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Sample records for factor cleaving protease

  1. Purification of human von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease and its identification as a new member of the metalloproteinase family.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, K; Suzuki, H; McMullen, B; Chung, D

    2001-09-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is synthesized in megakaryocytes and endothelial cells as a very large multimer, but circulates in plasma as a group of multimers ranging from 500 to 10 000 kd. An important mechanism for depolymerization of the large multimers is the limited proteolysis by a vWF-cleaving protease present in plasma. The absence or inactivation of the vWF-cleaving protease results in the accumulation of large multimers, which may cause thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The vWF-cleaving protease was first described as a Ca(++)-dependent proteinase with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 300 kd. Thus far, however, it has not been isolated and characterized. In this study, the purification of human vWF-cleaving protease from a commercial preparation of factor VIII/vWF concentrate by means of several column chromatographic steps, including 2 steps of heparin-Sepharose column, is reported. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the anion exchange and gel filtration column fractions showed that the vWF-cleaving protease activity corresponded to a protein band of 150 kd. After reduction, it migrated with an apparent weight of 190 kd. The amino terminal sequence of the 150-kd band was AAGGIL(H)LE(L)L(D)AXG(P)X(V)XQ (single-letter amino acid codes), with the tentative residues shown in parentheses. A search of the human genome sequence identified the vWF-cleaving protease as a new member of the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motif) family of metalloproteinase. An active site sequence of HEIGHSFGLEHE (single-letter amino acid codes) was located at 150 residues from the N terminus of the protein.

  2. Protease Omi facilitates neurite outgrowth in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells by cleaving transcription factor E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Hu, Qing-song; Xu, Ran-jie; Zhen, Xue-chu; Wang, Guang-hui

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Omi is an ATP-independent serine protease that is necessary for neuronal function and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of protease Omi in regulating differentiation of mouse neuroblastoma cells and to identify the substrate of Omi involved in this process. Methods: Mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells and Omi protease-deficient mnd2 mice were used in this study. To modulate Omi and E2F1 expression, N2a cells were transfected with expression plasmids, shRNA plasmids or siRNA. Protein levels were detected using immunoblot assays. The interaction between Omi and E2F1 was studied using immunoprecipitation, GST pulldown and in vitro cleavage assays. N2a cells were treated with 20 μmol/L retinoic acid (RA) and 1% fetal bovine serum to induce neurite outgrowth, which was measured using Image J software. Results: E2F1 was significantly increased in Omi knockdown cells and in brain lysates of mnd2 mice, and was decreased in cells overexpressing wild-type Omi, but not inactive Omi S276C. In brain lysates of mnd2 mice, endogenous E2F1 was co-immunoprecipitated with endogenous Omi. In vitro cleavage assay demonstrated that Omi directly cleaved E2F1. Treatment of N2a cells with RA induced marked differentiation and neurite outgrowth accompanied by significantly increased Omi and decreased E2F1 levels, which were suppressed by pretreatment with the specific Omi inhibitor UCF-101. Knockdown of Omi in N2a cells suppressed RA-induced neurite outgrowth, which was partially restored by knockdown of E2F1. Conclusion: Protease Omi facilitates neurite outgrowth by cleaving the transcription factor E2F1 in differentiated neuroblastoma cells; E2F1 is a substrate of Omi. PMID:26238290

  3. German cockroach frass proteases cleave pro-matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Valerie S; Page, Kristen

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, secreted as pro-MMP-9, is cleaved by serine proteases at the N-terminus to generate active MMP-9. Pro-MMP-9 has been found in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with asthma. Because many inhaled aeroallergens contain active proteases, the authors sought to determine whether German cockroach (GC) fecal remnants (frass) and house dust mite (HDM) were able to cleave pro-MMP-9. Treatment of recombinant human (rh) pro-MMP-9 with GC frass resulted in a dose- and time-dependent cleavage. This was abrogated by pretreating frass with an inhibitor of serine, but not cysteine protease activity. GC frass also induced cleavage of pro-MMP-9 from primary human neutrophils dependent on the active serine proteases in GC frass. HDM was less potent at cleaving pro-MMP-9. Alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT), a naturally occurring protease inhibitor, attenuated GC frass-induced cleavage of pro-MMP-9. A1AT partially inactivated the serine protease activity in GC frass, while GC frass cleaved A1AT in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These data suggest that GC frass-derived serine proteases could regulate the activity of MMP-9 and that A1AT may play an important role in modulating GC frass activity in vivo. These data suggest a mechanism by which inhalation of GC frass could regulate airway remodeling through the activation of pro-MMP-9.

