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Sample records for factor blocks kainic

  1. Block LU factorization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, James W.; Higham, Nicholas J.; Schreiber, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the currently popular 'block algorithms' are scalar algorithms in which the operations have been grouped and reordered into matrix operations. One genuine block algorithm in practical use is block LU factorization, and this has recently been shown by Demmel and Higham to be unstable in general. It is shown here that block LU factorization is stable if A is block diagonally dominant by columns. Moreover, for a general matrix the level of instability in block LU factorization can be founded in terms of the condition number kappa(A) and the growth factor for Gaussian elimination without pivoting. A consequence is that block LU factorization is stable for a matrix A that is symmetric positive definite or point diagonally dominant by rows or columns as long as A is well-conditioned.

  2. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats. PMID:25746462

  3. New Insight on the Synthesis of Neurotoxins Domoic Acid and Kainic Acid.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Adriano; Costante, Roberto; Stefanucci, Azzurra; Novellino, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    Mono or di-substituted prolines, namely proline chimeras of natural or synthetic origin, carry the side chain of other specific amino acids on the pyrrolidine ring. Thus, proline chimeras are useful tools for a wide range of chemical and biological applications as chiral synthons or building blocks for peptidomimetic design. We focused our attention on domoic acid and kainic acid and we report here a concise and up to date review on their stereoselective and asymmetric syntheses.

  4. Automatic Blocking Of QR and LU Factorizations for Locality

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Q; Kennedy, K; You, H; Seymour, K; Dongarra, J

    2004-03-26

    QR and LU factorizations for dense matrices are important linear algebra computations that are widely used in scientific applications. To efficiently perform these computations on modern computers, the factorization algorithms need to be blocked when operating on large matrices to effectively exploit the deep cache hierarchy prevalent in today's computer memory systems. Because both QR (based on Householder transformations) and LU factorization algorithms contain complex loop structures, few compilers can fully automate the blocking of these algorithms. Though linear algebra libraries such as LAPACK provides manually blocked implementations of these algorithms, by automatically generating blocked versions of the computations, more benefit can be gained such as automatic adaptation of different blocking strategies. This paper demonstrates how to apply an aggressive loop transformation technique, dependence hoisting, to produce efficient blockings for both QR and LU with partial pivoting. We present different blocking strategies that can be generated by our optimizer and compare the performance of auto-blocked versions with manually tuned versions in LAPACK, both using reference BLAS, ATLAS BLAS and native BLAS specially tuned for the underlying machine architectures.

  5. Blueberry polyphenols attenuate kainic acid-induced decrements in cognition and alter inflammatory gene expression in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Lau, Francis C.; Carey, Amanda N.; Galli, Rachel L.; Spangler, Edward L.; Ingram, Donald K.; Joseph, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease may be partly due to long-term exposure and increased susceptibility to inflammatory insults. In the current study, we investigated whether polyphenols in blueberries can reduce the deleterious effects of inflammation induced by central administration of kainic acid by altering the expression of genes associated with inflammation. To this end, 4-month-old male Fischer-344 (F344) rats were fed a control, 0.015% piroxicam (an NSAID) or 2% blueberry diet for 8 weeks before either Ringer's buffer or kainic acid was bilaterally micro-infused into the hippocampus. Two weeks later, following behavioral evaluation, the rats were killed and total RNA from the hippocampus was extracted and used in real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to analyze the expression of inflammation-related genes. Kainic acid had deleterious effects on cognitive behavior as kainic acid-injected rats on the control diet exhibited increased latencies to find a hidden platform in the Morris water maze compared to Ringer's buffer-injected rats and utilized non-spatial strategies during probe trials. The blueberry diet, and to a lesser degree the piroxicam diet, was able to improve cognitive performance. Immunohistochemical analyses of OX-6 expression revealed that kainic acid produced an inflammatory response by increasing the OX-6 positive areas in the hippocampus of kainic acid-injected rats. Kainic acid up-regulated the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α, the neurotrophic factor IGF-1, and the transcription factor NF-κB. Blueberry and piroxicam supplementations were found to attenuate the kainic acid-induced increase in the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and NF-κB, while only blueberry was able to augment the increased IGF-1 expression. These results indicate that blueberry polyphenols attenuate learning impairments following neurotoxic insult and exert anti-inflammatory actions

  6. Circling behavior following unilateral kainic acid injections into rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R J; Reavill, C; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1981-12-01

    Unilateral injection of kainic acid (2.5-25 nmol) into rat anterior caudate putamen induced dose-related circling behaviour. Kainic acid (10 nmol) consistently caused initial weak ipsiversive circling lasting 1 h followed by prolonged strong contraversive rotation lasting in excess of 10 h. Unilateral intrastriatal administration of L-glutamic acid, or of monosodium L-glutamate, to normal rats, or administration of monosodium L-glutamate to rats with extensive decortication, did not induce circling behaviour. The simultaneous unilateral injection of monosodium L-glutamate (1 mumol) with kainic acid (10 nmol) did not modify circling behaviour induced by kainic acid. However, extensive decortication greatly reduced circling induced by unilateral intrastriatal kainic acid (10 nmol), and effect not reversed by the simultaneous administration of monosodium L-glutamate (1 mumol). Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the left nigrostriatal pathway abolished the initial ipsiversive rotation and potentiated the subsequent contraversive rotation for up to 4 h after intrastriatal injection of kainic acid (10 nmol). Peripheral administration of haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) also abolished initial ipsiversive rotation and decreased the subsequent contraversive rotation. Electro-coagulation of the ipsilateral strio-nigral pathway prolonged the initial ipsiversive rotation produced by kainic acid, but markedly attenuated contraversive rotation. These findings suggest that circling induced by intrastriatal administration of kainic acid depends on intact corticostriate pathways, but it cannot be reproduced or modified by intrastriatal administration of glutamate. Kainic acid circling appears to be mediated via strio-nigral pathways, and to be modulated by dopaminergic function. PMID:7333356

  7. Incomplete block factorization preconditioning for indefinite elliptic problems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun-Hua

    1996-12-31

    The application of the finite difference method to approximate the solution of an indefinite elliptic problem produces a linear system whose coefficient matrix is block tridiagonal and symmetric indefinite. Such a linear system can be solved efficiently by a conjugate residual method, particularly when combined with a good preconditioner. We show that specific incomplete block factorization exists for the indefinite matrix if the mesh size is reasonably small. And this factorization can serve as an efficient preconditioner. Some efforts are made to estimate the eigenvalues of the preconditioned matrix. Numerical results are also given.

  8. A dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase protects against kainic acid-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Marini, Herbert; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Pizzino, Gabriele; Pallio, Giovanni; Calò, Margherita; Adamo, Elena Bianca; Trichilo, Vincenzo; Interdonato, Monica; Galfo, Federica; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-06-01

    Systemic administration of kainic acid causes inflammation and apoptosis in the brain, resulting in neuronal loss. Dual cyclooxygenase/5-lipoxygenase (COX/5-LOX) inhibitors could represent a possible neuroprotective approach in preventing glutamate excitotoxicity. Consequently, we investigated the effects of a dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX following intraperitoneal administration of kainic acid (KA, 10 mg/kg) in rats. Animals were randomized to receive either the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX (flavocoxid, 20 mg/kg i.p.) or its vehicle (1 ml/kg i.p.) 30 min after KA administration. Sham brain injury rats were used as controls. We evaluated protein expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK1/2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in the hippocampus. Animals were also observed for monitoring behavioral changes according to Racine Scale. Finally, histological analysis and brain edema evaluation were carried out. Treatment with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX decreased protein expression of p-ERK1/2 and TNF-α in hippocampus, markedly reduced MDA, LTB4 and PGE2 hippocampal levels, and also ameliorated brain edema. Histological analysis showed a reduction in cell damage in rats treated with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX, particularly in hippocampal subregion CA3c. Moreover, flavocoxid significantly improved behavioral signs following kainic acid administration. Our results suggest that dual inhibition of COX/5-LOX by flavocoxid has neuroprotective effects during kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity. PMID:25893744

  9. Growth hormone reverses excitotoxic damage induced by kainic acid in the green iguana neuroretina.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Mora, Janeth; Carranza, Martha; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    It is known that growth hormone (GH) is expressed in extrapituitary tissues, including the nervous system and ocular tissues, where it is involved in autocrine/paracrine actions related to cell survival and anti-apoptosis in several vertebrates. Little is known, however, in reptiles, so we analyzed the expression and distribution of GH in the eye of green iguana and its potential neuroprotective role in retinas that were damaged by the intraocular administration of kainic acid (KA). It was found, by Western blotting, that GH-immunoreactivity (GH-IR) was expressed as two isoforms (15 and 26kDa, under reducing conditions) in cornea, vitreous, retina, crystalline, iris and sclera, in varying proportions. Also, two bands for the growth hormone receptor (GHR)-IR were observed (70 and 44kDa, respectively) in the same tissues. By immunofluorescence, GH-IR was found in neurons present in several layers of the neuroretina (inner nuclear [INL], outer nuclear [ONL] and ganglion cell [GCL] layers) as determined by its co-existence with NeuN, but not in glial cells. In addition, GH and GHR co-expression was found in the same cells, suggesting paracrine/autocrine interactions. KA administration induced retinal excitotoxic damage, as determined by a significant reduction of the cell density and an increase in the appearance of apoptotic cells in the INL and GCL. In response to KA injury, both endogenous GH and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) expression were increased by 70±1.8% and 33.3±16%, respectively. The addition of exogenous GH significantly prevented the retinal damage produced by the loss of cytoarchitecture and cell density in the GCL (from 4.9±0.79 in the control, to 1.45±0.2 with KA, to 6.35±0.49cell/mm(2) with KA+GH) and in the INL (19.12±1.6, 10.05±1.9, 21.0±0.8cell/mm(2), respectively) generated by the long-term effect of 1mM KA intraocular administration. The co-incubation with a specific anti-GH antibody, however, blocked the protective effect of GH

  10. Estimate Soil Erodibility Factors Distribution for Maioli Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wen-Ying

    2014-05-01

    The natural conditions in Taiwan are poor. Because of the steep slopes, rushing river and fragile geology, soil erosion turn into a serious problem. Not only undermine the sloping landscape, but also created sediment disaster like that reservoir sedimentation, river obstruction…etc. Therefore, predict and control the amount of soil erosion has become an important research topic. Soil erodibility factor (K) is a quantitative index of distinguish the ability of soil to resist the erosion separation and handling. Taiwan soil erodibility factors have been calculated 280 soil samples' erodibility factors by Wann and Huang (1989) use the Wischmeier and Smith nomorgraph. 221 samples were collected at the Maioli block in Miaoli. The coordinates of every sample point and the land use situations were recorded. The physical properties were analyzed for each sample. Three estimation methods, consist of Kriging, Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) and Spline, were applied to estimate soil erodibility factors distribution for Maioli block by using 181 points data, and the remaining 40 points for the validation. Then, the SPSS regression analysis was used to comparison of the accuracy of the training data and validation data by three different methods. Then, the best method can be determined. In the future, we can used this method to predict the soil erodibility factors in other areas.

  11. Capsaicin prevents kainic acid-induced epileptogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Lee, Jong-Geol; Yon, Jung-Min; Oh, Ki-Wan; Baek, In-Jeoung; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Lee, Beom Jun; Yun, Young Won; Nam, Sang-Yoon

    2011-05-01

    Epilepsy is a neurodegenerative disease with periodic occurrences of spontaneous seizures as the main symptom. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of capsaicin, the major ingredient of hot peppers, in a kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus model. After intraperitoneal injections of KA (30mg/kg) in 8-week-old male ICR mice, the animals were treated subcutaneously with capsaicin (0.33mg/kg or 1mg/kg) and then examined for any anti-ictogenic, hypothermic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects of the capsaicin treatment 3 days after KA treatment. KA injections significantly enhanced neurodegenerative conditions but co-injection with capsaicin reduced the detrimental effects of KA in a dose-dependent manner in mice. The co-administered group that received KA and 1mg/kg of capsaicin showed significantly decreased behavioral seizure activity and body temperature for 3h and also remarkably blocked intense and high-frequency seizure discharges in the parietal cortex for 3 days compared with those that received KA alone. Capsaicin treatment significantly diminished the levels of oxidant activity and malondialdehyde concentration and increased the antioxidant activity in the blood and brain of KA-treated mice. In addition, capsaicin significantly lowered the KA-induced increase in the concentration of the cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α in the brain. Furthermore, co-treatment of KA and capsaicin (1mg/kg) resulted in considerably decreased apoptotic cell death in the cornu ammonis sections of the hippocampus compared with that seen in the KA-alone group. These findings indicate that capsaicin is preventative for the epileptogenesis induced by KA in mice.

  12. Repeated exposure to low doses of kainic acid activates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) prior to seizure in transgenic NF-κB/EGFP reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, James A; Kirkley, Kelly A; Padmanabhan, Rachel; Liang, Li-Ping; Raol, Yogendra H; Patel, Manisha; Bialecki, Russell A; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2014-09-01

    Predicting seizurogenic properties of pharmacologically active compounds is difficult due to the complex nature of the mechanisms involved and because of the low sensitivity and high variability associated with current behavioral-based methods. To identify early neuronal signaling events predictive of seizure, we exposed transgenic NF-κB/EGFP reporter mice to multiple low doses of kainic acid (KA), postulating that activation of the stress-responsive NF-κB pathway could be a sensitive indicator of seizurogenic potential. The sub-threshold dose level proximal to the induction of seizure was determined as 2.5mg/kg KA, using video EEG monitoring. Subsequent analysis of reporter expression demonstrated significant increases in NF-κB activation in the CA3 and CA1 regions of the hippocampus 24h after a single dose of 2.5mg/kg KA. This response was primarily observed in pyramidal neurons with little non-neuronal expression. Neuronal NF-κB/EGFP expression was observed in the absence of glial activation, indicating a lack of neurodegeneration-induced neuroinflammation. Protein expression of the immediate-early gene, Nurr1, increased in neurons in parallel to NF-κB activation, supporting that the sub-threshold doses of KA employed directly caused neuronal stress. Lastly, KA also stimulated NF-κB activation in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures established from NF-κB/EGFP reporter mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate the potential advantages of using genetically encoded stress pathway reporter models in the screening of seizurogenic properties of new pharamacologically active compounds.

  13. Baicalein, a Constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis, Reduces Glutamate Release and Protects Neuronal Cell Against Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Lu, Cheng Wei; Lin, Tzu Yu; Huang, Shu Kuei; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the health benefits of flavonoids, particularly their effects on neurodegenerative disease, is increasing. This study evaluated the role of baicalein, a flavonoid compound isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Scutellaria baicalensis, in glutamate release and glutamate neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus. In the rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), baicalein inhibits depolarization-induced glutamate release, and this phenomenon is prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca[Formula: see text] ions and blocking presynaptic Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel activity. In slice preparations, whole cell patch-clamp experiments revealed that baicalein reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, without affecting their amplitude. In a kainic acid rat model, intraperitoneally administering baicalein to rats before the kainic acid intraperitoneal injection substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced neuronal cell death, c-Fos expression, and the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin in the hippocampus. This study is the first to demonstrate that the natural compound baicalein inhibits glutamate release from hippocampal nerve terminals, and executes a protective action against kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity in vivo. The findings enhance the understanding of baicalein's action in the brain, and suggest that this natural compound is valuable for treating brain disorders related to glutamate excitotoxicity. PMID:27430911

  14. The kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Maxime; Avoli, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    The kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy has greatly contributed to the understanding of the molecular, cellular and pharmacological mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. This model presents with neuropathological and electroencephalographic features that are seen in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. It is also characterized by a latent period that follows the initial precipitating injury (i.e., status epilepticus) until the appearance of recurrent seizures, as observed in the human condition. Finally, the kainic acid model can be reproduced in a variety of species using either systemic, intrahippocampal or intra-amygdaloid administrations. In this review, we describe the various methodological procedures and evaluate their differences with respect to the behavioral, electroencephalographic and neuropathological correlates. In addition, we compare the kainic acid model with other animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy such as the pilocarpine and the kindling model. We conclude that the kainic acid model is a reliable tool for understanding temporal lobe epilepsy, provided that the differences existing between methodological procedures are taken into account.

  15. Small peptides blocking inhibition of factor Xa and tissue factor-factor VIIa by tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI).

    PubMed

    Dockal, Michael; Hartmann, Rudolf; Fries, Markus; Thomassen, M Christella L G D; Heinzmann, Alexandra; Ehrlich, Hartmut; Rosing, Jan; Osterkamp, Frank; Polakowski, Thomas; Reineke, Ulrich; Griessner, Andreas; Brandstetter, Hans; Scheiflinger, Friedrich

    2014-01-17

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor that inhibits activated factor X (FXa) via a slow-tight binding mechanism and tissue factor-activated FVII (TF-FVIIa) via formation of a quaternary FXa-TFPI-TF-FVIIa complex. Inhibition of TFPI enhances coagulation in hemophilia models. Using a library approach, we selected and subsequently optimized peptides that bind TFPI and block its anticoagulant activity. One peptide (termed compound 3), bound with high affinity to the Kunitz-1 (K1) domain of TFPI (Kd ∼1 nM). We solved the crystal structure of this peptide in complex with the K1 of TFPI at 2.55-Å resolution. The structure of compound 3 can be segmented into a N-terminal anchor; an Ω-shaped loop; an intermediate segment; a tight glycine-loop; and a C-terminal α-helix that is anchored to K1 at its reactive center loop and two-stranded β-sheet. The contact surface has an overall hydrophobic character with some charged hot spots. In a model system, compound 3 blocked FXa inhibition by TFPI (EC50 = 11 nM) and inhibition of TF-FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation by TFPI (EC50 = 2 nM). The peptide prevented transition from the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex, but did not affect formation of the loose FXa-TFPI complex. The K1 domain of TFPI binds and inhibits FVIIa and the K2 domain similarly inhibits FXa. Because compound 3 binds to K1, our data show that K1 is not only important for FVIIa inhibition but also for FXa inhibition, i.e. for the transition of the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex. This mode of action translates into normalization of coagulation of hemophilia plasmas. Compound 3 thus bears potential to prevent bleeding in hemophilia patients. PMID:24275667

  16. Small Peptides Blocking Inhibition of Factor Xa and Tissue Factor-Factor VIIa by Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI)*

    PubMed Central

    Dockal, Michael; Hartmann, Rudolf; Fries, Markus; Thomassen, M. Christella L. G. D.; Heinzmann, Alexandra; Ehrlich, Hartmut; Rosing, Jan; Osterkamp, Frank; Polakowski, Thomas; Reineke, Ulrich; Griessner, Andreas; Brandstetter, Hans; Scheiflinger, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor that inhibits activated factor X (FXa) via a slow-tight binding mechanism and tissue factor-activated FVII (TF-FVIIa) via formation of a quaternary FXa-TFPI-TF-FVIIa complex. Inhibition of TFPI enhances coagulation in hemophilia models. Using a library approach, we selected and subsequently optimized peptides that bind TFPI and block its anticoagulant activity. One peptide (termed compound 3), bound with high affinity to the Kunitz-1 (K1) domain of TFPI (Kd ∼1 nm). We solved the crystal structure of this peptide in complex with the K1 of TFPI at 2.55-Å resolution. The structure of compound 3 can be segmented into a N-terminal anchor; an Ω-shaped loop; an intermediate segment; a tight glycine-loop; and a C-terminal α-helix that is anchored to K1 at its reactive center loop and two-stranded β-sheet. The contact surface has an overall hydrophobic character with some charged hot spots. In a model system, compound 3 blocked FXa inhibition by TFPI (EC50 = 11 nm) and inhibition of TF-FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation by TFPI (EC50 = 2 nm). The peptide prevented transition from the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex, but did not affect formation of the loose FXa-TFPI complex. The K1 domain of TFPI binds and inhibits FVIIa and the K2 domain similarly inhibits FXa. Because compound 3 binds to K1, our data show that K1 is not only important for FVIIa inhibition but also for FXa inhibition, i.e. for the transition of the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex. This mode of action translates into normalization of coagulation of hemophilia plasmas. Compound 3 thus bears potential to prevent bleeding in hemophilia patients. PMID:24275667

  17. Houttuyniae Herba Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity via Calcium Response Modulation in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Jeong, Hyun Uk; Hong, Sung In; Oh, Myung Sook

    2015-12-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder characterized by the repeated occurrence of electrical activity known as seizures. This activity induces increased intracellular calcium, which ultimately leads to neuronal damage. Houttuyniae Herba, the aerial part of Houttuynia cordata, has various pharmacological effects and is widely used as a traditional herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract on kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Kainic acid directly acts on calcium release, resulting in seizure behavior, neuronal damage, and cognitive impairment. In a rat primary hippocampal culture system, Houttuyniae Herba water extract significantly protected neuronal cells from kainic acid toxicity. In a seizure model where mice received intracerebellar kainic acid injections, Houttuyniae Herba water extract treatment resulted in a lower seizure stage score, ameliorated cognitive impairment, protected neuronal cells against kainic acid-induced toxicity, and suppressed neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus. In addition, Houttuyniae Herba water extract regulated increases in the intracellular calcium level, its related downstream pathways (reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction), and calcium/calmodulin complex kinase type II immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampus, which resulted from calcium influx stimulation induced by kainic acid. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract through inhibition of calcium generation in a kainic acid-induced epileptic model. PMID:26366753

  18. Progesterone, administered prior to kainic acid, reduces decrements in cognitive performance in the Morris Water Maze

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Cheryl A.; Walf, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The nature of progesterone (P4)’s neuroprotective effects is of interest. We investigated effects of P4 when administered prior to, or following, kainic acid, which produces ictal activity and damage to the hippocampus, to mediate effects on spatial performance. The hypothesis was that P4, compared to vehicle, would reduce decrements in Morris Water Maze performance induced by kainic acid. Experiment 1: We examined the effects of kainic acid on plasma stress hormone, corticosterone, and progestogen (P4 and its metabolites) levels in plasma and the hippocampus following subcutaneous (s.c.) P4 administration to ovariectomized rats. Rats administered kainic acid had the highest corticosterone levels immediately following injection. P4 is 5α-reduced to dihydroprogesterone (DHP) and subsequently metabolized to 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (3α,5α-THP) by 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The regimen of P4 utilized produced circulating and hippocampal levels of P4, DHP, and 3α,5α-THP within a physiological range, which decline at 14 hours post-injection, and were not altered by kainic acid. Experiment 2: The physiological P4 regimen was administered to rats before, or following, kainic acid-induced seizures, and later effects on water maze performance were compared to that of rats administered vehicle. Rats administered kainic acid had significantly poorer performance in the water maze (i.e. increased latencies and distances to the hidden platform) than did rats administered vehicle. Administration of P4 before, but not after, kainic acid prevented these performance deficits. Thus, these data suggest that a physiological regimen of P4 can prevent some of the deficits in water maze performance produced by kainic acid. PMID:20715152

  19. Chronic exercise dampens hippocampal glutamate overflow induced by kainic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip V; Reiss, Jenny I; Murray, Patrick S; Dishman, Rod K; Spradley, Jessica M

    2015-05-01

    Our laboratory has previously reported that chronic, voluntary exercise diminishes seizure-related behaviors induced by convulsant doses of kainic acid. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that exercise exerts this protective effect through a mechanism involving suppression of glutamate release in the hippocampal formation. Following three weeks of voluntary wheel running or sedentary conditions, rats were injected with 10 mg/kg of kainic acid, and hippocampal glutamate was measured in real time using a telemetric, in vivo voltammetry system. A separate experiment measured electroencephalographic (EEG) activity following kainic acid treatment. Results of the voltammetry experiment revealed that the rise in hippocampal glutamate induced by kainic acid is attenuated in exercising rats compared to sedentary controls, indicating that the exercise-induced protection against seizures involves regulation of hippocampal glutamate release. The findings reveal the potential benefit of regular exercise in the treatment and prevention of seizure disorders and suggest a possible neurobiological mechanism underlying this effect. PMID:25668513

  20. Microtubule inhibitors block the morphological changes induced in Drosophila blood cells by a parasitoid wasp factor.

    PubMed

    Rizki, R M; Rizki, T M

    1990-03-15

    The shape change of Drosophila melanogaster blood cells (lamellocytes) from discoidal to bipolar that is caused by a factor from the female parasitoid Leptopilina heterotoma is blocked by the tubulin inhibitors vinblastine and vincristine in vitro. The actin inhibitor, cytochalasin B, causes arborization of Drosophila lamellocytes and acts synergistically with the wasp factor to alter lamellocyte morphology. Lamellocyte aborization induced by cytochalasin B is blocked by simultaneous treatment with vinblastine. These observations indicate that the changes in lamellocyte shape induced by both the wasp factor and cytochalasin B require microtubule assembly. PMID:2311722

  1. Fibroblast growth factors, old kids on the new block.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Cong; Xiao, Jian; McKeehan, Wallace L; Wang, Fen

    2016-05-01

    The fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of cell intrinsic regulatory peptides that control a broad spectrum of cellular activities. The family includes canonic FGFs that elicit their activities by activating the FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase and non-canonic members that elicit their activities intracellularly and via FGFR-independent mechanisms. The FGF signaling axis is highly complex due to the existence of multiple isoforms of both ligands and receptors, as well as cofactors that include the chemically heterogeneous heparan sulfate (HS) cofactors, and in the case of endocrine FGFs, the Klotho coreceptors. Resident FGF signaling controls embryonic development, maintains tissue homeostasis, promotes wound healing and tissue regeneration, and regulates functions of multiple organs. However, ectopic or aberrant FGF signaling is a culprit for various diseases, including congenital birth defects, metabolic disorder, and cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which the specificity of FGF signaling is achieved remain incompletely understood. Since its application as a druggable target has been gradually recognized by pharmaceutical companies and translational researchers, understanding the determinants of FGF signaling specificity has become even more important in order to get into the position to selectively suppress a particular pathway without affecting others to minimize side effects. PMID:26768548

  2. Intra-alveolar tissue factor pathway inhibitor is not sufficient to block tissue factor procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Bastarache, Julie A; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhengming; Albertine, Kurt H; Matthay, Michael A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2008-05-01

    The alveolar compartment in acute lung injury contains high levels of tissue factor (TF) procoagulant activity favoring fibrin deposition. We previously reported that the alveolar epithelium can release TF procoagulant activity in response to a proinflammatory stimulus. To test the hypothesis that the alveolar epithelium further modulates intra-alveolar fibrin deposition through secretion of an endogenous inhibitor to TF, tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), we measured TFPI levels in edema fluid (EF) from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. To determine whether the alveolar epithelium can release TFPI, both full-length TFPI and truncated TFPI were measured (ELISA) in pulmonary edema fluid from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and a control group of patients with hydrostatic pulmonary edema (HYDRO). TFPI protein was also measured in conditioned media (CM) and cell lysates (CL) from human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) after exposure to cytomix (TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IFN-gamma). TFPI protein levels were higher in pulmonary edema fluid from patients with ARDS vs. HYDRO. TFPI protein was increased in CM and did not change in CL after cytomix treatment; TFPI mRNA levels (RT-PCR) did not change. Despite the high levels of TFPI, both the EF and CM retained significant TF procoagulant activity as measured by plasma recalcification time. The majority of intra-alveolar TFPI was in a truncated, inactive form, whereas the majority of TFPI released from cells was full length, suggesting different mechanisms of inactivation. In summary, the alveolar epithelium releases TFPI in response to an inflammatory stimulus but does not increase TFPI gene transcription or protein production. Levels of intra-alveolar TFPI in ARDS are not sufficient to block intra-alveolar TF procoagulant activity due to truncation and inactivation of intra-alveolar TFPI. PMID:18310227

  3. Effects of brain IKKβ gene silencing by small interfering RNA on P-glycoprotein expression and brain damage in the rat kainic acid-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Su, Ling-Ying; Liu, Xin-Hong; Li, Le-Chao; Hao, Jin-Bo; Huang, Xian-Jing; Di, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in brain is an important mechanism accounting for the drug-therapy failure in epilepsy. Over-expression of P-gp in epilepsy rat brain may be regulated by inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Inhibitory κ B kinase subunit β (IKKβ) is an up-stream molecular controlling NF-κB activation. With the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and kainic acid (KA)-induced rat epileptic seizure model, the present study was aimed to further evaluate the role of NF-κB inhibition, via blocking IKKβ gene transcription, in the epileptic brain P-gp over-expression, seizure susceptibility, and post-seizure brain damage. siRNA targeting IKKβ was administered to rats via intracerebroventricular injection before seizure induction by KA microinjection; scrambled siRNA was used as control. Brain mRNA and protein levels of IKKβ and P-gp were detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Latency to grade III or V seizure onset was recorded, brain damage was evaluated by neuronal cell counting and epileptiform activity was monitored by electroencephalography. IKKβ siRNA pre-treatment inhibited NF-κB activation and abolished P-gp over-expression in KA-induced epileptic rat brain, accompanied by decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggested that epileptogenic-induced P-gp over-expression could be regulated by IKKβ through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24040792

  4. Task Parallel Incomplete Cholesky Factorization using 2D Partitioned-Block Layout

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyungjoo; Rajamanickam, Sivasankaran; Stelle, George Widgery; Edwards, Harold C.; Olivier, Stephen Lecler

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a task-parallel algorithm for sparse incomplete Cholesky factorization that utilizes a 2D sparse partitioned-block layout of a matrix. Our factorization algorithm follows the idea of algorithms-by-blocks by using the block layout. The algorithm-byblocks approach induces a task graph for the factorization. These tasks are inter-related to each other through their data dependences in the factorization algorithm. To process the tasks on various manycore architectures in a portable manner, we also present a portable tasking API that incorporates different tasking backends and device-specific features using an open-source framework for manycore platforms i.e., Kokkos. A performance evaluation is presented on both Intel Sandybridge and Xeon Phi platforms for matrices from the University of Florida sparse matrix collection to illustrate merits of the proposed task-based factorization. Experimental results demonstrate that our task-parallel implementation delivers about 26.6x speedup (geometric mean) over single-threaded incomplete Choleskyby- blocks and 19.2x speedup over serial Cholesky performance which does not carry tasking overhead using 56 threads on the Intel Xeon Phi processor for sparse matrices arising from various application problems.

  5. Increased susceptibility to hippocampal and amygdala kindling following intrahippocampal kainic acid.

    PubMed

    Feldblum, S; Ackermann, R F

    1987-08-01

    The effects of unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid, a potent neuroexcitant and neurotoxin, on subsequent susceptibility to kindling of the contralateral hippocampus or contralateral amygdala were investigated in albino rats. At the chosen doses (0.20 to 1.25 micrograms dissolved in physiologic saline), the kainic acid-induced lesion was confined to the injected hippocampus and in two cases the ipsilateral entorhinal cortex; never were there contralateral lesions. Approximately 2 to 6 weeks post-injection, each animal received daily afterdischarge-producing electrical stimulations until stage 5 kindled limbic seizures occurred. Kindling in pretreated animals was significantly accelerated compared with controls; the hippocampal kindling rate decreased from 13.2 stimulations to 3.7, the amygdala kindling rate from 7.8 stimulations to 3.0. Many treated animals had first-stimulation stage 5 seizures, compared with none for controls. Importantly, this facilitation of kindling was not reversed by suppression of the acute, induced seizures with the anticonvulsants, diazepam and phenobarbital, which have repeatedly been demonstrated to effectively suppress limbic kindling. Such results, considered together with findings from the literature, suggest that partial kindling does not occur during kainic acid-induced seizures, and that the observed susceptibility to kindling and other epileptogenic agents subsequent to kainic acid treatment may in fact be related to neurophysiologic and neurochemical consequences of kainic acid-induced lesions.

  6. Regional block anesthesia in a patient with factor V Leiden mutation and axillary artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Erkalp, Kerem; Comlekci, Mevlut; Inan, Bekir; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Ozdemir, Haluk; Saidoglu, Leyla

    2011-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients with coagulation disorders presents safety and technical challenges. This case describes a 58-year-old woman with factor V Leiden mutation who required distal saphenous vein harvest and axillo-brachial bypass to treat axillary artery occlusion. The patient underwent surgery with satisfactory anesthesia using infraclavicular brachial plexus block, thoracic paravertebral block, and unilateral subarachnoid block. These three regional anesthetic interventions were performed in lieu of general anesthesia to minimize risks of thrombotic events, pain, and to decrease recovery time. Despite higher failure rates of regional anesthesia, longer time required for procedures, and added discomforts during surgery, the benefits may outweigh risks for selected high-risk patients, including those with factor V Leiden mutations. PMID:22915885

  7. Salubrinal, ER stress inhibitor, attenuates kainic acid-induced hippocampal cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Soo; Heo, Rok Won; Kim, Hwajin; Yi, Chin-Ok; Shin, Hyun Joo; Han, Jong Woo; Roh, Gu Seob

    2014-10-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal death is closely linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Parkin is an ubiquitin E3 ligase that mediates the ubiquitination of the Bcl-2 family of proteins and its mutations are associated with neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the effect of salubrinal, an ER stress inhibitor, on the regulation of ER stress and mitochondrial apoptosis induced by KA, in particular, by controlling parkin expression. We showed that salubrinal significantly reduced seizure activity and increased survival rates of mice with KA-induced seizures. We found that salubrinal protected neurons against apoptotic death by reducing expression of mitochondrial apoptotic factors and elF2α-ATF4-CHOP signaling proteins. Interestingly, we showed that salubrinal decreased the KA-induced parkin expression and inhibited parkin translocation to mitochondria, which suggests that parkin may regulate a cross-talk between ER and mitochondria. Collectively, inhibition of ER stress attenuates mitochondrial apoptotic and ER stress pathways and controls parkin-mediated neuronal death following KA-induced seizures. PMID:24728926

  8. Neuroprotective effects of butterbur and rough aster against kainic Acid-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Hee; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2005-01-01

    The separate and combined neuroprotective effects of rough aster (Aster scaber) and butterbur (Petasite japonicus) extracts against oxidative damage in the brain of mice challenged with kainic acid were examined by comparing behavioral changes and biochemical parameters of oxidative stress. Rough aster butanol extract (400 mg/kg) and/or butterbur butanol extract (150 or 400 mg/kg) were administered to male ICR mice, 6-8 weeks old, through a gavage for 4 days consecutively, and on day 4, kainic acid (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally. Compared with the vehicle-treated control, no significant changes in body and brain weight were observed in mice administered rough aster or butterbur butanol extract. Administration of kainic acid only, causing a lethality of approximately 54%, resulted in a significant decrease of total glutathione level and increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) value in brain tissue. The administration of butterbur or rough aster extract (400 mg/kg) decreased the lethality (50%) of kainic acid to 25%, alleviated the behavioral signs of neurotoxicity, restored the cytosolic glutathione level of brain homogenate to approximately 80% (P < .05), and reduced kainic acid-induced increases in TBARS values. In contrast to no significant neuroprotection by butterbur extract at a low dose (150 mg/kg), the combination of rough aster extract and butterbur extract reduced the lethality to 12.5%. Moreover, the combination delayed the onset time of behavioral signs by twofold, and significantly preserved the level of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. However, the other biochemical parameters were not altered significantly by the combination. Thus, the combination of two vegetable extracts significantly increased the neuroprotective action against kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Based on these findings, the combination of butterbur extract and rough aster extract contains a functional agent or

  9. Effects of kainic acid on hypothermia induced by reserpine, oxotremorine and apomorphine in mice.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Poisson, L; Larousse, C

    1987-03-01

    Antagonists of the norepinephrine reuptake and beta-adrenoreceptor agonists are potent, at once, on the three following tests: antagonism of hypothermia induced by reserpine, oxotremorine and apomorphine. 2-Carboxy-4-isopropenyl-3-pyrrolidine-acetic acid (kainic acid), which is a powerful stimulant of the neurons and a destroyer of the dopaminergic neurons, has been used in these tests to show if it is possible to antagonize hypothermia induced by different substances. The results obtained show that kainic acid is potent on these three tests, thus providing evidence that it is a stimulant of norepinephrine neurons as well as serotoninergic neurons, even if it is peripherically injected.

  10. A short scalable route to (-)-α-kainic acid using Pt-catalyzed direct allylic amination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Watanabe, Kenji; Tsukamoto, Masafumi; Shibuya, Ryozo; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Ohshima, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    An increased supply of scarce or inaccessible natural products is essential for the development of more sophisticated pharmaceutical agents and biological tools, and thus the development of atom-economical, step-economical and scalable processes to access these natural products is in high demand. Herein we report the development of a short, scalable total synthesis of (-)-α-kainic acid, a useful compound in neuropharmacology that is, however, limited in supply from natural resources. The synthesis features sequential platinum-catalyzed direct allylic aminations and thermal ene-cyclization, enabling the gram-scale synthesis of (-)-α-kainic acid in six steps and 34% overall yield. PMID:25604395

  11. A family of permutations for concurrent factorization of block tridiagonal matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, Senol; Melosh, Robert J.; Salama, Moktar

    1989-01-01

    The inherent strong seriality of closely coupled systems is circumvented by defining a family of permutations for reordering equation sets whose matrix of coefficients is Hermitian block tridiagonal. The authors show how these permutations can be used to achieve relatively high concurrency in the Cholesky factorization of banded systems at the expense of introducing limited extra computations due to fill-in terms in the factors. Directed graphs are developed for the concurrent factorization of the transformed matrix of coefficients by the Cholesky algorithm. Expressions for speedup and efficiency are derived in terms of parameters of the permutation, set of equations, and machine architecture.

  12. Factors Influencing Shear Alignment of Cylinder-Forming Block Copolymer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Raleigh; Register, Richard; Chaikin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Application of shear stress to block copolymers is known to preferentially orient the microdomains in the direction of applied shear. While this phenomenon has been well studied for bulk block copolymer systems, the use of shear stress to align microdomains in block copolymer thin films (typically one to several microdomain layers) is still an active area of research. Numerous experimental factors influence the ease with which orientation is achieved as well as the ultimate quality of alignment observed. The present work investigates several of these factors using a series of cylinder-forming poly(styrene)-poly(hexylmethacrylate) copolymers. Parameters studied include film thickness, block copolymer molecular weight and composition, substrate wetting conditions (controlled via grafted polymer brush layers of either polystyrene or polyhexylmethacrylate), and applied shear stress. Quality of alignment is assessed via atomic force microscopy and subsequent computation of an orientational order parameter and the density of defects in the microdomain lattice. The results are compared to a melting-recrystallization model, thus providing greater insight into the fundamental mechanisms and key parameters which control how microdomains order in response to shear. In general monolayers are observed to align more poorly than thicker films, though the influence of film thickness on orientation depends strongly on polymer composition. Alignment quality is ultimately limited by inherent fluctuations in the cylinder trajectories as well as the presence of isolated dislocations.

  13. Expression and subcellular localization of thymosin beta15 following kainic acid treatment in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Woong; Kim, Younghwa; Kim, Eun Hae; Koh, Doyle; Sun, Woong Kim, Hyun

    2008-07-11

    Thymosin {beta}15 (T{beta}15) is a pleiotropic factor which exerts multiple roles in the development of nervous system and brain diseases. In this study, we found that the expressions of T{beta}15 mRNA and protein were substantially increased in several brain regions including hippocampal formation and cerebral cortex, following kainic acid (KA)-evoked seizures in rat. Interestingly, a subset of cortex neurons exhibited nuclear T{beta}15 immunoreactivity upon KA treatment. Furthermore, translocation of T{beta}15 from cytosol to nuclei was observed in cultured neurons or HeLa cells during staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis, which was also verified by time-lapse imaging of YFP-tagged T{beta}15. It appeared that localization of T{beta}15 is restricted to the cytosol in normal condition by its G-actin-interacting domain, because site-directed mutagenesis of this region resulted in the nuclear localization of T{beta}15 in the absence of STS treatment. To explore the role of nuclear T{beta}15, we enforced T{beta}15 to localize in the nuclei by fusion of T{beta}15 with nuclear localization signal (NLS-T{beta}15). However, overexpression of NLS-T{beta}15 did not alter the viability of cells in response to STS treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that nuclear localization of T{beta}15 is a controlled process during KA or STS stimulation, although its functional significance is yet to be clarified.

  14. Factors determining drug residence in skin during transdermal absorption: studies on beta-blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Yagi, S; Nakayama, K; Kurosaki, Y; Higaki, K; Kimura, T

    1998-11-01

    The factors determining drug residence in skin during penetration across rat abdominal skin were investigated using five beta-blocking agents with different lipophilicities as model drugs in vivo and in vitro. The amount of beta-blocking agent in the skin at steady state correlated well with lipophilicity. The distribution of beta-blocking agents to the stratum corneum and the contribution of intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum to their skin distribution were also correlated with their lipophilicity, suggesting that the stratum corneum, especially intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum, would be responsible for the residence of beta-blocking agents in the skin. Furthermore, cholesterol-3-sulfate, palmitic acid, stearic acid and oleic acid were found to interact with the beta-blocking agents, which are cationized under the physiological condition, and were assumed to play an important role in the skin accumulation. On the other hand, the binding to keratinocyte was so small that keratinocyte might have little effect on the skin accumulation of the beta-blocking agents. Drug transport from the stratum corneum to viable skin was suggested to be regulated by the lipophilicity of these agents. To investigate the residence of these drugs in viable skin, in vitro transport studies using stripped skin were performed. The transport rate constant across viable skin to receptor cells (k23) was inversely correlated with the lipophilicity of the drugs. The elimination rate constants from viable skin (k(vs)) obtained in the in vivo study were much smaller than the values of k23 obtained in the in vitro study, and they were inversely correlated with the binding to cytosol components of viable skin but not the lipophilicity. The viable skin-to-muscle concentration ratio of these drugs, obtained at the beta-phase of the plasma concentration-time curve after intravenous administration, was also inversely correlated with the binding to the cytosol components of viable

  15. Oxidative stress effect on progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) binding to PIBF-receptor in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Palkovics, Tamas; Szekeres-Barthó, Júlia; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-ligand binding is an essential interaction for biological function. Oxidative stress can modify receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics, thus altering cell physiological functions. The aim of this study is to analyze how oxidative stress may alter receptor-ligand binding and lipid domain distribution in the case of progesterone-induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor. For membrane fluidity regionalization analysis of MEC-1 lymphocytes, two-photon microscopy was used in individual living cells. Lymphocytes were also double stained with AlexaFluor647/progesterone-induced blocking factor and Laurdan to evaluate -induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor distribution in the different membrane domains, under oxidative stress. A new procedure has been developed which quantitatively analyzes the regionalization of a membrane receptor among the lipid domains of different fluidity in the plasma membrane. We have been able to establish a new tool which detects and evaluates lipid raft clustering from two-photon microscopy images of individual living cells. We show that binding of progesterone-induced blocking factor to progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor causes a rigidification of plasma membrane which is related to an increase of lipid raft clustering. However, this clustering is inhibited under oxidative stress conditions. In conclusion, oxidative stress decreases membrane fluidity, impairs receptor-ligand binding and reduces lipid raft clustering.

  16. Effect of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate on brain mitochondrial DNA damage and seizures induced by kainic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiro-aki; Mohanan, Parayanthala V

    2003-07-20

    The effects of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate on brain mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and seizures induced by kainic acid were examined both in vivo and in vitro. An intraperitoneal (ip) injection of kainic acid (45 mg/kg) produced broad-spectrum limbic and severe sustained seizures in all of the treated mice. The seizures were abolished when alpha-ketoglutarate (2 g/kg) or oxaloacetate (1 g/kg) was injected intraperitoneally in the animals 1 min before kainic acid administration. In addition, the administration of kainic acid caused damage to mtDNA in brain frontal and middle cortex of mice. These effects were completely abolished by the ip preinjection of alpha-ketoglutarate (2 g/kg) or oxaloacetate (1 g/kg). In vitro exposure of kainic acid (0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 mM) to brain homogenate inflicted damage to mtDNA in a concentration-dependent manner. The damage of mtDNA induced by 1.0 mM kainic acid was attenuated by the co-treatment with alpha-ketoglutarate (2.5 or 5.0 mM) or oxaloacetate (0.75 or 1.0 mM). Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro exposure of kainic acid elicited an increase in lipid peroxidation. However, the increased lipid peroxidation was completely inhibited by cotreatment of alpha-ketoglutarate or oxaloacetate. These results suggest that alpha-keto acids such as alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate play a role in the inhibition of seizures and subsequent mtDNA damage induced by the excitotoxic/neurotoxic agent, kainic acid.

  17. Evaluation of emerging factors blocking filtration of high-adjunct-ratio wort.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ting; Zhu, Linjiang; Zheng, Feiyun; Li, Yongxian; Li, Qi

    2014-08-20

    Corn starch has become a common adjunct for beer brewing in Chinese breweries. However, with increasing ratio of corn starch, problems like poor wort filtration performance arise, which will decrease production capacity of breweries. To solve this problem, factors affecting wort filtration were evaluated, such as the size of corn starch particle, special yellow floats formed during liquefaction of corn starch, and residual substance after liquefaction. The effects of different enzyme preparations including β-amylase and β-glucanase on filtration rate were also evaluated. The results indicate that the emerging yellow floats do not severely block filtration, while the fine and uniform-shape corn starch particle and its incompletely hydrolyzed residue after liquefaction are responsible for filtration blocking. Application of β-amylase preparation increased the filtration rate of liquefied corn starch. This study is useful for our insight into the filtration blocking problem arising in the process of high-adjunct-ratio beer brewing and also provides a feasible solution using enzyme preparations.

  18. SCN5A variant that blocks fibroblast growth factor homologous factor regulation causes human arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Sturm, Amy C.; Murphy, Nathaniel; Adelman, Sara; Wang, Chaojian; Yan, Haidun; Johnson, Benjamin L.; Csepe, Thomas A.; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert S. D.; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Weiss, Raul; Salazar, Christina; Hund, Thomas J.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Nav channels are essential for metazoan membrane depolarization, and Nav channel dysfunction is directly linked with epilepsy, ataxia, pain, arrhythmia, myotonia, and irritable bowel syndrome. Human Nav channelopathies are primarily caused by variants that directly affect Nav channel permeability or gating. However, a new class of human Nav channelopathies has emerged based on channel variants that alter regulation by intracellular signaling or cytoskeletal proteins. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) are a family of intracellular signaling proteins linked with Nav channel regulation in neurons and myocytes. However, to date, there is surprisingly little evidence linking Nav channel gene variants with FHFs and human disease. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that mutations in SCN5A (encodes primary cardiac Nav channel Nav1.5) that alter FHF binding result in human cardiovascular disease. We describe a five*generation kindred with a history of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, and sudden cardiac death. Affected family members harbor a novel SCN5A variant resulting in p.H1849R. p.H1849R is localized in the central binding core on Nav1.5 for FHFs. Consistent with these data, Nav1.5 p.H1849R affected interaction with FHFs. Further, electrophysiological analysis identified Nav1.5 p.H1849R as a gain-of-function for INa by altering steady-state inactivation and slowing the rate of Nav1.5 inactivation. In line with these data and consistent with human cardiac phenotypes, myocytes expressing Nav1.5 p.H1849R displayed prolonged action potential duration and arrhythmogenic afterdepolarizations. Together, these findings identify a previously unexplored mechanism for human Nav channelopathy based on altered Nav1.5 association with FHF proteins. PMID:26392562

  19. Kainic acid induces expression of caveolin-1 in activated microglia in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shigeko; Matsuda, Wakoto; Tooyama, Ikuo; Yasuhara, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1, a major constituent of caveolae, has been implicated in endocytosis, signal transduction and cholesterol transport in a wide variety of cells. In the present study, the expression of caveolin-1 was examined by immunohistochemistry in rat brain with or without systemic injection of kainic acid (KA). Caveolin-1 immunoreactivity was observed in capillary walls in brains of control rats. From one to seven days after KA injection, caveolin-1 immunoreactivity appeared in activated microglia in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and other brain regions. The strongest immunoreactivity of microglia was seen after 3 days after KA administration. The expression of caveolin-1 was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The induction of caveolin-1 expression in microglia activated in response to kainic acid administration suggests its possible role in a modulation of inflammation. PMID:23690214

  20. Thiazolidinediones block tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced inhibition of insulin signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Xu, M; Spiegelman, B M

    1997-01-01

    TNF-alpha has been shown to be an important mediator of insulin resistance linked to obesity. This cytokine induces insulin resistance, at least in part, through inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor. Recently, a new class of compounds, the antidiabetic thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has been shown to improve insulin resistance in obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in both rodents and man. Here we show that TZDs have powerful effects on the ability of TNF-alpha to alter the most proximal steps of insulin signaling, including tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and its major substrate, IRS-1, and activation of PI3-kinase. Troglitazone or pioglitazone essentially eliminate the reduction in tyrosine phosphorylation of IR and IRS-1 caused by TNF-alpha in fat cells, even at relatively high doses (25 ng/ml). That this effect of TZDs operates through activation of the nuclear receptor PPARgamma/ RXR complex is shown by the fact that similar effects are observed with other PPARgamma/RXR ligands such as 15 deoxy Delta12,14PGJ2 and LG268. The TZDs do not inhibit all TNF-alpha signaling in that the transcription factor NF-kB is still induced well. These data indicate that TZDs can specifically block certain actions of TNF-alpha related to insulin resistance, suggesting that this block may contribute to their antidiabetic actions. PMID:9312188

  1. Autoradiographic analysis of 3H-glutamate, 3H-dopamine, and 3H-GABA accumulation in rabbit retina after kainic acid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, C.K.; Redburn, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    We have previously reported that exposure of isolated rabbit retina to 10(-3) M kainic acid produces profound morphological changes in specific retinal neurons (Hampton et al, 1981). We noted specific swelling of horizontal cell bodies and neurites, necrosis of cell bodies in the amacrine and ganglion cell layers, and swelling of elements in the inner plexiform layer. We now report a differential sensitivity to kainic acid of specific subclasses of amacrine cells autoradiographically labeled with 3H-glutamate, 3H-GABA, or 3H-dopamine. Three different effects were observed: (1) Labeling of neurons after incubation in 3H-glutamate was uniformly reduced while labeling of glia was much less affected. (2) The accumulation of 3H-dopamine was also decreased by kainic acid in two of the three labeled bands of the inner plexiform layer. The outermost labeled band was insensitive to kainic acid at the highest concentration tested (10(-2) M). These findings provide a basis for the subclassification of dopaminergic amacrine cells into at least two subclasses based on their sensitivity to kainic acid. (3) Kainic acid caused a dramatic increase in the labeling of GABAergic amacrine cell bodies and their terminals. This increased intensity may reflect a compensatory increase in uptake activity in response to kainic acid-induced depletion of endogenous GABA stores. These results confirm the highly toxic nature of kainic acid and demonstrate a high degree of specificity and complexity in its action in the retina.

  2. Peroxiredoxin 1 interacts with and blocks the redox factor APE1 from activating interleukin-8 expression.

    PubMed

    Nassour, Hassan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Saad, Amine; Papaluca, Arturo; Brosseau, Nicolas; Affar, El Bachir; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    APE1 is an essential DNA repair protein that also possesses the ability to regulate transcription. It has a unique cysteine residue C65, which maintains the reduce state of several transcriptional activators such as NF-κB. How APE1 is being recruited to execute the various biological functions remains unknown. Herein, we show that APE1 interacts with a novel partner PRDX1, a peroxidase that can also prevent oxidative damage to proteins by serving as a chaperone. PRDX1 knockdown did not interfere with APE1 expression level or its DNA repair activities. However, PRDX1 knockdown greatly facilitates APE1 detection within the nucleus by indirect immunofluorescence analysis, even though APE1 level was unchanged. The loss of APE1 interaction with PRDX1 promotes APE1 redox function to activate binding of the transcription factor NF-κB onto the promoter of a target gene, the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8 involved in cancer invasion and metastasis, resulting in its upregulation. Depletion of APE1 blocked the upregulation of IL-8 in the PRDX1 knockdown cells. Our findings suggest that the interaction of PRDX1 with APE1 represents a novel anti-inflammatory function of PRDX1, whereby the association safeguards APE1 from reducing transcription factors and activating superfluous gene expression, which otherwise could trigger cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27388124

  3. Peroxiredoxin 1 interacts with and blocks the redox factor APE1 from activating interleukin-8 expression

    PubMed Central

    Nassour, Hassan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Saad, Amine; Papaluca, Arturo; Brosseau, Nicolas; Affar, El Bachir; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    APE1 is an essential DNA repair protein that also possesses the ability to regulate transcription. It has a unique cysteine residue C65, which maintains the reduce state of several transcriptional activators such as NF-κB. How APE1 is being recruited to execute the various biological functions remains unknown. Herein, we show that APE1 interacts with a novel partner PRDX1, a peroxidase that can also prevent oxidative damage to proteins by serving as a chaperone. PRDX1 knockdown did not interfere with APE1 expression level or its DNA repair activities. However, PRDX1 knockdown greatly facilitates APE1 detection within the nucleus by indirect immunofluorescence analysis, even though APE1 level was unchanged. The loss of APE1 interaction with PRDX1 promotes APE1 redox function to activate binding of the transcription factor NF-κB onto the promoter of a target gene, the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8 involved in cancer invasion and metastasis, resulting in its upregulation. Depletion of APE1 blocked the upregulation of IL-8 in the PRDX1 knockdown cells. Our findings suggest that the interaction of PRDX1 with APE1 represents a novel anti-inflammatory function of PRDX1, whereby the association safeguards APE1 from reducing transcription factors and activating superfluous gene expression, which otherwise could trigger cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27388124

  4. Protective effects of bupivacaine against kainic acid-induced seizure and neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan Ming; Wu, Chia Chan; Wang, Ming Jiuh; Lee, Ming Yi; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-01-01

    The excessive release of glutamate is a critical element in the neuropathology of epilepsy, and bupivacaine, a local anesthetic agent, has been shown to inhibit the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals. This study investigated whether bupivacaine produces antiseizure and antiexcitotoxic effects using a kainic acid (KA) rat model, an animal model used for temporal lobe epilepsy, and excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments. The results showed that administering bupivacaine (0.4 mg/kg or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to rats 30 min before intraperitoneal injection of KA (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and reduced the seizure score. In addition, bupivacaine attenuated KA-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the inhibition of microglial activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, bupivacaine shortened the latency of escaping onto the platform in the Morris water maze learning performance test. Collectively, these data suggest that bupivacaine has therapeutic potential for treating epilepsy.

  5. Naringenin ameliorates kainic acid-induced morphological alterations in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungha; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Shin, Won-Ho; Bae, Young-Seuk; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-10-19

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is a morphological alteration characteristic of temporal lobe epilepsy. Recently, we reported that treatment with naringin, a flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, reduced spontaneous recurrent seizures by inhibiting kainic acid (KA)-induced GCD and neuronal cell death in mouse hippocampus, suggesting that naringin might have beneficial effects for preventing epileptic events in the adult brain. However, it is still unclear whether the beneficial effects of naringin treatment are mediated by the metabolism of naringin into naringenin in the KA-treated hippocampus. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated whether intraperitoneal injections of naringenin could mimic naringin-induced effects against GCD caused by intrahippocampal KA injections in mice. Our results showed that treatment with naringenin delayed the onset of KA-induced seizures and attenuated KA-induced GCD by inhibiting activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in both neurons and reactive astrocytes in the DG. In addition, its administration attenuated the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) from microglial activation in the DG following KA treatment. These results suggest that naringenin may be an active metabolite of naringin and help prevent the progression of epileptic insults in the hippocampus in vivo; therefore, naringenin may be a beneficial metabolite of naringin for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:27584687

  6. Naringenin ameliorates kainic acid-induced morphological alterations in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungha; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Shin, Won-Ho; Bae, Young-Seuk; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-10-19

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is a morphological alteration characteristic of temporal lobe epilepsy. Recently, we reported that treatment with naringin, a flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, reduced spontaneous recurrent seizures by inhibiting kainic acid (KA)-induced GCD and neuronal cell death in mouse hippocampus, suggesting that naringin might have beneficial effects for preventing epileptic events in the adult brain. However, it is still unclear whether the beneficial effects of naringin treatment are mediated by the metabolism of naringin into naringenin in the KA-treated hippocampus. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated whether intraperitoneal injections of naringenin could mimic naringin-induced effects against GCD caused by intrahippocampal KA injections in mice. Our results showed that treatment with naringenin delayed the onset of KA-induced seizures and attenuated KA-induced GCD by inhibiting activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in both neurons and reactive astrocytes in the DG. In addition, its administration attenuated the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) from microglial activation in the DG following KA treatment. These results suggest that naringenin may be an active metabolite of naringin and help prevent the progression of epileptic insults in the hippocampus in vivo; therefore, naringenin may be a beneficial metabolite of naringin for the treatment of epilepsy.

