that progress to form chronic non-healing ulcers and gangrene. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can be used as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of these ulcers. However, due to paucity of cases, there is limited data on the clinical benefit of HBOT and identifying factors associated with healing. The purpose of this study was to determine patient outcomes and factors associated with healing in patients with calciphylaxis undergoing HBOT. A retrospective chart review was completed on patients who were diagnosed with calciphylaxis and had hyperbaric medicine consultation between May 2012 and January 2016. Clinical outcomes, demographics, risk factors, laboratory values, wound distribution, and HBOT profiles were collected and analyzed. We identified 8 patients. Out of 8 patients consulted for calciphylaxis, five were consented and underwent HBOT (2 males and 3 females). All had coexisting ESRD and Diabetes. All males were able to tolerate being in the chamber and received therapeutic treatments (at least 20 HBOT) with complete resolution of ulcers. HBOT was discontinued in one female due to an inconsistent biopsy report and two others due to death secondary to septic shock or respiratory arrest and severe uremia. Calciphylaxis is a devastating disease with a high mortality rate. Our results demonstrated a positive response to HBOT especially when receiving at least 20 treatments. A majority of calciphylaxis cases are females and indeed female gender has been cited as a risk factor for this disease. However, current literature has not conferred a relationship between gender nor the number of HBOT received and outcomes. Our results showed that males had a more favorable outcome provided they received at least twenty HBOT. Further prospective studies are needed to elucidate these outcomes.

  20. Fragmentation of Patient Safety Research: A Critical Reflection of Current Human Factors Approaches to Patient Handover

    PubMed Central

    Manser, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The integration of human factors science in research and interventions aimed at increased patient safety has led to considerable improvements. However, some challenges to patient safety persist and may require human factors experts to critically reflect upon their predominant approaches to research and improvement. This paper is a call to start a discussion of these issues in the area of patient handover. Briefly reviewing recent handover research shows that while these studies have provided valuable insights into the communication practices for a range of handover situations, the predominant research strategy of studying isolated handover episodes replicates the very problem of fragmentation of care that the studies aim to overcome. Thus, there seems to be a need for a patient-centred approach to handover research that aims to investigate the interdependencies of handover episodes during a series of transitions occurring along the care path. Such an approach may contribute to novel insights and help to increase the effectiveness and sustainability of interventions to improve handover. Significance for public health While much of public health research has a preventive focus, health services research is generally concerned with the ways in which care is provided to those requiring treatment. This paper calls for a patient-centred approach to research on patient handover; a significant contributor to adverse events in healthcare. It is argued that this approach has the potential to improve our understanding of handover processes along the continuum of care. Thus, it can provide a scientific foundation for effective improvements in handover that are likely to reduce patient harm and help to maintain patient safety. PMID:25170504

  1. Hearing the patient's voice? Factors affecting the use of patient survey data in quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E; Cleary, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop a framework for understanding factors affecting the use of patient survey data in quality improvement. Design: Qualitative interviews with senior health professionals and managers and a review of the literature. Setting: A quality improvement collaborative in Minnesota, USA involving teams from eight medical groups, focusing on how to use patient survey data to improve patient centred care. Participants: Eight team leaders (medical, clinical improvement or service quality directors) and six team members (clinical improvement coordinators and managers). Results: Respondents reported three types of barriers before the collaborative: organisational, professional and data related. Organisational barriers included lack of supporting values for patient centred care, competing priorities, and lack of an effective quality improvement infrastructure. Professional barriers included clinicians and staff not being used to focusing on patient interaction as a quality issue, individuals not necessarily having been selected, trained or supported to provide patient centred care, and scepticism, defensiveness or resistance to change following feedback. Data related barriers included lack of expertise with survey data, lack of timely and specific results, uncertainty over the effective interventions or time frames for improvement, and consequent risk of perceived low cost effectiveness of data collection. Factors that appeared to have promoted data use included board led strategies to change culture and create quality improvement forums, leadership from senior physicians and managers, and the persistence of quality improvement staff over several years in demonstrating change in other areas. Conclusion: Using patient survey data may require a more concerted effort than for other clinical data. Organisations may need to develop cultures that support patient centred care, quality improvement capacity, and to align professional receptiveness and leadership with

  2. Antifungal Susceptibility and Risk Factors in Patients with Candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Mermutluoglu, Cigdem; Deveci, Ozcan; Dayan, Saim; Aslan, Emel; Bozkurt, Fatma; Tekin, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the antifungal susceptibility, typology, and risk factors of candidemia among adult and pediatric inpatients at a university hospital. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was designed, and data collected between December 2013 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. The case group consisted of patients with candidemia. The control group was selected from the inpatients that did not develop candidemia but were admitted in the same clinic and during the same period as the candidemia group. The diagnosis of candidemia was based on a compatible clinical picture and positive blood culture of Candida spp. The demographic characteristics, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores, comorbidities, use of invasive devices, antibiotics administered, and duration of antibiotic uses were compared between both the groups. Results: Out of the 84 patients, 42 (50%) were included in the case group, and the remaining 42 (50%) were included in the control group. Out of all the patients, 31 (36.9%) were female, and 53 (63.1%) were male. When the clinical findings of the case and control groups were compared, the prevalence of nosocomial infections, sepsis, candiduria, and fever was statistically significantly higher in the case group. Among the isolated group in the study, 22 (52.4%) were identified as C. albicans, while the others were non-albicans Candida strains. The C. albicans strain (4.5%) was resistant to fluconazole, while 7 among the non-albicans Candida strains (35%) were resistant to fluconazole. In the case group, abdominal surgery, CVP catheter presence, TPN, endotracheal intubation, frequency of blood transfusion, and SOFA scores were significantly higher than the control groups. The logistic regression test demonstrated that TPN and blood transfusion are the most important risk factors for candidemia (OR=8.14 and OR=5.96, respectively). Conclusion: The invasive Candida infections continue to be a major

  3. Antifungal Susceptibility and Risk Factors in Patients with Candidemia.

    PubMed

    Mermutluoglu, Cigdem; Deveci, Ozcan; Dayan, Saim; Aslan, Emel; Bozkurt, Fatma; Tekin, Recep

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antifungal susceptibility, typology, and risk factors of candidemia among adult and pediatric inpatients at a university hospital. A case-control study was designed, and data collected between December 2013 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. The case group consisted of patients with candidemia. The control group was selected from the inpatients that did not develop candidemia but were admitted in the same clinic and during the same period as the candidemia group. The diagnosis of candidemia was based on a compatible clinical picture and positive blood culture of Candida spp. The demographic characteristics, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores, comorbidities, use of invasive devices, antibiotics administered, and duration of antibiotic uses were compared between both the groups. Out of the 84 patients, 42 (50%) were included in the case group, and the remaining 42 (50%) were included in the control group. Out of all the patients, 31 (36.9%) were female, and 53 (63.1%) were male. When the clinical findings of the case and control groups were compared, the prevalence of nosocomial infections, sepsis, candiduria, and fever was statistically significantly higher in the case group. Among the isolated group in the study, 22 (52.4%) were identified as C. albicans, while the others were non-albicans Candida strains. The C. albicans strain (4.5%) was resistant to fluconazole, while 7 among the non-albicans Candida strains (35%) were resistant to fluconazole. In the case group, abdominal surgery, CVP catheter presence, TPN, endotracheal intubation, frequency of blood transfusion, and SOFA scores were significantly higher than the control groups. The logistic regression test demonstrated that TPN and blood transfusion are the most important risk factors for candidemia (OR=8.14 and OR=5.96, respectively). The invasive Candida infections continue to be a major health problem in Turkey and in our hospital

  4. Risk factors for sudden cardiac death among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ping-Yi; Hung, Galen Chin-Lun; Jhong, Jia-Rong; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2015-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia suffer from excessive premature mortality, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is receiving growing attention as a potential cause. The present study investigated the incidence of SCD and its risk factors in a large schizophrenia cohort. We enrolled a consecutive series of 8264 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (according to DSM-III-R and DSM-IV criteria) who were admitted to a psychiatric center in northern Taiwan from January 1, 1985 through December 31, 2008. By linking with national mortality database, 64 cases of SCD were identified. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for SCD was estimated. The cases were matched with controls randomly selected using risk-set sampling in a 1:2 ratio. A standardized chart review process was used to collect socio-demographic and clinical characteristics and the prescribed drugs for each study subject. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify correlates of SCD at the index admission and the latest admission. The SMR for SCD was 4.5. For the clinical profiles at the index admission, physical disease (adjusted risk ratio [aRR]=2.91, P<.01) and aggressive behaviors (aRR=3.99, P<.01) were associated with the risk of SCD. Regarding the latest admission, electrocardiographic abnormalities (aRR=5.46, P<.05) and administration of first-generation antipsychotics (aRR=5.13, P<.01) elevated the risk for SCD. Consistently, aggressive behaviors (aRR=3.26, P<.05) were associated with increased risk as well. Apart from cardiovascular profiles and antipsychotics, physical aggression is a crucial risk factor that deserves ongoing work for clarifying the mechanisms mediating SCD in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Mortality among Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Mannstadt, Michael; Isakova, Tamara; Rauh-Hain, Jose Alejandro; Tamez, Hector; Shah, Anand; Smith, Kelsey; Lee, Hang; Thadhani, Ravi; Jüppner, Harald; Wolf, Myles

    2010-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) is a hormone that increases the rate of urinary excretion of phosphate and inhibits renal production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thus helping to mitigate hyperphosphatemia in patients with kidney disease. Hyperphosphatemia and low 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels are associated with mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease, but the effect of the level of FGF-23 on mortality is unknown. Methods We examined mortality according to serum phosphate levels in a prospective cohort of 10,044 patients who were beginning hemodialysis treatment and then analyzed FGF-23 levels and mortality in a nested case–control sample of 200 subjects who died and 200 who survived during the first year of hemodialysis treatment. We hypothesized that increased FGF-23 levels at the initiation of hemodialysis would be associated with increased mortality. Results Serum phosphate levels in the highest quartile (>5.5 mg per deciliter [1.8 mmol per liter]) were associated with a 20% increase in the multivariable adjusted risk of death, as compared with normal levels (3.5 to 4.5 mg per deciliter [1.1 to 1.4 mmol per liter]) (hazard ratio, 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 1.4). Median C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF-23) levels were significantly higher in case subjects than in controls (2260 vs. 1406 reference units per milliliter, P<0.001). Multivariable adjusted analyses showed that increasing FGF-23 levels were associated with a monotonically increasing risk of death when examined either on a continuous scale (odds ratio per unit increase in log-transformed cFGF-23 values, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.4 to 2.4) or in quartiles, with quartile 1 as the reference category (odds ratio for quartile 2, 1.6 [95% CI, 0.8 to 3.3]; for quartile 3, 4.5 [95% CI, 2.2 to 9.4]; and for quartile 4, 5.7 [95% CI, 2.6 to 12.6]). Conclusions Increased FGF-23 levels appear to be independently associated with mortality among patients who are beginning hemodialysis

  6. Patient factors Predict Periprosthetic Fractures Following Revision Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Jensen, Matthew; Lewallen, David

    2011-01-01

    We assessed important patient risk factors for postoperative periprosthetic fractures after revision total hip replacement (THR) using prospectively collected Institutional Joint Registry data. We used univariate and multivariable-adjusted Cox regression analyses. There were 330 postoperative periprosthetic fractures after 6,281 revision THRs. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, hazard [95% confidence interval] of periprosthetic fracture was higher for: women, 1.66 [1.32, 2.08], p<0.001; higher Deyo-Charlson comorbidity index of 2, 1.46 (1.03, 2.07) and index of 3+, 2.01 (1.48, 2.73), overall p<0.001; and operative diagnosis, especially previous non-union, 5.76 (2.55, 13.02), overall p<0.001. Hazard was lower in 61–70 year old, 0.64 (0.49, 0.84) and 71–80 year old 0.57 (0.43, 0.76), compared to <60 years (overall p<0.0001). Our study identified important modifiable and unmodifiable risk factors for fractures after revision THR. PMID:22342128

  7. [Predictive factors for speech perception in patients with cochlear implant].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, T; Iwaki, T; Yamamoto, K; Doi, K; Kudo, T

    1998-06-01

    Cochlear implant therapy is an epoch-making advance in artificial sensory organ transplants, but the positive effects on speech perception vary. Quantification theory type I, a multivariate analysis, was used to determine predictive factors for speech perception in patients with cochlear implants. Fifty-one postlingual deaf adults (18 male and 33 female, mean age, 53.4, mean duration of deafness, 8.6 years) were tested for speech perception three or more months after a Nucleus 22 channels cochlear implant. The cause of deafness in nine patients was labyrinthitis, ototoxicity in five, meningitis in three and unknown in the remaining 34. Speech perception was measured by vowel, consonant and word recognition using a live voice, and monosyllable, word and sentence recognition using a videodisc. All tests were administered in a sound only condition. Results of the univariate analysis indicated that age at implantation was correlated with monosyllable recognition, and duration of deafness was correlated with live voice word recognition. Residual hearing and coding strategy were both correlated with all outcome measures. The multivariate analysis revealed that coding strategy, duration of deafness, residual hearing and the number of electrodes were significant predictors of live voice word recognition in that order.

  8. Genetic risk factors of cisplatin induced ototoxicity in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Talach, T; Rottenberg, J; Gal, B; Kostrica, R; Jurajda, M; Kocak, I; Lakomy, R; Vogazianos, E

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxicity is an important adverse effect of using Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) (CDDP) as a form of chemotherapy. The clinical picture of CDDP induced ototoxicity includes perceptive hearing impairment (reversible or permanent) and tinnitus. Ototoxicity manifests with considerable variability between patients. The objective of this prospective study was to investigate a possible genetic background to this variability. We assessed ototoxicity induced by therapeutic doses of CDDP in adult patients with germinative testicular tumors, or other tumors treated with an identical CDDP dosage scheme. Audiological examination before, during and after the treatment has shown deterioration in hearing; first in the high-frequencies and with increased CDDP cumulative doses, impairment in other frequencies as well. Occurrence of tinnitus was not dependent on the administered dose of CDDP, or the other risk factors examined in this study. The association of CDDP induced ototoxicity with genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes was examined. Our study has demonstrated an association of early onset of CDDP induced ototoxicity with the presence of two copies of GSTT1 gene (p=0,009) and with T allele of rs9332377 polymorphism in COMT gene (p=0,001).

  9. Dental treatment of patients with coagulation factor alterations: an update.

    PubMed

    Jover-Cerveró, Alba; Poveda Roda, Rafael; Bagán, José V; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda

    2007-09-01

    Hemostasia is a defense mechanism that protects vascular integrity, avoids blood loss, and maintains blood fluidity throughout the circulatory system. The biochemical processes leading to blood clot formation are complex, and alterations can appear at any point within the chain of events. While a range of alterations can affect the coagulation factors, some are more common than others in the general population, including congenital (hemophilia A and B, Von Willebrand's disease) and acquired disorders (anticoagulant drugs). Such diseases require special consideration in the context of dental treatment, and therefore must be known to dental professionals. Interconsultation with the hematologist will provide orientation on the characteristics of the disease and on the best approach to treatment, including the need for replacement therapy, the application of local hemostatic measures, the modification of anticoagulant therapy, etc. In any case, the most important concern is the prevention of bleeding complications by compiling a detailed clinical history, with adequate planning of treatment, and taking special care to avoid soft tissue damage during the dental treatment of such patients. The dental surgeon must enhance awareness among patients and their relatives of the importance of correct oral hygiene, which will help avoid the need for invasive dental treatments and will reduce the number of visits to the dentist.

  10. Evaluation of von Willebrand factor in COPD patients*

    PubMed Central

    Bártholo, Thiago Prudente; da Costa, Cláudia Henrique; Rufino, Rogério

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the absolute serum von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels and relative serum vWF activity in patients with clinically stable COPD, smokers without airway obstruction, and healthy never-smokers. METHODS: The study included 57 subjects, in three groups: COPD (n = 36); smoker (n = 12); and control (n = 9). During the selection phase, all participants underwent chest X-rays, spirometry, and blood testing. Absolute serum vWF levels and relative serum vWF activity were obtained by turbidimetry and ELISA, respectively. The modified Medical Research Council scale (cut-off score = 2) was used in order to classify COPD patients as symptomatic or mildly symptomatic/asymptomatic. RESULTS: Absolute vWF levels were significantly lower in the control group than in the smoker and COPD groups: 989 ± 436 pg/mL vs. 2,220 ± 746 pg/mL (p < 0.001) and 1,865 ± 592 pg/mL (p < 0.01). Relative serum vWF activity was significantly higher in the COPD group than in the smoker group (136.7 ± 46.0% vs. 92.8 ± 34.0%; p < 0.05), as well as being significantly higher in the symptomatic COPD subgroup than in the mildly symptomatic/asymptomatic COPD subgroup (154 ± 48% vs. 119 ± 8%; p < 0.05). In all three groups, there was a negative correlation between FEV1 (% of predicted) and relative serum vWF activity (r2 = −0.13; p = 0.009). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that increases in vWF levels and activity contribute to the persistence of systemic inflammation, as well as increasing cardiovascular risk, in COPD patients. PMID:25210959

  11. Factors affecting the cerebral network in brain tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Heimans, Jan J; Reijneveld, Jaap C

    2012-06-01

    Brain functions, including cognitive functions, are frequently disturbed in brain tumor patients. These disturbances may result from the tumor itself, but also from the treatment directed against the tumor. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy all may affect cerebral functioning, both in a positive as well as in a negative way. Apart from the anti-tumor treatment, glioma patients often receive glucocorticoids and anti-epileptic drugs, which both also have influence on brain functioning. The effect of a brain tumor on cerebral functioning is often more global than should be expected on the basis of the local character of the disease, and this is thought to be a consequence of disturbance of the cerebral network as a whole. Any network, whether it be a neural, a social or an electronic network, can be described in parameters assessing the topological characteristics of that particular network. Repeated assessment of neural network characteristics in brain tumor patients during their disease course enables study of the dynamics of neural networks and provides more insight into the plasticity of the diseased brain. Functional MRI, electroencephalography and especially magnetoencephalography are used to measure brain function and the signals that are being registered with these techniques can be analyzed with respect to network characteristics such as "synchronization" and "clustering". Evidence accumulates that loss of optimal neural network architecture negatively impacts complex cerebral functioning and also decreases the threshold to develop epileptic seizures. Future research should be focused on both plasticity of neural networks and the factors that have impact on that plasticity as well as the possible role of assessment of neural network characteristics in the determination of cerebral function during the disease course.

  12. Patients' Adherence to Healthy Behavior in Coronary Heart Disease: Risk Factor Management Among Jordanian Patients.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Sultan M; Darawad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Poor adherence to risk factor management behaviors for coronary heart disease (CHD) patients increases the risk for a further cardiac event. There is a scarcity of literature about the level of adherence to risk factor management behaviors after CHD diagnosis in Jordan. The aim of this study was to explore which demographic, psychosocial, and clinical factors predict better adherence to risk factor management behaviors, particularly smoking cessation, physical activity, healthy diet, and medication adherence. In addition, we sought to explore the association of poor adherence to hospital readmission. A cross-sectional survey was performed using a sample of 350 patients who visited the outpatient clinics in 4 hospitals in Jordan. Data were obtained from 254 patients (response rate, 73%). Most were overweight (47.8%) or obese (28.5%), and 30% remained smokers after CHD diagnosis; 53 (21.5%) described themselves as ex-smokers. One-third of participants (88, 34.8%) performed regular walking exercise. Only 16% of participants reported that they had been instructed to perform regular activity. Stepwise multiple regressions revealed younger age and lower body mass index as independent predictors for more physical activity. Only 51 (20.9%) reported always following a low-fat dietary regimen, and participants who received dietary recommendation advice were significantly more likely to be on a healthy diet (odds ratio, 10.3; 95% confidence interval, 3.79-30.80; P < .001). Most of the participants (183, 72%) reported low medication adherence (score ≤6), based on the Morisky scale, and only 5 (2%) reported a high adherence score (score = 8). Male gender and having chronic back pain were independent predictors for better medication adherence. About one-third of participants had been hospitalized for cardiac reason at last 2 times in the past 12 months. Rehospitalization was significantly more common among patients who were not following a dietary regimen (Mann-Whitney Z = -2

  13. Factor XIII levels and factor XIII B subunit polymorphisms in patients with venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Zoltán A; Katona, Éva; Kállai, Judit; Bereczky, Zsuzsanna; Somodi, Laura; Molnár, Éva; Kovács, Bettina; Miklós, Tünde; Ajzner, Éva; Muszbek, László

    2017-08-26

    The association of plasma factor XIII (FXIII) level with venous thromboembolism (VTE) is still controversial and the effect of sex and FXIII B subunit (FXIII-B) polymorphisms in this respect have not been explored. 1/ To determine FXIII activity and antigen levels in patients with a history of VTE and how they are influenced by sex and FXIII-B polymorphisms. 2/ To explore the association of FXIII levels and FXIII-B polymorphisms with the risk of VTE. 218 VTE patients and equal number of age and sex matched controls were enrolled in the study. FXIII activity was measured by ammonia release assay; FXIII-A2B2 and FXIII-B levels were determined by ELISAs. FXIII-B polymorphisms were identified by RT-PCR using melting point analysis. Adjusted FXIII activity and FXIII-A2B2 antigen levels were significantly higher in females with a history of VTE than in the respective controls. FXIII-B levels were significantly lower in male VTE patients than in controls. FXIII-A2B2 antigen levels in the upper tertile increased the risk of VTE in females (adjusted OR: 2.52; CI: 1.18-5.38). Elevated FXIII-B antigen level had a protective effect only in males (adjusted OR: 0.19; CI: 0.08-0.46). FXIII-B Intron K c.1952+144 C>G polymorphism significantly lowered FXIII activity, FXIII-A2B2 and FXIII-B antigen levels in both groups. FXIII-B polymorphisms did not influence the risk of VTE. In VTE patients the changes of FXIII level and their effect on the risk of VTE show considerable sex-specific differences. Intron K polymorphism results in decreased FXIII levels, but does not influence the risk of VTE. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Prevalence of factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency among 426 patients with coronary heart disease awaiting cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Halbmayer, W M; Haushofer, A; Radek, J; Schön, R; Deutsch, M; Fischer, M

    1994-05-01

    Several case reports of myocardial infarction in patients with factor XII deficiency have been published. In the present study we investigated the prevalence of this condition. Factor XII activity (one-stage clotting assay), fibrinogen (derived method), and lipoprotein (a) (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were measured in the plasma of 426 consecutive patients with coronary heart disease awaiting cardiac surgery. Among the 426 patients, 44 (10.3%) were found to be moderately deficient in factor XII (factor XII activity 17-50%, antigen 15-57%). The prevalence of factor XII deficiency was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) among patients with coronary heart disease than among 300 healthy blood donors (2.3%). Among coronary heart disease patients with this deficiency, elevated levels of fibrinogen, lipoprotein (a), and blood pressure were no more prevalent than in those without the deficiency; nor were cigarette smoking or a positive family history of thromboembolism more prevalent. Coronary heart disease patients showed a 10% prevalence of factor XII deficiency. However, the pattern of atherosclerotic risk factors did not differ between patients with or without the deficiency.

  15. Complement factor B activation in patients with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Ivan; Dalloul, Mudar; Wong, Karen A; Bakare, Olufunke; Schweis, Franz; Garala, Maya; Alam, Amit; Medranda, Giorgio; Lekovic, Jovana; Shuaib, Waqas; Tedjasukmana, Andreas; Little, Perry; Hanono, Daniel; Wijetilaka, Ruvini; Weedon, Jeremy; Lin, Jun; Toledano, Roulhac d'Arby; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Bb, the active fragment of complement factor B (fB), has been reported to be a predictor of preeclampsia. However, conflicting results have been found by some investigators. We hypothesized that the disagreement in findings may be due to the racial/ethnic differences among various study groups, and that fB activation is significant in women of an ethnic minority with preeclampsia. We investigated the maternal and fetal levels of Bb (the activated fB fragment) in pregnant women of an ethnic minority with or without preeclampsia. We enrolled 291 pregnant women (96% of an ethnic minority, including 78% African-American). Thirteen percent of these were diagnosed with preeclampsia. Maternal venous blood was collected from all participants together with fetal umbilical cord blood samples from 154 deliveries in the 291 women. The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and multivariate analyses. Maternal Bb levels were significantly higher in the preeclamptic group than in the nonpreeclamptic group. Levels of Bb in fetal cord blood were similar in both groups. Subgroup analyses of African-American patients' results confirmed the study hypothesis that there would be a significant increase in Bb in the maternal blood of the preeclamptic group and no increase in Bb in the fetal cord blood of this group. These results suggest that a maternal immune response through complement fB might play a role in the development of preeclampsia, particularly in African-American patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Uncontrolled factors of blood pressure in essential hypertension: from "patient's high blood pressure" to "hypertensive patient"].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xing-Jiang; Wang, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Hypertension is a significant medical and public health issue which puts an enormous burden on health care resources and the community. It is a chronic medical condition in which the systemic arterial blood pressure (BP) is elevated. Serious complications including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases would be preventable if the rise in BP with age could be prevented or diminished. The majority of hypertensive patients require long-term treatment. Oral antihypertensive drugs, lifestyle modification including exercise and dietary modification are milestones for hypertension therapy. However, the control rate of hypertension hasn't reached the expected requirements currently. "Three lows" status quo, just low awareness, low treatment, and low control, are still the major problems confronting modern medicine. Recently, uncontrolled factors of blood pressure are widely concerned, which include insomnia, constipation, mood disorders, exogenous, etc. What's more, the control strategies of hypertension should not only pay close attention to "patient's high blood pressure", but also to "hypertensive patient". Therefore, the treatment of uncontrolled factors of blood pressure plays an important role in hypertensive therapy, which could be further research priorities.

  17. Identification of medication non-adherence factors in adolescent transplant patients: the patient's viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Bullington, Pamela; Pawola, Larry; Walker, Rosemary; Valenta, Annette; Briars, Leslie; John, Eunice

    2007-12-01

    Studies report a clear association between medication non-adherence and an unfavorable transplant outcome. The adolescent population, in particular, has difficulty adhering to post-transplant medication regimens. The purpose of this study is to identify, categorize and understand the opinions of adolescent transplant patients regarding why they may not take their medications as prescribed. From January to August 2005, nine adolescent kidney transplant patients at an urban medical center were surveyed and asked to rank-order 33 statements regarding their opinions on why adolescents may not take their medications as prescribed. Q-methodology, a powerful tool in subjective study, was used to identify and categorize the viewpoints of adolescents on this subject. Three factors emerged and were labeled to reflect their distinct viewpoints: (1) Medication Issues (e.g. taste, size, frequency, schedule), (2) Troubled Adolescent (e.g. poor home life, depression, overwhelming situation), and (3) Deliberate Non-Adherer (e.g. attention-seeker, infallible attitude). By understanding these different viewpoints and the factors that contribute to them, it may be easier to identify which management approach to non-adherence works best in specific subgroups of patients.

  18. The prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors among Saudi patients with hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Owaidah, Tarek; Momen, Abdulkareem Al; Alzahrani, Hazzaa; Almusa, Abdulrahman; Alkasim, Fawaz; Tarawah, Ahmed; Nouno, Randa Al; Batniji, Fatima Al; Alothman, Fahad; Alomari, Ali; Abu-Herbish, Saud; Abu-Riash, Mahmoud; Siddiqui, Khawar; Ahmed, Mansor; Mohamed, SY; Saleh, Mahasen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hemophilia A and B are X-linked diseases that predominantly affect male patients. Patients can develop coagulation factor inhibitors, which exponentially increases the treatment cost. However, the prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors in Saudi Arabia is unclear. This study aimed to determine the Saudi prevalence of factor VIII and IX inhibitors. This 4-year, 7-center, cross-sectional study evaluated the Saudi prevalences of hemophilia A and B. We collected the patients’ clinical data, evaluated their disease, and tested for factor inhibitors. We included 202 patients with hemophilia (median age at diagnosis: 0.13 years, range: birth–34.8 years). The patients included 198 male patients (98%), 148 patients with hemophilia A (73.3%), and 54 patients with hemophilia B (26.7%). The patients exhibited severe factor VIII activity (<1%; 121 patients; 5.2%), moderate activity (1–5%; 7 patients; 4.9%), and mild activity (14 patients; 9.9%). Among the patients with care-related data, most patients were treated for episodic bleeding (76.8%) or received prophylaxis (22.6%); 1 patient received both treatments. Among the patients with source-related data, the factor replacements were derived from plasma (48.4%), recombinant concentrates (22.9%), both sources (14.6%), or fresh frozen plasma (14.1%). Factor VIII inhibitors were observed in 43 (29.3%) of the 147 patients, and only 1 of the 54 patients developed factor IX inhibitors. Most patients who developed inhibitors had severe hemophilia (40/44; 90.9%), and inhibitors were also common among patients who received recombinant products (14/43; 32.6%). The Saudi prevalence of factor inhibitors was similar to those among other ethnic populations. PMID:28079788

  19. Factors associated with patient satisfaction scores for physician care in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Frederick; Horst, Michael; To, Tuc; Rogers, Amelia; Edavettal, Mathew; Wu, Daniel; Anderson, Jeffrey; Lee, John; Osler, Turner; Brosey, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 identifies "patient experience of care" as one of five domains of excellent care. We hypothesized that there are specific demographic factors associated with higher or lower physician satisfaction (PS) scores in trauma patients. Press-Ganey PS scores for September 2004 to December 2010 were compared with trauma variables and the association of a mean PS greater than or equal to 75 (high score) or less than or equal to 50 (low score). Those variables that proved significant on univariate analysis were subjected to multivariate logistic regression analysis. Significance was at p < 0.05. There were 12,196 admissions, of whom 1,631 (13.4%) returned patient satisfaction survey. A total of 1,174 patients (75.5%) returned a high PS (≥75), and 126 patients (8.1%) returned a low PS (≤50). In the multiple logistic regression analysis, 65 years or older (odds ratio [OR], 1.7), having had a surgical procedure (OR, 1.6), and having a positive impression of the hospital care (OR, 7.0) proved significant for a high PS. Those patients who scored a low PS were significantly more likely to be younger (18-29 years: OR, 2.4; 30-64 years: OR, 1.8), to have not had surgery (OR, 2.2), had an Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 16 or lower (OR, 2.6), had a complication of care (OR, 4.4), and rated the hospital care as poor (OR, 9.2). A trauma patient who is satisfied with his or her physician care is one who is 65 years or older, requires surgery, and is predominantly satisfied with other aspects of their hospital care. Unsatisfied patients are younger, are nonoperative, had lower ISS, had a complication of care, and rated their hospital care as poor. Understanding the specific characteristics of Press-Ganey results for trauma patients will allow trauma surgeons and their hospital partners to develop strategies to improve patients' satisfaction with their trauma surgeon's care. Epidemiologic study, level III; therapeutic study, level IV.