  4. Immune evasion by pathogenic Leptospira strains: the secretion of proteases that directly cleave complement proteins.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Courrol, Daniella Dos Santos; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Hirata, Izaura Yoshico; Vasconcellos, Sílvio Arruda; Juliano, Luiz; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-03-01

    Leptospirosis is an infectious disease of public health importance. To successfully colonize the host, pathogens have evolved multiple strategies to escape the complement system. Here we demonstrate that the culture supernatant of pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira inhibit the three complement pathways. We showed that the proteolytic activity in the supernatants of pathogenic strains targets the central complement molecule C3 and specific proteins from each pathway, such as factor B, C2, and C4b. The proteases cleaved α and β chains of C3 and work in synergy with host regulators to inactivate C3b. Proteolytic activity was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, suggesting the participation of metalloproteases. A recombinant leptospiral metalloprotease from the thermolysin family cleaved C3 in serum and could be one of the proteases responsible for the supernatant activity. We conclude that pathogenic leptospiral proteases can deactivate immune effector molecules and represent potential targets to the development of new therapies in leptospirosis.

  5. Botulinum protease-cleaved SNARE fragments induce cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Jason; Cuijpers, Sabine A G; Ferrari, Enrico; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Rust, Aleksander; Leese, Charlotte; O'Brien, John A; Binz, Thomas; Davletov, Bazbek

    2014-01-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are crucial for exocytosis, trafficking, and neurite outgrowth, where vesicular SNAREs are directed toward their partner target SNAREs: synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa and syntaxin. SNARE proteins are normally membrane bound, but can be cleaved and released by botulinum neurotoxins. We found that botulinum proteases types C and D can easily be transduced into endocrine cells using DNA-transfection reagents. Following administration of the C and D proteases into normally refractory Neuro2A neuroblastoma cells, the SNARE proteins were cleaved with high efficiency within hours. Remarkably, botulinum protease exposures led to cytotoxicity evidenced by spectrophotometric assays and propidium iodide penetration into the nuclei. Direct delivery of SNARE fragments into the neuroblastoma cells reduced viability similar to botulinum proteases' application. We observed synergistic cytotoxic effects of the botulinum proteases, which may be explained by the release and interaction of soluble SNARE fragments. We show for the first time that previously observed cytotoxicity of botulinum neurotoxins/C in neurons could be achieved in cells of neuroendocrine origin with implications for medical uses of botulinum preparations. PMID:24372287

  6. Complement 1s is the Serine Protease that Cleaves IGFBP-5 in Human Osteoarthritic Joint Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Walker H.; Yocum, Sue A.; Rowland, Michael; Kellner, Debra; Lazerwith, Scott; Sverdrup, Francis; Yates, Matthew; Radabaugh, Melissa; Clemmons, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) are trophic factors for cartilage and have been shown to be chondroprotective in animal models of osteoarthritis. IGFBP-5 is degraded in joint fluid and inhibition of IGFBP-5 degradation has been shown to enhance the trophic effects of IGF-I. Objective To determine the identity of IGFBP-5 protease activity in human osteoarthritic (OA) joint fluid. Method OA joint fluid was purified and the purified material analyzed by IGFBP-5 zymography. Results Both crude joint fluid and purified material contained a single band of proteolytic activity that cleaved IGFBP-5. Immunoblotting of joint fluid for complement 1s (C1s) showed a band that had the same Mr estimate, e.g. 88 kDa. In gel tryptic digestion and subsequent peptide analysis by LC-MS/MS showed that the band contained human complement 1s. A panel of protease inhibitors was tested for their ability to inhibit IGFBP-5 cleavage by the purified protease. Three serine protease inhibitors, FUT175 and CP 143217 and CB-349547 had IC50’s between 1and 6 uM. Two other serine protease inhibitors had intermediate activity (e.g. IC50’s 20–40 uM) and MMP inhibitors had no detectible activity at concentrations up to 300 uM. Conclusion Human OA fluid contains a serine protease that cleaves IGFBP-5. Zymography, immunoblotting and LCMS/MS analysis indicate that complement 1s is the protease that accounts for this activity. PMID:18930415