  7. Hesperidin inhibits glutamate release and exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity induced by kainic acid in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia Ying; Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Huang, Shu Kuei; Wang, Ying Chou; Chou, Shang Shing Peter; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-09-01

    The citrus flavonoid hesperidin exerts neuroprotective effects and could cross the blood-brain barrier. Given the involvement of glutamate neurotoxicity in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, this study was conducted to evaluate the potential role of hesperidin in glutamate release and glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus of rats. In rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), hesperidin inhibited the release of glutamate and elevation of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration evoked by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. The inhibitory effect of hesperidin on evoked glutamate release was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca(2+) ions and blocking the activity of Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels or protein kinase C. In hippocampal slice preparations, whole-cell patch clamp experiments showed that hesperidin reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude, indicating the involvement of a presynaptic mechanism. In addition, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of kainic acid (KA, 15 mg/kg) elevated the extracellular glutamate levels and caused considerable neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA3 area. These KA-induced alterations were attenuated by pretreatment with hesperidin (10 or 50 mg/kg, i.p.) before administering the KA. These results demonstrate that hesperidin inhibits evoked glutamate release in vitro and attenuates in vivo KA-induced neuronal death in the hippocampus. Our findings indicate that hesperidin may be a promising candidate for preventing or treating glutamate excitotoxicity related brain disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Intergenic transcriptional interference is blocked by RNA polymerase III transcription factor TFIIIB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korde, Asawari; Rosselot, Jessica M; Donze, David

    2014-02-01

    The major function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase III is to transcribe transfer RNA, 5S ribosomal RNA, and other small non-protein-coding RNA molecules. Assembly of the RNA polymerase III complex on chromosomal DNA requires the sequential binding of transcription factor complexes TFIIIC and TFIIIB. Recent evidence has suggested that in addition to producing RNA transcripts, chromatin-assembled RNA polymerase III complexes may mediate additional nuclear functions that include chromatin boundary, nucleosome phasing, and general genome organization activities. This study provides evidence of another such "extratranscriptional" activity of assembled RNA polymerase III complexes, which is the ability to block progression of intergenic RNA polymerase II transcription. We demonstrate that the RNA polymerase III complex bound to the tRNA gene upstream of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATG31 gene protects the ATG31 promoter against readthrough transcriptional interference from the upstream noncoding intergenic SUT467 transcription unit. This protection is predominately mediated by binding of the TFIIIB complex. When TFIIIB binding to this tRNA gene is weakened, an extended SUT467-ATG31 readthrough transcript is produced, resulting in compromised ATG31 translation. Since the ATG31 gene product is required for autophagy, strains expressing the readthrough transcript exhibit defective autophagy induction and reduced fitness under autophagy-inducing nitrogen starvation conditions. Given the recent discovery of widespread pervasive transcription in all forms of life, protection of neighboring genes from intergenic transcriptional interference may be a key extratranscriptional function of assembled RNA polymerase III complexes and possibly other DNA binding proteins.

  9. The factor XIIa blocking antibody 3F7: a safe anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory activities

    PubMed Central

    Worm, Marie; Köhler, Elodie C.; Panda, Rachita; Long, Andy; Butler, Lynn M.; Stavrou, Evi X.; Nickel, Katrin F.; Fuchs, Tobias A.

    2015-01-01

    The plasma protein factor XII (FXII) is the initiating protease of the procoagulant and proinflammatory contact system. FXII activates both the bradykinin (BK) producing kallikrein-kinin system and the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. Contact with negatively charged surfaces induces auto-activation of zymogen FXII that results in activated FXII (FXIIa). Various in vivo activators of FXII have been identified including heparin, misfolded protein aggregates, nucleic acids and polyphosphate. Murine models have established a central role of FXII in arterial and venous thromboembolic diseases. Despite the central function of FXII in pathologic thrombosis, its deficiency does not impair hemostasis in animals or humans. The selective role of FXIIa in thrombosis, but not hemostasis, offers an exciting novel strategy for safe anticoagulation based on interference with FXIIa. We have generated the recombinant fully human FXIIa-blocking antibody 3F7, which abolished FXIIa enzymatic activity and prevented thrombosis in a cardiopulmonary bypass system in large animals, in the absence of increased therapy-associated bleeding. Furthermore, 3F7 also interfered with BK-driven edema in the severe swelling disorder hereditary angioedema (HAE) type III. Taken together, targeting FXIIa with 3F7 appears to be a promising approach to treat edema disorders and thrombosis. PMID:26605293

  10. Enteric pathogens deploy cell cycle inhibiting factors to block the bactericidal activity of Perforin-2

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Ryan M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Olsson, Melissa L; Podack, Eckhard R; Munson, George P

    2015-01-01

    Perforin-2 (MPEG1) is an effector of the innate immune system that limits the proliferation and spread of medically relevant Gram-negative, -positive, and acid fast bacteria. We show here that a cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complex containing cullin-1 and βTrCP monoubiquitylates Perforin-2 in response to pathogen associated molecular patterns such as LPS. Ubiquitylation triggers a rapid redistribution of Perforin-2 and is essential for its bactericidal activity. Enteric pathogens such as Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli disarm host cells by injecting cell cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) into mammalian cells to deamidate the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. Because CRL activity is dependent upon NEDD8, Cif blocks ubiquitin dependent trafficking of Perforin-2 and thus, its bactericidal activity. Collectively, these studies further underscore the biological significance of Perforin-2 and elucidate critical molecular events that culminate in Perforin-2-dependent killing of both intracellular and extracellular, cell-adherent bacteria. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06505.001 PMID:26418746

  11. Blocking Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Reduces the Neural Invasion Potential of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bapat, Aditi A.; Munoz, Ruben M.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is thought to be one of the factors responsible for the high rate of tumor recurrence after surgery and the pain generation associated with pancreatic cancer. Signaling via the nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway between pancreatic cancer cells and the surrounding nerves has been implicated in PNI, and increased levels of these proteins have been correlated to poor prognosis. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism of the NGF signaling pathway in PNI in pancreatic cancer. We show that knocking down NGF or its receptors, TRKA and p75NTR, or treatment with GW441756, a TRKA kinase inhibitor, reduces the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer cells migrate towards dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in a co-culture assay, indicating a paracrine NGF signaling between the DRGs and pancreatic cancer cells. Knocking down the expression of NGF pathway proteins or inhibiting the activity of TRKA by GW441756 reduced the migratory ability of Mia PaCa2 towards the DRGs. Finally, blocking NGF signaling by NGF neutralizing antibodies or GW441756 inhibited the neurite formation in PC-12 cells in response to conditioned media from pancreatic cancer cells, indicating a reciprocal signaling pathway between the pancreatic cancer cells and nerves. Our results indicate that NGF signaling pathway provides a potential target for developing molecularly targeted therapies to decrease PNI and reduce pain generation. Since there are several TRKA antagonists currently in early clinical trials they could now be tested in the clinical situation of pancreatic cancer induced pain. PMID:27792755

  12. Progesterone-induced blocking factor differentially regulates trophoblast and tumor invasion by altering matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Halasz, Melinda; Polgar, Beata; Berta, Gergely; Czimbalek, Livia; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Invasiveness is a common feature of trophoblast and tumors; however, while tumor invasion is uncontrolled, trophoblast invasion is strictly regulated. Both trophoblast and tumor cells express high levels of the immunomodulatory progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), therefore, we aimed to test the possibility that PIBF might be involved in invasion. To this aim, we used PIBF-silenced or PIBF-treated trophoblast (HTR8/Svneo, and primary trophoblast) and tumor (HT-1080, A549, HCT116, PC3) cell lines. Silencing of PIBF increased invasiveness as well as MMP-2,-9 secretion of HTR8/SVneo, and decreased those of HT-1080 cells. PIBF induced immediate STAT6 activation in both cell lines. Silencing of IL-4Rα abrogated all the above effects of PIBF, suggesting that invasion-related signaling by PIBF is initiated through the IL-4Rα/PIBF-receptor complex. In HTR-8/SVneo, PIBF induced fast, but transient Akt and ERK phosphorylation, whereas in tumor cells, PIBF triggered sustained Akt, ERK, and late STAT3 activation. The late signaling events might be due to indirect action of PIBF. PIBF induced the expression of EGF and HB-EGF in HT-1080 cells. The STAT3-activating effect of PIBF was reduced in HB-EGF-deficient HT-1080 cells, suggesting that PIBF-induced HB-EGF contributes to late STAT3 activation. PIBF binds to the promoters of IL-6, EGF, and HB-EGF; however, the protein profile of the protein/DNA complex is different in the two cell lines. We conclude that in tumor cells, PIBF induces proteins, which activate invasion signaling, while-based on our previous data-PIBF might control trophoblast invasion by suppressing proinvasive genes.

  13. First principles calculations of nucleon and pion form factors: understanding the building blocks of nuclear matter from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Constantia Alexandrou; Bojan Bistrovic; Robert Edwards; P de Forcrand; George Fleming; Philipp Haegler; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Andrew Pochinsky; Dru Renner; David Richards; Wolfram Schroers; Antonios Tsapalis

    2005-10-01

    Lattice QCD is an essential complement to the current and anticipated DOE-supported experimental program in hadronic physics. In this poster we address several key questions central to our understanding of the building blocks of nuclear matter, nucleons and pions. Firstly, we describe progress at computing the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, describing the distribution of charge and current, before considering the role played by the strange quarks. We then describe the study of transition form factors to the Delta resonance. Finally, we present recent work to determine the pion form factor, complementary to the current JLab experimental determination and providing insight into the approach to asymptotic freedom.

  14. Phospholipids block nuclear factor-kappa B and tau phosphorylation and inhibit amyloid-beta secretion in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pandey, N R; Sultan, K; Twomey, E; Sparks, D L

    2009-12-29

    Inflammation and oxidative stress have been shown to play a critical role in the pathophysiology that leads to neurodegeneration. Omega-6 phospholipids, e.g. dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and therefore experiments were undertaken to determine whether DLPC can prevent inflammatory neurodegenerative events in the model neuronal cell line, SH-SY5Y. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) and H(2)O(2) activate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in SH-SY5Y cells within 5 min and this activation is completely blocked by DLPC (12 microM). DLPC blocks IkappaBalpha phosphorylation in the SH-SY5Y cells and prevents the phosphorylation and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB). The phospholipid inhibits induction of MAPK and NF-kappaB in similar fashion to the MEK1/2-inhibitor, U0126 (10 microM). DLPC completely abolishes TNF-alpha, H(2)O(2) and lipopolysaccaride (LPS)-induced neuronal tau phosphorylation. Cellular amyloid precursor protein levels are reduced by DLPC and LPS-induced amyloid-beta expression and secretion in SH-SY5Y cells are completely blocked by DLPC. Taken together, these data suggest that DLPC can act through MAPK to block neuronal inflammatory cascades and prevent potential pathological consequences in the neuronal metabolism of amyloid and tau proteins. PMID:19788916

  15. Neuroprotective effect of rough aster butanol fraction against oxidative stress in the brain of mice challenged with kainic acid.

    PubMed

    Sok, Dai-Eun; Oh, Sang Hee; Kim, Yun-Bae; Kim, Mee Ree

    2003-07-30

    The neuroprotective effect of the butanol fraction from the methanol extract of Aster scaber Thunb. (rough aster butanol fraction) on oxidative damage in the brain of mice challenged with kainic acid was examined using behavioral signs and biochemical parameters of oxidative stress. The rough aster butanol fraction (0.4-1.0 g/kg) was administered to ICR male mice, 6-8 weeks, through a gavage for 4 days consecutively, and on the third day, kainic acid (50 mg/kg) was ip administered. When compared to the vehicle-treated control, no significant changes in body and brain weight were observed in mice administered the rough aster butanol fraction. Administration of kainic acid only, causing a lethality of approximately 54%, resulted in a significant decrease of total glutathione level and an increase of the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) value in brain tissue. When the rough aster butanol fraction was examined for neuroprotective action, the rough aster butanol fraction (0.4 g/kg) alleviated the lethality (25%) of kainic acid and the behavioral sign of its neurotoxicity. Moreover, administration of the rough aster butanol fraction at a dose of 0.4 g/kg restored the glutathione level in the cytosolic portion of brain homogenate to approximately 80% (p < 0.05). Also, the rough aster butanol fraction (0.4 g/kg) led to a significant reduction of kainic acid-induced increase of TBARS value. In addition, the glutathione peroxidase activity was restored significantly (p < 0.05) in the cytosolic portion of brain homogenate, whereas glutathione reductase activity was not. On the basis of these results, the rough aster butanol fraction is suggested to contain a functional agent to prevent oxidative stress in the brain of mice.

  16. Regulation of hippocampal Fas receptor and death-inducing signaling complex after kainic acid treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-12-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced brain neuronal cell death (especially in the hippocampus) was shown to be mainly mediated by the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. This study investigated the regulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway mediated by Fas ligand/Fas receptor and components of the indispensable death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in the hippocampus (marked changes) and cerebral cortex (modest changes) of KA-treated mice. KA (45mg/kg) induced a severe behavioral syndrome with recurrent motor seizures (scores; maximal at 60-90min; minimal at 72h) with activation of hippocampal pro-apoptotic JNK (+2.5 fold) and increased GFAP (+57%) and nuclear PARP-1 fragmentation (+114%) 72h post-treatment (delayed neurotoxicity). In the extrinsic apoptotic pathway (hippocampus), KA (72h) reduced Fas ligand (-92%) and Fas receptor aggregates (-24%). KA (72h) also altered the contents of major DISC components: decreased FADD adaptor (-44%), reduced activation of initiator caspase-8 (-47%) and increased survival FLIP-S (+220%). Notably, KA (72h) upregulated the content of anti-apoptotic p-Ser191 FADD (+41%) and consequently the expression of p-FADD/FADD ratio (+1.9-fold), a neuroplastic index. Moreover, the p-FADD dependent transcription factor NF-κB was also increased (+61%) in the hippocampus after KA (72h). The convergent adaptation of the extrinsic apoptotic machinery 72h after KA in mice (with otherwise normal gross behavior) is a novel finding which suggests the induction of survival mechanisms to partly counteract the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell region after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Laurén, Hanna B; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Brandt, Annika M; Rios-Rojas, Clarissa J; Holopainen, Irma E

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in epileptogenesis in the developing brain remain poorly understood. The gene array approach could reveal some of the factors involved by allowing the identification of a broad scale of genes altered by seizures. In this study we used microarray analysis to reveal the gene expression profile of the laser microdissected hippocampal CA1 subregion one week after kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) in 21-day-old rats, which are developmentally roughly comparable to juvenile children. The gene expression analysis with the Chipster software generated a total of 1592 differently expressed genes in the CA1 subregion of KA-treated rats compared to control rats. The KEGG database revealed that the identified genes were involved in pathways such as oxidative phosporylation (26 genes changed), and long-term potentiation (LTP; 18 genes changed). Also genes involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis, gliosis, inflammation, and GABAergic transmission were altered. To validate the microarray results we further examined the protein expression for a subset of selected genes, glial fibrillary protein (GFAP), apolipoprotein E (apo E), cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1), Purkinje cell protein 4 (PEP-19), and interleukin 8 receptor (CXCR1), with immunohistochemistry, which confirmed the transcriptome results. Our results showed that SE resulted in no obvious CA1 neuronal loss, and alterations in the expression pattern of several genes during the early epileptogenic phase were comparable to previous gene expression studies of the adult hippocampus of both experimental epileptic animals and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). However, some changes seem to occur after SE specifically in the juvenile rat hippocampus. Insight of the SE-induced alterations in gene expression and their related pathways could give us hints for the development of new target-specific antiepileptic drugs that interfere with the progression of the disease in the juvenile age

  18. Regulation of hippocampal Fas receptor and death-inducing signaling complex after kainic acid treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-12-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced brain neuronal cell death (especially in the hippocampus) was shown to be mainly mediated by the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. This study investigated the regulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway mediated by Fas ligand/Fas receptor and components of the indispensable death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in the hippocampus (marked changes) and cerebral cortex (modest changes) of KA-treated mice. KA (45mg/kg) induced a severe behavioral syndrome with recurrent motor seizures (scores; maximal at 60-90min; minimal at 72h) with activation of hippocampal pro-apoptotic JNK (+2.5 fold) and increased GFAP (+57%) and nuclear PARP-1 fragmentation (+114%) 72h post-treatment (delayed neurotoxicity). In the extrinsic apoptotic pathway (hippocampus), KA (72h) reduced Fas ligand (-92%) and Fas receptor aggregates (-24%). KA (72h) also altered the contents of major DISC components: decreased FADD adaptor (-44%), reduced activation of initiator caspase-8 (-47%) and increased survival FLIP-S (+220%). Notably, KA (72h) upregulated the content of anti-apoptotic p-Ser191 FADD (+41%) and consequently the expression of p-FADD/FADD ratio (+1.9-fold), a neuroplastic index. Moreover, the p-FADD dependent transcription factor NF-κB was also increased (+61%) in the hippocampus after KA (72h). The convergent adaptation of the extrinsic apoptotic machinery 72h after KA in mice (with otherwise normal gross behavior) is a novel finding which suggests the induction of survival mechanisms to partly counteract the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus. PMID:26044520

  19. Transient changes in the limbic histaminergic system after systemic kainic acid-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Lintunen, Minnamaija; Sallmen, Tina; Karlstedt, Kaj; Panula, Pertti

    2005-10-01

    Increased brain histamine is reported to protect against convulsions. We used systemic kainic acid (KA) administration to study possible changes of the histaminergic system in rat brain in status epilepticus (SE). Robust increases in brain histamine concentrations and numbers of histamine-immunoreactive nerve fibers were detected in the piriform cortex (Pir) and amygdala after KA injection, suggesting a reactive increase, which is opposite to other published aminergic transmitter responses. These changes, lasting several weeks, might be coupled to a mechanism unrelated to the anticonvulsive function of histamine. Transient increases in mRNA expression of H(3) receptor isoforms with a full-length third intracellular loop, coupled to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, were detected first in the hippocampal CA3c area, followed by the Pir and amygdala and then the hippocampal CA1 area. These results suggest that histamine and H3 receptors, which also control the release of GABA and glutamate, might be involved in convulsive SE.

  20. Induction of plasminogen in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons by kainic acid.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Y; Kitamura, Y; Taniguchi, T

    1998-08-14

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is used to treat acute stroke, but tPA- and plasminogen-gene-deficient mice exhibit resistance to neurodegeneration. Thus, it is unclear whether the tPA-plasminogen system, an extracellular proteolytic cascade plays a helpful or harmful role, and whether plasminogen is induced by neurodegeneration. In the CA3, kainic acid (KA)-injection caused neuronal damage after 6 h, and almost all of the neurons were lost after 7 days. Plasminogen mRNA was strongly induced 6 h after injection, then gradually decreased, and was very weak at 2 days after injection. Plasminogen protein was expressed after 6 h and localized in abnormally shaped neurons. The in vivo expression of plasminogen was synchronous with morphological changes in neurons. These results suggest that the expression of plasminogen induced by KA-injection may disrupt of neuron-extracellular matrix interaction and thereby contribute to cell death in neurons in the hippocampus.

  1. Fibrinogen blocks the autoactivation and thrombin-mediated activation of factor XI on dextran sulfate.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C F; Colman, R W

    1992-01-01

    The intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation is activated when factor XIa, one of the three contact-system enzymes, is generated and then activates factor IX. Factor XI has been shown to be efficiently activated in vitro by surface-bound factor XIIa after factor XI is transported to the surface by its cofactor, high molecular weight kininogen (HK). However, individuals lacking any of the three contact-system proteins--namely, factor XII, prekallikrein, and HK--do not suffer from bleeding abnormalities. This mystery has led several investigators to search for an "alternate" activation pathway for factor XI. Recently, factor XI has been reported to be autoactivated on the soluble "surface" dextran sulfate, and thrombin was shown to accelerate the autoactivation. However, it was also reported that HK, the cofactor for factor XIIa-mediated activation of factor XI, actually diminishes the thrombin-catalyzed activation rate of factor XI. Nonetheless, it was suggested that thrombin was a more efficient activator than factor XIIa. In this report we investigated the effect of fibrinogen, the major coagulation protein in plasma, on the activation rate of factor XI. Fibrinogen, the preferred substrate for thrombin in plasma, virtually prevented autoactivation of factor XI as well as the thrombin-mediated activation of factor XI, while having no effect on factor XIIa-catalyzed activation. HK dramatically curtailed the autoactivation of factor XI in addition to the thrombin-mediated activation. These data indicate that factor XI would not be autoactivated in a plasma environment, and thrombin would, therefore, be unlikely to potentiate the activation. We believe that the "missing pathway" for factor XI activation remains an enigma that warrants further investigation. PMID:1454798

  2. Inhibition of pyrimidine synthesis reverses viral virulence factor-mediated block of mRNA nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Das, Priyabrata; Schmolke, Mirco; Manicassamy, Balaji; Wang, Yaming; Deng, Xiaoyi; Cai, Ling; Tu, Benjamin P; Forst, Christian V; Roth, Michael G; Levy, David E; García-Sastre, Adolfo; de Brabander, Jef; Phillips, Margaret A; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2012-02-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza virus is a major virulence factor essential for virus replication, as it redirects the host cell to promote viral protein expression. NS1 inhibits cellular messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) processing and export, down-regulating host gene expression and enhancing viral gene expression. We report in this paper the identification of a nontoxic quinoline carboxylic acid that reverts the inhibition of mRNA nuclear export by NS1, in the absence or presence of the virus. This quinoline carboxylic acid directly inhibited dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), a host enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, and partially reduced pyrimidine levels. This effect induced NXF1 expression, which promoted mRNA nuclear export in the presence of NS1. The release of NS1-mediated mRNA export block by DHODH inhibition also occurred in the presence of vesicular stomatitis virus M (matrix) protein, another viral inhibitor of mRNA export. This reversal of mRNA export block allowed expression of antiviral factors. Thus, pyrimidines play a necessary role in the inhibition of mRNA nuclear export by virulence factors.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of trans-caryophyllene against kainic acid induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Song, Zhi; Liao, Daguang; Zhang, Tianyi; Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Kai; Luo, Kui; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Trans-caryophyllene (TC), a component of essential oil found in many flowering plants, has shown its neuroprotective effects in various neurological disorders. However, the effects of TC on epilepsy haven't been reported before. In this study, we investigated the effect of TC on kainic acid-induced seizure activity caused by oxidative stress and pro-inflammation. We found that TC pretreatment significantly decreased seizure activity score compared to kainic acid treated group. Importantly, TC pretreatment leads to lowering the mortality in kainic acid treated mice. In addition, TC was found to significantly inhibit KA-induced generation of malondialdehyde. TC pretreatment also preserved the activity of GPx, SOD, and CAT. Notably, our data shows that an important property of TC is its capacity to exert cerebral anti-inflammatory effects by mitigating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. These data suggest that TC has a potential protective effect on chemical induced seizure and brain damage. PMID:25417010

  4. Integrated assessment of behavioral and environmental risk factors for Lyme disease infection on Block Island, Rhode Island.

    PubMed

    Finch, Casey; Al-Damluji, Mohammed Salim; Krause, Peter J; Niccolai, Linda; Steeves, Tanner; O'Keefe, Corrine Folsom; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Peridomestic exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi-infected Ixodes scapularis nymphs is considered the dominant means of infection with black-legged tick-borne pathogens in the eastern United States. Population level studies have detected a positive association between the density of infected nymphs and Lyme disease incidence. At a finer spatial scale within endemic communities, studies have focused on individual level risk behaviors, without accounting for differences in peridomestic nymphal density. This study simultaneously assessed the influence of peridomestic tick exposure risk and human behavior risk factors for Lyme disease infection on Block Island, Rhode Island. Tick exposure risk on Block Island properties was estimated using remotely sensed landscape metrics that strongly correlated with tick density at the individual property level. Behavioral risk factors and Lyme disease serology were assessed using a longitudinal serosurvey study. Significant factors associated with Lyme disease positive serology included one or more self-reported previous Lyme disease episodes, wearing protective clothing during outdoor activities, the average number of hours spent daily in tick habitat, the subject's age and the density of shrub edges on the subject's property. The best fit multivariate model included previous Lyme diagnoses and age. The strength of this association with previous Lyme disease suggests that the same sector of the population tends to be repeatedly infected. The second best multivariate model included a combination of environmental and behavioral factors, namely hours spent in vegetation, subject's age, shrub edge density (increase risk) and wearing protective clothing (decrease risk). Our findings highlight the importance of concurrent evaluation of both environmental and behavioral factors to design interventions to reduce the risk of tick-borne infections.

  5. The AP-1 family member FOS blocks transcriptional activity of the nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, Rosa; Nogueira, Edson; Bassett, Mary H.; Carr, Bruce R.; Suzuki, Takashi; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Andò, Sebastiano; Rainey, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Steroid production in the adrenal zona glomerulosa is under the control of angiotensin II (Ang II), which, upon binding to its receptor, activates protein kinase C (PKC) within these cells. PKC is a potent inhibitor of the steroidogenic enzyme CYP17. We have demonstrated that, in the ovary, PKC activates expression of FOS, a member of the AP-1 family, and increased expression of this gene is linked to CYP17 downregulation. However, the pathway and the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of PKC on CYP17 expression are not defined. Herein, we demonstrated that Ang II inhibited CYP17 through PKC and ERK1/2-activated FOS and that blocking FOS expression decreased PKC-mediated inhibition. Although CYP17 transcription was activated by the nuclear receptor SF-1, expression of FOS resulted in a decrease in SF-1-mediated gene transcription. FOS physically interacted with the hinge region of SF-1 and modulated its transactivity, thus preventing binding of cofactors such as SRC1 and CBP, which were necessary to fully activate CYP17 transcription. Collectively, these results indicate a new regulatory mechanism for SF-1 transcriptional activity that might influence adrenal zone-specific expression of CYP17, a mechanism that can potentially be applied to other steroidogenic tissues. PMID:20980388

  6. A Framework for Batched and GPU-Resident Factorization Algorithms Applied to Block Householder Transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Tingzing Tim; Tomov, Stanimire Z; Luszczek, Piotr R; Dongarra, Jack J

    2015-01-01

    As modern hardware keeps evolving, an increasingly effective approach to developing energy efficient and high-performance solvers is to design them to work on many small size and independent problems. Many applications already need this functionality, especially for GPUs, which are currently known to be about four to five times more energy efficient than multicore CPUs. We describe the development of one-sided factorizations that work for a set of small dense matrices in parallel, and we illustrate our techniques on the QR factorization based on Householder transformations. We refer to this mode of operation as a batched factorization. Our approach is based on representing the algorithms as a sequence of batched BLAS routines for GPU-only execution. This is in contrast to the hybrid CPU-GPU algorithms that rely heavily on using the multicore CPU for specific parts of the workload. But for a system to benefit fully from the GPU's significantly higher energy efficiency, avoiding the use of the multicore CPU must be a primary design goal, so the system can rely more heavily on the more efficient GPU. Additionally, this will result in the removal of the costly CPU-to-GPU communication. Furthermore, we do not use a single symmetric multiprocessor(on the GPU) to factorize a single problem at a time. We illustrate how our performance analysis, and the use of profiling and tracing tools, guided the development and optimization of our batched factorization to achieve up to a 2-fold speedup and a 3-fold energy efficiency improvement compared to our highly optimized batched CPU implementations based on the MKL library(when using two sockets of Intel Sandy Bridge CPUs). Compared to a batched QR factorization featured in the CUBLAS library for GPUs, we achieved up to 5x speedup on the K40 GPU.

  7. Snow precipitation at four ice core sites in East Antarctica: provenance, seasonality and blocking factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarchilli, Claudio; Frezzotti, Massimo; Ruti, Paolo Michele

    2011-11-01

    Snow precipitation is the primary mass input to the Antarctic ice sheet and is one of the most direct climatic indicators, with important implications for paleoclimatic reconstruction from ice cores. Provenance of precipitation and the dynamic conditions that force these precipitation events at four deep ice core sites (Dome C, Law Dome, Talos Dome, and Taylor Dome) in East Antarctica were analysed with air mass back trajectories calculated using the Lagrangian model and the mean composite data for precipitation, geopotential height and wind speed field data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast from 1980 to 2001. On an annual basis, back trajectories showed that the Atlantic-Indian and Ross-Pacific Oceans were the main provenances of precipitation in Wilkes Land (80%) and Victoria Land (40%), respectively, whereas the greatest influence of the ice sheet was on the interior near the Vostok site (80%) and in the Southwest Ross Sea (50%), an effect that decreased towards the coast and along the Antarctic slope. Victoria Land received snowfall atypically with respect to other Antarctica areas in terms of pathway (eastern instead of western), seasonality (summer instead of winter) and velocity (old air age). Geopotential height patterns at 500 hPa at low (>10 days) and high (2-6 days) frequencies during snowfall cycles at two core sites showed large positive anomalies at low frequencies developing in the Tasman Sea-Eastern Indian Ocean at higher latitudes (60-70°S) than normal. This could be considered part of an atmospheric blocking event, with transient eddies acting to decelerate westerlies in a split region area and accelerate the flow on the flanks of the low-frequency positive anomalies.

  8. Blocking single-stranded transferred DNA conversion to double-stranded intermediates by overexpression of yeast DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A.

    PubMed

    Dafny-Yelin, Mery; Levy, Avner; Dafny, Raz; Tzfira, Tzvi

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens delivers its single-stranded transferred DNA (T-strand) into the host cell nucleus, where it can be converted into double-stranded molecules. Various studies have revealed that double-stranded transfer DNA (T-DNA) intermediates can serve as substrates by as yet uncharacterized integration machinery. Nevertheless, the possibility that T-strands are themselves substrates for integration cannot be ruled out. We attempted to block the conversion of T-strands into double-stranded intermediates prior to integration in order to further investigate the route taken by T-DNA molecules on their way to integration. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) plants that overexpress three yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) protein subunits of DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A (RFA) were produced. In yeast, these subunits (RFA1-RFA3) function as a complex that can bind single-stranded DNA molecules, promoting the repair of genomic double strand breaks. Overexpression of the RFA complex in tobacco resulted in decreased T-DNA expression, as determined by infection with A. tumefaciens cells carrying the β-glucuronidase intron reporter gene. Gene expression was not blocked when the reporter gene was delivered by microbombardment. Enhanced green fluorescent protein-assisted localization studies indicated that the three-protein complex was predominantly nuclear, thus indicating its function within the plant cell nucleus, possibly by binding naked T-strands and blocking their conversion into double-stranded intermediates. This notion was further supported by the inhibitory effect of RFA expression on the cell-to-cell movement of Bean dwarf mosaic virus, a single-stranded DNA virus. The observation that RFA complex plants dramatically inhibited the transient expression level of T-DNA and only reduced T-DNA integration by 50% suggests that double-stranded T-DNA intermediates, as well as single-stranded T-DNA, play significant roles in the integration process. PMID:25424309

  9. Harnessing High Density Lipoproteins to Block Transforming Growth Factor Beta and to Inhibit the Growth of Liver Tumor Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Fioravanti, Jessica; Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Frank, Kathrin; Aranda, Fernando; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Dotor, Javier; Umansky, Viktor; Prieto, Jesús; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a powerful promoter of cancer progression and a key target for antitumor therapy. As cancer cells exhibit active cholesterol metabolism, high density lipoproteins (HDLs) appear as an attractive delivery system for anticancer TGFβ-inhibitory molecules. We constructed a plasmid encoding a potent TGF-β-blocking peptide (P144) linked to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) through a flexible linker (pApoLinkerP144). The ApoLinkerP144 sequence was then incorporated into a hepatotropic adeno-associated vector (AAVApoLinkerP144). The aim was to induce hepatocytes to produce HDLs containing a modified ApoA-I capable of blocking TGF-β. We observed that transduction of the murine liver with pApoLinkerP144 led to the appearance of a fraction of circulating HDL containing the fusion protein. These HDLs were able to attenuate TGF-β signaling in the liver and to enhance IL-12 -mediated IFN-γ production. Treatment of liver metastasis of MC38 colorectal cancer with AAVApoLinkerP144 resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth and enhanced expression of IFN-γ and GM-CSF in cancerous tissue. ApoLinkerP144 also delayed MC38 liver metastasis in Rag2−/−IL2rγ−/− immunodeficient mice. This effect was associated with downregulation of TGF-β target genes essential for metastatic niche conditioning. Finally, in a subset of ret transgenic mice, a model of aggressive spontaneous metastatic melanoma, AAVApoLinkerP144 delayed tumor growth in association with increased CD8+ T cell numbers in regional lymph nodes. In conclusion, modification of HDLs to transport TGF-β-blocking molecules is a novel and promising approach to inhibit the growth of liver metastases by immunological and non-immunological mechanisms. PMID:24797128

  10. A Heparin-Mimicking Block Copolymer Both Stabilizes and Increases the Activity of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a protein involved in cellular functions in applications such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. Stabilization of this protein is important for its use as a therapeutic since the native protein is unstable during storage and delivery. Additionally, the ability to increase the activity of FGF2 is important for its application, particularly in chronic wound healing and the treatment of various ischemic conditions. Here we report a heparin mimicking block copolymer, poly(styrenesulfonate-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate)-b-vinyl sulfonate) (p(SS-co-PEGMA)-b-VS, that contains a segment that enhances the stability of FGF2 and one that binds to the FGF2 receptor. The FGF2 conjugate retained activity after exposure to refrigeration (4 °C) and room temperature (23 °C) for 7 days, while unmodified FGF2 was inactive after these standard storage conditions. A cell study performed with a cell line lacking native heparan sulfate proteoglycans indicated that the conjugated block copolymer facilitated binding of FGF2 to its receptor similar to the addition of heparin to FGF2. A receptor-based enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) confirmed the results. The conjugate also increased the migration of endothelial cells by 80% compared to FGF2 alone. Additionally, the FGF2-p(SS-co-PEGMA)-b-VS stimulated endothelial cell sprouting 250% better than FGF2 at low concentration. These data verify that this rationally designed protein-block copolymer conjugate enhances receptor binding, cellular processes such as migration and tube-like formation, and stability, and suggest that it may be useful for applications in biomaterials, tissue regeneration, and wound healing. PMID:27580376

  11. Surgery versus Nerve Blocks for Lumbar Disc Herniation : Quantitative Analysis of Radiological Factors as a Predictor for Successful Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joohyun; Hur, Junseok W.; Lee, Jang-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the clinical and radiological factors as predictors for successful outcomes in lumbar disc herniation (LDH) treatment. Methods Two groups of patients with single level LDH (L4–5) requiring treatment were retrospectively studied. The surgery group (SG) included 34 patients, and 30 patients who initially refused the surgery were included in the nerve blocks group (NG). A visual analogue scale (VAS) for leg and back pain and motor deficit were initially evaluated before procedures, and repeated at 1, 6, and 12 months. Radiological factors including the disc herniation length, disc herniation area, canal length-occupying ratio, and canal area-occupying ratio were measured and compared. Predicting factors of successful outcomes were determined with multivariate logistic regression analysis after the optimal cut off values were established with a receiver operating characteristic curve. Results There was no significant demographic difference between two groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis with radiological and clinical (12 months follow-up) data revealed that the high disc herniation length with cutoff value 6.31 mm [odds ratio (OR) 2.35; confidence interval (CI) 1.21–3.98] was a predictor of successful outcomes of leg pain relief in the SG. The low disc herniation length with cutoff value 6.23 mm (OR 0.05; CI 0.003–0.89) and high baseline VAS leg (OR 12.63; CI 1.64–97.45) were identified as predictors of successful outcomes of leg pain relief in the NG. Conclusion The patients with the disc herniation length larger than 6.31 mm showed successful outcomes with surgery whereas the patients with the disc herniation length less than 6.23 mm showed successful outcomes with nerve block. These results could be considered as a radiological criteria in choosing optimal treatment options for LDH. PMID:27651866

  12. Surgery versus Nerve Blocks for Lumbar Disc Herniation : Quantitative Analysis of Radiological Factors as a Predictor for Successful Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joohyun; Hur, Junseok W.; Lee, Jang-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the clinical and radiological factors as predictors for successful outcomes in lumbar disc herniation (LDH) treatment. Methods Two groups of patients with single level LDH (L4–5) requiring treatment were retrospectively studied. The surgery group (SG) included 34 patients, and 30 patients who initially refused the surgery were included in the nerve blocks group (NG). A visual analogue scale (VAS) for leg and back pain and motor deficit were initially evaluated before procedures, and repeated at 1, 6, and 12 months. Radiological factors including the disc herniation length, disc herniation area, canal length-occupying ratio, and canal area-occupying ratio were measured and compared. Predicting factors of successful outcomes were determined with multivariate logistic regression analysis after the optimal cut off values were established with a receiver operating characteristic curve. Results There was no significant demographic difference between two groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis with radiological and clinical (12 months follow-up) data revealed that the high disc herniation length with cutoff value 6.31 mm [odds ratio (OR) 2.35; confidence interval (CI) 1.21–3.98] was a predictor of successful outcomes of leg pain relief in the SG. The low disc herniation length with cutoff value 6.23 mm (OR 0.05; CI 0.003–0.89) and high baseline VAS leg (OR 12.63; CI 1.64–97.45) were identified as predictors of successful outcomes of leg pain relief in the NG. Conclusion The patients with the disc herniation length larger than 6.31 mm showed successful outcomes with surgery whereas the patients with the disc herniation length less than 6.23 mm showed successful outcomes with nerve block. These results could be considered as a radiological criteria in choosing optimal treatment options for LDH.

  13. Functional analysis of tanshinone IIA that blocks the redox function of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Jiangdong; Li, Mengxia; Qian, Chengyuan; Wang, Shufeng; Cheng, Yi; Chen, Benjamin PC; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein possessing both DNA repair and redox regulatory activities. It has been shown that blocking redox function leads to genotoxic, antiangiogenic, cytostatic, and proapoptotic effects in cells. Therefore, the selective inhibitors against APE1’s redox function can be served as potential pharmaceutical candidates in cancer therapeutics. In the present study, we identified the biological specificity of the Chinese herbal compound tanshinone IIA (T2A) in blocking the redox function of APE1. Using dual polarization interferometry, the direct interaction between APE1 and T2A was observed with a KD value at subnanomolar level. In addition, we showed that T2A significantly compromised the growth of human cervical cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the growth-inhibitory or proapoptotic effect of T2A was diminished in APE1 knockdown or redox-deficient cells, suggesting that the cytostatic effect of T2A might be specifically through inhibiting the redox function of APE1. Finally, T2A pretreatment enhanced the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation or other chemotherapeutic agents in human cervical cancer and colon cancer cell lines. The data presented herein suggest T2A as a promising bioactive inhibitor of APE1 redox activity. PMID:25395832

  14. Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity Experimental Model: Protective Merits of Natural Products and Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Sairazi, Nur Shafika; Sirajudeen, K. N. S.; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Mummedy, Swamy; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is well recognized as a major pathological process of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS). In the animal models of neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity is commonly induced experimentally by chemical convulsants, particularly kainic acid (KA). KA-induced excitotoxicity in rodent models has been shown to result in seizures, behavioral changes, oxidative stress, glial activation, inflammatory mediator production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain upon KA administration. Recently, there is an emerging trend to search for natural sources to combat against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Natural products and plant extracts had attracted a considerable amount of attention because of their reported beneficial effects on the CNS, particularly their neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity. They provide significant reduction and/or protection against the development and progression of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. This indicates that natural products and plants extracts may be useful in protecting against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration. Thus, targeting of multiple pathways simultaneously may be the strategy to maximize the neuroprotection effect. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in KA-induced excitotoxicity and attempts to collate the various researches related to the protective effect of natural products and plant extracts in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:26793262

  15. Multi-omics profile of the mouse dentate gyrus after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Marijn; Bielefeld, Pascal; Fratantoni, Silvina A; Hubens, Chantal J; Piersma, Sander R; Pham, Thang V; Voskuyl, Rob A; Lucassen, Paul J; Jimenez, Connie R; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can develop from alterations in hippocampal structure and circuit characteristics, and can be modeled in mice by administration of kainic acid (KA). Adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) contributes to hippocampal functions and has been reported to contribute to the development of TLE. Some of the phenotypical changes include neural stem and precursor cells (NPSC) apoptosis, shortly after their birth, before they produce hippocampal neurons. Here we explored these early phenotypical changes in the DG 3 days after a systemic injection of KA inducing status epilepticus (KA-SE), in mice. We performed a multi-omics experimental setup and analyzed DG tissue samples using proteomics, transcriptomics and microRNA profiling techniques, detecting the expression of 2327 proteins, 13401 mRNAs and 311 microRNAs. We here present a description of how these data were obtained and make them available for further analysis and validation. Our data may help to further identify and characterize molecular mechanisms involved in the alterations induced shortly after KA-SE in the mouse DG. PMID:27529540

  16. Three-dimensional optical tomographic brain imaging during kainic-acid-induced seizures in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluestone, Avraham Y.; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Hielscher, Andreas H.; Stewart, Mark

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we explored the potential of diffuse optical tomography for brain oximetry and describe our efforts towards imaging hemodynamic changes in rat brains during kainic-acid (KA) induced seizures. Using electrophysiological techniques we first showed that KA induces a pronounced transient hypotension in urethane anesthetized rats that is coincident with seizure activity beginning in ventral and spreading to dorsal hippocampus. We observed sustained increases in vagus and sympathetic activity during generalized limbic seizure activity, which alters blood pressure regulation and heart rhythms. Subsequently, we used optical tomographic methods to study KA induced seizures in anesthetized animals to better define the hemodynamic cerebral vascular response. We observed a lateralized increase in deoxyhemoglobin after KA injection at the time when the blood pressure (BP) was decreased. By contrast, injection of phenylephrine produced a symmetric global increase in total hemoglobin. These findings indicate that our instrument is sensitive to the local hemodynamics, both in response to a global increase in blood pressure (phenylephrine injection) and a lateralized decrease in oxyhemoglobin produced by an asymmetric response to KA; a response that may be critically important for severe autonomic nervous system alterations during seizures. The results of this study provide the impetus for combining complimentary modalities, imaging and electrophysiological, to ultimately gain a better understanding of the underlying physiology of seizure activity in the rat.

  17. Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity Experimental Model: Protective Merits of Natural Products and Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Mohd Sairazi, Nur Shafika; Sirajudeen, K N S; Asari, Mohd Asnizam; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Mummedy, Swamy; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is well recognized as a major pathological process of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS). In the animal models of neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity is commonly induced experimentally by chemical convulsants, particularly kainic acid (KA). KA-induced excitotoxicity in rodent models has been shown to result in seizures, behavioral changes, oxidative stress, glial activation, inflammatory mediator production, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain upon KA administration. Recently, there is an emerging trend to search for natural sources to combat against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Natural products and plant extracts had attracted a considerable amount of attention because of their reported beneficial effects on the CNS, particularly their neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity. They provide significant reduction and/or protection against the development and progression of acute and chronic neurodegeneration. This indicates that natural products and plants extracts may be useful in protecting against excitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration. Thus, targeting of multiple pathways simultaneously may be the strategy to maximize the neuroprotection effect. This review summarizes the mechanisms involved in KA-induced excitotoxicity and attempts to collate the various researches related to the protective effect of natural products and plant extracts in the KA model of neurodegeneration.

  18. Myoinositol Attenuates the Cell Loss and Biochemical Changes Induced by Kainic Acid Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Kikvidze, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Identification of compounds preventing or modifying the biochemical changes that underlie the epileptogenesis process and understanding the mechanism of their action are of great importance. We have previously shown that myoinositol (MI) daily treatment for 28 days prevents certain biochemical changes that are triggered by kainic acid (KA) induced status epilepticus (SE). However in these studies we have not detected any effects of MI on the first day after SE. In the present study we broadened our research and focused on other molecular and morphological changes at the early stages of SE induced by KA and effects of MI treatment on these changes. The increase in the amount of voltage-dependent anionic channel-1 (VDAC-1), cofilin, and caspase-3 activity was observed in the hippocampus of KA treated rats. Administration of MI 4 hours later after KA treatment abolishes these changes, whereas diazepam treatment by the same time schedule has no significant influence. The number of neuronal cells in CA1 and CA3 subfields of hippocampus is decreased after KA induced SE and MI posttreatment significantly attenuates this reduction. No significant changes are observed in the neocortex. Obtained results indicate that MI posttreatment after KA induced SE could successfully target the biochemical processes involved in apoptosis, reduces cell loss, and can be successfully used in the future for translational research.

  19. Myoinositol Attenuates the Cell Loss and Biochemical Changes Induced by Kainic Acid Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Kikvidze, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Identification of compounds preventing or modifying the biochemical changes that underlie the epileptogenesis process and understanding the mechanism of their action are of great importance. We have previously shown that myoinositol (MI) daily treatment for 28 days prevents certain biochemical changes that are triggered by kainic acid (KA) induced status epilepticus (SE). However in these studies we have not detected any effects of MI on the first day after SE. In the present study we broadened our research and focused on other molecular and morphological changes at the early stages of SE induced by KA and effects of MI treatment on these changes. The increase in the amount of voltage-dependent anionic channel-1 (VDAC-1), cofilin, and caspase-3 activity was observed in the hippocampus of KA treated rats. Administration of MI 4 hours later after KA treatment abolishes these changes, whereas diazepam treatment by the same time schedule has no significant influence. The number of neuronal cells in CA1 and CA3 subfields of hippocampus is decreased after KA induced SE and MI posttreatment significantly attenuates this reduction. No significant changes are observed in the neocortex. Obtained results indicate that MI posttreatment after KA induced SE could successfully target the biochemical processes involved in apoptosis, reduces cell loss, and can be successfully used in the future for translational research. PMID:27642592

  20. Salidroside protects against kainic acid-induced status epilepticus via suppressing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Si, Pei-Pei; Zhen, Jun-Li; Cai, Yun-Lei; Wang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous mechanisms by which the brain generates seizures. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE). Salidroside (SDS) extracted from Rhodiola rosea L. shows multiple bioactive properties, such as neuroprotection and antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo. This study explored the role of SDS in kainic acid (KA)-induced SE and investigated the underlying mechanism. Latency to SE increased in the SDS-pretreated mice compared to the KA group, while the percentage of incidence of SE was significantly reduced. These results suggested that pretreatment with SDS not only delayed SE, but it also decreased the incidence of SE induced by KA. KA increased MDA level and reduced the production of SOD and GSH at multiple timepoints after KA administration. SDS inhibited the change of MDA, SOD and GSH induced by KA prior to SE onset, indicating that SDS protects against KA-induced SE via suppressing oxidative stress. Based on these results, we investigated the possible molecular mechanism of SDS. Pretreatment with SDS reversed the KA-induced decrease in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK); increased the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity in KA-treated mice, which had no demonstrable effect on SIRT1 mRNA and protein; and suppressed the KA-induced increase in Ace-FoxO1. These results showed that AMPK/SIRT1/FoxO1 signaling is possibly the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by SDS.

  1. Myoinositol Attenuates the Cell Loss and Biochemical Changes Induced by Kainic Acid Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Tsverava, Lia; Lordkipanidze, Tamar; Lepsveridze, Eka; Nozadze, Maia; Kikvidze, Marina; Solomonia, Revaz

    2016-01-01

    Identification of compounds preventing or modifying the biochemical changes that underlie the epileptogenesis process and understanding the mechanism of their action are of great importance. We have previously shown that myoinositol (MI) daily treatment for 28 days prevents certain biochemical changes that are triggered by kainic acid (KA) induced status epilepticus (SE). However in these studies we have not detected any effects of MI on the first day after SE. In the present study we broadened our research and focused on other molecular and morphological changes at the early stages of SE induced by KA and effects of MI treatment on these changes. The increase in the amount of voltage-dependent anionic channel-1 (VDAC-1), cofilin, and caspase-3 activity was observed in the hippocampus of KA treated rats. Administration of MI 4 hours later after KA treatment abolishes these changes, whereas diazepam treatment by the same time schedule has no significant influence. The number of neuronal cells in CA1 and CA3 subfields of hippocampus is decreased after KA induced SE and MI posttreatment significantly attenuates this reduction. No significant changes are observed in the neocortex. Obtained results indicate that MI posttreatment after KA induced SE could successfully target the biochemical processes involved in apoptosis, reduces cell loss, and can be successfully used in the future for translational research. PMID:27642592

  2. Evidence for Status Epilepticus and Pro-Inflammatory Changes after Intranasal Kainic Acid Administration in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sabilallah, Mounira; Fontanaud, Pierre; Linck, Nathalie; Boussadia, Badreddine; Peyroutou, Ronan; Lasgouzes, Thibault; Rassendren, François A; Marchi, Nicola; Hirbec, Helene E

    2016-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) is routinely used to elicit status epilepticus (SE) and epileptogenesis. Among the available KA administration protocols, intranasal instillation (IN) remains understudied. Dosages of KA were instilled IN in mice. Racine Scale and Video-EEG were used to assess and quantify SE onset. Time spent in SE and spike activity was quantified for each animal and confirmed by power spectrum analysis. Immunohistochemistry and qPCR were performed to define brain inflammation occurring after SE, including activated microglial phenotypes. Long term video-EEG recording was also performed. Titration of IN KA showed that a dose of 30 mg/kg was associated with low mortality while eliciting SE. IN KA provoked at least one behavioral and electrographic SE in the majority of the mice (>90%). Behavioral and EEG SE were accompanied by a rapid and persistent microglial-astrocytic cell activation and hippocampal neurodegeneration. Specifically, microglial modifications involved both pro- (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) genes. Our initial long-term video-EEG exploration conducted using a small cohort of mice indicated the appearance of spike activity or SE. Our study demonstrated that induction of SE is attainable using IN KA in mice. Typical pro-inflammatory brain changes were observed in this model after SE, supporting disease pathophysiology. Our results are in favor of the further development of IN KA as a means to study seizure disorders. A possibility for tailoring this model to drug testing or to study mechanisms of disease is offered. PMID:26963100

  3. Effect of baicalin on hippocampal damage in kainic acid-induced epileptic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zheng-Jian; Liang, Ri-Sheng; Shi, Song-Sheng; Wang, Chun-Hua; Yang, Wei-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of baicalin on the expression of miR-497 and its target B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) in the hippocampus of kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptic mice. To establish status epilepticus (SE), 0.1 µg/5 µl KA was injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle in mice, which then received an intraperitoneal injection of baicalin (100 mg/kg) after 1 and 8 h. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to observe the pathological changes in morphology and neuronal apoptosis was determined by terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling staining. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 proteins in the hippocampus, while reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify hippocampal miR-497 expression. The results showed that baicalin significantly attenuated neuronal damage and apoptosis in the hippocampus 72 h after SE. In addition, baicalin decreased SE-induced expression of miR-497 and cleaved caspase-3 protein, while upregulating the expression of Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, the present results suggest that baicalin possesses potent antiapoptotic properties and attenuates hippocampal injury in mice after SE, which may be associated with the downregulation of miR-497 and cleaved caspase-3 and the upregulation of Bcl-2. PMID:27588062

  4. Luteolin protects the hippocampus against neuron impairments induced by kainic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-07-01

    Glutamatergic excitotoxicity is crucial in the pathogenesis of numerous brain disorders. Luteolin, a flavonoid compound, inhibits glutamate release, however, its ability to affect glutamate-induced brain injury is unknown. Therefore, this study evaluated the protective effect of luteolin against brain damage induced by kainic acid (KA), a glutamate analog. Rats were treated with luteolin (10 or 50mg/kg, intraperitoneally) 30min before an intraperitoneal injection of KA (15mg/kg). Luteolin treatment reduced the KA-induced seizure score and elevations of glutamate levels in the hippocampus. A histopathological analysis showed that luteolin attenuated KA-induced neuronal death and microglial activation in the hippocampus. An immunoblotting analysis showed that luteolin restored the KA-induced reduction in Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Furthermore, a Morris water maze test revealed that luteolin effectively prevented KA-induced learning and memory impairments. The results suggest that luteolin protected rat brains from KA-induced excitotoxic damage by reducing glutamate levels, mitigating inflammation, and enhancing Akt activation in the hippocampus. Therefore, luteolin may be beneficial for preventing or treating brain disorders associated with excitotoxic neuronal damage. PMID:27185356

  5. Glycyrrhizin attenuates kainic Acid-induced neuronal cell death in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lidan; Jin, Yinchuan; Kim, Il-Doo; Lee, Ja-Kyeong

    2013-06-01

    Glycyrrhizin (GL), a triterpene that is present in the roots and rhizomes of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-viral effects. Recently, we demonstrated that GL produced the neuroprotective effects with the suppression of microglia activation and proinflammatory cytokine induction in the postischemic brain with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats and improved motor impairment and neurological deficits. In the present study, we investigated whether GL has a beneficial effect in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal death model. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of 0.94 nmole (0.2 µg) of KA produced typical neuronal death in both CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In contrast, administration of GL (10 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before KA administration significantly suppressed the neuronal death, and this protective effect was more stronger at 50 mg/kg. Moreover, the GL-mediated neuroprotection was accompanied with the suppression of gliosis and induction of proinflammatory markers (COX-2, iNOS, and TNF-α). The anti-inflammatory and anti-excitotoxic effects of GL were verified in LPS-treated primary microglial cultures and in NMDA- or KA-treated primary cortical cultures. Together these results suggest that GL confers the neuroprotection through the mechanism of anti-inflammatory and anti-excitotoxic effects in KA-treated brain. PMID:23833559

  6. Evidence for Status Epilepticus and Pro-Inflammatory Changes after Intranasal Kainic Acid Administration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sabilallah, Mounira; Fontanaud, Pierre; Linck, Nathalie; Boussadia, Badreddine; Peyroutou, Ronan; Lasgouzes, Thibault; Rassendren, François A.

    2016-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) is routinely used to elicit status epilepticus (SE) and epileptogenesis. Among the available KA administration protocols, intranasal instillation (IN) remains understudied. Dosages of KA were instilled IN in mice. Racine Scale and Video-EEG were used to assess and quantify SE onset. Time spent in SE and spike activity was quantified for each animal and confirmed by power spectrum analysis. Immunohistochemistry and qPCR were performed to define brain inflammation occurring after SE, including activated microglial phenotypes. Long term video-EEG recording was also performed. Titration of IN KA showed that a dose of 30 mg/kg was associated with low mortality while eliciting SE. IN KA provoked at least one behavioral and electrographic SE in the majority of the mice (>90%). Behavioral and EEG SE were accompanied by a rapid and persistent microglial-astrocytic cell activation and hippocampal neurodegeneration. Specifically, microglial modifications involved both pro- (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) genes. Our initial long-term video-EEG exploration conducted using a small cohort of mice indicated the appearance of spike activity or SE. Our study demonstrated that induction of SE is attainable using IN KA in mice. Typical pro-inflammatory brain changes were observed in this model after SE, supporting disease pathophysiology. Our results are in favor of the further development of IN KA as a means to study seizure disorders. A possibility for tailoring this model to drug testing or to study mechanisms of disease is offered. PMID:26963100

  7. Alterations of taurine in the brain of chronic kainic acid epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Baran, H

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of taurine in the kainic acid (KA, 10 mg/kg, s.c.) chronic model of epilepsy, six months after KA application. The KA-rats used were divided into a group of animals showing weak behavioural response to KA (WDS, rare focal convulsion; rating scale <2 up to 3 h after KA injection) and a group of strong response to KA (WDS, seizures; rating >3 up to 3 h after KA injection). The brain regions investigated were caudate nucleus, substantia nigra, septum, hippocampus, amygdala/piriform cortex, and frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital cortices. KA-rats with rating <2 developed spontaneous WDS which occurred chronically and six months after KA injection increased taurine levels were found in the hippocampus (125.4% of control). KA-rats with rating >3 developed spontaneous recurrent seizures and six months after injection increased taurine levels were found in the caudate nucleus (162.5% of control) and hippocampus (126.6% of control), while reduced taurine levels were seen in the septum (78.2% of control). In summary, increased taurine levels in the hippocampus may involve processes for membrane stabilisation, thus favouring recovery after neuronal hyperactivity. The increased taurine levels in the caudate nucleus could be involved in the modulation of spontaneous recurrent seizure activity.

  8. Multi-omics profile of the mouse dentate gyrus after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Marijn; Bielefeld, Pascal; Fratantoni, Silvina A.; Hubens, Chantal J.; Piersma, Sander R.; Pham, Thang V.; Voskuyl, Rob A.; Lucassen, Paul J.; Jimenez, Connie R.; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can develop from alterations in hippocampal structure and circuit characteristics, and can be modeled in mice by administration of kainic acid (KA). Adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) contributes to hippocampal functions and has been reported to contribute to the development of TLE. Some of the phenotypical changes include neural stem and precursor cells (NPSC) apoptosis, shortly after their birth, before they produce hippocampal neurons. Here we explored these early phenotypical changes in the DG 3 days after a systemic injection of KA inducing status epilepticus (KA-SE), in mice. We performed a multi-omics experimental setup and analyzed DG tissue samples using proteomics, transcriptomics and microRNA profiling techniques, detecting the expression of 2327 proteins, 13401 mRNAs and 311 microRNAs. We here present a description of how these data were obtained and make them available for further analysis and validation. Our data may help to further identify and characterize molecular mechanisms involved in the alterations induced shortly after KA-SE in the mouse DG. PMID:27529540

  9. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... heart block. Doctors use a test called an EKG (electrocardiogram) to help diagnose heart block. This test ...