  20. Factors That Affect Patient Attitudes toward Infection Control Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Daniel J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated patient attitudes toward different disease control measures taken in dental school clinics (n=272 patients) and private practices (n=107 patients). Variables examined included sex, age, educational background, and knowledge of infectious diseases. Patients tended to accept the control measures being used in each context. (MSE)

  1. Factors believed by Jordanian acne patients to affect their acne condition.

    PubMed

    El-Akawi, Z; Abdel-Latif Nemr, N; Abdul-Razzak, K; Al-Aboosi, M

    2006-11-01

    This study in Jordan described the pattern of acne in 166 untreated acne patients aged 13-42 years attending dermatology clinics and assessed patients' perceptions of factors that have an effect on their acne condition. Family history of acne was positive in 69.3% of acne patients. Emotional stress, hot weather and sweating were believed to be aggravating factors by acne patients of both sexes, and premenstrual factors and cosmetics were factors among women. Many acne patients believed that their acne was exacerbated by certain aspects of diet including nuts, chocolate, fatty food, fried food, eggs, cakes and biscuits, spices and coffee and tea.

  2. Personal Factors that Affect the Satisfaction of Female Patients Undergoing Esthetic Suture after Typical Thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Young; Kim, Jung Won; Park, Jin Hyung; Kim, Jung Hun; Han, Yea Sik

    2013-07-01

    In esthetic surgery, understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction is important for successful practice. We hypothesize that the factors that influence patient satisfaction include not only aesthetic and functional outcomes, but also personal factors such as the level of familiarity with factors affecting wound healing and expectations regarding aesthetic outcome. One hundred patients who underwent esthetic closure after thyroidectomy were included in this study. In order to evaluate the individual characteristics of the patients, a preoperative survey was administered to the patients. We estimated the patient satisfaction six months postoperatively and assessed the aesthetic and functional outcomes using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. According to the results of correlation analysis, level of familiarity with wound healing factors had a positive correlation with satisfaction. High expectations, pain, itching, and high observer scale score had negative correlations with satisfaction. The factors that were correlated with satisfaction were included in the multiple regression analysis. Level of familiarity with wound healing factors was found to have a positive relationship with satisfaction, while itching and observer scale were found to have a negative relationship with satisfaction. After excluding 10 patients who had hypertrophic scars, only level of familiarity with wound healing factors and expectations affected satisfaction. The level of familiarity with factors affecting wound healing and expectations were found to independently affect satisfaction. Improving patients' level of familiarity with wound healing factors and reducing their expectations by providing suitable preoperative education has the potential to improve patient satisfaction.

  3. Personal Factors that Affect the Satisfaction of Female Patients Undergoing Esthetic Suture after Typical Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Young; Kim, Jung Won; Park, Jin Hyung; Kim, Jung Hun

    2013-01-01

    Background In esthetic surgery, understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction is important for successful practice. We hypothesize that the factors that influence patient satisfaction include not only aesthetic and functional outcomes, but also personal factors such as the level of familiarity with factors affecting wound healing and expectations regarding aesthetic outcome. Methods One hundred patients who underwent esthetic closure after thyroidectomy were included in this study. In order to evaluate the individual characteristics of the patients, a preoperative survey was administered to the patients. We estimated the patient satisfaction six months postoperatively and assessed the aesthetic and functional outcomes using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Results According to the results of correlation analysis, level of familiarity with wound healing factors had a positive correlation with satisfaction. High expectations, pain, itching, and high observer scale score had negative correlations with satisfaction. The factors that were correlated with satisfaction were included in the multiple regression analysis. Level of familiarity with wound healing factors was found to have a positive relationship with satisfaction, while itching and observer scale were found to have a negative relationship with satisfaction. After excluding 10 patients who had hypertrophic scars, only level of familiarity with wound healing factors and expectations affected satisfaction. Conclusions The level of familiarity with factors affecting wound healing and expectations were found to independently affect satisfaction. Improving patients' level of familiarity with wound healing factors and reducing their expectations by providing suitable preoperative education has the potential to improve patient satisfaction. PMID:23898441

  4. [The concentration of growth factors in patients with inherent and acquired shortenings of limbs bones].

    PubMed

    Strogov, M V; Luneva, S N; Novikov, K I

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with the results of study of level of growth factors in blood serum of patients with inherent and post-traumatic shortenings of limbs' bones. The detection in blood serum the level of epidermal growth factor insulin-like growth factor I and angiopoetins is proposed to monitor in given patients the reparative bone formation.

  5. Factors Affecting Compliance to Intravitreal Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Therapy in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Polat, Onur; İnan, Sibel; Özcan, Serkan; Doğan, Mustafa; Küsbeci, Tuncay; Yavaş, Güliz Fatma; İnan, Ümit Übeyt

    2017-08-01

    To determine factors influencing compliance in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (n-AMD) undergoing intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy. The files of n-AMD patients recommended treatment with ranibizumab were reviewed retrospectively. The treatment regimen was 3 consecutive monthly injections followed by monthly follow-up with intravitreal injections as needed (pro re nata, PRN). Demographic and ocular characteristics were recorded. The patients were categorized into 2 groups: full compliance to treatment, or incomplete loading schedule and/or irregular maintenance treatment. All patients were interviewed by phone about factors affecting continuation of treatment. Mean age of the 314 patients (160 female, 154 male) included in the study was 71.6±9.1 years. A total of 246 patients (78.3%) could complete 3 consecutive injections at 1-month intervals after the start of treatment; 57 patients (18.2%) did not attend monthly follow-up during the 1-year follow-up period following the 3 consecutive monthly injections. Overall, 39.8% of the patients were not able to fully comply with the ranibizumab treatment by PRN regimen for 1 year. Better visual acuity at baseline, smaller lesion size, living closer to the hospital, higher education and sociocultural level, and better financial status were determined as factors affecting patient compliance. The most frequent reasons to discontinue treatment were fear of injection, disbelief in the benefit of the treatment, financial limitations, continuation of treatment at another center, and comorbid systemic diseases. Patient compliance and success rates of anti-VEGF therapy may be increased by determining the factors affecting patient compliance and raising awareness about n-AMD among patients and their relatives.

  6. Seasonal variations in urinary risk factors among patients with nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, K.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-four hour urine specimens from 5,677 stone-forming patients throughout the United States were analyzed for seasonal variations in urinary risk factors for nephrolithiasis. Determinations were performed for urine volume, pH, calcium, oxalate, phosphorus, sodium, magnesium, citrate, sulfate, uric acid, and the relative supersaturation (RS) of calcium oxalate, brushite, monosodium urate, and uric acid. Criteria for significant seasonal variation included a significant difference in monthly means of risk factors, seasonal grouping of the data by the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple range test, consistent year-to-year trends and a physiologically significant range. Minimum urine volume of 1.54 +/- 0.70 SD L/day occurred in October while a maximum urine volume of 1.76 +/- 0.78 SD L/day was observed during February. Minimum urine pH of 5.94 +/- 0.64 SD was observed during July and August while a maximum pH of 6.18 +/- 0.61 SD was observed during February. Daily urinary excretion of sodium was lowest during August, 158 +/- 74 SD mEq/day and highest during February 177 +/- 70 SD mEq/day. The RS of brushite and uric acid were found to display significant pH-dependent seasonal variation with a maximum RS of uric acid 2.26 +/- 1.98 SD in June and a low of 1.48 +/- 1.30 SD in February. Maximum RS of brushite 2.75 +/- 2.58 was observed during February. Minimum RS of brushite 1.93 +/- 1.70 SD was observed in June. Phosphorus excretion displayed seasonal variation about a spring-fall axis with a maximum value 1042 +/- 373 SD mg/day in April and a minimum value of 895 +/- 289 SD mg/day. Urine volume, sodium, and pH were significantly lower during the summer (June, July, August) than in the winter (December, January, February). The RS of uric acid was higher, but that of brushite and monosodium urate was lower in the summer than in the winter. The seasonal changes observed in urine volume, pH, sodium, and the RS of brushite and uric acid are consistent with summertime sweating

  7. Seasonal variations in urinary risk factors among patients with nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, K.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-four hour urine specimens from 5,677 stone-forming patients throughout the United States were analyzed for seasonal variations in urinary risk factors for nephrolithiasis. Determinations were performed for urine volume, pH, calcium, oxalate, phosphorus, sodium, magnesium, citrate, sulfate, uric acid, and the relative supersaturation (RS) of calcium oxalate, brushite, monosodium urate, and uric acid. Criteria for significant seasonal variation included a significant difference in monthly means of risk factors, seasonal grouping of the data by the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple range test, consistent year-to-year trends and a physiologically significant range. Minimum urine volume of 1.54 +/- 0.70 SD L/day occurred in October while a maximum urine volume of 1.76 +/- 0.78 SD L/day was observed during February. Minimum urine pH of 5.94 +/- 0.64 SD was observed during July and August while a maximum pH of 6.18 +/- 0.61 SD was observed during February. Daily urinary excretion of sodium was lowest during August, 158 +/- 74 SD mEq/day and highest during February 177 +/- 70 SD mEq/day. The RS of brushite and uric acid were found to display significant pH-dependent seasonal variation with a maximum RS of uric acid 2.26 +/- 1.98 SD in June and a low of 1.48 +/- 1.30 SD in February. Maximum RS of brushite 2.75 +/- 2.58 was observed during February. Minimum RS of brushite 1.93 +/- 1.70 SD was observed in June. Phosphorus excretion displayed seasonal variation about a spring-fall axis with a maximum value 1042 +/- 373 SD mg/day in April and a minimum value of 895 +/- 289 SD mg/day. Urine volume, sodium, and pH were significantly lower during the summer (June, July, August) than in the winter (December, January, February). The RS of uric acid was higher, but that of brushite and monosodium urate was lower in the summer than in the winter. The seasonal changes observed in urine volume, pH, sodium, and the RS of brushite and uric acid are consistent with summertime sweating

  8. Factor I Autoantibodies in Patients with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Disease-Associated or an Epiphenomenon?

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, David; Pappworth, Isabel Y.; Anderson, Holly; Hayes, Christine M.; Moore, Iain; Hunze, Eva-Maria; Bennaceur, Karim; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan; Strain, Lisa; Ward, Roy; Plant, Nick; Nailescu, Corina; Goodship, Timothy H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a disease associated with mutations in the genes encoding the complement regulators factors H and I. In addition, factor H autoantibodies have been reported in ∼10% of patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. This study searched for the presence of factor I autoantibodies in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study screened 175 atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome patients for factor I autoantibodies using ELISA with confirmatory Western blotting. Functional studies using purified immunoglobulin from one patient were subsequently undertaken. Results Factor I autoantibodies were detected in three patients. In one patient with a high titer of autoantibody, the titer was tracked over time and was found to have no association with disease activity. This study found evidence of an immune complex of antibody and factor I in this patient, but purified IgG, isolated from current serum samples, had only a minor effect on fluid phase and cell surface complement regulation. Genetic analysis of the three patients with factor I autoantibodies revealed that they had two copies of the genes encoding factor H–related proteins 1 and 3 and therefore, did not have a deletion commonly associated with factor H autoantibodies in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Two patients, however, had functionally significant mutations in complement factor H. Conclusions These findings reinforce the concept of multiple concurrent risk factors being associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome but question whether autoantibodies per se predispose to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:22223611

  9. Tooth wear: prevalence and associated factors in general practice patients

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Pashova, Hristina; Packard, J.D.; Zhou, Lingmei; Hilton, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of tooth wear and to investigate factors associated with tooth wear in patients from general practices in the Northwest United States. Methods Data on the diagnosis and treatment of oral diseases during the previous year were collected in a survey with a systematic random sample of patients (n = 1530) visiting general dentists from the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT) (n = 80). Prevalence ratios (PRs) of moderate to severe occlusal and incisal tooth wear by patient characteristics were estimated using cluster-adjusted multiple binomial regression for adults (18+ years) and children/adolescents (3–17 years). Results For adults, the mean number of teeth with wear facets was 5.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.6–6.2] and 51% of the adults had four or more teeth with wear. Participants 45–64 and 65+ years old were 1.3 (95% CI = 1.1–1.6) and 1.4 (95% CI = 1.1–1.8) times as likely to have 4+ teeth with moderate to severe wear facets as participants 18–44 years old. Adult males had a 20% (PR = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.1–1.4) higher prevalence of wear than adult females. Adults who were using, or had ever used occlusal splints had higher prevalence of tooth wear compared to those who never used such appliances (PR = 1.3; 95% CI = 1.0–1.5). Adults with any periodontal bone loss also had a 20% higher prevalence of wear than adults without periodontal disease (PR = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.0–1.4). For children/adolescents, the mean number of teeth with moderate to severe wear facets was 1.6 (95% CI = 0.9–2.6) and 31% of the children had one or more teeth with wear facets. The adjusted prevalence ratio of tooth wear (1+ teeth with wear facets) for boys was 1.6 times as high (95% CI = 1.1–2.4) as compared with girls. The prevalence of wear for children 12+ years old was 50% (PR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.3–0.8) lower than that of children <12 years old. Angle’s class II was associated

  10. Pediatric Coccidioidomycosis Patients: Perceptions, Quality of Life and Psychosocial Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gaab, Erin Mary; Naeem, Fouzia

    2015-01-01

    Research investigating the effects of coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) on children and the psychosocial implications of this disease in general is lacking. This study reviews what is known about pediatric coccidioidomycosis patients. It documents the psychological functioning, quality of life, and illness perceptions of a sample of coccidioidomycosis patient families. Primary caregivers of pediatric patients and patients from a major hospital in the San Joaquin Valley of California were interviewed regarding their perceptions of disease detection, access to care and the patient/family experience. PMID:27417796

  11. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  12. Patient and medication-related factors associated with hospital-acquired hyponatremia in patients hospitalized from heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saepudin, S; Ball, Patrick A; Morrissey, Hana

    2016-08-01

    Background Hyponatremia has been known as an important predictor of clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). While information on hyponatremia in patients with HF has been available abundantly, information on factors associated with increased risk of developing hospital-acquired hyponatremia (HAH) is still limited. Objective To identify patients and medication-related factors associated with HAH in patients hospitalized from HF. Setting Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods This is a nested case-control study with patients developing HAH served as case group and each patient in case group was matched by age and gender to three patients in control group. Patients included in this study are patients hospitalized from HF, and coded with I.50 according to ICD-10, during 2011-2013 at Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Information retrieved from patients' medical records included demographic profiles, vital signs and symptoms at admission, past medical history, medication during hospitalization and clinical chemistry laboratory records. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to find out patient and treatment-related factors associated with the development of HAH. Main outcome measures Patients and medication related factors having significant association with HAH. Results Four hundreds sixty-four patients were included in this study and 45 of them (9.7 %) met criteria of developing HAH so then, accordingly, 135 patients were selected as controls. 36 patient- and 22 treatment-related factors were analyzed in univariate logistic regression resulted in 20 factors having p value <0.2 and were included in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Final factors showing significant association with HAH are presence of ascites at admission (odds ratio = 4.7; 95 % confidence interval 1.9-11.5) and administration of amiodarone (3.2; 1.3-7.4) and heparin (3.1; 1.2-7.3) during hospital stay. Conclusion Presence of ascites at

  13. Monitoring Anticoagulation in Patients with an Unreliable PT/INR: Factor II versus Chromogenic Factor X Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kreuziger, Lisa M Baumann; Datta, Yvonne H; Johnson, Andrew D; Zantek, Nicole D; Shanley, Ryan; Reding, Mark T

    2015-01-01

    The International Normalized Ratio (INR) can be unreliable in patients with lupus anticoagulants (LAC) or other conditions affecting baseline testing. Alternative methods to assess anticoagulation on warfarin through measures of vitamin K dependent factor activity by clot based or chromogenic assays may be necessary. In this patient population, the ideal method is unknown. Methods Thirty-six patients stable on warfarin with LAC or unreliable INR testing had an INR, a prothrombin time based clotting assay for factor II (FII) activity, and a chromogenic assay for factor X (CFX) activity performed simultaneously. Results Eighty-nine sets of measurements were obtained of which 83 sets included all three assays. CFX and FII levels were well correlated (r=0.92) in all patients and in 26 patients with a documented antiphospholipid antibody (r=0.93). Parallel testing was seen in 99% of FII assays. Sixty one percent of CFX and 57% of FII were within the therapeutic range. In 32 CFX and FII pairs where assessment of anticoagulation was discordant, 16 CFX agreed with INR and 13 FII agreed with INR (McNemar’s, χ2=0.14, p=0.7). The number of times tests were discrepant was not statistically different between CFX and FII (p=0.36). Conclusions Chromogenic factor X and factor II activity are well correlated in patients that require alternative monitoring of warfarin. Either test can be used in this population. PMID:24681704

  14. Increased concentrations of tumour necrosis factor in "cachectic" patients with severe chronic heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, J; Abdullah, I; Dargie, H J; Shapiro, D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain whether patients with cardiac failure and reduced body weight ("cardiac cachexia") have increased circulating concentrations of tumour necrosis factor (cachectin). DESIGN--Patients with cardiac failure were prospectively identified as "cachectic" (body fat less than 27% in men and less than 29% in women measured by skinfold thickness callipers) or "non-cachectic". Tumour necrosis factor was assayed blind to patient group. SETTING--Cardiology unit in a tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--26 consecutive patients (10 women) (mean age 61) admitted for investigation or treatment of chronic heart failure. All were in New York Heart Association class III or IV. RESULTS--In nine of the 16 cachectic patients the concentration of tumour necrosis factor was increased (mean (SEM) 74 (20) pg/ml) compared with one of the 10 "non-cachectic" patients (22 pg/ml, p less than 0.001). Patients with a raised circulating concentration of tumour necrosis factor weighed significantly less (55.6 (3.5) kg) than those in whom the concentration of tumour necrosis factor was normal (69.0 (4.1) kg) (p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS--Circulating concentrations of tumour necrosis factor were increased in a significant proportion of patients with chronic heart failure and low body weight. Tumour necrosis factor stimulates catabolism experimentally and it may be a factor in the weight loss seen in patients with "cardiac cachexia". PMID:1747295

  15. Time to accelerate integration of human factors and ergonomics in patient safety.

    PubMed

    Gurses, Ayse P; Ozok, A Ant; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Progress toward improving patient safety has been slow despite engagement of the health care community in improvement efforts. A potential reason for this sluggish pace is the inadequate integration of human factors and ergonomics principles and methods in these efforts. Patient safety problems are complex and rarely caused by one factor or component of a work system. Thus, health care would benefit from human factors and ergonomics evaluations to systematically identify the problems, prioritize the right ones, and develop effective and practical solutions. This paper gives an overview of the discipline of human factors and ergonomics and describes its role in improving patient safety. We provide examples of how human factors and ergonomics principles and methods have improved both care processes and patient outcomes. We provide five major recommendations to better integrate human factors and ergonomics in patient safety improvement efforts: build capacity among health care workers to understand human factors and ergonomics, create market forces that demand the integration of human factors and ergonomics design principles into medical technologies, increase the number of human factors and ergonomic practitioners in health care organizations, expand investments in improvement efforts informed by human factors and ergonomics, and support interdisciplinary research to improve patient safety. In conclusion, human factors and ergonomics must play a more prominent role in health care if we want to increase the pace in improving patient safety.

  16. An exploration of factors promoting patient participation in primary care medical interviews.

    PubMed

    Cegala, Donald J

    2011-01-01

    Street's (2003) ecological model of communication in medical encounters was used to select and examine factors that potentially promote or retard patient participation. Patient participation was defined as information seeking and provision, assertive utterances, and emotional expressions. Patient participation discourse scores were used as the dependent variable in a multilevel regression analysis with 19 predictor variables representing cultural, organizational, and interpersonal factors of the ecological model. The analysis revealed eight significant predictors of patient participation. The results were discussed with respect to other research using the ecological model and their implications for continued study of factors that promote or retard patient participation.

  17. Predictive factors of restless leg syndrome in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Adel; Nasiriani, Khadijeh; Mirzaei, Samaneh; Azimpour Ardakani, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    The restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a neurologic disorder suffering the hemodialysis patients. Although the pathophysiology of this syndrome remains unknown yet, an investigation of the parameters pertinent to it may help to develop the related medical knowledge and to improve the therapeutic-care interventions in this regard. The correlation between the RLSs on individual, clinical, and laboratory indices in patients undergoing hemodialysis. This descriptive-analytic study was conducted on 104 hemodialysis patients. Diagnosis of RLS was made using the International RLS Standard Questionnaire. The data on individual, clinical, and laboratory indices were obtained from patients' recorded files and interviews. Based on our findings, 28.8% of the patients undergoing hemodialysis were affected with mild RLS, 41.7% with moderate RLS, and 29.5% with severe RLS. There was a statistically significant correlation between affliction with RLS on the one hand, and age and gender, on the other (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between RLS and education level, occupation, length of hemodialysis, fasting blood sugar (FBS), hepatitis B and C, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), iron, hemoglobin (Hb) level and also KT/Vor URR (P < 0.05). Regarding the high prevalence of RLS among the hemodialysis patients, there is the necessity for taking more care of these patients to reduce the somatic complications of the RLS especially among the elderly and female patients and to control the blood sugar of these patients at the normal level.

  18. A Geriatric Patient: Age Is Not a Factor

    PubMed Central

    Klodnitskaya, Lisa; Harutunian, Michele M.; Mareque Buenos, Santiago; Estafan, Denise; Wolff, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. A patient presented to the dental office expressing dissatisfaction with the appearance of his teeth, and as a result, of his smile. Our objective was to satisfy his initial chief complaint: “I don't like how my teeth look when I smile.” Methodology. Upon completing all initial exams and consultations, an esthetic dental treatment plan was formulated and agreed upon by both the practitioners and the patient. Results. The patient received periodontal treatment first to create esthetic gingival margins. Anterior ceramic crowns followed. Conclusion. The results surpassed all patient's expectations. PMID:21754930

  19. Patient factors that influence clinicians' decision making in self-management support: A clinical vignette study.

    PubMed

    Bos-Touwen, Irene D; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; van der Wulp, Ineke; Schuurmans, Marieke J; de Wit, Niek J

    2017-01-01

    Self-management support is an integral part of current chronic care guidelines. The success of self-management interventions varies between individual patients, suggesting a need for tailored self-management support. Understanding the role of patient factors in the current decision making of health professionals can support future tailoring of self-management interventions. The aim of this study is to identify the relative importance of patient factors in health professionals' decision making regarding self-management support. A factorial survey was presented to primary care physicians and nurses. The survey consisted of clinical vignettes (case descriptions), in which 11 patient factors were systematically varied. Each care provider received a set of 12 vignettes. For each vignette, they decided whether they would give this patient self-management support and whether they expected this support to be successful. The associations between respondent decisions and patient factors were explored using ordered logit regression. The survey was completed by 60 general practitioners and 80 nurses. Self-management support was unlikely to be provided in a third of the vignettes. The most important patient factor in the decision to provide self-management support as well as in the expectation that self-management support would be successful was motivation, followed by patient-provider relationship and illness perception. Other factors, such as depression or anxiety, education level, self-efficacy and social support, had a small impact on decisions. Disease, disease severity, knowledge of disease, and age were relatively unimportant factors. This is the first study to explore the relative importance of patient factors in decision making and the expectations regarding the provision of self-management support to chronic disease patients. By far, the most important factor considered was patient's motivation; unmotivated patients were less likely to receive self-management support

  20. Pattern of factor VIII inhibitors in patients with hemophilia A in the north east of Iran.

    PubMed

    Modaresi, A R; Torghabeh, H Mansouri; Pourfathollah, A A; Shooshtari, M Mahmoodian; Yazdi, Z Rezaie

    2006-06-01

    This survey was conducted to evaluate coagulation factor VIII:C inhibitors among 102 hemophilia A patients from different cities of Khorasan province in north east of Iran in order to identify and characterize the pattern of inhibitor formation in these patients population. For this purpose, we randomly obtained plasma samples of 102 hemophilia A patients (44 patients with severe, 28 patients with intermediate and 30 patients with mild hemophilia A) and studied them using two tests: the APTT mix and Bethesda test were performed. In the whole group 20 patients (19.6%) factor VIII inhibitors were detected. These were in 11 patients with severe, five patients with intermediate and four patients with mild hemophilia A. None of patients with hemophilia A had previously been studied for the presence of an inhibitor, so there was no existing history of inhibitor evaluation.

  1. Risk factors for developing mineral bone disease in phenylketonuric patients.

    PubMed

    Mirás, Alicia; Bóveda, M Dolores; Leis, María R; Mera, Antonio; Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luís; Fernández-Lorenzo, José R; Fraga, José M; Couce, María L

    2013-03-01

    There is a compromised bone mass in phenylketonuria patients compared with normal population, but the mechanisms responsible are still a matter of investigation. In addition, tetrahydrobiopterin therapy is a new option for a significant proportion of these patients and the prevalence of mineral bone disease (MBD) in these patients is unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study including 43 phenylketonuric patients. Bone densitometry, nutritional assessment, physical activity questionnaire, biochemical parameters, and molecular study were performed in all patients. Patients were stratified by phenotype, age and type of treatment. The MBD prevalence in phenylketonuria was 14%. Osteopenic and osteoporotic (n=6 patients) had an average daily natural protein intake significantly lower than the remaining (n=37) patients with PKU (14.33 ± 8.95 g vs 21.25 ± 20.85 g). Besides, a lower body mass index was found. There were no statistical differences in physical activity level, calcium, phosphorus and fat intake, and in phenylalanine, vitamin D, paratohormone, docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid blood levels. Mutational spectrum was found in up to 30 different PAH genotypes and no relationship was established among genotype and development of MBD. None of the twelve phenylketonuric patients treated with tetrahydrobiopterin (27.9%), for an average of 7.1 years, developed MBD. Natural protein intake and blood levels of eicosapentaenoic acid were significantly higher while calcium intake was lower in these patients. This study shows that the decrease in natural protein intake can play an important role in MBD development in phenylketonuric patients. Therapy with tetrahydrobiopterin allows a more relaxed protein diet, which is associated with better bone mass.

  2. Metabolic syndrome: prevalence and risk factors in Korean gout patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Hyun; Song, Gwan Gyu; Ji, Jong Dae; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Young Ho; Choi, Sung Jae

    2016-10-12

    We performed this study to investigate associations between metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and gout. We reviewed the medical records of 151 patients with gout at the Department of Rheumatology in Korea University Ansan Hospital. The following measures were examined: waist circumference, blood pressure, alcohol consumption, and levels of triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting serum glucose, serum uric acid (SUA), creatinine, insulin, and C-peptide. We assessed metabolic syndrome by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index and renal function by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation; patients were classified according to World Health Organization Asia-Pacific obesity criteria. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in gout patients (50.8%) was higher than in non-gout patients. The mean SUA level was significantly higher in gout patients with metabolic syndrome (9.13 ± 3.15 mg/dL) than in gout patients without metabolic syndrome (8.14 ± 2.07 mg/dL). The mean SUA level was also significantly higher in patients with gout and CKD (9.55 ± 2.86 mg/dL) than in patients with gout but no CKD (7.74 ± 2.27 mg/dL). In gout patients, HOMA-IR was positively correlated with waist circumference (r = 0.409, p = 0.001). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with gout was 50.8%, which is higher than the prevalence in the general Korean population. Hyperuricemia in gout patients was correlated with metabolic syndrome and CKD. Insulin resistance may provide clues to better understand the relationship between metabolic syndrome, CKD, and gout.

  3. Studying the Relationship between Individual and Organizational Factors and Nurses' Perception of Patient Safety Culture.

    PubMed

    Abdolahzadeh, Farahnaz; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Boroumand, Aniroda

    2012-12-01

    Safety culture is considered as an important factor in improving patient safety. Therefore, identifying individual and organizational factors affecting safety culture is crucial. This study was carried out to determine individual and organizational factors associated with nurses' perception of patient safety culture. The present descriptive study included 940 nurses working in four training hospitals affiliated with Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran). Data was collected through the self-report questionnaire of patient safety culture. Descriptive (number, percent, mean, and standard deviation) and inferential (t-test and analysis of variance) statistics were used to analyze the data in SPSS. Nurses' perception of patient safety culture was significantly correlated with marital status, workplace, and overtime hours. The results of this study revealed that some individual and organizational factors can impact on nurses' perception of patient safety culture. Nursing authorities should thus pay more attention to factors which promote patient safety culture and ultimately the safety of provided services.

  4. Peripartum anesthetic management of patients with Factor XI deficiency.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Alon; Orbach-Zinger, Sharon; Eidelman, Leonid A; Ginosar, Yehuda; Ioscovich, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Factor XI deficiency is predominantly found in the Ashkenazi Jewish population with a prevalence of 9%, but also seen in other ethnicities. Little information is available on obstetric anesthesia management in women with Factor XI deficiency. Therefore, we undertook a study to evaluate obstetric, anesthetic and perinatal outcomes in parturients with Factor XI deficiency. A retrospective study was conducted with chart reviews from 1996 to 2011 resulted in 74 women with Factor XI level deficiency. We compared anesthetic and obstetric management in parturients with low (≤30%) level of Factor XI to those with higher levels. Ninety-one pregnancy outcomes were reviewed in these 74 women with Factor XI deficiency. Forty-three women had levels ≤30% in 46 labors while 31 women had levels >30% in 45 labors. Women with low levels of Factor XI were significantly more likely to receive FFP and less likely to receive neuroaxial anesthesia. There were no anesthetic complications and no difference in mode of delivery or neonatal outcomes. This study is the first step in building a national database for anesthetic cases and outcomes of parturients with Factor XI deficiency. Further efforts must be made to provide safe analgesia for these women.

  5. Prolonged bradycardia, asystole and outcome of high spinal cord injury patients: Risk factors and management

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nissar; Rhaman, M. A.; Raza, Ali; Shabana, Adel; Malstrom, Mahommad Faisal; Al-Sulaiti, Ghanem

    2016-01-01

    Background: High spinal cord injury (HSCI) is one of the devastating traumatic injuries. 80% of these patients are young male, and 93% will have major neurological disabilities. There is a paucity of literature about prolonged bradycardia in HSCI patients. The aim of this study was to know the prevalence, risk factors, precipitating factors for prolonged bradycardia in the HSCI patients. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary hospital, with spinal cord injury above level of dorsal (D4) were enrolled in this study prospectively. Patient's demographic data, mechanism, level and type of spinal injury, associated injuries, injury severity score (ISS), spinal shock, vasopressors used, time of occurrence of bradycardia, treatment for bradycardia, precipitating as well as risk factors and outcome were recorded. Results: During the study period, a total of 138 patients were admitted to the ICU with HSCI. Majority of patients were male. The most frequently associated injury in these patients was skeletal fractures (38.4%). Most common complication was pneumonia 56 (41%). Forty-five (33%) of the total patients had prolonged bradycardia; 87% of these patients had pneumonia when bradycardia occurred. 53.4% had cardiac asystole. 29 (21%) patients had bradycardia at the time of endotracheal suctioning, whereas 27 (20%) patients developed bradycardia at the time of positioning. Majority of the patients were managed conservatively. Those HSCI patients who developed prolonged bradycardia, their ISS score was statistically higher, ICU and hospital stay was significantly higher compared with those HSCI patient who did not have prolonged bradycardia. Multivariate analysis revealed that hypotension on admission; pneumonia, and tracheostomy were risk factors for the development of prolonged bradycardia in HSCI patients. Conclusion: Prolonged bradycardia was associated with significantly higher incidence of asystole

  6. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Perceptions of Factors Impacting Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Susan P; Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Shirey, Maria R

    Certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) provide more than 40 million anesthetics each year in the United States. This article describes a study that investigates relationships among CRNA organizational structures (CRNA practice models, work setting, workload, level of education, work experience), CRNA ratings of patient safety culture, and CRNA adverse anesthesia-related event (ARE) reporting. This is a cross-sectional survey study of 336 CRNAs randomly selected from American Association of Nurse Anesthetists database. Workload was measured using NASA Task-Load Index and the Revised Individual Workload Perception Scale. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Overall Perceptions of Safety Scale and Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Patient Safety Grade Scale were utilized to measure safety culture. Dependent variables (ARE) included difficult intubation/extubation, inadequate ventilation/oxygenation, and pulmonary aspiration. The Revised Individual Workload Perception Scale workload was significantly associated with ARE. Years' experience and Patient Safety Grade Scale were inversely associated with ARE. Overall Perceptions of Safety Scale was significantly and inversely associated with ARE. Practice model, education, and work setting were not associated with ARE. Based on findings, CRNA workload, years' experience, and patient safety culture may be important markers for ARE. Administrative interventions designed to upgrade patient safety culture and ensure manageable CRNA workload may foster quality patient care.