  7. Preserved Expression of mRNA Coding von Willebrand Factor-Cleaving Protease ADAMTS13 by Selenite and Activated Protein C.

    PubMed

    Ekaney, Michael L; Bockmeyer, Clemens L; Sossdorf, Maik; Reuken, Philipp A; Conradi, Florian; Schuerholz, Tobias; Blaess, Markus F; Friedman, Scott L; Lösche, Wolfgang; Bauer, Michael; Claus, Ralf A

    2015-04-03

    In sepsis, the severity-dependent decrease of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-inactivating protease, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 13 (ADAMTS13), results in platelet aggregation and consumption, leading to sepsis-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and organ failure. Previous reports assessing its functional deficiency have pinpointed involvement of autoantibodies or mutations to propagate thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, mechanisms of acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency during host response remain unclear. To enhance understanding of ADAMTS13 deficiency in sepsis, we evaluated changes in expression of mRNA coding ADAMTS13 during septic conditions using primary cellular sources of the protease. We hypothesized that proinflammatory cytokines and constituents of serum from septic patients affect the transcriptional level of ADAMTS13 in vitro, and previously recommended therapeutic agents as adjunctive therapy for sepsis interact therewith. Cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), endothelial cells (HMEC) and human precision-cut liver slices as an ex vivo model were stimulated with sepsis prototypic cytokines, bacterial endotoxin and pooled serum obtained from septic patients. Stimulation resulted in a significant decrease in ADAMTS13 mRNA between 10% and 80% of basal transcriptional rates. Costimulation of selenite or recombinant activated protein C (APC) with serum prevented ADAMTS13 decrease in HSCs and increased ADAMTS13 transcripts in HMEC. In archived clinical samples, the activity of ADAMTS13 in septic patients treated with APC (n = 5) increased with an accompanying decrease in VWF propeptide as surrogate for improved endothelial function. In conclusion, proinflammatory conditions of sepsis repress mRNA coding ADAMTS13 and the ameliorating effect by selenite and APC may support the concept for identification of beneficial mechanisms triggered by these drugs at a molecular level.

  8. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus 3C-Like Protease Regulates Its Interferon Antagonism by Cleaving NEMO

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Shi, Yanling; Zhang, Huan; Gao, Li; Peng, Guiqing; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Kui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is an enteropathogenic coronavirus causing lethal watery diarrhea in piglets. Since 2010, a PEDV variant has spread rapidly in China, and it emerged in the United States in 2013, posing significant economic and public health concerns. The ability to circumvent the interferon (IFN) antiviral response, as suggested for PEDV, promotes viral survival and regulates pathogenesis of PEDV infections, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we show that PEDV-encoded 3C-like protease, nsp5, is an IFN antagonist that proteolytically cleaves the nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) essential modulator (NEMO), an essential adaptor bridging interferon-regulatory factor and NF-κB activation. NEMO is cleaved at glutamine 231 (Q231) by PEDV, and this cleavage impaired the ability of NEMO to activate downstream IFN production and to act as a signaling adaptor of the RIG-I/MDA5 pathway. Mutations specifically disrupting the cysteine protease activity of PEDV nsp5 abrogated NEMO cleavage and the inhibition of IFN induction. Structural analysis suggests that several key residues outside the catalytic sites of PEDV nsp5 probably impact NEMO cleavage by modulating potential interactions of nsp5 with their substrates. These data show that PEDV nsp5 disrupts type I IFN signaling by cleaving NEMO. Previously, we and others demonstrated that NEMO is also cleaved by 3C or 3C-like proteinases of picornavirus and artertivirus. Thus, NEMO probably represents a prime target for 3C or 3C-like proteinases of different viruses. IMPORTANCE The continued emergence and reemergence of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) underscore the importance of studying how this virus manipulates the immune responses of its hosts. During coevolution with its hosts, PEDV has acquired mechanisms to subvert host innate immune responses for its survival advantage. At least two proteins encoded by PEDV have been identified as interferon (IFN