  10. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein haplodeficiency attenuates seizure severity and NF-κB-mediated neuroinflammation in kainic acid-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Shin, H J; Kim, H; Heo, R W; Kim, H J; Choi, W S; Kwon, H M; Roh, G S

    2014-07-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures followed by neuronal death are associated with neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is known as a transcriptional factor activating osmoprotective genes, and in brain, it is expressed in neuronal nuclei. Thus dysregulation of TonEBP may be involved in the pathology of KA-induced seizures. Here we used TonEBP heterozygote (+/-) mice to study the roles of TonEBP. Electroencephalographic study showed that TonEBP (+/-) mice reduced seizure frequency and severity compared with wild type during KA-induced status epilepticus. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis showed that KA-induced neuroinflammation and BBB leakage were dramatically reduced in TonEBP (+/-) mice. Similarly, TonEBP-specific siRNA reduced glutamate-induced death in HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells. TonEBP haplodeficiency prevented KA-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and attenuated inflammation. Our findings identify TonEBP as a critical regulator of neuroinflammation and BBB leakage in KA-induced seizures, which suggests TonEBP as a good therapeutic target. PMID:24608792

  11. Corticotropin-releasing factor antagonist blocks microwave-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Acute (45-min) irradiation with pulsed low-level microwaves (2450-MHz, 2 microseconds pulses at 500 pps, average power density of 1 mW/cm2, whole-body average specific absorption rate of 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. These effects were blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with intracerebroventricular injection of the specific corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonist, alpha-helical-CRF9-41 (25 micrograms). Similar injection of the antagonist had no significant effect on HACU in the brain of the sham-exposed rats. These data suggest that low-level microwave irradiation activates CRF in the brain, which in turn causes the changes in central HACU.

  12. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L; Tomas, Juan M; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-07-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  13. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L.; Tomas, Juan M.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:25971969

  14. Selective stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptor subtypes and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture: effect of kainic acid.

    PubMed

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, O S

    1990-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate. Here we report on the influence of another glutamate analogue, kainic acid, which, in contrast to N-methyl-D-aspartate, is believed to stimulate transmitter receptors mediating fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials. The kainate effect was complex: increased survival at low concentrations (the maximum, at 25-50 microM, was about 50% promotion), whereas concentrations exceeding 50 microM resulted first in a loss of the effect, and then at concentrations of 2-5 x 10(-4) M cells became vulnerable to kainate. The trophic influence of kainate is mediated through receptors other than the N-methyl-D-aspartate preferring subtype. In contrast to the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate, that of kainate did not depend on the medium K+ level and was potently blocked by dinitroquinoxalinedione, which--at the concentration used here--did not counteract the promotion of cell survival evoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Quisqualate was a potent inhibitor of the rescue by kainate. Furthermore, blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors with the selective antagonists MK-801 or aminophosphonovalerate did not inhibit, but rather potentiated the trophic effect of kainate. Possible mechanisms underlying the trophic effect of chronic depolarization or treatment with excitatory amino acids are discussed, and it is proposed that they involve elevated free cytoplasmic calcium activity following increased influx through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (high K+ and kainate) or receptorgated channels (N-methyl-D-aspartate).

  15. Excessive alcohol consumption is blocked by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Carnicella, Sebastien; Amamoto, Ryoji; Ron, Dorit

    2009-02-01

    We previously found that activation of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) pathway in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) reduces moderate alcohol (ethanol) intake in a rat operant self-administration paradigm. Here, we set out to assess the effect of GDNF in the VTA on excessive voluntary consumption of ethanol. Long-Evans rats were trained to drink large quantities of a 20% ethanol solution in an intermittent-access two-bottle choice drinking paradigm. The rats were given three 24-h sessions per week, and GDNF's actions were measured when rats achieved a baseline of ethanol consumption of 5.5g/kg/24h. We found that microinjection of GDNF into the VTA 10min before the beginning of an ethanol-drinking session significantly reduced ethanol intake and preference, but did not affect total fluid intake. We further show that GDNF greatly decreased both the first bout of excessive ethanol intake at the beginning of the session, and the later consummatory activity occurring during the dark cycle. These data suggest that GDNF is a rapid and long-lasting inhibitor of "binge-like" ethanol consumption.

  16. Excitatory amino acid transporter 2 downregulation correlates with thalamic neuronal death following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in rat.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Masashi; Kurokawa, Haruna; Shimada, Akinori; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Miyata, Hajime; Morita, Takehito

    2015-02-01

    Recurrent seizures without interictal resumption (status epilepticus) have been reported to induce neuronal death in the midline thalamic region that has functional roles in memory and decision-making; however, the pathogenesis underlying status epilepticus-induced thalamic neuronal death is yet to be determined. We performed histological and immunohistochemical studies as well as cerebral blood flow measurement using 4.7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer on midline thalamic region in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 75, male, 7 weeks after birth, body weight 250-300 g) treated with intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (10 mg/kg) to induce status epilepticus (n = 55) or normal saline solution (n = 20). Histological study using paraffin-embedded specimens revealed neuronal death showing ischemic-like changes and Fluoro-Jade C positivity with calcium deposition in the midline thalamic region of epileptic rats. The distribution of neuronal death was associated with focal loss of immunoreactivity for excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), stronger immunoreaction for glutamate and increase in number of Iba-1-positive microglial cells showing swollen cytoplasm and long processes. Double immunofluorescence study demonstrated co-expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) within microglial cells, and loss of EAAT2 immunoreactivity in reactive astrocytes. These microglial alterations and astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation were also observed in tissue without obvious neuronal death in kainic acid-treated rats. These results suggest the possible role of glutamate excitotoxicity in neuronal death in the midline thalamic region following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus due to astrocytic EAAT2 downregulation following microglial activation showing upregulation of IL-1β and iNOS.

  17. Seismic responses and controlling factors of Miocene deepwater gravity-flow deposits in Block A, Lower Congo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Wang, Zhenqi; Yu, Shui; Ngia, Ngong Roger

    2016-08-01

    The Miocene deepwater gravity-flow sedimentary system in Block A of the southwestern part of the Lower Congo Basin was identified and interpreted using high-resolution 3-D seismic, drilling and logging data to reveal development characteristics and main controlling factors. Five types of deepwater gravity-flow sedimentary units have been identified in the Miocene section of Block A, including mass transport, deepwater channel, levee, abandoned channel and sedimentary lobe deposits. Each type of sedimentary unit has distinct external features, internal structures and lateral characteristics in seismic profiles. Mass transport deposits (MTDs) in particular correspond to chaotic low-amplitude reflections in contact with mutants on both sides. The cross section of deepwater channel deposits in the seismic profile is in U- or V-shape. The channel deposits change in ascending order from low-amplitude, poor-continuity, chaotic filling reflections at the bottom, to high-amplitude, moderate to poor continuity, chaotic or sub-parallel reflections in the middle section and to moderate-weak amplitude, good continuity, parallel or sub-parallel reflections in the upper section. The sedimentary lobes are laterally lobate, which corresponds to high-amplitude, good-continuity, moundy reflection signatures in the seismic profile. Due to sediment flux, faults, and inherited terrain, few mass transport deposits occur in the northeastern part of the study area. The front of MTDs is mainly composed of channel-levee complex deposits, while abandoned-channel and lobe-deposits are usually developed in high-curvature channel sections and the channel terminals, respectively. The distribution of deepwater channel, levee, abandoned channel and sedimentary lobe deposits is predominantly controlled by relative sea level fluctuations and to a lesser extent by tectonism and inherited terrain.

  18. Factors influencing the therapeutic effect of muscle afferent block for oromandibular dystonia and dyskinesia: implications for their distinct pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kaji, R; Shibasaki, H; Iizuka, T

    2002-10-01

    Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) is a focal dystonia manifested by involuntary masticatory and/or lingual muscle contractions. Muscle afferent block (MAB) by injecting anaesthetic and alcohol intramuscularly is recently used for the treatment of OMD. To study the factors affecting the efficacy of MAB, 44 patients with OMD were treated by local injection of lidocaine and ethanol. They were divided into four groups (spastic, rhythmic, dyskinetic, and task-specific) according to the pattern of incisal movement and involuntary contraction. We used a clinical scaling protocol in terms of four parameters (mastication, speech, pain, and discomfort) to evaluate the change of symptoms objectively. The relationship of improvement in clinical scores with various parameters was assessed statistically. The overall objective improvement was 60.2 +/- 29.5%. The scores decreased significantly (P<0.0001, paired t-test) after MAB. The maximal incisal velocity significantly correlated inversely with the clinical improvement, and MAB was particularly effective for spastic contraction. Dyskinetic and rhythmic groups showed variable and significantly less improvements than the spastic group. MAB is highly effective for OMD, but not for the patients with dyskinetic symptoms. The jaw movement pattern is an important factor for predicting the outcome. The difference in the response to MAB in OMD and oral and/or orofacial dyskinesia suggests the distinct pathophysiology between the two.

  19. Neuroprotective effect of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis against kainic acid-neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Juárez, Angélica; Chamorro, Germán; Alva-Sánchez, Claudia; Paniagua-Castro, Norma; Pacheco-Rosado, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    Context Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis (SP) is a cyanobacterium which has attracted attention because of its nutritional value and pharmacological properties. It was previously reported that SP reduces oxidative stress in the hippocampus and protects against damaging neurobehavioural effects of systemic kainic acid (KA). It is widely known that the systemic administration of KA induces neuronal damage, specifically in the CA3 hippocampal region. Objective The present study determines if the SP sub-chronic treatment has neuroprotective properties against KA. Materials and methods Male SW mice were treated with SP during 24 d, at doses of 0, 200, and 800 mg/kg, once daily, and with KA (35 mg/kg, ip) as a single dose on day 14. After the treatment, a histological analysis was performed and the number of atrophic neuronal cells in CA3 hippocampal region was quantified. Results Pretreatment with SP does not protect against seizures induced by KA. However, mortality in the SP 200 and the SP 800 groups was of 20%, while for the KA group, it was of 60%. A single KA ip administration produced a considerable neuronal damage, whereas both doses of SP sub-chronic treatment reduced the number of atrophic neurons in CA3 hippocampal region with respect to the KA group. Discussion The SP neurobehaviour improvement after KA systemic administration correlates with the capacity of SP to reduce KA-neuronal death in CA3 hippocampal cells. This neuroprotection may be related to the antioxidant properties of SP. Conclusion SP reduces KA-neuronal death in CA3 hippocampal cells. PMID:26799655

  20. Atenolol offers better protection than clonidine against cardiac injury in kainic acid-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Read, M I; Harrison, J C; Kerr, D S; Sammut, I A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Status epilepticus is increasingly associated with cardiac injury in both clinical and animal studies. The current study examined ECG activity for up to 48 h following kainic acid (KA) seizure induction and compared the potential of atenolol and clonidine to attenuate this cardiac pathology. Experimental Approach Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 300–350 g) were implanted with ECG and electrocorticogram electrodes to allow simultaneous telemetric recordings of cardiac and cortical responses during and after KA-induced seizures. Animals were randomized into saline controls, and saline vehicle-, clonidine- or atenolol-pretreated KA groups. Key Results KA administration in the saline-pretreated group produced an immediate bradycardic response (maximal decrease of 28 ± 6%), coinciding with low-level seizure activity. As high-level seizure behaviours and EEG spiking increased, tachycardia also developed, with a maximum heart rate increase of 38 ± 7% coinciding with QTc prolongation and T wave elevation. Both clonidine and atenolol pretreatment attenuated seizure activity and reduced KA-induced changes in heart rate, QTc interval and T wave amplitude observed during both bradycardic and tachycardic phases in saline-pretreated KA animals. Clonidine, however, failed to reduce the power of EEG frequencies. Atenolol and to a lesser extent clonidine attenuated the cardiac hypercontraction band necrosis, inflammatory infiltration, and oedema at 48 h after KA, relative to the saline-KA group. Conclusions and Implications Severe seizure activity in this model was clearly associated with altered ECG activity and cardiac pathology. We suggest that modulation of sympathetic activity by atenolol provides a promising cardioprotective approach in status epilepticus. PMID:25765931

  1. Acacetin Inhibits Glutamate Release and Prevents Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Huang, Wei-Jan; Wu, Chia-Chan; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2014-01-01

    An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be a molecular mechanism associated with several neurological diseases that causes neuronal damage. Therefore, searching for compounds that reduce glutamate neurotoxicity is necessary. In this study, the possibility that the natural flavone acacetin derived from the traditional Chinese medicine Clerodendrum inerme (L.) Gaertn is a neuroprotective agent was investigated. The effect of acacetin on endogenous glutamate release in rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes) was also investigated. The results indicated that acacetin inhibited depolarization-evoked glutamate release and cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]C) in the hippocampal nerve terminals. However, acacetin did not alter synaptosomal membrane potential. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of acacetin on evoked glutamate release was prevented by the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker known as ω-conotoxin MVIIC. In a kainic acid (KA) rat model, an animal model used for excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments, acacetin (10 or 50 mg/kg) was administrated intraperitoneally to the rats 30 min before the KA (15 mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection, and subsequently induced the attenuation of KA-induced neuronal cell death and microglia activation in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The present study demonstrates that the natural compound, acacetin, inhibits glutamate release from hippocampal synaptosomes by attenuating voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry and effectively prevents KA-induced in vivo excitotoxicity. Collectively, these data suggest that acacetin has the therapeutic potential for treating neurological diseases associated with excitotoxicity. PMID:24520409

  2. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Induced Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition is blocked by a chemical antagonist of translation factor eIF4E

    PubMed Central

    Smith, K. A.; Zhou, B.; Avdulov, S.; Benyumov, A.; Peterson, M.; Liu, Y.; Okon, A.; Hergert, P.; Braziunas, J.; Wagner, C. R.; Borok, Z.; Bitterman, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) imparts disease-defining properties to epithelial cells in cancer and organ fibrosis. Prior studies identify EMT control points at the level of transcription and translation, and indicate that activation of translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is involved in the mechanisms coordinating these two levels of control. Here we show that 4Ei-1, a specific chemical antagonist of the eIF4E-mRNA cap interaction, potently inhibits transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) mediated EMT in lung epithelial cells. Upon treatment with TGF-β1, we observed a rapid recruitment of Snail1 mRNA into the actively translated polysome pool accompanied by accumulation of the EMT transcription factor Snail1 in the nucleus. 4Ei-1 blocks ribosome recruitment to the Snail1 transcript thereby preventing accumulation of the Snail1 protein in the nucleus. Our findings establish an obligatory role for upstream translational control of downstream Snail1-mediated transcriptional events in TGF-β1 induced EMT, and provide proof of concept for efforts to pharmacologically modulate the eIF4E-cap interaction as a means to inhibit pathological EMT in the setting of cancer and organ fibrosis. PMID:26678431

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor blockade reduces the invasiveness of gastrointestinal cancers via blocking production of matrilysin.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yasushi; Li, Rong; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Min, Yongfen; Piao, Wenhua; Wang, Yu; Imsumran, Arisa; Li, Hua; Arimura, Yoshiaki; Lee, Choon-Taek; Imai, Kohzoh; Carbone, David P; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2009-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) signaling is required for carcinogenicity and proliferation of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. We have previously shown significant therapeutic activity for recombinant adenoviruses expressing dominant-negative insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR/dn), including suppression of tumor invasion. In this study, we sought to evaluate the mechanism of inhibition of invasion and the relationship between IGF-IR and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in GI carcinomas. We analyzed the role of IGF-IR on invasion in three GI cancer cell lines, colorectal adenocarcinoma, HT29; pancreatic adenocarcinoma, BxPC3 and gastric adenocarcinoma, MKN45, using a modified Boyden chamber method and subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. The impact of IGF-IR signaling on the expression of MMPs and the effects of blockade of matrilysin or IGF-IR on invasiveness were assessed using recombinant adenoviruses, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 and antisense matrilysin. Invasive subcutaneous tumors expressed several MMPs. IGF-IR/dn reduced the expression of these MMPs but especially matrilysin (MMP-7). Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) stimulated secretion of matrilysin and IGF-IR/dn blocked IGF-mediated matrilysin induction in three GI cancers. Both IGF-IR/dn and inhibition of matrilysin reduced in vitro invasion to the same degree. NVP-AEW541 also reduced cancer cell invasion both in vitro and in murine xenograft tumors via suppression of matrilysin. Thus, blockade of IGF-IR is involved in the suppression of cancer cell invasion through downregulation of matrilysin. Strategies of targeting IGF-IR may have significant therapeutic utility to prevent invasion and progression of human GI carcinomas.

  4. Vertical ridge augmentation using an equine block infused with recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB: a histologic study in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Simion, Massimo; Nevins, Myron; Rocchietta, Isabella; Fontana, Filippo; Maschera, Emilio; Schupbach, Peter; Kim, David M

    2009-06-01

    This preclinical study evaluated the efficacy of purified recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB), combined with a novel equine hydroxyapatite and collagen (eHAC) bone block, in providing vertical bone regeneration in critical-size defects simulating localized mandibular alveolar bone atrophy. In addition, the impact of barrier membrane placement in growth factor-mediated bone regeneration was also studied. Bilateral posterior mandibular defects simulating severe localized bony atrophy were created in 12 adult foxhounds following removal of all four mandibular premolars. Three months later, the defects were grafted as follows: group A: eHAC block alone; group B: eHAC block + collagen membrane; group C: eHAC block + rhPDGF-BB; group D: eHAC block + rhPDGF-BB + membrane. The animals were sacrificed after 5 months and the grafted areas were examined histologically, radiographically, and clinically. Groups A and B (controls) exhibited little to no vertical bone regeneration. Group C demonstrated significant vertical bone regeneration, with dense, well-vascularized bone, high bone-to-implant contact, and accelerated replacement of graft particles with newly formed bone. In group D, with the imposition of a barrier membrane, robust bone regeneration was less evident when compared to group C. As in the first study in this series, the importance of the periosteum as a source of osteoprogenitor cells in growth factor-mediated regenerative procedures is examined. PMID:19537464

  5. Blocking Endogenous Leukemia Inhibitory Factor During Placental Development in Mice Leads to Abnormal Placentation and Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Amy; Correia, Jeanne; Krishnan, Tara; Menkhorst, Ellen; Cuman, Carly; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulation and is critical for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. Specialized trophoblast cells derived from the embryonic trophectoderm play a pivotal role in the establishment of the placenta. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is one of the predominant cytokines present in the placenta during early pregnancy. LIF has been shown to regulate trophoblast adhesion and invasion in vitro, however its precise role in vivo is unknown. We hypothesized that LIF would be required for normal placental development in mice. LIF and LIFRα were immunolocalized to placental trophoblasts and fetal vessels in mouse implantation sites during mid-gestation. Temporally blocking LIF action during specific periods of placental development via intraperitoneal administration of our specific LIFRα antagonist, PEGLA, resulted in abnormal placental trophoblast and vascular morphology and reduced activated STAT3 but not ERK. Numerous genes regulating angiogenesis and oxidative stress were altered in the placenta in response to LIF inhibition. Pregnancy viability was also significantly compromised in PEGLA treated mice. Our data suggest that LIF plays an important role in placentation in vivo and the maintenance of healthy pregnancy. PMID:26272398

  6. Amlexanox Blocks the Interaction between S100A4 and Epidermal Growth Factor and Inhibits Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-01-01

    The human S100A4 protein binds calcium, resulting in a change in its conformation to promote the interaction with its target protein. Human epidermal growth factor (EGF) is the target protein of S100A4 and a critical ligand of the receptor EGFR. The EGF/EGFR system promotes cell survival, differentiation, and growth by activating several signaling pathways. Amlexanox is an anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic drug that is used to treat recurrent aphthous ulcers. In the present study, we determined that amlexanox interacts with S100A4 using heteronuclear single quantum correlation titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A4 with EGF and amlexanox using fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We generated two binary models (for the S100A4-EGF and S100A4-amlexanox complexes) and observed that amlexanox and EGF share a similar binding region in mS100A4. We also used a WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A4, EGF, and amlexanox, and found that amlexanox blocks the binding between S100A4 and EGF, and is therefore useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs. PMID:27559743

  7. Amlexanox Blocks the Interaction between S100A4 and Epidermal Growth Factor and Inhibits Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-01-01

    The human S100A4 protein binds calcium, resulting in a change in its conformation to promote the interaction with its target protein. Human epidermal growth factor (EGF) is the target protein of S100A4 and a critical ligand of the receptor EGFR. The EGF/EGFR system promotes cell survival, differentiation, and growth by activating several signaling pathways. Amlexanox is an anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic drug that is used to treat recurrent aphthous ulcers. In the present study, we determined that amlexanox interacts with S100A4 using heteronuclear single quantum correlation titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A4 with EGF and amlexanox using fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We generated two binary models (for the S100A4-EGF and S100A4-amlexanox complexes) and observed that amlexanox and EGF share a similar binding region in mS100A4. We also used a WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A4, EGF, and amlexanox, and found that amlexanox blocks the binding between S100A4 and EGF, and is therefore useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs. PMID:27559743

  8. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins.

  9. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins. PMID:26517887

  10. Dehydroepiandrosterone and metformin modulate progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and cytokines in early pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, C G; Mikó, E; Szekeres-Bartho, J; Paz, D A; Motta, A B

    2008-09-01

    The present study examined the mechanism by which metformin (N,N'-dimethylbiguanide) prevents embryonic resorption induced in mice by dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Treatment with DHEA (60mg/kg, s.c. 24 and 48h post-implantation) induces embryo resorption of early pregnant BALB/c mice while simultaneous treatment with metformin (240mg/kg, oral 24 and 48h post-implantation) prevents it. During pregnancy progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) modulates prostaglandins (PGs) and cytokine production. These findings prompted us to investigate the effect of DHEA and metformin on both PIBF and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expressions at the implantation sites, as well as cytokine production. PIBF and COX2 expression were detected by immunohistochemistry from DHEA and DHEA+ metformin treated 8 days-pregnant mice and serum cytokine levels of these animals were determined by ELISA. DHEA treatment both abolished PIBF expression and increased COX2 expression. Embryo resorption correlates with the lack of PIBF expression, diminished IL-6 levels and increased IL-2 concentration while metformin was able to reverse the effect of DHEA on both PIBF and COX2 expression and IL-6 levels. We concluded that hyperandrogenization induces embryo resorption in early pregnancy diminishing PIBF in implantation sites, having a pro-inflammatory effect. Metformin is able to prevent such effects.

  11. The protective effect of myo-inositol on hippocamal cell loss and structural alterations in neurons and synapses triggered by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Kotaria, Nato; Kiladze, Maia; Zhvania, Mzia G; Japaridze, Nadezhda J; Bikashvili, Tamar; Solomonia, Revaz O; Bolkvadze, Tamar

    2013-07-01

    It is known that myo-inositol pretreatment attenuates the seizure severity and several biochemical changes provoked by experimentally induced status epilepticus. However, it remains unidentified whether such properties of myo-inositol influence the structure of epileptic brain. In the present light and electron microscopic research we elucidate if pretreatment with myo-inositol has positive effect on hippocampal cell loss, and cell and synapses damage provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with (i) saline, (ii) saline + kainic acid, (iii) myo-inositol + kainic acid. Assessment of cell loss at 2, 14, and 30 days after treatment demonstrate cytoprotective effect of myo-inositol in CA1 and CA3 areas. It was strongly expressed in pyramidal layer of CA1, radial and oriental layers of CA3 and in less degree-in other layers of both fields. Ultrastructural alterations were described in CA1, 14 days after treatment. The structure of neurons, synapses, and porosomes are well preserved in the rats pretreated with myo-inositol in comparing with rats treated with only kainic acid.

  12. PK 11195 attenuates kainic acid-induced seizures and alterations in peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) protein components in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Veenman, L; Leschiner, S; Spanier, I; Weisinger, G; Weizman, A; Gavish, M

    2002-03-01

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) are located in glial cells in the brain and in peripheral tissues. Mitochondria form the primary location for PBR. Functional PBR appear to require at least three components: an isoquinoline binding protein, a voltage-dependent anion channel, and an adenine nucleotide carrier. In the present study, rats received intraperitoneal kainic acid injections, which are known to cause seizures, neurodegeneration, hyperactivity, gliosis, and a fivefold increase in PBR ligand binding density in the hippocampus. In the forebrain of control rats, hippocampal voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide carrier abundance was relatively low, while isoquinoline binding protein abundance did not differ between hippocampus and the rest of the forebrain. One week after kainic acid injection, isoquinoline binding protein abundance was increased more than 20-fold in the hippocampal mitochondrial fraction. No significant changes were detected regarding hippocampal voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide carrier abundance. Pre-treatment with the isoquinoline PK11195, a specific PBR ligand, attenuated the occurrence of seizures, hyperactivity, and increases in isoquinoline binding protein levels in the hippocampus, which usually follow kainic acid application. These data suggest that isoquinoline binding protein may be involved in these effects of kainic acid injections.

  13. Blocking Infralimbic Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF or FGF2) Facilitates Extinction of Drug Seeking After Cocaine Self-Administration.

    PubMed

    Hafenbreidel, Madalyn; Twining, Robert C; Rafa Todd, Carolynn; Mueller, Devin

    2015-12-01

    Drug exposure results in structural and functional changes in brain regions that regulate reward and these changes may underlie the persistence of compulsive drug seeking and relapse. Neurotrophic factors, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF2), are necessary for neuronal survival, growth, and differentiation, and may contribute to these drug-induced changes. Following cocaine exposure, bFGF is increased in addiction-related brain regions, including the infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex (IL-mPFC). The IL-mPFC is necessary for extinction, but whether drug-induced overexpression of bFGF in this region affects extinction of drug seeking is unknown. Thus, we determined whether blocking bFGF in IL-mPFC would facilitate extinction following cocaine self-administration. Rats were trained to lever press for intravenous infusions of cocaine before extinction. Blocking bFGF in IL-mPFC before four extinction sessions resulted in facilitated extinction. In contrast, blocking bFGF alone was not sufficient to facilitate extinction, as blocking bFGF and returning rats to their home cage had no effect on subsequent extinction. Furthermore, bFGF protein expression increased in IL-mPFC following cocaine self-administration, an effect reversed by extinction. These results suggest that cocaine-induced overexpression of bFGF inhibits extinction, as blocking bFGF during extinction permits rapid extinction. Therefore, targeted reductions in bFGF during therapeutic interventions could enhance treatment outcomes for addiction.

  14. Lateral ridge augmentation using an equine flex bone block infused with recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor BB: a clinical and histologic study.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Nicola; Scivetti, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a patient who underwent horizontal ridge augmentation using recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor BB (rhPDGF-BB) in combination with a collagenate equine block. Ninety days after the first surgery, 8 mm of new bone was noted on a computed tomography scan, and three 5-mm implants were placed. Histology, performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy, showed a large amount of newly formed bone well characterized with osteon and resorption lacunae, which demonstrated the intense bone remodeling. This study supports the use of rhPDGF-BB in combination with allograft blocks. PMID:21837304

  15. Insulin-like growth factor II blocks apoptosis of N-myc2-expressing woodchuck liver epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D; Faris, R; Hixson, D; Affigne, S; Rogler, C E

    1996-01-01

    N-myc2 and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) are coordinately overexpressed in the great majority of altered hepatic foci, which are the earliest precancerous lesions observed in the liver of woodchuck hepatitis virus carrier woodchucks, and these genes continue to be overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). We have investigated the function of these genes in woodchuck hepatocarcinogenesis by using a woodchuck liver epithelial cell line (WC-3). WC-3 cells react positively with a monoclonal antibody (12.8.5) against woodchuck oval cells, suggesting a lineage relationship with oval cells. Overexpression of N-myc2 in three WC-3 cell lines caused their morphological transformation and increased their growth rate and saturation density in medium containing 10% serum. Removal of serum from the medium increased cell death of the N-myc2-expressing lines, whereas cell death in control lines was minimal. The death of N-myc2-expressing WC-3 cells was accompanied by nucleosomal fragmentation of cellular DNA, and DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining revealed condensation and fragmentation of the nuclei, suggesting that N-myc2-expressing WC-3 cells undergo apoptosis in the absence of serum. In colony regression assays, conducted in the absence of serum, control colonies were stable, while N-myc2-expressing colonies regressed to various degrees. Addition of recombinant human IGF-II to the serum-free medium blocked both cell death and colony regression in all the N-myc2-expressing lines. Therefore, coordinate overexpression of N-myc2 and IGF-II in woodchuck altered hepatic foci may allow cells which otherwise might die to survive and progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:8709253

  16. Kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and activation of inflammatory processes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures: treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor does not prevent neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Juha T; Ruohonen, Saku; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Plysjuk, Anna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-06-01

    In the postnatal rodent hippocampus status epilepticus (SE) leads to age- and region-specific excitotoxic neuronal damage, the precise mechanisms of which are still incompletely known. Recent studies suggest that the activation of inflammatory responses together with glial cell reactivity highly contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage. However, pharmacological tools to attenuate their activation in the postnatal brain are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs). A specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) was used to study whether or not it could ameliorate neuronal death. Our results show that KA treatment (24 h) resulted in a dose-dependent degeneration of CA3a/b pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, COX-2 immunoreactivity was pronouncedly enhanced particularly in CA3c pyramidal neurons, microglial and astrocyte morphology changed from a resting to active appearance, the expression of the microglial specific protein, Iba1, increased, and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production increased. These indicated the activation of inflammatory processes. However, the expression of neither proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nor the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA was significantly altered by KA treatment as studied by real-time PCR. Despite activation of an array of inflammatory processes, neuronal damage could not be rescued either with the combined pre- and co-treatment with a specific COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398. Our results suggest that KA induces activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes in immature OHCs, and that the timing of anti-inflammatory treatment to achieve neuroprotection is a challenge due to developmental properties and the complexity of inflammatory processes activated by

  17. The β2-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol elicits neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic actions in the kainic acid model of excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Lorna C; Ryan, Katie J; Griffin, Eadaoin W; Connor, Thomas J; Harkin, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Excitotoxicity is a mechanism of neuronal cell death implicated in a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainic acid (KA) induces inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus, resulting in neuronal loss. Evidence indicates that stimulation of glial β(2)-adrenoceptors has anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic properties that could result in neuroprotection. Consequently, in this study we examined the effect of the β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol on KA-induced inflammation, neurotrophic factor expression and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Clenbuterol (0.5mg/kg) was administered to rats one hour prior to KA (10mg/kg). Epileptic behaviour induced by KA was assessed for three hours following administration using the Racine scale. Twenty-four hours later TUNEL staining in the CA3 hippocampal subfield and hippocampal caspase-3 activity was assessed to measure KA-induced apoptosis. In addition, expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IFN-γ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), kynurenine pathway enzymes indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO), the microglial activation marker CD11b, and the neurotrophins BDNF and NGF were quantified in the hippocampus using real-time PCR. Whilst clenbuterol treatment did not significantly alter KA-induced epileptic behavior it ameliorated KA-induced apoptosis, and this neuroprotective effect was accompanied by reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, reduced expression of iNOS, IDO, KMO and CD11b, coupled with increased BDNF and NGF expression in KA-treated rats. In conclusion, the β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol has anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic actions and elicits a neuroprotective effect in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:20599496

  18. Antibodies That Block or Activate Mouse B Cell Activating Factor of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Family (BAFF), Respectively, Induce B Cell Depletion or B Cell Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Vigolo, Michele; Willen, Laure; Tardivel, Aubry; Smulski, Cristian R; Zheng, Timothy S; Gommerman, Jennifer; Hess, Henry; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Mackay, Fabienne; Donzé, Olivier; Schneider, Pascal

    2016-09-16

    B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF), also known as B lymphocyte stimulator, is a ligand required for the generation and maintenance of B lymphocytes. In this study, the ability of different monoclonal antibodies to recognize, inhibit, or activate mouse BAFF was investigated. One of them, a mouse IgG1 named Sandy-2, prevented the binding of BAFF to all of its receptors, BAFF receptor, transmembrane activator and calcium modulating ligand interactor, and B cell maturation antigen, at a stoichiometric ratio; blocked the activity of mouse BAFF on a variety of cell-based reporter assays; and antagonized the prosurvival action of BAFF on primary mouse B cells in vitro A single administration of Sandy-2 in mice induced B cell depletion within 2 weeks, down to levels close to those observed in BAFF-deficient mice. This depletion could then be maintained with a chronic treatment. Sandy-2 and a previously described rat IgG1 antibody, 5A8, also formed a pair suitable for the sensitive detection of endogenous circulating BAFF by ELISA or using a homogenous assay. Interestingly, 5A8 and Sandy-5 displayed activities opposite to that of Sandy-2 by stimulating recombinant BAFF in vitro and endogenous BAFF in vivo These tools will prove useful for the detection and functional manipulation of endogenous mouse BAFF and provide an alternative to the widely used BAFF receptor-Fc decoy receptor for the specific depletion of BAFF in mice. PMID:27451394

  19. Efficacy of continuous epidural block in acute herpes zoster: Incidence and predictive factors of postherpetic neuralgia, a retrospective single-center study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo Na; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Eung Don

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate efficacy of continuous epidural block for prevent postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) progression in cases of acute herpes zoster with severe pain and also to identify predictive factors for PHN in such conditions.We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of patients with herpes zoster who underwent continuous epidural block between March 2013 and October 2015. Time points were set as 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset. PHN was defined as the presence of pain with NRS ≥3 at certain time points.The incidence of developing PHN was 38.1%, 27.0%, and 19.0% 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset, respectively. Age and duration of catheterization were predictive factors for PHN at 1 month. Age, duration of catheterization, and NRS at first visit were identified as predictive factors for PHN at 3 months. Presence of diabetes, duration of catheterization, and NRS during catheterization were significant predictive factors for PHN at 6 months.The incidence of PHN is higher in zoster patients with severe pain that requires continuous epidural block compared to incidence in the general population. Advanced age and severe initial pain intensity were predictive factors of PHN development. Prolonged catheterization resulting from weak response to treatment strongly suggested progression to PHN. PMID:27512887

  20. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  1. Different Responses in Induction of Allergen Specific Immunoglobulin G4 and IgE-Blocking Factors for Three Mite Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Products

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Son, Young Woong; Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Shin, Yoo Seob; Shin, Jung U; Sim, Da Woon; Park, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Kwang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Specific immunoglobulin G4 (sIgG4) and immunoglobulin E (IgE)-blocking factors produced by subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) play a critical role in the induction of allergen tolerance. However, comparative studies of available SCIT reagents on the induction of sIgG4 are limited. We compared increases in sIgG4 for three different house dust mite (HDM) SCIT reagents. Materials and Methods Seventy-two HDM sensitized allergic patients were enrolled and classified into four groups: 1) control (n=27), 2) SCIT with Hollister-Stier® (n=19), 3) Tyrosine S® (n=16), and 4) Novo-Helisen® (n=10). Levels of specific IgE (sIgE), sIgG4, and IgE blocking factor to Dermatophagoides farinae (D. farinae) were measured using ImmunoCAP (sIgE, sIgG4) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (IgE-blocking factors). Levels were measured before and 13.9±6.6 months after the SCIT. The allergen specificity and the induction levels of sIgE and sIgG4 were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Results After SCIT, sIgG4 levels to D. farinae increased significantly; however, the increases differed significantly among the SCIT groups (p<0.001). Specific IgG4 levels to D. farinae were highest in Hollister-Stier® (3.7±4.1 mg/L), followed by Novo-Helisen® (2.2±2.3 mg/L) and Tyrosine S® (0.7±0.5 mg/L). In addition, patients who were administered using Hollister-Stier® showed the most significant decrease in IgE/IgG4 ratio (p<0.001) and increase in blocking factor (p=0.009). Finally, according to IgE immunoblot results, the Hollister-Stier® group showed the most significant attenuation of IgE binding patterns among others. Conclusion Currently available SCIT reagents induce different levels of specific IgG4, IgE/IgG4 ratio, and IgE-blocking factor. PMID:27593871

  2. Ultraviolet B-induced activated protein-1 activation does not require epidermal growth factor receptor but is blocked by a dominant negative PKClambda/iota.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Ma, W y; Bowden, G T; Dong, Z

    1996-12-01

    The exposure of mammalian cells to UV irradiation leads to the activation of transcription factors such as activated protein-1 (AP-1) and NFkappaB. It is postulated that epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, but not protein kinase C (PKC), is the major membrane mediator in UV-induced signal transduction. Since UVB is responsible for most of the carcinogenic effects of sun exposure, we investigated the role of EGF receptors and PKC in UVB-induced AP-1 activation. Our results indicated that while the down-regulation of novel PKC (nPKC) and conventional PKC (cPKC) by pretreatment of cells with 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate cannot block UVB-induced AP-1 activity, it can block 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate-induced AP-1 activity. Further, the dominant negative mutant PKClambda/iota blocked UVB-induced AP-1 activity in all doses and time courses studied. In contrast, UVB-induced AP-1 activity from cells devoid of EGF receptor (B82) was not significantly different from that of the stable transfectants with a kinase-deficient EGF receptor (B82M721) or those with a wild-type EGF receptor (B82L) at all UVB irradiation doses and time courses studied. All of this evidence indicated that aPKC, but not EGF receptor, is involved in UVB-induced AP-1 activation. PMID:8940130

  3. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  4. Auditory brain-stem evoked potentials in cat after kainic acid induced neuronal loss. II. Cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zaaroor, M; Starr, A

    1991-01-01

    Auditory brain-stem potentials (ABRs) were studied in cats for up to 6 weeks after kainic acid had been injected unilaterally into the cochlear nucleus (CN) producing extensive neuronal destruction. The ABR components were labeled by the polarity at the vertex (P, for positive) and their order of appearance (the arabic numerals 1, 2, etc.). Component P1 can be further subdivided into 2 subcomponents, P1a and P1b. The assumed correspondence between the ABR components in cat and man is indicated by providing human Roman numeral designations in parentheses following the feline notation, e.g., P2 (III). To stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection, the ABR changes consisted of a loss of components P2 (III) and P3 (IV), and an attenuation and prolongation of latency of components P4 (V) and P5 (VI). The sustained potential shift from which the components arose was not affected. Wave P1a (I) was also slightly but significantly attenuated compatible with changes of excitability of nerve VIII in the cochlea secondary to cochlear nucleus destruction. Unexpectedly, to stimulation of the ear contralateral to the injection side, waves P2 (III), P3 (IV), and P4 (V) were also attenuated and delayed in latency but to a lesser degree than to stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection. Changes in binaural interaction of the ABR following cochlear nucleus lesions were similar to those produced in normal animals by introducing a temporal delay of the input to one ear. The results of the present set of studies using kainic acid to induce neuronal loss in auditory pathway when combined with prior lesion and recording experiments suggest that each of the components of the ABR requires the integrity of an anatomically diffuse system comprising a set of neurons, their axons, and the neurons on which they terminate. Disruption of any portion of the system will alter the amplitude and/or the latency of that component. PMID:1716569

  5. Cyclic Limulus anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) factor-derived peptide CLP-19 antagonizes LPS function by blocking binding to LPS binding protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Ni, Bing; Ren, Jian-dong; Chen, Jian-hong; Tian, Zhi-qiang; Tang, Min; Li, Di; Xia, Peiyuan

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation and septic shock due to endotoxins from Gram-negative bacteria infection continue to pose significant challenges to human healthcare. It is, therefore, necessary to develop therapeutic strategies targeting endotoxins, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), to prevent their potentially systemic effects. Pathogenesis due to Gram-negative bacteria involves LPS binding to the host LPS-binding protein (LBP), causing detrimental downstream signaling cascades. Our previous study showed that CLP-19, a synthetic peptide derived from the Limulus anti-LPS factor (LALF), could effectively neutralize LPS toxicity; however, the detailed mechanisms underlying this anti-LPS effect remained unexplained. Thus, we carried out investigations to determine how the CLP-19 neutralizes LPS toxicity. CLP-19 was found to block LPS binding to LBP in a dose-dependent manner, as evidenced by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, CLP-19 blocked LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling proteins p38, extracellular signal-regulating kinase (ERK)1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2. Furthermore, CLP-19 potency in LPS antagonism in vitro and in vivo was directly associated with its ability to block the LPS-LBP interaction. Taken together, the results suggested that CLP-19's inhibitory effect on LPS-LBP binding and on the subsequent MAPK pathway signaling may be responsible for its anti-LPS mechanism. This peptide appears to represent a potential therapeutic agent for clinical treatment of sepsis. PMID:22040879

  6. A novel antibody against human factor B that blocks formation of the C3bB proconvertase and inhibits complement activation in disease models.

    PubMed

    Subías, Marta; Tortajada, Agustín; Gastoldi, Sara; Galbusera, Miriam; López-Perrote, Andrés; Lopez, Lucia de Juana; González-Fernández, Fernando Ataúlfo; Villegas-Martínez, Ana; Dominguez, Mercedes; Llorca, Oscar; Noris, Marina; Morgan, B Paul; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2014-12-01

    The alternative pathway (AP) is critical for the efficient activation of complement regardless of the trigger. It is also a major player in pathogenesis, as illustrated by the long list of diseases in which AP activation contributes to pathology. Its relevance to human disease is further emphasized by the high prevalence of pathogenic inherited defects and acquired autoantibodies disrupting components and regulators of the AP C3-convertase. Because pharmacological downmodulation of the AP emerges as a broad-spectrum treatment alternative, there is a powerful interest in developing new molecules to block formation and/or activity of the AP C3-convertase. In this paper, we describe the generation of a novel mAb targeting human factor B (FB). mAb FB48.4.2, recognizing with high affinity an evolutionary-conserved epitope in the Ba fragment of FB, very efficiently inhibited formation of the AP C3-proconvertase by blocking the interaction between FB and C3b. In vitro assays using rabbit and sheep erythrocytes demonstrated that FB28.4.2 was a potent AP inhibitor that blocked complement-mediated hemolysis in several species. Using ex vivo models of disease we demonstrated that FB28.4.2 protected paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria erythrocytes from complement-mediated hemolysis and inhibited both C3 fragment and C5b-9 deposition on ADP-activated HMEC-1 cells, an experimental model for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Moreover, i.v. injection of FB28.4.2 in rats blocked complement activation in rat serum and prevented the passive induction of experimental autoimmune Myasthenia gravis. As a whole, these data demonstrate the potential value of FB28.4.2 for the treatment of disorders associated with AP complement dysregulation in man and animal models.

  7. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W.; Burnham, W. McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-01-01

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy. PMID:27273072

  8. Exploratory Metabolomics Profiling in the Kainic Acid Rat Model Reveals Depletion of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 during Epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Heischmann, Svenja; Quinn, Kevin; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion; Liang, Li-Ping; Reisdorph, Rick; Reisdorph, Nichole; Patel, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no reliable markers are available to evaluate the epileptogenic potential of a brain injury. The electroencephalogram is the standard method of diagnosis of epilepsy; however, it is not used to predict the risk of developing epilepsy. Biomarkers that indicate an individual’s risk to develop epilepsy, especially those measurable in the periphery are urgently needed. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common form of acquired epilepsy, is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures following brain injury and a seizure-free “latent” period. Elucidation of mechanisms at play during epilepsy development (epileptogenesis) in animal models of TLE could enable the identification of predictive biomarkers. Our pilot study using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomics analysis revealed changes (p-value ≤ 0.05, ≥1.5-fold change) in lipid, purine, and sterol metabolism in rat plasma and hippocampus during epileptogenesis and chronic epilepsy in the kainic acid model of TLE. Notably, disease development was associated with dysregulation of vitamin D3 metabolism at all stages and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 depletion in the acute and latent phase of injury-induced epileptogenesis. These data suggest that plasma VD3 metabolites reflect the severity of an epileptogenic insult and that a panel of plasma VD3 metabolites may be able to serve as a marker of epileptogenesis. PMID:27526857

  9. The relationship between stress protein induction and the oxidative defense system in the rat hippocampus following kainic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Gilberti, E A; Trombetta, L D

    2000-07-27

    The time and dose-dependent effects of kainic acid (KA) induced excitotoxicity on the oxidative defense system and the relationship to the induction of stress proteins were investigated in the rat hippocampus. Male Long-Evans rats were injected subcutaneously with 5.0, 7.5, or 10 mg KA/kg. Rats were sacrificed and the hippocampus removed and processed for biochemical and electrophoretic analysis. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) increased significantly at the 5 mg KA/kg dose, while malondialdehyde (MDA) levels significantly increased at 7.5 mg KA/kg when measured at 24 h. A dose of 10 mg KA/kg depleted significantly hippocampal glutathione (GSH) levels at 8, 16 and 24 h post-treatment while GPx activity was increased significantly at 2, 4, 8 and 16 hr post-treatment. The 10 mg KA/kg increased significantly hippocampal MDA levels at 2 h post-treatment and decreased significantly thereafter. The induction of stress proteins increased in a dose and time dependent manner. The expression of Hp72 and Hsp32 increased significantly at 16 h with a maximum induction observed at 24 h post-treatment. The data suggests that KA toxicity is mediated through the formation of reactive oxygen species resulting in alterations in the oxidative defense system. The expression of stress proteins following KA administration may reflect a concomitant but alternate response to excitotoxic events.

  10. Ketogenic Diet, but Not Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Diet, Reduces Spontaneous Seizures in Juvenile Rats with Kainic Acid-induced Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Simone M.; Stafstrom, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) is effective in many cases of drug-resistant epilepsy, particularly in children. In the classic KD, fats consist primarily of long-chain saturated triglycerides. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially the n-3 type, decrease neuronal excitability and provide neuroprotection; pilot human studies have raised the possibility of using PUFAs to control seizures in patients. Methods: To determine the relative roles of the KD and PUFAs in an animal model, we induced epilepsy in juvenile rats (P29–35) using intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA). KA caused status epilepticus in all rats. Two days after KA, rats were randomized to one of 4 dietary groups: Control diet; PUFA diet; KD; or KD plus PUFA. All diets were administered isocalorically at 90% of the rat recommended daily calorie requirement. Spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) were assessed for 3 months after diet randomization. Results: Rats receiving the KD or KD-PUFA diet had significantly fewer SRS than those receiving the Control diet or PUFA diet. The PUFA diet did not reduce SRS compared to the Control diet. Conclusions: In the KA epilepsy model, the KD protects against SRS occurrence but dietary enhancement with PUFA does not afford additional protection against spontaneous seizures. PMID:27390673

  11. Effect of intra-cisternal application of kainic acid on the spinal cord and locomotor activity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Nilesh K; Goh, Tiffanie EW; Bala Krishnan, Thalisha; Nadarajah, Vishna D; Vasavaraj, Arun K; Soga, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease of idiopathic etiology. Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the proposed hypotheses causing progressive death of motor neurons. We aimed to develop an experimental animal model of this disease to enhance the knowledge of pathophysiological mechanism of ALS. Male Wistar rats were infused with Kainic acid (KA) intra-cisternally for 5 days at the dosage of 50 fmol/day and 150 fmol/day. Locomotor activity, sensory function and histological changes in cervical and lumbar sections of spinal cord were evaluated. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Neurofilament Protein (NFP) were used as immunohistochemical marker for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage respectively. Specific Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activity of spinal cord was estimated. The locomotor activity in the parameter of observed mean action time remained reduced on 14th day after administration of KA. Spinal motor neurons under Nissl stain showed pyknosis of nucleus and vacuolation of neuropil. GFAP expression increased significantly in the lumbar section of the spinal cord with high dose of KA treatment (p<0.05). NFP was expressed in axonal fibres around the neurons in KA-treated rats. A significant increase in specific SOD activity in both cervical and lumbar sections of the spinal cord was found with low dose of KA treatment (p<0.05). This study concludes that spinal cord damage with some features similar to ALS can be produced by low dose intra-cisternal administration of KA. PMID:23923068

  12. Kainic acid-induced F-344 rat model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: gene expression and canonical pathways.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok K; Searfoss, George H; Reams, Rachel Y; Jordan, William H; Snyder, Paul W; Chiang, Alan Y; Jolly, Robert A; Ryan, Timothy P

    2009-10-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a severe neurological condition of unknown pathogenesis for which several animal models have been developed. To obtain a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of lesion progression, we used a rat kainic acid (KA) treatment model of MTLE coupled with global gene expression analysis to examine temporal (four hours, days 3, 14, or 28) gene regulation relative to hippocampal histopathological changes. The authors recommend reviewing the companion histopathology paper (Sharma et al. 2008) to get a better understanding of the work presented here. Analysis of filtered gene expression data using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (Ingenuity Systems, http://www.ingenuity.com) revealed that a number of genes pertaining to neuronal plasticity (RhoA, Rac1, Cdc42, BDNF, and Trk), neurodegeneration (Caspase3, Calpain 1, Bax, a Cytochrome c, and Smac/Diablo), and inflammation/immune-response pathways (TNF-alpha, CCL2, Cox2) were modulated in a temporal fashion after KA treatment. Expression changes for selected genes known to have a role in neuronal plasticity were subsequently validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Notably, canonical pathway analysis revealed that a number of genes within the axon guidance signaling canonical pathway were up-regulated from Days 3 to 28, which correlated with aberrant mossy fiber (MF) sprouting observed histologically beginning at Day 6. Importantly, analysis of the gene expression data also identified potential biomarkers for monitoring neurodegeneration (Cox2) and neuronal/synaptic plasticity (Kalrn). PMID:19700661

  13. Exploratory Metabolomics Profiling in the Kainic Acid Rat Model Reveals Depletion of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 during Epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heischmann, Svenja; Quinn, Kevin; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion; Liang, Li-Ping; Reisdorph, Rick; Reisdorph, Nichole; Patel, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no reliable markers are available to evaluate the epileptogenic potential of a brain injury. The electroencephalogram is the standard method of diagnosis of epilepsy; however, it is not used to predict the risk of developing epilepsy. Biomarkers that indicate an individual's risk to develop epilepsy, especially those measurable in the periphery are urgently needed. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common form of acquired epilepsy, is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures following brain injury and a seizure-free "latent" period. Elucidation of mechanisms at play during epilepsy development (epileptogenesis) in animal models of TLE could enable the identification of predictive biomarkers. Our pilot study using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomics analysis revealed changes (p-value ≤ 0.05, ≥1.5-fold change) in lipid, purine, and sterol metabolism in rat plasma and hippocampus during epileptogenesis and chronic epilepsy in the kainic acid model of TLE. Notably, disease development was associated with dysregulation of vitamin D3 metabolism at all stages and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 depletion in the acute and latent phase of injury-induced epileptogenesis. These data suggest that plasma VD3 metabolites reflect the severity of an epileptogenic insult and that a panel of plasma VD3 metabolites may be able to serve as a marker of epileptogenesis. PMID:27526857

  14. Altered expression of sphingosine kinase 1 and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 in mouse hippocampus after kainic acid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Byeong Tak; Jeong, Eun Ae; Kim, Joon Soo; Cho, Yong Woon; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Roh, Gu Seob

    2010-03-12

    Kainic acid (KA) induces hippocampal cell death and astrocyte proliferation. There are reports that sphingosine kinase (SPHK)1 and sphingosine-1- phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1P{sub 1}) signaling axis controls astrocyte proliferation. Here we examined the temporal changes of SPHK1/S1P{sub 1} in mouse hippocampus during KA-induced hippocampal cell death. Mice were killed at 2, 6, 24, or 48 h after KA (30 mg/kg) injection. There was an increase in Fluoro-Jade B-positive cells in the hippocampus of KA-treated mice with temporal changes of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. The lowest level of SPHK1 protein expression was found 2 h after KA treatment. Six hours after KA treatment, the expression of SPHK1 and S1P{sub 1} proteins steadily increased in the hippocampus. In immunohistochemical analysis, SPHK1 and S1P{sub 1} are more immunoreactive in astrocytes within the hippocampus of KA-treated mice than in hippocampus of control mice. These results indicate that SPHK1/S1P{sub 1} signaling axis may play an important role in astrocytes proliferation during KA-induced excitotoxicity.

  15. Antiepileptic Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla and Rhynchophylline Involved in the Initiation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Phosphorylation of MAPK Signal Pathways in Acute Seizures of Kainic Acid-Treated Rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Seizures cause inflammation of the central nervous system. The extent of the inflammation is related to the severity and recurrence of the seizures. Cell surface receptors are stimulated by stimulators such as kainic acid (KA), which causes intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal pathway transmission to coordinate a response. It is known that Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) and rhynchophylline (RP) have anticonvulsive effects, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a novel strategy for treating epilepsy by investigating how UR and RP initiate their anticonvulsive mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered KA (12 mg/kg, i.p.) to induce seizure before being sacrificed. The brain was removed 3 h after KA administration. The results indicate that pretreatment with UR (1.0 g/kg), RP (0.25 mg/kg), and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg) for 3 d could reduce epileptic seizures and could also reduce the expression of c-Jun aminoterminal kinase phosphorylation (JNKp) of MAPK signal pathways in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus brain tissues. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 β , IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor- α remain unchanged, indicating that the anticonvulsive effect of UR and RP is initially involved in the JNKp MAPK signal pathway during the KA-induced acute seizure period. PMID:24381640

  16. Inhibition of transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase-1 blocks cancer cell adhesion, invasion, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ray, D M; Myers, P H; Painter, J T; Hoenerhoff, M J; Olden, K; Roberts, J D

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tumour cell metastasis involves cell adhesion and invasion, processes that depend on signal transduction, which can be influenced by the tumour microenvironment. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, found both in the diet and in response to inflammatory responses, are important components of this microenvironment. Methods: We used short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1) in human tumour cells to examine its involvement in fatty acid-stimulated cell adhesion and invasion in vitro. An in vivo model of metastasis was developed in which cells, stably expressing firefly luciferase and either a control shRNA or a TAK1-specific shRNA, were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice fed diets, rich in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Tumour growth and spontaneous metastasis were monitored with in vivo and in situ imaging of bioluminescence. Results: Arachidonic acid activated TAK1 and downstream kinases in MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells and led to increased adhesion and invasion. Knockdown of TAK1 blocked this activation and inhibited both cell adhesion and invasion in vitro. Tumour growth at the site of injection was not affected by TAK1 knockdown, but both the incidence and extent of metastasis to the lung were significantly reduced in mice injected with TAK1 knockdown cells compared with mice carrying control tumour cells. Conclusion: These data demonstrate the importance of TAK1 signalling in tumour metastasis in vivo and suggest an opportunity for antimetastatic therapies. PMID:22644295

  17. Targeted Disruption of Heparan Sulfate Interaction with Hepatocyte and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors Blocks Normal and Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, Fabiola; Pajalunga, Deborah; Fowler, C. Andrew; Uren, Aykut; Rabe, Daniel C.; Peruzzi, Benedetta; MacDonald, Nicholas J.; Blackman, Davida K.; Stahl, Stephen J.; Byrd, R. Andrew; Bottaro, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) regulate normal development and homeostasis, and drive disease progression in many forms of cancer. Both proteins signal by binding to receptor tyrosine kinases and heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans on target cell surfaces. Basic residues comprising the primary HS binding sites on HGF and VEGF provide similar surface charge distributions without underlying structural similarity. Combining three acidic amino acid substitutions in these sites in the HGF isoform NK1 or the VEGF isoform VEGF165 transformed each into potent, selective competitive antagonists of their respective normal and oncogenic signaling pathways. Our findings illustrate the importance of HS in growth factor driven cancer progression and reveal an efficient strategy for therapeutic antagonist development. PMID:22897854

  18. Neuromuscular block

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them especially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are especially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of especial interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors. PMID:16402115

  19. Blocking Single-Stranded Transferred DNA Conversion to Double-Stranded Intermediates by Overexpression of Yeast DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A1

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Avner; Dafny, Raz; Tzfira, Tzvi

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens delivers its single-stranded transferred DNA (T-strand) into the host cell nucleus, where it can be converted into double-stranded molecules. Various studies have revealed that double-stranded transfer DNA (T-DNA) intermediates can serve as substrates by as yet uncharacterized integration machinery. Nevertheless, the possibility that T-strands are themselves substrates for integration cannot be ruled out. We attempted to block the conversion of T-strands into double-stranded intermediates prior to integration in order to further investigate the route taken by T-DNA molecules on their way to integration. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) plants that overexpress three yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) protein subunits of DNA REPLICATION FACTOR A (RFA) were produced. In yeast, these subunits (RFA1–RFA3) function as a complex that can bind single-stranded DNA molecules, promoting the repair of genomic double strand breaks. Overexpression of the RFA complex in tobacco resulted in decreased T-DNA expression, as determined by infection with A. tumefaciens cells carrying the β-glucuronidase intron reporter gene. Gene expression was not blocked when the reporter gene was delivered by microbombardment. Enhanced green fluorescent protein-assisted localization studies indicated that the three-protein complex was predominantly nuclear, thus indicating its function within the plant cell nucleus, possibly by binding naked T-strands and blocking their conversion into double-stranded intermediates. This notion was further supported by the inhibitory effect of RFA expression on the cell-to-cell movement of Bean dwarf mosaic virus, a single-stranded DNA virus. The observation that RFA complex plants dramatically inhibited the transient expression level of T-DNA and only reduced T-DNA integration by 50% suggests that double-stranded T-DNA intermediates, as well as single-stranded T-DNA, play significant roles in the integration process. PMID

  20. Immunotherapy of human tumour xenografts overexpressing the EGF receptor with rat antibodies that block growth factor-receptor interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Modjtahedi, H.; Eccles, S.; Box, G.; Styles, J.; Dean, C.