  7. Factors influencing skin autofluorescence of patients with peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Mácsai, Emília; Benke, A; Cseh, A; Vásárhelyi, B

    2012-06-01

    Skin autofluorescence (SAF) measurement is a simple, noninvasive method to assess tissue advanced glycation end products (AGE). In patients with end-stage renal disease and in those on hemodialysis AGE production is increased. Less is known about those treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). In this study we tested if SAF is influenced by clinical and treatment characteristics in PD patients.This cross-sectional study included 198 PD patients (of those, 128 were on traditional glucose-based solutions and 70 patients were partially switched to icodextrin-based PD). SAF measurements were done with a specific AGE Reader device. The impact of patients' age, gender, current diabetes, duration of PD, cumulative glucose exposure, body mass index, smoking habits and use of icodextrin on SAF values were tested with multiple regression analysis.Our analysis revealed that patients' age, current diabetes and icodextrin use significantly increase patients' SAF values (p = 0.015, 0.012, 0.005, respectively). AGE exposure of PD patients with diabetes and on icodextrin solution is increased. Further investigation is required whether this finding is due to the icodextrin itself or for a still unspecified clinical characteristic of PD population treated with icodextrin.

  8. Affection for Patients as a Factor in Therapists' Outcome Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paul J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Explores the possibility of separating psychotherapists' judgments of treatment outcome from their affective reactions to their patients. If therapists' judgments of symptom remission cannot be utilized independently of their affection for their patients, this would present reason to doubt the utility of such judgments despite their current…

  9. Risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Matzkin, Valeria; Slobodianik, Nora; Pallaro, Anabel; Bello, Mabel; Geissler, Catherine

    2007-09-01

    hypercholesterolemia, hypercortisolemia and low levels of essential fatty acids, oestrogens and antioxidant vitamins are more prevalent in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) than in the general population. This study aims (1) to compare cardiovascular risk parameters in-patients with AN and controls, and (2) to compare the parameters in-patients on admission and at four month follow up. Blood samples and anthropometry were taken from patients with AN on admission (N=30) and matched controls (N=30). Twenty one patients were re-tested after four months of treatment. Total cholesterol, LDL, Apo B and fibrinogen concentrations were elevated in patients on admission compared with controls, while retinol and tocopherol were decreased. Low levels of T3, T4 and estradiol were correlated with increased cholesterol values. After treatment there was a tendency for most of the abnormal markers to normalise. However, HDL levels decreased leaving patients with an undesirable lipid profile. Cardiovascular disease is not commonly a problem in these patients, however, with age, and without treatment, the cardiovascular risk may increase.

  10. Intercultural comparison of patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care in Australia and Korea: an exploratory factor analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hush, Julia M; Lee, Haejung; Yung, Vivian; Adams, Roger; Mackey, Martin; Wand, Benedict M; Nelson, Roger; Beattie, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to conduct a cross-cultural comparison of the factors that influence patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physiotherapy care in Australia and Korea. Methods: Prospective studies were conducted in Australia and Korea. Patient satisfaction data were collected using the MedRisk Instrument for Measuring Patient Satisfaction with Physical Therapy Care (MRPS) from a total of 1666 patients who were attending clinics for physiotherapy treatment of a musculoskeletal condition. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify factors determining patient satisfaction in each cohort. Results: A four-factor solution for the MRPS was found for the Australian and Korean data sets, explaining 61 and 55% of the variance respectively. Communication and respect, convenience and quality time and person-focused care were factors common to both countries. One factor unique to Korea was courtesy and propriety. For both cultures, global patient satisfaction was significantly but weakly correlated with the outcome of treatment. Conclusions: The interpersonal aspect of care, namely effective communication and respect from the therapist, appears to be the predominant and universal factor that influences patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care, although other culturally specific factors were identified. Physiotherapists can maximize patient satisfaction with care by addressing those features that uniquely contribute to patient satisfaction in the cultural context in which they are working. PMID:24421620

  11. Intercultural comparison of patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care in Australia and Korea: an exploratory factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Hush, Julia M; Lee, Haejung; Yung, Vivian; Adams, Roger; Mackey, Martin; Wand, Benedict M; Nelson, Roger; Beattie, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a cross-cultural comparison of the factors that influence patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physiotherapy care in Australia and Korea. Prospective studies were conducted in Australia and Korea. Patient satisfaction data were collected using the MedRisk Instrument for Measuring Patient Satisfaction with Physical Therapy Care (MRPS) from a total of 1666 patients who were attending clinics for physiotherapy treatment of a musculoskeletal condition. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify factors determining patient satisfaction in each cohort. A four-factor solution for the MRPS was found for the Australian and Korean data sets, explaining 61 and 55% of the variance respectively. Communication and respect, convenience and quality time and person-focused care were factors common to both countries. One factor unique to Korea was courtesy and propriety. For both cultures, global patient satisfaction was significantly but weakly correlated with the outcome of treatment. The interpersonal aspect of care, namely effective communication and respect from the therapist, appears to be the predominant and universal factor that influences patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care, although other culturally specific factors were identified. Physiotherapists can maximize patient satisfaction with care by addressing those features that uniquely contribute to patient satisfaction in the cultural context in which they are working.

  12. Activation of clotting factors XI and IX in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Peters, R J; de Winter, R; Lubbers, Y P; Barzegar, S; Bauer, K A; Rosenberg, R D; Hack, C E; ten Cate, H

    2000-11-01

    In acute coronary events, plaque rupture and the subsequent formation of the catalytic tissue factor-factor VIIa complex is considered to initiate coagulation. It is unknown whether clotting factors XI and IX are activated in acute coronary events. Therefore, we prospectively investigated the activation of clotting factors XI and IX as well as activation of the contact system and the common pathway in 50 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in 50 patients with unstable angina pectoris (UAP), and in 50 patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP). Factor XIa-C1 inhibitor complexes, which reflect acute activation of factor XI, were detected in 24% of the patients with AMI, 8% of the patients with UAP, and 4% of the patients with SAP (P<0.05), whereas factor XIa-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complexes, which reflect chronic activation, were observed equally in all 3 study groups. Factor IX peptide levels were significantly higher in the patients with AMI and UAP compared with the patients with SAP (P<0.01). No differences regarding markers of the common pathway were demonstrated. Fibrinopeptide A levels were elevated in patients with AMI compared with patients with UAP and those with SAP (P<0.01). Factor XIIa- or kallikrein-C1 inhibitor complexes were not increased. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration of the activation of clotting factors XI and IX in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Because these clotting factors are considered to be important for continuous thrombin generation and clot stability, their activation might have clinical and therapeutic consequences.

  13. A Systematic Review of the Factors that Patients Use to Choose their Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Yahanda, Alexander T; Lafaro, Kelly J; Spolverato, Gaya; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-01-01

    Given surgery's inherent risks, a patient should be able to make the most informed decisions possible in selecting surgical treatment. However, there is little information on what factors patients deem important when choosing a surgeon. We performed a systematic review of the literature focused on how patients select surgical care, focusing on identification of factors that influence patient choice as well as important sources of information used by patients. A search of all available literature on factors associated with choice of surgeon/surgical care, as well as sources of information used by patients before undergoing surgery, was conducted using the MEDLINE/PubMed electronic database. Of the 2315 publications identified, 86 studies met inclusion criteria. Overall, patients draw upon a wide range of factors when choosing surgical care. Surgeon reputation and competency stood out as the most valued professional attributes. Patients also often selected surgeons based on their interpersonal skills. Many patients chose surgical care using hospital, rather than surgeon, characteristics. For these patients, hospital reputation and hospital distance were factors of primary importance. Importantly, most patients relied on word-of-mouth and physician referrals when choosing a surgeon. Patients also expressed interest in quality information on surgeons, indicating that these data would be useful in decision-making. Patients draw upon a myriad of factors when choosing a surgeon and the circumstances surrounding patients' decisions maybe differ based on sociodemographic, cultural, as well as other factors. Additional information on how patients choose surgeons or hospitals will help providers assist patients in finding their preferred caregivers.

  14. Predictive Factors of Rapid Cognitive Decline in Patients with Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Barbe, Coralie; Morrone, Isabella; Novella, J L; Dramé, Moustapha; Wolak-Thierry, Aurore; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Ankri, Joël; Jolly, Damien; Mahmoudi, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    To determine predictive factors associated with rapid cognitive decline (RCD) in elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients suffering from mild to moderate AD were included. RCD was defined as the loss of at least 3 points on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) over 12 months. Factors associated with RCD were identified by logistic regression. Among 123 patients included, 61 were followed up until 12 months. RCD occurred in 46% of patients (n = 28). Polymedication (p < 0.0001), the fact that the caregiver was the child or spouse of the patient (p < 0.0001) and autonomy for washing (p < 0.0001) were protective factors against RCD, while the presence of caregiver burden (p < 0.0001) was shown to be a risk factor for RCD. Early detection of the RCD risk in AD patients could make it possible to anticipate the patient's medical needs and adjust the care plan for caregiver burden.

  15. Genotype and phenotype report on patients with combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII in Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mehran; Cairo, Andrea; Safarpour, Mohammad M; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Ekramzadeh, Maryam; Afrasiabi, Abdolreza; Shahriari, Mahdi; Menegatti, Marzia

    2014-06-01

    Combined factor V (FV) and factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by mild-to-moderate bleeding. Epistaxis, postsurgical bleeding and menorrhagia are the most common symptoms. The aim of this study is to report the phenotype-genotype characterization carried out in patients affected with combined FV and FVIII deficiency from Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Shiraz Hemophilia Center, southern Iran. Twelve cases, seven men and five women coming from eight families were included in our study after taking consent form. Coagulation activity for all patients was measured. All exons and intron-exon junctions of lectin mannose binding protein 1 (LMAN1) gene and multiple coagulation factor deficiency 2 genes were amplified by PCR, and subsequently sequenced by the Sanger method. Patients[Combining Acute Accent] age ranged from 6 to 59 years mean ± SD: 23.8 ± 15.4 years and median: 22 years. No patient presented with severe bleeding symptom. Only one patient had severe FV and FVIII deficiency (both factor levels <1%). Four different type of mutations (duplication, insertion, splice site and nonsense), occurring in different locuses, were identified on LMAN1 gene in 12 Iranian patients. There was a significant correlation between FV and FVIII levels, which is indicative of association with loss of function of LMAN1 gene, and reduced plasma levels of both factors. Our study showed that all of our characterized patients with combined FV and FVIII deficiency present different homozygous mutations on LMAN1 gene introducing a premature stop codon. Larger studies are needed to calculate the correlation between factor levels, genetic and bleeding symptoms.

  16. Patients with pelvic fracture: what factors are associated with mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Hsin K.; Tay, Seow Y.; Phua, Dong H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pelvic fracture is one of the major injuries that lead to death in patients who sustain high-impact injuries such as road traffic accidents and falls from height. Aims This study aims to look at the epidemiology and the significant predictors of mortality in victims with pelvic fracture presenting to the emergency department (ED) of an urban Asian city. Methods This was a retrospective data analysis of all trauma patients with pelvic fracture who were treated at the ED of an urban adult hospital in Singapore from April 2001 to December 2004. Student’s t-test and χ2 test were used in statistical analysis where appropriate. Results The study included 179 consecutive patients. Sixty-four percent of patients were males, and 71% of patients were in the 20–49-year-old age group. Road traffic accidents and falls from height were the two most common mechanisms of injury. Mortality rate was 37%. Pelvic fracture severity, shock and coma at presentation, and the presence of concurrent head and chest injuries were associated with increased mortality. Gender, other mechanisms of injury and other concomitant injuries were not associated with increased mortality. Conclusions The mortality rate of trauma patients with pelvic fracture continues to be high. In such patients, predictors of mortality are the severity of the pelvic fracture, the presence of coma, shock, and head and chest injuries. PMID:21373296

  17. Factors affecting patient outcome in primary cutaneous aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatara, Alexander M.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary cutaneous aspergillosis (PCA) is an uncommon infection of the skin. There is a paucity of organized literature regarding this entity in regard to patient characteristics, associated Aspergillus species, and treatment modalities on outcome (disease recurrence, disease dissemination, and mortality). We reviewed all published reports of PCA from 1967 to 2015. Cases were deemed eligible if they included the following: patient baseline characteristics (age, sex, underlying condition), evidence of proven or probable PCA, primary treatment strategy, and outcome. We identified 130 eligible cases reported from 1967 to 2015. The patients were predominantly male (63.8%) with a mean age of 30.4 ± 22.1 years. Rates of PCA recurrence, dissemination, and mortality were 10.8%, 18.5%, and 31.5%, respectively. In half of the cases, there was an association with a foreign body. Seven different Aspergillus species were reported to cause PCA. Systemic antifungal therapy without surgery was the most common form of therapy (60% of cases). Disease dissemination was more common in patients with underlying systemic conditions and occurred on average 41.4 days after PCA diagnosis (range of 3–120 days). In a multivariate linear regression model of mortality including only patients with immunosuppressive conditions, dissemination and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome were statistically significantly associated with increased mortality. Nearly one-third of patients with PCA die with the disease. Dissemination and host status are critical in patient outcome. PMID:27367980

  18. The factors contributing to death anxiety in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Gokcen; Kaymak, Semra Ulusoy; Cankurtaran, Eylem Sahin; Karslioglu, Ersin Hatice; Ozalp, Elvan; Soygur, Haldun

    2012-01-01

    Suffering comes in many ways for patients confronting cancer. One of these is an unspecifiable fear about death, which is an existential issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between death anxiety and its correlates in cancer patients. Seventy cancer patients were assessed using SCID-I, Templer's Death Anxiety Scale, the Hospital Anxiety (A) and Depression (D) Scale, the Distress Thermometer, the Visual Analogue Scale for pain (VAS), the Global Assessment of Functioning, and Glock and Stark's Dimensions of Religious Commitment scales, and these assessments were compared between cancer patients with and without death anxiety. Multiple regression analysis was conducted after correlation analysis between death anxiety and sociodemographic and clinical variables. Axis I psychiatric diagnosis, pain scores, and negative believes about what will happen after death were found to be higher in patients having death anxiety than patients not having death anxiety. Also life expectancy was perceived as shortened in patients with death anxiety. Death anxiety was associated with anxiety, depressive symptoms, and beliefs about what will happen after death. In conclusion, death anxiety could not be regarded as a natural consequence of having cancer; it is associated with the unresolved psychological and physical distress.

  19. Predictive factors of restless leg syndrome in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Adel; Nasiriani, Khadijeh; Mirzaei, Samaneh; Azimpour Ardakani, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a neurologic disorder suffering the hemodialysis patients. Although the pathophysiology of this syndrome remains unknown yet, an investigation of the parameters pertinent to it may help to develop the related medical knowledge and to improve the therapeutic-care interventions in this regard. Objectives: The correlation between the RLSs on individual, clinical, and laboratory indices in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Patients and Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was conducted on 104 hemodialysis patients. Diagnosis of RLS was made using the International RLS Standard Questionnaire. The data on individual, clinical, and laboratory indices were obtained from patients’ recorded files and interviews. Results: Based on our findings, 28.8% of the patients undergoing hemodialysis were affected with mild RLS, 41.7% with moderate RLS, and 29.5% with severe RLS. There was a statistically significant correlation between affliction with RLS on the one hand, and age and gender, on the other (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between RLS and education level, occupation, length of hemodialysis, fasting blood sugar (FBS), hepatitis B and C, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), iron, hemoglobin (Hb) level and also KT/Vor URR (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Regarding the high prevalence of RLS among the hemodialysis patients, there is the necessity for taking more care of these patients to reduce the somatic complications of the RLS especially among the elderly and female patients and to control the blood sugar of these patients at the normal level. PMID:27471741

  20. Psychological Factors in 155 Patients with Functional Uterine Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, W. A.

    1965-01-01

    One hundred and fifty-five women with functional uterine bleeding were studied to evaluate the importance of concomitant psychological disorders. Psychological illnesses were diagnosed in 128 patients (82.6%), most of which arose from problems directly related to sexual or reproductive functions. The remaining 27 patients (17.4%) were different in that they were psychologically stable and all but two were at puberty or approaching the menopause. Histological studies of endometrial samples from 135 of these patients indicated little evidence of abnormal sex hormone activity; 77 (57%) showed normal secretory phase endometrium and 32 (23.7%), proliferative phase endometrium. The remaining 26 (19.2%) showed evidence of some endocrine dysfunction, 15 such specimens being obtained from psychologically stable patients. It is probable that psychological disturbances are the principal cause of functional uterine bleeding during the prime reproductive years. The psychological component of the illness is the most important and determines the ultimate prognosis. PMID:14261152

  1. Severe bacterial infections in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: prevalence and clinical risk factors.

    PubMed

    Teawtrakul, Nattiya; Jetsrisuparb, Arunee; Sirijerachai, Chittima; Chansung, Kanchana; Wanitpongpun, Chinadol

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial infection is one of the major causes of death in patients with thalassemia. Clinical predictive factors for severe bacterial infection were evaluated in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT). A retrospective study was conducted of patients with NTDT aged ≥ 10 years at Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University, Thailand. Clinical characteristics and potential clinical risk factors for bacterial infection were collected. Risk factors for bacterial infection were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression analysis. A severe bacterial infection was found in 11 of the total 211 patients with NTDT (5.2%). None of the clinical factors assessed was shown to be statistically associated with severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. However, three factors were demonstrated to be potential predictive factors for severe bacterial infection: time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and serum ferritin >1000 ng/ml. None of the patients died from infection. The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients with NTDT was found to be moderate. Time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and iron overload may be clinical risk factors for severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. Bacterial infection should be recognized in splenectomized patients with NTDT, particularly those who have an iron overload. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient and carer identified factors which contribute to safety incidents in primary care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hernan, Andrea L; Giles, Sally J; Fuller, Jeffrey; Johnson, Julie K; Walker, Christine; Dunbar, James A

    2015-09-01

    Patients can have an important role in reducing harm in primary-care settings. Learning from patient experience and feedback could improve patient safety. Evidence that captures patients' views of the various contributory factors to creating safe primary care is largely absent. The aim of this study was to address this evidence gap. Four focus groups and eight semistructured interviews were conducted with 34 patients and carers from south-east Australia. Participants were asked to describe their experiences of primary care. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and specific factors that contribute to safety incidents were identified in the analysis using the Yorkshire Contributory Factors Framework (YCFF). Other factors emerging from the data were also ascertained and added to the analytical framework. Thirteen factors that contribute to safety incidents in primary care were ascertained. Five unique factors for the primary-care setting were discovered in conjunction with eight factors present in the YCFF from hospital settings. The five unique primary care contributing factors to safety incidents represented a range of levels within the primary-care system from local working conditions to the upstream organisational level and the external policy context. The 13 factors included communication, access, patient factors, external policy context, dignity and respect, primary-secondary interface, continuity of care, task performance, task characteristics, time in the consultation, safety culture, team factors and the physical environment. Patient and carer feedback of this type could help primary-care professionals better understand and identify potential safety concerns and make appropriate service improvements. The comprehensive range of factors identified provides the groundwork for developing tools that systematically capture the multiple contributory factors to patient safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  3. Factors affecting patient compliance with compressive brace therapy for pectus carinatum.

    PubMed

    Kang, Du-Young; Jung, Junho; Chung, Sangho; Cho, Jinkyung; Lee, Sungsoo

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors affecting patient compliance with brace therapy for pectus carinatum. Eighty-six pectus carinatum patients who started brace therapy from August 2008 to November 2011 were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups: patients who wore the brace for ≥6 months (compliance group) or patients who wore the brace for <6 months (non-compliance group). Factors affecting patient compliance were assessed at the last day of follow-up with a multiple-choice questionnaire. The questionnaire comprised seven items: pain at compression site, skin problems on compression area, confidence in brace treatment, shame, discomfort, initial result of bracing treatment and total number of factors affecting patient compliance. Eighty-six patients completed the survey, including seven (8.1%) female patients and 79 (91.9%) male patients, with a mean age of 12.0 years at the time of treatment (range, 3-20 years). The initial result of the compression period (P <0.001) and total number of factors affecting patient compliance (P <0.05) were significant predictors of patient compliance. An initial successful result of the compression period may increase patient compliance during treatment for pectus carinatum. Additional efforts to decrease pain, skin problems, shame and discomfort, and to give confidence may be beneficial in increasing compliance with bracing treatment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient factors associated with increased acute care costs of hip fractures: a detailed analysis of 402 patients.

    PubMed

    Aigner, R; Meier Fedeler, T; Eschbach, D; Hack, J; Bliemel, C; Ruchholtz, S; Bücking, B

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify patient factors associated with higher costs in hip fracture patients. The mean costs of a prospectively observed sample of 402 patients were 8853 €. The ASA score, Charlson comorbidity index, and fracture location were associated with increased costs. Fractures of the proximal end of the femur (hip fractures) are of increasing incidence due to demographic changes. Relevant co-morbidities often present in these patients cause high complication rates and prolonged hospital stays, thus leading to high costs of acute care. The aim of this study was to perform a precise cost analysis of the actual hospital costs of hip fractures and to identify patient factors associated with increased costs. The basis of this analysis was a prospectively observed single-center trial, which included 402 patients with fractures of the proximal end of the femur. All potential cost factors were recorded as accurately as possible for each of the 402 patients individually, and statistical analysis was performed to identify associations between pre-existing patient factors and acute care costs. The mean total acute care costs per patient were 8853 ± 5676 € with ward costs (5828 ± 4294 €) and costs for surgical treatment (1972 ± 956 €) representing the major cost factors. The ASA score, Charlson comorbidity index, and fracture location were identified as influencing the costs of acute care for hip fracture treatment. Hip fractures are associated with high acute care costs. This study underlines the necessity of sophisticated risk-adjusted payment models based on specific patient factors. Economic aspects should be an integral part of future hip fracture research due to limited health care resources.

  5. Compliance, clinical outcome, and quality of life of patients with stable angina pectoris receiving once-daily betaxolol versus twice daily metoprolol: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kardas, Przemyslaw

    2007-01-01

    A randomized, controlled trial was conducted in an outpatient setting to examine the effect of beta-blocker dosing frequency on patient compliance, clinical outcome, and health-related quality of life in patients with stable angina pectoris. One hundred and twelve beta-blockers-naive outpatients with stable angina pectoris were randomized to receive betaxolol, 20 mg once daily or metoprolol tartrate, 50 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. The principal outcome measure was overall compliance measured electronically, whereas secondary outcome measures were drug effectiveness and health-related quality of life. The overall compliance was 86.5 +/- 21.3% in the betaxolol group versus 76.1 +/- 26.3% in the metoprolol group (p < 0.01), and the correct number of doses was taken on 84.4 +/- 21.6% and 64.0 +/- 31.7% of treatment days, respectively (p < 0.0001). The percentage of missed doses was 14.5 +/- 21.5% in the once-daily group and 24.8 +/- 26.4% in the twice-daily group (p < 0.01). The percentage of doses taken in the correct time window (58.6% vs 42.0%, p = 0.01), correct interdose intervals (77.4% v 53.1%, p < 0.0001), and therapeutic coverage (85.6% vs 73.7%, p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the once-daily group. Both studied drugs had similar antianginal effectiveness. Health-related quality of life improved in both groups, but this increase was more pronounced in the betaxolol arm in some dimensions. The study demonstrates that patient compliance with once-daily betaxolol is significantly better than with twice daily metoprolol. Similarly, this treatment provides better quality of life. These results demonstrate possible therapeutic advantages of once-daily over twice-daily beta-blockers in the treatment of stable angina pectoris.

  6. Hourly rounding and patient falls: what factors boost success?

    PubMed

    Goldsack, Jennifer; Bergey, Meredith; Mascioli, Susan; Cunningham, Janet

    2015-02-01

    Falls are a persistent problem in all healthcare settings, with rates in acute care hospitals ranging from 1.3 to 8.9 falls per 1,000 inpatient days, about 30% resulting in serious injury. A 30-day prospective pilot study was conducted on two units with pre- and postimplementation evaluation to determine the impact of patient-centered proactive hourly rounding on patient falls as part of a Lean Six Sigma process improvement project. Nurse leaders and a staff champion from Unit 1 were involved in the process from the start of the implementation period, while Unit 2 was introduced to the project for training shortly before the intervention began. On Unit 1, where staff and leadership were engaged in the project from the outset, the 1-year baseline mean fall rate was 3.9 falls/1,000 patient days. The pilot period fall rate of 1.3 falls/1,000 patient days was significantly lower than the baseline fall rate (P = 0.006). On Unit 2, where there was no run-in period, the 1-year baseline mean fall rate was 2.6 falls/1,000 patient days, which fell, but not significantly, to 2.5 falls/1,000 patient days during the pilot period (P = 0.799). Engaging an interdisciplinary team, including leadership and unit champions, to complete a Lean Six Sigma process improvement project and implement a patient-centered proactive hourly rounding program was associated with a significant reduction in the fall rate in Unit 1. Implementation of the same program in Unit 2 without engaging leadership or front-line staff in program design did not impact its fall rate. The active involvement of leadership and front-line staff in program design and as unit champions during the project run-in period was critical to significantly reducing inpatient fall rates and call bell use in an adult medical unit.

  7. Victimization of patients with severe psychiatric disorders: prevalence, risk factors, protective factors and consequences for mental health. A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Victimization among people with a Severe Mental Illness is a common phenomenon. The objectives of this study proposal are: to delineate the extent and kind of victimization in a representative sample of chronic psychiatric patients; to contribute to the development and validation of a set of instruments registering victimization of psychiatric patients; to determine risk factors and protective factors; and to gain insight into the possible consequences of victimization. Methods/Design An extensive data set of 323 patients with Sever Mental Illness (assessed 4 years ago) is used. In 2010 a second measurement will be performed, enabling longitudinal research on the predictors and consequences of victimization. Discussion The consequences of (re)victimization have barely been subjected to analysis, partially due to the lack of a comprehensive, conceptual model for victimization. This research project will contribute significantly to the scientific development of the conceptual model of victimization in chronic psychiatric patients. PMID:21067566

  8. Estimation of patient attenuation factor for iodine-131 based on direct dose rate measurements from radioiodine therapy patients.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Khaled; Alenezi, Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the actual dose at 1 m from the patients per unit activity with the aim of providing a more accurate prediction of the dose levels around radioiodine patients in the hospital, as well as to compare our results with the literature. In this work the demonstration of a patient body tissue attenuation factor is verified by comparing the dose rates measured from the patients with those measured from the unshielded radioiodine capsules immediately after administration of the radioactivity. The normalized dose rate per unit activity is therefore proposed as an operational quantity that can be used to predict exposure rates to staff and patients' relatives. The average dose rate measured from our patient per unit activity was 38.4±11.8 μSv/h/GBq. The calculated attenuation correction factor based on our measurements was 0.55±0.17. The calculated dose rate from a radioiodine therapy patient should normally include a factor accounting for patient body tissue attenuation and scatter. The attenuation factor is currently neglected and not applied in operational radiation protection. Realistic estimation of radiation dose levels from radioiodine therapy patients when properly performed will reduce the operational cost and optimize institutional radiation protection practice. It is recommended to include patient attenuation factors in risk assessment exercises - in particular, when accurate estimates of total effective doses to exposed individuals are required when direct measurements are not possible. The information provided about patient attenuation might benefit radiation protection specialists and regulators.