  9. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  10. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  11. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus 3C Protease Cleaves NEMO To Impair Innate Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Li, Kui; Zhong, Huijuan; Fan, Jinxiu; Ouyang, Chao; Zhang, Huan; Duan, Erzhen; Luo, Rui; Zhang, Zhongming; Liu, Xiangtao; Chen, Huanchun

    2012-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly contagious viral illness of wild and domestic cloven-hoofed animals. The causative agent, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), replicates rapidly, efficiently disseminating within the infected host and being passed on to susceptible animals via direct contact or the aerosol route. To survive in the host, FMDV has evolved to block the host interferon (IFN) response. Previously, we and others demonstrated that the leader proteinase (Lpro) of FMDV is an IFN antagonist. Here, we report that another FMDV-encoded proteinase, 3Cpro, also inhibits IFN-α/β response and the expression of IFN-stimulated genes. Acting in a proteasome- and caspase-independent manner, the 3Cpro of FMDV proteolytically cleaved nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) essential modulator (NEMO), a bridging adaptor protein essential for activating both NF-κB and interferon-regulatory factor signaling pathways. 3Cpro specifically targeted NEMO at the Gln 383 residue, cleaving off the C-terminal zinc finger domain from the protein. This cleavage impaired the ability of NEMO to activate downstream IFN production and to act as a signaling adaptor of the RIG-I/MDA5 pathway. Mutations specifically disrupting the cysteine protease activity of 3Cpro abrogated NEMO cleavage and the inhibition of IFN induction. Collectively, our data identify NEMO as a substrate for FMDV 3Cpro and reveal a novel mechanism evolved by a picornavirus to counteract innate immune signaling. PMID:22718831

  12. Group A Streptococcal Cysteine Protease Cleaves Epithelial Junctions and Contributes to Bacterial Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Sumitomo, Tomoko; Nakata, Masanobu; Higashino, Miharu; Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2013-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that possesses an ability to translocate across the epithelial barrier. In this study, culture supernatants of tested GAS strains showed proteolytic activity against human occludin and E-cadherin. Utilizing various types of protease inhibitors and amino acid sequence analysis, we identified SpeB (streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B) as the proteolytic factor that cleaves E-cadherin in the region neighboring the calcium-binding sites within the extracellular domain. The cleaving activities of culture supernatants from several GAS isolates were correlated with the amount of active SpeB, whereas culture supernatants from an speB mutant showed no such activities. Of note, the wild type strain efficiently translocated across the epithelial monolayer along with cleavage of occludin and E-cadherin, whereas deletion of the speB gene compromised those activities. Moreover, destabilization of the junctional proteins was apparently relieved in cells infected with the speB mutant, as compared with those infected with the wild type. Taken together, our findings indicate that the proteolytic efficacy of SpeB in junctional degradation allows GAS to invade deeper into tissues. PMID:23532847

  13. A kallikrein-like serine protease in prostatic fluid cleaves the predominant seminal vesicle protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lilja, H