    1993-01-01

    Athymic mice bearing xenografts of human tumours that overexpress the receptor (EGFR) for EGF and TGF alpha have been used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of three new rat monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against two distinct epitopes on the extracellular domain of the human EGFR. The antibodies, ICR16 (IgG2a), ICR62 (IgG2b) and ICR64 (IgG1), have been shown (Modjtahedi et al., 1993) to be potent inhibitors of the growth in vitro of a number of human squamous cell carcinomas because they block receptor-ligand interaction. When given i.p. at 200 micrograms dose, the three antibodies were found to induce complete regression of xenografts of the HN5 tumour if treatment with antibody commenced at the time of tumour implantation (total doses: ICR16, 3.0 mg; ICR62, 1.2 mg; ICR64, 2.2 mg). More importantly when treatment was delayed until the tumours were established (mean diam. 0.5 cm) both ICR16 and ICR62 induced complete or almost complete regression of the tumours. Furthermore, treatment with a total dose of only 0.44 mg of ICR62 was found to induce complete remission of xenografts of the breast carcinoma MDA-MB 468, but ICR16 was less effective at this dose of antibody and only 4/8 tumours regressed completely. ICR16 and ICR62 were poor inhibitors of the growth in vitro of the vulval carcinoma A431, but both induced a substantial delay in the growth of xenografts of this tumour and 4/8 tumours regressed completely in the mice treated with ICR62 (total dose 2.2 mg). Although ICR16 and ICR64 were more effective than ICR62 as growth inhibitors in vitro, ICR62 was found to be substantially better at inducing regression of the tumour xenografts due perhaps to additional activation of host immune effector functions by the IgG2b antibody. We conclude that these antibodies may be useful therapeutic agents that can be used alone without conjugation to other cytotoxic moieties. PMID:7679281

  1. Block People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rayma

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an activity in which students in an after-school art class drew one another on pieces of 2-by-4 scrap lumber in order to create a class portrait in three dimensions. Stresses that the portraits on the wood blocks were done in-the-round, or each side was covered. (CMK)

  2. Protein Kinase Cδ Blocks Immediate-Early Gene Expression in Senescent Cells by Inactivating Serum Response Factor

    PubMed Central

    Wheaton, Keith; Riabowol, Karl

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblasts lose the ability to replicate in response to growth factors and become unable to express growth-associated immediate-early genes, including c-fos and egr-1, as they become senescent. The serum response factor (SRF), a major transcriptional activator of immediate-early gene promoters, loses the ability to bind to the serum response element (SRE) and becomes hyperphosphorylated in senescent cells. We identify protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) as the kinase responsible for inactivation of SRF both in vitro and endogenously in senescent cells. This is due to a higher level of PKCδ activity as cells age, production of the PKCδ catalytic fragment, and its nuclear localization in senescent but not in low-passage-number cells. The phosphorylation of T160 of SRF by PKCδ in vitro and in vivo led to loss of SRF DNA binding activity. Both the PKCδ inhibitor rottlerin and ectopic expression of a dominant negative form of PKCδ independently restored SRE-dependent transcription and immediate-early gene expression in senescent cells. Modulation of PKCδ activity in vivo with rottlerin or bistratene A altered senescent- and young-cell morphology, respectively. These observations support the idea that the coordinate transcriptional inhibition of several growth-associated genes by PKCδ contributes to the senescent phenotype. PMID:15282327

  3. Gramicidin A blocks tumor growth and angiogenesis through inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    David, Justin M; Owens, Tori A; Inge, Landon J; Bremner, Ross M; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K

    2014-04-01

    Ionophores are hydrophobic organic molecules that disrupt cellular transmembrane potential by permeabilizing membranes to specific ions. Gramicidin A is a channel-forming ionophore that forms a hydrophilic membrane pore that permits the rapid passage of monovalent cations. Previously, we found that gramicidin A induces cellular energy stress and cell death in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines. RCC is a therapy-resistant cancer that is characterized by constitutive activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Here, we demonstrate that gramicidin A inhibits HIF in RCC cells. We found that gramicidin A destabilized HIF-1α and HIF-2α proteins in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, which in turn diminished HIF transcriptional activity and the expression of various hypoxia-response genes. Mechanistic examination revealed that gramicidin A accelerates O(2)-dependent downregulation of HIF by upregulating the expression of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein, which targets hydroxylated HIF for proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, gramicidin A reduced the growth of human RCC xenograft tumors without causing significant toxicity in mice. Gramicidin A-treated tumors also displayed physiologic and molecular features consistent with the inhibition of HIF-dependent angiogenesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate a new role for gramicidin A as a potent inhibitor of HIF that reduces tumor growth and angiogenesis in VHL-expressing RCC.

  4. Pharmacologic suppression of oxidative damage and dendritic degeneration following kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity in mouse cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Gupta, Ramesh C; Aschner, Michael; Montine, Thomas J; Milatovic, Dejan

    2008-07-01

    Intense seizure activity associated with status epilepticus and excitatory amino acid (EAA) imbalance initiates oxidative damage and neuronal injury in CA1 of the ventral hippocampus. We tested the hypothesis that dendritic degeneration of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 hippocampal area resulting from seizure-induced neurotoxicity is modulated by cerebral oxidative damage. Kainic acid (KA, 1 nmol/5 microl) was injected intracerebroventricularly to C57Bl/6 mice. F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and F4-neuroprostanes (F4-NeuroPs) were used as surrogate measures of in vivo oxidative stress and biomarkers of lipid peroxidation. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was quantified by evaluating citrulline level and pyramidal neuron dendrites and spines were evaluated using rapid Golgi stains and a Neurolucida system. KA produced severe seizures in mice immediately after its administration and a significant (p<0.001) increase in F2-IsoPs, F4-NeuroPs and citrulline levels were seen 30 min following treatment. At the same time, hippocampal pyramidal neurons showed significant (p<0.001) reduction in dendritic length and spine density. In contrast, no significant change in neuronal dendrite and spine density or F2-IsoP, F4-NeuroPs and citrulline levels were found in mice pretreated with vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol, 100mg/kg, i.p.) for 3 days, or with N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN, 200mg/kg, i.p.) or ibuprofen (inhibitors of cyclooxygenase, COX, 14 microg/ml of drinking water) for 2 weeks prior to KA treatment. These findings indicate novel interactions among free radical-induced generation of F2-IsoPs and F4-NeuroPs, nitric oxide and dendritic degeneration, closely associate oxidative damage to neuronal membranes with degeneration of the dendritic system, and point to possible interventions to limit severe damage in acute neurological disorders.

  5. Histaminergic neurons protect the developing hippocampus from kainic acid-induced neuronal damage in an organotypic coculture system.

    PubMed

    Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Soini, Sanna; Taira, Tomi; Michelsen, Kimmo A; Panula, Pertti; Holopainen, Irma E

    2006-01-25

    The central histaminergic neuron system inhibits epileptic seizures, which is suggested to occur mainly through histamine 1 (H1) and histamine 3 (H3) receptors. However, the importance of histaminergic neurons in seizure-induced cell damage is poorly known. In this study, we used an organotypic coculture system and confocal microscopy to examine whether histaminergic neurons, which were verified by immunohistochemistry, have any protective effect on kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in the developing hippocampus. Fluoro-Jade B, a specific marker for degenerating neurons, indicated that, after the 12 h KA (5 microM) treatment, neuronal damage was significantly attenuated in the hippocampus cultured together with the posterior hypothalamic slice containing histaminergic neurons [HI plus HY (POST)] when compared with the hippocampus cultured alone (HI) or with the anterior hypothalamus devoid of histaminergic neurons. Moreover, alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, an inhibitor of histamine synthesis, eliminated the neuroprotective effect in KA-treated HI plus HY (POST), and extracellularly applied histamine (1 nM to 100 microM) significantly attenuated neuronal damage only at 1 nM concentration in HI. After the 6 h KA treatment, spontaneous electrical activity registered in the CA1 subregion contained significantly less burst activity in HI plus HY (POST) than in HI. Finally, in KA-treated slices, the H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide enhanced the neuroprotective effect of histaminergic neurons, whereas the H1 receptor antagonists triprolidine and mepyramine dose-dependently decreased the neuroprotection in HI plus HY (POST). Our results suggest that histaminergic neurons protect the developing hippocampus from KA-induced neuronal damage, with regulation of neuronal survival being at least partly mediated through H1 and H3 receptors.

  6. Effects of genistein on cognitive dysfunction and hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairment in an ovariectomized rat kainic acid model of seizure.

    PubMed

    Khodamoradi, Mehdi; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Esmaeilpour, Khadije; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-09-01

    The major objective of this study was to investigate the probable effects of genistein (one of the most important soy phytoestrogens-SPEs) on seizure-induced cognitive dysfunction, hippocampal early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) impairment and morphological damage to CA1 neurons in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three weeks after ovariectomy, cannulae were implanted over the left lateral ventricle. After a 7-day recovery period, animals were injected by genistein (0.5 or 5mg/kg) or vehicle during four consecutive days, each 24h. One h after the last treatment, kainic acid (KA) or vehicle was perfused into the left lateral ventricle to induce generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Finally, 7 days later, spatial learning and memory of animals were examined using the Morris water maze (MWM) task, hippocampal E-LTP was assessed using in-vivo field potential recordings and the morphology of hippocampal CA1 area was examined using Fluoro-Jade C staining. KA-induced generalized seizures resulted in spatial learning and memory impairment, E-LTP deficit and CA1 cell injury. Seizure-induced abnormalities improved partially only by the lower dose of genistein (0.5mg/kg). However, genistein at the higher dose (5mg/kg) did not have any beneficial effects. Also, genistein did not affect seizure activity. It is concluded that genistein may have partially preventive effects against seizure-induced cognitive impairment in OVX rats. Also, it seems that such effects of genistein are correlated with its beneficial effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and morphology. PMID:27235295

  7. Combined Low-Intensity Exercise and Ascorbic Acid Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizure and Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jae; Song, Wook; Jin, Eun Hee; Kim, Jongkyu; Chun, Yoonseok; An, Eung Nam; Park, Sok

    2016-05-01

    Physical exercise and vitamins such as ascorbic acid (ASC) have been recognized as an effective strategy in neuroprotection and neurorehabilitatioin. However, there is a need to find an efficient treatment regimen that includes ASC and low-intensity exercise to diminish the risk of overtraining and nutritional treatment by attenuating oxidative stress. In the present study, we investigated the combined effect of low-intensity physical exercise (EX) and ASC on kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice. The mice were randomly assigned into groups as follows: "KA only" (n = 11), "ASC + KA" (n = 11), "Ex + KA" (n = 11), "ASC + Ex + KA" (n = 11). In the present study, low intensity of swimming training period lasted 8 weeks and consisted of 30-min sessions daily (three times per week) without tail weighting. Although no preventive effect of low-intensity exercise or ASC on KA seizure occurrence was evident, there was a decrease of seizure activity, seizure development (latency to first seizures), and mortality in "ASC + Ex + KA" compared to "ASC + KA", "Ex + KA", and "KA only" group. In addition, a preventive synergistic coordination of low-intensity exercise and ASC was evident in glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity compared to separate treatment. These results suggest that low-intensity exercise and ASC treatment have preventive effects on seizure activity and development with alternation of oxidative status. PMID:26646003

  8. Inhibitory effects of imidazoline receptor ligands on basal and kainic acid-induced neurotoxic signalling in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2016-09-01

    This in vivo study assessed the potential of the imidazoline receptor (IR) ligands moxonidine (selective I1-IR), BU224 (selective I2-IR) and LSL61122 (mixed I1/I2-IR) to dampen excitotoxic signalling induced by kainic acid (KA; 45 mg/kg) in the mouse brain (hippocampus and cerebral cortex). KA triggered a strong behavioural syndrome (seizures; maximal at 60-90 minutes) and sustained stimulation (at 72 hours with otherwise normal mouse behaviour) of pro-apoptotic c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) and calpain with increased cleavage of p35 into neurotoxic p25 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5 [Cdk5] activators) in mouse hippocampus. Pretreatment (five days) with LSL61122 (10 mg/kg), but not moxonidine (1 mg/kg) or BU224 (20 mg/kg), attenuated the KA-induced behavioural syndrome, and all three IR ligands inhibited JNK and calpain activation, as well as p35/p25 cleavage after KA in the hippocampus (effects also observed after acute IR drug treatments). Efaroxan (I1-IR, 10 mg/kg) and idazoxan (I2-IR, 10 mg/kg), postulated IR antagonists, did not antagonise the effects of moxonidine and LSL61122 on KA targets (these IR ligands showed agonistic properties inhibiting pro-apoptotic JNK). Brain subcellular preparations revealed reduced synaptosomal postsynaptic density-95 protein contents (a mediator of JNK activation) and indicated increased p35/Cdk5 complexes (with pro-survival functions) after treatment with moxonidine, BU224 and LSL61122. These results showed that I1- and I2-IR ligands (moxonidine and BU224), and especially the mixed I1/I2-IR ligand LSL61122, are partly neuroprotective against KA-induced excitotoxic signalling. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of IR drugs in disorders associated with glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:27302941

  9. Inhibitory effects of imidazoline receptor ligands on basal and kainic acid-induced neurotoxic signalling in mice.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2016-09-01

    This in vivo study assessed the potential of the imidazoline receptor (IR) ligands moxonidine (selective I1-IR), BU224 (selective I2-IR) and LSL61122 (mixed I1/I2-IR) to dampen excitotoxic signalling induced by kainic acid (KA; 45 mg/kg) in the mouse brain (hippocampus and cerebral cortex). KA triggered a strong behavioural syndrome (seizures; maximal at 60-90 minutes) and sustained stimulation (at 72 hours with otherwise normal mouse behaviour) of pro-apoptotic c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) and calpain with increased cleavage of p35 into neurotoxic p25 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5 [Cdk5] activators) in mouse hippocampus. Pretreatment (five days) with LSL61122 (10 mg/kg), but not moxonidine (1 mg/kg) or BU224 (20 mg/kg), attenuated the KA-induced behavioural syndrome, and all three IR ligands inhibited JNK and calpain activation, as well as p35/p25 cleavage after KA in the hippocampus (effects also observed after acute IR drug treatments). Efaroxan (I1-IR, 10 mg/kg) and idazoxan (I2-IR, 10 mg/kg), postulated IR antagonists, did not antagonise the effects of moxonidine and LSL61122 on KA targets (these IR ligands showed agonistic properties inhibiting pro-apoptotic JNK). Brain subcellular preparations revealed reduced synaptosomal postsynaptic density-95 protein contents (a mediator of JNK activation) and indicated increased p35/Cdk5 complexes (with pro-survival functions) after treatment with moxonidine, BU224 and LSL61122. These results showed that I1- and I2-IR ligands (moxonidine and BU224), and especially the mixed I1/I2-IR ligand LSL61122, are partly neuroprotective against KA-induced excitotoxic signalling. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of IR drugs in disorders associated with glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration.

  10. Effect of block-periodized exercise training on bone and coronary heart disease risk factors in early post-menopausal women: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, W; Bebenek, M; von Stengel, S; Engelke, K; Kalender, W A

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this 12 month randomized exercise intervention was to determine the effect of a block-periodized multipurpose exercise program on bone mineral density (BMD) and parameters of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in early post-menopausal women. Eighty-five subjects (52.3 ± 2.4 years) living in the area of Erlangen (Germany) were randomly assigned into an exercise (EG, n=43) or a wellness-control group (CG: n=42). The EG performed a periodized multipurpose exercise program with 4-6-week blocks of high-intensity bone-specific exercise intermitted by 10-12 weeks of exercise dedicated to increase endurance and reduce cardiac and metabolic risk factors. The CG performed a low-volume/low-intensity "wellness" program to increase well-being. After 12 months, significant exercise effects were observed for the lumbar spine (LS) BMD as assessed by quantitative computed tomography [total BMD (EG: -0.3 ± 2.1% vs CG: -2.1 ± 2.2%, P=0.015); trabecular BMD (EG: -0.7 ± 3.4% vs CG: -4.7 ± 4.9%, P=0.001) and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (EG: -0.1 ± 2.2% vs CG: -2.0 ± 2.0%, P=0.002)]. However, no significant effects were observed for total hip BMD as assessed by DXA (P=0.152). Although all MetS parameters were favorably affected among the EG, only the effect for waist circumference was significant. In summary, short periods of bone-specific intervention embedded in longer periods of exercises dedicated to improve cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors positively affected BMD at the LS.

  11. Renal fibrosis is not reduced by blocking transforming growth factor-β signaling in matrix-producing interstitial cells

    PubMed Central

    Neelisetty, Surekha; Alford, Catherine; Reynolds, Karen; Woodbury, Luke; Nlandu-khodo, Stellor; Yang, Haichun; Fogo, Agnes B.; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Harris, Raymond C.; Zent, Roy; Gewin, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) strongly promotes renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, but the cellular target that mediates its profibrotic actions has not been clearly identified. While in vitro data suggest that TGF-β-induced matrix production is mediated by renal fibroblasts, the role of these cells in TGF-β-dependent tubulointerstitial fibrosis following renal injury is not well defined. To address this, we deleted the TGF-β type II receptor in matrix-producing interstitial cells using two different inducible Cre models: COL1A2-Cre with a mesenchymal enhancer element and tenascin-Cre which targets medullary interstitial cells and either the mouse unilateral ureteral obstruction or aristolochic acid renal injury model. Renal interstitial cells lacking the TGF-β receptor had significantly impaired collagen I production, but unexpectedly, overall tissue fibrosis was unchanged in the conditional knockouts after renal injury. Thus, abrogating TGF-β signaling in matrix-producing interstitial cells is not sufficient to reduce fibrosis after renal injury. PMID:25760325

  12. S. aureus blocks efferocytosis of neutrophils by macrophages through the activity of its virulence factor alpha toxin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor S.; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Hotz, Meghan; Cheng, Lily; Miller, Lloyd S.; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C. Kendall; Sellman, Bret R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia, such as those caused by Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with an influx of inflammatory neutrophils into the lung tissue and airways. Regulation and clearance of recruited neutrophils is essential for preventing tissue damage by “friendly fire”, a responsibility of macrophages in a process called efferocytosis. We hypothesized that S. aureus impairs efferocytosis by alveolar macrophages (AMs) through the activity of the secreted virulence factor alpha toxin (AT), which has been implicated in altering the antimicrobial function of AMs. Infection of mice lacking AMs resulted in significantly increased numbers of neutrophils in the lung, while clearance of neutrophils delivered intranasally into uninfected mice was reduced in AM depleted animals. In vitro, sublytic levels of AT impaired uptake of apoptotic neutrophils by purified AMs. In vivo, the presence of AT reduced uptake of neutrophils by AMs. Differential uptake of neutrophils was not due to changes in either the CD47/CD172 axis or CD36 levels. AT significantly reduced lung expression of CCN1 and altered AM surface localization of DD1α, two proteins known to influence efferocytosis. We conclude that AT may contribute to tissue damage during S. aureus pneumonia by inhibiting the ability of AM to clear neutrophils at the site of infection. PMID:27739519

  13. Optimization of Blocked Designs in fMRI Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maus, Barbel; van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Goebel, Rainer; Berger, Martijn P. F.

    2010-01-01

    Blocked designs in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are useful to localize functional brain areas. A blocked design consists of different blocks of trials of the same stimulus type and is characterized by three factors: the length of blocks, i.e., number of trials per blocks, the ordering of task and rest blocks, and the time between…

  14. [Electrophysiological and behavioral features of septal seizures in cats--experimental sham-rage seizures induced by injection of kainic acid].

    PubMed

    Hashizume, K; Tanaka, T; Yonemasu, Y

    1994-07-01

    The septal nucleus has close connections with the hippocampus and amygdala and is known to be involved in emotional behavior. We analyzed the electrophysiological and behavioral features of seizures induced by an injection of kainic acid into the lateral septal nucleus of the cat. Stereotactic surgery was performed to implant a cannula into the lateral septal nucleus to make the injection, and deep electrodes were implanted into the hippocampus and amygdala bilaterally. Seven days post operatively kainic acid, 0.5 microgram/0.5 microliter, was injected via the cannula, and three to five minutes later the cats began to exhibit head turning to the contralateral side. The seizures subsequently progressed limbic seizure status. The electroencephalogram revealed that the spike discharges started in the lateral septal nucleus, extended to the ipsilateral hippocampus and amygdala, then propagated to the contralateral side. Spontaneous sham-rage seizures occurred more than seven days after the injection. These seizure were characterized by sudden onset of aggressive and violent behavior which included hissing, biting and scratching. The electroencephalogram showed synchronization of rhythmic spikes in the ipsilateral septal nucleus, hippocampus and amygdala during such seizures. Further study of this model is important not only to understand the relationship between the septal nucleus and the hippocampus and amygdala but to understand the mechanism of sham-rage seizures. In addition, this model may be useful in understanding the emotional features of intractable complex partial seizures in man. PMID:7946621

  15. Endothelial Barrier Protection by Local Anesthetics: Ropivacaine and Lidocaine Block Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–induced Endothelial Cell Src Activation

    PubMed Central

    Piegeler, Tobias; Votta-Velis, E. Gina; Bakhshi, Farnaz R.; Mao, Mao; Carnegie, Graeme; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Schwartz, David E.; Borgeat, Alain; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Minshall, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction mediated in part by Src-kinase activation plays a crucial role in acute inflammatory disease. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), activate Src via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt-dependent nitric oxide generation, a process initiated by recruitment of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85 to TNF-receptor-1. Because amide-linked local anesthetics have well-established anti-inflammatory effects, the authors hypothesized that ropivacaine and lidocaine attenuate inflammatory Src signaling by disrupting the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase–Akt–nitric oxide pathway, thus blocking Src-dependent neutrophil adhesion and endothelial hyperpermeability. Methods Human lung microvascular endothelial cells, incubated with TNFα in the absence or presence of clinically relevant concentrations of ropivacaine and lidocaine, were analyzed by Western blot, probing for phosphorylated/activated Src, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, Akt, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and caveolin-1. The effect of ropivacaine on TNFα-induced nitric oxide generation, co-immunoprecipitation of TNF-receptor-1 with p85, neutrophil adhesion, and endothelial barrier disruption were assessed. Results Ropivacaine and lidocaine attenuated TNFα-induced Src activation (half-maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 8.611 × 10−10 M for ropivacaine; IC50 = 5.864 × 10−10 M for lidocaine) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation (IC50 = 7.572 × 10−10 M for ropivacaine; IC50 = 6.377 × 10−10 M for lidocaine). Akt activation (n = 7; P = 0.006) and stimulus-dependent binding of TNF-receptor-1 and p85 (n = 6; P = 0.043) were blocked by 1 nM of ropivacaine. TNFα-induced neutrophil adhesion and disruption of endothelial monolayers via Src-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1- and caveolin-1-phosphorylation, respectively, were also attenuated. Conclusions Ropivacaine and lidocaine

  16. Overexpression of actin-depolymerizing factor blocks oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Sun, Lu; Si, Yan-Fang; Li, Bao-Min

    2012-12-01

    The aim of present work was to elucidate the role of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF), an important regulator of actin cytoskeleton, in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to ox-LDL. Treatment with LDL served as control. It was found that ADF mRNA level and protein expression were decreased when exposed to ox-LDL in MBMECs. Then, we investigated the influence of ADF overexpression on ox-LDL-treated MBMECs. Structurally, overexpression of ADF inhibited ox-LDL-induced F-actin formation. Functionally, overexpression of ADF attenuated ox-LDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier marked by restoration of transendothelial electrical resistance, permeability of Evans Blue and expression of tight junction-associated proteins including ZO-1 and occludin, and blocked ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress marked by inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and activity of NADPH oxidase and Nox2 expression. However, overexpression of ADF in control cells had no significant effect on endothelial permeability and ROS formation. In conclusion, overexpression of ADF blocks ox-LDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. In addition, siRNA-mediated downregulation of ADF expression aggravated ox-LDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier and ROS formation. These findings identify ADF as a key signaling molecule in the regulation of BBB integrity and suggest that ADF might be used as a target to modulate diseases accompanied by ox-LDL-induced BBB compromise.

  17. Mechanisms of Heart Block after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – Cardiac Anatomy, Clinical Predictors and Mechanical Factors that Contribute to Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Mark; Chilakamarri Yeshwant, Srinath; Chava, Sreedivya; Lawrence Lustgarten, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a valuable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive or increased risk for conventional surgical replacement. Consequently, patients undergoing TAVR are prone to peri-procedural complications including cardiac conduction disturbances, which is the focus of this review. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances and arrhythmias before, during or after TAVR remain a matter of concern for this high-risk group of patients, as they have important consequences on hospital duration, short- and long-term medical management and finally on decisions of device-based treatment strategies (pacemaker or defibrillator implantation). We discuss the mechanisms of atrioventricular disturbances and characterise predisposing factors. Using validated clinical predictors, we discuss strategies to minimise the likelihood of creating permanent high-grade heart block, and identify factors to expedite the decision to implant a permanent pacemaker when the latter is unavoidable. We also discuss optimal pacing strategies to mitigate the possibility of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26835105

  18. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Veggiani, Gianluca; Ossolengo, Giuseppe; Aliprandi, Marisa; Cavallaro, Ugo; Marco, Ario de

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. {yields} These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. {yields} The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  19. Altered mRNA editing and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors after kainic acid exposure in cyclooxygenase-2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Luca; Barbon, Alessandro; Palumbo, Sara; Mora, Cristina; Toscano, Christopher D; Bosetti, Francesca; Barlati, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) binds to the AMPA/KA receptors and induces seizures that result in inflammation, oxidative damage and neuronal death. We previously showed that cyclooxygenase-2 deficient (COX-2(-/-)) mice are more vulnerable to KA-induced excitotoxicity. Here, we investigated whether the increased susceptibility of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA is associated with altered mRNA expression and editing of glutamate receptors. The expression of AMPA GluR2, GluR3 and KA GluR6 was increased in vehicle-injected COX-2(-/-) mice compared to wild type (WT) mice in hippocampus and cortex, whereas gene expression of NMDA receptors was decreased. KA treatment decreased the expression of AMPA, KA and NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, with a significant effect in COX-2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we analyzed RNA editing levels and found that the level of GluR3 R/G editing site was selectively increased in the hippocampus and decreased in the cortex in COX-2(-/-) compared with WT mice. After KA, GluR4 R/G editing site, flip form, was increased in the hippocampus of COX-2(-/-) mice. Treatment of WT mice with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib for two weeks decreased the expression of AMPA/KA and NMDAR subunits after KA, as observed in COX-2(-/-) mice. After KA exposure, COX-2(-/-) mice showed increased mRNA expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, such as cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), microglia (CD11b) and astrocyte (GFAP). Thus, COX-2 gene deletion can exacerbate the inflammatory response to KA. We suggest that COX-2 plays a role in attenuating glutamate excitotoxicity by modulating RNA editing of AMPA/KA and mRNA expression of all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and, in turn, neuronal excitability. These changes may contribute to the increased vulnerability of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA. The overstimulation of glutamate receptors as a consequence of COX-2 gene deletion suggests a functional coupling between COX-2 and the

  20. Neonatal seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol or kainic acid disrupt primary cilia growth on developing mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander K; Le, Megan M; Smith, Tyler S; Hoang-Minh, Lan B; Atkinson, Eric W; Ugartemendia, George; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Coleman, Jason E; Sarkisian, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal or early-life seizures (ELS) are often associated with life-long neurophysiological, cognitive and behavioral deficits, but the underlying mechanisms contributing to these deficits remain poorly understood. Newborn, post-migratory cortical neurons sprout ciliary buds (procilia) that mature into primary cilia. Disruption of the growth or signaling capabilities of these cilia has been linked to atypical neurite outgrowth from neurons and abnormalities in neuronal circuitry. Here, we tested the hypothesis that generalized seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) or kainic acid (KA) during early postnatal development impair neuronal and/or glial ciliogenesis. Mice received PTZ (50 or 100mg/kg), KA (2mg/kg), or saline either once at birth (P0), or once daily from P0 to P4. Using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, the cilia of neurons and glia were examined at P7, P14, and P42. A total of 83 regions were analyzed, representing 13 unique neocortical and hippocampal regions. Neuronal cilia were identified by co-expression of NeuN and type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII) or somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), while glial cilia were identified by co-expression of GFAP, Arl13b, and gamma-tubulin. We found that PTZ exposure at either P0 or from P0 to P4 induced convulsive behavior, followed by acute and lasting effects on neuronal cilia lengths that varied depending on the cortical region, PTZ dose, injection frequency, and time post-PTZ. Both increases and decreases in neuronal cilia length were observed. No changes in the length of glial cilia were observed under any of the test conditions. Lastly, we found that a single KA seizure at P0 led to similar abnormalities in neuronal cilia lengths. Our results suggest that seizure(s) occurring during early stages of cortical development induce persistent and widespread changes in neuronal cilia length. Given the impact neuronal cilia have on neuronal differentiation, ELS-induced changes in ciliogenesis may

  1. Auditory brain-stem evoked potentials in cat after kainic acid induced neuronal loss. I. Superior olivary complex.

    PubMed

    Zaaroor, M; Starr, A

    1991-01-01

    Auditory brain-stem potentials (ABRs) were studied in cats for up to 45 days after kainic acid had been injected unilaterally or bilaterally into the superior olivary complex (SOC) to produce neuronal destruction while sparing fibers of passage and the terminals of axons of extrinsic origin connecting to SOC neurons. The components of the ABR in cat were labeled by their polarity at the vertex (P, for positive) and their order of appearance (the arabic numerals 1, 2, etc.). Component P1 can be further subdivided into 2 subcomponents labeled P1a and P1b. The correspondences we have assumed between the ABR components in cat and man are indicated by providing a Roman numeral designation for the human component in parentheses following the feline notation, e.g., P4 (V). With bilateral SOC destruction, there was a significant and marked attenuation of waves P2 (III), P3 (IV), P4 (V), P5 (VI), and the sustained potential shift (SPS) amounting to as much as 80% of preoperative values. Following unilateral SOC destruction the attenuation of many of these same ABR components, in response to stimulation of either ear, was up to 50%. No component of the ABR was totally abolished even when the SOC was lesioned 100% bilaterally. In unilaterally lesioned cats with extensive neuronal loss (greater than 75%) the latencies of the components beginning at P3 (IV) were delayed to stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection site but not to stimulation of the ear contralateral to the injection. Binaural interaction components of the ABR were affected in proportion to the attenuation of the ABR. These results are compatible with multiple brain regions contributing to the generation of the components of the ABR beginning with P2 (III) and that components P3 (IV), P4 (V), and P5 (VI) and the sustained potential shift depend particularly on the integrity of the neurons of the SOC bilaterally. The neurons of the lateral subdivision (LSO) and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body

  2. Plant Translation Elongation Factor 1Bβ Facilitates Potato Virus X (PVX) Infection and Interacts with PVX Triple Gene Block Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, JeeNa; Lee, Seonhee; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Kang, Jin-Ho; Kang, Min-Young; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (eEF1) has two components: the G-protein eEF1A and the nucleotide exchange factor eEF1B. In plants, eEF1B is itself composed of a structural protein (eEF1Bγ) and two nucleotide exchange subunits (eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ). To test the effects of elongation factors on virus infection, we isolated eEF1A and eEF1B genes from pepper (Capsicum annuum) and suppressed their homologs in Nicotiana benthamiana using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The accumulation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Potato virus X (PVX) was significantly reduced in the eEF1Bβ- or eEF1Bɣ-silenced plants as well as in eEF1A-silenced plants. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ interacted with eEF1A and that eEF1A and eEF1Bβ interacted with triple gene block protein 1 (TGBp1) of PVX. These results suggest that both eEF1A and eEF1Bβ play essential roles in the multiplication of PVX by physically interacting with TGBp1. Furthermore, using eEF1Bβ deletion constructs, we found that both N- (1-64 amino acids) and C-terminal (150-195 amino acids) domains of eEF1Bβ are important for the interaction with PVX TGBp1 and that the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bβ is involved in the interaction with eEF1A. These results suggest that eEF1Bβ could be a potential target for engineering virus-resistant plants. PMID:26020533

  3. Plant Translation Elongation Factor 1Bβ Facilitates Potato Virus X (PVX) Infection and Interacts with PVX Triple Gene Block Protein 1.

    PubMed

    Hwang, JeeNa; Lee, Seonhee; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Kang, Jin-Ho; Kang, Min-Young; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (eEF1) has two components: the G-protein eEF1A and the nucleotide exchange factor eEF1B. In plants, eEF1B is itself composed of a structural protein (eEF1Bγ) and two nucleotide exchange subunits (eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ). To test the effects of elongation factors on virus infection, we isolated eEF1A and eEF1B genes from pepper (Capsicum annuum) and suppressed their homologs in Nicotiana benthamiana using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The accumulation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Potato virus X (PVX) was significantly reduced in the eEF1Bβ- or eEF1Bɣ-silenced plants as well as in eEF1A-silenced plants. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ interacted with eEF1A and that eEF1A and eEF1Bβ interacted with triple gene block protein 1 (TGBp1) of PVX. These results suggest that both eEF1A and eEF1Bβ play essential roles in the multiplication of PVX by physically interacting with TGBp1. Furthermore, using eEF1Bβ deletion constructs, we found that both N- (1-64 amino acids) and C-terminal (150-195 amino acids) domains of eEF1Bβ are important for the interaction with PVX TGBp1 and that the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bβ is involved in the interaction with eEF1A. These results suggest that eEF1Bβ could be a potential target for engineering virus-resistant plants.

  4. Plant Translation Elongation Factor 1Bβ Facilitates Potato Virus X (PVX) Infection and Interacts with PVX Triple Gene Block Protein 1.

    PubMed

    Hwang, JeeNa; Lee, Seonhee; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Kang, Jin-Ho; Kang, Min-Young; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (eEF1) has two components: the G-protein eEF1A and the nucleotide exchange factor eEF1B. In plants, eEF1B is itself composed of a structural protein (eEF1Bγ) and two nucleotide exchange subunits (eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ). To test the effects of elongation factors on virus infection, we isolated eEF1A and eEF1B genes from pepper (Capsicum annuum) and suppressed their homologs in Nicotiana benthamiana using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The accumulation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Potato virus X (PVX) was significantly reduced in the eEF1Bβ- or eEF1Bɣ-silenced plants as well as in eEF1A-silenced plants. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ interacted with eEF1A and that eEF1A and eEF1Bβ interacted with triple gene block protein 1 (TGBp1) of PVX. These results suggest that both eEF1A and eEF1Bβ play essential roles in the multiplication of PVX by physically interacting with TGBp1. Furthermore, using eEF1Bβ deletion constructs, we found that both N- (1-64 amino acids) and C-terminal (150-195 amino acids) domains of eEF1Bβ are important for the interaction with PVX TGBp1 and that the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bβ is involved in the interaction with eEF1A. These results suggest that eEF1Bβ could be a potential target for engineering virus-resistant plants. PMID:26020533

  5. Comparative Effects of Periarticular Multimodal Drug Injection and Single-Shot Femoral Nerve Block on Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty and Factors Influencing Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kan, Hiroyuki; Hino, Manabu; Ichimaru, Shohei; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Sawa, Teiji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the analgesic effects of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and assessed factors associated with analgesia obtained by these two methods. Materials and Methods Study subjects included 66 patients (72 knees) who underwent TKA for osteoarthritis of the knee. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the amount of analgesics used, number of days to achieve 90° of flexion of the knee joint, date of initiating parallel-bar walking, range of motion of the knee joint at discharge, and adverse events were investigated. Results The VAS scores did not differ significantly between two groups, whereas the amount of analgesics used was significantly lower in the LIA group. Preoperative flexion contracture was significantly more severe in the LIA group with high VAS compared with low VAS. No serious adverse event occurred in the LIA or FNB group. Conclusions The lower analgesic usage in the LIA group than the FNB group indicates that the analgesic effect of LIA was greater than that of singleshot FNB after TKA. There were no serious complications in either group. The postoperative analgesic effect of LIA was smaller in patients with severe than less severe preoperative flexion contracture.

  6. Comparative Effects of Periarticular Multimodal Drug Injection and Single-Shot Femoral Nerve Block on Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty and Factors Influencing Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kan, Hiroyuki; Hino, Manabu; Ichimaru, Shohei; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Sawa, Teiji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the analgesic effects of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and assessed factors associated with analgesia obtained by these two methods. Materials and Methods Study subjects included 66 patients (72 knees) who underwent TKA for osteoarthritis of the knee. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the amount of analgesics used, number of days to achieve 90° of flexion of the knee joint, date of initiating parallel-bar walking, range of motion of the knee joint at discharge, and adverse events were investigated. Results The VAS scores did not differ significantly between two groups, whereas the amount of analgesics used was significantly lower in the LIA group. Preoperative flexion contracture was significantly more severe in the LIA group with high VAS compared with low VAS. No serious adverse event occurred in the LIA or FNB group. Conclusions The lower analgesic usage in the LIA group than the FNB group indicates that the analgesic effect of LIA was greater than that of singleshot FNB after TKA. There were no serious complications in either group. The postoperative analgesic effect of LIA was smaller in patients with severe than less severe preoperative flexion contracture. PMID:27595078

  7. A human monoclonal antibody targeting the stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) blocks tumor cell signaling and inhibits tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Lebron, Maria B; Brennan, Laura; Damoci, Christopher B; Prewett, Marie C; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Duignan, Inga J; Credille, Kelly M; DeLigio, James T; Starodubtseva, Marina; Amatulli, Michael; Zhang, Yiwei; Schwartz, Kaben D; Burtrum, Douglas; Balderes, Paul; Persaud, Kris; Surguladze, David; Loizos, Nick; Paz, Keren; Kotanides, Helen

    2014-09-01

    Stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) exerts multiple biological effects on target cells upon binding its ligand stem cell factor (SCF). Aberrant activation of c-Kit results in dysregulated signaling and is implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. The development of more specific and effective c-Kit therapies is warranted given its essential role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we describe the biological properties of CK6, a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the extracellular region of human c-Kit. CK6 specifically binds c-Kit receptor with high affinity (EC 50 = 0.06 nM) and strongly blocks its interaction with SCF (IC 50 = 0.41 nM) in solid phase assays. Flow cytometry shows CK6 binding to c-Kit on the cell surface of human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), melanoma, and leukemia tumor cell lines. Furthermore, exposure to CK6 inhibits SCF stimulation of c-Kit tyrosine kinase activity and downstream signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (AKT), in addition to reducing tumor cell line growth in vitro. CK6 treatment significantly decreases human xenograft tumor growth in NCI-H526 SCLC (T/C% = 57) and Malme-3M melanoma (T/C% = 58) models in vivo. The combination of CK6 with standard of care chemotherapy agents, cisplatin and etoposide for SCLC or dacarbazine for melanoma, more potently reduces tumor growth (SCLC T/C% = 24, melanoma T/C% = 38) compared with CK6 or chemotherapy alone. In summary, our results demonstrate that CK6 is a c-Kit antagonist antibody with tumor growth neutralizing properties and are highly suggestive of potential therapeutic application in treating human malignancies harboring c-Kit receptor. PMID:24921944

  8. Passive cigarette smoke exposure inhibits ultraviolet light B-induced skin tumors in SKH-1 hairless mice by blocking the nuclear factor kappa B signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Gottipati, Koteswara R; Poulsen, Henrik; Starcher, Barry

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to sunlight [ultraviolet light B (UVB) irradiation] is the most common cause of non-melanoma skin tumors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of passive cigarette smoke superimposed over UVB irradiation, on tumor development, skin pathology and matrix changes in SKH-1 hairless mice. Groups of mice were exposed to 0.1 J/cm(2) of UVB five times per week for 20 weeks and/or exposure to passive cigarette smoke from 40 cigarettes a day over the same time period. UVB exposure resulted in an average of four large squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 15 smaller papillomas per mouse, whereas exposing the mice to both UVB + passive cigarette smoke completely prevented SCC formation and averaged less than one small papilloma per mouse. Oxidative DNA damage was investigated and there were no significant changes in the levels of urinary DNA adducts between control, smoke, UV and UV + smoke groups with the exception of 8-oxo guanine which was significantly reduced in the presence of passive cigarette smoke. Immunohistochemistry results revealed that tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNF-R2), glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB)/p65, KI-67 and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) were markedly up-regulated in the epithelium by UVB exposure, whereas passive smoke exposure combined with the UVB irradiation completely blocked the expression of these proteins. Our results suggest that passive smoke exposure prevents UVB-induced SCC in mice and dramatically reduces the incidence of non-malignant papillomas by altering the NF-kappaB signalling pathway of tumorigenesis. PMID:18312384

  9. Targeting downstream transcription factors and epigenetic modifications following Toll-like receptor 7/8 ligation to forestall tissue injury in anti-Ro60 associated heart block.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Robert M; Markham, Androo J; Reed, Joanne H; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Halushka, Marc K; Buyon, Jill P

    2016-02-01

    Based on the consistent demonstration of fibrosis of the atrioventricular node surrounded by macrophages and multinucleated giant cells in anti-Ro antibody exposed fetuses dying with heart block, this study focuses on macrophage signaling stimulated by ssRNA associated with the Ro60 protein and the impact of antagonizing innate cell drivers such as TLR7/8. Transcriptome and epigenetic modifications which affect transcription factors, NF-κB and STAT1, were selected to evaluate the phenotype of macrophages in which TLR7/8 was ligated following treatment with either anti-Ro60/Ro60/hY3 RNA immune complexes or transfection with hY3. Based on microarray, TNF and IL6 were among the most highly upregulated genes in both stimulated conditions, each of which was significantly inhibited by preincubation with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ). In contrast, following stimulation of macrophages with either TNF-α or IFN-α, which do not signal through TLR, the resultant gene expression was refractory to HCQ. Ligation of TLR7/8 resulted in increased histone methylation as measured by increased H3K4me2, a requirement for binding of NF-κB at certain promoters, specifically the kB1 region in the TNF promoter (ChIP-qPCR), which was significantly decreased by HCQ. In summary, these results support that the HCQ-sensitive phenotype of hY3 stimulated macrophages reflects the bifurcation of TLR downstream signals involving NF-κB and STAT 1 pathways and for the former dimethylation of H3K4. Accordingly, HCQ may act more as a preventive measure in downregulating the initial production of IFN-α or TNF-α and not affect the resultant autocoid stimulation reflected in TNF-α and IFN-α responsive genes. The beneficial scope of antimalarials in the prevention of organ damage, inclusive of heart block in an anti-Ro offspring or more broadly SLE, may include in part, a mechanism targeting TLR-dependent epigenetic modification.

  10. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsu-Jan; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR), which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA-) induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus PMID:21837247

  11. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance the Apoptotic Activity of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 by Blocking PKC-Induced IGFBP-3 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung Hyun; Whang, Young Mi; Min, Hye-Young; Han, Seung Ho; Kang, Ju-Hee; Song, Ki-Hoon; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Kim, Yeul Hong; Lee, Ho-Young

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 induces apoptosis of cancer cells. However, preexisting resistance to IGFBP-3 could limit its antitumor activities. This study characterizes the efficacy and mechanism of the combination of recombinant IGFBP-3 (rIGFBP-3) and HDAC inhibitors to overcome IGFBP-3 resistance in a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. The effects of the combination of rIGFBP-3 and a number of HDAC inhibitors on cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed in vitro and in vivo by using the MTT assay, a flow cytometry-based TUNEL assay, western blot analyses, and the NSCLC xenograft tumor model. Combined treatment with HDAC inhibitors and rIGFBP-3 had synergistic antiproliferative effects accompanied by increased apoptosis rates in a subset of NSCLC and HNSCC cell lines in vitro. Moreover, combined treatment with depsipeptide and rIGFBP-3 completely suppressed tumor growth and increased the apoptosis rate in vivo in H1299 NSCLC xenografts. Evidence suggests that HDAC inhibitors increased the half-life of rIGFBP-3 protein by blocking protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of rIGFBP-3. In addition, combined treatment of IGFBP-3 with an HDAC inhibitor facilitates apoptosis through up-regulation of rIGFBP-3 stability and Akt signaling inhibition. The ability of HDAC inhibitors to decrease PKC activation may enhance apoptotic activities of rIGFBP-3 in NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. These results indicated that combined treatment with HDAC inhibitor and rIGFBP-3 could be an effective treatment strategy for NSCLC and HNSCC with highly activated PKC. PMID:22362554

  12. Targeting Heat Shock Protein 90 Overrides the Resistance of Lung Cancer Cells by Blocking Radiation-induced Stabilization of Hypoxia-inducible Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo-Young; Oh, Seung Hyun; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Hong, Waun Ki; Lee, Ho-Young

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) has been suggested to play a major role in tumor radioresistance. However, the mechanisms through which irradiation regulates HIF-1α expression remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms that mediate HIF-1 activation and thus radioresistance. Here we show that irradiation induces survival and angiogenic activity in a subset of radioresistant lung cancer cell lines by elevating HIF-1α protein expression. Radiation induced HIF-1α protein expression mainly through two distinct pathways, including an increase in de novo protein synthesis via activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR and stabilization of HIF-1α protein via augmenting the interaction between heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and HIF-1α protein. While the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway was activated by irradiation in all the lung cancer cells examined, the HSP90-HIF-1α interaction was enhanced in the resistant cells only. Inhibition of Hsp90 function by 17-AAG or deguelin, a novel natural inhibitor of HSP90, suppressed increases in HIF-1α/Hsp90 interaction and HIF-1α expression in radioresistant cells. Furthermore, combined treatment of radiation with deguelin significantly decreased the survival and angiogenic potential of radioresistant lung cancer cells in vitro. We finally determined in vivo that systemic administration of deguelin resulted in profound inhibition of tumor growth and angiogenesis when combined with radiation. These results provide a strong rationale to target Hsp90 as a means to block radiation-induced HIF-1α and thus to circumvent radioresistance in lung cancer cells. PMID:19176399

  13. Atrioventricular block after ASD closure

    PubMed Central

    Asakai, Hiroko; Weskamp, Sofia; Eastaugh, Lucas; d'Udekem, Yves; Pflaumer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) is a common congenital heart defect. There is limited data on both early and late atrioventricular (AV) block post ASD closure. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of AV block associated with ASD closure. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent ASD closure either with a device or surgical method at the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne between 1996 and 2010 was performed. Baseline demographics, procedural details and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results A total of 378 patients were identified; 242 in the device group and 136 in the surgical group. Fourteen patients (3.7%) had AV block (1 with second degree and 13 with first degree) at a median follow-up of 28 months; 11/242 (4.5%) in the device group and 3/135 (2.2%) in the surgical group (p=0.39). Six patients had new-onset AV block after ASD closure. In the device subgroup, patients with AV block at follow-up had a larger indexed device size compared with those without (22 (15–31) vs 18(7–38), p=0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed the presence of AV block either pre procedure or post procedure to be the only variables associated with late AV block. Conclusions Late AV block in patients with repaired ASD is rare and most likely independent of the technique used. In the device subgroup, the only risk factor identified to be associated with late AV block was the presence of either preprocedural or postprocedural AV block, so long-term follow-up for these patients should be provided. PMID:27540418

  14. Groundwater arsenic contamination in one of the 107 arsenic-affected blocks in West Bengal, India: Status, distribution, health effects and factors responsible for arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Tarit

    2010-11-01

    A somewhat detailed study was carried out in Gaighata, one of the 107 arsenic-affected blocks in West Bengal, India, to determine the degree of groundwater contamination with arsenic, its depth wise distribution, correlation with iron, arsenical health effects to the inhabitants and the factors responsible for arsenic poisoning. Groundwater in all the 107 mouzas over 13 gram-panchayets in Gaighata block contains arsenic above 0.01mgl(-1) and in 91 mouzas, arsenic concentration has been found above 0.05mgl(-1). About 59.2 and 40.3% of the tubewell water samples contain arsenic above 0.01 and 0.05mgl(-1), respectively. The approximate population drinking arsenic-contaminated water above 0.01 and 0.05mgl(-1) are 106,560 and 72,540, respectively. The tubewells that were installed within the depth range of 15.4-30.3m are mostly arsenic-contaminated. Even the shallow groundwater level (7.87-15.1m) is arsenic-contaminated. Both arsenic and iron concentrations in groundwater gradually increase from lower depth to higher depth up to 39.4m, and then decrease with increasing depth. About 58% of the deep tubewell water samples (depth range 122-182m, n=31) contain arsenic ≥0.05mgl(-1). About 72% of the arsenic-contaminated deep tubewells (n=18) were safe when surveyed first time. But within a span of 2-5 years, they became contaminated with arsenic. The linear regression shows direct correlation between arsenic and iron concentrations in groundwater (r(2)=0.8114, p<0.0001, n=912). Intakes of inorganic arsenic from water by an adult male and female in the surveyed areas are 11.7 and 13.1μg/kg body wt./day, respectively and these values are higher than the WHO recommended PTDI value of inorganic arsenic (2.1μg/kg body wt./day). Mean arsenic concentrations in urine, hair and nail samples, collected from the inhabitants of Gutri mouza are higher than their normal level and the values are 292μgl(-1) (range: 8.35-1024μg l(-1), n=193), 2.50mgkg(-1) (range: 0.17-5.99mgkg(-1), n

  15. Novel role of Engrailed 1 as a prosurvival transcription factor in basal-like breast cancer and engineering of interference peptides block its oncogenic function

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, A S; Graves, L M; Blancafort, P

    2014-01-01

    Basal-like breast tumors are aggressive cancers associated with high proliferation and metastasis. Chemotherapy is currently the only treatment option; however, resistance often occurs resulting in recurrence and patient death. Some extremely aggressive cancers are also associated with hypoxia, inflammation and high leukocyte infiltration. Herein, we discovered that the neural-specific transcription factor, Engrailed 1 (EN1), is exclusively overexpressed in these tumors. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of EN1 triggered potent and selective cell death. In contrast, ectopic overexpression of EN1 in normal cells activated survival pathways and conferred resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Exogenous expression of EN1 cDNA reprogrammed the breast epithelial cells toward a long-lived, neural-like phenotype displaying dopaminergic markers. Gene expression microarrays demonstrated that the EN1 cDNA altered transcription of a high number of inflammatory molecules, notably chemokines and chemokine receptors, which could mediate prosurvival pathways. To block EN1 function, we engineered synthetic interference peptides (iPeps) comprising the EN1-specific sequences that mediate essential protein-protein interactions necessary for EN1 function and an N-terminal cell-penetrating peptide/nuclear localization sequence. These EN1-iPeps rapidly mediated a strong apoptotic response in tumor cells overexpressing EN1, with no toxicity to normal or non EN1-expressing cells. Delivery of EN1-iPeps into basal-like cancer cells significantly decreased the fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of chemotherapeutic drugs routinely used to treat breast cancer. Lastly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that EN1-iPeps captured targets involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Importantly, the EN1-iPeps bound the glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) target, which

  16. Immunohistochemical detection of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in formalin-fixed breast carcinoma cell block preparations: correlation of results to corresponding tissue block (needle core and excision) samples.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Mary D; Birdsong, George G; Siddiqui, Momin T; Cohen, Cynthia; Hanley, Krisztina Z

    2013-03-01

    Evaluation of ER, PR and Her 2 are routinely performed on breast carcinomas. For accurate detection of these markers, compliance with the ASCO/CAP guidelines is recommended. Our previous study showed that alcohol fixation did not affect ER results when alcohol-fixed cell block (CB) sections were compared to formalin-fixed tissue sections, while PR and Her2 showed less concordance. The aim of this study was to evaluate and to compare ER, PR and Her2 IHC results on formalin-fixed CB sections to those observed on subsequent surgical (needle core or resection) specimens (SS). Fifty cases of formalin fixed CB samples obtained from primary (18%) and metastatic (82%) breast carcinomas were studied, all of which had subsequent SS available. ER, PR, and Her2 IHC studies were done on all samples and results were compared. ER results on formalin-fixed CB samples showed excellent correlation with SS (correlation coefficient cc = 0.82). While there was minimal improvement in PR results (cc = 0.433), Her2 detection did not improve by formalin fixation (cc = 0.439). Formalin fixation for CB preparations does not significantly improve the already good detection of ER positive breast tumors. The concordance rate in PR and IHC results between formalin-fixed CB and SS samples showed improvement as compared with the alcohol-fixed CB results. However, there was no improvement in detection of Her2 overexpression by using formalin fixation on cytology specimens.

  17. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... the P and the R waves on the EKG (electrocardiogram). First-degree heart block may not cause ...

  18. THE FIRST GRADE CLINIC--A MEDIUM FOR EARLY IDENTIFICATION OF PHYSICAL, SOCIAL, EMOTIONAL, AND MENTAL DEVELOPMENT FACTOR THAT MAY TEND TO BLOCK OR IMPEDE SCHOOL PROGRESS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCGAHAN, F.E.

    DURING A 5-YEAR PERIOD, A FIRST GRADE CLINIC IDENTIFIED, AT THE START OF EACH SCHOOL YEAR, CHILDREN WITH DEVIATIONS IN BEHAVIOR, SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL ADJUSTMENT, AND MENTAL MATURATION THAT MIGHT BLOCK OR RETARD SUCCESS IN SCHOOL. THESE CHILDREN WERE REFERRED FOR FURTHER DIAGNOSTIC EVALUATIONS. THE PROGRAM WAS FIRST TRIED IN ONE CLASSROOM. A 3-YEAR…

  19. Creative Construction: Unit Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of unit blocks with young children in early childhood education (ECE) settings to expand all areas of the curriculum. Discusses the origin of blocks in ECE programs, presents developmental stages of block play, describes children's building styles, and makes recommendations for getting started in block play for children of…

  20. Skin delivery by block copolymer nanoparticles (block copolymer micelles).

    PubMed

    Laredj-Bourezg, Faiza; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Pelletier, Jocelyne; Valour, Jean-Pierre; Rovère, Marie-Rose; Smatti, Batoule; Chevalier, Yves

    2015-12-30

    Block copolymer nanoparticles often referred to as "block copolymer micelles" have been assessed as carriers for skin delivery of hydrophobic drugs. Such carriers are based on organic biocompatible and biodegradable materials loaded with hydrophobic drugs: poly(lactide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer (PLA-b-PEG) nanoparticles that have a solid hydrophobic core made of glassy poly(d,l-lactide), and poly(caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer (PCL-b-PEG) nanoparticles having a liquid core of polycaprolactone. In vitro skin absorption of all-trans retinol showed a large accumulation of retinol in stratum corneum from both block copolymer nanoparticles, higher by a factor 20 than Polysorbate 80 surfactant micelles and by a factor 80 than oil solution. Additionally, skin absorption from PLA-b-PEG nanoparticles was higher by one order of magnitude than PCL-b-PEG, although their sizes (65nm) and external surface (water-swollen PEG layer) were identical as revealed by detailed structural characterizations. Fluorescence microscopy of histological skin sections provided a non-destructive picture of the storage of Nile Red inside stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis. Though particle cores had a different physical states (solid or liquid as measured by (1)H NMR), the ability of nanoparticles for solubilization of the drug assessed from their Hildebrand solubility parameters appeared the parameter of best relevance regarding skin absorption.

  1. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  2. The anti-inflammatory activity of duloxetine, a serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, prevents kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal death in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee-Soo; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Hong, Seongkweon; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Choong-Hyun

    2015-11-15

    Duloxetine (DXT), a potent serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is widely used in the treatment of major depressive disorder. In the present study, we examined the effects of DXT treatment on seizure behavior and excitotoxic neuronal damage in the mouse hippocampal CA3 region following intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA) injection. DXT treatment showed no effect on KA-induced behavioral seizure activity. However, treatment with 10mg/kg DXT reduced KA-induced neuronal death in the hippocampal CA3 region at 72h after KA administration, and treatment with 20 and 40mg/kg DXT showed a noticeable neuroprotection in the hippocampal CA3 region after KA injection. In addition, KA-induced activations of microglia and astrocytes as well as KA-induced increases of TNF-α and IL-1β levels were also suppressed by DXT treatment. These results indicate that DXT displays the neuroprotective effect against KA-induced excitotoxic neuronal death through anti-inflammatory action. PMID:26453128

  3. Formation of the base modification 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine and DNA fragmentation following seizures induced by systemic kainic acid in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lan, J; Henshall, D C; Simon, R P; Chen, J

    2000-01-01

    The formation of oxidative DNA damage as a consequence of seizures remains little explored. We therefore investigated the regional and temporal profile of 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation, a hallmark of oxidative DNA damage and DNA fragmentation in rat brain following seizures induced by systemic kainic acid (KA). Formation of 8-OHdG was determined via HPLC with electrochemical detection, and single- and double-stranded DNA breaks were detected using in situ DNA polymerase I-mediated biotin-dATP nick-translation (PANT) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL), respectively. Systemic KA (11 mg/kg) significantly increased levels of 8-OHdG within the thalamus after 2 h, within the amygdala/piriform cortex after 4 h, and within the hippocampus after 8 h. Levels remained elevated up to sevenfold within these areas for 72 h. Smaller increases in 8-OHdG levels were also detected within the parietal cortex and striatum. PANT-positive cells were detected within the thalamus, amygdala/piriform cortex, and hippocampus 24-72 h following KA injection. TUNEL-positive cells appeared within the same brain regions and over a similar time course (24-72 h) but were generally lower in number. The present data suggest oxidative damage to DNA may be an early consequence of epileptic seizures and a possible initiation event in the progression of seizure-induced injury to DNA fragmentation and cell death.