  9. Factors that affect life expectancy of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ying; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Wang, Jung-Der; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2013-12-01

    We used a new, semi-parametric method to estimate life expectancy and expected years of life lost (EYLL) after diagnosis of gastric cancer and assess whether patients' sex or tumor type or location had any effects. We performed a nationwide retrospective cohort study of 35,576 patients with gastric cancer who were registered in the Taiwan Cancer Registry from 1998 through 2007; data were collected until the end of 2010. The Monte Carlo method and tables in Taiwan National Vital Statistics database were matched to the cohort reference populations on the basis of age and sex. The estimated regression line and the survival curve of reference populations were used to extrapolate the survival curve beyond 2010. We compared patients' age at diagnosis, life expectancy, and EYLL based on sex, tumor type, and location. In Taiwan, gastric cancer is more prevalent among men, and 88.6% of tumors are adenocarcinomas. Patients with adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia have shorter life expectancies and greater EYLL than those with noncardia tumors (P < .05). Women with gastric adenocarcinoma are diagnosed at a younger age and have longer life expectancies but more EYLL than men with such tumors (P < .05). The estimated years of life saved if gastric adenocarcinoma is diagnosed at an early stage and cured are 22,827 years (2.62 years/case) for women and 33,700 years (1.97 years/case) for men. Among patients with gastric cancer, men and patients with adenocarcinomas of the cardia have shorter life expectancies and more EYLL. Early detection of gastric adenocarcinoma can increase life expectancy. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Number of Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors and Mortality in Patients With First Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Canto, John G.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Rogers, William J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Frederick, Paul D.; French, William J.; Gibson, C. Michael; Pollack, Charles V.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Zalenski, Robert J.; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J.; Greenland, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Context Few studies have examined the association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors and outcomes of acute myocardial infarction in community practice. Objective To determine the association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors in patients with first myocardial infarction and hospital mortality. Design Observational study from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction, 1994-2006. Patients We examined the presence and absence of 5 major traditional coronary heart disease risk factors (hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and family history of coronary heart disease) and hospital mortality among 542 008 patients with first myocardial infarction and without prior cardiovascular disease. Main Outcome Measure All-cause in-hospital mortality. Results A majority (85.6%) of patients who presented with initial myocardial infarction had at least 1 of the 5 coronary heart disease risk factors, and 14.4% had none of the 5 risk factors. Age varied inversely with the number of coronary heart disease risk factors, from a mean age of 71.5 years with 0 risk factors to 56.7 years with 5 risk factors (P for trend <.001). The total number of in-hospital deaths for all causes was 50 788. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were 14.9%, 10.9%, 7.9%, 5.3%, 4.2%, and 3.6% for patients with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. After adjusting for age and other clinical factors, there was an inverse association between the number of coronary heart disease risk factors and hospital mortality adjusted odds ratio (1.54; 95% CI, 1.23-1.94) among individuals with 0 vs 5 risk factors. This association was consistent among several age strata and important patient subgroups. Conclusion Among patients with incident acute myocardial infarction without prior cardiovascular disease, in-hospital mortality was inversely related to the number of coronary heart disease risk factors. PMID:22089719

  11. CKD and Its Risk Factors among Patients with Cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Prot-Bertoye, Caroline; Lebbah, Saïd; Daudon, Michel; Tostivint, Isabelle; Bataille, Pierre; Bridoux, Franck; Brignon, Pierre; Choquenet, Christian; Cochat, Pierre; Combe, Christian; Conort, Pierre; Decramer, Stéphane; Doré, Bertrand; Dussol, Bertrand; Essig, Marie; Gaunez, Nicolas; Joly, Dominique; Le Toquin-Bernard, Sophie; Méjean, Arnaud; Meria, Paul; Morin, Denis; N’Guyen, Hung Viet; Noël, Christian; Normand, Michel; Pietak, Michel; Ronco, Pierre; Saussine, Christian; Tsimaratos, Michel; Friedlander, Gérard; Traxer, Olivier; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting renal cystine reabsorption; it causes 1% and 8% of stones in adults and children, respectively. This study aimed to determine epidemiologic and clinical characteristics as well as comorbidities among cystinuric patients, focusing on CKD and high BP. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This retrospective study was conducted in France, and involved 47 adult and pediatric nephrology and urology centers from April 2010 to January 2012. Data were collected from 442 cystinuric patients. Results Median age at onset of symptoms was 16.7 (minimum to maximum, 0.3–72.1) years and median diagnosis delay was 1.3 (0–45.7) years. Urinary alkalinization and cystine-binding thiol were prescribed for 88.8% and 52.2% of patients, respectively, and 81.8% had at least one urological procedure. Five patients (1.1%, n=4 men) had to be treated by dialysis at a median age of 35.0 years (11.8–70.7). Among the 314 patients aged ≥16 years, using the last available plasma creatinine, 22.5% had an eGFR≥90 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (calculated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation), whereas 50.6%, 15.6%, 7.6%, 2.9%, and 0.6% had an eGFR of 60–89, 45–59, 30–44, 15–29, and <15, respectively. Among these 314 patients, 28.6% had high BP. In multivariate analysis, CKD was associated with age (odds ratio, 1.05 [95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.07]; P<0.001), hypertension (3.30 [1.54 to 7.10]; P=0.002), and severe damage of renal parenchyma defined as a past history of partial or total nephrectomy, a solitary congenital kidney, or at least one kidney with a size <10 cm in patients aged ≥16 years (4.39 [2.00 to 9.62]; P<0.001), whereas hypertension was associated with age (1.06 [1.04 to 1.08]; P<0.001), male sex (2.3 [1.3 to 4.1]; P=0.003), and an eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (2.7 [1.5 to 5.1]; P=0.001). Conclusions CKD and high BP occur frequently in patients with cystinuria and

  12. Recurrent venous thromboembolism in a patient with heterozygous factor v leiden mutation.

    PubMed

    White, C Whitney; Thomason, Angela R; Prince, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    To report a patient case identifying risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation. A 54-year-old Caucasian male was diagnosed with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation in 2008 after experiencing a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and bilateral pulmonary embolism. The patient was treated appropriately and started on anticoagulation therapy with warfarin through an anticoagulation management clinic. After approximately 17 months of warfarin therapy without incident, warfarin was discontinued. Within 2 months after discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy, the patient experienced his second DVT and left pulmonary artery embolus. The risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation is documented as an approximate 1.4-fold increase compared to patients without thrombophilia. However, the risk increases dramatically when nonreversible (age) or reversible risk factors (obesity, smoking, and long air flights) are present in this population. Based on recent literature, heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation exponentially increases the risk of recurrent VTE, especially in the presence of other risk factors. Health care providers should complete a comprehensive review of the patients' other risk factors when deciding on duration of anticoagulation therapy for patients with positive heterozygous Factor V Leiden mutation.

  13. Associated risk factors for chronic kidney disease of unknown etiologies in 241 patients.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xuexue; Lu, Jing; Wang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Apart from the well-known etiologies, there are still a high proportion of patients with chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu), which has rarely been reported on. In this study, we explored the potential associated risk factors for CKDu and identified those that occur in childhood. 700 patients with CKD we were selected randomly from 4 hospitals in Chengdu and 241 were screened for CKDu. The following clinical information was analyzed: demographic data, life style, personal and family history, nephrotoxic drugs, exposure to poison, allergies, and recurrent respiratory infections in childhood. Among 700 CKD patients, 34.43% (241/700) were CKDu. Of the 241 patients, there were 67.63% (163/241) with at least 1 associated risk factor and 56.44% (92/163) with more than 1. Patients with a personal history of an associated risk factor represented the largest proportion (31.95%, 77/241), while 28.63% (69/241) of the CKDu patients had risk factors appearing in childhood. Logistic regression analysis supported the results. The study demonstrated that most so-called CKDu patients do have an identifiable etiology, and that several associated risk factors contribute to it. Of all the risk factors, age >60 years, nephrotoxic drugs, exposure to poison, and alcohol consumption were the independent significant factors for CKDu. Furthermore, many risk factors that caused kidney injury started in childhood.

  14. Analysis of contributing factors associated to related patients safety incidents in Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Martín Delgado, M C; Merino de Cos, P; Sirgo Rodríguez, G; Álvarez Rodríguez, J; Gutiérrez Cía, I; Obón Azuara, B; Alonso Ovies, Á

    2015-01-01

    To explore contributing factors (CF) associated to related critical patients safety incidents. SYREC study pos hoc analysis. A total of 79 Intensive Care Departments were involved. The study sample consisted of 1.017 patients; 591 were affected by one or more incidents. The CF were categorized according to a proposed model by the National Patient Safety Agency from United Kingdom that was modified. Type, class and severity of the incidents was analyzed. A total 2,965 CF were reported (1,729 were associated to near miss and 1,236 to adverse events). The CF group more frequently reported were related patients factors. Individual factors were reported more frequently in near miss and task related CF in adverse events. CF were reported in all classes of incidents. The majority of CF were reported in the incidents classified such as less serious, even thought CF patients factors were associated to serious incidents. Individual factors were considered like avoidable and patients factors as unavoidable. The CF group more frequently reported were patient factors and was associated to more severe and unavoidable incidents. By contrast, individual factors were associated to less severe and avoidable incidents. In general, CF most frequently reported were associated to near miss. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Salivary transforming growth factor alpha in patients with Sjögren's syndrome and reflux laryngitis.

    PubMed

    Corvo, Marco Antonio dos Anjos; Eckley, Claudia Alessandra; Rizzo, Luis Vicente; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Rodriguez, Tomas Navarro; Bussoloti Filho, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Saliva plays a key role in the homeostasis of the digestive tract, through its inorganic components and its protein growth factors. Sjögren's syndrome patients have a higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and laryngopharyngeal reflux. Decreased salivary transforming growth factor alpha levels were observed in dyspeptic patients, but there have been no studies in patients with Sjögren's syndrome and laryngopharyngeal reflux. To compare the salivary transforming growth factor alpha levels of patients with Sjögren's syndrome and laryngopharyngeal reflux to those of healthy controls. This is a prospective controlled study. Twelve patients with Sjögren's syndrome and laryngopharyngeal reflux and 11 controls were prospectively evaluated. Spontaneous and stimulated saliva samples were obtained to establish salivary transforming growth factor alpha concentrations. The salivary transforming growth factor alpha levels of patients were significantly higher than those of healthy controls. Five patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux also had erosive esophagitis; their salivary transforming growth factor alpha levels were comparable to controls. Salivary transforming growth factor alpha level was significantly higher in patients with Sjögren's syndrome and laryngopharyngeal reflux when compared to the control group. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia: among trauma patients with and without brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gianakis, Anastasia; McNett, Molly; Belle, Josie; Moran, Cristina; Grimm, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates remain highest among trauma and brain injured patients; yet, no research compares VAP risk factors between the 2 groups. This retrospective, case-controlled study identified risk factors for VAP among critically ill trauma patients with and without brain injury. Data were abstracted on trauma patients with (cases) and without (controls) brain injury. Data gathered on n = 157 subjects. Trauma patients with brain injury had more emergent and field intubations. Age was strongest predictor of VAP in cases, and ventilator days predicted VAP in controls. Trauma patients with brain injury may be at higher risk for VAP.

  17. Treatment of patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors to factor FVIII with cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Ambriz Fernandez, R; Quintana Gonzalez, S; Martinez Murillo, C; Dominguez Garcia, V; Rodriguez Moyado, H; Collazo Jaloma, J

    1996-01-01

    In this study, cimetidine was used to treat patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors to factor VIII who presented with acute hemorrhages (Group A) and those without hemorrhages (Group B). The dose of cimetidine was 15 mg/kg/day. Group A consisted of five patients with inhibitors between 156 and > 10,000 Bethesda Units (BU), all with serious hemorrhagic problems. The control of hemorrhaging was effective in 100% of these patients, although inhibitor levels remained high (25-380 BU). Group B consisted of seven patients who did not have hemorrhages, whose inhibitor levels were 41-358 BU. Five of these patients no longer had anamnestic responses to Factor VIII after several months of treatment with cimetidine. No difference in the response to cimetidine was seen between HIV positive and HIV negative patients. The results suggest that cimetidine is useful to suppress inhibitors to Factor VIII in patients with hemophilia A.

  18. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  19. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  20. Transfer of Patients in a Telestroke Network: What Are the Relevant Factors for Making This Decision?

    PubMed

    Klingner, Carsten M; Brodoehl, Stefan; Funck, Laura; Klingner, Caroline C; Berrouschot, Jörg; Witte, Otto W; Günther, Albrecht

    2017-07-27

    Background/Introduction: Current telestroke network consultations are focused on decision-making in the hyperacute stage of stroke management. The two main questions in telestroke consultations are whether thrombolysis should be initiated and whether the patient should be transferred to a hub hospital. Although guidelines exist for initiating intravenous thrombolytic therapy, the question of whether patients should be transferred is far more elusive. In this study, we investigated the factors involved in the decision to transfer stroke patients to a hub hospital. We were particularly interested in identifying factors that promote or impede the transfer of patients. We enrolled 1,615 cases of telestroke consultation of the University Hospital Jena. The two main factors that independently influenced the probability of transferring a patient were the patient's age and the identification of a proximal vessel occlusion. Interestingly, factors such as the severity of symptoms and the time elapsed from symptom onset were not found to have an independent influence on the decision to transfer a patient. The transfer of most patients was justified by the possibility of performing interventional reperfusion therapy. We discuss the effectiveness of the current decision-making process and possible ways to improve decision-making for a more effective selection of patients who would benefit from transfer. The decision-making process to a transfer patient is not standardized and constitutes a trade-off between the intention to treat all possible patients while avoiding the transfer of patients without treatment options.

  1. Prognostic factors of Bell's palsy: prospective patient collected observational study.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Hato, Naohito; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Yanagihara, Naoaki

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate various parameters potentially influencing poor prognosis in Bell's palsy and to assess the predictive value for Bell's palsy. A single-center prospective patient collected observation and validation study was conducted. To evaluate the correlation between patient characteristics and poor prognosis, we performed univariate and multivariate analyzes of age, gender, side of palsy, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and facial grading score 1 week after onset. To evaluate the accuracy of the facial grading score, we prepared a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and calculated the area under the ROC curve (AUROC). We also calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive/negative likelihood ratio, and positive/negative predictive value. We included Bell's palsy patients who attended Ehime University Hospital within 1 week after onset between 1977 and 2011. We excluded patients who were less than 15 years old and lost-to-follow-up within 6 months. The main outcome was defined as non-recovery at 6 months after onset. In total, 679 adults with Bell's palsy were included. The facial grading score at 1 week showed a correlation with non-recovery in the multivariate analysis, although age, gender, side of palsy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension did not. The AUROC of the facial grading score was 0.793. The Y-system score at 1 week moderate accurately predicted non-recovery at 6 months in Bell's palsy.

  2. Survivin as a Prognostic Factor for Osteosarcoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Osaka, Eiji; Suzuki, Takashi; Osaka, Shunzo; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Sugita, Hideyuki; Asami, Satoru; Tabata, Keiichi; Hemmi, Akihiro; Sugitani, Masahiko; Nemoto, Norimichi; Ryu, Junnosuke

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Survivin is one of the apoptosis inhibitor genes and is rarely expressed in adult ­tissues. However, survivin expression has been detected in various human cancers and ­correlations have been recognized between the level of expression of this gene in tumors and prognosis. In this study, we investigated the correlations between survivin mRNA expres­sion in osteosarcoma tissues and clinicopathological parameters. Methods: There were 22 osteosarcoma patients in our hospital with paraffin-embedded ­tissues which could be extracted from biopsy specimens. We used the RT-PCR method after extracting total RNA and conducted a densitometric analysis to determine the ratio of survivin relative to h-GAPDH as an internal marker. Results: Expression of survivin mRNA was detected in all osteosarcoma samples. Patients with metastasis had high survivin mRNA levels in initial biopsy specimens (p<0.01). Moreover, there was a statistically significant difference in survivin mRNA expression between ­patients with and without metastasis (p<0.01). Conclusion: We concluded that high levels of survivin mRNA expression suggest poor prognosis for osteosarcoma patients. PMID:17327929

  3. Which Factors Influence Functional Patients Improvements During Rehabilitation?

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Messina; Lorena, Rasimelli; Chiara, Bonavita; Emma, Ceriale; Cecilia, Quercioli; Nicola, Nante

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rehabilitation in patients with disabilities is an important aspect of tertiary prevention. Severity of disability, evaluated by global measures of autonomy, is essential for functional outcome evaluation. Aim: To determine the effectiveness of a rehabilitation programme in terms of percentage functional improvement (PFI); to verify the role of gender, age and length of stay (LOS), by motor and cognitive domains, on PFI. Design: Longitudinal study. Setting: An intensive rehabilitation hospital. Population: 305 inpatients. Methods: The disability has been investigated using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Percentage differences between discharge and admission were calculated for FIM score. Wilcoxon matched pair test for the six areas and the two domains of the FIM score were calculated. The effect of LOS, gender and age on PFI were studied with Robust regression. Results: Neurological and Orthopaedic patients had improvements on Motor and Cognitive domains. The greatest gains were in the Self Care, Sphintere Control, Transfer and Locomotion Areas (p=<0.001). LOS was associated (p<0.001) with PFI while age resulted borderline significant (p=0.049) in the cognitive domain in Neurological patients. Conclusion: The rehabilitation improved the overall conditions of neurological and orthopaedic patients. LOS emerged as the most important determinant in PFI. PMID:24762348

  4. Factors that impact on sleep in intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Tembo, Agness C; Parker, Vicki

    2009-12-01

    This literature review shows that sleep is important for healing and survival of critical illness (Richardson et al., 2007; Straham and Brown, 2004). Sleep deprivation impinges on recovery, ability to resist infection, brings about neurological problems such as delirium, respiratory problems because it weakens upper air way muscles thus prolonging the duration of ventilation, ICU stay and complicating periods just after extubation (Friese, 2008; Parthasarathy and Tobin, 2004). Noise, pain and discomfort (Jacobi et al., 2002; Honkus, 2003) modes of ventilation and drugs have been cited as causes of sleep deprivation in critically ill patients (Friese, 2008; Parthasarathy and Tobin, 2004). The inability of nurses to accurately assess patients' sleep has also been cited as a concern while polysonography has been cited as the most effective way of assessing patients' sleep despite the difficulties associated with it. While some of these causes of sleep disruption can not be easily alleviated, every effort must be made to promote REM and SWS sleep. More research is needed to find solutions to sleep disruption in ICU. More research is needed to ascertain the impact of mechanical ventilation on sleep disruption and more focused ways of sleep assessment are needed. Nurses need to minimise disruptions by clustering their care at night in order to allow patients to have the much needed REM sleep. Furthermore, more specific way of sleep assessment in the critically ill.

  5. Risk Factors for Hemorrhagic Transformation in Patients with Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction

    PubMed Central

    ÖCEK, Levent; GÜNER, Derya; ULUDAĞ, İrem Fatma; TİFTİKÇİOĞLU, Bedile İrem; ZORLU, Yaşar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) can be seen at any time following ischemic stroke. Although HT usually occurs as a complication of antithrombotic, anticoagulant, or thrombolytic treatments, it can also occur spontaneously. We aimed to investigate the occurrence of early HT and its relevant risk factors in patients diagnosed with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction who were not treated with thrombolytic agents. Methods We recruited 171 patients with acute MCA infarction between January 2011 and July 2012 who were not treated with thrombolytic agents and were suitable to our inclusion criteria. Controlled neuroimaging was performed immediately in patients with deterioration, otherwise on day 7 following stroke. All patients were investigated for AIS risk factors and biochemical analyses were performed. Patients with HT in controlled neuroimaging were grouped both clinically (i.e., symptomatic or asymptomatic) and radiologically, according to “European Cooperative Acute Stroke Radiological Study” (ECASS), and risk factors were examined. Results We enrolled 171 patients [94 men (55%) and 77 women (45%)] in the study. HT developed in 37 patients (21.63%). In terms of risk factor analysis, the most frequent etiological factor was atherosclerosis in AIS patients (50.3%). National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores were significantly higher both in sHT patients according to asHT patients and in HT patients on day 7 compared with their initial scores. Serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and total cholesterol (TC) levels were significantly lower in patients with HT (p<.001). Conclusion HT is a major complication in AIS that considerably increases the morbidity and mortality. To reduce the occurrence of HT, risk factors for each patient population should be determined. Acute thrombolytic therapy should be used cautiously in high-risk patients, and appropriate alternative therapies should

  6. Changes in neurotrophic and inflammatory factors in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenxing; Wang, Yong; Fang, Qiwu; Wu, Jianping; Gao, Xinyou; Liu, Hui; Cao, Liu; An, Jianxiong

    2017-01-10

    Inflammatory and neurotrophic factors are involved in postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), but the association of these factors in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with the level of pain is poorly known. The present study aimed to examine the changes in neurotrophic and inflammatory factors in the CSF of patients with PHN and to study the correlation between these factors and the degree of pain. Fifty patients with PHN and 28 patients with hemifacial spasm (as controls) were recruited between May 2015 and March 2016. CSF levels of inflammatory and neurotrophic factors were measured by ELISA. Compared with controls, patients with PHN had lower CSF levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin (NT)-3, NT-5, and P substance (all P<0.05), and higher CSF levels of interleukin (IL)-1β (P=0.050). Among patients with PHN, CSF BDNF levels were positively correlated to IL-8 (rs=0.229, P=0.04); glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) levels to IL-8 (rs=0.326, P=0.004) levels; NGF levels to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels (rs=0.229, P=0.044); NT-3 levels to IL-1β (rs=0.228, P=0.045); and NT-5 levels to IL-8 (rs=0.388, P<0.001), and TNF-α (rs=0.445, P<0.001) levels. Inflammatory and neurotrophic factors were not correlated with the visual analog scale score and von Frey. Multivariable linear regression showed PHN was associated with NGF (P=0.038) and BDNF (P=0.029), independently from age and major medical history. In conclusion, patients with PHN showed low levels of BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and NT-5. Among patients with PHN, CSF levels of neurotrophic factors positively correlated with inflammatory factors.

  7. Phenotypic expression of factor H mutations in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaziri-Sani, F; Holmberg, L; Sjöholm, A G; Kristoffersson, A-C; Manea, M; Frémeaux-Bacchi, V; Fehrman-Ekholm, I; Raafat, R; Karpman, D

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the phenotypic expression of factor H mutations in two patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Factor H in serum was assayed by rocket immunoelectrophoresis, immunoblotting, and double immunodiffusion and in tissue by immunohistochemistry. Functional activity was analyzed by hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes and binding to endothelial cells. A homozygous mutation in complement control protein (CCP) domain 10 of factor H was identified in an adult man who first developed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and later HUS. C3 levels were very low. The patient had undetectable factor H levels in serum and a weak factor H 150 kDa band. Double immunodiffusion showed partial antigenic identity with factor H in normal serum owing to the presence of factor H-like protein 1. Strong specific labeling for factor H was detected in glomerular endothelium, mesangium and in glomerular and tubular epithelium as well as in bone marrow cells. A heterozygous mutation in CCP 20 of factor H was found in a girl with HUS. C3 levels were moderately decreased at onset. Factor H levels were normal and a normal 150 kDa band was present. Double immunodiffusion showed antigenic identity with normal factor H. Factor H labeling was minimal in the renal cortex. Factor H dysfunction was demonstrated by increased sheep erythrocyte hemolysis and decreased binding to endothelial cells. In summary, two different factor H mutations associated with HUS were examined: in one, factor H accumulated in cells, and in the other, membrane binding was reduced.

  8. Factors predisposing to dislocation of the Thompson hemiarthroplasty: 22 dislocations in 338 patients.

    PubMed

    Pajarinen, Jarkko; Savolainen, Vesa; Tulikoura, Ilkka; Lindahl, Jan; Hirvensalo, Eero

    2003-02-01

    In a series of 338 patients, we have retrospectively analyzed technical and anatomical factors, which may predispose to a dislocation of the Thompson hemiprosthesis. 22 patients (7%) had at least 1 dislocation during the 6-month follow-up. The most significant independent factor predisposing to dislocation was the use of a posterior approach (dislocation rate 16%). We examined the radiographs and data on operations in the 22 patients, using 79 random patients without dislocation as controls. Factors correlating with an increase in the incidence of dislocation were the length of the residual femoral neck > 0.5 cm in short patients (< 165 cm), and considerable change in the postoperative offset of the hip. Acetabular measurements showed no correlation to the dislocation. Our findings suggest that the main factors predicting dislocation are technical and not related to anatomical measurements.

  9. Patient race/ethnicity and patient-physician race/ethnicity concordance in the management of cardiovascular disease risk factors for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Traylor, Ana H; Subramanian, Usha; Uratsu, Connie S; Mangione, Carol M; Selby, Joe V; Schmittdiel, Julie A

    2010-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Patient-physician race/ethnicity concordance can improve care for minority patients. However, its effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD) care and prevention is unknown. We examined associations of patient race/ethnicity and patient-physician race/ethnicity concordance on CVD risk factor levels and appropriate modification of treatment in response to high risk factor values (treatment intensification) in a large cohort of diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study population included 108,555 adult diabetic patients in Kaiser Permanente Northern California in 2005. Probit models assessed the effect of patient race/ethnicity on risk factor control and treatment intensification after adjusting for patient and physician-level characteristics. RESULTS African American patients were less likely than whites to have A1C <8.0% (64 vs. 69%, P < 0.0001), LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dl (40 vs. 47%, P < 0.0001), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) <140 mmHg (70 vs. 78%, P < 0.0001). Hispanic patients were less likely than whites to have A1C <8% (62 vs. 69%, P < 0.0001). African American patients were less likely than whites to have A1C treatment intensification (73 vs. 77%, P < 0.0001; odds ratio [OR] 0.8 [95% CI 0.7-0.9]) but more likely to receive treatment intensification for SBP (78 vs. 71%, P < 0.0001; 1.5 [1.3-1.7]). Hispanic patients were more likely to have LDL cholesterol treatment intensification (47 vs. 45%, P < 0.05; 1.1 [1.0-1.2]). Patient-physician race/ethnicity concordance was not significantly associated with risk factor control or treatment intensification. CONCLUSIONS Patient race/ethnicity is associated with risk factor control and treatment intensification, but patient-physician race/ethnicity concordance was not. Further research should investigate other potential drivers of disparities in CVD care.

  10. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in korean patients with Alzheimer's disease: exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis of the neuropsychiatric inventory.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyo Shin; Ahn, Inn Sook; Kim, Ji Hae; Kim, Doh Kwan

    2010-01-01

    We designed this study to examine subsyndromes in Korean patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Initial participants were 778 AD patients recruited from the Clinical Research Center for Dementia of South Korea and assessed via the Korean Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Those with > or =1 neuropsychiatric symptom were randomly divided into groups. Principal axis factoring with oblimin rotation was used to analyze group 1 inventory results, and maximum likelihood estimation extraction with Bollen-Stine bootstrapping was used for group 2. The results of the EFA showed the presence of 4 subsyndromes: hyperactivity, affect, psychosis and apathy/vegetative symptom. The CFA results indicated this model was the best-fitting model for explaining these subsyndromes. Our model showed the best fit and identified 4 subsyndromes. This study might contribute to a clearer understanding of the neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The concept of Watson's carative factors in nursing and their (dis)harmony with patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Pajnkihar, Majda; Štiglic, Gregor; Vrbnjak, Dominika

    2017-01-01

    Constant reviews of the caring behavior of nurses and patient satisfaction help to improve the quality of nursing. The aim of our research was to explore relationships between the level of nursing education, the perception of nurses and nursing assistants of Watson's carative factors, and patient satisfaction. A questionnaire survey using a convenience sample of 1,098 members of nursing teams and a purposive sample of 1,123 patients in four health care institutions in Slovenia was conducted in August 2012. A demographic questionnaire and the Caring Nurse-Patient Interactions Scale (nurse version) were delivered to the nurses. A Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey was delivered to discharged patients. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Carative factor sensibility was related to the level of nursing education. Patients were satisfied with the care received from nurses, nursing assistants and hospitals, although we found differences between the perceptions of nurses and nursing assistants of carative factors and patient satisfaction. By comparing only the perceptions of nurses and nursing assistants of carative factors in health care institutions, differences were found for seven out of ten carative factors. We did not find major significant differences between carative factors and level of nurse education, except in one carative factor. Differences in perceptions of carative factors between health care institutions are probably the result of different institutional factors. The results can be of great benefit to nurse administrators and educators, indicating the factors that must be taken into account for enhancing patient satisfaction. Emphasis on caring theories should be placed in nursing education and their application in nursing practice.

  12. Patient-related medical risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection of the hip and knee

    PubMed Central

    Eka, Aleeson

    2015-01-01

    Despite advancements and improvements in methods for preventing infection, periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a significant complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Prevention is the most important strategy to deal with this disabling complication, and prevention should begin with identifying patient-related risk factors. Medical risk factors, such as morbid obesity, malnutrition, hyperglycemia, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), preoperative anemia, cardiovascular disorders, chronic renal failure, smoking, alcohol abuse and depression, should be evaluated and optimized prior to surgery. Treating patients to get laboratory values under a specified threshold or cessation of certain modifiable risk factors can decrease the risk of PJI. Although significant advances have been made in past decades to identify these risk factors, there remains some uncertainty regarding the risk factors predisposing TJA patients to PJI. Through a review of the current literature, this paper aims to comprehensively evaluate and provide a better understanding of known medical risk factors for PJI after TJA. PMID:26539450

  13. Factors associated with patient satisfaction in surgery: the role of patients' perceptions of received care, visit characteristics, and demographic variables.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Tonio; Klewer, Joerg; Kugler, Joachim

    2010-11-01

    Measures of satisfaction of surgical patients can be used to evaluate and redesign the process of care or to complement established procedures to improve quality of services. However, study findings regarding aspects of patient satisfaction are often inconsistent and depend on the setting. The primary goals of this research were to identify factors associated with satisfaction among patients in a surgical setting. Data used in this study were obtained from randomly selected 2699 surgical patients discharged during January-December 2008 from 26 hospitals who responded to a mailed survey. The instrument assessed satisfaction regarding 23 items of perceived care, patient demographic, and visit characteristics. Bivariate and multivariate techniques were used to reveal relations between indicators and overall satisfaction. Bivariate statistics showed strong relations between overall satisfaction and perceived care with weaker findings pertaining to demographic and visit characteristics. The Multivariate logistic regression predicting overall satisfaction demonstrated that patients receiving surgical services predominantly have similar demands and priorities regardless of age and gender. The strongest factors were (P < 0.05) the interpersonal manner of medical practitioners and nurses, organization of operations, admittance, and discharge, as well as perceived length of stay. This study identified factors that are related to satisfaction of surgical patients and indicated the intensity of this relationship. These findings support health care providers and medical practitioners with valuable information to meet needs and preferences of patients receiving surgical services. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Nicassio, Perry M; Ormseth, Sarah R; Custodio, Mara K; Olmstead, Richard; Weisman, Michael H; Irwin, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the factor structure of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The sample included 107 patients with RA, 88 females and seven males, with an average age of 56.09 years, recruited from the greater Southern California area. Confirmatory factor analysis evaluated single, two- and three-factor models. The single factor solution yielded a poor fit to the data. While the three-factor solution had the best fit, the two-factor solution, comprised of sleep efficiency and perceived sleep quality factors, was optimal because it had very good fit, and acceptable reliability for its individual factors. Clinical indices were consistently correlated with the sleep quality factor, but not with the sleep efficiency factor.

  15. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nicassio, Perry M.; Ormseth, Sarah R.; Custodio, Mara K.; Olmstead, Richard; Weisman, Michael H.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the factor structure of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The sample included 107 patients with RA, 88 females and seven males, with an average age of 56.09 years, recruited from the greater Southern California area. Confirmatory factor analysis evaluated single, two- and three-factor models. The single factor solution yielded a poor fit to the data. While the three-factor solution had the best fit, the two-factor solution, comprised of sleep efficiency and perceived sleep quality factors, was optimal because it had very good fit, and acceptable reliability for its individual factors. Clinical indices were consistently correlated with the sleep quality factor, but not with the sleep efficiency factor. PMID:23390921

  16. Homozygous factor V Leiden mutation in type IV Ehlers-Danlos patient

    PubMed Central

    Refaat, Marwan; Hotait, Mostafa; Winston, Brion

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. Several hemostatic abnormalities have been described in EDS patients that increase the bleeding tendencies of these patients. This case report illustrates a patient with an unusual presentation of a patient with type IV EDS, platelet δ-storage pool disease and factor V Leiden mutation. Young woman having previous bilateral deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli coexisting with ruptured splenic aneurysm and multiple other aneurysms now presented with myocardial infarction. Presence of factor V Leiden mutation raises the possibility that the infarct was due to acute coronary thrombosis, although coronary artery aneurysm and dissection with myocardial infarction is known to occur in vascular type EDS. This is the first report in the medical literature of factor V Leiden mutation in an EDS patient which made the management of our patient challenging with propensity to both bleeding and clotting. PMID:24653990

  17. Homozygous factor V Leiden mutation in type IV Ehlers-Danlos patient.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Marwan; Hotait, Mostafa; Winston, Brion

    2014-03-16

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by collagen synthesis defects. Several hemostatic abnormalities have been described in EDS patients that increase the bleeding tendencies of these patients. This case report illustrates a patient with an unusual presentation of a patient with type IV EDS, platelet δ-storage pool disease and factor V Leiden mutation. Young woman having previous bilateral deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli coexisting with ruptured splenic aneurysm and multiple other aneurysms now presented with myocardial infarction. Presence of factor V Leiden mutation raises the possibility that the infarct was due to acute coronary thrombosis, although coronary artery aneurysm and dissection with myocardial infarction is known to occur in vascular type EDS. This is the first report in the medical literature of factor V Leiden mutation in an EDS patient which made the management of our patient challenging with propensity to both bleeding and clotting.