    1985-01-01

    A 33-kD glycoprotein, known as the "prostate-specific antigen," was purified to homogeneity from human seminal plasma. The prostatic protein was identified as a serine protease, and its NH2-terminal sequence strongly suggests that it belongs to the family of glandular kallikreins. The structural protein of human seminal coagulum, the predominant protein in seminal vesicle secretion, was rapidly cleaved by the prostatic enzyme, which suggests that this seminal vesicle protein may serve as the physiological substrate for the protease. The prostatic enzyme hydrolyzed arginine- and lysine-containing substrates with a distinct preference for the former. All synthetic substrates tested were poor substrates for the enzyme. Synthetic Factor XIa substrate (pyro-glutamyl-prolyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide), and the synthetic kallikrein substrate (H-D-prolyl-phenylalanyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide) were hydrolyzed with maximum specific activities at 23 degrees C of 79 and 34 nmol/min per mg and Km values of 1.0 and 0.45 mM, respectively. Synthetic substrates for plasmin, chymotrypsin, and elastase were either not hydrolyzed by the enzyme at all, or only hydrolyzed very slowly. Images PMID:3902893

  14. Ovastacin, a cortical granule protease, cleaves ZP2 in the zona pellucida to prevent polyspermy.

    PubMed

    Burkart, Anna D; Xiong, Bo; Baibakov, Boris; Jiménez-Movilla, Maria; Dean, Jurrien

    2012-04-02

    The mouse zona pellucida is composed of three glycoproteins (ZP1, ZP2, and ZP3), of which ZP2 is proteolytically cleaved after gamete fusion to prevent polyspermy. This cleavage is associated with exocytosis of cortical granules that are peripherally located subcellular organelles unique to ovulated eggs. Based on the cleavage site of ZP2, ovastacin was selected as a candidate protease. Encoded by the single-copy Astl gene, ovastacin is an oocyte-specific member of the astacin family of metalloendoproteases. Using specific antiserum, ovastacin was detected in cortical granules before, but not after, fertilization. Recombinant ovastacin cleaved ZP2 in native zonae pellucidae, documenting that ZP2 was a direct substrate of this metalloendoprotease. Female mice lacking ovastacin did not cleave ZP2 after fertilization, and mouse sperm bound as well to Astl-null two-cell embryos as they did to normal eggs. Ovastacin is a pioneer component of mouse cortical granules and plays a definitive role in the postfertilization block to sperm binding that ensures monospermic fertilization and successful development.

  15. Enterovirus 68 3C Protease Cleaves TRIF To Attenuate Antiviral Responses Mediated by Toll-Like Receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zichun; Li, Linlin; Lei, Xiaobo; Zhou, Hongli; Zhou, Zhuo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human enterovirus 68 (EV68) is a member of the EV-D species, which belongs to the EV genus of the Picornaviridae family. Over the past several years, there have been increasingly documented outbreaks of respiratory disease associated with EV68. As a globally emerging pathogen, EV68 infects both adults and children. However, the molecular basis of EV68 pathogenesis is unknown. Here we report that EV68 inhibits Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)-mediated innate immune responses by targeting the TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing beta interferon (TRIF). In infected HeLa cells, EV68 inhibits poly(I·C)-induced interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation and beta interferon (IFN-β) expression. Further investigations revealed that TRIF, a critical adaptor downstream of TLR3, is targeted by EV68. When expressed alone, 3Cpro, an EV68-encoded protease, cleaves TRIF. 3Cpro mediates TRIF cleavage at Q312 and Q653, which are sites in the amino- and carboxyl-terminal domains, respectively. This cleavage relies on 3Cpro's cysteine protease activity. Cleavage of TRIF abolishes the capacity of TRIF to activate NF-κB and IFN-β signaling. These results suggest that control of TRIF by 3Cpro may be a mechanism by which EV68 subverts host innate immune responses. IMPORTANCE EV68 is a globally emerging pathogen, but the molecular basis of EV68 pathogenesis is unclear. Here we report that EV68 inhibits TLR3-mediated innate immune responses by targeting TRIF. Further investigations revealed that TRIF is cleaved by 3Cpro. These results suggest that control of TRIF by 3Cpro may be a mechanism by which EV68 impairs type I IFN production in response to TLR3 activation. PMID:24672048