  4. Effects of a subconvulsive dose of kainic acid on the gene expressions of the arginine vasopressin, oxytocin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Ohkubo, Jun-ichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Matsuura, Takanori; Maruyama, Takashi; Onaka, Tatsushi; Suzuki, Hideaki; Ueta, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) synthesis in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) is up-regulated by kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure in rats. However, it remains unknown whether a subconvulsive dose of KA affects the HNS. Here we examined the effects of subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of a low dose of KA (4 mg/kg) on the gene expressions of the AVP, oxytocin (OXT) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular nuclei (PVN) of the rat hypothalamus, using in situ hybridization histochemistry. The expression of the AVP gene in the SON and PVN was judged to be up-regulated in KA-treated rats in comparison with saline-treated rats as controls. Next, the expression of the OXT gene was significantly increased in the SON at 6-24h and in the PVN at 6 and 12h after s.c. administration of KA. Finally, the expression of the nNOS gene was significantly increased in the SON and PVN at 3 and 6h after s.c. administration of KA. These results suggest that up-regulation of the gene expressions of the AVP, OXT and nNOS in the rat hypothalamus may be differentially affected by peripheral administration of a subconvulsive dose of KA.

  5. Effects on Spatial Cognition and Nociceptive Behavior Following Peripheral Nerve Injury in Rats with Lesion of the Striatal Marginal Division Induced by Kainic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuxin; Zhou, Chang; Li, Guoying; Tian, Yinghong; Liu, Jing; Yan, Li; Jiang, Yuyun; Tian, Sumin

    2015-11-01

    Neuropathic pain and cognitive deficit are frequently comorbidity in clinical, but their underlying correlation and mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we utilized a combined rat model including kainic acid (KA) injection into bilateral striatal marginal division and chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). PET/CT scans revealed that the SUVmax of KA rats was significantly decreased when compared to naive and saline rats. In contrast to the naive and saline rats, KA rats had longer latencies in locating the hidden platform on day 4, 5 in Morris water maze task. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia of KA rats were alleviated following CCI. Immunostaining results showed that substance P was markedly increased within ipsilateral spinal cord dorsal horn of KA rats after CCI, especially on the post-operative day 14. By means of real-time PCR, the up-regulation of GluR within ipsilateral spinal cord dorsal horn was observed in all KA and CCI rats. PKCγ, IL-6 and NF-κB were up-regulated in both CCI rats when compared to naive and their respective sham rats. These results suggest that cognitive impairment of rats altered the pain behaviors, and these intracellular regulators play crucial roles in the process of neuropathic pain. PMID:26415594

  6. In situ demonstration of Fluoro-Turquoise conjugated gelatin for visualizing brain vasculature and endothelial cells and their characterization in normal and kainic acid exposed animals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Paule, Merle G; Schmued, Larry

    2013-10-15

    The present study describes a new method for the visualization of the vasculature lumen and endothelial cells and characterizes their morphology in the brains of normal and kainic acid (KA) treated rats. Herein, labeling was accomplished using Fluoro-Turquoise (FT), a novel reactive blue fluorochrome conjugated to gelatin. Strong blue fluorescence was observed throughout the brain vasculature following intra-cardiac perfusion with FT-gel in normal animals. However, in the brains of KA treated rats (hippocampus, midline and ventral thalamus, piriform cortex), the vascular lumen was typically constricted, sclerotic and only faintly stained. The advantages of FT-gel over other markers can be attributed to its unique chemical and spectral properties. Specifically, Fluoro-Turquoise is a very bright blue UV excitable dye that does not bleed through when visualized using other filters, making it ideal for multiple immunofluorescent labeling studies. Its brightness at low magnification also makes it ideal for low magnification whole brain imaging. Compared to alternative techniques for visualizing blood vessels, such as India ink, fluorescent dye-conjugated dextran, the corrosion technique, endothelial cell markers and lectins, the present method results in excellent visualization of blood vessels. PMID:23954779

  7. In situ demonstration of Fluoro-Turquoise conjugated gelatin for visualizing brain vasculature and endothelial cells and their characterization in normal and kainic acid exposed animals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Paule, Merle G; Schmued, Larry

    2013-10-15

    The present study describes a new method for the visualization of the vasculature lumen and endothelial cells and characterizes their morphology in the brains of normal and kainic acid (KA) treated rats. Herein, labeling was accomplished using Fluoro-Turquoise (FT), a novel reactive blue fluorochrome conjugated to gelatin. Strong blue fluorescence was observed throughout the brain vasculature following intra-cardiac perfusion with FT-gel in normal animals. However, in the brains of KA treated rats (hippocampus, midline and ventral thalamus, piriform cortex), the vascular lumen was typically constricted, sclerotic and only faintly stained. The advantages of FT-gel over other markers can be attributed to its unique chemical and spectral properties. Specifically, Fluoro-Turquoise is a very bright blue UV excitable dye that does not bleed through when visualized using other filters, making it ideal for multiple immunofluorescent labeling studies. Its brightness at low magnification also makes it ideal for low magnification whole brain imaging. Compared to alternative techniques for visualizing blood vessels, such as India ink, fluorescent dye-conjugated dextran, the corrosion technique, endothelial cell markers and lectins, the present method results in excellent visualization of blood vessels.

  8. Neuronal degeneration and a decrease in laminin-like immunoreactivity is associated with elevated tissue-type plasminogen activator in the rat hippocampus after kainic acid injection.

    PubMed

    Nagai, N; Urano, T; Endo, A; Takahashi, H; Takada, Y; Takada, A

    1999-02-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that converts the inactive precursor plasminogen to the active protease plasmin. In the central nervous system, tPA has been suggested to participate in plasticity, memory and the neuronal degeneration caused by excitotoxins, but its precise functions during these processes are still unclear. We show in this report that tPA antigen level and extracellular tPA activity increased in the hippocampus during the early stages of neuronal degeneration in the CA3 region following the injection of kainic acid (KA) into the lateral cerebral ventricles. The increase in tPA antigen level was transient and its peak was at 4 h after the injection. tPA activity was also increased 4 h after the injection, but it remained at a high level for more than 8 h. Histological zymography showed that the increase in tPA activity was mainly localized in the CA3 region. In the same region, the disappearance of interneuronal laminin-like immunoreactivity and atrophic changes in pyramidal neurons were observed 4 h after the injection of KA. These results suggested that such focal and transient increases in tPA synthesis and release, which result in the proteolysis of laminin through plasminogen activation, could be involved in the neuronal degeneration in the CA3 region after the injection of KA.

  9. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Suppresses Inflammation-Induced Expression of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 by Blocking Nuclear Factor-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunzi; Kong, Juan; Sun, Tao; Li, George; Szeto, Frances L.; Liu, Weicheng; Deb, Dilip K.; Wang, Youli; Zhao, Qun; Thadhani, Ravi; Li, Yan Chun

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is a major fibrinolytic inhibitor. High PAI-1 is associated with increased renal and cardiovascular disease risk. Previous studies demonstrated PAI-1 down-regulation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that exposure of mouse embryonic fibroblasts to TNFα or LPS led to a marked induction of PAI-1, which was blunted by 1,25(OH)2D3, NF-κB inhibitor or p65 siRNA, suggesting the involvement of NF-κB in 1,25(OH)2D3-induced repression. In mouse Pai-1 promoter a putative cis-κB element was identified at −299. EMSA and ChIP assays showed that TNF-α increased p65/p50 binding to this κB site, which was disrupted by 1,25(OH)2D3. Luciferase reporter assays showed that PAI-1 promoter activity was induced by TNFα or LPS, and the induction was blocked by 1,25(OH)2D3. Mutation of the κB site blunted TNFα, LPS or 1,25(OH)2D3 effects. 1,25(OH)2D3 blocked IκBα degradation and arrested p50/p65 nuclear translocation. In mice LPS stimulated PAI-1 expression in the heart and macrophages, and the stimulation was blunted by pre-treatment with a vitamin D analog. Together these data demonstrate that 1,25(OH)2D3 down-regulates PAI-1 by blocking NF-κB activation. Inhibition of PAI-1 production may contribute to the reno- and cardio-protective effects of vitamin D. PMID:21176770

  10. Learning with Large Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how large hollow blocks can meet many preschool children's learning needs through creative dramatic play, and also gives some guidelines on how these blocks can be constructed by parents and teachers. (BB)

  11. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, ... surgical procedures block activity in all types of neurons. This can cause numbness, paralysis, and other nervous ...

  12. Block-based image hashing with restricted blocking strategy for rotational robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shijun; Yang, Jianquan

    2012-12-01

    Image hashing is a potential solution for image content authentication (a desired image hashing algorithm should be robust to common image processing operations and various geometric distortions). In the literature, researchers pay more attention to block-based image hashing algorithms due to their robustness to common image processing operations (such as lossy compression, low-pass filtering, and additive noise). However, the block-based hashing strategies are sensitive to rotation processing operations. This indicates that the robustness of the block-based hashing methods against rotation operations is an important issue. Towards this direction, in this article we propose a restricted blocking strategy by investigating effect of two rotation operations on an image and its blocks in both theoretical and experimental ways. Furthermore, we apply the proposed blocking strategy for the recently reported non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) hashing. Experimental results have demonstrated the validity of the block-based hashing algorithms with restricted blocking strategy for rotation operations.

  13. Block Scheduling. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2003-01-01

    What are the effects of block scheduling? Results of transitioning from traditional to block scheduling are mixed. Some studies indicate no change in achievement results, nor change in teachers' opinions about instructional strategies. Other studies show that block scheduling doesn't work well for Advanced Placement or Music courses, that "hard to…

  14. Blocking and associability change.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; Haselgrove, Mark

    2013-07-01

    Blocking of learning about a conditioned stimulus (the "blocked" cue) occurs when it is trained alongside an additional stimulus (the "blocking" cue) that has been previously presented with the outcome. A number of theories (e.g., N. J. Mackintosh. 1975a. A Theory of Attention: Variations in the Associability of Stimuli With Reinforcement. Psychological Review, 82, 276-298; J. M. Pearce & G. Hall. 1980. A Model for Pavlovian Learning: Variation in the Effectiveness of Conditioned But Not Unconditioned Stimuli. Psychological Review, 87, 532-552) account for this attenuation in learning by proposing that attention paid to the blocked cue is restricted. In three experiments, we examined the associability of both blocked and blocking cues. In Experiment 1, rats were trained with a blocking protocol before being given a test discrimination composed of two components; one of these components required the use of the previously blocked cue as a discriminative stimulus, and the other component was soluble by using the blocking cue. To our surprise, the component that depended on the blocked cue was more readily solved than the component dependent on the blocking cue. The results of Experiments 2 and 3 suggest that this is due to the quantity of exposure that each stimulus received during initial training. Implications for theories of blocking, and more widely associative learning, are discussed.

  15. Asymmetric aza-[2,3]-Wittig sigmatropic rearrangements: chiral auxiliary control and formal asymmetric synthesis of (2S, 3R, 4R)-4-hydroxy-3-methylproline and (-)-kainic acid.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James C; O'Loughlin, Julian M A; Tornos, James A

    2005-08-01

    A survey of 16 different chiral auxiliaries and a variety of strategies found that an (-)-8-phenylmenthol ester of a glycine derived migrating group can control the absolute stereochemistry of aza-[2,3]-Wittig sigmatropic rearrangements with diastereoselectivities of ca. 3 : 1 with respect to the auxiliary. In two specific examples, ca. 50% yields of enantiomerically pure products were obtained after chromatographic purification. These were synthetically manipulated with no erosion of stereochemistry into intermediates that completed formal asymmetric syntheses of (+)-HyMePro and (-)-kainic acid.

  16. Alleviation of kainic acid-induced brain barrier dysfunction by 4-o-methylhonokiol in in vitro and in vivo models.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Yi; Ahn, Sun-Young; Yoo, Jae Hyeon; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2015-01-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate whether 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), a principal ingredient of Magnolia (M.) officinalis bark, alleviated acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) kainic acid- (KA-) induced brain blood barrier dysfunction (BBBD) via pathological examination and cytological analyses of the brain tissues of mice. KA (10-30 mg/kg) time- and dose-dependently increased the water content of brain tissues and induced edema and encephalopathy. However, pretreatment with MH (5 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the water content of the brain compared to that observed in the KA control group. Furthermore, MH significantly and dose-dependently reversed the remarkable variations in evan's blue dye (EBD) staining and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels that were induced by KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.). MH also decreased the elevated seizure scores that were induced by KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice in a manner similar to scavengers such as DMTU and trolox. Additionally, MH significantly scavenged intracellular ROS and Ca2+ within hippocampal cells. The tight junction seals mediated by claudin (Cld-5) were also found to be modulated by MH. MH efficiently reduced 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (IC50, 52.4 mM) and •OH with an electron spin resonance (ESR) signal rate constant of 4×10(9) M(-1)·S(-1), which is close to the reactivity of the vitamin E analog trolox. Taken together, these results suggest that MH may enhance radical scavenging in lipid and hydrophobic environments, which may be important for the physiological activity of the barrier.

  17. Comparison of short-term effects of midazolam and lorazepam in the intra-amygdala kainic acid model of status epilepticus in mice.

    PubMed

    Diviney, Mairead; Reynolds, James P; Henshall, David C

    2015-10-01

    Benzodiazepines remain as the first-line treatment for status epilepticus (SE), but debate continues as to the choice and delivery route of pharmacotherapy. Lorazepam is currently the preferred anticonvulsant for clinical use, but midazolam has become a popular alternative, particularly as it can be given by nonintravenous routes. Anticonvulsants are also commonly used to terminate SE in animal models. Here, we aimed to compare the efficacy of midazolam with that of lorazepam in an experimental model of focal-onset SE. Status epilepticus was induced by intra-amygdala microinjection of kainic acid in 8week old C57Bl/6 mice. Forty minutes later, mice were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of either lorazepam or midazolam (8mg/kg). Electroencephalogram (EEG) activity, histology, and behavioral tests assessing recovery of function were evaluated and compared between groups. Intraperitoneal injection of either lorazepam or midazolam resulted in similar patterns of reduced EEG epileptiform activity during 1-hour recordings. Damage to the hippocampus and presentation of postinsult anxiety-related behavior did not significantly differ between treatment groups at 72h. However, return of normal behaviors such as grooming, levels of activity, and the evaluation of overall recovery of SE mice were all superior at 24h in animals given midazolam compared with lorazepam. Our results indicate that midazolam is as effective as lorazepam as an anticonvulsant in this model while also providing improved animal recovery after SE. These data suggest that midazolam might be considered by researchers as an anticonvulsant in animal models of SE, particularly as it appears to satisfy the requirements of refining procedures involving experimental animals at early time-points after SE.

  18. Changes and overlapping distribution in the expression of CB1/OX1-GPCRs in rat hippocampus by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei; Wang, Xiang-Qing; Chen, Ya-Nan; Yang, Nan; Lang, Sen-Yang; Zuo, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Jia-Tang; Li, Rui-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening neurological disorder. It is important to discover new drugs to control SE without the development of pharmacoresistance. Focus on the cannabinoid receptor and cannabinoid-related compounds might be a good option. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and orexin receptor 1 (OX1) both belong to the GPCR superfamily and display "cross-talk" interactions, however, there has been no study of the effect of OX1/CB1 in epilepsy. Therefore, we investigated the potential long-term effects of SE on CB1 and OX1 expression in rat hippocampus, aiming to elucidate whether they are involved in the causative mechanism of epilepsy and whether they might form a heterodimer. In this study, SE was induced with kainic acid, and results of immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR both showed that the expression of CB1 in the hippocampus increased after SE and was significantly higher compared to controls especially 1 week post-SE. However we did not find any significant difference in the expression of OX1 between the SE group and the controls at any time. Under immunofluorescence staining, we observed an overlapping distribution of CB1 and OX1 in the hippocampus. The increased expression of CB1 in the hippocampus indicates that CB1 may play an important role in the underlying mechanism of SE, but the effect of OX1 was not obvious. The overlapping distribution of CB1 and OX1 in the hippocampus indicates that they may form a heterodimer to exert their effect in epilepsy.

  19. Role for pro-inflammatory cytokines in regulating expression of GABA transporter type 1 and 3 in specific brain regions of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Yin, Jian; Qin, Wei; Sha, Suxu; Xu, Jun; Jiang, Changbin

    2015-03-01

    In general, pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) contribute to regulation of epilepsy-associated pathophysiological processes in the central nerve system. In this report, we examined the specific activation of PICs, namely IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in rat brain after kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE). Also, we examined the role played by PICs in regulating expression of GABA transporter type 1 and 3 (GAT-1 and GAT-3, respectively), which are the two important subtypes of GATs responsible for the regulation of extracellular GABA levels in the brain. Our results show that IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly increased in the parietal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala of KA-rats as compared with sham control animals (P < 0.05, KA rats vs. control rats). KA-induced SE also significantly increased (P < 0.05 vs. controls) the protein expression of GAT-1 and GAT-3 in those brain regions. In addition, central administration of antagonists to IL-1β and TNF-α receptors significantly attenuated amplified GAT-1 and GAT-3 (P < 0.05 vs. vehicle control for each antagonist group). However, antagonist to IL-6 receptor failed to attenuate enhancement in expression of GAT-1 and GAT-3 induced by KA-induced SE. Overall, our data demonstrate that PIC pathways are activated in the specific brain regions during SE which thereby selectively leads to upregulation of GABA transporters. As a result, it is likely that de-inhibition of GABA system is increased in the brain. This support a role for PICs in engagement of the adaptive mechanisms associated with epileptic activity, and has pharmacological implications to target specific PICs for neuronal dysfunction and vulnerability related to epilepsy. PMID:25708016

  20. Systemic injection of kainic acid: Gliosis in olfactory and limbic brain regions quantified with ( sup 3 H)PK 11195 binding autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Baudry, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases may result from excessive stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptors by endogenous ligands. Because neuronal degeneration is associated with glial proliferation and hypertrophy, the degenerative changes throughout rat brain following the systemic administration of kainic acid (12 mg/kg) were mapped with quantitative autoradiography of (3H)PK 11195. This radioligand binds to a mitochondrial benzodiazepine binding site (MBBS) on microglia and astrocytes. Analysis of eight horizontal and four coronal brain levels revealed up to 16-fold increases in (3H)PK 11195 binding from 1 to 5 weeks but not 1 day after kainate injection. Increases in (3H)PK 11195 binding were predominantly in ventral limbic brain regions and olfactory projections to neocortical areas, with the olfactory cortex greater than subiculum/CA1 greater than anterior olfactory nucleus, medial thalamic nucleus, and piriform cortex greater than cingulate cortex and rostral hippocampus greater than dentate gyrus, septum, and amygdala greater than entorhinal cortex and temporal cortex. Little or no enhancement of (3H)PK 11195 binding was observed in numerous regions including the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, cerebellum, thalamic nuclei, choroid plexus, medulla, parietal or occipital cortex, or pons. A 2-fold greater extent of neurodegeneration was obtained in ventral portions of the olfactory bulb, entorhinal cortex, temporal cortex, and dentate gyrus compared with the dorsal portions of these structures. The pattern of increase in (3H)PK 11195 binding closely matched the patterns of neuronal degeneration reported following parenteral kainate injection. These findings strengthen the notion that quantitative autoradiography of (3H)PK 11195 is a valuable tool to quantify the extent of neuronal degeneration.

  1. Alleviation of Kainic Acid-Induced Brain Barrier Dysfunction by 4-O-Methylhonokiol in In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-Yi; Ahn, Sun-Young; Yoo, Jae Hyeon; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2015-01-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate whether 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), a principal ingredient of Magnolia (M.) officinalis bark, alleviated acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) kainic acid- (KA-) induced brain blood barrier dysfunction (BBBD) via pathological examination and cytological analyses of the brain tissues of mice. KA (10–30 mg/kg) time- and dose-dependently increased the water content of brain tissues and induced edema and encephalopathy. However, pretreatment with MH (5 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the water content of the brain compared to that observed in the KA control group. Furthermore, MH significantly and dose-dependently reversed the remarkable variations in evan's blue dye (EBD) staining and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels that were induced by KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.). MH also decreased the elevated seizure scores that were induced by KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice in a manner similar to scavengers such as DMTU and trolox. Additionally, MH significantly scavenged intracellular ROS and Ca2+ within hippocampal cells. The tight junction seals mediated by claudin (Cld-5) were also found to be modulated by MH. MH efficiently reduced 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (IC50, 52.4 mM) and •OH with an electron spin resonance (ESR) signal rate constant of 4 × 109 M−1 · S−1, which is close to the reactivity of the vitamin E analog trolox. Taken together, these results suggest that MH may enhance radical scavenging in lipid and hydrophobic environments, which may be important for the physiological activity of the barrier. PMID:25688368

  2. [Dephosphorelation of Bad and upregulation of Bcl-2 in hippocampus of rats following limbic seizure induced by kainic acid injection into amygdaloid nucleus].

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Fu; Lu, Chuan-Zhen; Xia, Zuo-Li; Niu, Jing-Zhong; Yang, Ming-Feng; Luo, Yu-Min; Hong, Zhen

    2005-06-25

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the seizure-induced changes in Bad (Bcl-2-associated death protein), 14-3-3, phosphoBad, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL expression in the rat model of focal limbic seizure. Unilateral intra-amygdaloid injection of kainic acid (KA) was made to induce seizure. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and regional cerebral flow (r-CBF) were monitored continuously. Diazepam (30 mg/kg) was administered to terminate the seizure. The apoptotic and surviving neurons in the hippocampus were observed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferrase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and cresyl violet staining, the expression of Bad, 14-3-3, phosphoBad, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL were detected with immunofluorescence, Western blot and immunoprecipitation. The results showed that TUNEL-positive neurons appeared at 8 h and reached maximum at 24 h following seizure cessation within the ipsilateral CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. Seizure induced the dephosphorylation of Bad and the dissociation of Bad from its chaperone protein 14-3-3 and subsequent dimerization of Bad with Bcl-XL. The expression of phosphoBad decreased and Bcl-2 increased. There was little change in r-CBF after the seizure. These results suggest that seizure leads to a dephosphorylation of Bad and an upregulation of Bcl-2. Dephosphorylation of Bad may be injurious while the upregulation of Bcl-2 may be protective to the brain damage induced by seizures, but not related with r-CBF.

  3. Ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate isolated from kaempferia galanga inhibits inflammation by suppressing interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and angiogenesis by blocking endothelial functions

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Muhammad Ihtisham; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Sadikun, Amirin; Majid, Amin Malik Shah Abdul; Al-Suede, Fouad Saleih R.; Hassan, Loiy Elsir Ahmed; Altaf, Rabia; Ahamed, Mohamed B. Khadeer

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects of ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate isolated from Kaempferia galanga. METHODS: The anti-inflammatory effects of ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate were assessed using the cotton pellet granuloma assay in rats, whereby the levels of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α were measured in the animals' blood. In addition, the levels of interleukin, tumor necrosis factor, and nitric oxide were measured in vitro using the human macrophage cell line (U937). The analgesic effects of ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate were assessed by the tail flick assay in rats. The anti-angiogenic effects were evaluated first by the rat aortic ring assay and, subsequently, by assessing the inhibitory effects of ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate on vascular endothelial growth factor, proliferation, migration, and tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. RESULTS: Ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate strongly inhibited granuloma tissue formation in rats. It prolonged the tail flick time in rats by more than two-fold compared with the control animals. The inhibition of interleukin and tumor necrosis factor by ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate was significant in both in vivo and in vitro models; however, only a moderate inhibition of nitric oxide was observed in macrophages. Furthermore, ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate considerably inhibited microvessel sprouting from the rat aorta. These mechanistic studies showed that ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate strongly inhibited the differentiation and migration of endothelial cells, which was further confirmed by the reduced level of vascular endothelial growth factor. CONCLUSION: Ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate exhibits significant anti-inflammatory potential by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenesis, thus inhibiting the main functions of endothelial cells. Thus, ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate could be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory and

  4. Block ground interaction of rockfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkwein, Axel; Gerber, Werner; Kummer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    During a rockfall the interaction of the falling block with the ground is one of the most important factors that define the evolution of a rockfall trajectory. It steers the rebound, the rotational movement, possibly brake effects, friction losses and damping effects. Therefore, if most reliable rockfall /trajectory simulation software is sought a good understanding of the block ground interaction is necessary. Today's rockfall codes enable the simulation of a fully 3D modelled block within a full 3D surface . However, the details during the contact, i.e. the contact duration, the penetration depth or the dimension of the marks in the ground are usually not part of the simulation. Recent field tests with rocks between 20 and 80 kg have been conducted on a grassy slope in 2014 [1]. A special rockfall sensor [2] within the blocks measured the rotational velocity and the acting accelerations during the tests. External video records and a so-called LocalPositioningSystem deliver information on the travel velocity. With these data not only the flight phases of the trajectories but also the contacts with the ground can be analysed. During the single jumps of a block the flight time, jump length, the velocity, and the rotation are known. During the single impacts their duration and the acting accelerations are visible. Further, the changes of rotational and translational velocity influence the next jump of the block. The change of the rotational velocity over the whole trajectory nicely visualizes the different phases of a rockfall regarding general acceleration and deceleration in respect to the inclination and the topography of the field. References: [1] Volkwein A, Krummenacher B, Gerber W, Lardon J, Gees F, Brügger L, Ott T (2015) Repeated controlled rockfall trajectory testing. [Abstract] Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17: EGU2015-9779. [2] Volkwein A, Klette J (2014) Semi-Automatic Determination of Rockfall Trajectories. Sensors 14: 18187-18210.

  5. Island custom blocking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Carabetta, R.J. )

    1988-03-01

    The technique of Island blocking is being used more frequently since the advent of our new head and neck blocking techniques and the implementation of a newly devised lung protocol. The system presented affords the mould room personnel a quick and accurate means of island block fabrication without the constant remeasuring or subtle shifting to approximate correct placement. The cookie cutter is easily implemented into any department's existing block cutting techniques. The device is easily and inexpensively made either in a machine shop or acquired by contacting the author.

  6. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  7. 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione targets nuclear factor kappaB to block expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase, prevents hypotension, and improves survival in endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Karuri, Asok R; Huang, Yong; Bodreddigari, Sridevi; Sutter, Carrie Hayes; Roebuck, Bill D; Kensler, Thomas W; Sutter, Thomas R

    2006-04-01

    Septicemia is a major cause of death associated with noncoronary intensive care. Systemic production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) is a major cause of hypotension and poor organ perfusion seen in septic shock. Here, we show that pretreatment of F344 rats with the cancer chemoprotective agent 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) blocks lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated induction of hepatic iNOS and significantly reduces the associated serum levels of NO metabolites and enzyme markers of toxicity provoked by treatment with LPS. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that this protective effect is largely due to suppression of iNOS expression in hepatocytes. Importantly, pretreatment of animals with D3T blunts LPS-mediated hypotension and dramatically increases their survival. Inasmuch as iNOS expression can be regulated by nuclear factor (NF) kappaB, mechanistic studies show that D3T blocks NFkappaB nuclear translocation and DNA binding and that these effects are accompanied by changes in the levels of phospho-inhibitor of NFkappaB. In conclusion, this study identifies new drug classes and targets that may improve the prevention and treatment of septic shock, as well as chronic diseases associated with the NFkappaB and iNOS pathways.

  8. The nuclear localization of the Arabidopsis transcription factor TIP is blocked by its interaction with the coat protein of Turnip crinkle virus

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Tao; Qu Feng; Morris, T. Jack . E-mail: jmorris@unlnotes.unl.edu

    2005-01-20

    We have previously reported that TIP, an Arabidopsis protein, interacts with the coat protein (CP) of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) in yeast cells and that this interaction correlated with the resistance response in the TCV-resistant Arabidopsis ecotype Dijon-17. TIP was also able to activate transcription of reporter genes in yeast cells, suggesting that it is likely a transcription factor. We have now verified the physical interaction between TIP and TCV CP in vitro and showed that CP mutants unable to interact with TIP in yeast cells bind TIP with much lower affinity in vitro. Secondly, we have performed gel shift experiments demonstrating that TIP does not bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. The subcellular localization of TIP was also investigated by transiently expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TIP in Nicotiana benthamiana plant cells, which showed that GFP-tagged TIP localizes primarily to nuclei. Significantly, co-expression of TCVCP and GFP-TIP prevented the nuclear localization of TIP. Together, these results suggest that TIP might be a transcription factor involved in regulating the defense response of Arabidopsis to TCV and that its normal role is compromised by interaction with the invading viral CP.

  9. Congenital complete atrioventricular block.

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, N J; Fenrich, A L; Friedman, R A

    1997-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is found in 1 of 22,000 live births. Over time, it has become apparent that these patients represent not a single distinct disease process, but several processes with the common manifestation of atrioventricular block. The evaluation of these patients to determine their risk of sudden death and need for pacing is not well defined. Images PMID:9456483

  10. High Relief Block Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Explains a method of block printing using styrofoam shapes to make high relief. Describes the creation of the block design as well as the actual printing process. Uses a range of paper types for printing so children can see the results of using different media. (LS)

  11. Surviving Block Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Marjorie

    A discussion of block scheduling for second language instruction looks at the advantages and disadvantages and offers some suggestions for classroom management and course organization. It is argued that block scheduling may offer a potential solution to large classes, insufficient time for labs, too little individualized instruction; few…

  12. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  13. Prevention of kainic acid-induced changes in nitric oxide level and neuronal cell damage in the rat hippocampus by manganese complexes of curcumin and diacetylcurcumin.

    PubMed

    Sumanont, Yaowared; Murakami, Yukihisa; Tohda, Michihisa; Vajragupta, Opa; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2006-03-13

    Curcumin is a natural antioxidant isolated from the medicinal plant Curcuma longa Linn. We previously reported that manganese complexes of curcumin (Cp-Mn) and diacetylcurcumin (DiAc-Cp-Mn) exhibited potent superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity in an in vitro assay. Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radial playing a multifaceted role in the brain and its excessive production is known to induce neurotoxicity. Here, we examined the in vivo effect of Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn on NO levels enhanced by kainic acid (KA) and L-arginine (L-Arg) in the hippocampi of awake rats using a microdialysis technique. Injection of KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and L-Arg (1000 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the concentration of NO and Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn (50 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reversed the effects of KA and L-Arg without affecting the basal NO concentration. Following KA-induced seizures, severe neuronal cell damage was observed in the CA1 and CA3 subfields of hippocampal 3 days after KA administration. Pretreatment with Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn (50 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated KA-induced neuronal cell death in both CA1 and CA3 regions of rat hippocampus compared with vehicle control, and Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn showed more potent neuroprotective effect than their parent compounds, curcumin and diacetylcurcumin. These results suggest that Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn protect against KA-induced neuronal cell death by suppression of KA-induced increase in NO levels probably by their NO scavenging activity and antioxidative activity. Cp-Mn and DiAc-Cp-Mn have an advantage to be neuroprotective agents in the treatment of acute brain pathologies associated with NO-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress-induced neuronal damage such as epilepsy, stroke and traumatic brain injury. PMID:16266725

  14. The effect of insulin-loaded linear poly(ethylene glycol)-brush-like poly(l-lysine) block copolymer on renal ischemia/reperfusion-induced lung injury through downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fei; Tang, Xiangyuan; Li, Xin; Xia, Wenquan; Liu, Daojun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the therapeutic effect of insulin-loaded linear poly(ethylene glycol)-brush-like poly(l-lysine) block copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-b-(poly(ethylenediamine l-glutamate)-g-poly(l-lysine)) (PEG-b-(PELG-g-PLL) on renal ischemia/reperfusion-induced lung injury through downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) as compared to free insulin. Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 30 U/kg insulin or insulin/PEG-b-(PELG-g-PLL) complex, and then subjected to 45 minutes of ischemia and 24 hours of reperfusion. The blood and lungs were collected, the level of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were measured, and the dry/wet lung ratios, the activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase, the content of methane dicarboxylic aldehyde and tumor necrosis factor-α, and the expression of HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured in pulmonary tissues. Both insulin and insulin/PEG-b-(PELG-g-PLL) preconditioning improved the recovery of renal function, reduced pulmonary oxidative stress injury, restrained inflammatory damage, and downregulated the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF as compared to ischemia/reperfusion group, while insulin/PEG-b-(PELG-g-PLL) significantly improved this effect. PMID:27175073

  15. Apoptosis is induced by N-myc expression in hepatocytes, a frequent event in hepadnavirus oncogenesis, and is blocked by insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, K; Ganem, D

    1996-01-01

    Induction of hepatocellular carcinoma in woodchucks by woodchuck hepatitis virus is associated with the activation of N-myc gene expression, usually by viral DNA integration in cis to the N-myc locus. We have examined the consequences of N-myc up-regulation in rodent hepatic cells in culture. Mouse alpha ML hepatocytes infected with a retroviral vector overexpressing the woodchuck N-myc2 gene display a higher proliferation rate than parental alpha ML cells but are morphologically unchanged and do not form colonies in soft agar. However, they display an increased propensity to undergo apoptosis, an effect that is markedly augmented by serum deprivation. Expression of the woodchuck hepatitis virus X gene in alpha ML cells does not alter the growth phenotype of the cells and has no effect upon N-myc-dependent apoptosis. However, apoptosis in N-myc2-expressing alpha ML cells is strongly inhibited by insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II). IGF II gene expression is also strongly up-regulated during hepatic carcinogenesis in vivo in virally infected animals and has been speculated to be part of an autocrine growth-stimulatory pathway. Our results suggest that IGF II may play another role in the development of virus-induced hepatoma: the prevention of programmed cell death triggered by deregulated N-myc expression. PMID:8627653

  16. Proteasome inhibition blocks ligand-induced dynamic processing and internalization of epidermal growth factor receptor via altered receptor ubiquitination and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kesarwala, Aparna H; Samrakandi, Mustapha M; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2009-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR), a member of the EGF superfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases, is a critical regulator of cell growth and an important target for single agent and combination anticancer therapeutics. To further investigate the dynamics of ligand-induced EGFR processing and regulation noninvasively, we developed a chimeric EGFR-firefly luciferase (FLuc) fusion reporter to directly monitor processing of EGFR in real-time. In a stable HeLa cell line expressing the reporter at physiologically relevant levels, bioluminescence imaging continuously monitored reporter dynamics, correlating with the ligand-induced response of endogenous EGFR as determined by Western blot, subcellular localization of an EGFR-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein, and validated pharmacologic responses. The signaling competency of the reporter was confirmed by gene rescue experiments in EGFR-null cells. Bioluminescence analysis further showed that proteasome inhibition with bortezomib or MG132 attenuated overall ligand-induced degradation of EGFR. In cells expressing EGFR-GFP, pretreatment with proteasome inhibitors trapped essentially all of the receptor at the cell membrane both before and after ligand-induced activation with EGF. Furthermore, proteasome inhibition enhanced receptor ubiquitination in both the basal and ligand-activated states as well as delayed the processing of ligand-activated phosphorylation of the receptor, kinetically correlating with attenuated receptor degradation. These observations point to a potential mechanism for the synergistic therapeutic effects of combination EGFR- and proteasome-targeted therapies.

  17. Co-immobilized poly(ethylene glycol)-block-polyamines promote sensitivity and restrict biofouling on gold sensor surface for detecting factor IX in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2014-08-21

    In order to detect an extremely low amount of human coagulation factor IX (FIX), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)/aptamer co-immobilized surface was constructed using original PEG-polyamine surface modification agents on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor chip. Initially, a gold (Au) sensor chip of SPR was modified using poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly[2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PEG-b-PAMA) followed by treatment with SH-dT20 and was duplexed with anti-FIX aptamer extended using A24. Furthermore, the co-immobilization of pentaethylenehexamine-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (N6-PEG) on the sensing surface completely quenched bio-fouling. On this dual tethered PEG-surface, we determined that the dissociation constant for FIX-aptamer interaction was 37 ± 10 pM, and the sensitivity of detection could reach up to 800 fM on using aptamer-FIX-antibody sandwich pattern detected by gold nanoparticle-conjugated anti-mouse antibody. We could detect FIX in the presence of abundant albumin. Furthermore, to mimic the actual detection of FIX in clinical samples, we demonstrated our experimental results with human blood plasma instead of FIX. Higher-sensitivity was attained because of dual polymers immobilized on Au surface, and this can emerge as a common strategy for any aptamer-protein interactions. The selective binding of aptamer in human blood plasma described here indicates the suitability of the present strategy for detection in clinically relevant samples.

  18. Solar ultraviolet irradiation reduces collagen in photoaged human skin by blocking transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; He, Tianyuan; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2004-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation from the sun reduces production of type I procollagen (COLI), the major structural protein in human skin. This reduction is a key feature of the pathophysiology of premature skin aging (photoaging). Photoaging is the most common form of skin damage and is associated with skin carcinoma. TGF-beta/Smad pathway is the major regulator of type I procollagen synthesis in human skin. We have previously reported that UV irradiation impairs transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)/Smad signaling in mink lung epithelial cells. We have investigated the mechanism of UV irradiation impairment of the TGF-beta/Smad pathway and the impact of this impairment on type I procollagen production in human skin fibroblasts, the major collagen-producing cells in skin. We report here that UV irradiation impairs TGF-beta/Smad pathway in human skin by down-regulation of TGF-beta type II receptor (TbetaRII). This loss of TbetaRII occurs within 8 hours after UV irradiation and precedes down-regulation of type I procollagen expression in human skin in vivo. In human skin fibroblasts, UV-induced TbetaRII down-regulation is mediated by transcriptional repression and results in 90% reduction of specific, cell-surface binding of TGF-beta. This loss of TbetaRII prevents downstream activation of Smad2/3 by TGF-beta, thereby reducing expression of type I procollagen. Preventing loss of TbetaRII by overexpression protects against UV inhibition of type I procollagen gene expression in human skin fibroblasts. UV-induced down-regulation of TbetaRII, with attendant reduction of type I procollagen production, is a critical molecular mechanism in the pathophysiology of photoaging.

  19. Gauge Blocks - A Zombie Technology.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Gauge blocks have been the primary method for disseminating length traceability for over 100 years. Their longevity was based on two things: the relatively low cost of delivering very high accuracy to users, and the technical limitation that the range of high precision gauging systems was very small. While the first reason is still true, the second factor is being displaced by changes in measurement technology since the 1980s. New long range sensors do not require master gauges that are nearly the same length as the part being inspected, and thus one of the primary attributes of gauge blocks, wringing stacks to match the part, is no longer needed. Relaxing the requirement that gauges wring presents an opportunity to develop new types of end standards that would increase the accuracy and usefulness of gauging systems. PMID:27096119

  20. Nanostructured particles from multi scale building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampsey, J. Eric

    Nanotechnology has emerged as one of the most exciting new and developing fields in science today. New nanoscale materials and devices such as nanoparticles, nanocomposites, nanowires, and nanosensors could revolutionize the 21st century in the same way that the transistor and Internet led to the information age. One key component in developing these new technologies is to assemble individual atomic and molecular building blocks into larger structures with fundamentally new properties and functions. Nature is very efficient at assembling multi scale building blocks such as proteins, lipids, and minerals into nanostructured materials such as bone, teeth, diatoms, eggshells, seashells, cell membranes, and DNA. Surfactant and colloidal building block can also be assembled into different nanoscale materials and devices by utilizing hydrophobic/hydrophilic and other surface interactions. Using these concepts, this dissertation focuses on the syntheses and applications of nanostructured particles assembled from multi scale building blocks. Important factors in the synthesis of the particles include particle size, particle morphology, pore size and pore structure. Five different types of nanostructured particles assembled from different multi scale building blocks are demonstrated in this work: (1) Spherical metal/silica mesoporous particles with high surface areas and controllable pore sizes, pore structures, and metal content are synthesized from surfactant, silicate, and metal building blocks for catalytic applications; (2) Mesoporous hollow spheres with controllable pore sizes and pore structures are synthesized from surfactant, silica, and polystyrene building blocks; (3) Spherical mesoporous carbon particles with controllable pore sizes and pore structures are templated from silica particles assembled from silica and surfactant building blocks; (4) Spherical mesoporous, microporous, and bimodal carbon particles are synthesized from sucrose and silica building blocks

  1. Characterization of blocked isocyanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirčeva, A.; Janežič, M.; Žigon, M.; Malavašič, T.

    1992-03-01

    An ionomer crosslinker on the basis of partly blocked hexamethylene isocyanurate was synthesized and characterized by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy and by gel permeation chromatography. To determine the selectivity of the blocking reaction. model compounds were also prepared. Deblocking and curing courses were studied by FTIR thermal methods. The selectivity of the blocking reaction was found to be poor and therefore the obtained ionomer crosslinker consisted of different monomer and oligomer components. Deblocking and curing were highly temperature dependent. Curing was more efficient in one-pack systems consisting of the ionomer crosslinker and of an OH groups rich ionomer polyurethane resin.

  2. Light extraction block with curved surface

    DOEpatents

    Levermore, Peter; Krall, Emory; Silvernail, Jeffrey; Rajan, Kamala; Brown, Julia J.

    2016-03-22

    Light extraction blocks, and OLED lighting panels using light extraction blocks, are described, in which the light extraction blocks include various curved shapes that provide improved light extraction properties compared to parallel emissive surface, and a thinner form factor and better light extraction than a hemisphere. Lighting systems described herein may include a light source with an OLED panel. A light extraction block with a three-dimensional light emitting surface may be optically coupled to the light source. The three-dimensional light emitting surface of the block may includes a substantially curved surface, with further characteristics related to the curvature of the surface at given points. A first radius of curvature corresponding to a maximum principal curvature k.sub.1 at a point p on the substantially curved surface may be greater than a maximum height of the light extraction block. A maximum height of the light extraction block may be less than 50% of a maximum width of the light extraction block. Surfaces with cross sections made up of line segments and inflection points may also be fit to approximated curves for calculating the radius of curvature.

  3. Minocycline blocks asthma-associated inflammation in part by interfering with the T cell receptor-nuclear factor κB-GATA-3-IL-4 axis without a prominent effect on poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed

    Naura, Amarjit S; Kim, Hogyoung; Ju, Jihang; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Jordan, Joaquin; Catling, Andrew D; Rezk, Bashir M; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Pyakurel, Kusma; Tarhuni, Abdelmetalab F; Abughazleh, Mohammad Q; Errami, Youssef; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Ochoa, Augusto C; Boulares, A Hamid

    2013-01-18

    Minocycline protects against asthma independently of its antibiotic function and was recently reported as a potent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. In an animal model of asthma, a single administration of minocycline conferred excellent protection against ovalbumin-induced airway eosinophilia, mucus hypersecretion, and Th2 cytokine production (IL-4/IL-5/IL-12(p70)/IL-13/GM-CSF) and a partial protection against airway hyperresponsiveness. These effects correlated with pronounced reduction in lung and sera allergen-specific IgE. A reduction in poly(ADP-ribose) immunoreactivity in the lungs of minocycline-treated/ovalbumin-challenged mice correlated with decreased oxidative DNA damage. The effect of minocycline on PARP may be indirect, as the drug failed to efficiently block direct PARP activation in lungs of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine-treated mice or H(2)O(2)-treated cells. Minocycline blocked allergen-specific IgE production in B cells potentially by modulating T cell receptor (TCR)-linked IL-4 production at the mRNA level but not through a modulation of the IL-4-JAK-STAT-6 axis, IL-2 production, or NFAT1 activation. Restoration of IL-4, ex vivo, rescued IgE production by minocycline-treated/ovalbumin-stimulated B cells. IL-4 blockade correlated with a preferential inhibition of the NF-κB activation arm of TCR but not GSK3, Src, p38 MAPK, or ERK1/2. Interestingly, the drug promoted a slightly higher Src and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Inhibition of NF-κB was linked to a complete blockade of TCR-stimulated GATA-3 expression, a pivotal transcription factor for IL-4 expression. Minocycline also reduced TNF-α-mediated NF-κB activation and expression of dependent genes. These results show a potentially broad effect of minocycline but that it may block IgE production in part by modulating TCR function, particularly by inhibiting the signaling pathway, leading to NF-κB activation, GATA-3 expression, and subsequent IL-4 production.

  4. Optoelectronics using block copolymers.

    SciTech Connect

    Botiz, I.; Darling, S. B.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

    2010-05-01

    Block copolymers, either as semiconductors themselves or as structure directors, are emerging as a promising class of materials for understanding and controlling processes associated with both photovoltaic energy conversion and light emitting devices.

  5. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  6. Resolving writer's block.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, P.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Writer's block, or a distinctly uncomfortable inability to write, can interfere with professional productivity. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To identify writer's block and to outline suggestions for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Once the diagnosis has been established, a stepwise approach to care is recommended. Mild blockage can be resolved by evaluating and revising expectations, conducting a task analysis, and giving oneself positive feedback. Moderate blockage can be addressed by creative exercises, such as brainstorming and role-playing. Recalcitrant blockage can be resolved with therapy. Writer's block can be prevented by taking opportunities to write at the beginning of projects, working with a supportive group of people, and cultivating an ongoing interest in writing. CONCLUSIONS: Writer's block is a highly treatable condition. A systematic approach can help to alleviate anxiety, build confidence, and give people the information they need to work productively. PMID:9481467

  7. Blocked tear duct

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby may have an eye infection called conjunctivitis . ... increase the chance of other infections, such as conjunctivitis. ... be prevented. Proper treatment of nasal infections and conjunctivitis may reduce the risk of having a blocked ...

  8. Block copolymer battery separator

    DOEpatents

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  9. Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from cell block two into the "Death Row" exercise yard - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and southwest guard tower, looking from cell block eight roof - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  12. Growing Up with Their Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winarski, Diana L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes one teacher's use of traditional wooden blocks in fifth-grade curriculum. Notes that use of blocks can teach communication, teamwork, precision, and arithmetic concepts. Also describes four easy classroom block projects. (TM)

  13. [Thromboembolic prophylaxis and central blocks].

    PubMed

    Vincenti, E

    2001-09-01

    Epidural and spinal blocks are widely used in several surgical settings in order to obtain analgesic advantages and reduce blood loss and thromboembolic complications. However, many high risk patients receive perioperatively some anti-coagulant treatments for preventing venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Although a number of large observations has demonstrated a very low rate of major neurological impairment due to spinal haematomas, in the last years an increasing number of case reports seems to cause an excessive anxiety to the anaesthesiologists. On the other hand, spinal haematomas occurred in same cases without anti-coagulant therapy. An other question concerns the onset time from an epidural/spinal puncture and the development of neurological symptoms of spinal compression, which may appear even after days or weeks. Female gender, aged patients, vascular surgery, uncontrolled positions on the table, number of spinal punctures, large gauge of needle and low degree of skill are the main factors involving in the haemorrhagic phenomena around spinal cord. Accurate anamnesis, no anti-coagulant medication before surgery, and a perfect technique of managing spinal/epidural block are essential elements for reducing probability of severe bleeding and consequent expansive haematomas. Also, informed consent of patients and careful judgement of advantages vs risks of a central block for every high risk case determine the final decision about the regional anaesthesia: to do or not to do.

  14. Stimulation of Anterior Thalamic Nuclei Protects Against Seizures and Neuronal Apoptosis in Hippocampal CA3 Region of Kainic Acid-induced Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Da-Wei; Liu, Huan-Guang; Yang, An-Chao; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The antiepileptic effect of the anterior thalamic nuclei (ANT) stimulation has been demonstrated; however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic ANT stimulation on hippocampal neuron loss and apoptosis. Methods: Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: The control group, the kainic acid (KA) group, the sham-deep brain stimulation (DBS) group, and the DBS group. KA was used to induce epilepsy. Seizure count and latency to the first spontaneous seizures were calculated. Nissl staining was used to analyze hippocampal neuronal loss. Polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were conducted to assess the expression of caspase-3 (Casp3), B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl2), and Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) in the hippocampal CA3 region. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine the differences between the four groups. Results: The latency to the first spontaneous seizures in the DBS group was significantly longer than that in the KA group (27.50 ± 8.05 vs. 16.38 ± 7.25 days, P = 0.0005). The total seizure number in the DBS group was also significantly reduced (DBS vs. KA group: 11.75 ± 6.80 vs. 23.25 ± 7.72, P = 0.0002). Chronic ANT-DBS reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA3 region (DBS vs. KA group: 23.58 ± 6.34 vs. 13.13 ± 4.00, P = 0.0012). After chronic DBS, the relative mRNA expression level of Casp3 was decreased (DBS vs. KA group: 1.18 ± 0.37 vs. 2.09 ± 0.46, P = 0.0003), and the relative mRNA expression level of Bcl2 was increased (DBS vs. KA group: 0.92 ± 0.21 vs. 0.48 ± 0.16, P = 0.0004). The protein expression levels of CASP3 (DBS vs. KA group: 1.25 ± 0.26 vs. 2.49 ± 0.38, P < 0.0001) and BAX (DBS vs. KA group: 1.57 ± 0.49 vs. 2.80 ± 0.63, P = 0.0012) both declined in the DBS group whereas the protein expression level of BCL2 (DBS vs. KA group: 0.78 ± 0.32 vs. 0.36 ± 0.17, P = 0.0086) increased in the DBS group. Conclusions: This study demonstrated

  15. A Place for Block Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of block play--including its contributions to perceptual, fine motor, and cognitive development--and components of a good preschool block play area. Recommends unit blocks complemented by stacking blocks, toys, beads, cubes, and Brio wooden toys. Makes recommendations for space, size, locations and connections to other…

  16. Pharmacologic inhibition of reactive gliosis blocks TNF-α-mediated neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Livne-Bar, Izhar; Lam, Susy; Chan, Darren; Guo, Xiaoxin; Askar, Idil; Nahirnyj, Adrian; Flanagan, John G; Sivak, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    Reactive gliosis is an early pathological feature common to most neurodegenerative diseases, yet its regulation and impact remain poorly understood. Normally astrocytes maintain a critical homeostatic balance. After stress or injury they undergo rapid parainflammatory activation, characterized by hypertrophy, and increased polymerization of type III intermediate filaments (IFs), particularly glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin. However, the consequences of IF dynamics in the adult CNS remains unclear, and no pharmacologic tools have been available to target this mechanism in vivo. The mammalian retina is an accessible model to study the regulation of astrocyte stress responses, and their influence on retinal neuronal homeostasis. In particular, our work and others have implicated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling as a key regulator of glutamate recycling, antioxidant activity and cytokine secretion by astrocytes and related Müller glia, with potent influences on neighboring neurons. Here we report experiments with the small molecule inhibitor, withaferin A (WFA), to specifically block type III IF dynamics in vivo. WFA was administered in a model of metabolic retinal injury induced by kainic acid, and in combination with a recent model of debridement-induced astrocyte reactivity. We show that WFA specifically targets IFs and reduces astrocyte and Müller glial reactivity in vivo. Inhibition of glial IF polymerization blocked p38 MAPK-dependent secretion of TNF-α, resulting in markedly reduced neuronal apoptosis. To our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate that pharmacologic inhibition of IF dynamics in reactive glia protects neurons in vivo. PMID:27685630

  17. A Fluid Block Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubben, Gerald C.

    1976-01-01

    Achieving flexibility without losing student accountability is a challenge that faces every school. With a fluid block schedule, as described here, accountability is maintained without inhibiting flexibility. An additional advantage is that three levels of schedule decision making take some of the pressure off the principal. (Editor)

  18. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  19. Flattening basic blocks.

    SciTech Connect

    Utke, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2006-01-01

    The application of cross country elimination strategies requires access to the computational graph or at least subgraphs for certain scopes, e.g. a basic block. Under the presence of aliased variables the construction of these (sub)graphs encounters ambiguities. We propose an algorithm to construct ambiguity free subgraphs.

  20. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  1. What's behind Block Scheduling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierke, Carolyn

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of block scheduling in secondary schools focuses on its impact on the school library media center. Discusses increased demand for library services, scheduling classes, the impact on librarians' time, teaching information technology, local area networks, and the increased pace of activity. (LRW)

  2. Activation of the rat follicle-stimulating hormone receptor promoter by steroidogenic factor 1 is blocked by protein kinase a and requires upstream stimulatory factor binding to a proximal E box element.

    PubMed

    Heckert, L L

    2001-05-01

    The receptor for the pituitary glycoprotein hormone FSH (FSHR) and the nuclear hormone receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) play important roles in control of the hypothalamic-pituitary- gonadal axis. FSHR is essential for integrating the pituitary FSH signal to gonadal response, while SF-1 is an important transcriptional regulator of many genes that function within this axis and is essential for the development of gonads and adrenal glands. Given the critical role of SF-1 in regulation of the gonads and the coexpression of FSHR and SF-1 in Sertoli and granulosa cells, we examined the ability of SF-1 to regulate transcription of the FSHR gene. We found that SF-1 stimulated rat FSHR promoter activity in a dose-dependent and promoter-specific manner. Examination of various promoter deletion mutants indicated that SF-1 acts through the proximal promoter region and upstream promoter sequences. An E box element within the proximal promoter is essential for activation of the FSHR promoter by SF-1. This element binds the transcriptional regulators USF1 and USF2 (upstream stimulatory factors 1 and 2) but not SF-1, as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In addition, functional studies identified a requirement for the USF proteins in SF-1 activation of FSHR and mapped an important regulatory domain within exons 4 and 5 of USF2. Cotransfection studies revealed that activation of protein kinase A leads to inhibition of SF-1-stimulated transcription of FSHR, while it synergized with SF-1 to activate the equine LH beta-promoter (ebeta). Thus, stimulation of the cAMP pathway differentially regulates SF-1 activation of the FSHR and ebeta-promoters.

  3. Nontelomeric splice variant of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 maintains neuronal traits by sequestering repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peisu; Casaday-Potts, Rebecca; Precht, Patricia; Jiang, Haiyang; Liu, Yie; Pazin, Michael J; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-09-27

    Telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) is critical for telomere integrity in dividing stem and somatic cells, but its role in postmitotic neurons is unknown. Apart from protecting telomeres, nuclear TRF2 interacts with the master neuronal gene-silencer repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), and disruption of this interaction induces neuronal differentiation. Here we report a developmental switch from the expression of TRF2 in proliferating neural progenitor cells to expression of a unique short nontelomeric isoform of TRF2 (TRF2-S) as neurons establish a fully differentiated state. Unlike nuclear TRF2, which enhances REST-mediated gene repression, TRF2-S is located in the cytoplasm where it sequesters REST, thereby maintaining the expression of neuronal genes, including those encoding glutamate receptors, cell adhesion, and neurofilament proteins. In neurons, TRF2-S-mediated antagonism of REST nuclear activity is greatly attenuated by either overexpression of TRF2 or administration of the excitatory amino acid kainic acid. Overexpression of TRF2-S rescues kainic acid-induced REST nuclear accumulation and its gene-silencing effects. Thus, TRF2-S acts as part of a unique developmentally regulated molecular switch that plays critical roles in the maintenance and plasticity of neurons.

  4. Nontelomeric splice variant of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 maintains neuronal traits by sequestering repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peisu; Casaday-Potts, Rebecca; Precht, Patricia; Jiang, Haiyang; Liu, Yie; Pazin, Michael J.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) is critical for telomere integrity in dividing stem and somatic cells, but its role in postmitotic neurons is unknown. Apart from protecting telomeres, nuclear TRF2 interacts with the master neuronal gene-silencer repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), and disruption of this interaction induces neuronal differentiation. Here we report a developmental switch from the expression of TRF2 in proliferating neural progenitor cells to expression of a unique short nontelomeric isoform of TRF2 (TRF2-S) as neurons establish a fully differentiated state. Unlike nuclear TRF2, which enhances REST-mediated gene repression, TRF2-S is located in the cytoplasm where it sequesters REST, thereby maintaining the expression of neuronal genes, including those encoding glutamate receptors, cell adhesion, and neurofilament proteins. In neurons, TRF2-S–mediated antagonism of REST nuclear activity is greatly attenuated by either overexpression of TRF2 or administration of the excitatory amino acid kainic acid. Overexpression of TRF2-S rescues kainic acid-induced REST nuclear accumulation and its gene-silencing effects. Thus, TRF2-S acts as part of a unique developmentally regulated molecular switch that plays critical roles in the maintenance and plasticity of neurons. PMID:21903926

  5. Managing access block.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Peter; Scown, Paul; Campbell, Donald

    2002-01-01

    There is pessimism regarding the ability of the Acute Health Sector to manage access block for emergency and elective patients. Melbourne Health suffered an acute bed crisis in 2001 resulting in record ambulance diversions and emergency department (ED) delays. We conducted an observational study to reduce access block for emergency patients whilst maintaining elective throughput at Melbourne Health. This involved a clinician-led taskforce using previously proven principles for organisational change to implement 51 actions to improve patient access over a three-month period. The primary outcome measures were ambulance diversion, emergency patients waiting more than 12 hours for an inpatient bed, elective throughput and theatre cancellations. Despite a reduction in multi-day bed numbers all primary objectives were met, ambulance diversion decreased to minimal levels, 12-hour waits decreased by 40% and elective throughput was maintained. Theatre cancellations were also minimised. We conclude that access block can be improved by clinician-led implementation of proven process improvements over a short time frame. The ability to sustain change over the longer term requires further study.