  18. Factors influencing general practitioners in the referral of elderly cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Delva, Fleur; Marien, Emilie; Fonck, Marianne; Rainfray, Muriel; Demeaux, Jean-Louis; Moreaud, Philippe; Soubeyran, Pierre; Sasco, Annie J; Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone

    2011-01-06

    A number of studies have identified advanced age as a barrier to accessing specialised oncological care. Many factors can influence the care provided for elderly patients after a diagnosis of cancer has been established or is suspected. Only one European study has analysed the decision processes leading general practitioners (GPs) to refer elderly patients with cancer to oncologists. The objectives of the current study are to describe the factors that influence these decisions and to identify the particular factors and GP characteristics that are associated with systematic referral of these patients in South-West France. This is a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of GPs in Aquitaine, South-West France. Questionnaire items were selected using a Delphi consensus approach and sent by post. Two logistic regression models were constructed to investigate GPs' decisions to refer these patients. The response rate obtained was 30%. Half of the general practitioners reported "always" referring their elderly cancer patients to oncologists. More than 75% reported being influenced by patient-related elements (patient and/or family wishes, comorbid factors, unsuitability of invasive investigations, physical and mental autonomy), by cancer-related elements (severity of symptoms, expected side-effects) and an organisational element (whether the general practitioner was used to collaborating with oncologists). Logistic regression analysis showed that cancer site and organisational difficulties in patient management were significantly associated with the decision to refer elderly patients with early-stage cancer. For advanced stages, oncology training, patient age, organisational difficulties in patient management and stage of cancer were significantly associated with the decision to refer elderly patients. Cancer-linked factors and organisational difficulties have been highlighted as influencing the decisions of GPs in the referral of elderly patients to a cancer

  19. Prevalence and risk factors of hepatitis C virus infection in haemodialysis patients: a multicentre study in 2796 patients

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichsen, H; Leimenstoll, G; Stegen, G; Schrader, H; Fölsch, U R; Schmidt, W E

    2002-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a significant problem in the management of haemodialysis patients. A high prevalence of HCV infection in haemodialysis patients has been reported. Risk factors such as the number of blood transfusions or duration on haemodialysis have been identified. Aim: To determine the prevalence of HCV by antibody testing and HCV-RNA determination by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in haemodialysis patients. Furthermore, liver function tests were performed and epidemiological data were obtained to determine risk factors for HCV in this cohort of patients. Results: A total of 2796 patients from 43 dialysis centres were enrolled. The overall prevalence of HCV (HCV antibody and/or HCV-RNA positivity) was 7.0% (195 patients). Antibody positivity occurred in 171 patients (6.1%). Viraemia was detectable in 111 patients (4.0%). Twenty four of 111 HCV RNA positive patients (21.6%) were negative for HCV antibodies. Thus 0.8% of the entire study population was HCV positive but could not be diagnosed by routine HCV antibody testing. Major risk factors identified by a standard questionnaire in 1717 of 2796 patients were the number of blood transfusions individuals had received and duration of dialysis, the latter including patients who received no blood transfusions. Sequencing of the 5`untranslated region of the genome showed a dominant genotype 1 (77.6%) within the cohort. Further reverse transcription-PCR of the NS5b and core region were performed to document phylogenetic analysis. Comparing nucleic acid sequences detected by PCR, no homogeneity was found and thus nosocomial transmission was excluded. Conclusions: HCV is common in German haemodialysis patients but screening for HCV antibodies alone does not exclude infection with HCV. PMID:12171969

  20. [Prognostic factors of morbimortality in patients with emphysematous pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Torres-Mercado, León Octavio; García-Padilla, Miguel Ángel; Serrano-Brambila, Eduardo; Maldonado-Alcaraz, Efraín; López-Sámano, Virgilio Augusto; Montoya-Martínez, Guillermo; Moreno-Palacios, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: La pielonefritis enfisematosa es una infección grave del tracto urinario caracterizada por la presencia de gas en los sistemas colectores, en el parénquima renal o en el tejido perirrenal; su causa no es del todo conocida, pero se ha sugerido que se debe a la fermentación de glucosa por enterobacterias y anaerobios. El objetivo fue evaluar los factores pronósticos de morbimortalidad en pacientes con diagnóstico de pielonefritis enfisematosa. Métodos: estudio de cohorte histórica en pacientes con diagnóstico de pielonefritis enfisematosa que ingresaron a nuestro hospital de marzo de 2005 a diciembre de 2014. Se identificaron los pacientes con desenlace adverso definido como aquel que requirió estancia en unidad de cuidados intensivos, nefrectomía o muerte. Se realizó una regresión logística múltiple para obtener la relación de cada factor pronóstico con el desenlace adverso. Resultados: Fueron evaluados 73 pacientes (48 mujeres [65.8 %]). Diabetes, litiasis urinaria, infección por Escherichia coli y el estado de choque se presentaron en 68.5 %, 68.5 %, 63 % y 15.1 %, respectivamente. Fueron factores significativos para desenlace adverso la leucocitosis ≥ 12 000 μL (RM 43.65, IC 95 % 2.36-805, p < 0.001), la trombocitopenia ≤ 120 000 μL (RM 363, IC 95 % 9.2-14208, p < 0.0001), y la clase radiológica 3 de Huang (RM 62, IC 95 % 4-964, p < 0.001). Conclusión: la trombocitopenia, la leucocitosis y la clase radiológica 3 se asociaron con un desenlace adverso en los pacientes con pielonefritis enfisematosa.

  1. [Risk factors and rejection frequency in patients undergoing penetrating keratoplasty].

    PubMed

    Gittins-Nuñez, Luis Othón; Díaz Del Castillo-Martín, Ernesto; Huerta-Albañil, Irma; Ríos-Prado, Rita; Soto-Dávila, Marco Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el trasplante de córnea representa uno de los procedimientos quirúrgicos que con mayor frecuencia se realizan en todo el mundo y de los que tienen un mejor pronóstico. Dentro de sus principales indicaciones se encuentran: el queratocono, la queratopatía bullosa, el rechazo corneal previo, la distrofia corneal y la infección. Los factores de riesgo conocidos para rechazo del trasplante son: edad del receptor, presencia de vasos en la córnea receptora, presión intraocular y retrasplante. El objetivo de este artículo es determinar los factores de riesgo y la frecuencia de rechazo corneal en pacientes sometidos a queratoplastia penetrante. Métodos: el diseño del estudio fue descriptivo, observacional, transversal, retrospectivo y analítico. Se estudiaron los pacientes operados de queratoplastia penetrante en la consulta externa de córnea, con seguimiento mínimo de 6 meses. Se llevó a cabo una revisión de expedientes clínicos de pacientes operados de queratoplastia penetrante en Hospital de Especialidades del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI del IMSS. Resultados: del total de los pacientes trasplantados 35.3 % presentaron rechazo del trasplante corneal. La neovascularización corneal previa al trasplante de la corona receptora estuvo presente en 21.3 %. Conclusiones: en nuestro estudio encontramos resultados similares a los reportados en la literatura, siendo los factores de riesgo más importantes para presentar rechazo: el uso de trépanos mayores a 7.50 mm, paciente con antecedentes de neovascularización corneal previa, queratopatía y queratitis herpética.

  2. [Risk Factors and extraneurological complications of stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Guarnaschelli, M; Lucero, N; Moreno Andreatta, N; Buonanotte, M C; Atalah, D; Deabato, C; Frias, I; Fuentes, V; Perez Frias, J; Riccetti, J; Rivero, M; Sad, A; Buonanotte, C F

    2013-01-01

    El Accidente cerebro vascular (ACV) constituye la tercera causa de muerte a nivel mundial; actuar sobre los factores de riesgo modificables constituye hoy la mejor estrategia de prevención. Las complicaciones médicas son frecuentes en los pacientes internados por ACV; la valoración del NIHSS de ingreso, está asociado al resultado final en términos de duración de internación, supervivencia y ubicación al alta. Objetivo. Determinar los factores de riesgo (FR) en pacientes internados por ACV en el HNC de Córdoba y caracterizar las complicaciones no neurológicas en relación al NIHSS de ingreso. Material y métodos. Estudio prospectivo de pacientes internados en el HNC con diagnóstico de ACV del primero de septiembre de 2010 al 30 de diciembre de 2012, se aplicó la escala de NIHSS al ingreso. Se determinaron los factores de riesgo cerebrovasculares; se evaluaron las complicaciones no neurológicas durante la internación. Resultados. El total de pacientes ingresados por ACV fue de 200, con ACV isquémico 168 (84%) y ACV hemorrágico 32(16%). La Hipertensión Arterial fue el FR más frecuente (83,5%); más del 40% tenía 3 o más FR para ACV. Tuvieron complicaciones: 32% de los pacientes, la Infección respiratoria fue la más frecuente (14.5%)Pacientes con NIHSS superior a 10 puntos presentaron mayor porcentaje de complicaciones. Conclusión. El control de FR múltiples constituye una estrategia efectiva para disminuir la incidencia de ACV. La prevención de las complicaciones médicas permiten un mejor cuidado del paciente y reducen la morbilidad relacionada al ACV.

  3. Self-Care Behaviors and Related Factors in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zinat Motlagh, Sayed Fazel; Chaman, Reza; Sadeghi, Erfan; Eslami, Ahmad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background An assessment of an individual’s hypertension self-care behavior may provide clinicians and practitioners with important information regarding how to better control hypertension. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the self-care behaviors of hypertensive patients. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in a sample of 1836 patients of both genders who had been diagnosed with hypertension in urban and rural health centers in the Kohgiluyeh Boyerahmad Province in southern Iran. They were randomly selected and were invited to participate in the study. Self-care activities were measured using the H-hypertension self-care activity level effects. Results The mean age of the respondents was 63 (range: 30 - 92), and 36.1% reported adherence to the recommended levels of medication; 24.5% followed the physical activity level guidelines. Less than half (39.2%) met the criteria for practices related to weight management, and adherence to low-salt diet recommendations was also low (12.3%). Overall, 86.7% were nonsmokers, and 100% abstained from alcohol. The results of a logistic regression indicated that gender was significantly associated with adherence to physical activity (OR = 0.716) and non-smoking (OR = 1.503) recommendations; that is, women were more likely to take part in physical activity than men. There was also a significant association between age and adherence to both a low-salt diet (OR = 1.497) and medication (OR = 1.435). Conclusions Based on our findings, it is crucial to implement well-designed educational programs to improve hypertension self-care behaviors. PMID:27621938

  4. Imaging predictive factors and exercise training in CRT patients.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana; Santa Clara, Helena

    2016-10-14

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe chronic heart failure (CHF) and intraventricular conduction delay, which is identified by a QRS interval of 120msec or more on a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). CRT improved functional capacity, reduced hospitalizations for worsening CHF and increased survival. However, about 30-40% of patients who underwent CRT were non-responders with no clinical or echocardiographic improvement. Imaging parameters for prediction of CRT response have been reviewed. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), recognized as the gold standard to assess viability, has shown to obtain good results regarding quantification of scar burden. CMR-derived measures of mechanical dyssynchrony appear to predict the outcome of CRT, however they have not been externally validated. Nuclear imaging techniques, namely single-photon emission cardiac tomography (SPECT) provide data on scar burden and location, left ventricular (LV) function, LV contraction and mechanical dyssynchrony from a single scan. The presence, location and burden of myocardial scar have been shown to affect response to CRT. However, compared to CMR, the low spatial resolution of scintigraphy might overestimate the scar extent. This problem can be overcome by positron emission tomography (PET). SPECT has also been used to quantify dyssynchrony, using phase analysis. Imaging investigation is ongoing, trying to better identifying CRT non-responders. The combination of ExT in CRT has not been well investigated; however some data show different aerobic exercise modes and intensities can further improve CRT benefits. Data available on the effects of ExT in patients with CRT have been reviewed.

  5. Sarcopenia is a prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Takuya; Aoyagi, Yukihiko; Tanaka, Shinichi; Okadome, Jun; Morisaki, Koichi; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-04-01

    Sarcopenia has been proposed as a prognostic factor for various diseases. Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) have a very poor prognosis, but sarcopenia has not been reported as a prognostic factor for CLI patients. If sarcopenia is associated with the prognosis of CLI patients, it could help select the treatment plan. Therefore, we examined whether sarcopenia is a prognostic factor for CLI patients. We performed a retrospective study of CLI patients diagnosed with Fontaine III or IV peripheral artery disease who underwent preoperative computed tomography imaging and revascularization between January 2002 and December 2009. The presence of sarcopenia was defined as skeletal muscle area of <114.0 cm(2) for men or <89.8 cm(2) for women using transverse computed tomography scans at the third lumbar vertebra. We compared the 5-year survival rate and clinical characteristics between patients with or without sarcopenia. We also screened possible prognostic factors for overall survival using hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Of 64 eligible patients, 28 patients had sarcopenia and 36 did not. There were significant differences in age, skeletal muscle area, body mass index, and the presence of smoking, cerebrovascular disease, and hemodialysis between patients with and without sarcopenia (all P < .05). The 5-year survival rate was significantly lower in patients with sarcopenia (23.5% vs 77.5%, P = .001). Prognostic factors for overall survival were the presence of sarcopenia (HR, 3.22; 95% CI, 1.24-9.11; P = .02), requirement for hemodialysis (HR, 4.30; 95% CI, 1.60-12.2; P = .004), and postoperative complications (HR, 5.02; 95% CI, 1.90-13.7; P = .001). Our results suggest that sarcopenia is a prognostic factor for CLI patients. Exercise and nutritional interventions focusing on improving sarcopenia might be useful treatment options for CLI patients. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Predictive Factors for a Long Hospital Stay in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ko-iam, Wasana; Sandhu, Trichak; Paiboonworachat, Sahattaya; Pongchairerks, Paisal; Chotirosniramit, Anon; Chotirosniramit, Narain; Chandacham, Kamtone; Jirapongcharoenlap, Tidarat

    2017-01-01

    Background. Although the advantages of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) over open cholecystectomy are immediately obvious and appreciated, several patients need a postoperative hospital stay of more than 24 hours. Thus, the predictive factors for this longer stay need to be investigated. The aim of this study was to identify the causes of a long hospital stay after LC. Methods. This is a retrospective cohort study with 500 successful elective LC patients being included in the analysis. Short hospital stay was defined as being discharged within 24 hours after the operation, whereas long hospital stay was defined as the need for a stay of more than 24 hours after the operation. Results. Using multivariable analysis, ten independent predictive factors were identified for a long hospital stay. These included patients with cirrhosis, patients with a history of previous acute cholecystitis, cholangitis, or pancreatitis, patients on anticoagulation with warfarin, patients with standard-pressure pneumoperitoneum, patients who had been given metoclopramide as an intraoperative antiemetic drug, patients who had been using abdominal drain, patients who had numeric rating scale for pain > 3, patients with an oral analgesia requirement > 2 doses, complications, and private ward admission. Conclusions. LC difficulties were important predictive factors for a long hospital stay, as well as medication and operative factors. PMID:28239497

  7. Risk Factors for Portal Vein Thrombosis in Patients With Cirrhosis Awaiting Liver Transplantation in Shiraz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Homayon, Katayon; Motevalli, Dorna; Heidari, Seyed Taghi; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Malek-Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portal vein thrombosis is a fairly common and potentially life-threatening complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. The risk factors for portal vein thrombosis in these patients are still not fully understood. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the associations between various risk factors in cirrhotic patients and the development of portal vein thrombosis. Patients and Methods: In this case-control study performed at the Shiraz organ transplantation center, Iran, we studied 219 patients (> 18 years old) with liver cirrhosis, who were awaiting liver transplants in our unit, from November 2010 to May 2011. The patients were evaluated by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests, including factor V Leiden, prothrombin gene mutation, Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) mutation, and serum levels of protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, homocysteine, factor VIII, and anticardiolipin antibodies. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the assessed hypercoagulable states between patients with or without portal vein thrombosis. A history of previous variceal bleeding with subsequent endoscopic treatment in patients with portal vein thrombosis was significantly higher than in those without it (P = 0.013, OR: 2.526, 95% CI: 1.200 - 5.317). Conclusions: In our population of cirrhotic patients, treatment of variceal bleeding predisposed the patients to portal vein thrombosis, but hypercoagulable disorders by themselves were not associated with portal vein thrombosis. PMID:26977162

  8. Patients with brain metastases derived from gastrointestinal cancer: clinical characteristics and prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Lin, L; Zhao, C-H; Ge, F-J; Wang, Y; Chen, Y-L; Liu, R-R; Jia, R; Liu, L-J; Liu, J-Z; Xu, J-M

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to evaluate the natural history, outcome, and possible prognostic factors in patients with brain metastases derived from gastrointestinal cancers. The clinical features, prognostic factors, and the effects of different treatment modalities on survival were retrospectively investigated in 103 patients with brain metastases derived from gastrointestinal cancers. The median time from diagnosis of primary tumor to brain metastasis was 22.00 months. The interval between diagnosis of primary tumor relapse and brain metastasis was 8.00 months. The median follow-up time was 7.80 months. The median survival time after diagnosis of brain metastases was 4.10 months for all patients and 1.17 months for patients who received only steroids (36.9 %), 3.97 months for patients who only received whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT 31.1 %), 11.07 months for patients who received gamma-knife surgery alone or/and WBRT (20.4 %), and 13.70 months for patients who underwent surgery and radiotherapy (12 patients, 11.6 %) (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, extracranial metastasis, and chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors. Brain metastasis derived from gastrointestinal tract cancer is rare, and overall patient survival is poor. RPA class, chemotherapy after brain metastases, and treatment regimens were independent prognostic factors for the survival of patients with brain metastases derived from gastrointestinal cancers.

  9. Revision rhinoplasty: measurement of patient-reported outcomes and analysis of predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ozan Luay

    2016-01-01

    Considering that revision rhinoplasty is one of the most difficult plastic surgical procedures, evaluating patient satisfaction is fundamental in order to determine success and identify variables that may affect the outcomes. Our first study objective was to determine satisfaction levels in revision patients and to compare results with those obtained in primary rhinoplasty patients. Second, we sought to identify factors that may influence the degree of satisfaction. Satisfaction was evaluated in 54 revision and 54 primary rhinoplasty patients using the rhinoplasty outcome evaluation questionnaire. To identify associated factors, patients were assessed for demographic characteristics, medical history, follow-up time, reason for revision, graft usage, the severity of nasal deformity, and satisfaction with the provided care and information given before the surgery. All revision and primary rhinoplasty patients experienced improvements in satisfaction scores. Although the improvements were higher in primary rhinoplasty patients, the levels obtained in revision patients can be considered high. We found that young and male patients tend to have less satisfaction increment after the surgery. Patients who underwent revision for aesthetic reasons had higher improvements in satisfaction scores when compared to those patients who underwent revision for a combination of aesthetic and functional reasons. The improvement in satisfaction scores in patients who were satisfied with the information given before surgery was higher. Our data suggest that significant patient satisfaction is achieved after revision rhinoplasty and highlight the importance of the informed consent process when planning revision, especially on young and male patients. III.

  10. Apathy and associated factors in Mexican patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; González-Latapi, Paulina; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Martínez-Ramírez, Daniel; Velázquez-Osuna, Salvador; Camacho-Ordoñez, Azyadeh

    2014-05-01

    Apathy is one of the most common behavioral disturbances in Parkinson's disease (PD) with a reported prevalence of 17-51 %. Apathy has been associated with depression, cognitive deficits, and poor quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of apathy in Mexican subjects with PD and its correlation with clinical and demographic characteristics. A cross-sectional, descriptive, and analytic study was carried out. Consecutive subjects with PD attending the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City were included. Demographic and other relevant clinical data were collected. The Apathy Scale was applied to all subjects. A cut-off score of ≥ 14 was used. A total of 241 non-demented patients (52.7 % male) were included. Apathy was found in 43 % of subjects. Lower body mass index, older age of PD onset, cognitive decline and disease severity were all related to apathy. The use of dopamine agonists or rasagiline was more common in patients with low apathy scores. Our results show that the prevalence of apathy in Mexican subjects with PD is similar to other reports.

  11. Oncologic Patients' Knowledge Expectations and Cognitive Capacities During Illness Trajectory: Analysis of Critical Moments and Factors.

    PubMed

    Heli, Vaartio-Rajalin; Helena, Leino-Kilpi; Liisa, Iire; Kimmo, Lehtonen; Heikki, Minn

    2015-01-01

    Cancer and its management affect patients' cognitive resources and education needs in several ways. The objective of this study is to identify significant factors affecting cognitive resources and knowledge expectations of adult patients with cancer during the course of their illness trajectory. Current or former patients with cancer (n = 53) were recruited to focus group interviews and individual in-depth interviews. The informants' knowledge expectations vary during their illness trajectory and are affected by personal, situational, and clinical factors. These should be acknowledged to provide person-centered, holistic nursing care and patient education.

  12. Human factors and systems engineering approach to patient safety for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rivera, A Joy; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2008-01-01

    The traditional approach to solving patient safety problems in healthcare is to blame the last person to touch the patient. But since the publication of To Err is Human, the call has been instead to use human factors and systems engineering methods and principles to solve patient safety problems. However, an understanding of the human factors and systems engineering is lacking, and confusion remains about what it means to apply their principles. This paper provides a primer on them and their applications to patient safety.

  13. Factors related to patients' general satisfaction with removable partial dentures: a stepwise multiple regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Zlatarić, Dubravka Knezović; Celebić, Asja

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze factors related to patients' general satisfaction with removable partial dentures (RPDs), such as esthetics, retention, speech, chewing, and comfort. A total of 103 patients with Kennedy Class I RPDs (34 to 82 years old; mean age: 63; 35 men, 68 women) assessed their satisfaction with dentures. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship among the factors. Significant correlations were found between general satisfaction and each of the individual components (P < .05). The patients' assessment of esthetics explained almost 50% of general satisfaction in both arches (P < .05). Esthetics, chewing, and speech had significant effects on the patients' general satisfaction with dentures.

  14. Acute anal toxicity after whole pelvic radiotherapy in patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids: identification of dosimetric and patient factors.

    PubMed

    Jang, H; Baek, J G; Yoo, S-J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids are known to be less tolerant of radiation doses lower than known tolerance doses. In the present study, the authors sought to identify the risk factors of acute haemorrhoid aggravation after whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT). The records of 33 patients with cervical, rectal or prostate cancer with asymptomatic haemorrhoids, which were confirmed by colonoscopy before the start of radiotherapy (RT), were reviewed. Acute anal symptoms, such as anal pain and bleeding, were observed up to 1 month after RT completion. Dosimetric and patient factors were analysed, and subgroup analyses were performed. The median induction dose for acute anal symptoms was 34.1 Gy (range, 28.8-50.4 Gy). Post-operative treatment intent showed more acute anal toxicity of patient factors (p = 0.04). In subgroup analysis, post-operative treatment intent and concurrent chemoradiotherapy were found to be related to acute anal symptoms (p < 0.01). Of the dosimetric factors, V10 tended to be related to acute anal symptoms (p = 0.08). This study indicates that asymptomatic haemorrhoid may deteriorate after low-dose radiation and that patient factors, such as treatment intent and concurrent chemotherapy, probably influence anal toxicity. In patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids, WPRT requires careful dosimetry and clinical attention. The tolerance of anal canal tends to be ignored in patients with pelvic cancer who are undergoing WPRT. However, patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids may be troubled by low radiation doses, and further studies are required.

  15. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients starting hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Hui; Kim, Ha Yeon; Kang, Yong Un; Kim, Chang Seong; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan

    2015-01-01

    Background Incident hemodialysis patients have the highest mortality in the first several months after starting dialysis. This study evaluated the in-hospital mortality rate after hemodialysis initiation, as well as related risk factors. Methods We examined in-hospital mortality and related factors in 2,692 patients starting incident hemodialysis. The study population included patients with acute kidney injury, acute exacerbation of chronic kidney disease, and chronic kidney disease. To determine the parameters associated with in-hospital mortality, patients who died in hospital (nonsurvivors) were compared with those who survived (survivors). Risk factors for in-hospital mortality were determined using logistic regression analysis. Results Among all patients, 451 (16.8%) died during hospitalization. The highest risk factor for in-hospital mortality was cardiopulmonary resuscitation, followed by pneumonia, arrhythmia, hematologic malignancy, and acute kidney injury after bleeding. Albumin was not a risk factor for in-hospital mortality, whereas C-reactive protein was a risk factor. The use of vancomycin, inotropes, and a ventilator was associated with mortality, whereas elective hemodialysis with chronic kidney disease and statin use were associated with survival. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy was not associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusion Incident hemodialysis patients had high in-hospital mortality. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, infections such as pneumonia, and the use of inotropes and a ventilator was strong risk factors for in-hospital mortality. However, elective hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease was associated with survival. PMID:26484040

  16. Patient safety in the operating room: an intervention study on latent risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient safety is one of the greatest challenges in healthcare. In the operating room errors are frequent and often consequential. This article describes an approach to a successful implementation of a patient safety program in the operating room, focussing on latent risk factors that influence patient safety. We performed an intervention to improve these latent risk factors (LRFs) and increase awareness of patient safety issues amongst OR staff. Methods Latent risk factors were studied using a validated questionnaire applied to the OR staff before and after an intervention. A pre-test/post-test control group design with repeated measures was used to evaluate the effects of the interventions. The staff from one operating room of an university hospital acted as the intervention group. Controls consisted of the staff of the operating room in another university hospital. The outcomes were the changes in LRF scores, perceived incident rate, and changes in incident reports between pre- and post-intervention. Results Based on pre-test scores and participants’ key concerns about organizational factors affecting patient safety in their department the intervention focused on the following LRFs: Material Resources, Training and Staffing Recourses. After the intervention, the intervention operating room - compared to the control operating room - reported significantly fewer problems on Material Resources and Staffing Resources and a significantly lower score on perceived incident rate. The contribution of technical factors to incident causation decreased significantly in the intervention group after the intervention. Conclusion The change of state of latent risk factors can be measured using a patient safety questionnaire aimed at these factors. The change of the relevant risk factors (Material and Staffing resources) concurred with a decrease in perceived and reported incident rates in the relevant categories. We conclude that interventions aimed at unfavourable

  17. Cardiovascular risk factor control is insufficient in young patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Jensen, Jesper Møller; Brøndberg, Anders Krogh; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Jensen, Henrik Kjærulf

    2016-01-01

    Background Control of cardiovascular risk factor is important in secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) but it is unknown whether treatment targets are achieved in young patients. We aimed to examine the prevalence and control of risk factors in this subset of patients. Methods We performed a cross-sectional, single-center study on patients with documented CAD before age 40. All patients treated between 2002 and 2014 were invited to participate at least 6 months after the last coronary intervention. We included 143 patients and recorded the family history of cardiovascular disease, physical activity level, smoking status, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, metabolic status, and current medical therapy. Risk factor control and treatment targets were evaluated according to the shared guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology. Results The most common insufficiently controlled risk factors were overweight (113 [79.0%]), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol above target (77 [57.9%]), low physical activity level (78 [54.6%]), hypertriglyceridemia (67 [46.9%]), and current smoking (53 [37.1%]). Almost one-half of the patients fulfilled the criteria of metabolic syndrome. The median (interquartile range) number of uncontrolled modifiable risk factors was 2 (2;4) and only seven (4.9%) patients fulfilled all modifiable health measure targets. Conclusion Among the youngest patients with CAD, there remains a potential to improve the cardiovascular risk profile. PMID:27307744

  18. Efficacy of clobetasol spray: factors beyond patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Tina; Koo, John; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-02-01

    Clobetasol 0.05% spray, a topical clobetasol propionate, is a non-greasy formulation that has shown increased clinical efficacy in a head-to-head comparison with foam formulation. Moreover, available data from randomized, controlled, double-blind trials suggests that clobetasol spray is, in fact, slightly more effective than most, if not all, other preparations of clobetasol. The fact that clobetasol spray is exceptionally easy to comply with may have played a major role in this outcome; however, other factors must be considered. These include vehicle metamorphosis post-application as well as vehicle and excipient effects on stratum corneum permeability. Basic concepts in topical drug delivery and how they apply to this spray vehicle may further explain the greater efficacy of clobetasol spray.

  19. [FACTORS WHICH INFLUENCE THE LEAN MASS LOSS IN CANCER PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Sánchez, Eduardo; Muñoz Alferez, Maria José

    2015-10-01

    Introducción: el cáncer es una enfermedad de gran importancia sanitaria debido a las consecuencias físicas y funcionales que conlleva. Entre estas consecuencias está la desnutrición, que puede provocar una pérdida de masa magra y con ello una disminución de la calidad de vida, aumento de las estancias hospitalarias, costes sanitarios, etc. El objetivo de este estudio es conocer qué factores influyen en la pérdida de masa magra. Material y métodos: se trata de un estudio transversal en una muestra de 72 pacientes que reciben tratamiento radioterápico con finalidad curativa en un período comprendido entre el 7 de febrero y el 14 de mayo de 2014. Resultados: del total de pacientes se estudiaron 64, de los cuales el 43,7% presentan pérdida de masa magra, siendo el porcentaje de 21,8% los pacientes que pierden < 2%, el 4,7% los que presentan una pérdida entre el 2-5% y > 5%, el 17,2% de los pacientes. De entre los factores estudiados que pueden influir en la pérdida de masa magra, solo la presencia de síntomas digestivos poseen significación estadísitca (OR = 3,3 o 6,6, según tomemos como referencia el porcentaje de pérdida). Conclusiones: el objetivo del personal sanitario que trabaja con estos pacientes de evitar las consecuencias que acompañan a la pérdida de masa magra. Por todo esto, es importante actuar antes de la aparición de síntomas digestivos, mediante la prevención de los mismos, o la aplicación precoz de una intervención nutricional individualizada.

  20. Factors affecting intellectual outcome in pediatric brain tumor patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ellenberg, L.; McComb, J.G.; Siegel, S.E.; Stowe, S.

    1987-11-01

    A prospective study utilizing repeated intellectual testing was undertaken in 73 children with brain tumors consecutively admitted to Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles over a 3-year period to determine the effect of tumor location, extent of surgical resection, hydrocephalus, age of the child, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy on cognitive outcome. Forty-three patients were followed for at least two sequential intellectual assessments and provide the data for this study. Children with hemispheric tumors had the most general cognitive impairment. The degree of tumor resection, adequately treated hydrocephalus, and chemotherapy had no bearing on intellectual outcome. Age of the child affected outcome mainly as it related to radiation. Whole brain radiation therapy was associated with cognitive decline. This was especially true in children below 7 years of age, who experienced a very significant loss of function after whole brain radiation therapy.