  16. EspL is a bacterial cysteine protease effector that cleaves RHIM proteins to block necroptosis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Mühlen, Sabrina; Nachbur, Ueli; Pham, Chi L L; Zhang, Ying; Hildebrand, Joanne M; Oates, Clare V; Lung, Tania Wong Fok; Ingle, Danielle; Dagley, Laura F; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Petrie, Emma J; Schroeder, Gunnar N; Crepin, Valerie F; Frankel, Gad; Masters, Seth L; Vince, James; Murphy, James M; Sunde, Margaret; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2017-01-13

    Cell death signalling pathways contribute to tissue homeostasis and provide innate protection from infection. Adaptor proteins such as receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1), receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 3 (RIPK3), TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) and Z-DNA-binding protein 1 (ZBP1)/DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI) that contain receptor-interacting protein (RIP) homotypic interaction motifs (RHIM) play a key role in cell death and inflammatory signalling(1-3). RHIM-dependent interactions help drive a caspase-independent form of cell death termed necroptosis(4,5). Here, we report that the bacterial pathogen enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector EspL to degrade the RHIM-containing proteins RIPK1, RIPK3, TRIF and ZBP1/DAI during infection. This requires a previously unrecognized tripartite cysteine protease motif in EspL (Cys47, His131, Asp153) that cleaves within the RHIM of these proteins. Bacterial infection and/or ectopic expression of EspL leads to rapid inactivation of RIPK1, RIPK3, TRIF and ZBP1/DAI and inhibition of tumour necrosis factor (TNF), lipopolysaccharide or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C))-induced necroptosis and inflammatory signalling. Furthermore, EPEC infection inhibits TNF-induced phosphorylation and plasma membrane localization of mixed lineage kinase domain-like pseudokinase (MLKL). In vivo, EspL cysteine protease activity contributes to persistent colonization of mice by the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. The activity of EspL defines a family of T3SS cysteine protease effectors found in a range of bacteria and reveals a mechanism by which gastrointestinal pathogens directly target RHIM-dependent inflammatory and necroptotic signalling pathways.

  17. Cell-specific and developmental expression of lectican-cleaving proteases in mouse hippocampus and neocortex.

    PubMed

    Levy, C; Brooks, J M; Chen, J; Su, J; Fox, M A

    2015-03-01

    Mounting evidence has demonstrated that a specialized extracellular matrix exists in the mammalian brain and that this glycoprotein-rich matrix contributes to many aspects of brain development and function. The most prominent supramolecular assemblies of these extracellular matrix glycoproteins are perineuronal nets, specialized lattice-like structures that surround the cell bodies and proximal neurites of select classes of interneurons. Perineuronal nets are composed of lecticans, a family of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that includes aggrecan, brevican, neurocan, and versican. These lattice-like structures emerge late in postnatal brain development, coinciding with the ending of critical periods of brain development. Despite our knowledge of the presence of lecticans in perineuronal nets and their importance in regulating synaptic plasticity, we know little about the development or distribution of the extracellular proteases that are responsible for their cleavage and turnover. A subset of a large family of extracellular proteases (called a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs [ADAMTS]) is responsible for endogenously cleaving lecticans. We therefore explored the expression pattern of two aggrecan-degrading ADAMTS family members, ADAMTS15 and ADAMTS4, in the hippocampus and neocortex. Here, we show that both lectican-degrading metalloproteases are present in these brain regions and that each exhibits a distinct temporal and spatial expression pattern. Adamts15 mRNA is expressed exclusively by parvalbumin-expressing interneurons during synaptogenesis, whereas Adamts4 mRNA is exclusively generated by telencephalic oligodendrocytes during myelination. Thus, ADAMTS15 and ADAMTS4 not only exhibit unique cellular expression patterns but their developmental upregulation by these cell types coincides with critical aspects of neural development.