  6. Block 3. This photograph depicts the northern view of Block ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 3. This photograph depicts the northern view of Block 2 towards the May D & F Tower from the main path along the western facades - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  7. Block Transfer Handbook: Constructing and Negotiating Block Transfer Agreements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Finola

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide resources for institutions or articulation committees who are engaged in the task of investigating the feasibility of block transfer agreements. Block transfer is the process whereby a block of credits is granted to students who have successfully completed a certificate, diploma, or cluster of courses…

  8. View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are used to support ship when it is repositioned to paint inaccessible areas masked by original support blocks. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Carpentry Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. The poor man's cell block

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a simple method for making formalin or isopropyl alcohol vapour fixed cell blocks from fine needle aspiration cytology specimens that we refer to as ‘The Poor Man's Cell Block.’ PMID:20671053

  10. The neuroprotective efficacy of cell-penetrating peptides TAT, penetratin, Arg-9, and Pep-1 in glutamic acid, kainic acid, and in vitro ischemia injury models using primary cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Bruno P; Craig, Amanda J; Milech, Nadia; Hopkins, Richard M; Watt, Paul M; Knuckey, Neville W

    2014-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small peptides (typically 5-25 amino acids), which are used to facilitate the delivery of normally non-permeable cargos such as other peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, or drugs into cells. However, several recent studies have demonstrated that the TAT CPP has neuroprotective properties. Therefore, in this study, we assessed the TAT and three other CPPs (penetratin, Arg-9, Pep-1) for their neuroprotective properties in cortical neuronal cultures following exposure to glutamic acid, kainic acid, or in vitro ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation). Arg-9, penetratin, and TAT-D displayed consistent and high level neuroprotective activity in both the glutamic acid (IC50: 0.78, 3.4, 13.9 μM) and kainic acid (IC50: 0.81, 2.0, 6.2 μM) injury models, while Pep-1 was ineffective. The TAT-D isoform displayed similar efficacy to the TAT-L isoform in the glutamic acid model. Interestingly, Arg-9 was the only CPP that displayed efficacy when washed-out prior to glutamic acid exposure. Neuroprotection following in vitro ischemia was more variable with all peptides providing some level of neuroprotection (IC50; Arg-9: 6.0 μM, TAT-D: 7.1 μM, penetratin/Pep-1: >10 μM). The positive control peptides JNKI-1D-TAT (JNK inhibitory peptide) and/or PYC36L-TAT (AP-1 inhibitory peptide) were neuroprotective in all models. Finally, in a post-glutamic acid treatment experiment, Arg-9 was highly effective when added immediately after, and mildly effective when added 15 min post-insult, while the JNKI-1D-TAT control peptide was ineffective when added post-insult. These findings demonstrate that different CPPs have the ability to inhibit neurodamaging events/pathways associated with excitotoxic and ischemic injuries. More importantly, they highlight the need to interpret neuroprotection studies when using CPPs as delivery agents with caution. On a positive note, the cytoprotective properties of CPPs suggests they are ideal carrier molecules to

  11. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  12. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  13. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  14. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  15. Building Curriculum during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Blocks are not just for play! In this article, Nicole Andrews describes observing the interactions of three young boys enthusiastically engaged in the kindergarten block center of their classroom, using blocks in a building project that displayed their ability to use critical thinking skills, physics exploration, and the development of language…

  16. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T] also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.

  17. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T]ℓ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock spacemore » exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.« less

  18. Block copolymer investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yufa, Nataliya A.

    The research presented in this thesis deals with various aspects of block copolymers on the nanoscale: their behavior at a range of temperatures, their use as scaffolds, or for creation of chemically striped surfaces, as well as the behavior of metals on block copolymers under the influence of UV light, and the healing behavior of copolymers. Invented around the time of World War II, copolymers have been used for decades due to their macroscopic properties, such as their ability to be molded without vulcanization, and the fact that, unlike rubber, they can be recycled. In recent years, block copolymers (BCPs) have been used for lithography, as scaffolds for nano-objects, to create a magnetic hard drive, as well as in photonic and other applications. In this work we used primarily atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), described in Chapter II, to conduct our studies. In Chapter III we demonstrate a new and general method for positioning nanoparticles within nanoscale grooves. This technique is suitable for nanodots, nanocrystals, as well as DNA. We use AFM and TEM to demonstrate selective decoration. In Chapters IV and V we use AFM and TEM to study the structure of polymer surfaces coated with metals and self-assembled monolayers. We describe how the surfaces were created, exhibit their structure on the nanoscale, and prove that their macroscopic wetting properties have been altered compared to the original polymer structures. Finally, Chapters VI and VII report out in-situ AFM studies of BCP at high temperatures, made possible only recently with the invention of air-tight high-temperature AFM imaging cells. We locate the transition between disordered films and cylinders during initial ordering. Fluctuations of existing domains leading to domain coarsening are also described, and are shown to be consistent with reptation and curvature minimization. Chapter VII deals with the healing of PS-b-PMMA following AFM-tip lithography or

  19. Organic photovoltaic cell incorporating electron conducting exciton blocking layers

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.

    2014-08-26

    The present disclosure relates to photosensitive optoelectronic devices including a compound blocking layer located between an acceptor material and a cathode, the compound blocking layer including: at least one electron conducting material, and at least one wide-gap electron conducting exciton blocking layer. For example, 3,4,9,10 perylenetetracarboxylic bisbenzimidazole (PTCBI) and 1,4,5,8-napthalene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (NTCDA) function as electron conducting and exciton blocking layers when interposed between the acceptor layer and cathode. Both materials serve as efficient electron conductors, leading to a fill factor as high as 0.70. By using an NTCDA/PTCBI compound blocking layer structure increased power conversion efficiency is achieved, compared to an analogous device using a conventional blocking layers shown to conduct electrons via damage-induced midgap states.

  20. Radiation Blocking Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Biomedical Optical Company of America's Eagle 475 lens absorbs 100 percent of all photowavelengths considered hazardous to eye tissue, including ultraviolet and blue light, which are considered contributors to cataract and age-related macular degeneration. The lens absorbs hazardous wavelengths, but allows a higher percentage of visually useful areas of the spectrum to pass through. Polarization blocks out irritating glint and glare and heightens visual acuity. The Eagle 475 sunglasses are the latest in a series of spinoffs that originated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where two scientists developed a protective, welding curtain that filtered out harmful irradiance. The result was a commercial curtain that absorbs filters and scatters light, providing protection for personnel in welding areas. Further research focused on protective industrial glasses and later on consumer products.

  1. Spintronics: Conceptual Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    The purpose of this introduction to spintronics is to provide some elementary description of its conceptual building blocks. Thus, it is intended for a newcomer to the field. After recalling rudimentary descriptions of spin precession and spin relaxation, spin-dependent transport is treated within the Boltzmann formalism. This suffices to introduce key notions such as the spin asymmetry of the conductivities in the two-current model, the spin diffusion length, and spin accumulation. Two basic mechanisms of spin relaxation are then presented, one arising from spin-orbit scattering and the other from electron-magnon collisions. Finally, the action of a spin-polarized current on magnetization is presented in a thermodynamics framework. This introduces the notion of spin torque and the characteristic length scale over which the transverse spin polarization of conduction electron decays as it is injected into a magnet.

  2. Atomic Basic Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  3. Large Block Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W

    2001-12-01

    This report documents the Large-Block Test (LBT) conducted at Fran Ridge near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The LBT was a thermal test conducted on an exposed block of middle non-lithophysal Topopah Spring tuff (Tptpmn) and was designed to assist in understanding the thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes associated with heating and then cooling a partially saturated fractured rock mass. The LBT was unique in that it was a large (3 x 3 x 4.5 m) block with top and sides exposed. Because the block was exposed at the surface, boundary conditions on five of the six sides of the block were relatively well known and controlled, making this test both easier to model and easier to monitor. This report presents a detailed description of the test as well as analyses of the data and conclusions drawn from the test. The rock block that was tested during the LBT was exposed by excavation and removal of the surrounding rock. The block was characterized and instrumented, and the sides were sealed and insulated to inhibit moisture and heat loss. Temperature on the top of the block was also controlled. The block was heated for 13 months, during which time temperature, moisture distribution, and deformation were monitored. After the test was completed and the block cooled down, a series of boreholes were drilled, and one of the heater holes was over-cored to collect samples for post-test characterization of mineralogy and mechanical properties. Section 2 provides background on the test. Section 3 lists the test objectives and describes the block site, the site configuration, and measurements made during the test. Section 3 also presents a chronology of events associated with the LBT, characterization of the block, and the pre-heat analyses of the test. Section 4 describes the fracture network contained in the block. Section 5 describes the heating/cooling system used to control the temperature in the block and presents the thermal history of the block during the test

  4. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.; Sushinsky, G. F.; Chwirut, D. J.; Bechtoldt, C. J.; Ruff, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys are to be considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks have been taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and micro-structural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response. New fabrication techniques for reference blocks are discussed and ASTM activities are summarized.

  5. Minocycline attenuates microglia activation and blocks the long-term epileptogenic effects of early-life seizures.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jayne; Fox, Patrick D; Condello, Carlo; Bartolini, Alyssa; Koh, Sookyong

    2012-05-01

    Innate immunity mediated by microglia appears to play a crucial role in initiating and propagating seizure-induced inflammatory responses. To address the role of activated microglia in the pathogenesis of childhood epilepsy, we first examined the time course of microglia activation following kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (KA-SE) in Cx3cr1(GFP/+) transgenic mice whose microglia are fluorescently labeled. We then determined whether this seizure-induced microglia activation primes the central immune response to overreact and to increase the susceptibility to a second seizure later in life. We used an inhibitor of microglia activation, minocycline, to block the seizure-induced inflammation to determine whether innate immunity plays a causal role in mediating the long-term epileptogenic effects of early-life seizure. First status epilepticus was induced at postnatal day (P) 25 and a second status at P39. KA-SE at P25 caused nearly a two-fold increase in microglia activation within 24h. Significant seizure-induced activation persisted for 7 days and returned to baseline by 14 days. P39 animals with prior exposure to KA-SE not only responded with greater microglial activation in response to "second hit" of KA, but shorter latency to express seizures. Inhibition of seizure-induced inflammation by 7 day minocycline post-treatment abrogated both the exaggerated microglia activation and the increased susceptibility to the second seizure later in life. The priming effect of early-life seizures is accompanied by modified and rapidly reactivated microglia. Our results suggest that anti-inflammatory therapy after SE may be useful to block the epileptogenic process and mitigate the long-term damaging effects of early-life seizures. PMID:22366182

  6. Bradyarrhythmias and conduction blocks.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Julia; Breithardt, Günter; Eckardt, Lars

    2012-07-01

    Bradyarrhythmias are a common clinical finding and comprise a number of rhythm disorders including sinus node dysfunction and atrioventricular conduction disturbances. Clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic electrocardiogram findings (eg, during a routine examination) to a wide range of symptoms such as heart failure symptoms, near syncope or syncope, central nervous symptoms, or nonspecific and chronic symptoms such as dizziness or fatigue. Conditions resulting in bradyarrhythmic disorders are divided into intrinsic and extrinsic conditions causing damage to the conduction system. Furthermore bradyarrhythmias can be a normal physiologic reaction under certain circumstances. A proper diagnosis including a symptom-rhythm correlation is extremely important and is generally established by noninvasive diagnostic studies (12-lead electrocardiogram, Holter electrocardiogram, exercise testing, event recorder, implantable loop recorder). Invasive electrophysiologic testing is rarely required. If reversible extrinsic causes of bradyarrhythmias such as drugs (most often beta-blockers, glycosides and/or calcium channel blockers) or underlying treatable diseases are ruled out, cardiac pacing is usually the therapy of choice in symptomatic bradyarrhythmias. In this article of the current series on arrhythmias we will review the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options of bradyarrhythmias, especially sinus node dysfunction and atrioventricular conduction blocks.

  7. 31 CFR 589.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 589.301 Section 589.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UKRAINE RELATED SANCTIONS...

  8. 31 CFR 588.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 588.301 Section 588.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WESTERN BALKANS...

  9. Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the west to the east. This photograph reveals the alignment of trees within the central path of the park. In addition, this photograph exposes broken bricks aligning tree beds - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  10. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS...

  11. 31 CFR 541.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 541.301 Section 541.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS...

  12. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  13. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  14. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  15. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  16. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  17. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  18. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  19. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  20. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS...

  1. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  2. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  4. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  5. 31 CFR 545.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 545.301 Section 545.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN)...

  6. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  7. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  8. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM...

  9. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  10. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  11. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  12. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  13. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  14. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  15. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  16. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  17. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  18. Adjustable-Angle Drill Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Adjustable angular drill block accurately transfers hole patterns from mating surfaces not normal to each other. Block applicable to transfer of nonperpendicular holes in mating contoured assemblies in aircraft industry. Also useful in general manufacturing to transfer mating installation holes to irregular and angular surfaces.

  19. Block Transfer Agreement Evaluation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastedo, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate for the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) the effectiveness of block transfer agreements (BTAs) in the BC Transfer System and recommend steps to be taken to improve their effectiveness. Findings of this study revealed that institutions want to expand block credit transfer;…

  20. Robust changes in expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein across the brain do not translate to detectable changes in BDNF levels in CSF or plasma.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Thomas A; Bove, Susan E; Pilsmaker, Catherine D; Mariga, Abigail; Drummond, Elena M; Cadelina, Gregory W; Adamowicz, Wendy O; Swetter, Brentt J; Carmel, Sharon; Dumin, Jo Ann; Kleiman, Robin J

    2012-09-01

    Adult rats were treated acutely with peripheral kainic acid (KA), and changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein were tracked over time across multiple brain regions. Despite robust elevation in both mRNA and protein in multiple brain regions, plasma BDNF was unchanged and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) BDNF levels remained undetectable. Primary neurons were then treated with KA. BDNF was similarly elevated within neurons, but was undetectable in neuronal media. Thus, while deficits in BDNF signaling have been implicated in a number of diseases, these data suggest that extracellular concentrations of BDNF may not be a facile biomarker for changes in neurons.

  1. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys were considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. Some RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks were taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and microstructural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response.

  2. Block Curricula: A Guide to Teaching with Unit Blocks and Hollow Blocks in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Phyllis; Tiedemann, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for preschool teachers was designed for use with wooden unit and hollow blocks to foster a variety of math, science, language, and social skills. Following an introduction to the curriculum and a discussion of cooperative learning and stages of block building, the guide is divided into three parts. Part 1 of the guide, "Unit…

  3. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This student guide together with an instructor guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The student guide contains self-contained instructional material that students can study at their own pace most of the time. Six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units, with some units…

  4. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This instructor guide together with a student guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The instructor guide is a resource for planning and managing individualized, competency-based instruction in six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units with some units having several…

  5. 1-2-3 Blocks: Beginning Block Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Evelyn

    This book discusses ways that blocks can be used with young children to help them develop different intellectual, motor, and social skills. The book is divided into four sections organized by block type: (1) unit blocks; (2) hollow blocks; (3) table blocks; and (4) homemade blocks. Each section describes the block type, gives reasons for using the…

  6. Interatrial Block in the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Lovely; Devadoss, Ramprakash; Chaubey, Vinod K; Spodick, David H

    2014-01-01

    Interatrial block (IAB; P-wave duration ≥ 110 ms), which represents a delay in the conduction between the atria, is a pandemic conduction abnormality that is frequently underappreciated in clinical practice. Despite its comprehensive documentation in the medical literature, it has still not received adequate attention and also not adequately described and discussed in most cardiology textbooks. IAB can be of varying degrees and classified based on the degree of P-duration and its morphology. It can transform into a higher degree block and can also manifest transiently. IAB may be a preceding or causative risk factor for various atrial arrhythmias (esp. atrial fibrillation) and also be associated with various other clinical abnormalities ranging from left atrial dilation and thromboembolism including embolic stroke and mesenteric ischemia. IAB certainly deserves more attention and prospective studies are needed to formulate a standard consensus regarding appropriate management strategies. PMID:24827803

  7. Neurologic complication after anterior sciatic nerve block.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shruti; Hadzic, Admir; Vloka, Jerry D; Cafferty, Maureen S; Moucha, Calin S; Santos, Alan C

    2005-05-01

    The lack of reported complications related to lower extremity peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs) may be related to the relatively infrequent application of these techniques and to the fact that most such events go unpublished. Our current understanding of the factors that lead to neurologic complications after PNBs is limited. This is partly the result of our inability to conduct meaningful retrospective studies because of a lack of standard and objective monitoring and documentation procedures for PNBs. We report a case of permanent injury to the sciatic nerve after sciatic nerve block through the anterior approach and discuss mechanisms that may have led to the injury. Intraneural injection and nerve injury can occur in the absence of pain on injection and it may be heralded by high injection pressure (resistance).

  8. 31 CFR 560.322 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... name of the Government of Iran, any Iranian financial institution, or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 560.211, or in which the Government of Iran,...

  9. Revisiting {N}=4 superconformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissi, Agnese; Łukowski, Tomasz

    2016-02-01

    We study four-point correlation functions of four generic half-BPS supermultiplets of {N}=4 SCFT in four dimensions. We use the two-particle Casimir of four-dimensional superconformal algebra to derive superconformal blocks which contribute to the partial wave expansion of such correlators. The derived blocks are defined on analytic superspace and allow us in principle to find any component of the four-point correlator. The lowest component of the result agrees with the superconformal blocks found by Dolan and Osborn.

  10. Toughness in block copolymer modified epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Declet-Perez, Carmelo

    One of the major shortcomings preventing the widespread use of epoxy resins in engineering applications is the inherent brittleness of these materials. The incorporation of small amounts of amphiphilic block copolymers into the formulation is one of the most promising strategies to toughen epoxies. These molecules are known to form nanostructures in the epoxy resin that can be preserved upon curing. This strategy is very attractive since significant enhancements in toughness can be obtained without detrimental effects on other properties of the matrix. Despite many examples of successful implementation, an in-depth understanding of the factors that lead to toughness in block copolymer modified epoxies is still elusive. The goal of this dissertation is to understand, first, the deformation mechanisms leading to toughness and, second, how different formulation parameters affect these processes. In this work we used two types of block copolymer modifiers, which produced nanostructures with different physical properties. These block copolymers self-assembled into well-dispersed spherical micelles with either rubbery or glassy cores in various epoxy formulations. Both of these modifiers toughened different epoxy formulations, although to different extents. The rubbery core micelles consistently outperformed the glassy core micelles by roughly a factor of two. While the toughening afforded by the rubbery core micelles was consistent with the current understanding of toughening, the results from the glassy core micelles could not be explained with the same reasoning. In order to understand the deformation mechanisms leading to different levels of toughness, we performed small-angle x-ray scattering experiments while simultaneously deforming our material. This combination of techniques, referred to as in-situ SAXS, allowed us to monitor changes in the structure of the block copolymer micelles as a result of the applied load. With this technique, we showed that the rubbery

  11. Ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block vs continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for hip replacement in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bin; He, Miao; Cai, Guang-Yu; Zou, Tian-Xiao; Zhang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block are 2 traditional anesthesia methods in orthopedic surgeries, but it is controversial which method is better. The objective of this study was to compare the practicality, efficacy, and complications of the 2 modalities in hip replacement surgery in the elderly and to assess the utility of a novel cannula-over-needle set. Methods: In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical investigation, 60 elderly patients undergoing hip replacement were randomly assigned to receive either continuous femoral nerve block or continuous fascia iliaca compartment block. After ultrasound-guided nerve block, all patients received general anesthesia for surgery and postoperative analgesia through an indwelling cannula. Single-factor analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups. Results: There was a significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean visual analog scale scores (at rest) at 6 hours after surgery: 1.0 ± 1.3 in the femoral nerve block group vs 0.5 ± 0.8 in the fascia iliaca compartment block group (P < 0.05). The femoral nerve block group had better postoperative analgesia on the medial aspect of the thigh, whereas the fascia iliaca compartment block group had better analgesia on the lateral aspect of the thigh. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block with the novel cannula-over-needle provide effective anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for elderly hip replacement patients. PMID:27759633

  12. Ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Anil; Srinivasan, Karthikeyan Kallidaikurichi; Iohom, Gabriella

    2014-09-01

    The axillary brachial plexus block is the most widely performed upper limb block. It is relatively simple to perform and one of the safest approaches to brachial plexus block. With the advent of ultrasound technology, there is a marked improvement in the success rate of the axillary block. This review will focus on the technique of ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block. PMID:25110766

  13. The Building Blocks of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Betty O.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses teaching techniques for teaching about rocks, minerals, and the differences between them. Presents a model-building activity that uses plastic building blocks to build crystal and rock models. (YDS)

  14. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... the middle ear and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  15. Atrioventricular block, ECG tracing (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal rhythm (arrhythmia) called an atrioventricular (AV) block. P waves show that the top of the heart received electrical activity. Each P wave is usually followed by the tall (QRS) waves. ...

  16. Recursion relations for conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-09-01

    In the context of conformal field theories in general space-time dimension, we find all the possible singularities of the conformal blocks as functions of the scaling dimension Δ of the exchanged operator. In particular, we argue, using representation theory of parabolic Verma modules, that in odd spacetime dimension the singularities are only simple poles. We discuss how to use this information to write recursion relations that determine the conformal blocks. We first recover the recursion relation introduced in [1] for conformal blocks of external scalar operators. We then generalize this recursion relation for the conformal blocks associated to the four point function of three scalar and one vector operator. Finally we specialize to the case in which the vector operator is a conserved current.

  17. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  18. Modeling block detectors in SimSET.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Robert; Gillispie, Steven; Schmitz, Ruth; Lewellen, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We have added a block detector model to the Simulation System for Emission Tomography (SimSET) software version 2.9. METHODS: The new model simulates the detector system as a collection of right rectangular boxes and allows for very flexible positioning of these boxes. This model allows users to simulate typical block-based cylindrical tomographs, pixelated positron emission mammography (PEM) detectors, and many more imaginative tomograph designs. We have tested the block detector software against analytically derived results and against SimSET simulations of dual-headed and cylindrical detector tomographs. We have also compared experimental and simulated sensitivities for a General Electric DSTE PET for 3 different phantom diameters in 2d and 3d acquisition modes. RESULTS: The tests against analytically derived results and against simulations were validated both statistically using the t-test and visually by comparing profiles through the sinograms. Within the limits of statistical fluctuation, the new software passed all tests. In comparisons with data from the PET scanner, the simulation showed better agreement than previous SimSET releases, but still showed substantially increased coincidence sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: We believe the increased sensitivity is a result of the very simple default models used for energy resolution and scintillation light collection, and the lack of any livetime correction. The new release provides a user-modifiable function where all these factors can be realistically modeled for a given tomograph. The SimSET software, including source code, remains in the public domain.

  19. A standardized block fabrication technique

    SciTech Connect

    Famiglietti, R.; Noriega, B.; Sanders, R. )

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of delivered dose is a primary goal in every radiation therapy department. Improved imaging techniques now enable the radiation therapist to define more precisely the area of interest, which helps the sparing of normal surrounding tissue. Tray-mounted customized blocks are routinely used to define this treatment portal accurately and reproducibly. However, the level of accuracy is dependent on the block fabrication technique and the skill of the block cutter. We at Moffitt Cancer Center have standardized our system in a way that minimizes some of the human errors, while keeping the procedure fast and accurate. This system uses a tray template that simulates our blocking trays. The function of this tray is to position the styrofoam (and therefore the cerrobend block) on the tray in such a way as to insure proper alignment with the treatment machine. We also feel this improves upon some common designs using random holes or hole patterns, which may interfere with the treatment area. This system is not overly sophisticated and can be easily implemented in most radiation therapy departments.

  20. Block Matching for Object Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gyaourova, A; Kamath, C; Cheung, S

    2003-10-13

    Models which describe road traffic patterns can be helpful in detection and/or prevention of uncommon and dangerous situations. Such models can be built by the use of motion detection algorithms applied to video data. Block matching is a standard technique for encoding motion in video compression algorithms. We explored the capabilities of the block matching algorithm when applied for object tracking. The goal of our experiments is two-fold: (1) to explore the abilities of the block matching algorithm on low resolution and low frame rate video and (2) to improve the motion detection performance by the use of different search techniques during the process of block matching. Our experiments showed that the block matching algorithm yields good object tracking results and can be used with high success on low resolution and low frame rate video data. We observed that different searching methods have small effect on the final results. In addition, we proposed a technique based on frame history, which successfully overcame false motion caused by small camera movements.

  1. Toy Blocks and Rotational Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varieschi, Gabriele U.; Jully, Isabel R.

    2005-09-01

    Have you ever observed a child playing with toy blocks? A favorite game is to build towers and then make them topple like falling trees. To the eye of a trained physicist this should immediately look like an example of the physics of "falling chimneys," when tall structures bend and break in mid-air while falling to the ground. The game played with toy blocks can actually reproduce well what is usually seen in photographs of falling towers, such as the one that appeared on the cover of the September 1976 issue of The Physics Teacher. In this paper we describe how we performed and analyzed these simple but interesting experiments with toy blocks.

  2. Radial coordinates for conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogervorst, Matthijs; Rychkov, Slava

    2013-05-01

    We develop the theory of conformal blocks in CFTd expressing them as power series with Gegenbauer polynomial coefficients. Such series have a clear physical meaning when the conformal block is analyzed in radial quantization: individual terms describe contributions of descendants of a given spin. Convergence of these series can be optimized by a judicious choice of the radial quantization origin. We argue that the best choice is to insert the operators symmetrically. We analyze in detail the resulting “ρ-series” and show that it converges much more rapidly than for the commonly used variable z. We discuss how these conformal block representations can be used in the conformal bootstrap. In particular, we use them to derive analytically some bootstrap bounds whose existence was previously found numerically.

  3. Automatic blocking of nested loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Robert; Dongarra, Jack J.

    1990-01-01

    Blocked algorithms have much better properties of data locality and therefore can be much more efficient than ordinary algorithms when a memory hierarchy is involved. On the other hand, they are very difficult to write and to tune for particular machines. The reorganization is considered of nested loops through the use of known program transformations in order to create blocked algorithms automatically. The program transformations used are strip mining, loop interchange, and a variant of loop skewing in which invertible linear transformations (with integer coordinates) of the loop indices are allowed. Some problems are solved concerning the optimal application of these transformations. It is shown, in a very general setting, how to choose a nearly optimal set of transformed indices. It is then shown, in one particular but rather frequently occurring situation, how to choose an optimal set of block sizes.

  4. Block-based neural networks.

    PubMed

    Moon, S W; Kong, S G

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a novel block-based neural network (BBNN) model and the optimization of its structure and weights based on a genetic algorithm. The architecture of the BBNN consists of a 2D array of fundamental blocks with four variable input/output nodes and connection weights. Each block can have one of four different internal configurations depending on the structure settings, The BBNN model includes some restrictions such as 2D array and integer weights in order to allow easier implementation with reconfigurable hardware such as field programmable logic arrays (FPGA). The structure and weights of the BBNN are encoded with bit strings which correspond to the configuration bits of FPGA. The configuration bits are optimized globally using a genetic algorithm with 2D encoding and modified genetic operators. Simulations show that the optimized BBNN can solve engineering problems such as pattern classification and mobile robot control. PMID:18244385

  5. Block LancZos PACKage

    2005-05-01

    BLZPACK (for Block LancZos PACKage) is a standard Fortran 77 implementation of the block Lanczos algorithm intended for the solution of the standard eigenvalue problem Ax=ux or the generalized eigenvalue problem Ax=uBx, where A and B are real, sparse symmetric matrices, u and eigenvalue and x and eigenvector. The development of this eigensolver was motivated by the need to solve large, sparse, generalized problems from free vibration analyses in structural engineering. Several upgrades were performedmore » afterwards aiming at the solution of eigenvalues problems from a wider range of applications.« less

  6. Block LancZos PACKage

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Osni

    2005-05-01

    BLZPACK (for Block LancZos PACKage) is a standard Fortran 77 implementation of the block Lanczos algorithm intended for the solution of the standard eigenvalue problem Ax=ux or the generalized eigenvalue problem Ax=uBx, where A and B are real, sparse symmetric matrices, u and eigenvalue and x and eigenvector. The development of this eigensolver was motivated by the need to solve large, sparse, generalized problems from free vibration analyses in structural engineering. Several upgrades were performed afterwards aiming at the solution of eigenvalues problems from a wider range of applications.

  7. Teaching Numeracy, Language, and Literacy with Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburger, Abigail; Vaughan, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    By enhancing the block play in classrooms, teachers can help children acquire the emerging skills they need--with numbers, vocabulary, and reading--for kindergarten readiness. Newburger and Vaughan provide a theoretical foundation describing why and how to use blocks, and give guidance on selecting blocks and block safety. With chapters on the…

  8. Unit Blocks: A Curriculum for Early Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Mary Ann

    Teachers can use unit blocks as tools for directed learning activities, or blocks can be reserved for children's discovery learning experiences. To use unit blocks for discovery learning, children need adequate, protected space and sufficient, uninterrupted time. Given opportunities for free play with unit blocks, children progress through seven…

  9. Planning Block Play Experiences for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Betty Ruth

    Playing with blocks can facilitate the creative, social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development of young children. This article presents information and activities concerning block play and its role in young children's experience. Topics covered include: (1) types of blocks; (2) selection of blocks and accessories; (3) planning of the…

  10. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  11. Sinoatrial block complicating legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Medarov, B; Tongia, S; Rossoff, L

    2003-11-01

    A 59 year old woman presented with acute onset of fever, chills, diaphoresis, vague chest discomfort, and was found to be hypotensive and tachypnoeic. An electrocardiogram demonstrated sinoatrial block with a junctional rhythm between 50 and 80 beats/min. All cultures were negative and imaging studies unrevealing. Her urine tested positive for Legionella pneumophila antigen serotype 1 and she improved with antibiotic therapy.

  12. The Federal Block Grant Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Seymour; Linster, Charles A.

    Block grants have been defined as programs through which funds are provided to governmental units, such as state or local governments, based upon a statutory formula. They are usually provided for use in a defined, but broad, area and at the recipient's discretion. This document describes the historical development of these grants and the role of…

  13. Preschoolers' Thinking during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccolo, Diana L.; Test, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Children build foundations for mathematical thinking in early play and exploration. During the preschool years, children enjoy exploring mathematical concepts--such as patterns, shape, spatial relationships, and measurement--leading them to spontaneously engage in mathematical thinking during play. Block play is one common example that engages…

  14. Block Scheduling: Three Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Edward L.

    This is a followup study of teacher perceptions regarding block scheduling. The original study was done in 1996 at a small city high school in a predominantly rural county in Ohio. At that time, lack of communication was found to be the central theme in the resistance that emerged. This paper is based on data from written responses to open-ended…

  15. A soluble factor secreted by an HIV-1-resistant cell line blocks transcription through inactivating the DNA-binding capacity of the NF-kappa B p65/p50 dimer.

    PubMed

    Lesner, Adam; Li, Yuchang; Nitkiewicz, Jadwiga; Li, Guanhua; Kartvelishvili, Alex; Kartvelishvili, Magdalena; Simm, Malgorzata

    2005-08-15

    The identity and activity of several anti-HIV soluble factor(s) secreted by CD8 and CD4 T lymphocytes have been determined; however, some of them still await definition. We have established an HIV-1-resistant, transformed CD4 T cell line that secretes HIV-1 resistance protein(s). Our studies indicate that this protein(s), called HIV-1 resistance factor (HRF), inhibits transcription of the virus by interfering with the activity of NF-kappaB. In the present report we identified the site at which HRF exerts this inhibition by evaluating a set of discrete events in NF-kappaB action. We tested the kappaB oligonucleotide binding activity in nuclei of resistant cells, nuclear translocation and binding to the HIV-1 long terminal repeat of p65 and p50 proteins from susceptible cells after exposure to HRF, and the binding of recombinant p50 to the kappaB oligonucleotide in vitro as affected by prior or simultaneous exposure to HRF. The results of this experimental schema indicate that HRF interacts with p50 after it enters the nucleus, but before its binding to DNA and that this interaction impedes the formation of an NF-kappaB-DNA complex required for the promotion of transcription. These findings suggest that HRF mediates a novel innate immune response to virus infection. PMID:16081828

  16. Indole-3-carbinol enhances the resolution of rat liver fibrosis and stimulates hepatic stellate cell apoptosis by blocking the inhibitor of κB kinase α/inhibitor of κB-α/nuclear factor-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Ping, Jie; Gao, Ai-mei; Qin, Hai-quan; Wei, Xiao-ning; Bai, Jing; Liu, Lian; Li, Xiao-hai; Li, Rui-wen; Ao, Ying; Wang, Hui

    2011-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in liver fibrosis, and the clearance of activated HSC by apoptosis is associated with the resolution of liver fibrosis. The development of strategies that promote this process in a selective way is therefore important. We evaluated the effects of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a nutritional component derived from vegetables from the Brassica family, on liver fibrosis and HSC apoptosis. The in vivo therapeutic effects of I3C were monitored in three rat models of liver fibrosis induced by porcine serum, bile duct ligation, or multiple hepatotoxic factors, and its proapoptotic effect and molecular mechanism were studied in vitro in HSC-T6, a rat HSC line. The results showed that I3C treatment significantly reduced the number of activated HSC in the livers of rats with liver fibrosis. In histopathology, I3C reduced hepatocyte degeneration and necrosis, accelerated collagen degradation, and promoted the reversal of liver fibrosis. I3C prescribed to HSC-T6 resulted in morphologic alterations typical of apoptosis and DNA cleavage to a nucleosomal ladder. Moreover, I3C significantly increased the HSC-T6 apoptosis rate and the expression ratio of Bax to Bcl-2. High-throughput protein array analysis indicated that the tumor necrosis factor-α/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signal pathway participated in I3C-induced HSC-T6 apoptosis. Western blot and electrophoretic mobility-shift assay confirmed that I3C inhibited the phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB kinase α and inhibitor of κB-α and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In conclusion, I3C could promote the reverse process of liver fibrosis in vivo and induce apoptosis of activated HSC in vitro, which indicates the use of I3C as a potential therapeutic agent in liver fibrosis treatment.

  17. Suppression of MMP-9 and FAK expression by pomolic acid via blocking of NF-κB/ERK/mTOR signaling pathways in growth factor-stimulated human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hyun; Cho, Yoon Young; Yoon, Seong Woo; Park, Byoungduck

    2016-09-01

    The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) have been implicated in the invasion, metastasis and cell motility of cancer cells. It is considered that epidermal growth factor (EGF) may increase cell motility, an event involved in cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Pomolic acid (PA), an active triterpenoid from Euscaphis japonica, is known to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of cancer cells, but the effect of PA on the invasiveness of cancer cells is largely unknown. In this study, we first determined the molecular mechanism by which PA inhibits the migratory and invasive abilities of highly metastatic MDA-MB‑231 cells. Transwell invasion, wound-healing assay and F-actin reorganization showed that PA significantly inhibits the EGF-induced invasion, migration and cell motility by reducing expression of MMP-9 and FAK phosphorylation. In particular, PA potently suppressed the phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, extraceullar signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Furthermore, PA treatment inhibited the DNA binding activity of NF-κB and activator protein (AP)-1, which is known to mediate the expression of EGFR and MMP-9. These results suggest that PA may be a potential therapeutic candidate for treatment of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27573547

  18. Manassantin B isolated from Saururus chinensis inhibits cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin D2 generation by blocking Fyn-mediated nuclear factor-kappaB and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways in bone marrow derived-mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of manassantin B (Man B) isolated from Saururus chinensis (S. chinensis) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generation in mouse bone marrow derived-mast cells (BMMCs). Man B inhibited the generation of PGD2 dose-dependently by inhibiting COX-2 expression in immunoglobulin E (IgE)/Ag-stimulated BMMCs. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of COX-2 expression by Man B, the effects of Man B on the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), a transcription factor essential and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) for COX-2 induction, were examined. Man B attenuated the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and its DNA-binding activity by inhibiting inhibitors of kappa Bα (IκBα) degradation and concomitantly suppressing IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation. In addition, Man B suppressed phosphorylation of MAPKs including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. It was also found that Man B suppressed Fyn kinase activation and consequent downstream signaling processes, including those involving Syk, Gab2, and Akt. Taken together, the present results suggest that Man B suppresses COX-2 dependent PGD2 generation by primarily inhibiting Fyn kinase in FcεRI-mediated mast cells.

  19. A basic review on the inferior alveolar nerve block techniques

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Hesham

    2014-01-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve block is the most common injection technique used in dentistry and many modifications of the conventional nerve block have been recently described in the literature. Selecting the best technique by the dentist or surgeon depends on many factors including the success rate and complications related to the selected technique. Dentists should be aware of the available current modifications of the inferior alveolar nerve block techniques in order to effectively choose between these modifications. Some operators may encounter difficulty in identifying the anatomical landmarks which are useful in applying the inferior alveolar nerve block and rely instead on assumptions as to where the needle should be positioned. Such assumptions can lead to failure and the failure rate of inferior alveolar nerve block has been reported to be 20-25% which is considered very high. In this basic review, the anatomical details of the inferior alveolar nerve will be given together with a description of its both conventional and modified blocking techniques; in addition, an overview of the complications which may result from the application of this important technique will be mentioned. PMID:25886095

  20. Lovastatin decreases the synthesis of inflammatory mediators in the hippocampus and blocks the hyperthermia of rats submitted to long-lasting status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Telma Luciana Furtado; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Silva, Michele Juliana Vieira; Bandeira, Tatiane de Aquino; Perosa, Sandra Regina; Argañaraz, Gustavo Adolfo; Silva, Marcelo de Paula; Araujo, Thiago Rodrigues; Frangiotti, Maria Isabel Berzaghi; Amado, Débora; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Silva, José Antonio; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça

    2011-01-01

    Statins may act on inflammatory responses, decreasing oxidative stress and also reducing temperature after a brain ischemic insult. Previous data have indicated that statins protect neurons from death during long-lasting status epilepticus (SE) and attenuate seizure behaviors in animals treated with kainic acid. In this context, the study described here aimed to investigate the effect of lovastatin on body temperature and on mRNA expression levels of hippocampal cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and kinin B1 and B2 receptors of rats submitted to pilocarpine-induced SE. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed a significant decrease in mRNA expression of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and kinin B1 receptor in animals with SE treated with lovastatin, compared with untreated animals with SE (P<0.001). Lovastatin also reduced SE-induced hyperthermia, indicating that mechanisms related to brain protection are triggered by this drug under conditions associated with acute excitotoxicity or long-lasting SE. PMID:21130693

  1. The Nurr1 Activator 1,1-Bis(3'-Indolyl)-1-(p-Chlorophenyl)Methane Blocks Inflammatory Gene Expression in BV-2 Microglial Cells by Inhibiting Nuclear Factor κB.

    PubMed

    De Miranda, Briana R; Popichak, Katriana A; Hammond, Sean L; Jorgensen, Bryce A; Phillips, Aaron T; Safe, Stephen; Tjalkens, Ronald B

    2015-06-01

    NR4A family orphan nuclear receptors are an important class of transcription factors for development and homeostasis of dopaminergic neurons that also inhibit expression of inflammatory genes in glial cells. The identification of NR4A2 (Nurr1) as a suppressor of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-related neuroinflammatory genes in microglia and astrocytes suggests that this receptor could be a target for pharmacologic intervention in neurologic disease, but compounds that promote this activity are lacking. Selected diindolylmethane compounds (C-DIMs) have been shown to activate or inactivate nuclear receptors, including Nurr1, in cancer cells and also suppress astrocyte inflammatory signaling in vitro. Based upon these data, we postulated that C-DIM12 [1,1-bis(3'-indolyl)-1-(p-chlorophenyl) methane] would suppress inflammatory signaling in microglia by a Nurr1-dependent mechanism. C-DIM12 inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of NF-κB-regulated genes in BV-2 microglia including nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), and the effects were attenuated by Nurr1-RNA interference. Additionally, C-DIM12 decreased NF-κB activation in NF-κB-GFP (green fluorescent protein) reporter cells and enhanced nuclear translocation of Nurr1 primary microglia. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that C-DIM12 decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced p65 binding to the NOS2 promoter and concurrently enhanced binding of Nurr1 to the p65-binding site. Consistent with these findings, C-DIM12 also stabilized binding of the Corepressor for Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription Factor (CoREST) and the Nuclear Receptor Corepressor 2 (NCOR2). Collectively, these data identify C-DIM12 as a modulator of Nurr1 activity that results in inhibition of NF-κB-dependent gene expression in glial cells by stabilizing nuclear corepressor proteins, which reduces binding of p65 to inflammatory gene promoters.

  2. [Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies in congenital heart block].

    PubMed

    Barrios Prieto, Ernesto; Martínez Ceccopieri, David Alejandro; Panduro Barón, J Guadalupe; Fajardo Dueñas, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    Describe a case of a female patient having anti-Ro/SSA antibodies without any other risk factor or collagen disease. In her first pregnancy a congenital heart block and hydrops in the fetus were diagnosed, and these caused stillbirth. In a second pregnancy an in utero treatment resulted in the succesful delivery of a normal child.

  3. Expression of Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome is Blocked by a Nonimmunoglobulin Protein in Plasma from Infected Cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P.; Ferrer, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma of cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus contains a soluble factor that blocks the expression of the viral genome in cultured lymphocytes. The blocking factor is not present in plasma of bovine leukemia virus-free cattle or of cattle infected with common bovine viruses. Blocking of bovine leukemia virus expression by the plasma factor is reversible, and seems to be mediated by a nonimmunoglobulin protein molecule.

  4. Belos Block Linear Solvers Package

    2004-03-01

    Belos is an extensible and interoperable framework for large-scale, iterative methods for solving systems of linear equations with multiple right-hand sides. The motivation for this framework is to provide a generic interface to a collection of algorithms for solving large-scale linear systems. Belos is interoperable because both the matrix and vectors are considered to be opaque objects--only knowledge of the matrix and vectors via elementary operations is necessary. An implementation of Balos is accomplished viamore » the use of interfaces. One of the goals of Belos is to allow the user flexibility in specifying the data representation for the matrix and vectors and so leverage any existing software investment. The algorithms that will be included in package are Krylov-based linear solvers, like Block GMRES (Generalized Minimal RESidual) and Block CG (Conjugate-Gradient).« less

  5. Dissolution patterns on caramel blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Berhanu, Michael; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    We investigate erosion by dissolution processes. We perform laboratory experiments on hard caramel bodies, which dissolve on a short timescale, compared to geological material such as limestone. We put a block of caramel, tilted from the horizontal, in a water tank without flow. The dissolution syrup, which is denser than pure water, sinks and the flow detaching from the surface creates patterns underneath the caramel block. These patterns result from the coupled dynamics of the flow detaching and the eroding surface and are reminiscent of scallops observed in the walls of phreatic cave passages. We investigate the mechanisms of formation of these structures and their evolution depending on several parameters such as the fluid density or the flow velocity. We finally parallel the formation of patterns on melting iceberg.

  6. Multi-level block permutation

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Anderson M.; Webster, Matthew A.; Vidaurre, Diego; Nichols, Thomas E.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Under weak and reasonable assumptions, mainly that data are exchangeable under the null hypothesis, permutation tests can provide exact control of false positives and allow the use of various non-standard statistics. There are, however, various common examples in which global exchangeability can be violated, including paired tests, tests that involve repeated measurements, tests in which subjects are relatives (members of pedigrees) — any dataset with known dependence among observations. In these cases, some permutations, if performed, would create data that would not possess the original dependence structure, and thus, should not be used to construct the reference (null) distribution. To allow permutation inference in such cases, we test the null hypothesis using only a subset of all otherwise possible permutations, i.e., using only the rearrangements of the data that respect exchangeability, thus retaining the original joint distribution unaltered. In a previous study, we defined exchangeability for blocks of data, as opposed to each datum individually, then allowing permutations to happen within block, or the blocks as a whole to be permuted. Here we extend that notion to allow blocks to be nested, in a hierarchical, multi-level definition. We do not explicitly model the degree of dependence between observations, only the lack of independence; the dependence is implicitly accounted for by the hierarchy and by the permutation scheme. The strategy is compatible with heteroscedasticity and variance groups, and can be used with permutations, sign flippings, or both combined. We evaluate the method for various dependence structures, apply it to real data from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) as an example application, show that false positives can be avoided in such cases, and provide a software implementation of the proposed approach. PMID:26074200

  7. Uav Photogrammetry: Block Triangulation Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, R.; Pagliari, D.; Passoni, D.; Pinto, L.; Sona, G.; Dosso, P.

    2013-08-01

    UAVs systems represent a flexible technology able to collect a big amount of high resolution information, both for metric and interpretation uses. In the frame of experimental tests carried out at Dept. ICA of Politecnico di Milano to validate vector-sensor systems and to assess metric accuracies of images acquired by UAVs, a block of photos taken by a fixed wing system is triangulated with several software. The test field is a rural area included in an Italian Park ("Parco Adda Nord"), useful to study flight and imagery performances on buildings, roads, cultivated and uncultivated vegetation. The UAV SenseFly, equipped with a camera Canon Ixus 220HS, flew autonomously over the area at a height of 130 m yielding a block of 49 images divided in 5 strips. Sixteen pre-signalized Ground Control Points, surveyed in the area through GPS (NRTK survey), allowed the referencing of the block and accuracy analyses. Approximate values for exterior orientation parameters (positions and attitudes) were recorded by the flight control system. The block was processed with several software: Erdas-LPS, EyeDEA (Univ. of Parma), Agisoft Photoscan, Pix4UAV, in assisted or automatic way. Results comparisons are given in terms of differences among digital surface models, differences in orientation parameters and accuracies, when available. Moreover, image and ground point coordinates obtained by the various software were independently used as initial values in a comparative adjustment made by scientific in-house software, which can apply constraints to evaluate the effectiveness of different methods of point extraction and accuracies on ground check points.

  8. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  9. Nanoparticles: scaffolds and building blocks.

    PubMed

    Shenhar, Roy; Rotello, Vincent M

    2003-07-01

    Nanoparticles provide key tools for bridging the gap between "bottom-up" synthetic methods and "top-down" fabrication. In this Account we describe some of the unique structural aspects of nanoparticles and the use of these attributes to the creation of devices with tunable specificity and environmental response. We also explore the use of nanoparticles as "building blocks" for the creation of nanocomposite materials that feature structural control from the molecular to the micron scale.

  10. Carrying-over effects of GVBD blocking on post-blocking meiotic progression of oocytes: species difference and the signaling pathway leading to MPF activation.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Lian, Hua-Yu; Gao, Yan; Sun, Ming-Ju; Gong, Shuai; Zheng, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Chuan-Xin; Tan, Jing-He

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to improve the quality of in vitro matured oocytes by blocking germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and allowing more time for ooplasmic maturation have achieved little due to a lack of knowledge on the molecular events during GVBD blocking. Such knowledge is also important for studies aimed at regulating gene expression in maturing oocytes prior to GVBD. We studied species difference and signaling pathways leading to the carrying-over effect of GVBD blocking on post-blocking meiotic progression (PBMP). Overall, GVBD-blocking with roscovitine decelerated PBMP of mouse oocytes but accelerated that of pig oocytes. During blocking culture, whereas cyclin B of pig oocytes increased continuously, that of mouse oocytes declined first and then increased slowly. In both species, (a) whereas active CDC2A showed a dynamics similar to cyclin B, inactive CDC2A decreased continuously; (b) when oocytes were blocked in blocking medium containing cycloheximide, PBMP was decelerated significantly while cyclin B and active CDC2A decreasing to the lowest level; (c) whereas sodium vanadate in blocking medium reduced PBMP, epidermal growth factor (EGF) in blocking medium accelerated PBMP significantly with no effect on cyclin B levels. In conclusion, the EGF signaling cascade accelerated PBMP by promoting the pre-MPF (M-phase-promoting factor) to MPF conversion during GVBD blocking with roscovitine. The significant difference in PBMP observed between mouse and pig oocytes was caused by species difference in cyclin B dynamics during blocking culture as no species difference was observed in either pre-MPF to MPF conversion or the EGF signaling activity. PMID:25078078

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2-driven glioma progression is prevented by blocking a clinically significant integrin, integrin-linked kinase, and NF-κB network

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Kristen M.; Annala, Matti; Chua, Corrine Y. X.; Dunlap, Sarah M.; Liu, Yuexin; Hugen, Niek; Moore, Lynette M.; Cogdell, David; Hu, Limei; Nykter, Matti; Hess, Kenneth; Fuller, Gregory N.; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) is increasingly recognized as a glioma oncogene, emerging as a target for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we used an integrative approach to characterizing the IGFBP2 network, combining transcriptional profiling of human glioma with validation in glial cells and the replication-competent ASLV long terminal repeat with a splice acceptor/tv-a glioma mouse system. We demonstrated that IGFBP2 expression is closely linked to genes in the integrin and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) pathways and that these genes are associated with prognosis. We further showed that IGFBP2 activates integrin β1 and downstream invasion pathways, requires ILK to induce cell motility, and activates NF-κB. Most significantly, the IGFBP2/integrin/ILK/NF-κB network functions as a physiologically active signaling pathway in vivo by driving glioma progression; interfering with any point in the pathway markedly inhibits progression. The results of this study reveal a signaling pathway that is both targetable and highly relevant to improving the survival of glioma patients. PMID:22345562

  12. Monoclonal antibody to the type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) receptor blocks IGF-I receptor-mediated DNA synthesis: clarification of the mitogenic mechanisms of IGF-I and insulin in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Flier, J.S.; Usher, P.; Moses, A.C.

    1986-02-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I) stimulate an overlapping spectrum of biological responses in human skin fibroblasts. Although insulin and IGF-I are known to stimulate the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA in these cells, the identify of the receptor(s) that mediates this effect has not been fully clarified. The mouse anti-human IGF-I receptor antibody ..cap alpha..IR-3 binds with specificity to IGF-I but not to insulin receptors in human placental membranes; it also specifically inhibits the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-I but not /sup 125/I-labeled insulin to suspensions of human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. ..cap alpha..IR-3 competitively inhibits IGF-I-mediated stimulation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into DNA. This inhibition is dependent on the concentration of ..cap alpha..IR-3 and in the presence of a fixed antibody concentration can be partially overcome by high concentrations of IGF-I. In contrast, at concentrations of < 1 ..mu..g/ml, the effect of insulin to stimulate (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation is not inhibited by ..cap alpha..IR-3. However, the incremental effects of higher concentrations (> 1 ..mu..g/ml) of insulin on (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation are inhibited by ..cap alpha..IR-3. ..cap alpha..IR-3 is a highly specific antagonist of IGF-I receptor-mediated mitogenesis in human skin fibroblasts. By using this antibody, it is shown directly that insulin can act through the IGF-I receptor to stimulate DNA synthesis but can also activate this effect through the insulin receptor itself.

  13. Neutralization of gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha blocks in vivo synthesis of nitrogen oxides from L-arginine and protection against Francisella tularensis infection in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-treated mice.

    PubMed Central

    Green, S J; Nacy, C A; Schreiber, R D; Granger, D L; Crawford, R M; Meltzer, M S; Fortier, A H

    1993-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from Mycobacterium bovis BCG-infected C3H/HeN mice produced nitrite (NO2-, an oxidative end product of nitric oxide [NO] synthesis) and inhibited the growth of Francisella tularensis, a facultative intracellular bacterium. Both NO2- production and inhibition of bacterial growth were suppressed by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a substrate inhibitor of nitrogen oxidation of L-arginine, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Intraperitoneal injection of mice with BCG increased urinary nitrate (NO3-) excretion coincident with development of activated macrophages capable of secreting nitrogen oxides and inhibiting F. tularensis growth in vitro. Eight days after BCG inoculation, mice survived a normally lethal intraperitoneal challenge with F. tularensis. Treatment of these BCG-infected mice with MAbs to IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha at the time of BCG inoculation reduced urinary NO3- levels to those found in normal uninfected mice for up to 14 days. The same anticytokine antibody treatment abolished BCG-mediated protection against F. tularensis: mice died within 4 to 6 days. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-IFN-gamma or anti-TNF-alpha antibody 8 days after BCG infection also reduced urinary NO3- and abolished protection against F. tularensis. Isotype control (immunoglobulin G) or anti-interleukin 4 MAbs had little effect on these parameters at any time of treatment. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were clearly involved in the regulation of macrophage activation by BCG in vivo. Protection against F. tularensis challenge by BCG depended upon the physiological generation of reactive nitrogen oxides induced by these cytokines. PMID:8423095

  14. How much sun does sunblock block?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendryx, Jennifer

    2008-03-01

    Sunscreens vary by strength, brand, and active ingredients. Consumers want to know which product is most effective. Using a spectrometer, I am able to observe the behavior of UV rays when they encounter the sunscreen. The UV is expected to be absorbed or reflected at different amounts, depending on the active ingredients of the sunscreen. What is the cause of the variations? More importantly, how can these variations be measured? The objective of this experiment is to answer these questions with limited time and resources. I will take several spectra of transmitted and reflected UV rays and compare between samples how much of the UV is actually blocked. I hope to analyze several variable factors that may (or may not) change the effectiveness of sunscreen.

  15. Pulmonary embolism following celiac plexus block and neurolysis

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Miles S.; Kelly, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute pain in chronic disease requires the physician to choose from an arsenal of pain management techniques tailored to the individual patient. Celiac plexus block and neurolysis are commonly employed for the management of chronic abdominal pain, especially in debilitating conditions such as cancer or chronic pancreatitis. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, and produces few complications. We present a case of pulmonary embolism following a celiac plexus block and neurolysis procedure. Further study is required to determine if celiac plexus ablation, alone or in combination with other risk factors, may contribute to increased risk for pulmonary embolism in patients seeking treatment for chronic upper abdominal pain conditions. PMID:27365890

  16. The effect of the amount of blocking cue training on blocking of appetitive conditioning in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, David J; Jones, William S; Austen, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Conditioning of a target cue is blocked when it occurs in compound with another cue (blocking cue) that has already received conditioning. Although blocking of appetitive conditioning is commonly used in rodents as a test of selective learning, it has been demonstrated rarely in mice. In order to investigate the conditions that result in blocking in mice two studies tested the effect of the extent of prior blocking cue training on blocking of appetitive conditioning. Mice received either 80 or 200 trials of blocking cue training prior to compound conditioning. A control group received only compound training. Experiment 1 assessed the ability of a visual cue to block conditioning to an auditory target cue. Exposure to the context and the unconditioned stimulus, sucrose pellets, was equated across groups. Blocking was evident in mice that received 200, but not 80 training trials with the visual blocking cue. Responding to the blocking cue was similar across groups. Experiment 2 assessed the ability of an auditory cue to block conditioning to a visual target cue. Blocking was evident in mice trained with 80 and 200 auditory blocking cue trials. The results demonstrate that the strength of blocking in mice is dependent on the modality and experience of the blocking cue. Furthermore, prolonged training of the blocking cue after asymptotic levels of conditioned responding have been reached is necessary for blocking to occur under certain conditions suggesting that the strength of conditioned responding is a limited measure of learning.

  17. Replication forks blocked by protein-DNA complexes have limited stability in vitro.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Peter; Guy, Colin P

    2008-08-29

    There are many barriers that replication forks must overcome in order to duplicate a genome in vivo. These barriers include damage to the template DNA and proteins bound to this template. If replication is halted by such a block, then the block must be either removed or bypassed for replication to continue. If continuation of replication employs the original fork, avoiding the need to reload the replication apparatus, then the blocked replisome must retain functionality. In vivo studies of Escherichia coli replication forks suggest that replication forks blocked by protein-DNA complexes retain the ability to resume replication upon removal of the block for several hours. Here we tested the functional stability of replication forks reconstituted in vitro and blocked by lac repressor-operator complexes. Once a fork comes to a halt at such a block, it cannot continue subsequently to translocate through the block until addition of IPTG induces repressor dissociation. However, the ability to resume replication is retained only for 4-6 min regardless of the topological state of the template DNA. Comparison of our in vitro data with previous in vivo data suggests that either accessory factors that stabilise blocked forks are present in vivo or the apparent stability of blocked forks in vivo is due to continual reloading of the replication apparatus at the site of the block.

  18. Block Volume Estimation from the Discontinuity Spacing Measurements of Mesozoic Limestone Quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (Jv) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (Vb), the mean volumetric joint count (Jvb) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (Vin) and volumetric joint count (Jvi) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements. PMID:24696642

  19. Block volume estimation from the discontinuity spacing measurements of mesozoic limestone quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (J(v)) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (V(b)), the mean volumetric joint count (J(vb)) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (V(in)) and volumetric joint count (J(vi)) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements. PMID:24696642

  20. Hillslope-derived blocks retard river incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobe, Charles M.; Tucker, Gregory E.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-05-01

    The most common detachment-limited river incision models ignore the effects of sediment on fluvial erosion, yet steep reaches of mountain rivers often host clusters of large (>1 m) blocks. We argue that this distribution of blocks is a manifestation of an autogenic negative feedback in which fast vertical river incision steepens adjacent hillslopes, which deliver blocks to the channel. Blocks inhibit incision by shielding the bed and enhancing form drag. We explore this feedback with a 1-D channel-reach model in which block delivery by hillslopes depends on the river incision rate. Results indicate that incision-dependent block delivery can explain the block distribution in Boulder Creek, Colorado. The proposed negative feedback may significantly slow knickpoint retreat, channel adjustment, and landscape response compared to rates predicted by current theory. The influence of hillslope-derived blocks may complicate efforts to extract base level histories from river profiles.