  1. Prognostic Factors in Patients Hospitalized with Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Avinash; Yadav, Ambuj; Consul, Shuchi; Kumar, Sukriti; Prakash, Ved; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Annesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is characterized by a biochemical triad of hyperglycemia, acidosis, and ketonemia. This condition is life-threatening despite improvements in diabetic care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and biochemical prognostic markers of DKA. We assessed correlations in prognostic markers with DKA-associated morbidity and mortality. Methods Two hundred and seventy patients that were hospitalized with DKA over a period of 2 years were evaluated clinically and by laboratory tests. Serial assays of serum electrolytes, glucose, and blood pH were performed, and clinical outcome was noted as either discharged to home or death. Results The analysis indicated that significant predictors included sex, history of type 1 diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes mellitus, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total leukocyte count, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, serum magnesium, serum phosphate, serum osmolality, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminases, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminases, serum albumin, which were further regressed and subjected to multivariate logistic regression (MLR) analysis. The MLR analysis indicated that males were 7.93 times more likely to have favorable outcome compared with female patients (odds ratio, 7.93; 95% confidence interval, 3.99 to 13.51), while decreases in mean APACHE II score (14.83) and serum phosphate (4.38) at presentation may lead to 2.86- and 2.71-fold better outcomes, respectively, compared with higher levels (APACHE II score, 25.00; serum phosphate, 6.04). Conclusion Sex, baseline biochemical parameters such as APACHE II score, and phosphate level were important predictors of the DKA-associated mortality. PMID:27586452

  2. Assessing the influence of treating therapist and patient prognostic factors on recovery from axial pain.

    PubMed

    Simon, Corey B; Stryker, Sandra E; George, Steven Z

    2013-11-01

    Limited research exists regarding the influence of a treating physical therapist on patient recovery (deemed therapist effects). Recent randomized clinical trials data provide an indication of small therapist effects for manual therapy; however, the extent to which therapist effects exist in the average outpatient facility is not clear. Moreover, patient-related prognostic factors, like fear-avoidance or pain duration, are important to consider since these may also influence the extent of therapist effects. To assess therapist effects and the influence of patient prognostic factors on recovery from axial pain in an outpatient orthopedic physical therapy facility. Clinical data were collected from consecutive patients with musculoskeletal neck and low back pain. Patient outcomes included pain intensity (visual analog scale) and functional measure (CareConnections functional outcomes index) scores. Therapist effects estimates and the influence of intake fear-avoidance (fear-avoidance beliefs questionnaire) and pain duration (days) were examined using multilevel linear or regression modeling. A total of 258 patients (160 females; mean age 46.4±14.9 years) completed physical therapy and the required outcome measures. Five physical therapists (1-13 years of experience, mean 5.8 years) provided treatment. Therapists effects did not exist for discharge pain intensity or function after accounting for intake scores (P > 0.05). Further, therapist experience did not influence patient outcomes. Patient prognostic factors of fear-avoidance and pain duration did not influence therapists effects on the same patient outcome measures (P > 0.05). Preliminary findings suggest that there are no major differences in patient outcome based on either the individual therapist (therapist effect) or therapist experience in this type of PT setting. Established prognostic factors had no influence on therapist effects for this cohort. Future analyses should consider intrinsic therapist factors

  3. Identification and prevalence of PTSD risk factors in ECMO patients: A single centre study.

    PubMed

    Tramm, Ralph; Hodgson, Carol; Ilic, Dragan; Sheldrake, Jayne; Pellegrino, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is one of the most invasive rescue therapies for acute heart and/or lung failure. Survivors have high rates of adverse mental health outcomes, such as post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and manifest post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Yet no study to date has identified and explored PTSD risk factors in these patients. The primary aim of this study was to determine and explore post-traumatic stress risk factors for patients treated with ECMO. It also aimed to provide a baseline profile for future hypothesis testing with respect to risk factor exposure, level of exposure and post-traumatic stress outcomes in these patients. Retrospective cohort study. The study was conducted at the Alfred Hospital Melbourne, Australia. Patients were selected in 2012 from an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) registry that prospectively included all patients admitted to ICU and treated with ECMO. Data were extracted from the ICU ECMO registry, ICU and ward charts, progress notes, referrals, drug charts and discharge letters. Data were descriptively analysed. Patients treated with ECMO are exposed to almost all investigated PTSD risk factors. These included psychiatric history (psychiatric comorbidities), admission to ICU and treatment (prolonged ventilation during prolonged ICU stay), and drug therapy (all patients treated with PTSD risk related drugs). ECMO patients are exposed to PTSD risk factors such as young age, mechanical ventilation, drug administration, delirium and agitation. Younger age, heterogeneous conditions, profound illness severity and prolonged ICU stay describe the case complexity of patients and may explain these findings. Patients in ICU are increasingly conscious during active treatment and this may have positive or negative psychological effects. "Awake" ECMO in which patients are conscious while on active life support may represent a unique PTSD risk factor in this perspective. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier

  4. Genetic factors influencing inhibitor development in a cohort of South African haemophilia A patients.

    PubMed

    Lochan, A; Macaulay, S; Chen, W C; Mahlangu, J N; Krause, A

    2014-09-01

    A critical complication of factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy in Haemophilia A (HA) treatment is inhibitor development. Known genetic factors predisposing to inhibitor development include FVIII (F8) gene mutations, ethnicity, a family history of inhibitors and FVIII haplotype mismatch. The aim of this study was to characterize and correlate these genetic factors in a cohort of South African HA patients. This was a retrospective study that included 229 patients and involved the analysis of patient files, HA molecular and clinical databases and molecular analysis of the F8 gene haplotype. Of the 229 patients, 51% were of black ethnicity, 49% were white, 5% had mild HA, 4% were moderate and 91% were severe, 36% were int22 positive and 13% were inhibitor positive. Of the inhibitor positive patients, 72% were black patients. Inhibitors were reported in 27% of black int22 positive patients, 13% of black int22 negative patients, 9% of white int22 positive patients and 7% of white int22 negative. The H1 haplotype was more common in whites (75%) and H2 was more common in blacks (74%). H3 and H5 were only found in black patients and had a higher frequency of inhibitor development than H1 and H2. In this small HA cohort, black patients had a significantly higher frequency of inhibitor development and the results were indicative of an association between inhibitor development, ethnicity and haplotype.

  5. Management and Outcomes Among Chinese Hospitalized Patients With Established Cardiovascular Disease or Multiple Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingang; Yang, Yuejin; Gu, Hongqiu; Li, Wei; Hu, Dayi

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the management and outcomes among hospitalized patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease (PAD), or with multiple (≥ 2) cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (multiple risk factors [MRFs]). We retrospectively studied 3732 hospitalized patients of either CV disease or ≥ 2 risk factors for atherothrombosis from October 2004 to January 2005. Outcomes included CV death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and hospitalization for atherothrombotic events. About one-third had disease involving ≥ 1 vascular bed. Medication was more intense in patients with CAD than in others. The lowest use of statins and antiplatelet treatment was in the PAD-only group. Patients with PAD experienced a higher CV mortality (5.1%) than the patients with CAD (3.73%) or stroke (4.1%), P < .001. Cardiovascular death ranged from 1.2% for patients with MRFs, 2.8% for patients with 1-bed disease, 4.7% for patients with 2-bed disease to 6.4% for patients with 3-bed disease (P for trend <.001). For hospitalized patients with established atherosclerotic arterial disease, a substantial increase in CV event rates occurs with increasing numbers of affected arterial beds. Patients with PAD were at an especially high risk.

  6. Factors associated with subendocardial ischemia risk in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno Caldin da; Sanjuan, Adriano; Costa-Hong, Valéria; Reis, Luciene Dos; Graciolli, Fabiana; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Bortolotto, Luiz Aparecido; Moyses, Rosa Maria Affonso; Elias, Rosilene Motta

    2016-01-01

    Bone metabolism disorder (BMD) and vascular dysfunction contribute to excess cardiovascular mortality observed in hemodialysis patients. Vascular dysfunction, a new marker of atherosclerosis, can play a role in this risk. Even though associated with higher mortality in the general population, such vascular evaluation in patients on hemodialysis has not been extensively studied. In this cross-sectional study, hemodialysis patients were submitted to flow-mediated dilation, subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) and ejection duration index assessment, in order to estimate the impact of BMD markers on vascular dysfunction. A matched cohort of patients with (n = 16) and without (n = 11) severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) was studied. Additionally, time spent under severe SHPT was also evaluated. Patients with severe SHPT had lower SEVR and higher ejection duration index, indicating higher cardiovascular risk. Lower SEVR was also associated to diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.435, p = 0.049), serum 25-Vitamin-D levels (r = 0.479, p = 0.028) and to more time spent under severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), defined as time from PTH > 500pg/ml until parathyroidectomy surgery or end of the study (r = -0.642, p = 0.027). In stepwise multiple regression analysis between SEVR and independent variables, lower SEVR was independently associated to lower serum 25-Vitamin-D levels (p = 0.005), female sex (p = 0.012) and more time spent under severe SHPT (p = 0.001) in a model adjusted for age, serum cholesterol, and blood pressure (adjusted r² = 0.545, p = 0.001). Subendocardial perfusion was lower in patients with BMD, reflecting higher cardiovascular risk in this population. Whether early parathyroidectomy in the course of kidney disease could modify such results still deserves further investigation. Distúrbios do metabolismo ósseo (DMO) e alterações da função vascular contribuem para a elevada mortalidade de pacientes em hemodiálise. A disfunção vascular

  7. Identifying risk factors for refractory febrile neutropenia in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Tokunaga, Shoji; Ikegame, Satoshi; Harada, Eiji; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Uchino, Junji; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-02-01

    Information about the development of febrile neutropenia in patients with solid tumors remains insufficient. In this study, we tried to identify the risk factors for refractory febrile neutropenia in patients with lung cancer. A total of 59 neutropenic fever episodes associated with anti-tumor chemotherapy for lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed. We compared patient characteristics according to their initial response to treatment with antibiotics. For 34 of 59 (58%) episodes a response to initial antibiotics was obtained whereas 25 of 59 (42%) were refractory to treatment. Multivariate analysis demonstrated independent risk factors for refractory febrile neutropenia with lung cancer. These risk factors were the severity of febrile neutropenia (odds ratio (OR) 6.11; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.85-20.14) and C-reactive protein more than 10 mg/dl (OR 4.39; 95% CI 1.22-15.74). These factors could predict outcome for patients with lung cancer who develop refractory febrile neutropenia.

  8. Factor IX mutations in haemophilia B patients in Malaysia: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Balraj, Pauline; Ahmad, Munirah; Khoo, Alan Soo Beng; Ayob, Yasmin

    2012-06-01

    Haemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. Identification of mutations contributing to defective factor IX may be advantageous for precise carrier and prenatal diagnosis. We studied 16 patients from 11 families, consisting of 8 patients of the Malay ethnic group, of which 6 were siblings. Factor IX mutations have not been previously reported in the Malay ethnic group. The functional region of the factor IX gene was sequenced and mutations were identified in either the exon or intronic regions in 15 of the patients. One novel mutation, 6660_6664delTTCTT was identified in siblings with moderate form of haemophilia B. Mutations identified in our patients when linked with disease severity were similar to findings in other populations. In summary, this preliminary data will be used to build a Malaysian mutation database which would facilitate genetic counseling.

  9. Risk Factors for Hospitalization in a National Sample of Medicare Home Health Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Madigan, Elizabeth A.; Sheehan, T. Joseph; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Kleppinger, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Acute care hospitalization during or immediately following a Medicare home health care (HHC) episode is a major adverse outcome, but little has been published about HHC patient-level risk factors for hospitalization. We determined risk factors at HHC admission associated with subsequent acute care hospitalization in a nationally representative Medicare patient sample (n=374,123). Hospitalization was measured using Medicare claims data; risk factors were measured using Outcome Assessment and Information Set data. Seventeen percent of sample members were hospitalized. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that the most influential risk factors (all p<.001) were: skin wound as primary HHC diagnosis; clinician-judged guarded rehabilitation prognosis; congestive heart failure as primary HHC diagnosis; presence of depressive symptoms; dyspnea severity; and Black, compared to White. HHC initiatives that minimize chronic condition exacerbations, and that actively treat depressive symptoms, might help reduce Medicare patient hospitalizations. Unmeasured reasons for higher hospitalization rates among Black HHC patients deserve further investigation. PMID:24781967

  10. Cytokines, matrix metalloproteases, angiogenic and growth factors in tears of normal subjects and vernal keratoconjunctivitis patients.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, A; Sathe, S; Bortolotti, M; Beaton, A; Sack, R

    2009-05-01

    To detect the presence of multiple mediators and growth factors in tears of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) patients with active disease using stationary phase antibody arrays. Tears were collected from 12 normal subjects (CT) and 24 active VKC patients. Tears were centrifuged and successively probed using three microwell plate arrays specific for: (i) cytokines: interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha; (ii) growth factors: basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), platelet-derived growth factor, thrombopoietin, angiopoietin-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), keratocyte growth factor, tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease (TIMP)-1 and heparin-binding epithelial growth factor (HB-EGF) and (iii) matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-13, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. Interleukin-8 signals were detected in all CT and highly detected in all VKC samples. The Th2-type cytokines, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 were detected only in tears of VKC patients. Signals for bFGF, HB-EGF, VEGF and HGF were detected in 41-87% of VKC samples and in few CT samples. Only TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were found in all normal and patient tear samples, whereas MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9 and MMP-10 were highly present in all VKC samples. Stationary phase antibody array methodology was useful for the screening of various cytokines, growth factors and MMPs in tears. These analyses identified in tears of VKC patients previously unreported factors including MMP-3 and MMP-10 and multiple proteases, growth factors and cytokines, which may all play an important role in the pathogenesis of conjunctival inflammation.

  11. Factors associated with severe uncontrolled asthma and the perception of control by physicians and patients.

    PubMed

    Vennera, María del Carmen; Picado, César; Herráez, Lys; Galera, Jordi; Casafont, Jordi

    2014-09-01

    Despite current treatments, more than half of patients with asthma are not controlled. The objective was to evaluate the correlation between control perceived by patients and physicians, compared with control evaluated according to criteria of the Spanish Guidelines for Asthma Management (GEMA), and to investigate the factors associated with that control. Multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study including 343 patients with severe persistent asthma according to GEMA criteria seen in the Department of Pulmonology and Allergology. The correlation between asthma control perceived by the patient, the physician and according to clinical judgment based on the GEMA criteria was calculated, and a multivariate analysis was used to determine variables related to the perception of asthma control. According to GEMA criteria, only 10.2% of patients were well controlled, 27.7% had partial control and 62.1% were poorly controlled. Both the physicians and the patients overestimated control: 75.8% and 59.3% of patients had controlled asthma according to the patient and the physician, respectively, and were not controlled according to GEMA (P<.0001). Patients with uncontrolled asthma according GEMA had higher body mass index (P=.006) and physical inactivity (P=.016). Factors associated with a perceived lack of control by both physicians and patients were: nocturnal awakenings (≥ 1 day/week), frequent use of rescue medication (≥ 5 days/week) and significant limitation in activities. Discrepant factors between physicians and patients were dyspnea and emergency room visits (patients only), FEV1 ≤ 80% and a poorer understanding of the disease by the patient (physicians only). Only 10% of patients with severe asthma evaluated in this study are controlled according to GEMA criteria. Patients and physicians overestimate control and the overestimation by patients is greater. Physical inactivity and obesity are associated with a lack of control according to GEMA. Copyright

  12. Factors that enable nurse-patient communication in a family planning context: a positive deviance study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Mi; Heerey, Michelle; Kols, Adrienne

    2008-10-01

    Family planning programmes in developing countries need a better understanding of nurse-patient communication in order to improve the quality of counselling. To identify factors in the clinic and in the community that enable nurses and patients to communicate effectively with one another. The study explored the personal experiences of nurses and patients who communicate especially effectively during family planning consultations (so-called "positive deviants"). Sixty-four randomly selected public clinics located in East Java, Indonesia. Seven positive deviant nurses and 32 positive deviant patients were identified from among 64 nurses and 768 patients who participated in an earlier patient coaching study. Flooding prevented 5 patients from participating in the study, reducing their number to 27. Investigators conducted: (1) a content analysis of qualitative data collected by structured in-depth interviews and focus-group discussions (FGDs) with positive deviant nurses and patients, and (2) analyses of variance (ANOVA) of quantitative data on clinic, nurse, and patient characteristics. Positive deviant nurses identified four factors, listed in rough order of importance, that helped them communicate effectively: independent study to strengthen their knowledge and skills; communication aids; feedback from colleagues; and motivation stemming from a desire to help people, patients' appreciation, husband's support, and increased income. Positive deviant patients identified five enabling factors: motivation due to their need for a service; confidence in their own communication skills; positive feedback from nurses; belief in patients' right and responsibility to communicate with nurses; and communication aids. Insights from positive deviant nurses and patients suggest that efforts to improve nurse-patient communication should go beyond conventional communication skills training. Managers should consider a mix of clinic-based interventions (such as peer feedback

  13. Insight of patients and their parents into schizophrenia: Exploring agreement and the influence of parental factors.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, Alexandra; Norton, Joanna; Bortolon, Catherine; Robichon, Melissa; Rolland, Camille; Boulenger, Jean-Philippe; Raffard, Stéphane; Capdevielle, Delphine

    2015-08-30

    Poor insight is found in up to 80% of schizophrenia patients and has been associated with multiple factors of which cognitive functioning, social and environmental factors. Few studies have explored associations between patient insight and that of their biological parents', and the influence of parental factors. Insight was assessed in 41 patients and their biological parents with Amador's Scale for the assessment of Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD). Parents' knowledge about schizophrenia and critical attitudes were assessed with validated self-report questionnaires. Both groups underwent cognitive assessments for working memory and executive functioning. Insight in patients and their parents was not associated for any of the SUMD dimensions but a significant correlation was found between patient and parent awareness of treatment effect for patient-parent dyads with frequent daily contact. Low parental critical attitude was associated with higher patient awareness of symptoms and a high parental memory task score with high patient insight. Our study is the first to suggest a possible influence of parental factors such as critical attitudes and cognitive performance on patient insight. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Predictive factors for supraclavicular lymph node recurrence in N1 breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kong, Moonkyoo; Hong, Seong Eon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors for supraclavicular lymph node recurrence (SCLR) in N1 breast cancer patients and define a high-risk subgroup who might benefit from supraclavicular nodal radiotherapy (RT). From January 1995 to December 2009, 113 breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive axillary lymph nodes were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent breast-conserving surgery (BCS) or modified radical mastectomy (MRM). RT was given to all patients who received BCS. Among the patients given MRM, those with breast tumors >5 cm in size received RT. Regional nodal irradiation was not applied. Systemic chemotherapy was given to 105 patients (92.9%). Patient data were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed to identify predictive factors for SCLR. The median follow-up duration was 6.5 years, with 5- and 10-year actuarial SCLR rates of 9.3% and 11.2%, respectively. Factors associated with SCLR on univariate analysis included histologic grade, number of dissected axillary lymph nodes, lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension (ECE), and adjuvant chemotherapy. On multivariate analysis, histologic grade and ECE remained significant. The patient group with grade 3 and ECE had a significantly higher rate of SCLR compared with the remainder (5-year SCLR rate; 71.4% vs. 4.0%, p<0.001). Histologic grade and ECE status are significant predictive factors for SCLR. Supraclavicular nodal RT is necessary in N1 breast cancer patients featuring histologic grade 3 and ECE.

  15. Patient-related risk factors that predict poor outcome after total hip replacement.

    PubMed Central

    MacWilliam, C H; Yood, M U; Verner, J J; McCarthy, B D; Ward, R E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with poor outcome after total hip replacement (THR) surgery. DATA SOURCES: This article is the first to present results from the American Medical Group Association (AMGA) THR consortium. STUDY DESIGN: The outcomes evaluated were pain and physical function. Eight patient risk factors were evaluated. These included the age, sex, race, marital status, and education of the patient; whether the patient had polyarticular disease or other comorbid conditions; and the patient's preoperative pain and physical function score. DATA COLLECTION: Data were collected from patients using AMGA-approved, self-administered questionnaires preoperatively and at six weeks, three months, six months, one year, and two years postoperatively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the patient risk factors studied, race, education, number of comorbid conditions, and preoperative Health Status Questionnaire (HSQ) score were found to be associated with poor outcome. These risk factors were found to have an effect on both pain and physical function at six months postoperatively. Patients with higher preoperative scores were found to have higher postoperative scores, but substantially fewer of these patients received any benefit from their surgery. For each 10-point increase in preoperative score, patients could expect at least a 6-point decrease in postoperative improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that preoperative status is an important predictor of outcome for THR. PMID:8943994

  16. Patient-related risk factors for tooth loss in aggressive periodontitis after active periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Amelie; El Sayed, Nihad; Kim, Ti-Sun; Reitmeir, Peter; Eickholz, Peter; Pretzl, Bernadette

    2011-04-01

    Evaluation of patient-related risk factors contributing to tooth loss and recurrence of periodontitis 10.5 years after initial therapy in patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP). Eighty-four of 174 patients were included. Re-examination consisted of patient's history, clinical examination and test for interleukin (IL)-1 composite genotype. Patients' charts were searched for regularity of maintenance and initial diagnosis. Statistical analysis was performed using Poisson and logistical regression analysis. The responder rate was 48%. Thirteen of 84 patients presented a localized AgP, 68 were females and 29 smoked. One hundred and thirteen teeth out of 2154 were lost after therapy (1.34 teeth/patient). Age (p=0.0018), absence of IL-1 composite genotype (p=0.0091) and educational status (p=0.0085) were identified as statistically significant risk factors for tooth loss. Twenty patients exhibited recurrence of periodontitis at re-examination. Smoking (p=0.0034) and mean Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI) (p=0.0239) contributed significantly to recurrence of disease. No patient participating regularly in supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) showed disease recurrence. Age, absence of IL-1 composite genotype and low social status are detected as risk factors for tooth loss. Smoking and high mean GBI are associated with an increased risk for recurrence of periodontitis, whereas regular SPT acts as a protective factor. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Molecular Analysis of Factor VIII and Factor IX Genes in Hemophilia Patients: Identification of Novel Mutations and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A.; Taher, Mohiuddin M.; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Athar, Mohammed; Bogari, Neda M.; Abalkhail, Halah A.; Owaidah, Tarek MA.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hemophilias A and B are X-linked bleeding disorders caused by mutations in the factor VIII and factor IX genes, respectively. Our objective was to identify the spectrum of mutations of the factor VIII and factor IX genes in Saudi Arabian population and determine the genotype and phenotype correlations by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Methods For genotyping, blood samples from Saudi Arabian patients were collected, and the genomic DNA was amplified, and then sequenced by Sanger method. For molecular simulations, we have used softwares such as CHARMM (Chemistry at Harvard Macromolecular Mechanics; http://www.charmm-gui.org) and GROMACS. In addition, the secondary structure was determined based on the solvent accessibility for the confirmation of the protein stability at the site of mutation. Results Six mutations (three novel and three known) were identified in factor VIII gene, and six mutations (one novel and five known) were identified in factor IX gene. The factor VIII novel mutations identified were c.99G>T, p. (W33C) in exon 1, c.2138 DelA, p. (N713Tfs*9) in eon14, also a novel mutation at splicing acceptor site of exon 23 c.6430 - 1G>A. In factor IX, we found a novel mutation c.855G>C, p. (E285D) in exon 8. These novel mutations were not reported in any factor VIII or factor IX databases previously. The deleterious effects of these novel mutations were confirmed by PolyPhen2 and SIFT programs. Conclusion The protein functional and structural studies and the models built in this work would be appropriate for predicting the effects of deleterious amino acid substitutions causing these genetic disorders. These findings are useful for genetic counseling in the case of consanguineous marriages which is more common in the Saudi Arabia. PMID:28270892

  18. GASTRIC CANCER AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS IN HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Galvão de Azevedo, Ioná; Leal Muniz Carneiro, Izabel Cristina; Oliveira Tomiya, Marília Tokiko; Pessoa de Araújo Burgos, Maria Goretti

    2015-07-01

    Introducción: a pesar de la disminución de la incidencia y la mortalidad, el cáncer gástrico sigue siendo el cuarto tumor más frecuente y la segunda causa de muerte por cáncer en el mundo. Objetivos: analizar los factores asociados con el cáncer gástrico en pacientes hospitalizados. Método: estudio de corte serie de casos, realizado en hospitales de Recife. Los datos fueron obtenidos a partir de cuestionarios adaptados de un modelo previamente validado, que contenían los problemas socioeconómicos, los hábitos alimentarios, el estilo de vida, los antecedentes familiares de cáncer, la infección por H. pylori y los datos antropométricos. Resultados: de los 33 pacientes, tuvieron un ligero predominio las mujeres con edades ≥ 60 años, de zonas rurales, con bajos niveles de educación e ingresos. De acuerdo con el IMC, el 57,6% fueron normales y el 69,7% en riesgo nutricional cuando se utiliza% PP. Se encontró que el 42,4% no se sometió a examen para H. pylori, el 48,5% tenían una predisposición genética, el 75,8% eran sedentarios, el 60,6% eran fumadores y ex fumadores, el 51,5% eran adictos al alcohol y el 36,4% tenían sobrepeso. Hubo consumo frecuente de alimentos salados, alimentos fritos, baja ingesta de frutas, alimentos que contienen nitratos/ nitritos, así como una inadecuada conservación de los alimentos. Conclusión: el bajo nivel socioeconómico, la inactividad física y los hábitos alimentarios inadecuados fueron factores predominantes para el cáncer gástrico en el grupo analizado.

  19. [Determinant Factors of Morbidity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Jacinto, Margarida; Silva, Eliana; Riso, Nuno; Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca

    2017-05-31

    Severity in systemic lupus erythematosus may vary from mild to even fatal consequences. There are no biomarkers to predict the disease's prognosis. The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/ Systemic Damage Index defines systemic lupus erythematosus disease severity and is found to predict prognosis. To test damage determinants in a single-centre systemic lupus erythematosus cohort. Retrospectively followed systemic lupus erythematosus female patients (defined by the identification of at least four systemic lupus erythematosus American College of Rheumatology criteria - fulfillment 100%, n = 76) over the past five years. Age of onset, ethnicity, disease duration, number of American College of Rheumatology criteria at the end of follow-up, cumulative: renal, neuropsychiatric and articular phenotypes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, smoking and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2K were correlated to the presence and degree of irreversible damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index). Accumulation of American College of Rheumatology criteria was measured in a sub-group of patients followed from disease onset (within a year of the first symptom ascribed to systemic lupus erythematosus) (n = 39 - 51%); Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index were performed. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney tests and Spearman correlation rho (Sig. 2-tailed p < 0.05). Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/Systemic Damage Index > 0 was present in 56.6% and significantly associated to a longer duration, a higher number of American College of Rheumatology criteria and a neuropsychiatric phenotype when compared with those with no damage. The final number of American College of Rheumatology criteria accrued was positively correlated to a higher disease activity over the past five years of follow

  20. Patient factors that influence clinicians’ decision making in self-management support: A clinical vignette study

    PubMed Central

    Bos-Touwen, Irene D.; Trappenburg, Jaap C. A.; van der Wulp, Ineke; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; de Wit, Niek J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Self-management support is an integral part of current chronic care guidelines. The success of self-management interventions varies between individual patients, suggesting a need for tailored self-management support. Understanding the role of patient factors in the current decision making of health professionals can support future tailoring of self-management interventions. The aim of this study is to identify the relative importance of patient factors in health professionals’ decision making regarding self-management support. Method A factorial survey was presented to primary care physicians and nurses. The survey consisted of clinical vignettes (case descriptions), in which 11 patient factors were systematically varied. Each care provider received a set of 12 vignettes. For each vignette, they decided whether they would give this patient self-management support and whether they expected this support to be successful. The associations between respondent decisions and patient factors were explored using ordered logit regression. Results The survey was completed by 60 general practitioners and 80 nurses. Self-management support was unlikely to be provided in a third of the vignettes. The most important patient factor in the decision to provide self-management support as well as in the expectation that self-management support would be successful was motivation, followed by patient-provider relationship and illness perception. Other factors, such as depression or anxiety, education level, self-efficacy and social support, had a small impact on decisions. Disease, disease severity, knowledge of disease, and age were relatively unimportant factors. Conclusion This is the first study to explore the relative importance of patient factors in decision making and the expectations regarding the provision of self-management support to chronic disease patients. By far, the most important factor considered was patient’s motivation; unmotivated patients

  1. Risk factors associated with venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Piper, Keaton; Algattas, Hanna; DeAndrea-Lazarus, Ian A; Kimmell, Kristopher T; Li, Yan Michael; Walter, Kevin A; Silberstein, Howard J; Vates, G Edward

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients undergoing spinal surgery are at risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). The authors sought to identify risk factors for VTE in these patients. METHODS The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database for the years 2006-2010 was reviewed for patients who had undergone spinal surgery according to their primary Current Procedural Terminology code(s). Clinical factors were analyzed to identify associations with VTE. RESULTS Patients who underwent spinal surgery (n = 22,434) were identified. The rate of VTE in the cohort was 1.1% (pulmonary embolism 0.4%; deep vein thrombosis 0.8%). Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis revealed 13 factors associated with VTE. Preoperative factors included dependent functional status, paraplegia, quadriplegia, disseminated cancer, inpatient status, hypertension, history of transient ischemic attack, sepsis, and African American race. Operative factors included surgery duration > 4 hours, emergency presentation, and American Society of Anesthesiologists Class III-V, whereas postoperative sepsis was the only significant postoperative factor. A risk score was developed based on the number of factors present in each patient. Patients with a score of ≥ 7 had a 100-fold increased risk of developing VTE over patients with a score of 0. The receiver-operating-characteristic curve of the risk score generated an area under the curve of 0.756 (95% CI 0.726-0.787). CONCLUSIONS A risk score based on race, preoperative comorbidities, and operative characteristics of patients undergoing spinal surgery predicts the postoperative VTE rate. Many of these risks can be identified before surgery. Future protocols should focus on VTE prevention in patients who are predisposed to it.