  18. Efficient sortase-mediated N-terminal labeling of TEV protease cleaved recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Sarpong, Kwabena; Bose, Ron

    2017-03-15

    A major challenge in attaching fluorophores or other handles to proteins is the availability of a site-specific labeling strategy that provides stoichiometric modification without compromising protein integrity. We developed a simple approach that combines TEV protease cleavage, sortase modification and affinity purification to N-terminally label proteins. To achieve stoichiometrically-labeled protein, we included a short affinity tag in the fluorophore-containing peptide for post-labeling purification of the modified protein. This strategy can be easily applied to any recombinant protein with a TEV site and we demonstrate this on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Membrane Scaffold Protein (MSP) constructs.

  19. Interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme-like protease cleaves DNA- dependent protein kinase in cytotoxic T cell killing

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells (CTL) represent the major defense mechanism against the spread of virus infection. It is believed that the pore-forming protein, perforin, facilitates the entry of a series of serine proteases (particularly granzyme B) into the target cell which ultimately leads to DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. We demonstrate here that during CTL-mediated cytolysis the catalytic subunit of DNA- dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an enzyme implicated in the repair of double strand breaks in DNA, is specifically cleaved by an interleukin (IL)-1 beta-converting enzyme (ICE)-like protease. A serine protease inhibitor, 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin (DCl), which is known to block granzyme B activity, inhibited CTL-induced apoptosis and prevented the degradation of DNA-PKcs in cells but failed to prevent the degradation of purified DNA-PKcs by CTL extracts. However, Tyr-Val- Ala-Asp-CH2Cl (YVAD-CMK) and other cysteine protease inhibitors prevented the degradation of purified DNA-PKcs by CTL extracts. Furthermore, incubation of DNA-PKcs with granzyme B did not produce the same cleavage pattern observed in cells undergoing apoptosis and when this substrate was incubated with either CTL extracts or the ICE-like protease, CPP32. Sequence analysis revealed that the cleavage site in DNA-PKcs during CTL killing was the same as that when this substrate was exposed to CPP32. This study demonstrates for the first time that the cleavage of DNA-PKcs in this intact cell system is exclusively due to an ICE-like protease. PMID:8760815

  20. Cleavage and activation of human factor IX by serine proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Enfield, D.L.; Thompson, A.R.

    1984-10-01

    Human factor IX circulates as a single-chain glycoprotein. Upon activation in vitro, it is cleaved into disulfide-linked light and heavy chains and an activation peptide. After reduction of activated /sup 125/I-factor IX, the heavy and light chains are readily identified by gel electrophoresis. A direct, immunoradiometric assay for factor IXa was developed to assess activation of factor IX for proteases that cleaved it. The assay utilized radiolabeled antithrombin III with heparin to identify the active site and antibodies to distinguish factor IX. After cleavage of factor IX by factor XIa, factor VIIa-tissue thromboplastin complex, or the factor X-activating enzyme from Russell's viper venom, antithrombin III bound readily to factor IXa. Cleavage of /sup 125/I-factor IX by trypsin, chymotrypsin, and granulocyte elastase in the presence of calcium yielded major polypeptide fragments of the sizes of the factor XIa-generated light and heavy chains. When the immunoradiometric assay was used to assess trypsin-cleaved factor IX, the product bound antithrombin III, but not maximally. After digesting with insolubilized trypsin, clotting activity confirmed activation. In evaluating activation of factor IX, physical evidence of activation cleavages does not necessarily correlate with generation of an active site.

  1. Characterization of the protease activity that cleaves the extracellular domain of {beta}-dystroglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Di; Saito, Fumiaki; Saito, Yuko; Nakamura, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro . E-mail: k-matsu@med.teikyo-u.ac.jp

    2006-06-30

    Dystroglycan (DG) complex, composed of {alpha}DG and {beta}DG, provides a link between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cortical cytoskeleton. Although the proteolytic processing of {beta}DG was reported in various physiological and pathological conditions, its exact mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we addressed this issue using the cell culture system of rat schwannoma cell line RT4. We found that the culture medium of RT4 cells was enriched with the protease activity that degrades the fusion protein construct of the extracellular domain of {beta}DG specifically. This activity was suppressed by the inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, but not by the inhibitors of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-8, and MMP-13. Zymography and RT-PCR analysis showed that RT4 cells secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 into the culture medium. Finally, active MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzymes degraded the fusion protein construct of the extracellular domain of {beta}DG. These results indicate (1) that RT4 cells secrete the protease activity that degrades the extracellular domain of {beta}DG specifically and (2) that MMP-2 and MMP-9 may be involved in this process.