  1. Workflow in interventional radiology: nerve blocks and facet blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddoway, Donald; Ingeholm, Mary Lou; Burgert, Oliver; Neumuth, Thomas; Watson, Vance; Cleary, Kevin

    2006-03-01

    Workflow analysis has the potential to dramatically improve the efficiency and clinical outcomes of medical procedures. In this study, we recorded the workflow for nerve block and facet block procedures in the interventional radiology suite at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC, USA. We employed a custom client/server software architecture developed by the Innovation Center for Computer Assisted Surgery (ICCAS) at the University of Leipzig, Germany. This software runs in an internet browser, and allows the user to record the actions taken by the physician during a procedure. The data recorded during the procedure is stored as an XML document, which can then be further processed. We have successfully gathered data on a number if cases using a tablet PC, and these preliminary results show the feasibility of using this software in an interventional radiology setting. We are currently accruing additional cases and when more data has been collected we will analyze the workflow of these procedures to look for inefficiencies and potential improvements.

  2. Method for making block siloxane copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Butler, N.L.; Jessop, E.S.; Kolb, J.R.

    1981-02-25

    A method for synthesizing block polysiloxane copolymers is disclosed. Diorganoscyclosiloxanes and an end-blocking compound are interacted in the presence of a ring opening polymerization catalyst, producing a blocked prepolymer. The prepolymer is then interacted with a silanediol, resulting in condensation polymerization of the prepolymers. A second end-blocking compound is subsequently introduced to end-cap the polymers and copolymers formed from the condensation polymerization.

  3. Method for making block siloxane copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Nora; Jessop, Edward S.; Kolb, John R.

    1982-01-01

    A method for synthesizing block polysiloxane copolymers. Diorganoscyclosiloxanes and an end-blocking compound are interacted in the presence of a ring opening polymerization catalyst, producing a blocked prepolymer. The prepolymer is then interacted with a silanediol, resulting in condensation polymerization of the prepolymers. A second end-blocking compound is subsequently introduced to end-cap the polymers and copolymers formed from the condensation polymerization.

  4. Pattern transfer using block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaodan; Gunkel, Ilja; Russell, Thomas P

    2013-10-13

    To meet the increasing demand for patterning smaller feature sizes, a lithography technique is required with the ability to pattern sub-20 nm features. While top-down photolithography is approaching its limit in the continued drive to meet Moore's law, the use of directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCPs) offers a promising route to meet this challenge in achieving nanometre feature sizes. Recent developments in BCP lithography and in the DSA of BCPs are reviewed. While tremendous advances have been made in this field, there are still hurdles that need to be overcome to realize the full potential of BCPs and their actual use.

  5. Large block test status report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, D.G.; Lin, W.; Blair, S.C.

    1997-08-26

    This report is intended to serve as a status report, which essentially transmits the data that have been collected to date on the Large Block Test (LBT). The analyses of data will be performed during FY98, and then a complete report will be prepared. This status report includes introductory material that is not needed merely to transmit data but is available at this time and therefore included. As such, this status report will serve as the template for the future report, and the information is thus preserved.

  6. Bullet-Block Science Video Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A science video blog, which has gone viral, shows a wooden block shot by a vertically aimed rifle. The video shows that the block hit dead center goes exactly as high as the one shot off-center. (Fig. 1). The puzzle is that the block shot off-center carries rotational kinetic energy in addition to the gravitational potential energy. This leads a…

  7. Block Play: Practical Suggestions for Common Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunks, Karyn Wellhousen

    2009-01-01

    Learning materials and teaching methods used in early childhood classrooms have fluctuated greatly over the past century. However, one learning tool has stood the test of time: Wood building blocks, often called unit blocks, continue to be a source of pleasure and learning for young children at play. Wood blocks have the unique capacity to engage…

  8. Imide/arylene ether block copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Bass, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Two series of imide/arylene either block copolymers were prepared using an arylene ether block and either an amorphous or semi-crystalline imide block. The resulting copolymers were characterized and selected physical and mechanical properties were determined. These results, as well as comparisons to the homopolymer properties, are discussed.

  9. Writer's block in a Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sy-Ying; Krashen, Stephen

    2003-10-01

    To assess whether writer's block occurs in languages other than English, a Chinese language translation of Rose's Writer's Block questionnaire was administered to 98 university students in Taiwan. Analysis suggests that writer's block occurs for Chinese students, and, as in English, it is related to premature editing and to a lack of strategies for dealing with complex writing tasks.

  10. 31 CFR 515.319 - Blocked account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account. 515.319 Section 515... § 515.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals or...

  11. 31 CFR 515.319 - Blocked account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account. 515.319 Section 515... § 515.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals or...

  12. 31 CFR 515.319 - Blocked account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account. 515.319 Section 515... § 515.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals or...

  13. 31 CFR 515.319 - Blocked account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account. 515.319 Section 515... § 515.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals or...

  14. 31 CFR 515.319 - Blocked account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account. 515.319 Section 515... § 515.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals or...

  15. 31 CFR 500.319 - Blocked account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account. 500.319 Section 500... § 500.319 Blocked account. The term blocked account shall mean an account in which any designated national has an interest, with respect to which account payments, transfers or withdrawals of...

  16. Encoders for block-circulant LDPC codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus to encode message input symbols in accordance with an accumulate-repeat-accumulate code with repetition three or four are disclosed. Block circulant matrices are used. A first method and apparatus make use of the block-circulant structure of the parity check matrix. A second method and apparatus use block-circulant generator matrices.

  17. Blockbusters: Ideas for the Block Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Polly K.; Nesmith, Jaynie

    1996-01-01

    Goals of block building in early childhood classrooms focus on physical, social, cognitive, and emotional development. Reports survey results of the value teachers place on block play. Offers illustrations of task cards to use with blocks in math, language arts, social studies, and science. Discusses guidelines and suggests idea cards and sentence…

  18. Naming Block Structures: A Multimodal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Lynn; Uhry, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    This study describes symbolic representation in block play in a culturally diverse suburban preschool classroom. Block play is "multimodal" and can allow children to experiment with materials to represent the world in many forms of literacy. Combined qualitative and quantitative data from seventy-seven block structures were collected and analyzed.…

  19. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  20. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  1. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  2. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  3. 43 CFR 8.4 - Blocking out.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Blocking out. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior JOINT POLICIES OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.4 Blocking out. Blocking out will be accomplished...

  4. MARINE BOTTOM COMMUNITIES OF BLOCK ISLAND WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sea has long been an integral part of Block Island's natural history, beginning when the rising sea surrounded the high spot on a Pleistocene terminal moraine that became Block Island. The southern New England continental shelf, which lies around Block Island, and the Great S...

  5. Evaluating small-body landing hazards due to blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, C.; Rodgers, D.; Barnouin, O.; Murchie, S.; Chabot, N.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Landed missions represent a vital stage of spacecraft exploration of planetary bodies. Landed science allows for a wide variety of measurements essential to unraveling the origin and evolution of a body that are not possible remotely, including but not limited to compositional measurements, microscopic grain characterization, and the physical properties of the regolith. To date, two spacecraft have performed soft landings on the surface of a small body. In 2001, the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission performed a controlled descent and landing on (433) Eros following the completion of its mission [1]; in 2005, the Hayabusa spacecraft performed two touch-and-go maneuvers at (25143) Itokawa [2]. Both landings were preceded by rendezvous spacecraft reconnaissance, which enabled selection of a safe landing site. Three current missions have plans to land on small bodies (Rosetta, Hayabusa 2, and OSIRIS-REx); several other mission concepts also include small-body landings. Small-body landers need to land at sites having slopes and block abundances within spacecraft design limits. Due to the small scale of the potential hazards, it can be difficult or impossible to fully characterize a landing surface before the arrival of the spacecraft at the body. Although a rendezvous mission phase can provide global reconnaissance from which a landing site can be chosen, reasonable a priori assurance that a safe landing site exists is needed to validate the design approach for the spacecraft. Method: Many robotic spacecraft have landed safely on the Moon and Mars. Images of these landing sites, as well as more recent, extremely high-resolution orbital datasets, have enabled the comparison of orbital block observations to the smaller blocks that pose hazards to landers. Analyses of the Surveyor [3], Viking 1 and 2, Mars Pathfinder, Phoenix, Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity landing sites [4--8] have indicated that for a reasonable difference in size (a factor

  6. Block-bordered diagonalization and parallel iterative solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, F.; Dag, H.; Bruggencate, M. ten

    1994-12-31

    One of the most common techniques for enhancing parallelism in direct sparse matrix methods is the reorganization of a matrix into a blocked-bordered structure. Incomplete LDU factorization is a very good preconditioner for PCG in serial environments. However, the inherent sequential nature of the preconditioning step makes it less desirable in parallel environments. This paper explores the use of BBD (Blocked Bordered Diagonalization) in connection with ILU preconditioners. The paper shows that BBD-based ILU preconditioners are quite amenable to parallel processing. Neglecting entries from the entire border can result in a blocked diagonal matrix. The result is a great increase in parallelism at the expense of additional iterations. Experiments on the Sequent Symmetry shared memory machine using (mostly) power system that matrices indicate that the method is generally better than conventional ILU preconditioners and in many cases even better than partitioned inverse preconditioners, without the initial setup disadvantages of partitioned inverse preconditioners.

  7. Organic photovoltaics incorporating electron conducting exciton blocking layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassiter, Brian E.; Wei, Guodan; Wang, Siyi; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.; Diev, Viacheslav V.; Thompson, Mark E.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate that 3,4,9,10 perylenetetracarboxylic bisbenzimidazole (PTCBI) and 1,4,5,8-napthalene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (NTCDA) can function as electron conducting and exciton blocking layers when interposed between the acceptor layer and cathode. A low-resistance contact is provided by PTCBI, while NTCDA acts as an exciton blocking layer and optical spacer. Both materials serve as efficient electron conductors, leading to a fill factor as high as 0.70. By using an NTCDA/PTCBI compound blocking layer structure in a functionalized-squaraine/C60-based device, we obtain a spectrally corrected power conversion efficiency of 5.1±0.1% under 1 sun, AM 1.5G simulated solar illumination, an improvement of >25% compared to an analogous device using a conventional bathocuproine layer that has previously been shown to conduct electrons via damage-induced midgap states.

  8. Efficacy of continuous epidural block in acute herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo Na; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Eung Don

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate efficacy of continuous epidural block for prevent postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) progression in cases of acute herpes zoster with severe pain and also to identify predictive factors for PHN in such conditions. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of patients with herpes zoster who underwent continuous epidural block between March 2013 and October 2015. Time points were set as 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset. PHN was defined as the presence of pain with NRS ≥3 at certain time points. The incidence of developing PHN was 38.1%, 27.0%, and 19.0% 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after zoster onset, respectively. Age and duration of catheterization were predictive factors for PHN at 1 month. Age, duration of catheterization, and NRS at first visit were identified as predictive factors for PHN at 3 months. Presence of diabetes, duration of catheterization, and NRS during catheterization were significant predictive factors for PHN at 6 months. The incidence of PHN is higher in zoster patients with severe pain that requires continuous epidural block compared to incidence in the general population. Advanced age and severe initial pain intensity were predictive factors of PHN development. Prolonged catheterization resulting from weak response to treatment strongly suggested progression to PHN. PMID:27512887

  9. Seismicity of the Jalisco Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Rutz, M.; Camarena-Garcia, M.; Trejo-Gomez, E.; Reyes-Davila, G.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2002-12-01

    In April 2002 began to transmit the stations of the first phase of Jalisco Telemetric Network located at the northwest of Jalisco Block and at the area of Volcan de Fuego (Colima Volcano), in June were deployed four additional MarsLite portable stations in the Bahia de Banderas area, and by the end of August one more portable station at Ceboruco Volcano. The data of these stations jointly with the data from RESCO (Colima Telemetric Network) give us the minimum seismic stations coverage to initiate in a systematic and permanent way the study of the seismicity in this very complex tectonic region. A preliminary analysis of seismicity based on the events registered by the networks using a shutter algorithm, confirms several important features proposed by microseismicity studies carried out between 1996 and 1998. A high level of seismicity inside and below of Rivera plate is observed, this fact suggest a very complex stress pattern acting on this plate. Shallow seismicity at south and east of Bahia de Banderas also suggest a complex stress pattern in this region of the Jalisco Block, events at more than 30 km depth are located under the mouth of the bay and in face of it, a feature denominated Banderas Boundary mark the change of the seismic regime at north of this latitude (20.75°N), however some shallow events were located at the region of Nayarit.

  10. Decoupling Processes in Block-and-ash Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanenkamp, E.; Davies, T.

    2009-05-01

    Lava dome collapse and collapse of lava flow fronts generate short-lived, highly mobile block-and-ash flows, usually comprising three components, a high-density, ground-hugging basal avalanche, a low-density ash cloud surge and a more dilute ash cloud on top. Generally the basal avalanche is valley-confined whereas the overlying surge has the ability to decouple from the dense basal part, overtop topographic barriers and affect greater areas than the basal avalanche, hence posing a larger hazard to the population. These processes have been observed at several volcanoes, e.g. Unzen (Japan), Merapi (Indonesia) and Soufriere Hills (Montserrat), resulting often in the loss of lives. Decoupling is often accentuated by topographic obstructions causing blocking or deflecting of the basal avalanche. Currently laboratory flume experiments are being undertaken to examine the factors initiating and influencing the decoupling processes of block-and-ash flows. A better understanding of the flow dynamics of a moving block-and-ash flow and of the interaction with the underlying substrate and topographic irregularities will provide better hazard zone delineation maps for the future. The experimental results will be used to investigate the emplacement of the block-and-ash flows at Mount Tarawera, New Zealand, where the deposits show indicators of possible decoupling processes during the AD 1305 Kaharoa eruptive episode.

  11. Complete atrioventricular block in adult Sjögren's syndrome with anti-Ro autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Sung, Myung Jun; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Young-Soo; Park, Chul-Yeon; Choe, Jung-Yoon

    2011-06-01

    Anti-Ro autoantibody is associated with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and neonatal lupus syndrome (i.e., congenital complete heart block in newborns). Generally, the adult atrioventricular (AV) node is believed to be relatively resistant to the scarring effects of anti-Ro/anti-La autoantibodies. However, there have been some reports of adult complete AV block in SS and SLE patients. Here, we report a case of complete heart block in primary SS with anti-Ro autoantibodies, with no other risk factor for the development of heart block, and review their etiological association.

  12. Novel Principle of Contactless Gauge Block Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Buchta, Zdeněk; Řeřucha, Šimon; Mikel, Břetislav; Čížek, Martin; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a novel principle of contactless gauge block calibration is presented. The principle of contactless gauge block calibration combines low-coherence interferometry and laser interferometry. An experimental setup combines Dowell interferometer and Michelson interferometer to ensure a gauge block length determination with direct traceability to the primary length standard. By monitoring both gauge block sides with a digital camera gauge block 3D surface measurements are possible too. The principle presented is protected by the Czech national patent No. 302948. PMID:22737012

  13. Peripheral nerve blocks for distal extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Offierski, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral nerve block is well suited for distal extremity surgery. Blocking the nerves at the distal extremity is easily done. It does not require ultrasound or stimulators to identify the nerve. Blocking nerves in the distal extremity is safe with low risk of toxicity. The effect of the nerve block is limited to the distribution of the nerve. The distal nerves in the lower extremity are sensory branches of the sciatic nerve. This provides a sensory block only. This has the advantage of allowing the patient to actively contract tendons in the foot and ambulate more quickly after surgery. PMID:24093651

  14. Stages of transformation of block elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeshko, V. A.; Evdokimova, O. V.; Babeshko, O. M.

    2016-05-01

    The property to have various representations is investigated for the block elements describing the solutions of boundary-value problems for sets of partial differential equations in the regions with a boundary. These representations have various destinations. One of the representations, which is called packed, is convenient for constructing solutions in block structures on the basis of solutions in separate blocks. Another representation, which is called unpacked, is convenient for a detailed investigation of the properties of solutions in an individual block of the block structure.

  15. BLOCKING OSCILLATOR DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Haase, J.A.

    1961-01-24

    A double-pulse generator, particuiarly a double-pulse generator comprising a blocking oscillator utilizing a feedback circuit to provide means for producing a second pulse within the recovery time of the blocking oscillator, is described. The invention utilized a passive network which permits adjustment of the spacing between the original pulses derived from the blocking oscillator and further utilizes the original pulses to trigger a circuit from which other pulses are initiated. These other pulses are delayed and then applied to the input of the blocking oscillator, with the result that the output from the oscillator circuit contains twice the number of pulses originally initiated by the blocking oscillator itself.

  16. Evaluation of Bi-Material Crack Using The Finite Block Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinneh, P.; Wen, P. H.

    2016-08-01

    The Finite Block Method has been employed in this paper to evaluate the stress intensity factor of a bi-material plate. The complex stress intensity factor components K1 and K2 determined by the Finite Block Method is compared with an equivalent Finite Element Method (ABAQUS) analysis. The paper demonstrates the accuracy of the Meshfree approach by the Finite Block Method without the arduous demand of meshing around the crack surface as seen on standard FEM crack analysis. This paper also describes the application of the polygonal singular core and the collocations points around the interface crack. A computational example for various E1/E2 material combinations is presented.

  17. Properties of concrete blocks prepared with low grade recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sun; Kou, Shi-cong; Wan, Hui-wen; Etxeberria, Miren

    2009-08-01

    Low grade recycled aggregates obtained from a construction waste sorting facility were tested to assess the feasibility of using these in the production of concrete blocks. The characteristics of the sorted construction waste are significantly different from that of crushed concrete rubbles that are mostly derived from demolition waste streams. This is due to the presence of higher percentages of non-concrete components (e.g. >10% soil, brick, tiles etc.) in the sorted construction waste. In the study reported in this paper, three series of concrete block mixtures were prepared by using the low grade recycled aggregates to replace (i) natural coarse granite (10mm), and (ii) 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% replacement levels of crushed stone fine (crushed natural granite <5mm) in the concrete blocks. Test results on properties such as density, compressive strength, transverse strength and drying shrinkage as well as strength reduction after exposure to 800 degrees C are presented below. The results show that the soil content in the recycled fine aggregate was an important factor in affecting the properties of the blocks produced and the mechanical strength deceased with increasing low grade recycled fine aggregate content. But the higher soil content in the recycled aggregates reduced the reduction of compressive strength of the blocks after exposure to high temperature due probably to the formation of a new crystalline phase. The results show that the low grade recycled aggregates obtained from the construction waste sorting facility has potential to be used as aggregates for making non-structural pre-cast concrete blocks.

  18. Block truncation signature coding for hyperspectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sumit; Chang, Chein-I.

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces a new signature coding which is designed based on the well-known Block Truncation Coding (BTC). It comprises of bit-maps of the signature blocks generated by different threshold criteria. Two new BTC-based algorithms are developed for signature coding, to be called Block Truncation Signature Coding (BTSC) and 2-level BTSC (2BTSC). In order to compare the developed BTC based algorithms with current binary signature coding schemes such as Spectral Program Analysis Manager (SPAM) developed by Mazer et al. and Spectral Feature-based Binary Coding (SFBC) by Qian et al., three different thresholding functions, local block mean, local block gradient, local block correlation are derived to improve the BTSC performance where the combined bit-maps generated by these thresholds can provide better spectral signature characterization. Experimental results reveal that the new BTC-based signature coding performs more effectively in characterizing spectral variations than currently available binary signature coding methods.

  19. Clinical significance of assessing Her2/neu expression in gastric cancer with dual tumor tissue paraffin blocks.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaowen; Wang, Haixing; Zeng, Haiying; Jin, Xuejuan; Sujie, Akesu; Xu, Chen; Liu, Yalan; Huang, Jie; Ji, Yuan; Tan, Yunshan; Liu, Tianshu; Hou, Yingyong; Qin, Jing; Sun, Yihong; Qin, Xinyu

    2015-06-01

    One paraffin block is routinely used for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2/neu) immunohistochemistry (IHC) assessment. Here, we investigated if picking 2 paraffin blocks for Her2/neu evaluation on 1 slide is an economical, efficient, and practical method, which may reduce false negativity of Her2/neu IHC assessment due to intratumoral heterogeneity. A total of 251 gastric cancer (GC) patients were divided into a cohort using 1 tumor tissue paraffin block (single-block group, n = 132) and a cohort using dual tumor tissue paraffin blocks (dual-block group, n = 119) when evaluating Her2/neu expression status by IHC. In dual-block group, we combined the results from 2 different paraffin blocks and used the higher one as the final score. The number of IHC 1+, 2+, and 3+ specimens in the single-block group was 31 (23.5%), 40 (30.3%), and 19 (14.4%), respectively. The combined final IHC score in the dual-block group of 1+, 2+, and 3+ was 26 (21.8%), 34 (28.6%), and 23 (19.3%), respectively. Inconsistent Her2/neu expression between blocks was found in 36 (30.3%) cases in the dual-block group. The pooled data in the single-block group and the dual-block group indicated that, when using dual blocks, the Her2/neu-positive (3+) rate of GC was higher compared to that in the single-block group. Our results implied that using dual paraffin blocks to assess Her2/neu expression of GC may help identify more patients with Her2/neu-positive GC who could benefit from targeted therapy, by reducing false-negative rate of Her2 status assessment. This is an efficient, economical, and practical method for Her2/neu evaluation of GC.

  20. Blanket Gate Would Address Blocks Of Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambe, John; Moopenn, Alexander; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1988-01-01

    Circuit-chip area used more efficiently. Proposed gate structure selectively allows and restricts access to blocks of memory in electronic neural-type network. By breaking memory into independent blocks, gate greatly simplifies problem of reading from and writing to memory. Since blocks not used simultaneously, share operational amplifiers that prompt and read information stored in memory cells. Fewer operational amplifiers needed, and chip area occupied reduced correspondingly. Cost per bit drops as result.

  1. The use of poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) as a microshunt to treat glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Leonard; Riss, Isabelle; Batlle, Juan F; Kato, Yasushi P; Martin, John B; Arrieta, Esdras; Palmberg, Paul; Parrish, Richard K; Weber, Bruce A; Kwon, Yongmoon; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-06-01

    The InnFocus MicroShunt® is a minimally invasive glaucoma drainage microtube used to shunt aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye to a flap formed under the conjunctiva and Tenon's capsule. The safety and clinical performance of this device approaches that of trabeculectomy with mitomycin C, the current 'gold standard' treatment for advanced glaucoma. The invention of a new biomaterial called poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) or 'SIBS' is the enabling factor which led to the success of this product. SIBS is ultrastable with virtually no foreign body reaction in the body, which manifests as clinically insignificant inflammation and capsule formation in the eye. The lack of capsule formation enables unobstructed flow through the 70 µm lumen tube and the achievement of controlled low intraocular pressure, which is important for the management of glaucoma. This article summarizes the integration of SIBS into a glaucoma drainage device and confirms its functionality with clinical success over a 2-year period. PMID:27047682

  2. The use of poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) as a microshunt to treat glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pinchuk, Leonard; Riss, Isabelle; Batlle, Juan F.; Kato, Yasushi P.; Martin, John B.; Arrieta, Esdras; Palmberg, Paul; Parrish, Richard K.; Weber, Bruce A.; Kwon, Yongmoon; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The InnFocus MicroShunt® is a minimally invasive glaucoma drainage microtube used to shunt aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye to a flap formed under the conjunctiva and Tenon’s capsule. The safety and clinical performance of this device approaches that of trabeculectomy with mitomycin C, the current ‘gold standard’ treatment for advanced glaucoma. The invention of a new biomaterial called poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) or ‘SIBS’ is the enabling factor which led to the success of this product. SIBS is ultrastable with virtually no foreign body reaction in the body, which manifests as clinically insignificant inflammation and capsule formation in the eye. The lack of capsule formation enables unobstructed flow through the 70 µm lumen tube and the achievement of controlled low intraocular pressure, which is important for the management of glaucoma. This article summarizes the integration of SIBS into a glaucoma drainage device and confirms its functionality with clinical success over a 2-year period. PMID:27047682

  3. Blocking Losses on an Optical Communications Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Piazzolla, Sabino

    2011-01-01

    Many photon-counting photo-detectors have the property that they become inoperative for some time after detection event. We say the detector is blocked during this time.Blocking produces losses when using the detector as a photon-counter to detect a communications signal. In this paper, we characterize blocking losses for single detectors and for arrays of detectors. For arrays, we discuss conditions under which the output may be approximated as a Poisson point process, and provide a simple approximation to the blocking loss. We show how to extend the analysis to arrays of non-uniformly illuminated arrays.

  4. Functionalized block copolymers as adhesion promoters

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, M.S.; Saunders, R.

    1995-03-01

    The goal of this work is to develop novel functionalized block copolymers to promote adhesion at inorganic substrate/polymer interfaces. We envision several potential advantages of functionalized block copolymers over small molecule coupling agents. Greater control over the structure of the interphase region should result through careful design of the backbone of the copolymer. The number of chains per area, the degree of entanglement between the copolymer and the polymer matrix, the number of sites per chain able to attach to the substrate, and the hydrophobicity of the interphase region can all be strongly affected by the choice of block lengths and the monomer sequence. In addition, entanglement between the copolymer and the polymer matrix, if achieved, should contribute significantly to adhesive strength. Our program involves four key elements: the synthesis of suitable functionalized block copolymers, characterization of the conformation of the copolymers at the interface by neutron reflectivity and atomic force microscopy, characterization of the degree of bonding by spectroscopy, and measurement of the mechanical properties of the interface. In this paper we discuss block copolymers designed as adhesion promoters for the copper/epoxy interface. We have synthesized a diblock with one block containing imidazole groups to bond to copper and a second block containing secondary amines to react with the epoxy matrix. We have also prepared a triblock copolymer containing a hydrophobic middle block. Below we describe the synthesis of the block copolymers by living, ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) and the first characterization data obtained by neutron reflectivity.

  5. Transient Trifascicular Block in Severe Hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Navnit; Singh, Anurag; Gaba, Ripudaman; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Agarwal, Mandavi; Shukla, Ranjeet

    2015-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a commonly encountered electrolyte abnormality that can significantly alter normal cardiac conduction. Potentially lethal dysrhythmias associated with hyperkalemia include complete heart block and Mobitz Type II second-degree AV block. We report a case of trifascicular block, due to hyperkalemia. The patient's symptoms and electrocardiogram (ECG) evidence of trifascicular block resolved with lowering of serum potassium levels, with subsequent ECG showing left anterior hemiblock. This paper highlights an infrequently reported dysrhythmia associated with hyperkalemia that emergency physicians should be familiar with. PMID:27608872

  6. PACS photometer calibration block analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, A.; Müller, T. G.; Kiss, C.; Balog, Z.; Billot, N.; Marton, G.

    2014-07-01

    The absolute stability of the PACS bolometer response over the entire mission lifetime without applying any corrections is about 0.5 % (standard deviation) or about 8 % peak-to-peak. This fantastic stability allows us to calibrate all scientific measurements by a fixed and time-independent response file, without using any information from the PACS internal calibration sources. However, the analysis of calibration block observations revealed clear correlations of the internal source signals with the evaporator temperature and a signal drift during the first half hour after the cooler recycling. These effects are small, but can be seen in repeated measurements of standard stars. From our analysis we established corrections for both effects which push the stability of the PACS bolometer response to about 0.2 % (stdev) or 2 % in the blue, 3 % in the green and 5 % in the red channel (peak-to-peak). After both corrections we still see a correlation of the signals with PACS FPU temperatures, possibly caused by parasitic heat influences via the Kevlar wires which connect the bolometers with the PACS Focal Plane Unit. No aging effect or degradation of the photometric system during the mission lifetime has been found.

  7. Blocking for Sequential Political Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    In typical political experiments, researchers randomize a set of households, precincts, or individuals to treatments all at once, and characteristics of all units are known at the time of randomization. However, in many other experiments, subjects “trickle in” to be randomized to treatment conditions, usually via complete randomization. To take advantage of the rich background data that researchers often have (but underutilize) in these experiments, we develop methods that use continuous covariates to assign treatments sequentially. We build on biased coin and minimization procedures for discrete covariates and demonstrate that our methods outperform complete randomization, producing better covariate balance in simulated data. We then describe how we selected and deployed a sequential blocking method in a clinical trial and demonstrate the advantages of our having done so. Further, we show how that method would have performed in two larger sequential political trials. Finally, we compare causal effect estimates from differences in means, augmented inverse propensity weighted estimators, and randomization test inversion. PMID:24143061

  8. A machine learning approach to create blocking criteria for record linkage.

    PubMed

    Giang, Phan H

    2015-03-01

    Record linkage, a part of data cleaning, is recognized as one of most expensive steps in data warehousing. Most record linkage (RL) systems employ a strategy of using blocking filters to reduce the number of pairs to be matched. A blocking filter consists of a number of blocking criteria. Until recently, blocking criteria are selected manually by domain experts. This paper proposes a new method to automatically learn efficient blocking criteria for record linkage. Our method addresses the lack of sufficient labeled data for training. Unlike previous works, we do not consider a blocking filter in isolation but in the context of an accompanying matcher which is employed after the blocking filter. We show that given such a matcher, the labels (assigned to record pairs) that are relevant for learning are the labels assigned by the matcher (link/nonlink), not the labels assigned objectively (match/unmatch). This conclusion allows us to generate an unlimited amount of labeled data for training. We formulate the problem of learning a blocking filter as a Disjunctive Normal Form (DNF) learning problem and use the Probably Approximately Correct (PAC) learning theory to guide the development of algorithm to search for blocking filters. We test the algorithm on a real patient master file of 2.18 million records. The experimental results show that compared with filters obtained by educated guess, the optimal learned filters have comparable recall but reduce throughput (runtime) by an order-of-magnitude factor.

  9. Improved Blocking at 25km Resolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemann, R.; Demory, M. E.; Mizielinski, M.; Roberts, M.; Shaffrey, L.; Strachan, J.; Vidale, P. L.; Matsueda, M.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that relatively coarse resolution of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) limits their ability to represent mid-latitude blocking. Assessing the role of model resolution for blocking is computationally expensive, as multi-decadal simulations at the desired resolution are necessary for a robust estimation of blocking statistics. Here, we use an ensemble of three atmosphere-only global models for which simulations that fulfil this requirement are available at resolutions of roughly 25km horizontal grid spacing in the mid-latitudes. This corresponds to about a fourfold increase in resolution over the highest-resolution CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5) models. The three models are (i) the ECMWF model (IFS) as used in the project Athena, (ii) the MRI-AGCM 3.2, and (iii) our own HadGEM3-GA3 simulations obtained in the UPSCALE project (UK on PrACE - weather-resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk). We use a two-dimensional blocking index to assess the representation of blocking in these simulations and in three reanalyses (ERA-Interim, ERA-40, MERRA). We evaluate the spatial distribution of climatological blocking frequency, the interannual variability of blocking occurrence as well as the persistence of blocking events. Furthermore, the degree to which blocking biases are associated with mean-state biases is quantified in the different models. We find that the representation of blocking remains very sensitive to atmospheric resolution as the grid spacing is reduced to about 25km. The simulated blocking frequency increases with resolution, mostly so as to reduce the model bias, yet there is considerable variation between the results obtained for different models, seasons, and for the Atlantic and Pacific regions.

  10. Parallel block schemes for large scale least squares computations

    SciTech Connect

    Golub, G.H.; Plemmons, R.J.; Sameh, A.

    1986-04-01

    Large scale least squares computations arise in a variety of scientific and engineering problems, including geodetic adjustments and surveys, medical image analysis, molecular structures, partial differential equations and substructuring methods in structural engineering. In each of these problems, matrices often arise which possess a block structure which reflects the local connection nature of the underlying physical problem. For example, such super-large nonlinear least squares computations arise in geodesy. Here the coordinates of positions are calculated by iteratively solving overdetermined systems of nonlinear equations by the Gauss-Newton method. The US National Geodetic Survey will complete this year (1986) the readjustment of the North American Datum, a problem which involves over 540 thousand unknowns and over 6.5 million observations (equations). The observation matrix for these least squares computations has a block angular form with 161 diagnonal blocks, each containing 3 to 4 thousand unknowns. In this paper parallel schemes are suggested for the orthogonal factorization of matrices in block angular form and for the associated backsubstitution phase of the least squares computations. In addition, a parallel scheme for the calculation of certain elements of the covariance matrix for such problems is described. It is shown that these algorithms are ideally suited for multiprocessors with three levels of parallelism such as the Cedar system at the University of Illinois. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  11. The probabilistic mechanism of formation of block structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. I.

    2012-03-01

    Questions on the formation of block structures are considered. It is shown that the block structure is characteristic of bodies in a wide range of scales from microscopic to astronomic and from the bodies of nonliving nature to living organisms and communities. A scheme of the mechanism of the probabilistic formation of block structures is suggested. The characteristics general for structures of all scales are revealed. Evidence is presented that the hierarchical pattern of element sizes is characteristic of natural structures in which the ratio of linear sizes of elements neighboring by hierarchy is 2-5, while the characteristic scale coefficient is √ N , where N is the total number of elements of which the system is formed. The block-probabilistic approach ensures knowledge of rare catastrophic events, including earthquakes, market crashes, floods, and industrial catastrophes, or creative events such as the formation of hypercomplex systems similar to organisms and communities. The statistics of rare events follows the power distribution (the distribution with a "heavy tail") rather than the exponential one and especially the Poisson distribution, the Gaussian distribution, or the distributions with "light tails" close to them. The expression for the factor of increasing the formation probability of the systems, which is of many orders of magnitude even for the simplest systems, is acquired.

  12. Perinatal outcome of fetal complete atrioventricular block: a multicenter experience.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K G; Ulmer, H E; Silverman, N H; Kleinman, C S; Copel, J A

    1991-05-01

    The clinical course and outcome of 55 fetuses with complete atrioventricular (AV) block detected prenatally were studied to identify factors that affect the natural history of this lesion. In 29 fetuses (53%) complete AV block was associated with complex structural heart defects, usually left atrial isomerism (n = 17) or discordant AV connection (n = 7). The other 26 fetuses had normal cardiac anatomy; in 19 cases the mother had connective tissue disease or tested positive for antinuclear antibodies. Six fetuses showed progression from sinus rhythm or second degree block to complete AV block. Of the 55 pregnancies, 5 were terminated and 24 fetuses or neonates died; at the end of the neonatal period 26 fetuses were still alive. Fetal or neonatal death correlated significantly with the presence of structural heart defects (4 of 29 surviving, p less than 0.001), hydrops (0 of 22 surviving, p less than 0.001), an atrial rate less than or equal to 120 beats/min (1 of 12 surviving, p less than 0.005) or a ventricular rate less than or equal to 55 beats/min (3 of 21 surviving, p less than 0.001). Mean atrial and ventricular rates were higher in surviving than in nonsurviving fetuses (142 +/- 8 vs. 127 +/- 21 beats/min, p less than 0.002; 64 +/- 8 vs. 52 +/- 8 beats/min, p less than 0.001, respectively). A slow atrial rate, however, was frequently associated with left atrial isomerism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Significant role of structural fractures in Ren-Qiu buried-block oil field, eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Q.; Xie-Pei, W.

    1983-03-01

    Ren-qui oil field is in a buried block of Sinian (upper Proterozoic) rocks located in the Ji-zhong depression of the western Bohai Bay basin in eastern China. The main reservoir consists of Sinian dolomite rocks. It is a fault block with a large growth fault on the west side which trends north-northeast with throws of up to 1 km (0.6 mi) or more. The source rocks for the oil are Paleogene age and overlie the Sinian dolomite rocks. The structural fractures are the main factor forming the reservoir of the buried-block oil field. Three structural lines, trending northeast, north-northeast, and northwest, form the regional netted fracture system. The north-northeast growth fault controlled the structural development of the buried block. The block was raised and eroded before the Tertiary sediments were deposited. In the Eocene Epoch, the Ji-zhong depression subsided, but the deposition, faulting, and related uplift of the block happened synchronously as the block was gradually submerged. At the same time, several horizontal and vertical karst zones were formed by the karst water along the netted structural fractures. The Eocene oil source rocks lapped onto the block and so the buried block, with many developed karst fractures, was surrounded by a great thickness of source rocks. As the growth fault developed, the height of the block was increased from 400 m (1300 ft) before the Oligocene to 1300 m (4250 ft) after. As the petroleum was generated, it migrated immediately into the karst fractures of the buried block along the growth fault. The karst-fractured block reservoir has an 800-m (2600-ft) high oil-bearing closure and good connections developed between the karst fractures.

  14. Biopolymers Containing Unnatural Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-06-30

    Although the main chain structure of polymers has a profound effect on their materials properties, the side groups can also have dramatic effects on their properties including conductivity, liquid crystallinity, hydrophobicity, elasticity and biodegradability. Unfortunately control over the side chain structure of polymers remains a challenge – it is difficult to control the sequence of chain elongation when mixtures of monomers are polymerized, and postpolymerization side chain modification is made difficult by polymer effects on side chain reactivity. In contrast, the mRNA templated synthesis of polypeptides on the ribosome affords absolute control over the primary sequence of the twenty amino acid monomers. Moreover, the length of the biopolymer is precisely controlled as are sites of crosslinking. However, whereas synthetic polymers can be synthesized from monomers with a wide range of chemically defined structures, ribosomal biosynthesis is largely limited to the 20 canonical amino acids. For many applications in material sciences, additional building blocks would be desirable, for example, amino acids containing metallocene, photoactive, and halogenated side chains. To overcome this natural constraint we have developed a method that allows unnatural amino acids, beyond the common twenty, to be genetically encoded in response to nonsense or frameshift codons in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells with high fidelity and good yields. Here we have developed methods that allow identical or distinct noncanonical amino acids to be incorporated at multiple sites in a polypeptide chain, potentially leading to a new class of templated biopolymers. We have also developed improved methods for genetically encoding unnatural amino acids. In addition, we have genetically encoded new amino acids with novel physical and chemical properties that allow selective modification of proteins with synthetic agents. Finally, we have evolved new metal-ion binding sites in proteins

  15. Erosion patterns on dissolving blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Patterns in nature are shaped under water flows and wind action, and the understanding of their morphodynamics goes through the identification of the physical mechanisms at play. When a dissoluble body is exposed to a water flow, typical patterns with scallop-like shapes may appear [1,2]. These shapes are observed on the walls of underground rivers or icebergs. We experimentally study the erosion of dissolving bodies made of salt, caramel or ice into water solutions without external flow. The dissolving mixture, which is created at the solid/liquid interface, undergoes a buoyancy-driven instability comparable to a Rayleigh-Bénard instability so that the dissolving front destabilizes into filaments. This mechanism yields to spatial variations of solute concentration and to differential dissolution of the dissolving block. We first observe longitudinal stripes with a well defined wavelength, which evolve towards chevrons and scallops that interact and move again the dissolving current. Thanks to a careful analysis of the competing physical mechanisms, we propose scaling laws, which account for the characteristic lengths and times of the early regime in experiments. The long-term evolution of patterns is understood qualitatively. A close related mechanism has been proposed to explain structures observed on the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes [3] and we suggest that our experiments are analogous and explain the scallop-like patterns on iceberg walls. [1] P. Meakin and B. Jamtveit, Geological pattern formation by growth and dissolution in aqueous systems, Proc. R. Soc. A 466, 659-694 (2010). [2] P.N. Blumberg and R.L. Curl, Experimental and theoretical studies of dissolution roughness, J. Fluid Mech. 65, 735-751 (1974). [3] L. Solari and G. Parker, Morphodynamic modelling of the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes, J.G.R. 118, 1432-1442 (2013).

  16. Block Study: Learning About Your Local Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckbreth, Catherine

    Designed for 7th- and 8th-grade students, five lessons using a block of houses in an urban neighborhood help students learn about the history of a neighborhood, the owners of the houses, and the style and architectural features of the homes. Although this unit has been developed for a specific neighborhood, a similar block study could be conducted…

  17. Block structured dynamics and neuronal coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Miranda, J. M.

    2005-11-01

    When certain control parameters of nervous cell models are varied, complex bifurcation structures develop in which the dynamical behaviors available appear classified in blocks, according to criteria of dynamical likelihood. This block structured dynamics may be a clue to understand how activated neurons encode information by firing spike trains of their action potentials.

  18. Improving massive experiments with threshold blocking.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Michael J; Sävje, Fredrik; Sekhon, Jasjeet S

    2016-07-01

    Inferences from randomized experiments can be improved by blocking: assigning treatment in fixed proportions within groups of similar units. However, the use of the method is limited by the difficulty in deriving these groups. Current blocking methods are restricted to special cases or run in exponential time; are not sensitive to clustering of data points; and are often heuristic, providing an unsatisfactory solution in many common instances. We present an algorithm that implements a widely applicable class of blocking-threshold blocking-that solves these problems. Given a minimum required group size and a distance metric, we study the blocking problem of minimizing the maximum distance between any two units within the same group. We prove this is a nondeterministic polynomial-time hard problem and derive an approximation algorithm that yields a blocking where the maximum distance is guaranteed to be, at most, four times the optimal value. This algorithm runs in O(n log n) time with O(n) space complexity. This makes it, to our knowledge, the first blocking method with an ensured level of performance that works in massive experiments. Whereas many commonly used algorithms form pairs of units, our algorithm constructs the groups flexibly for any chosen minimum size. This facilitates complex experiments with several treatment arms and clustered data. A simulation study demonstrates the efficiency and efficacy of the algorithm; tens of millions of units can be blocked using a desktop computer in a few minutes. PMID:27382151

  19. Precision aligned split V-block

    DOEpatents

    George, Irwin S.

    1984-01-01

    A precision aligned split V-block for holding a workpiece during a milling operation having an expandable frame for allowing various sized workpieces to be accommodated, is easily secured directly to the mill table and having key lugs in one base of the split V-block that assures constant alignment.

  20. LJ Teaching Award 2007: Rick J. Block

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles Rick J. Block, the recipient of the 2008 "LJ Teaching Award." Despite his "day job" and a heavy schedule of classroom teaching, Block finds time and intense energy to be the mentor, internship supervisor, and individual advisor to the students who fill every available seat in his classes at two LIS programs. In addition to…

  1. How Block Scheduling Reform Effects Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William R.; Flinders, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Block scheduling has become an increasingly popular reform movement for schools, school districts, and principals to enact. Much of the decision making as to whether to implement some type of block scheduling has occurred without understanding the implications this type of reform has on teachers and their classroom practices. This paper reports on…

  2. Young Children's Block Play and Mathematical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Boyoung; Chae, Jeong-Lim; Boyd, Barbara Foulks

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated young children's mathematical engagement in play with wooden unit blocks. Two boys, ages 6 and 7, were independently observed completing the task of filling outlined regions with the various sets of blocks. Three major mathematical actions were observed: categorizing geometric shapes, composing a larger shape…

  3. Block Grants: Federal Data Collection Provisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This fact sheet compares statutory data collection and reporting provisions of the federal education block grant (chapter 2 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act of 1981) with the nine other block grant programs funded in fiscal year 1986; data on statutory administrative cost limits are also provided. Each grant's legislation was…

  4. Block Play: Building a Foundation for Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Judith E.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews studies suggesting benefits of block play for literacy development that provides actual reading and writing experiences. Suggests that block play centers can be literacy-enhanced with materials that are authentic, useful, and appropriate, including: thematic books, magazines, architectural blueprints, envelopes, and adding machine tape.…

  5. A Nonlinear Multi-Scale Interaction Model for Atmospheric Blocking: The Eddy-Blocking Matching Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dehai; Cha, Jing; Zhong, Linhao; Dai, Aiguo

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear multi-scale interaction (NMI) model is used to propose an eddy-blocking matching (EBM) mechanism to account for how synoptic eddies reinforce or suppress a blocking flow. It is shown that the spatial structure of the eddy vorticity forcing (EVF) arising from upstream synoptic eddies determines whether an incipient block can grow into a meandering blocking flow through its interaction with the transient synoptic eddies from the west. Under certain conditions, the EVF exhibits a low-frequency oscillation on timescales of 2-3 weeks. During the EVF phase with a negative-over- positive dipole structure, a blocking event can be resonantly excited through the transport of eddy energy into the incipient block by the EVF. As the EVF changes into an opposite phase, the blocking decays. The NMI model produces life cycles of blocking events that resemble observations. Moreover, it is shown that the eddy north-south straining is a response of the eddies to a dipole- or Ω-type block. In our model, as in observations, two synoptic anticyclones (cyclones) can attract and merge with one another as the blocking intensifies, but only when the feedback of the blocking on the eddies is included. Thus, we attribute the eddy straining and associated vortex interaction to the feedback of the intensified blocking on synoptic eddies. The results illustrate the concomitant nature of the eddy deformation, whose role as a PV source for the blocking flow becomes important only during the mature stage of a block. Our EBM mechanism suggests that an incipient block flow is amplified (or suppressed) under certain conditions by the EVF coming from the upstream of the blocking region.

  6. Evaluation of neurolytic blocks using phenol and cryogenic block in the management of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, S; Walsh, N E; Schoenfeld, L S; Hoffman, J

    1989-06-01

    This study compared the use of phenol and cryogenic blocks for neurolysis in 28 patients. Patients were assigned randomly to receive peripheral nerve blocks with either phenol or cryoanalgesia. Significantly more patients in the phenol group received 20% or greater relief at 2, 12, and 24 wk than patients in the cryogenic group. Only 27% of patients received significant relief, however, indicating that neurolytic blocks were not particularly effective even though local anesthetic blocks produced significant but temporary pain relief. PMID:2732524

  7. Ultrasonographic evaluation of neck hematoma and block salvage after failed neurostimulation-guided interscalene block.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stephen M; Unger, M W Todd; Colson, James D; Serafini, Mario

    2010-11-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthetic techniques have shown some advantages over conventional paresthesia and neurostimulation techniques. We report the case of a neurostimulation-guided continuous interscalene block that would have ended in complication were it not for experience with ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. Familiarity with ultrasound-guided block techniques permitted assessment of a neck hematoma during interscalene block and ultimately allowed successful peripheral nerve block.

  8. Block copolymer structures in nano-pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Marco; Guo, Xiaohu; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2010-03-01

    We present results of coarse-grained computer modelling of block copolymer systems in cylindrical and spherical nanopores on Cell Dynamics Simulation. We study both cylindrical and spherical pores and systematically investigate structures formed by lamellar, cylinders and spherical block copolymer systems for various pore radii and affinity of block copolymer blocks to the pore walls. The obtained structures include: standing lamellae and cylinders, ``onions,'' cylinder ``knitting balls,'' ``golf-ball,'' layered spherical, ``virus''-like and mixed morphologies with T-junctions and U-type defects [1]. Kinetics of the structure formation and the differences with planar films are discussed. Our simulations suggest that novel porous nano-containers can be formed by confining block copolymers in pores of different geometries [1,2]. [4pt] [1] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, Polymer 49, 2797 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 214902 (2009).

  9. Bullet-Block Science Video Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A science video blog,1 which has gone viral, shows a wooden block shot by a vertically aimed rifle. The video2 shows that the block hit dead center goes exactly as high as the one shot off-center. (Fig. 1). The puzzle is that the block shot off-center carries rotational kinetic energy in addition to the gravitational potential energy. This leads a majority of the bloggers to claim that the block shot off-center should not go as high as the one shot dead center. Others have claimed that the energy tied up as rotational energy is insignificant and the two blocks should rise to the same height within experimental error.

  10. A Parent's Guide to Imaginative Block Play: Why Blocks Are Still One of America's Favorite Toys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.C. Timber/Habermaass Corp., Skaneateles, NY.

    This brochure, developed by a manufacturer of wooden blocks and trains, offers advice on the selection and use of toy blocks with children. The guide asserts that blocks, while often thought of as the most simple of toys, have great strength as creativity builders. Topics discussed in the brochure include: "Why We Want Our Children to Play"; "Why…

  11. Insulin-like growth factorblocks collagen release and down regulates matrix metalloproteinase-1, -3, -8, and -13 mRNA expression in bovine nasal cartilage stimulated with oncostatin M in combination with interleukin 1α

    PubMed Central

    Hui, W; Rowan, A; Cawston, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the effect of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) on the release of collagen, and the production and expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) induced by the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1α (IL1α) in combination with oncostatin M (OSM) from bovine nasal cartilage and primary human articular chondrocytes.
METHODS—Human articular chondrocytes and bovine nasal cartilage were cultured with and without IGF1 in the presence of IL1α or IL1α + OSM. The release of collagen was measured by an assay for hydroxyproline. Collagenase activity was determined with the diffuse fibril assay using 3H acetylated collagen. The expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-13, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) mRNA was analysed by northern blot.
RESULTS—IGF1 can partially inhibit the release of collagen induced by IL1α or IL1α + OSM from bovine nasal cartilage. This was accompanied by a reduced secretion and activation of collagenase by bovine nasal cartilage. IGF1 can also down regulate IL1α or IL1α + OSM induced MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-8, and MMP-13 mRNA expression in human articular chondrocytes and bovine chondrocytes. It had no significant effect on the production and expression of TIMP-1 mRNA in chondrocytes.
CONCLUSION—This study shows for the first time that IGF1 can partially block the release of collagen from cartilage and suggests that down regulation of collagenases by IGF1 may be an important mechanism in preventing cartilage resorption initiated by proinflammatory cytokines.

 PMID:11171688

  12. Atmospheric Blocking in the Northern Hemisphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, John Lewis

    Blocking is generally understood as the obstruction on a large scale of the normal west - to - east motion of mid-latitude pressure systems. It is a persistent phenomenon lasting from one to several weeks and the resulting prolonged weather regimes may have serious economic and social consequences. The recent Northern Hemisphere winters, starting with 1976 -77, featured unusually large circulation anomalies, many of which can be directly related to prolonged episodes of large scale blocking. The intent of this study is to investigate the statistics and certain diagnostics of blocking in the Northern Hemisphere. The first of the three primary objectives is to present and interpret the spatial and temporal distribution of blocking during the past 33 years. We develop objective identification criteria, adaptable to machine processing methods, by relating the blocking anticyclone to its associated positive anomaly of 5-day mean 500MB height. Anomalies meeting the criteria are called 'blocking signatures.' We present the seasonal frequency of occurrence of these signatures by longitude and by area. The results are in good agreement with published studies for the oceans, but they also reveal a high frequency of blocking signatures over the Northeastern Canadian Archipelago. This result, dubbed the 'Baffin Island Paradox' is further investigated and rationalized. A catalogue has been prepared which identifies the date, centre location and magnitude of every blocking signature which occurred from January 1, 1946 to December 31, 1978. A supplementary Catalogue identifies sequences of these signatures corresponding to actual blocking episodes. The second objective is to investigate whether regions with high incidence of blocking, in either the developing or the mature stage, features non-Gaussian distributions of 5-day mean geopotential. During winter, fields of significantly low kurtosis are found in certain mid-latitude regions where the genesis and amplification of

  13. Improving Block-level Efficiency with scsi-mq

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, Blake A

    2015-01-01

    Current generation solid-state storage devices are exposing a new bottlenecks in the SCSI and block layers of the Linux kernel, where IO throughput is limited by lock contention, inefficient interrupt handling, and poor memory locality. To address these limitations, the Linux kernel block layer underwent a major rewrite with the blk-mq project to move from a single request queue to a multi-queue model. The Linux SCSI subsystem rework to make use of this new model, known as scsi-mq, has been merged into the Linux kernel and work is underway for dm-multipath support in the upcoming Linux 4.0 kernel. These pieces were necessary to make use of the multi-queue block layer in a Lustre parallel filesystem with high availability requirements. We undertook adding support of the 3.18 kernel to Lustre with scsi-mq and dm-multipath patches to evaluate the potential of these efficiency improvements. In this paper we evaluate the block-level performance of scsi-mq with backing storage hardware representative of a HPC-targerted Lustre filesystem. Our findings show that SCSI write request latency is reduced by as much as 13.6%. Additionally, when profiling the CPU usage of our prototype Lustre filesystem, we found that CPU idle time increased by a factor of 7 with Linux 3.18 and blk-mq as compared to a standard 2.6.32 Linux kernel. Our findings demonstrate increased efficiency of the multi-queue block layer even with disk-based caching storage arrays used in existing parallel filesystems.

  14. Circular block matching based video stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lidong; Fu, Fangwen; Lin, Xinggang

    2005-07-01

    Video sequences captured by handheld digital camera need to be stabilized to eliminate the tiresome effects caused by camera"s undesirable shake or jiggle. The key issue of video stabilization is to estimate the global motion parameters between two successive frames. In this paper, a novel circular block matching algorithm is proposed to estimate the global motion parameters. This algorithm can deal with not only translational motion but even large rotational motion. For an appointed circular block in current frame, a four-dimensional rotation invariant feature vector is firstly extracted from it and used to judge if it is an effective block. Then the rotation invariant features based circular block matching process is performed to find the best matching blocks in reference frame for those effective blocks. With the matching results of any two effective blocks, a two-dimensional motion model is constructed to produce one group of frame motion parameters. A statistical method is proposed to calculate the estimated global motion parameters with all groups of global motion parameters. Finally, using the estimated motion parameters as the initial values, an iteration algorithm is introduced to obtain the refined global motion parameters. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is excellent in stabilizing frames with even burst global translational and rotational motions.

  15. Development of Alkali Activated Geopolymer Masonry Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, K.; Radhakrishna; Sasalatti, Vinod

    2016-09-01

    Cement masonry units are not considered as sustainable since their production involves consumption of fuel, cement and natural resources and therefore it is essential to find alternatives. This paper reports on making of geopolymer solid & hollow blocks and masonry prisms using non conventional materials like fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) and manufactured sand and curing at ambient temperature. They were tested for water absorption, initial rate of water absorption, dry density, dimensionality, compressive, flexural and bond-strength which were tested for bond strength with and without lateral confinement, modulus of elasticity, alternative drying & wetting and masonry efficiency. The properties of geopolymer blocks were found superior to traditional masonry blocks and the masonry efficiency was found to increase with decrease in thickness of cement mortar joints. There was marginal difference in strength between rendered and unrendered geopolymer masonry blocks. The percentage weight gain after 7 cycles was less than 6% and the percentage reduction in strength of geopolymer solid blocks and hollow blocks were 26% and 28% respectively. Since the properties of geopolymer blocks are comparatively better than the traditional masonry they can be strongly recommended for structural masonry.

  16. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  17. Surface plasmon enhanced cell microscopy with blocked random spatial activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Taehwang; Oh, Youngjin; Lee, Wonju; Yang, Heejin; Kim, Donghyun

    2016-03-01

    We present surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence microscopy with random spatial sampling using patterned block of silver nanoislands. Rigorous coupled wave analysis was performed to confirm near-field localization on nanoislands. Random nanoislands were fabricated in silver by temperature annealing. By analyzing random near-field distribution, average size of localized fields was found to be on the order of 135 nm. Randomly localized near-fields were used to spatially sample F-actin of J774 cells (mouse macrophage cell-line). Image deconvolution algorithm based on linear imaging theory was established for stochastic estimation of fluorescent molecular distribution. The alignment between near-field distribution and raw image was performed by the patterned block. The achieved resolution is dependent upon factors including the size of localized fields and estimated to be 100-150 nm.

  18. Gaussian curvature analysis allows for automatic block placement in multi-block hexahedral meshing.

    PubMed

    Ramme, Austin J; Shivanna, Kiran H; Magnotta, Vincent A; Grosland, Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    Musculoskeletal finite element analysis (FEA) has been essential to research in orthopaedic biomechanics. The generation of a volumetric mesh is often the most challenging step in a FEA. Hexahedral meshing tools that are based on a multi-block approach rely on the manual placement of building blocks for their mesh generation scheme. We hypothesise that Gaussian curvature analysis could be used to automatically develop a building block structure for multi-block hexahedral mesh generation. The Automated Building Block Algorithm incorporates principles from differential geometry, combinatorics, statistical analysis and computer science to automatically generate a building block structure to represent a given surface without prior information. We have applied this algorithm to 29 bones of varying geometries and successfully generated a usable mesh in all cases. This work represents a significant advancement in automating the definition of building blocks.