  2. Socioeconomic factors associated with visual impairment and ophthalmic care utilization in patients with type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jongnam; Rudnisky, Christopher; Bowen, Sarah; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-01

    To examine the association between socioeconomic factors and ophthalmic care services/visual impairment among patients with diabetes. Data from the Survey on Living with Chronic Disease in Canada (SLCDC)-Diabetes Component 2011 were used. A cross-sectional, nationally representative sample of patients with diabetes weighted to represent the civilian, noninstitutionalized Canadian population with self-reported type II diabetes. Socioeconomic factors were classified into predictive factors, need, and non-need factors. Factors associated with the ophthalmic care utilization and visual impairment were assessed using logistic regression models, weighted for the SLCDC sampling strategy. Among all patients with type II diabetes, factors associated with increased eye screening were: (i) discussion of diabetic complications with health professionals (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% CI 1.28-3.19); (ii) having private insurance (OR 3.23, 95% CI 2.21-4.73); and (iii) duration of diabetes longer than 10 years (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.04-2.25). Among asymptomatic patients (those who reported having no visual impairment), patients with lower income had 40% decreased odds of having eye screening services compared with those with higher income (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.37-0.98). Among all patients with type II diabetes, visual impairment was more likely in females (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.12-2.09), older patients (OR 18.12, 95% CI 6.63-49.51), and those with poor self-rated health (OR 3.10, 95% CI 1.62-5.96). Our study found that interactions between health professionals and patients, as well as having private health insurance, were the main factors associated with ophthalmic resource utilization, whereas age, sex, duration of diabetes, and self-rated health were associated with visual impairment in patients with type II diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigating factors associated with adherence behaviour in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: an observational patient-centered outcome study

    PubMed Central

    Efficace, F; Baccarani, M; Rosti, G; Cottone, F; Castagnetti, F; Breccia, M; Alimena, G; Iurlo, A; Rossi, A R; Pardini, S; Gherlinzoni, F; Salvucci, M; Tiribelli, M; Vignetti, M; Mandelli, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Optimal adherence to imatinib therapy is of paramount importance to maximise treatment effectiveness in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). The main objective of this study was to investigate patient-reported personal factors associated with adherence behaviour. Methods: Analysis was conducted on 413 CML patients receiving long-term therapy with imatinib. Adherence behaviour was measured with the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale and personal factors investigated included: quality of life, perceived social support, fatigue, symptom burden, psychological wellbeing and desire for additional information. Key socio-demographic and treatment-related factors were also taken into account. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate factors associated with optimal adherence to therapy. Results: In all, 53% of patients reported an optimal adherence behaviour. The final multivariate model retained the following variables as independent predictors of optimal adherence to therapy: desire for more information (ref. no), odds ratio (OR)=0.43 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.29–0.66; P<0.001), social support (higher score representing greater support), OR=1.29 (95% CI, 1.11–1.49; P<0.001) and concomitant drug burden (ref. no), OR=1.82 (95% CI, 1.18–2.80; P=0.006). Conclusion: This study suggests that a higher level of social support, satisfaction with information received and concomitant drug burden are the main factors associated with greater adherence to long-term imatinib therapy. PMID:22871884

  4. [Predict factors associated with malnutrition from patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) in head and neck cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Arribas, L; Hurtós, L; Milà, R; Fort, E; Peiró, I

    2013-01-01

    Patient Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) is a validated tool for nutrition evaluation in patients with cancer. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition in head and neck cancer patients at diagnosis and evaluate the independent prognostic factors for malnutrition from PG-SGA. All outpatients attending at the Head and Neck Cancer Multidisciplinary Meeting for primary diagnosis, staging and treatment were evaluated by an oncology dietitian using the patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA). Patients with recurrences or secondary tumours will be excluded. 64 patients were evaluated (55 men and 9 women) with an average age of 63 years and body mass index (BMI) of 25.3 kg/m(2) (SD ± 5.18). After the nutritional assessment we observed that 43.8% of patients were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. The most frequent symptom at diagnosis was dysphagia (48.4%) and anorexia (26.6%). From PG-SGA, the main prognostic factors (p<0,001) were the percentage of weight loss, serum albumin levels, BMI and the presence of dysphagia or/and anorexia prior diagnosis. Parameters as BMI, weight loss and low albumin levels at the time of diagnosis in head and neck cancer patients are independent predictors for malnutrition as well as the presence of anorexia or dysphagia.reaffirms the need for sustainability of interventions over time. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Sang-Young; Park, Sang-Il; Nam, Byung-Ho; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size {>=}2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p < .05). A statistically significant difference was found in the 3-year recurrence-free survival rate among the no further treatment, RT, and CRT groups (67.5%, 90.5%, and 97.5%, respectively; p < .05). The incidence of Grade 3-4 hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicities was not significantly different statistically between the RT and CRT groups (6.1% and 13.4%, respectively; p > .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

  6. Factors influencing treatment team recommendations to review tribunals for forensic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Martin, Krystle; Martin, Erica

    2016-07-01

    It is the responsibility of forensic psychiatric hospitals to detain and treat patients, gradually reintegrating them into society; decisions to release patients must balance risk to the public with maintaining the least restrictive environment for patients. Little is known about the factors considered when making such decisions and whether these factors have been empirically linked to future risk of violence. The current study explores the factors predictive of forensic treatment teams' recommendations for patients under the care of the Ontario Review Board (ORB). Factors differ depending on level of security; decisions on medium secure units were influenced by the presence of active symptoms and patients' overall violence risk level and decisions made on minimum secure units were influenced by the number of critical incidents that occurred within the recommendation year. Understanding the factors used to make recommendations to the ORB tribunal helps treatment teams to reflect on their own decision-making practices. Furthermore, the results serve to inform us about factors that influence length of stay for forensic psychiatric patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. [Risk factors for skin cancer development in patients after organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Imko-Walczuk, Beata; Piesiaków, Maria Luiza; Okuniewska, Aleksandra; Jaśkiewicz, Janusz; Lizakowski, Sławomir; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja; Rutkowski, Bolesław

    2012-11-13

    Cancer has become the second most common cause of death in patients after organ transplantation. Among all cancers arising de novo after transplantation skin cancers are the most common, accounting for 95% of all skin neoplasms. Due to the significantly higher morbidity, aggressive, rapid progression of cancer and unfavorable prognosis, the population requires a specific oncological approach. Therefore, special attention should be paid to factors predisposing to the development of cancer, including skin cancer, in patients after organ transplantation. Some of these factors are well understood, while the role of others is still ambiguous. Among the etiological factors mentioned are those that are associated with the recipient. These include genetic factors such as male sex, fair skin and inability to be tanned, and compatibility of the HLA system, and non genetic factors such as patient age, chronic skin ulcers and scars, the type of transplanted organ, immunosuppression, and particularly the type and cumulative doses of drugs. In addition, the pathogenesis of cancer is influenced by environmental factors such as exposure to sunlight and therefore latitude, ionizing radiation, chemical carcinogens and viral infections. Knowledge of etiological factors and mechanisms of etiopathogenesis allow for indication and observation of patients with increased risk of cancer as well as faster healing in these patients.  

  8. Factors associated with suicidal ideations and suicidal attempts in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gourav; Avasthi, Ajit; Grover, Sandeep; Singh, Shubh Mohan

    2014-12-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of suicidal ideations (SI) and to study the risk factors for SI and suicide attempt in patients with OCD. One hundred and thirty patients with OCD were assessed on Yale-Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale and Symptom Checklist, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Beck Anxiety Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Buss–Durkee Hostility Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Family Interview for Genetic Studies, Brown Assessment of Beliefs Scale and DSM-IV insight criteria for OCD. Of the 130 patients, 60 (46.1%) had current SI and 81 (62.3%) patients had life time SI. Of the 60 patients with current SI, 30 had current depression as assessed on SCID-CV. More than half (48 out of 81; 59.25%) of the patients with lifetime SI had lifetime comorbid depression. Ten patients had history of lifetime suicide attempts. Current SI in patients without current depression were associated with female gender, presence of comorbid psychiatric illness, contamination obsessions and cleaning/washing compulsions. To conclude this study suggests that SI are highly prevalent in patients with OCD and although depression may be a contributory factor for suicidal ideations in patients with OCD, but it is not the sole risk factor for suicidal ideations.

  9. Factors influencing the survival period in Japanese patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Akagi, Akio; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2015-10-15

    Although Japanese cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) generally involve longer survival periods compared to those from other countries, details regarding the factors influencing survival are unclear. To determine the influence of certain factors on survival, we retrospectively assessed 51 Japanese MM1-type sCJD patients with respect to background, clinical course, and disease management. No significant differences were found between men and women, tracheotomy and nontracheotomy patients, or patients treated in public and other types of hospitals. Although the survival period of tube-fed patients was significantly longer than that of patients who were not tube fed, survival of patients fed via a nasal tube did not differ significantly from that of gastrostomy-fed patients. The proportion of tube-fed patients was 68.6% (35/51). Disease duration was not significantly associated with age or year of onset. However, it was associated with time from onset to first recognition of myoclonus, first recognition of periodic sharp-wave complexes on electroencephalogram, and progression to the akinetic mutism state. Mechanical ventilation was not performed for any patient. Because the total disease duration increased in cases with a slowly progressive clinical course as a natural outcome, we concluded that the most crucial factor contributing to the prolonged survival of Japanese sCJD patients was tube feeding once the akinetic mutism state had been reached.

  10. Factors affecting decision-making of patients choosing acupuncture in a public hospital

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Thean Howe Bryan; Kong, Keng He; Low, Yin Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background With increasing evidence to support its practice, acupuncture has been integrated within many hospitals around the world. The purpose of this study is to understand the factors affecting decision making of patients as they select acupuncture treatment for their medical conditions and symptoms within a public hospital. Methods A qualitative study consisting of in depth interviews with 14 patients was conducted. All patients attended an acupuncture clinic within a public hospital. Data collected was analysed via thematic analysis. Results Four main factor groups affecting decision making of patients were identified- factors affecting the level and value of patient-centric care, the confidence and trust patients place within the acupuncture service, the presence of collaborative efforts between acupuncturists and Western medicine practitioners, and the knowledge, culture and belief society has regarding the role of acupuncture and Western medicine. All participants interviewed had more than one factor group present as enablers toward their eventual selection of acupuncture for ailment management. It was also noted that although the majority of participants had sufficient knowledge regarding acupuncture, there were a select few who had misperceptions or no knowledge regarding certain aspects of acupuncture. Conclusions There may be certain patterns in the way patients choose to utilise acupuncture services in public hospitals. Further studies should also be carried out in other public hospitals to analyse the factor groups identified further. PMID:26697443

  11. Free rheumatoid factor in dental periapical lesions and gingivae of patients with rheumatoid disease.

    PubMed

    Malmström, M; Jokinen, E J

    1975-01-01

    To determine whether evidence of rheumatoid inflammation, in the form of free rheumatoid factor, might be found in the teeth-supporting tissues of patients with known rheumatoid disease, tissues from the dental periapical lesions of one group of 50 rheumatoid and 23 control patients, and from the marginal gingivae of a second group of 58 rheumatoid patients were examined by the direct immunofluorescence technique that employed fluroesceinisothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled aggregated human IgG. The gingival tissues contained no free rheumatoid factor. Free rheumatoid factor-producing plasma cells were, however, detected in the dental periapical lesions of 3 of the 50 rheumatoid patients, i.e. in 6%, and in 1 of the control patients i.e., in 4%. This control patient had suffered from nephritis 10 months prior to the investigation. Because free rheumatoid factor did occur, albeit infrequently, in the dental periapical lesions of rheumatoid patients, a search for IgG rheumatoid factor, known to occur in greater abundance than the IgM type although "hidden", was indicated.

  12. Congenital combined deficiency of coagulation factors: a study of seven patients.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Majid; Tabibian, Shadi; Hosseini, Maryam Sadat; Alizadeh, Shaban; Hosseini, Soudabeh; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Combined deficiency of coagulation factors is considered as an extremely rare bleeding disorder (RBD) inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. This disorder is more likely to occur in regions with a high rate of consanguineous marriages or in restricted communities. Sistan and Baluchistan, a province in southeast of Iran with a high rate of consanguinity, is a clear model of such regions with a very high prevalence of recessively inherited disorders. The aim of this study was to report the frequency of combined factor deficiency in this province. This descriptive study was conducted on 358 patients with RBD. Demographic information and medical history of each patient were recorded, and the patients were examined by a physician. Routine screening tests were carried out for all patients, and further coagulation tests including coagulation factor activity and antigen assays were subsequently performed for all suspected patients. Among 358 patients, four were found to be affected with combined factor (F)V and FVIII deficiency (F5F8D). In addition, one patient with combined deficiency of FVII-FXIII, one with combined FVII-FX and one with combined FVIII-FIX deficiency were identified. In Sistan and Baluchistan Province, coinheritance of recessively inherited disorders like combined coagulation factor deficiencies was surprisingly higher than expected.

  13. Audiology patient fall statistics and risk factors compared to non-audiology patients.

    PubMed

    Criter, Robin E; Honaker, Julie A

    2016-10-01

    To compare fall statistics (e.g. incidence, prevalence), fall risks, and characteristics of patients who seek hearing healthcare from an audiologist to individuals who have not sought such services. Case-control study. Two groups of community-dwelling older adult patients: 25 audiology patients aged 60 years or older (M age: 69.2 years, SD: 4.5, range: 61-77) and a control group (gender- and age-matched ±2 years) of 25 non-audiology patients (M age: 69.6, SD: 4.7, range: 60-77). Annual incidence of falls (most recent 12 months) was higher in audiology patients (68.0%) than non-audiology patients (28.0%; p = .005). Audiology patients reported a higher incidence of multiple recent falls (p =.025) and more chronic health conditions (p = .028) than non-audiology patients. Significantly more audiology patients fall on an annual basis than non-audiology patients, suggesting that falls are a pervasive issue in general hearing clinics. Further action on the part of healthcare professionals providing audiologic services may be necessary to identify individuals at risk for falling.

  14. Factors affecting enrollment in literacy studies for English- and Spanish-speaking cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongyan; Valenzuela, Veronica; Diaz, Patricia; Cella, David; Hahn, Elizabeth A

    2008-09-10

    Study participation bias can affect inferences regarding outcomes. The objective is to compare characteristics of participants and non-participants of two literacy studies. Two studies of literacy and health-related quality of life were conducted in English- and Spanish-speaking cancer patients. Patients had a range of literacy skills, and each enrolled patient received $20. Nine hundred and twenty-two English-speaking patients were approached. Among the 651 who met eligibility criteria, 420 were enrolled (64.5 per cent). Four hundred and eighty-seven Spanish-speaking patients were approached. Among the 455 who met eligibility criteria, 414 were enrolled (91.0 per cent) (p<0.001). Multiple imputations were performed to impute missing data. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that recruiting site was the only factor predictive of enrollment in Spanish-speaking patients. Age, education, and recruiting site were important predictors in English-speaking patients. Sensitivity analysis using patients with complete data generated similar results. Spanish-speaking patients enrolled at a much higher rate than English-speaking patients, which is encouraging for future research in this underserved population. One important literacy-related factor (education) did not affect enrollment in Spanish-speaking patients, suggesting that there was no selection bias in this study. Recruiting sites with more indigent patients and long clinic waiting times had higher enrollment, suggesting that monetary compensation and time availability may be important considerations in study participation.

  15. Cholelithiasis and markers of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with metabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Koller, Tomas; Kollerova, Jana; Hlavaty, Tibor; Huorka, Martin; Payer, Juraj

    2012-02-01

    Cholelithiasis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) share the same risk factors. The aim of our study was to explore the relationship between these two conditions and to identify independent predictors of both diseases in a cohort of patients with metabolic risk factors. Consecutive patients with metabolic risk factors referred to the outpatient clinic during a one-year period were included. Cholelithiasis was defined by the presence of gallstones on abdominal ultrasound examination at inclusion or previously performed cholecystectomy. NAFLD was defined by the presence of at least one surrogate marker such as elevated alanine aminotransferase and/or gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and/or ultrasound signs of fatty liver. Other common liver diseases were thoroughly excluded. The prevalence of cholelithiasis among patients with and without NAFLD was determined and clinical and laboratory parameters were identified as predictors of NAFLD by multivariate logistic regression. In total, 482 consecutive patients were included: mean age 61 years; 61% were women; 52% of patients had more than 2 metabolic risk factors (obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, or low HDL cholesterol). NAFLD and cholelithiasis were present in 41% and 34% of all patients, respectively. Significantly higher prevalence of cholelithiasis was found among patients with NAFLD compared with patients without NAFLD (47% vs. 26%, respectively; p < 0.0001). In multivariate logistic regression model, type 2 diabetes (odds ratio (OR) = 1.99), BMI above 25 kg/m(2) (OR = 1.78), and cholelithiasis (OR = 1.77) were identified as independent predictors of NAFLD. Fifty six percent of patients with cholelithiasis had NAFLD compared with 33% of patients without cholelithiasis (p < 0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression identified age above 50 years (OR = 3.46), NAFLD (OR = 1.92), triglycerides above 1.7 mmol/l (OR = 1.91), BMI above 25 kg/m(2) (OR = 1.84), and total cholesterol

  16. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome: clinical description and triggering factors in 8 patients.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Rodriguez, J; Garcia-Carrasco, M; Ramos-Casals, M; Enriquez-Coronel, G; Colchero, C; Cervera, R; Font, J

    2000-01-01

    In 1992, an attempt to single out a different and important group of patients was adopted by introducing the term "catastrophic" antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) to describe their potentially life threatening clinical course, characterized by acute multiorgan failure (3 or more organ systems damaged). Patients previously described in the literature showed certain differences that appear to distinguish this minority group of patients with catastrophic APS from the majority of APS patients. We describe 8 patients with catastrophic APS, focusing especially on the possible extrinsic factors (mainly infections) that might trigger this "catastrophic" situation.

  17. Differences in Risk Factors for Suicidality between African American and White Patients Vulnerable to Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderwerker, Lauren C.; Chen, Joyce H; Charpentier, Peter; Paulk, Mary Elizabeth; Michalski, Marion; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2007-01-01

    Risk factors for suicidal ideation and attempts have been shown to differ between African Americans and Whites across the lifespan. In the present study, risk factors for suicidality were examined separately by race/ethnicity in a population of 131 older adult patients considered vulnerable to suicide due to substance abuse and/or medical frailty.…

  18. The factor structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) in Parkinson disease patients.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Danielle S; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Harrington, Donna; Shulman, Lisa M

    2017-05-01

    Psychological distress is common among Parkinson disease (PD) patients. Screening tools, such as the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18), help clinicians to identify and manage PD patients with psychiatric symptoms. The objective of this study is to test the factor structure of the BSI-18 in PD patients. Analysis was conducted on PD patients who had initial visits at a movement disorders center from 2004 to 2015. Univariate analysis was used to describe the distribution of socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. The BSI-18 was used to determine the prevalence of clinically significant psychological distress. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) treating BSI-18 items as ordered categorical data were conducted. Five competing models were tested. Multiple fit indices, parsimony, and past theory were used to select the final model. In the study sample (n=1067), 18.7%, 22.5%, 15.4%, and 15.0% of patients had BSI-18 T-scores indicative of clinically significant global psychological distress, somatization, depression, and anxiety, respectively. Of the competing models, the final model chosen was the second-order three-factor structure with somatization, depression, and anxiety loaded on psychological distress. The original proposed factor structure of the BSI-18 was validated in this patient population. Consequently, this study confirms the construct validity of the BSI-18 for screening of psychological distress in PD patients. Findings highlight somatization as a particularly important component of psychological distress in PD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Behavioral Activation Therapy for Depressed Cancer Patients: Factors Associated with Treatment Outcome and Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopko, D. R.; Robertson, S. M. C.; Colman, L.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been increased focus on evaluating the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for cancer patients. Among the several limitations inherent to these programs of research, few studies have targeted patients with well-diagnosed clinical depression and little is known about factors that best predict treatment outcome and…

  20. Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the…

  1. Factors Influencing Patient Satisfaction with Nursing Care in a Military Outpatient Clinic.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This study focuses on the factors which influence patient satisfaction with nursing care in an Air Force outpatient clinic. The review of literature...correlated with overall satisfaction. However, the trusting relationship was most highly correlated with patient satisfaction with nursing care .

  2. Frequency of and risk factors for poor cognitive performance in hemodialysis patients

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are few detailed data on cognition in patients undergoing dialysis. We evaluated the frequency of and risk factors for poor cognitive performance using detailed neurocognitive testing. In this cross-sectional cohort study, 314 hemodialysis patients from 6 Boston-area hemodialysis units underwe...

  3. [Anxiety disorders and influence factors in adolescent patients with cleft lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Ran, Hao; Jiang, Chang-wei; Zhou, Meng

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the anxiety disorders and influence factors that occur in adolescent patients with cleft lip and palate and to provide theoretical foundation for mental intervention. A total of 120 adolescent patients with cleft lip and palate were investigated using a general information questionnaire, the self-rating anxiety scale, and the social support rating scale (SSRS). The influence factors of anxiety disorders were analyzed. The effective questionnaires were 119. The occurrence rate of anxiety disorder in adolescent patients was 49.6% (59/119), and the occurrence rates of mild, moderate, and severe anxieties were 41.2% (49/119), 7.6% (9/119), and 0.8% (1/119), respectively. The gender, residential area, disease category, family status (one child or no children), and incidence rate of anxiety disorder in patients were statistically different (P<0.05). The SSRS scores of patients with anxiety disorder were lower than those of patients without anxiety disorder (P<0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that gender and social support were predictive factors of the occurrence of anxiety disorder (R=0.318). A high anxiety disorder rate occurred in adolescent patients with cleft lip and palate. dender and social support were important influencing factors for anxiety disorder. In the after-mental intervention, considerable attention should be given to the anxiety disorders of patients and improve their mental health.

  4. Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the…

  5. Factors associated with frovatriptan response in patients with migraine: A prospective, observational study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jong-Geun; Park, Sung-Pa

    2016-04-01

    Almost one-third of patients with migraine do not adequately respond to triptans. We examined factors contributing to frovatriptan response in patients with migraine. We enrolled new patients with migraine who consecutively visited our headache clinic. Eligible patients were instructed to take 2.5 mg of frovatriptan as soon as possible after migraine attack. The responsiveness was determined by whether headache was relieved or absent within 4 hours after the intake of frovatriptan. We assessed frovatriptan to be efficacious when headache responded to its administration in at least one of two successive migraine attacks and inefficacious when headache was not relieved in either attack. We included demographic, clinical and psychiatric variables in the analysis of factors associated with frovatriptan response. Of 128 eligible patients, 28 (21.9%) experienced frovatriptan inefficacy. In 24 patients with current major depressive disorder, 12 (50.0%) had frovatriptan inefficacy. Only current major depressive disorder was identified as a risk factor for inefficacy (odds ratio = 5.500, 95% confidence interval 2.103-14.382, ITALIC! p = 0.001). Depression may be a risk factor of frovatriptan inefficacy in patients with migraine, even though half of patients with major depressive disorder respond to frovatriptan. © International Headache Society 2015.

  6. Epithelial cells in bone marrow of oesophageal cancer patients: a significant prognostic factor in multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thorban, S; Rosenberg, R; Busch, R; Roder, R J

    2000-01-01

    The detection of epithelial cells in bone marrow, blood or lymph nodes indicates a disseminatory potential of solid tumours. 225 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus were prospectively studied. Prior to any therapy, cytokeratin-positive (CK) cells in bone marrow were immunocytochemically detected in 75 patients with the monoclonal anti-epithelial-cell antibody A45-B/B3 and correlated with established histopathologic and patient-specific prognosis factors. The prognosis factors were assessed by multivariate analysis. Twenty-nine of 75 (38.7%) patients with oesophageal cancer showed CK-positive cells in bone marrow. The analyses of the mean and median overall survival time showed a significant difference between patients with and without epithelial cells in bone marrow (P< 0.001). Multivariate analysis in the total patient population and in patients with curative resection of the primary tumour confirmed the curative resection rate and the bone marrow status as the strongest independent prognostic factors, besides the T-category. The detection of epithelial cells in bone marrow of oesophageal cancer patients is a substantial prognostic factor proved by multivariate analysis and is helpful for exact preoperative staging, as well as monitoring of neoadjuvant therapy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883665

  7. Factors associated with hepatitis C infection among patients with skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Chantavoraluk, Somjai

    2013-12-01

    The present study attempted to assess factors associated with positive anti-HCV among patients with skin diseases. A retrospective analysis of 3,496 subjects' history profiles from the HCV antibody surveillance projects performed from 2000 to 2007. Only 150 subject profiles with skin diseases were included in the analysis of factors associated with positive anti-HCV Patient profiles including socio-demographic parameters, the main risk behavior or risk exposure, types of skin diseases, anti-HIV status, and results of anti-HCV were analyzed using Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Results revealed that only 10 from 150 studied patients (6.7%) were positive for anti-HCV antibody. Patient profiles including socio-demographic parameters, the main risk behavior or risk exposure, types of skin diseases, and anti-HIV status among patients with or without anti-HCV were compared and analyzed to assess factors associated with positive anti-HCV. It was found that patient's income, types of skin disease, and anti-HIV status were significantly associated with positive anti-HCV among this group, p = 0.0240, p = 0.0053 and p = 0.0462, respectively. This analysis found three studied factors including patient's income, types of skin disease, and anti-HIV status to be significantly associated with HCV infection in patients with skin diseases. However, a large-scale work should be done to confirm the present study.

  8. Factors associated with knowledge and safety skills of arthritis patients receiving biologics: A survey of 677 patients.

    PubMed

    Rat, Anne-Christine; Fautrel, Bruno; Flipon, Elisabeth; Gossec, Laure; Marguerie, Laurent; Nataf, Henri; Pallot-Prades, Béatrice; Poilvert, Rose-Marie; Royant, Valérie; Sadji, Fatiha; Sordet, Christelle; Thevenot, Corinne; Beauvais, Catherine

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to determine patient and rheumatologist factors associated with the safety skills of patients receiving bDMARDs for inflammatory arthritis. Data were obtained from a descriptive observational cross-sectional nationwide survey performed in 2011 in France. Community- and hospital-based rheumatologists were selected at random. The BioSecure questionnaire was used to collect information on patient safety skills. Of the 677 patients included (mean age 53±13years old; 452 (67%) women, 411 (61%) had RA; 421 (64%) received subcutaneous bDMARDs). Patients had received information about their treatments from their physician 610 (90%), a nurse 207 (31%), by a written booklet 398 (59%), and/or during therapeutic patient education (TPE) sessions 99 (15%). The median BioSecure total score was 72/100 (IQR 60-82). In total, 99 (16.4%) patients had a low skill level; 321 (53.2%) a moderate skill level and 183 (30.3%) a high skill level. On multivariate regression analysis, as compared with high safety skills, low skills were associated with living alone (OR 2.8 [95% CI 1.3⿿6.0]), low educational level (OR 4.3 [2.1⿿8.9]), living in a large city (OR 3.1 [1.2⿿8.2]), being unemployed (OR 3.3 [1.6⿿6.7]) and not receiving written information, participating in TPE sessions or consulting a nurse (OR 3.8 [1.6⿿8.8]). One rheumatologist-related factor was a high number of patients receiving bDMARDs in the practice. We reveal factors associated with low safety skills of patients receiving bDMARDs for inflammatory arthritis, which should be addressed to improve safety skills in this population. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of genetic factors in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and iron overload - a prospective series of 234 patients.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Natalie; Chaze, Iphigénie; Alary, Anne-Sophie; Tachon, Gaëlle; Cunat, Séverine; Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Bismuth, Michael; Larrey, Dominique; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Schved, Jean-François; Donnadieu-Rigole, Hélène; Blanc, Pierre; Aguilar-Martinez, Patricia

    2016-05-01

    Iron overload (IO) in HFE-related hereditary haemochromatosis is associated with increased risk of liver cancer. This study aimed to investigate the role of other genes involved in hereditary IO among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with HCC diagnosed in our institution were included in this prospective study. Those with ferritin levels ≥300 μg/L (males) or ≥200 μg/L (females) and/or transferrin saturation ≥50% (males) or ≥45% (females) had liver iron concentration (LIC) evaluated by MRI. HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were screened. Genetic analyses of genes involved in hereditary IO (HFE, HJV/HFE2, HAMP, TFR2, SLC40A1, GNPAT) were performed in patients with increased LIC. A total of 234 patients were included; 215 (92%) had common acquired risk factors of HCC (mainly alcoholism or chronic viral hepatitis). 119 patients had abnormal iron parameters. Twelve (5.1%) were C282Y homozygotes, three were compound C282Y/H63D heterozygotes. LIC was measured by MRI in 100 patients. Thirteen patients with a LIC>70 μmol/g were enrolled in further genetic analyses: two unrelated patients bore the HAMP:c.-153C>T mutation at the heterozygous state, which is associated with increased risk of IO and severe haemochromatosis. Specific haplotypes of SLC40A1 were also studied. Additional genetic risk factors of IO were found in 18 patients (7.7%) among a large series of 234 HCC patients. Screening for IO and the associated at-risk genotypes in patients who have developed HCC, is useful for both determining etiologic diagnosis and enabling family screening and possibly primary prevention in relatives. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Restoration Survival: Revisiting Patients' Risk Factors Through a Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    van de Sande, F H; Collares, K; Correa, M B; Cenci, M S; Demarco, F F; Opdam, Njm

    2016-09-01

    A literature review was conducted to investigate the influence of patient-related factors on restoration survival in posterior permanent teeth as well as to report the methods used to collect these factors. The selection of articles on longitudinal clinical studies investigating the survival of posterior restorations (except full crowns and temporary fillings) and including patient-related factors was performed by applying predefined criteria. The review was organized into two parts, the first describing how patient factors were assessed in the studies (n=45) and the second presenting the statistical significance (n=27) and size of the effect (n=11) of these factors on restoration survival. Patient-related factors mentioned in the studies included age; gender; caries risk; caries activity/severity; decayed, missing, filled teeth; number of restorations; oral hygiene; and bruxism, among others. Sixteen studies included the patient age or age range in the analysis, which was found to be significant in 47% of the studies. Regarding gender, four of 17 reports found a significant effect on survival, showing more failures for men in three studies. The caries risk profile or related variables were included in the analysis of 15 studies, and a significant effect on survival was reported for high-caries-risk individuals (or related variables) in 67% of these studies. Bruxism was also found to influence restoration survival in three of six studies where this variable was investigated. Some issues were found regarding the reporting of methods used to classify patients according to risk and were thoroughly discussed. In view of the information gathered in this review, the assessment of patient factors along with other variables should become part of clinical studies investigating restoration survival, since several of these factors were shown to influence the failure of restorations, regardless of the material type.