  19. Gaussian curvature analysis allows for automatic block placement in multi-block hexahedral meshing.

    PubMed

    Ramme, Austin J; Shivanna, Kiran H; Magnotta, Vincent A; Grosland, Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    Musculoskeletal finite element analysis (FEA) has been essential to research in orthopaedic biomechanics. The generation of a volumetric mesh is often the most challenging step in a FEA. Hexahedral meshing tools that are based on a multi-block approach rely on the manual placement of building blocks for their mesh generation scheme. We hypothesise that Gaussian curvature analysis could be used to automatically develop a building block structure for multi-block hexahedral mesh generation. The Automated Building Block Algorithm incorporates principles from differential geometry, combinatorics, statistical analysis and computer science to automatically generate a building block structure to represent a given surface without prior information. We have applied this algorithm to 29 bones of varying geometries and successfully generated a usable mesh in all cases. This work represents a significant advancement in automating the definition of building blocks. PMID:20924860

  20. Dynamics of Block Copolymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Mochrie, Simon G. J.

    2014-09-09

    A detailed study of the dynamics of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles suspended in polystyrene homopolymer matrices was carried out using X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy for temperatures between 120 and 180 °C. For low molecular weight polystyrene homopolymers, the observed dynamics show a crossover from diffusive to hyper-diffusive behavior with decreasing temperatures. For higher molecular weight polystyrene, the nanoparticle dynamics appear hyper-diffusive at all temperatures studied. The relaxation time and characteristic velocity determined from the measured hyper-diffusive dynamics reveal that the activation energy and underlying forces determined are on the order of 2.14 × 10-19 J and 87 pN, respectively. We also carried out a detailed X-ray scattering study of the static and dynamic behavior of a styrene– isoprene diblock copolymer melt with a styrene volume fraction of 0.3468. At 115 and 120 °C, we observe splitting of the principal Bragg peak, which we attribute to phase coexistence of hexagonal cylindrical and cubic double- gyroid structure. In the disordered phase, above 130 °C, we have characterized the dynamics of composition fluctuations via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Near the peak of the static structure factor, these fluctuations show stretched-exponential relaxations, characterized by a stretching exponent of about 0.36 for a range of temperatures immediately above the MST. The corresponding characteristic relaxation times vary exponentially with temperature, changing by a factor of 2 for each 2 °C change in temperature. At low wavevectors, the measured relaxations are diffusive with relaxation times that change by a factor of 2 for each 8 °C change in temperature.

  1. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia with persistent ventriculoatrial block.

    PubMed

    Strohmer, Bernhard; Schernthaner, Christiana; Pichler, Maximilian

    2003-01-01

    We report the case of a 64-year-old patient with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and persistent VA block. Induction and maintenance of tachycardia occurred without apparent activation of the atria. Diagnostic characteristics were most compatible with AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT). Automatic junctional tachycardia and orthodromic nodoventricular or nodofascicular reentry tachycardia were considered in the differential diagnosis. Upper common pathway block during AVNRT may be explained by either intra-atrial conduction block or purely intranodal confined AVNRT. The arrhythmia was cured by a typical posteroseptal ablation approach guided by slow pathway potentials.

  2. Block Copolymer Membranes for Biofuel Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evren Ozcam, Ali; Balsara, Nitash

    2012-02-01

    Purification of biofuels such as ethanol is a matter of considerable concern as they are produced in complex multicomponent fermentation broths. Our objective is to design pervaporation membranes for concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous mixtures. Polystyrene-b-polydimethylsiloxane-b-polystyrene block copolymers were synthesized by anionic polymerization. The polydimethylsiloxane domains provide ethanol-transporting pathways, while the polystyrene domains provide structural integrity for the membrane. The morphology of the membranes is governed by the composition of the block copolymer while the size of the domains is governed by the molecular weight of the block copolymer. Pervaporation data as a function of these two parameters will be presented.

  3. An introduction to blocked impurity band detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geist, Jon

    1988-01-01

    Blocked impurity band detectors fabricated using standard silicon technologies offer the possibility of combining high sensitivity and high accuracy in a single detector operating in a low background environment. The solid state photomultiplier described by Petroff et al., which is a new type of blocked impurity band detector, offers even higher sensitivity as well as operation in the visible spectral region. The principle of operation and possible application of blocked impurity band detectors for stellar seismology and the search for extra-solar planets are described.

  4. Encoders for block-circulant LDPC codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Kenneth; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present two encoding methods for block-circulant LDPC codes. The first is an iterative encoding method based on the erasure decoding algorithm, and the computations required are well organized due to the block-circulant structure of the parity check matrix. The second method uses block-circulant generator matrices, and the encoders are very similar to those for recursive convolutional codes. Some encoders of the second type have been implemented in a small Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and operate at 100 Msymbols/second.

  5. Mixing thermodynamics of block-random copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckingham, Bryan Scott

    Random copolymerization of A and B monomers represents a versatile method to tune interaction strengths between polymers, as ArB random copolymers will exhibit a smaller effective Flory interaction parameter chi; (or interaction energy density X) upon mixing with A or B homopolymers than upon mixing A and B homopolymers with each other, and the ArB composition can be tuned continuously. Thus, the incorporation of a random copolymer block into the classical block copolymer architecture to yield "block-random" copolymers introduces an additional tuning mechanism for the control of structure-property relationships, as the interblock interactions and physical properties can be tuned continuously through the random block's composition. However, typical living or controlled polymerizations produce compositional gradients along the "random" block, which can in turn influence the phase behavior. This dissertation demonstrates a method by which narrow-distribution copolymers of styrene and isoprene of any desired composition, with no measurable down-chain gradient, are synthesized. This synthetic method is then utilized to incorporate random copolymers of styrene and isoprene as blocks into block-random copolymers in order to examine the resulting interblock mixing thermodynamics. A series of well-defined near-symmetric block and block-random copolymers (S-I, Bd-S, I-SrI, S-SrI and Bd-S rI diblocks, where S is polystyrene, I is polyisoprene and Bd is polybutadiene), with varying molecular weight and random-block composition are synthesized and the mixing thermodynamics---via comparison of their interaction energy densities, X---of their hydrogenated derivatives is examined through measurement of the order-disorder transition (ODT) temperature. Hydrogenated derivatives of I-SrI and S-SrI block-random copolymers, both wherein the styrene aromaticity is retained and derivatives wherein the styrene units are saturated to vinylcyclohexane (VCH), are found to hew closely to the

  6. Isolated Complete Heart Block in the Fetus.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew; Gordon, Patrick; Rosenthal, Eric; Simpson, John; Miller, Owen; Sharland, Gurleen

    2015-07-01

    Isolated congenital complete heart block (CCHB) is a rare disease with significant associated morbidity and mortality. A diagnosis is often made in fetal life, but data regarding long-term outcomes are limited, and fetal therapy to improve prognosis is controversial. In our institution, 85 fetuses were diagnosed with CCHB from 1981 to 2013 in 80 mothers. There were 37 anti-Ro-positive pregnancies, 36 both anti-Ro and anti-La positive, 10 antibody negative, and 2 of unknown antibody status. Antenatal treatments were given in 14 fetuses, with 8 given fluorinated steroids, 4 beta sympathomimetics, and both in 2. Of the original 85, 74 babies survived to delivery. Fetal hydrops was the only risk factor found to be significantly associated with intrauterine death (p <0.001). Four babies died before pacemaker implantation, 56 have had pacemakers implanted, and 14 are pacemaker free. The Kaplan-Meier estimate for median time to pacemaker implantation was 2.6 years, with 15 implanted in the neonatal period. There have been 14 postnatal deaths, with a Kaplan-Meier estimate of survival at 30 years of 76.8% (95% confidence interval 65% to 90%). Dilated cardiomyopathy was uncommon, occurring in 6 patients. Prematurity and hydrops were associated with increased postnatal mortality (p = 0.02 and 0.005, respectively). In conclusion, we present the largest single-unit experience of prenatally diagnosed CCHB in the published literature. Our cohort was conservatively managed, with survival similar to those previously published. These data offer insight into the long-term natural history of CCHB.

  7. Electrostatic control of block copolymer morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Charles E.; Zwanikken, Jos W.; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2014-07-01

    Energy storage is at present one of the foremost issues society faces. However, material challenges now serve as bottlenecks in technological progress. Lithium-ion batteries are the current gold standard to meet energy storage needs; however, they are limited owing to the inherent instability of liquid electrolytes. Block copolymers can self-assemble into nanostructures that simultaneously facilitate ion transport and provide mechanical stability. The ions themselves have a profound, yet previously unpredictable, effect on how these nanostructures assemble and thus the efficiency of ion transport. Here we demonstrate that varying the charge of a block copolymer is a powerful mechanism to predictably tune nanostructures. In particular, we demonstrate that highly asymmetric charge cohesion effects can induce the formation of nanostructures that are inaccessible to conventional uncharged block copolymers, including percolated phases desired for ion transport. This vastly expands the design space for block copolymer materials and is informative for the versatile design of battery electrolyte materials.

  8. Ultrasound guided nerve block for breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Diéguez, P; Casas, P; López, S; Fajardo, M

    2016-03-01

    The breast surgery has undergone changes in recent years, encouraging new initiatives for the anaesthetic management of these patients in order to achieve maximum quality and rapid recovery. The fundamental tool that has allowed a significant improvement in the progress of regional anaesthesia for breast disease has been ultrasound, boosting the description and introduction into clinical practice of interfascial chest wall blocks, although the reference standard is still the paravertebral block. It is very likely that these blocks will change the protocols in the coming years. A review is presented of the anatomy of the breast region, description of nerve blocks and techniques, as well as their indications, all according to published articles and the opinion of the authors based on their experience.

  9. Discovering Complex Ordered Phases of Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, An-Chang

    2012-02-01

    Block copolymers with their rich phase behavior and ordering transitions have become a paradigm for the study of structured soft materials. Understanding the structures and phase transitions in block copolymers has been one of the most active research areas in polymer science in the past two decades. One of the achievements is the self-consistent field theory (SCFT), which provides a powerful framework for the study of ordered phase of block copolymers. I will present a generic strategy to discover complex ordered phases of block copolymers within the SCFT framework. Specifically, a combination of real-space and reciprocal-space techniques is used to explore possible ordered phases in multiblock copolymer melts. These candidate phases can then be used to construct phase diagrams. Application of this strategy to linear and star ABC triblock copolymers has led to the discovery of a rich array of ordered phases.

  10. Ultrasound guided nerve block for breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Diéguez, P; Casas, P; López, S; Fajardo, M

    2016-03-01

    The breast surgery has undergone changes in recent years, encouraging new initiatives for the anaesthetic management of these patients in order to achieve maximum quality and rapid recovery. The fundamental tool that has allowed a significant improvement in the progress of regional anaesthesia for breast disease has been ultrasound, boosting the description and introduction into clinical practice of interfascial chest wall blocks, although the reference standard is still the paravertebral block. It is very likely that these blocks will change the protocols in the coming years. A review is presented of the anatomy of the breast region, description of nerve blocks and techniques, as well as their indications, all according to published articles and the opinion of the authors based on their experience. PMID:26776926

  11. Dynamic code block size for JPEG 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ping-Sing; LeCornec, Yann

    2008-02-01

    Since the standardization of the JPEG 2000, it has found its way into many different applications such as DICOM (digital imaging and communication in medicine), satellite photography, military surveillance, digital cinema initiative, professional video cameras, and so on. The unified framework of the JPEG 2000 architecture makes practical high quality real-time compression possible even in video mode, i.e. motion JPEG 2000. In this paper, we present a study of the compression impact using dynamic code block size instead of fixed code block size as specified in the JPEG 2000 standard. The simulation results show that there is no significant impact on compression if dynamic code block sizes are used. In this study, we also unveil the advantages of using dynamic code block sizes.

  12. Epoxy coatings over latex block fillers

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, L.D.

    1997-12-01

    Failures of polymerized epoxy coatings applied over latex/acrylic block fillers continue to plague owners of commercial buildings, particularly those with high architectural content such as condominiums, high rise offices, etc. Water treatment facilities in paper mills are especially prone to this problem. The types of failures include delamination of the topcoats, blisters in both the block fillers and the topcoats and disintegration of the block filler itself. While the problem is well known, the approach to a solution is not. A study of several coatings manufacturer`s Product Data Sheets shows a wide variance in the recommendations for what are purportedly generically equivalent block fillers. While one manufacturer might take an essentially architectural approach, another will take a heavy-duty industrial approach. To the specifying architect or engineer who has little training in the complexities of protective coating systems, this presents a dilemma. Who does he believe? What does he specify? To whom can he turn for independent advice?

  13. Block Coloplyer Nanoreactors for Inorganic Cluster Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Robert E.

    1997-03-01

    We have generalized our work on the spatial confinement of inorganic clusters in block copolymers to a nanoreactor scheme for cluster synthesis. Using this new methodology, a wide range of inorganic clusters can be synthesized from a single block copolymer starting material. Metals are selectively sequestered into domains of the heterogeneous block copolymer morphology, either from aqueous solutions of suitably chosen salts or via vapor permeation of organometallic compounds. Once "loaded", these metal-containing domains serve as localized reaction sites for cluster synthesis. The metal-sequestering sites are rejuvenated, rendering the nanoreactors capable of being reloaded with more of the same metal, or another, for further cluster synthesis. Magnetic and optical properties of free-standing block copolymer films containing various types of nanoclusters will be discussed.

  14. Atmospheric Blocking and Atlantic Multidecadal Ocean Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Rhines, Peter B.; Worthen, Denise L.

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric blocking over the northern North Atlantic, which involves isolation of large regions of air from the westerly circulation for 5 days or more, influences fundamentally the ocean circulation and upper ocean properties by affecting wind patterns. Winters with clusters of more frequent blocking between Greenland and western Europe correspond to a warmer, more saline subpolar ocean. The correspondence between blocked westerly winds and warm ocean holds in recent decadal episodes (especially 1996 to 2010). It also describes much longer time scale Atlantic multidecadal ocean variability (AMV), including the extreme pre-greenhouse-gas northern warming of the 1930s to 1960s. The space-time structure of the wind forcing associated with a blocked regime leads to weaker ocean gyres and weaker heat exchange, both of which contribute to the warm phase of AMV.

  15. Extrinsic germanium Blocked Impurity Bank (BIB) detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabach, Timothy N.; Huffman, James E.; Watson, Dan M.

    1989-01-01

    Ge:Ga blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detectors with long wavelength thresholds greater than 190 microns and peak quantum efficiencies of 4 percent, at an operating temperature of 1.8 K, have been fabricated. These proof of concept devices consist of a high purity germanium blocking layer epitaxially grown on a Ga-doped Ge substrate. This demonstration of BIB behavior in germanium enables the development of far infrared detector arrays similar to the current silicon-based devices. Present efforts are focussed on improving the chemical vapor deposition process used to create the blocking layer and on the lithographic processing required to produce monolithic detector arrays in germanium. Approaches to test the impurity levels in both the blocking and active layers are considered.

  16. Formation of Anisotropic Block Copolymer Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Chya Yan; Shull, Kenneth; Henderson, Kevin; Joester, Derk

    2011-03-01

    Anisotropic, fibrillar gels are important in a variety of processes. Biomineralization is one example, where the mineralization process often occurs within a matrix of collagen or chitin fibers that trap the mineral precursors and direct the mineralization process. We wish to replicate this type of behavior within block copolymer gels. Particularly, we are interested in employing gels composed of cylindrical micelles, which are anisotropic and closely mimic biological fibers. Micelle geometry is controlled in our system by manipulating the ratio of molecular weights of the two blocks and by controlling the detailed thermal processing history of the copolymer solutions. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Dynamic Light Scattering are used to determine the temperature dependence of the gel formation process. Initial experiments are based on a thermally-reversible alcohol-soluble system, that can be subsequently converted to a water soluble system by hydrolysis of a poly(t-butyl methacrylate) block to a poly (methacrylic acid) block. MRSEC.

  17. The Core of the Stuttering Block

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Martin F.

    1974-01-01

    A model of the core of the stuttering block is presented, based on evidence that the disorder is essentially an inappropriate, vigorous contraction of the posterior cricoarytenoid in response to the subglottal air pressures required for speech. (Author)

  18. Ophthalmic regional blocks: management, challenges, and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Palte, Howard D

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade ophthalmic anesthesia has witnessed a major transformation. The sun has set on the landscape of ophthalmic procedures performed under general anesthesia at in-hospital settings. In its place a new dawn has ushered in the panorama of eye surgeries conducted under regional and topical anesthesia at specialty eye care centers. The impact of the burgeoning geriatric population is that an increasing number of elderly patients will present for eye surgery. In order to accommodate increased patient volumes and simultaneously satisfy administrative initiatives directed at economic frugality, administrators will seek assistance from anesthesia providers in adopting measures that enhance operating room efficiency. The performance of eye blocks in a holding suite meets many of these objectives. Unfortunately, most practicing anesthesiologists resist performing ophthalmic regional blocks because they lack formal training. In future, anesthesiologists will need to block eyes and manage common medical conditions because economic pressures will eliminate routine preoperative testing. This review addresses a variety of topical issues in ophthalmic anesthesia with special emphasis on cannula and needle-based blocks and the new-generation antithrombotic agents. In a constantly evolving arena, the sub-Tenon’s block has gained popularity while the deep angulated intraconal (retrobulbar) block has been largely superseded by the shallower extraconal (peribulbar) approach. Improvements in surgical technique have also impacted anesthetic practice. For example, phacoemulsification techniques facilitate the conduct of cataract surgery under topical anesthesia, and suture-free vitrectomy ports may cause venous air embolism during air/fluid exchange. Hyaluronidase is a useful adjuvant because it promotes local anesthetic diffusion and hastens block onset time but it is allergenic. Ultrasound-guided eye blocks afford real-time visualization of needle position and local

  19. Ophthalmic regional blocks: management, challenges, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Palte, Howard D

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade ophthalmic anesthesia has witnessed a major transformation. The sun has set on the landscape of ophthalmic procedures performed under general anesthesia at in-hospital settings. In its place a new dawn has ushered in the panorama of eye surgeries conducted under regional and topical anesthesia at specialty eye care centers. The impact of the burgeoning geriatric population is that an increasing number of elderly patients will present for eye surgery. In order to accommodate increased patient volumes and simultaneously satisfy administrative initiatives directed at economic frugality, administrators will seek assistance from anesthesia providers in adopting measures that enhance operating room efficiency. The performance of eye blocks in a holding suite meets many of these objectives. Unfortunately, most practicing anesthesiologists resist performing ophthalmic regional blocks because they lack formal training. In future, anesthesiologists will need to block eyes and manage common medical conditions because economic pressures will eliminate routine preoperative testing. This review addresses a variety of topical issues in ophthalmic anesthesia with special emphasis on cannula and needle-based blocks and the new-generation antithrombotic agents. In a constantly evolving arena, the sub-Tenon's block has gained popularity while the deep angulated intraconal (retrobulbar) block has been largely superseded by the shallower extraconal (peribulbar) approach. Improvements in surgical technique have also impacted anesthetic practice. For example, phacoemulsification techniques facilitate the conduct of cataract surgery under topical anesthesia, and suture-free vitrectomy ports may cause venous air embolism during air/fluid exchange. Hyaluronidase is a useful adjuvant because it promotes local anesthetic diffusion and hastens block onset time but it is allergenic. Ultrasound-guided eye blocks afford real-time visualization of needle position and local

  20. Building-block selectivity of polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Liou, Grace F; Khosla, Chaitan

    2003-04-01

    For the past decade, polyketide synthases have presented an exciting paradigm for the controlled manipulation of complex natural product structure. These multifunctional enzymes catalyze the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products by stepwise condensation and modification of metabolically derived building blocks. In particular, regioselective modification of polyketide structure is possible by alterations in either intracellular acyl-CoA pools or, more commonly, by manipulation of acyl transferases that act as the primary gatekeepers for building blocks.

  1. MIBSA: Multi Interacting Blocks for Slope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattola, Giuseppe; Crosta, Giovanni; Castellanza, Riccardo; di Prisco, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    As it is well known, the slope instabilities have very important consequences in terms of human lives and activities. So predicting the evolution in time and space of slope mass movements becomes fundamental. This is even more relevant when we consider that the triggering mechanisms are a rising ground water level and the occurrence of earthquakes. Therefore, seasonal rainfall has a direct influence on the triggering of large rock and earthslide with a composite failure surface and causing differential behaviors within the sliding mass. In this contribution, a model describing the slope mass by means of an array of blocks that move on a prefixed failure surface, is defined. A shear band located at the base of each block, whose behavior is modelled via a viscous plastic model based on the Perzyna's approach, controls the slip velocity of the block. The motion of the blocks is obtained by solving the second balance equation in which the normal and tangential interaction forces are obtained by a specific interaction model. The model has been implemented in an original code and it is used to perform a parametric analysis that describes the effects of block interactions under a transient ground water oscillation. The numerical results confirm that the normal and tangential interactions between blocks can inhibit or induce the slope movements. The model is tested against some real case studies. This model is under development to add the dynamic effects generated by earthquake shaking.

  2. Improving massive experiments with threshold blocking

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael J.; Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    2016-01-01

    Inferences from randomized experiments can be improved by blocking: assigning treatment in fixed proportions within groups of similar units. However, the use of the method is limited by the difficulty in deriving these groups. Current blocking methods are restricted to special cases or run in exponential time; are not sensitive to clustering of data points; and are often heuristic, providing an unsatisfactory solution in many common instances. We present an algorithm that implements a widely applicable class of blocking—threshold blocking—that solves these problems. Given a minimum required group size and a distance metric, we study the blocking problem of minimizing the maximum distance between any two units within the same group. We prove this is a nondeterministic polynomial-time hard problem and derive an approximation algorithm that yields a blocking where the maximum distance is guaranteed to be, at most, four times the optimal value. This algorithm runs in O(n log n) time with O(n) space complexity. This makes it, to our knowledge, the first blocking method with an ensured level of performance that works in massive experiments. Whereas many commonly used algorithms form pairs of units, our algorithm constructs the groups flexibly for any chosen minimum size. This facilitates complex experiments with several treatment arms and clustered data. A simulation study demonstrates the efficiency and efficacy of the algorithm; tens of millions of units can be blocked using a desktop computer in a few minutes. PMID:27382151

  3. Turbulence Interface Simulation by Lagrangian Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, V. H.

    2015-12-01

    Most computational fluid-dynamics codes are developed using the Eulerian description. To find the numerical solution, fluxes are estimated on the surface of the finite volume using a truncation series. Spurious numerical oscillations and artificial numerical diffusion are consequences, particularly in regions across flow discontinuities. Diffusion often is introduced synthetically in many schemes to gain computational stability. Occasional switching to a diffusive upwind scheme, for example, is one classic strategy to manage the numerical oscillations [see e.g., Ghannadi & Chu 2015]. Lagrangian-block simulation offers an alternative that could minimize the spurious oscillations and false diffusive error. The blocks move in the direction of the flow. The squares of the block widths expand in proportion to the diffusivities. The block simulation procedure consists of (i) Lagrangian advection and diffusion, (ii) division into portions, and (iii) reassembly of the portions into new blocks. The blocks are renewed in each time increment to prevent excessive distortion. Details of the Lagrangian-block simulations method have been given in a series of papers by Tan & Chu (2012), Chu & Altai (2012, 2015}. In this paper, the exchanges across turbulence interfaces are considered for two problems. The first series of the simulations are conducted to find the mass and momentum exchanges across a shallow flow of two different depth. In the simulations, the advection and diffusion of three separated systems of blocks that contain the mass, momentum and potential vorticity are carried out using the Lagrangian-block simulation method. The simulation results are compared with data obtained from a previous laboratory investigation and related to the shear instability problem in rotating shear flow previously considered by Chu (2014). The second problem involves the turbulence generation across the interface of an internal waves. The simulation shows the development of gravitational

  4. Determinants of fertility in Athoor block, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Dutt, P R; Rajaretnam, T; Sasty, K R; Ramanujam, C

    1988-09-01

    Data from at least 10 surveys of thousands of households over the period 1960-86 indicate a decline in crude birth rate (CBR) between 1959-85 from 43.1 to 25.6 in the Athoor community development block. The adjacent community development block of Batlagundu, with a higher literacy rate and level of socioeconomic development, was used as control while identifying the proximate determinants of fertility in the study areas. Socioeconomic, institutional, and programmatic factors influencing these proximate determinants were also considered. Declines in the marital fertility rate, due in large part to high age of marriage and a decline in the incidence of young widows, contributed more than other factors to the decline in overall fertility rate. Greater use of contraceptive methods from 0 to 34.2% by 1986, further stemmed fertility. These effects were tempered, however, by a shortened postpartum amenorrhea from 14 to 10 months. Beyond identifying principal proximate determinants, 2 phenomena were explored. While there was an overall decline in CBR over the period, 25.6 is not the lowers level achieved during 1959-85. CBR reached a low of 23.7 in 1980, then climbed over the next few years to its 1985 level. A strong contributing factor to this reversal in a declining trend is a decrease of family planning activities from the level experienced in the 1960s. The 2nd phenomenon is the higher fertility level, desire for larger families, and greater fertility level variation over socioeconomic groups seen in the higher socioeconomic level control block. The authors concluded that high program efficiency must be maintained in the early stages of demographic transition to stabilize against fluctuations in birth rates and contraception prevalence. Additionally, modernizing influences may also affect proximate determinants in opposing manners. Education on child spacing and motivational campaigns targeted especially to young couples should be developed to afford maximum declines

  5. Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, facing north (note cell block fifteen to the right and cell block fourteen in the distance_ - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Cell block one and southeast guard tower, looking from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block one and southeast guard tower, looking from the central guard tower, facing southeast (note view also includes cell block ten (left) and cell block nine (right)) - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. 7. BLOCK HOUSE BASEMENT LOOKING THROUGH DOOR INTO CABLE TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. BLOCK HOUSE BASEMENT LOOKING THROUGH DOOR INTO CABLE TUNNEL RUNNING BETWEEN BLOCK HOUSE AND STATIC TEST TOWER. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Block House, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. Extended recency effect extended: blocking, presentation mode, and retention interval.

    PubMed

    Glidden, L M; Pawelski, C; Mar, H; Zigman, W

    1979-07-01

    The effect of blocking of stimulus items on the free recall of EMR adolescents was examined. In Experiment 1 a multitrial free-recall list of 15 pictures was presented either simultaneously in groups of 3, or sequentially, one at a time. Consistent ordering was used in both conditions, so that on each trial, each item in each set of 3 pictures was presented contiguously with the other 2 items from that set. In addition, recall came immediately or after a filled or unfilled delay of 24.5 seconds. Results showed that simultaneous presentation led to higher recall, subjective organization, and clustering than did sequential presentation, but analysis of serial-position curves showed a much reduced extended recency effect in comparison with previous studies. Experiment 2 was designed to determine whether the cause of the reduced extended recency was the use of pictures rather than words as stimuli. Stimuli were presented either as pictures, as pictures with auditory labels, or as words with auditory labels, with both simultaneous and consistent ordering for all conditions. Results indicated a strong extended recency effect for all groups, eliminating presentation mode as a causal factor in the data of Experiment 1. We concluded that blocking leads to increased organization and recall over a variety of presentation modes, rates, and block sizes.

  9. Fluorinated polyphenylenevinylene (PPV) block co-polymers for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sam-Shajing; Nguyen, Thuong; Brooks, Jaleesa

    2013-09-01

    Polymer based optoelectronic materials and thin film devices exhibit great potential in future space applications due to their flexibility, light weight, large light absorption coefficient, and promising radiation tolerance in space environment as compared to their inorganic semiconductor counterparts. Since carbon-fluorine (C-F) chemical bonds are much stronger than the carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds, fluorinated polymer films offer great potential for space applications due their expected resistance to oxidation, thermal stability, excellent wear properties, and low coefficients of friction. Their use in a space environment is extremely attractive since they are expected to retain their lubricating characteristics in vacuum, unlike many solid lubricants. Current existing polymer photovoltaic materials and devices suffer low photoelectric power conversion efficiencies due to a number factors including poor morphologies at nano scale that hinder the charge separation and transport. This paper reports our recent work on a fluorinated DBfA type block copolymer system where the donor (D) block contains a donor substituted and hydrocarbon based polyphenylenevinylene (PPV), acceptor (fA) block contains a fluorinated and a sulfone acceptor substituted polyphenylenevinylene (f-PPV), and B is a non-conjugated and flexible bridge unit. Preliminary studies reveal DBfA exhibits better nano phase morphologies and over 100 times more efficient optoelectronic conversion efficiencies as compared to D/fA blend.

  10. Molecular origin of photovoltaic performance in donor-block-acceptor all-conjugated block copolymers

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Kendall A.; Lin, Yen -Hao; Mok, Jorge W.; Yager, Kevin G.; Strzalka, Joseph; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Verduzco, Rafael

    2015-11-03

    All-conjugated block copolymers may be an effective route to self-assembled photovoltaic devices, but we lack basic information on the relationship between molecular characteristics and photovoltaic performance. Here, we synthesize a library of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) block poly((9,9-dialkylfluorene)-2,7-diyl-alt-[4,7-bis(alkylthiophen-5-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole]-2',2''-diyl) (PFTBT) donor-block-acceptor all-conjugated block copolymers and carry out a comprehensive study of processing conditions, crystallinity, domain sizes, and side-chain structure on photovoltaic device performance. We find that all block copolymers studied exhibit an out-of-plane crystal orientation after deposition, and on thermal annealing at high temperatures the crystal orientation flips to an in-plane orientation. By varying processing conditions on polymer photovoltaic devices, we show thatmore » the crystal orientation has only a modest effect (15-20%) on photovoltaic performance. The addition of side-chains to the PFTBT block is found to decrease photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies by at least an order of magnitude. Through grazing-incidence X-ray measurements we find that the addition of side-chains to the PFTBT acceptor block results in weak segregation and small (< 10 nm) block copolymer self-assembled donor and acceptor domains. This work is the most comprehensive to date on all-conjugated block copolymer systems and suggests that photovoltaic performance of block copolymers depends strongly on the miscibility of donor and acceptor blocks, which impacts donor and acceptor domain sizes and purity. Lastly, strategies for improving the device performance of block copolymer photovoltaics should seek to increase segregation between donor and acceptor polymer domains.« less

  11. A generalized method for alignment of block copolymer films: solvent vapor annealing with soft shear.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Zhe; Zhang, Yuanzhong; Groff, Jesse A; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Vogt, Bryan D

    2014-08-28

    One of the key issues associated with the utilization of block copolymer (BCP) thin films in nanoscience and nanotechnology is control of their alignment and orientation over macroscopic dimensions. We have recently reported a method, solvent vapor annealing with soft shear (SVA-SS), for fabricating unidirectional alignment of cylindrical nanostructures. This method is a simple extension of the common SVA process by adhering a flat, crosslinked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) pad to the BCP thin film. The impact of processing parameters, including annealing time, solvent removal rate and the physical properties of the PDMS pad, on the quality of alignment quantified by the Herman's orientational factor (S) is systematically examined for a model system of polystyrene-block-polyisoprene-block-polystyrene (SIS). As annealing time increases, the SIS morphology transitions from isotropic rods to highly aligned cylinders. Decreasing the rate of solvent removal, which impacts the shear rate imposed by the contraction of the PDMS, improves the orientation factor of the cylindrical domains; this suggests the nanostructure alignment is primarily induced by contraction of PDMS during solvent removal. Moreover, the physical properties of the PDMS controlled by the crosslink density impact the orientation factor by tuning its swelling extent during SVA-SS and elastic modulus. Decreasing the PDMS crosslink density increases S; this effect appears to be primarily driven by the changes in the solubility of the SVA-SS solvent in the PDMS. With this understanding of the critical processing parameters, SVA-SS has been successfully applied to align a wide variety of BCPs including polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS), polystyrene-block-poly(N,N-dimethyl-n-octadecylammonium p-styrenesulfonate) (PS-b-PSS-DMODA), polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) and polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinlypyridine) (PS-b-P2VP). These results suggest that SVA-SS is a generalizable

  12. [Effectiveness of sympathetic block using various technics].

    PubMed

    Weissenberg, W

    1987-07-01

    Blocking of sympathetic conduction aims at permanent or temporary elimination of those pain pathways conducted by the sympathetic nervous system. In order to provide an objective evaluation of sufficient blocking effect, earlier inquiries referred to parameters such as: (1) observation of clinical signs such as Horner's syndrome, Guttman's sign, anhidrosis, extended venous filling; (2) difference in skin temperature of at least 1.5 degrees C between blocked and unblocked side; (3) increase in amplitude of the pulse wave; and (4) depression of the psychogalvanic reflex (PGR) on the blocked side (Fig. 1). In clinical practice, these control parameters are effective because they are time-saving, technically simple, and highly evidential. Further parameters for evaluating sympathetic blockade are examination of hydrosis by means of color indicators such as bromocresol and ninhydrin, oscillometry, and plethysmography. The effectiveness of sympathetic blockade after stellate ganglion and sympathetic trunk blocks has been verified by various authors. In a clinical study, 16 patients were divided into four groups in order to test the effectiveness of sympathetic blockade after spinal anesthesia with 3 ml 0.75% bupivacaine (group I) and 4 ml 0.75% bupivacaine (group II) and after peridural anesthesia with 15 ml 0.75% bupivacaine (group III) and 20 ml 0.75% bupivacaine (group IV) by means of temperature difference, response of pulse wave amplitude and PGR between blocked lower and unblocked upper extremity, and sensory levels of block. The patients were classified as ASA I and II; their ages varied from 20 to 63 years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Improved technique for CT-guided celiac ganglia block

    SciTech Connect

    Haaga, J.R.; Kori, S.H.; Eastwood, D.W.; Borowski, G.P.

    1984-06-01

    Celiac nerve blocks have been performed without radiologic guidance, but recently several groups have reported computed tomography (CT)-guided techniques. The authors present a new technique of CT-guided celiac nerve block using an 18 gauge Teflon catheter, which permits a test block dose and permanent alcohol block with one procedure. The results of this new technique were very encouraging. Of nine cancer patients who had the test block, seven had good pain relief; these same patients had good pain control with the permanent block. Of six patients with pancreatitis, six had good pain relief from the test block, and three had some long-term relief from the permanent block.

  14. Increased coverage of protein families with the blocks database servers.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, J G; Greene, E A; Pietrokovski, S; Henikoff, S

    2000-01-01

    The Blocks Database WWW (http://blocks.fhcrc.org ) and Email (blocks@blocks.fhcrc.org ) servers provide tools to search DNA and protein queries against the Blocks+ Database of multiple alignments, which represent conserved protein regions. Blocks+ nearly doubles the number of protein families included in the database by adding families from the Pfam-A, ProDom and Domo databases to those from PROSITE and PRINTS. Other new features include improved Block Searcher statistics, searching with NCBI's IMPALA program and 3D display of blocks on PDB structures.

  15. Chain exchange in block copolymer micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jie; Bates, Frank; Lodge, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Block copolymer micelles are aggregates formed by self-assembly of amphiphilic copolymers dispersed in a selective solvent, driven by unfavorable interactions between the solvent and the core-forming block. Due to the relatively long chains being subject to additional thermodynamic and dynamic constraints (e.g., entanglements, crystallinity, vitrification), block copolymer micelles exhibit significantly slower equilibration kinetics than small molecule surfactants. As a result, details of the mechanism(s) of equilibration in block copolymer micelles remain unclear. This present works focuses on the chain exchange kinetics of poly(styrene-b-ethylenepropylene) block copolymers in squalane (C30H62) using time-resolved small angle neutron scattering (TR-SANS). A mixture of h-squalane and d-squalane is chosen so that it contrast matches a mixed 50/50 h/d polystyrene micelle core. When the temperature is appropriate and isotopically labeled chains undergo mixing, the mean core contrast with respect to the solvent decreases, and the scattering intensity is therefore reduced. This strategy allows direct probing of chain exchange rate from the time dependent scattering intensity I(q, t).

  16. Regulating block copolymer phases via selective homopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuang E-mail: eqchen@pku.edu.cn; Lei, Zhen; Hu, Nan; Chen, Er-Qiang E-mail: eqchen@pku.edu.cn; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-03-28

    The phase behavior of strongly segregated AB diblock copolymer and selective C homopolymer blends is examined theoretically using a combination of strong stretching theory (SST) and self-consistent field theory (SCFT). The C-homopolymer is immiscible with the B-blocks but strongly attractive with the A-blocks. The effect of homopolymer content on the order-order phase transitions is analyzed. It is observed that, for AB diblock copolymers with majority A-blocks, the addition of the C-homopolymers results in lamellar to cylindrical to spherical phase transitions because of the A/C complexation. For diblock copolymers with minor A-blocks, adding C-homopolymers leads to transitions from spherical or cylindrical morphology with A-rich core to lamellae to inverted cylindrical and spherical morphologies with B-rich core. The results from analytical SST and numerical SCFT are in good agreement within most regions of the phase diagram. But the deviation becomes more obvious when the composition of A-blocks is too small and the content of added C-homopolymers is large enough, where the SCFT predicts a narrow co-existence region between different ordered phases. Furthermore, it is found that the phase behavior of the system is insensitive to the molecular weight of C-homopolymer.

  17. Sulfonated Polymerized Ionic Liquid Block Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Meek, Kelly M; Elabd, Yossef A

    2016-07-01

    The successful synthesis of a new diblock copolymer, referred to as sulfonated polymerized ionic liquid (PIL) block copolymer, poly(SS-Li-b-AEBIm-TFSI), is reported, which contains both sulfonated blocks (sulfonated styrene: SS) and PIL blocks (1-[(2-acryloyloxy)ethyl]-3-butylimidazolium: AEBIm) with both mobile cations (lithium: Li(+) ) and mobile anions (bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide: TFSI(-) ). Synthesis consists of polymerization via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer, followed by post-functionalization reactions to covalently attach the imidazolium cations and sulfonic acid anions to their respective blocks, followed by ion exchange metathesis resulting in mobile Li(+) cations and mobile TFSI(-) anions. Solid-state films containing 1 m Li-TFSI salt dissolved in ionic liquid result in an ion conductivity of >1.5 mS cm(-1) at 70 °C, where small-angle X-ray scattering data indicate a weakly ordered microphase-separated morphology. These results demonstrate a new ion-conducting block copolymer containing both mobile cations and mobile anions. PMID:27125600

  18. Regulating block copolymer phases via selective homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Lei, Zhen; Hu, Nan; Chen, Er-Qiang; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-03-28

    The phase behavior of strongly segregated AB diblock copolymer and selective C homopolymer blends is examined theoretically using a combination of strong stretching theory (SST) and self-consistent field theory (SCFT). The C-homopolymer is immiscible with the B-blocks but strongly attractive with the A-blocks. The effect of homopolymer content on the order-order phase transitions is analyzed. It is observed that, for AB diblock copolymers with majority A-blocks, the addition of the C-homopolymers results in lamellar to cylindrical to spherical phase transitions because of the A/C complexation. For diblock copolymers with minor A-blocks, adding C-homopolymers leads to transitions from spherical or cylindrical morphology with A-rich core to lamellae to inverted cylindrical and spherical morphologies with B-rich core. The results from analytical SST and numerical SCFT are in good agreement within most regions of the phase diagram. But the deviation becomes more obvious when the composition of A-blocks is too small and the content of added C-homopolymers is large enough, where the SCFT predicts a narrow co-existence region between different ordered phases. Furthermore, it is found that the phase behavior of the system is insensitive to the molecular weight of C-homopolymer. PMID:25833605

  19. Mineral resources estimation based on block modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargawa, Waterman Sulistyana; Amri, Nur Ali

    2016-02-01

    The estimation in this paper uses three kinds of block models of nearest neighbor polygon, inverse distance squared and ordinary kriging. The techniques are weighting scheme which is based on the principle that block content is a linear combination of the grade data or the sample around the block being estimated. The case study in Pongkor area, here is gold-silver resource modeling that allegedly shaped of quartz vein as a hydrothermal process of epithermal type. Resources modeling includes of data entry, statistical and variography analysis of topography and geological model, the block model construction, estimation parameter, presentation model and tabulation of mineral resources. Skewed distribution, here isolated by robust semivariogram. The mineral resources classification generated in this model based on an analysis of the kriging standard deviation and number of samples which are used in the estimation of each block. Research results are used to evaluate the performance of OK and IDS estimator. Based on the visual and statistical analysis, concluded that the model of OK gives the estimation closer to the data used for modeling.

  20. Lateral approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, DK; Sahu, Anjana

    2010-01-01

    A lateral approach described by Volker Hempel and Dr. Dilip Kotharihas been further studied, evaluated and described in detail in the present study. The aim of this study was to evaluate lateral approach of supraclavicular brachial plexus block, mainly in terms of successes rate and complication rate. The study was conducted in secondary level hospital and tertiary level hospital from 2004 to 2008. It was a prospective nonrandomized open-level study. Eighty-two patients of both sexes, aged between 18 and 65 years with ASA Grade I and II scheduled to undergo elective major surgery of the upper limb below the midarm, were selected for this new lateral approach of brachial plexus block. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, any complications and need for supplement anaesthesia were observed. Success and complication rate were calculated in percentage. Average onset and duration of sensory and motor block was calculated as mean ± SD and percentage. Out of 82 patients, 75 (92%) have got successful block with no significant complication in any case. PMID:20885867

  1. The cholinergic blocking action of adrenergic blocking agents in the pharmacological analysis of autonomic innervation

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Helen; Burnstock, G.; Campbell, G.; Jowett, Alison; O'Shea, Judith; Wood, Margaret

    1963-01-01

    The adrenergic blocking agents tolazoline, phentolamine, piperoxan, yohimbine, phenoxybenzamine, bretylium and guanethidine block the excitatory actions both of cholinergic nerves and of added acetylcholine on a variety of vertebrate smooth muscle preparations. These cholinergic blocking actions often occurred with concentrations lower than those required to block the response of the guinea-pig vas deferens to stimulation of the adrenergic hypogastric nerve. The anti-acetylcholine activities of these drugs have been studied in detail, using the guinea-pig rectum and the toad bladder as test organs. In preparations sensitive to eserine, the anticholinesterase actions of the drugs competed with their anti-acetylcholine actions, so that either potentiation or block of responses to acetylcholine and to cholinergic nerve stimulation occurred with different concentrations. The responses of the toad bladder to acetylcholine were not potentiated by eserine. This enabled the antagonism of acetylcholine by the anti-adrenergic drugs to be estimated without interference from their anticholinesterase activity. When blocking activity was assessed on guinea-pig rectum previously treated with dyflos, the results were qualitatively similar to those on the toad bladder. Phenoxybenzamine often completely blocks responses both to added acetylcholine and to cholinergic nerve stimulation in concentrations less than those required to block adrenergic nerves. Guanethidine and piperoxan also show strong cholinergic blocking activity. Bretylium, yohimbine, tolazoline and phentolamine were less potent. However, in concentrations required to block the effect on the vas deferens of hypogastric nerve stimulation, these drugs at least halved the effects of acetylcholine and often of cholinergic nerve stimulation. It is concluded that these adrenergic blocking agents cannot be used to distinguish conclusively between adrenergic and cholinergic nerves. For reliable analysis of autonomic

  2. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Transgenic Mice Exhibit Passive Avoidance Deficits, Increased Seizure Severity and In Vitro Hyperexcitability in the Hippocampus and Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Croll, S. D.; Suri, C.; Compton, D. L.; Simmons, M. V.; Yancopoulos, G. D.; Lindsay, R. M.; Wiegand, S. J.; Rudge, J. S.; Scharfman, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor from the β-actin promoter were tested for behavioral, gross anatomical and physiological abnormalities. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA overexpression was widespread throughout brain. Overexpression declined with age, such that levels of overexpression decreased sharply by nine months. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor transgenic mice had no gross deformities or behavioral abnormalities. However, they showed a significant passive avoidance deficit. This deficit was dependent on continued overexpression, and resolved with age as brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts decreased. In addition, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor transgenic mice showed increased seizure severity in response to kainic acid. Hippocampal slices from brain-derived neurotrophic factor transgenic mice showed hyperexcitability in area CA3 and entorhinal cortex, but not in dentate gyrus. Finally, area CA1 long-term potentiation was disrupted, indicating abnormal plasticity. Our data suggest that overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brain can interfere with normal brain function by causing learning impairments and increased excitability. The results also support the hypothesis that excess brain-derived neurotrophic factor could be pro-convulsant in the limbic system. PMID:10501474

  3. Superintegrability of d-Dimensional Conformal Blocks.

    PubMed

    Isachenkov, Mikhail; Schomerus, Volker

    2016-08-12

    We observe that conformal blocks of scalar four-point functions in a d-dimensional conformal field theory can be mapped to eigenfunctions of a two-particle hyperbolic Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian. The latter describes two coupled Pöschl-Teller particles. Their interaction, whose strength depends smoothly on the dimension d, is known to be superintegrable. Our observation enables us to exploit the rich mathematical literature on Calogero-Sutherland models in deriving various results for conformal field theory. These include an explicit construction of conformal blocks in terms of Heckman-Opdam hypergeometric functions. We conclude with a short outlook, in particular, on the consequences of integrability for the theory of conformal blocks. PMID:27563949

  4. Arbitrary lattice symmetries via block copolymer nanomeshes

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of block copolymers is a powerful motif for spontaneously forming well-defined nanostructures over macroscopic areas. Yet, the inherent energy minimization criteria of self-assembly give rise to a limited library of structures; diblock copolymers naturally form spheres on a cubic lattice, hexagonally packed cylinders and alternating lamellae. Here, we demonstrate multicomponent nanomeshes with any desired lattice symmetry. We exploit photothermal annealing to rapidly order and align block copolymer phases over macroscopic areas, combined with conversion of the self-assembled organic phase into inorganic replicas. Repeated photothermal processing independently aligns successive layers, providing full control of the size, symmetry and composition of the nanoscale unit cell. We construct a variety of symmetries, most of which are not natively formed by block copolymers, including squares, rhombuses, rectangles and triangles. In fact, we demonstrate all possible two-dimensional Bravais lattices. Finally, we elucidate the influence of nanostructure on the electrical and optical properties of nanomeshes. PMID:26100566

  5. Concentration Dependent Structure of Block Copolymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soohyung; Bates, Frank S.; Lodge, Timothy P.

    2015-03-01

    Addition of solvent molecules into block copolymer can induce additional interactions between the solvent and both blocks, and therefore expands the range of accessible self-assembled morphologies. In particular, the distribution of solvent molecules plays a key role in determining the microstructure and its characteristic domain spacing. In this study, concentration dependent structures formed by poly(styrene-b-ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) solution in squalane are investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering. This reveals that squalane is essentially completely segregated into the PEP domains. In addition, the conformation of the PS block changes from stretched to nearly fully relaxed (i.e., Gaussian conformation) as amounts of squalane increases. NRF

  6. Radial expansion for spinning conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Hansen, Tobias; Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio

    2016-07-01

    This paper develops a method to compute any bosonic conformal block as a series expansion in the optimal radial coordinate introduced by Hogervorst and Rychkov. The method reduces to the known result when the external operators are all the same scalar operator, but it allows to compute conformal blocks for external operators with spin. Moreover, we explain how to write closed form recursion relations for the coefficients of the expansions. We study three examples of four point functions in detail: one vector and three scalars; two vectors and two scalars; two spin 2 tensors and two scalars. Finally, for the case of two external vectors, we also provide a more efficient way to generate the series expansion using the analytic structure of the blocks as a function of the scaling dimension of the exchanged operator.

  7. Superintegrability of d -Dimensional Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isachenkov, Mikhail; Schomerus, Volker

    2016-08-01

    We observe that conformal blocks of scalar four-point functions in a d -dimensional conformal field theory can be mapped to eigenfunctions of a two-particle hyperbolic Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian. The latter describes two coupled Pöschl-Teller particles. Their interaction, whose strength depends smoothly on the dimension d , is known to be superintegrable. Our observation enables us to exploit the rich mathematical literature on Calogero-Sutherland models in deriving various results for conformal field theory. These include an explicit construction of conformal blocks in terms of Heckman-Opdam hypergeometric functions. We conclude with a short outlook, in particular, on the consequences of integrability for the theory of conformal blocks.

  8. Block copolymers for opto-electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sam-Shajing; Fan, Zhen; Wang, Yiqing; Taft, Charles; Haliburton, James H.; Maaref, Shahin; Ledbetter, Abram J.; Bonner, Carl E.

    2004-05-01

    A D(donor)-B(bridge)-A(acceptor)-B(bridge)-type block copolymer system has been developed and preliminarily examined for potential opto-electronic photovoltaic functions. The unique feature of the device includes a primary DBAB-type block copolymer backbone, where D and A are conjugated donor and acceptor polymer blocks, and B is a non-conjugated and flexible chain, a π orbital stacked and conjugated chain self-assembled and ordered "secondary structure", and a donor/acceptor asymmetric layers sandwiched D/A columnar "tertiary structure". This structure is expected to improve photovoltaic power conversion efficiency significantly in comparison to most existing organic or polymeric donor/acceptor binary photovoltaic systems due to the reduction of "exciton loss", the "carrier loss", as well as the "photon loss" via three-dimensional space and energy level optimizations. Preliminary experimental results revealed better morphology and opto-electronic properties of DBAB vs. D/A blends.

  9. Dual-channel solid block optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, James C.; Bagley, Harold R.; Sloan, Jeffrey A.

    1993-11-01

    A new solid block correlator has been built for the U.S. Army Missile Command by OCA Applied Optics. This Advanced Solid Block Correlator (ASBC) is based on the same design approach useful for the original solid block correlator. The ASBC provides both improved performance and a vehicle for evaluating the recently available Liquid Crystal Televisions as spatial light modulators (SLMs). Performance is significantly enhanced by: (1) real-time programmable filter capability, (2) improved SLM speed, and (3) improved SLM uniformity. Furthermore, the ASBC also has the advantage of two separate filter channels to increase filter throughput or allow simultaneous monitoring of the response to two different filters. This paper will present the results obtained from initial tests performed with the ASBC.

  10. Rapid ordering of block copolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Pawel W.; Yager, Kevin G.

    2016-10-01

    Block-copolymers self-assemble into diverse morphologies, where nanoscale order can be finely tuned via block architecture and processing conditions. However, the ultimate usage of these materials in real-world applications may be hampered by the extremely long thermal annealing times—hours or days—required to achieve good order. Here, we provide an overview of the fundamentals of block-copolymer self-assembly kinetics, and review the techniques that have been demonstrated to influence, and enhance, these ordering kinetics. We discuss the inherent tradeoffs between oven annealing, solvent annealing, microwave annealing, zone annealing, and other directed self-assembly methods; including an assessment of spatial and temporal characteristics. We also review both real-space and reciprocal-space analysis techniques for quantifying order in these systems.

  11. Crystal blocking in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    del Campo, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The crystal blocking technique, used to measure very short lifetime (10/sup -18/ sec), was developed during the 1960's primarily in connection with the study of the channeling effect. Early blocking lifetime measurements involved light ion resonance reactions yielding typical lifetime values down to the order of 10/sup -17/ sec. Recently, studies of heavy-ion induced fission and fusion have extended the technique into the 10/sup -18/ to 10/sup -19/ sec scale. In this work measurements of fusion for /sup 16/O + Ge and deep inelastic reactions for /sup 28/Si + Ge are presented for bombarding energies around 8 nucleon. Also measurements of the projectile fragmenatation of 44 MeV/nucleon /sup 40/Ar + Ge are discussed. In all reactions studied the presence of particle evaporation is the dominant mechanism that determines the reaction times of about 10/sup -18/ sec extracted with the blocking technique. 16 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Block by Block: Neighborhoods and Public Policy on Chicago's West Side. Historical Studies of Urban America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Amanda I.

    2005-01-01

    In the decades following World War II, cities across the United States saw an influx of African American families into otherwise homogeneously white areas. This racial transformation of urban neighborhoods led many whites to migrate to the suburbs, producing the phenomenon commonly known as white flight. In "Block by Block," Amanda I. Seligman…

  13. 31 CFR 537.209 - Expenses of maintaining blocked property; liquidation of blocked account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Expenses of maintaining blocked property; liquidation of blocked account. 537.209 Section 537.209 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  14. Arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming or repair under nerve blocks: Which nerves should be blocked?

    PubMed Central

    Taha, AM; Abd-Elmaksoud, AM

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the role of the sciatic and obturator nerve blocks (in addition to femoral block) in providing painless arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming/repair. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with medial meniscus tear, who had been scheduled to knee arthroscopy, were planned to be included in this controlled prospective double-blind study. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups; FSO, FS, and FO. The femoral, sciatic, and obturator nerves were blocked in FSO groups. The femoral and sciatic nerves were blocked in FS group, while the femoral and obturator nerves were blocked in FO group. Intraoperative pain and its causative surgical maneuver were recorded. Results: All the patients (n = 7, 100%) in FO group had intraoperative pain. The research was terminated in this group but completed in FS and FSO groups (40 patients each). During valgus positioning of the knee for surgical management of the medial meniscus tear, the patients in FS group experienced pain more frequently than those in FSO group (P = 0.005). Conclusion: Adding a sciatic nerve block to the femoral nerve block is important for painless knee arthroscopy. Further adding of an obturator nerve block may be needed when a valgus knee position is required to manage the medial meniscus tear. PMID:27375382

  15. Melt-Miscibility in Block Copolymers Containing Polyethylene and Substituted Polynorbornene Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulhearn, William; Register, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Block copolymers containing a crystallizable block, such as polyethylene (PE), and a high-Tg amorphous block are potentially interesting materials since the rigid glassy block can mitigate the poor yield strength of the PE crystals. However, chemical incompatibility between blocks, quantified by the Flory interaction parameter χ or the interaction energy density X, drives microphase separation at low temperatures or high chain lengths. To prepare a high molecular weight PE-containing block copolymer that is easy to process (i.e. with a disordered low-viscosity melt) it is necessary to select amorphous blocks that have low mixing energies with PE. The only suitable polymers currently known are chemically similar to PE and therefore have similarly low glass transition temperatures. We investigate a series of both low- and high-Tg polymers based on substituted norbornene monomers, polymerized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Several ROMP polymers of this type exhibit high Tg and low interaction energy against PE. For example, hydrogenated poly(cyclohexyl norbornene) has Tg = 88 oC and has interaction energy density XhPCyN - PE ~ 0.8 MPa, comparable to the interaction energy density between PE and hydrogenated polyisoprene. The miscibility of an amorphous block can be further tuned by statistical copolymerization of norbornene units with aromatic side-groups (high Hildebrand solubility parameter) and norbornene units with aliphatic side-groups (low Hildebrand solubility parameter).

  16. Block Play: It's Not Just for Boys Anymore--Strategies for Encouraging Girls' Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokarz, Barb

    2008-01-01

    While block play is essential for both boys' and girls' social, cognitive, language, and motor development, girls do not engage in block play as frequently as boys. This situation can be attributed to the socialization process--children learn societal expectations for behavior and materials for both boys and girls--lack of experience for girls…

  17. A novel power block for CSP systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mittelman, Gur; Epstein, Michael

    2010-10-15

    Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) and in particular parabolic trough, is a proven large-scale solar power technology. However, CSP cost is not yet competitive with conventional alternatives unless subsidized. Current CSP plants typically include a condensing steam cycle power block which was preferably designed for a continuous operation and higher operating conditions and therefore, limits the overall plant cost effectiveness and deployment. The drawbacks of this power block are as follows: (i) no power generation during low insolation periods (ii) expensive, large condenser (typically water cooled) due to the poor extracted steam properties (high specific volume, sub-atmospheric pressure) and (iii) high installation and operation costs. In the current study, a different power block scheme is proposed to eliminate these obstacles. This power block includes a top Rankine cycle with a back pressure steam turbine and a bottoming Kalina cycle comprising another back pressure turbine and using ammonia-water mixture as a working fluid. The bottoming (moderate temperature) cycle allows power production during low insolation periods. Because of the superior ammonia-water vapor properties, the condensing system requirements are much less demanding and the operation costs are lowered. Accordingly, air cooled condensers can be used with lower economical penalty. Another advantage is that back pressure steam turbines have a less complex design than condensing steam turbines which make their costs lower. All of these improvements could make the combined cycle unit more cost effective. This unit can be applicable in both parabolic trough and central receiver (solar tower) plants. The potential advantage of the new power block is illustrated by a detailed techno-economical analysis of two 50 MW parabolic trough power plants, comparing between the standard and the novel power block. The results indicate that the proposed plant suggests a 4-11% electricity cost saving

  18. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM (ARC EXTERNAL TO BLOCK)

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.H.

    1958-09-01

    This patent pentains to an ion producing mechanism employed in a calutron which has the decided advantage of an increased amount of ionization effectuated by the arc, and a substantially uniform arc in poiat of time, i arc location and along the arc length. The unique features of the disclosed ion source lie in the specific structural arrangement of the source block, gas ionizing passage, filament shield and filament whereby the arc is established both within the ionizing passage and immediately outside the exit of the ionizing passage at the block face.

  19. Complete heart block following intentional carbamate ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Deborah; Kotowycz, Mark A; Methot, Michelle; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Organophosphates and carbamate compounds are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors used as agricultural insecticides and represent a common cause of cholinergic toxicity. Cardiac manifestations of organophosphate and carbamate toxicity are described primarily from reports of organophosphate exposure and include sinus bradycardia, prolonged PR interval, sinus tachycardia, prolonged corrected QT interval and ventricular arrhythmias. Complete atrioventricular block has rarely been reported with insecticide poisonings. A case of complete heart block following carbamate ingestion is described and the importance of extended cardiac monitoring in these patients is emphasized. PMID:19668791

  20. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-01

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. We also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks can be assembled.