  11. Factors associated with patient, and diagnostic delays in Chinese TB patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delay in seeking care is a major impediment to effective management of tuberculosis (TB) in China. To elucidate factors that underpin patient and diagnostic delays in TB management, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of factors that are associated with delays in TB care-seeking and diagnosis in the country. Methods This review was prepared following standard procedures of the Cochrane Collaboration and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement and checklist. Relevant studies published up to November 2012 were identified from three major international and Chinese literature databases: Medline/PubMed, EMBASE and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure). Results We included 29 studies involving 38,947 patients from 17 provinces in China. Qualitative analysis showed that key individual level determinants of delays included socio-demographic and economic factors, mostly poverty, rural residence, lack of health insurance, lower educational attainment, stigma and poor knowledge of TB. Health facility determinants included limited availability of resources to perform prompt diagnosis, lack of qualified health workers and geographical barriers. Quantitative meta-analysis indicated that living in rural areas was a risk factor for patient delays (pooled odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)): 1.79 (1.62, 1.98)) and diagnostic delays (pooled OR (95% CI): 1.40 (1.23, 1.59)). Female patients had higher risk of patient delay (pooled OR (95% CI): 1.94 (1.13, 3.33)). Low educational attainment (primary school and below) was also a risk factor for patient delay (pooled OR (95% CI): 2.14 (1.03, 4.47)). The practice of seeking care first from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TMC) providers was also identified as a risk factor for diagnostic delay (pooled OR (95% CI): 5.75 (3.03, 10.94)). Conclusion Patient and diagnostic delays in TB care are mediated by individual and health facility factors. Population

  12. Prevalence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk factors among the general population and osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Yun, Jae Moon; Chang, Chong Bum; Piao, Heng; Yu, Su Jong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the prevalence of possible risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and their age-group specific trend among the general population and osteoarthritis patients. METHODS We utilized data from the National Health Insurance Service that included claims data and results of the national health check-up program. Comorbid conditions (peptic ulcer, diabetes, liver disease, chronic renal failure, and gastroesophageal reflux disease), concomitant drugs (aspirin, clopidogrel, cilostazol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid, anticoagulants, and SSRI), personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) were considered as possible UGIB risk factors. We randomly imputed the prevalence of infection in the data considering the age-specific prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in Korea. The prevalence of various UGIB risk factors and the age-group specific trend of the prevalence were identified. Prevalence was compared between osteoarthritis patients and others. RESULTS A total of 801926 subjects (93855 osteoarthritis patients) aged 20 and above were included. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors became higher as the age increased. The prevalence of each comorbid condition and concomitant drug were higher in osteoarthritis patients. Thirty-five point zero two percent of the overall population and 68.50% of osteoarthritis patients had at least one or more risk factors of UGIB. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors in younger age groups were also substantial. Furthermore, when personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) and H. pylori infection were included, the prevalence of concurrent multiple risk factors increased greatly even in younger age groups. CONCLUSION Prevalence of UGIB risk factors was high in elderly population, but was also considerable in younger population. Patient with osteoarthritis was at higher UGIB risk than those without osteoarthritis

  13. Prevalence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk factors among the general population and osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Yun, Jae Moon; Chang, Chong Bum; Piao, Heng; Yu, Su Jong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2016-12-28

    To assess the prevalence of possible risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and their age-group specific trend among the general population and osteoarthritis patients. We utilized data from the National Health Insurance Service that included claims data and results of the national health check-up program. Comorbid conditions (peptic ulcer, diabetes, liver disease, chronic renal failure, and gastroesophageal reflux disease), concomitant drugs (aspirin, clopidogrel, cilostazol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid, anticoagulants, and SSRI), personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) were considered as possible UGIB risk factors. We randomly imputed the prevalence of infection in the data considering the age-specific prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in Korea. The prevalence of various UGIB risk factors and the age-group specific trend of the prevalence were identified. Prevalence was compared between osteoarthritis patients and others. A total of 801926 subjects (93855 osteoarthritis patients) aged 20 and above were included. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors became higher as the age increased. The prevalence of each comorbid condition and concomitant drug were higher in osteoarthritis patients. Thirty-five point zero two percent of the overall population and 68.50% of osteoarthritis patients had at least one or more risk factors of UGIB. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors in younger age groups were also substantial. Furthermore, when personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) and H. pylori infection were included, the prevalence of concurrent multiple risk factors increased greatly even in younger age groups. Prevalence of UGIB risk factors was high in elderly population, but was also considerable in younger population. Patient with osteoarthritis was at higher UGIB risk than those without osteoarthritis. Physicians should consider

  14. Risk Factors and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with IBD with Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Loes H C; Pierik, Marieke; Derikx, Lauranne A A P; de Jong, Elke; Kievit, Wietske; van den Heuvel, Tim R A; van Rosendael, Alexander R; Plasmeijer, Elsemieke I; Dewint, Pieter; Verhoeven, Rob H A; Overbeek, Lucy I H; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Hoentjen, Frank; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E

    2017-08-22

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk to develop malignant melanoma and this risk may increase with use of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. Impaired survival of immunosuppressed melanoma patients is reported in transplant and rheumatology patients. This study aims to (1) identify risk factors for melanoma development in patients with IBD, (2) compare clinical characteristics of melanoma in patients with IBD to the general population, and (3) assess the influence of immunosuppressive medication on survival. We retrospectively searched the Dutch Pathology Database to identify all Dutch patients with IBD with cutaneous melanoma between January 1991 and December 2011. We then performed 2 case-control studies. To identify risk factors for melanoma development in IBD, we compared patients with IBD with melanoma to the general IBD population. To compare outcome and survival after melanoma diagnosis, we compared cases with non-IBD melanoma patients. We included 304 patients with IBD with melanoma, 1800 IBD controls, and 8177 melanoma controls. IBD cases had more extensive IBD (ulcerative colitis: pancolitis: cases 44.5% versus IBD controls without melanoma 28.1%; P < 0.01; Crohn's disease: ileal and colonic disease: cases 57.9% versus controls 48.9%; P = 0.02). Despite a lower Nodes (N)-stage in patients with IBD (N1+ 8.3% versus 18.2%; P < 0.01) with comparable Tumor (T) and Metastasis (M) stages, survival was similar between groups, regardless of immunosuppressive or anti-TNF therapy. This study showed that IBD extent is a risk factor for melanoma development. Despite the lower N-stage in patients with IBD, we could not confirm impaired survival after melanoma in patients with IBD, regardless of anti-TNF and/or thiopurine use.

  15. Zika Virus Infection in Patient with No Known Risk Factors, Utah, USA, 2016

    PubMed Central

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R.; Novosad, Shannon A.; Dunn, Angela C.; Brent, Carolyn R.; Savage, Harry M.; Faraji, Ary; Peterson, Dallin; Dibbs, Andrew; Vietor, Brook; Christensen, Kimberly; Laven, Janeen J.; Godsey, Marvin S.; Christensen, Bryan; Beyer, Brigette; Cortese, Margaret M.; Johnson, Nina C.; Panella, Amanda J.; Biggerstaff, Brad J.; Rubin, Michael; Fridkin, Scott K.; Nakashima, Allyn K.

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, Zika virus disease developed in a man (patient A) who had no known risk factors beyond caring for a relative who died of this disease (index patient). We investigated the source of infection for patient A by surveying other family contacts, healthcare personnel, and community members, and testing samples for Zika virus. We identified 19 family contacts who had similar exposures to the index patient; 86 healthcare personnel had contact with the index patient, including 57 (66%) who had contact with body fluids. Of 218 community members interviewed, 28 (13%) reported signs/symptoms and 132 (61%) provided a sample. Except for patient A, no other persons tested had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection. Of 5,875 mosquitoes collected, none were known vectors of Zika virus and all were negative for Zika virus. The mechanism of transmission to patient A remains unknown but was likely person-to-person contact with the index patient. PMID:28726601

  16. Zika Virus Infection in Patient with No Known Risk Factors, Utah, USA, 2016.

    PubMed

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Novosad, Shannon A; Dunn, Angela C; Brent, Carolyn R; Savage, Harry M; Faraji, Ary; Peterson, Dallin; Dibbs, Andrew; Vietor, Brook; Christensen, Kimberly; Laven, Janeen J; Godsey, Marvin S; Christensen, Bryan; Beyer, Brigette; Cortese, Margaret M; Johnson, Nina C; Panella, Amanda J; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Rubin, Michael; Fridkin, Scott K; Staples, J Erin; Nakashima, Allyn K

    2017-08-01

    In 2016, Zika virus disease developed in a man (patient A) who had no known risk factors beyond caring for a relative who died of this disease (index patient). We investigated the source of infection for patient A by surveying other family contacts, healthcare personnel, and community members, and testing samples for Zika virus. We identified 19 family contacts who had similar exposures to the index patient; 86 healthcare personnel had contact with the index patient, including 57 (66%) who had contact with body fluids. Of 218 community members interviewed, 28 (13%) reported signs/symptoms and 132 (61%) provided a sample. Except for patient A, no other persons tested had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection. Of 5,875 mosquitoes collected, none were known vectors of Zika virus and all were negative for Zika virus. The mechanism of transmission to patient A remains unknown but was likely person-to-person contact with the index patient.

  17. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire in Turkish Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Tuğba; Özen, Şükrü; Kutlutürkan, Sevinç

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ) in Turkish cancer patients. Methods: This methodological study involved 135 cancer patients. Statistical methods included confirmatory or exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach alpha coefficients for internal consistency. Results: The values of fit indices are within the acceptable range. The alpha coefficients for emotional illness representations, cognitive illness representations, and total scale are 0.83, 0.80, and 0.85, respectively. Conclusions: The results confirm the two-factor structure of the Turkish BIPQ and demonstrate its reliability and validity. PMID:28217734

  18. Injuries in Patients with Epilepsy and Some Factors Associated with Injury

    PubMed Central

    MOLLAOĞLU, Mukadder; BOLAYIR, Ertuğrul

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate injuries in patients with epilepsy and some factors associated with injury. Methods This study included 126 epileptic patients who attended a neurology outpatient clinic of a hospital between March 2009 and March 2010. Data were collected using a patient information form and an injury evaluation form. The data were evaluated using percentage, mean and the Chi square test. Result 82.5% of patients have sustained injury due to an epileptic seizure. Soft tissue injuries were the most common (70.2%), followed by head injury (61.5%), dental and tongue injury (%58.6), burns (24%), and orthopaedic injury (21.2%). The most common site of burns were the upper extremities and the face (36% and 24%, respectively). Burns occurred during cooking in 32% of cases. Five patients had upper extremity fractures. Four patients faced the risk of bathtub drowning. The injuries usually occurred at home. The significant risk factors for injury were generalized tonic-clonic seizures and high frequency of seizures. Twenty-six patients were taken to the emergency unit due to an injury. Conclusion Injury is a common problem in patients with epilepsy. Dental and tongue injury was the most common seizure-related injury. The risk factors were generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and high frequency of seizures. Patients with epilepsy can lead normal lives but certain precautions are needed to prevent seizure-related injuries.

  19. Diarrhoea risk factors in enterally tube fed critically ill patients: a retrospective audit.

    PubMed

    Jack, Leanne; Coyer, Fiona; Courtney, Mary; Venkatesh, Bala

    2010-12-01

    Diarrhoea in the enterally tube fed (ETF) intensive care unit (ICU) patient is a multi-factorial problem. Diarrhoeal aetiologies in this patient cohort remain debatable; however, the consequences of diarrhoea have been well established and include electrolyte imbalance, dehydration, bacterial translocation, peri anal wound contamination and sleep deprivation. This study examined the incidence of diarrhoea and explored factors contributing to the development of diarrhoea in the ETF, critically ill, adult patient. After institutional ethical review and approval, a single centre medical chart audit was undertaken to examine the incidence of diarrhoea in ETF, critically ill patients. Retrospective, non-probability sequential sampling was used of all emergency admission adult ICU patients who met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Fifty patients were audited. Faecal frequency, consistency and quantity were considered important criteria in defining ETF diarrhoea. The incidence of diarrhoea was 78%. Total patient diarrhoea days (r=0.422; p=0.02) and total diarrhoea frequency (r=0.313; p=0.027) increased when the patient was ETF for longer periods of time. Increased severity of illness, peripheral oxygen saturation (Sp02), glucose control, albumin and white cell count were found to be statistically significant factors for the development of diarrhoea. Diarrhoea in ETF critically ill patients is multi-factorial. The early identification of diarrhoea risk factors and the development of a diarrhoea risk management algorithm is recommended. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Risk factors associated with falls in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yuko; Kimbara, Yoshiyuki; Kodera, Remi; Tsuboi, Yuki; Sato, Ken; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Mori, Seijiro; Ito, Hideki; Araki, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated risk factors of falls in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 211 patients aged ≧60years (168 diabetic patients and 43 non-diabetic control subjects) were studied. Factors associated with falls in the past year were retrospectively examined using multiple logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of patients who had a history of falls in the past year was twice as high as in diabetic patients compared in control subjects (36.9% vs. 18.6%, P<0.05). When diabetic patients were exclusively analyzed, the presence of any level of hypoglycemia and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) scores correlated with patients' falls. The presence of hypoglycemia (OR 3.62, 95% CI: 1.242-10.534, P=0.018), cognitive impairment (OR 3.63, 95% CI: 1.227-10.727, P=0.020), and high Fall Risk Index scores (OR 1.2, 95% CI: 1.010-1.425, P=0.039) was independently correlated with the presence of multiple falls. When the diabetic patients were divided into three groups according to the frequency of hypoglycemia episodes, the prevalence of falls increased as the frequency of hypoglycemia increased. Hypoglycemia was a risk factor of falls in elderly type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of psychological factors in orthodontic patients with TMD as applied to the "TMJ Scale".

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Motegi, Etsuko; Nomura, Mayumi; Narimiya, Yukie; Katsumura, Sakura; Miyazaki, Haruyo; Kaji, Hatsuhiko; Watanabe, Kazuya; Yamaguchi, Hideharu

    2002-05-01

    Physical and psychological evaluation have been required for TMD patients whose problems are multi dimensional. The questionnaire named the "TMJ Scale" was created to differentiate subjective TMD symptoms of patients. The purpose of this study was to clarify the reliability of the TMJ Scale for Japanese orthodontic patients with TMD and to differentiate the symptoms. Fifty orthodontic patients (average age 21y4m) with a chief complaint of TMD symptoms were compared with thirty patients (average age 21y1m) without TMD symptoms. The results were as follows: female patients in the symptom group in particular showed a higher degree of stress due to the chronic pain and abnormalities than those in the non-symptom group. Significant differences were observed in Pain Report, Joint Dysfunction and Global Scale at the 0.1% significant level, in Non-TM Disorder, Psychological Factor and Chronicity at the 1% level, and in Palpation Pain and Perceived Malocclusion at the 5% level in females. Few psychological problems were observed in male patients in the symptom group. Significant differences were observed in Range of Motion limitation at the 5% level in males. The differences in the psychological factors between male and female patients were clarified by using the TMJ Scale. These findings suggested that it was useful to differentiate the multiple symptoms, especially the psychological factors, by using the TMJ Scale for orthodontic patients with TMD.

  2. Factors predicting patients' perception of privacy and satisfaction for emergency care.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Ko; Lin, Chia-Ju

    2011-07-01

    To identify emergency department (ED) predictors of patients' perception of privacy and whether patients' perception of privacy was significantly associated with patient satisfaction, in an urban, university-based hospital ED. Patients' perceptions of privacy and satisfaction at one urban, university-based hospital ED were assessed. Structured questionnaires were performed, and measures for patients' perception of privacy and satisfaction as well as demographic data were included for data collection for each patient. Ordinal logistic regression model building was conducted for patients' perception of privacy. 364 patients were approached and 313 (86%) on-site questionnaires were completed. 75% of patients agreed and strongly agreed that privacy was very important for their emergency care. Factors that were highly correlated with patients' perception of privacy included personal information overheard by others (OR 0.6273), overhearing others' personal information (OR 0.5521), unintentionally heard inappropriate conversations from healthcare providers (OR 0.5992), being seen by irrelevant persons (OR 0.6337), space provided for privacy when being physically examined (OR 1.6091) and providers' respect for patients' privacy (OR 4.3455). Patient characteristics that significantly predicted lower ratings of perception of privacy included older age, the treatment area in a hallway and longer length of stay. Patient satisfaction was strongly predicted by the perception of privacy (OR 8.4545). These data identify specific factors that are determinants of patients' perception of privacy. It was found that patients' perception of privacy strongly predicts satisfaction. ED improvement efforts should focus on improving ED environmental design and continuing education of healthcare providers to protect patient privacy during their stay in the ED.

  3. Fever in trauma patients: evaluation of risk factors, including traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bengualid, Victoria; Talari, Goutham; Rubin, David; Albaeni, Aiham; Ciubotaru, Ronald L; Berger, Judith

    2015-03-01

    The role of fever in trauma patients remains unclear. Fever occurs as a response to release of cytokines and prostaglandins by white blood cells. Many factors, including trauma, can trigger release of these factors. To determine whether (1) fever in the first 48 hours is related to a favorable outcome in trauma patients and (2) fever is more common in patients with head trauma. Retrospective study of trauma patients admitted to the intensive care unit for at least 2 days. Data were analyzed by using multivariate analysis. Of 162 patients studied, 40% had fever during the first 48 hours. Febrile patients had higher mortality rates than did afebrile patients. When adjusted for severity of injuries, fever did not correlate with mortality. Neither the incidence of fever in the first 48 hours after admission to the intensive care unit nor the number of days febrile in the unit differed between patients with and patients without head trauma (traumatic brain injury). About 70% of febrile patients did not have a source found for their fever. Febrile patients without an identified source of infection had lower peak white blood cell counts, lower maximum body temperature, and higher minimum platelet counts than did febrile patients who had an infectious source identified. The most common infection was pneumonia. No relationship was found between the presence of fever during the first 48 hours and mortality. Patients with traumatic brain injury did not have a higher incidence of fever than did patients without traumatic brain injury. About 30% of febrile patients had an identifiable source of infection. Further studies are needed to understand the origin and role of fever in trauma patients. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  4. Communicating laboratory test results for rheumatoid factor: what do patients and physicians want?

    PubMed Central

    Kelman, Ariella; Robinson, Caroline O; Cochin, Elisenda; Ahluwalia, Nina J; Braverman, Julia; Chiauzzi, Emil; Simacek, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to explore patient and physician perspectives on current laboratory test reporting practices and to elicit ideas for improvement. Methods Two independent studies were conducted. The first solicited members of an online physician community for opinions on current laboratory test reporting practices and possible improvements. The second addressed the same topic, but solicited patient feedback, and included an evaluation of a mock laboratory test report for the rheumatoid factor blood test. Results Both physicians and patients expressed a desire for patient-friendly information on laboratory reports. Physicians expressed a need for education for patients around false-positive and false-negative results within laboratory reports, while patients sought context around the meaning of results, relevance to other tests, and follow-up steps. Conclusion Physicians and patients see value in enhancing laboratory test reports to improve communication. While reports should include the context that patients value, they should also contain cautionary interpretation emphasized by physicians. Patient consultation on improving laboratory reports may help improve such patient-focused communication and promote greater patient understanding of health information, thereby increasing patient participation in their own health care and improving outcomes. Practice implications Laboratory reports are typically designed by experts. Including patients in laboratory report design may facilitate communication and improve outcomes through better patient engagement. PMID:28008236

  5. Cardiovascular disease risk factors: prevalence and management in adult hemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming Y; Pruthi, Rajiv K

    2011-07-01

    With increasing longevity, the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in hemophilia patients is expected to increase; however, evidence-based guidelines on management are lacking. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and management of CVD risk factors in hemophilia patients. A retrospective study of 58 adult hemophilia patients (≥35 years) attending Mayo Comprehensive Hemophilia Center between 1 January 2006 and 15 October 2009 were reviewed. The prevalence of CVD risk factors was hypertension 65.5%, diabetes 10.3%, smoking 12.5% and obesity 19.6%. A total of 31% did not have a lipid profile on record. Management of risk factors included antihypertensive medications in 84.2% and lipid-lowering agents in 12.1%. During their medical evaluation, four of seven active smokers received smoking cessation counseling and four of 11 obese patients received lifestyle modification advice. Eight patients (13.8%) experienced a CVD event: myocardial infarction (MI) (n=3), coronary artery disease (n=2), both MI and ischemic stroke (n=1) and hemorrhagic strokes (n=2). Only five of eight patients were on low-dose aspirin, of which aspirin was discontinued in one patient after he was diagnosed with hemophilia following a bleeding work-up. Another patient on dual antiplatelet therapy post stent placement developed epistaxis resulting in clopidogrel cessation. Hemophilia patients are at risk for CVD, similar to the general age-matched male population. Screening for CVD risk factors, with preventive dietary and pharmacologic interventions, play a key role in the prevention and long-term management of CVD. Collaborative efforts between primary care providers, cardiologists and hemophilia center specialists remain essential in managing these complex patients.

  6. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Practices in Acute Lung Injury: What do patient factors contribute?

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, David J.; Howard, David; Muriithi, Angela; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro; Sevransky, Jonathan; Shanholtz, Carl; Netzer, Giora; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe red blood cell (RBC) transfusion practices and evaluate the association between patient-related factors and pre-transfusion hemoglobin concentration in acute lung injury (ALI). Design Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data Setting 9 intensive care units (ICUs) in 3 teaching hospitals in Baltimore, MD Patients 249 consecutive, mechanically ventilated ALI patients Interventions None Measurements and Main Results Simple and multiple linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between the nadir hemoglobin concentration on the day of initial RBC transfusion and 20 patient-level demographic, clinical and ICU treatment factors as well as ICU type. Of 249 ALI patients, 47% received a RBC transfusion in the ICU without evidence of active hemorrhage or acute cardiac ischemia. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) nadir hemoglobin on the day of first transfusion was 7.7 (1.1) g/dL with 67%, 36%, 15%, and 5% of patients transfused at >7, >8, >9, and >10g/dL, respectively. Transfused patients received a mean (SD) of 5 (6) RBC units from ALI diagnosis to ICU discharge. Pre-hospital use of iron or erythropoietin and platelet transfusion in the ICU were independently associated with lower pre-transfusion hemoglobin concentrations. No patient factors were associated with higher hemoglobin concentrations. Admission to a surgical (vs. medical) ICU was associated with a 0.6 g/dL (95% CI: 0.1, 1.1 g/dL) higher pre-transfusion hemoglobin. Conclusions ALI patients commonly receive RBC transfusions in the ICU. The pre-transfusion hemoglobin observed in our study was lower than earlier studies, but a restrictive strategy was not universally adopted. Patient factors do not explain the gap between clinical trial evidence and routine transfusion practices. Future studies should further explore ICU- and physician-related factors as a source of variability in transfusion practice. PMID:19384204

  7. Factors Affecting Patients' Preferences for and Actual Discussions About End-of-Life Care.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Shoaib; Engelberg, Ruth A; Downey, Lois; Nielsen, Elizabeth L; Paul, Sudiptho; Lahdya, Alexandria Z; Treece, Patsy D; Curtis, J Randall

    2016-09-01

    Discussions about end-of-life care are often difficult for patients and clinicians, and inadequate communication poses a barrier to patients receiving the care they desire. To understand factors that facilitate end-of-life care discussions that guide interventions to improve care. We examined baseline data from an ongoing randomized trial to evaluate associations between patients' self-reported desire for, and occurrence of, discussions about end-of-life care and factors influencing these discussions. Factors included emotional symptoms and barriers and facilitators to discussions. The sample included patients with serious illness (n = 473) and their primary or specialty care clinicians (n = 128). Regression analyses were adjusted for confounders and clustered patients under clinicians. Patients who endorsed each of three barriers to discussions were less likely to have had a discussion with their clinician (P-values ranging from <0.001 to 0.046). One facilitator (having had family/friends who died) was associated with past discussions (P = 0.037), and two facilitators were associated with wanting future discussion (P < 0.001): 1) concerns about future quality of life, 2) worries about being a burden on friends/family. Depression and anxiety were not associated with past discussions. However, patients with more anxiety were more likely to want future discussions (P = 0.001), as were patients with more depressive symptoms who had had discussions in the past (P < 0.001). The occurrence of, and desire for, patient-clinician communication about end-of-life care is associated with patient factors including communication barriers and facilitators and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Understanding these factors may facilitate design of effective communication interventions. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Complex wound-healing problems in neurosurgical patients: risk factors, grading and treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Kartik G; Müller, Adolf; Hong, Bujung; Potapov, Alexander A; Schackert, Gabriele; Seifert, Volker; Krauss, Joachim K

    2012-03-01

    Wound-healing problems in the neurosurgical patient can be particularly bothersome, owing to various specific risk factors involved. These may vary from simple wound dehiscence to complex multi-layer defects with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and contamination. The latter is quite rare in practice and requires an individually titrated reconstruction strategy. The objective is to retrospectively analyze neurosurgical patients with complex, recalcitrant wound-healing problems we had treated in our department, attempt to develop a grading system based on the risk factors specific to our specialty and adapt a surgical reconstruction algorithm. During an 11-year period, 49 patients were identified to have had complex, recalcitrant wound-healing problems involving the cranial vault (n = 43) and the skull base (n = 6) that required an adapted surgical wound-management strategy. The etiologies of wound healing problems were aftermaths of surgical treatment of: (1) brain tumors (nine cases), (2) aneurysm clipping (ten cases), (3) trauma (27 patients), and (4) congenital malformations (three patients). Local rotational advancement flaps were performed in 18 patients and free microvascular tissue transfer was performed in 37 cases. Major risk factors leading to recalcitrant wound healing problems in the presented group were: prolonged angiographic interventions (20%), ongoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy (47%), prolonged cortisone application (51%), CSF leak (76%) and, above all, multiple failed attempts at wound closure (94%). Stable long-term wound healing was achieved in all patients using vascularized tissue coverage. A ternary grading system was developed based on various risk factors in the presented cohort. Accordingly, the algorithm for reconstruction in neurosurgical patients was adapted. Primary disease, treatment history, and distorted anatomical structures are major concerns in the management of complex wound-healing problems in neurosurgical patients

  9. Yield of Staging Laparoscopy for Incurable Factors in Chinese Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Luo, Hongliang; Zhou, Chengliang; Zhan, Jianjun; Rao, Xionghui; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Zhengming

    2017-06-26

    Although the role of staging laparoscopy (SL) in detecting radiologically occult M1 disease has been widely recognized, it is seldom used in China and its clinical value based on Chinese population has been rarely reported. The aim of this study is to identify the yield of SL for Chinese patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC) and determine the proportions of patients in whom treatment plan is altered. The clinical data were retrospectively collected from 879 AGC patients who underwent SL without any definite signs of disseminated disease on imaging examination. The primary outcomes were the proportions of patients whose laparoscopy identified incurable factors (including M1 diseases and unresectable T4b diseases), and who had their treatment plan altered. SL revealed incurable factors in 130 (14.8%) patients, including macroscopic peritoneal metastasis (n = 92), positive peritoneal cytology (n = 10), liver metastasis (n = 12), para-aortic lymph node metastasis (n = 1), and unresectable T4b tumor (n = 18). After SL, treatment plans were altered in 123 (14.0%) patients, among which 82 (63.1%) patients were not offered any further procedure and referred for chemotherapy. Among 749 M0 patients who immediately proceeded to radical gastrectomy after SL, new incurable factors were found at subsequent operations in 21 (2.8%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size ≥8 cm, Borrmann type III and IV, and tumor invasion of T4a and T4b in preoperative imaging examination were the predictive factors for peritoneal metastasis. SL detects additional incurable factors in Chinese AGC patients with potentially resectable disease and optimizes their treatments. A systematic and painstaking inspection of the whole abdominal cavity, including routine entry into the bursa omentalis, is necessary for improving the yield of SL.

  10. Differences in risk factors for suicidality between African American and White patients vulnerable to suicide.

    PubMed

    Vanderwerker, Lauren C; Chen, Joyce H; Charpentier, Peter; Paulk, Mary Elizabeth; Michalski, Marion; Prigerson, Holly G

    2007-02-01

    Risk factors for suicidal ideation and attempts have been shown to differ between African Americans and Whites across the lifespan. In the present study, risk factors for suicidality were examined separately by race/ethnicity in a population of 131 older adult patients considered vulnerable to suicide due to substance abuse and/or medical frailty. In adjusted analyses, social support was significantly associated with suicidality in African American patients, while younger age and the presence of an anxiety disorder were significantly associated with suicidality in White patients. The results suggest that race/ethnicity-specific risk profiles may improve the detection of suicidality in vulnerable populations.

  11. Risk Factors for Urethral Condyloma among Heterosexual Young Male Patients with Condyloma Acuminatum of Penile Skin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first study that focuses on risk factor of urethral condyloma (UC). The subjects of our study included genital warts patients who had been diagnosed as having condyloma acuminatum of penile skin (CAPS) with/without UC. Relationship with UC of number of life time female partners, co-infection with urethritis, circumcision status, number of CAPS and wart diameter were studied by use of multivariate analysis. Co-infection with urethritis, circumcision status were risk factors of UC in heterosexual young male patients with CAPS. This information will be helpful for providing more professional counseling to patients with genital warts. PMID:27659432

  12. [Risk Factors for Suicidal Ideation in Patients with Depressive Disorders in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Castro-Díaz, Sergio; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Gil, Fabián; Uribe Restrepo, Miguel; Miranda, Carlos; de la Espriella, Mauricio; Arenas, Álvaro; Pinto, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Suicidal ideation is a poor prognostic factor in patients with depression, due to the risk of suicide attempt or completed suicide. However, it is a relatively unexplored aspect in the Colombian population. It is important to identify the associated factors in order to develop appropriate treatment strategies. To identify risk factors for suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder between 18 and 65 years in 5 Colombian cities. Data from 295 patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder were used from the Study of the Economic Burden of Depression in Colombia. The association between the clinical and psychosocial variables with the presence of suicidal ideation was assessed using two-level hierarchical models. Female sex was a factor associated with a lower risk of suicidal ideation. Factors associated with the presence of suicidal ideation include unemployment, smoking and alcohol use in the past 30 days, mental health perceived as fair or poor, diagnosis of double depression, inpatient treatment, low income, unemployment, and a major financial crisis in the last 2 years. Suicidal ideation is highly prevalent in patients with major depressive disorder. Risk factors associated with both the clinical and psychosocial domain must be carefully evaluated during risk assessment of patients with this diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes in serum growth factors in stroke rehabilitation patients and their relation to hemiparesis improvement.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hideto; Beppu, Hidehiko; Mizutani, Kenmei; Okamoto, Sayaka; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2014-07-01

    Predicting recovery from hemiparesis after stroke is important for rehabilitation. A few recent studies reported that the levels of some growth factors shortly after stroke were positively correlated with the clinical outcomes during the chronic phase. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between the serum levels of growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], insulin-like growth factor-I [IGF-I], and hepatocyte growth factor [HGF]) and improvement in hemiparesis in stroke patients who received rehabilitation in a postacute rehabilitation hospital. Subjects were 32 stroke patients (cerebral infarction: 21 and intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH]: 11). We measured serum levels of VEGF, IGF-I, and HGF and 5 items of the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS) for hemiparesis on admission and at discharge. Age-matched healthy subjects (n=15) served as controls. Serum levels of VEGF and HGF in cerebral infarct patients on admission were higher than those in control subjects, and the serum levels of IGF-I in stroke patients were lower than those in controls. The level of HGF in ICH patients on admission was negatively correlated with gains in SIAS, and higher outliers in HGF concentration were correlated with lower gains in SIAS. Focusing on the extremely high levels of these factors may be a predictor of the low recovery from hemiparesis after stroke.

  14. Quality of life and temperament factors in schizophrenia: comparative study of patients, their siblings and controls.

    PubMed

    Kurs, Rena; Farkas, Herman; Ritsner, Michael

    2005-03-01

    This study aimed to determine which temperament factors are associated with quality of life (QOL) in schizophrenia based on a triplet design comparing patients with their non-affected siblings and healthy control subjects. Forty-seven DSM-IV clinically stable schizophrenia outpatients, 47 non-affected siblings, and 56 non-patients matched for gender and age were evaluated using the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Life Satisfaction Questionaire. As expected, schizophrenia patients reported significantly poorer QOL in most specific domains and in general. They also revealed significantly higher scores on harm avoidance and scored lower on reward dependence, than both their siblings and controls. Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire temperament factors revealed no differences between the controls and the siblings. When differences between patients, their siblings and controls were adjusted for gender, age at examination, and education, ANOVA demonstrated that temperament factors contributed to poor satisfaction with physical health, social relationships and subjective feelings in schizophrenia patients. Harm avoidance was associated with general QOL independent of severity of psychopathology. Thus, this study suggests that temperament factors that are not necessarily part of the deterioration process of the illness are associated with the quality of life of schizophrenia patients. These and other non-illness related factors should be considered when evaluating quality of life outcomes in intervention studies.