  2. Central domain of IL-33 is cleaved by mast cell proteases for potent activation of group-2 innate lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Lefrançais, Emma; Duval, Anais; Mirey, Emilie; Roga, Stéphane; Espinosa, Eric; Cayrol, Corinne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is an alarmin cytokine from the IL-1 family. IL-33 activates many immune cell types expressing the interleukin 1 receptor-like 1 (IL1RL1) receptor ST2, including group-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s, natural helper cells, nuocytes), the major producers of IL-5 and IL-13 during type-2 innate immune responses and allergic airway inflammation. IL-33 is likely to play a critical role in asthma because the IL33 and ST2/IL1RL1 genes have been reproducibly identified as major susceptibility loci in large-scale genome-wide association studies. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating IL-33 activity is thus urgently needed. Here, we investigated the role of mast cells, critical effector cells in allergic disorders, known to interact with ILC2s in vivo. We found that serine proteases secreted by activated mast cells (chymase and tryptase) generate mature forms of IL-33 with potent activity on ILC2s. The major forms produced by mast cell proteases, IL-3395–270, IL-33107–270, and IL-33109–270, were 30-fold more potent than full-length human IL-331–270 for activation of ILC2s ex vivo. They induced a strong expansion of ILC2s and eosinophils in vivo, associated with elevated concentrations of IL-5 and IL-13. Murine IL-33 is also cleaved by mast cell tryptase, and a tryptase inhibitor reduced IL-33–dependent allergic airway inflammation in vivo. Our study identifies the central cleavage/activation domain of IL-33 (amino acids 66–111) as an important functional domain of the protein and suggests that interference with IL-33 cleavage and activation by mast cell and other inflammatory proteases could be useful to reduce IL-33–mediated responses in allergic asthma and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25313073

  3. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikado, Hideto; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2015-05-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity.

  4. SARS-CoV 3CL protease cleaves its C-terminal autoprocessing site by novel subsite cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Tomonari; Takemoto, Chie; Kim, Yong-Tae; Wang, Hongfei; Nishii, Wataru; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    The 3C-like protease (3CLpro) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) cleaves 11 sites in the polyproteins, including its own N- and C-terminal autoprocessing sites, by recognizing P4–P1 and P1′. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of 3CLpro with the C-terminal prosequence and the catalytic-site C145A mutation, in which the enzyme binds the C-terminal prosequence of another molecule. Surprisingly, Phe at the P3′ position [Phe(P3′)] is snugly accommodated in the S3′ pocket. Mutations of Phe(P3′) impaired the C-terminal autoprocessing, but did not affect N-terminal autoprocessing. This difference was ascribed to the P2 residue, Phe(P2) and Leu(P2), in the C- and N-terminal sites, as follows. The S3′ subsite is formed by Phe(P2)-induced conformational changes of 3CLpro and the direct involvement of Phe(P2) itself. In contrast, the N-terminal prosequence with Leu(P2) does not cause such conformational changes for the S3′ subsite formation. In fact, the mutation of Phe(P2) to Leu in the C-terminal autoprocessing site abolishes the dependence on Phe(P3′). These mechanisms explain why Phe is required at the P3' position when the P2 position is occupied by Phe rather than Leu, which reveals a type of subsite cooperativity. Moreover, the peptide consisting of P4–P1 with Leu(P2) inhibits protease activity, whereas that with Phe(P2) exhibits a much smaller inhibitory effect, because Phe(P3′) is missing. Thus, this subsite cooperativity likely exists to avoid the autoinhibition of the enzyme by its mature C-terminal sequence, and to retain the efficient C-terminal autoprocessing by the use of Phe(P2). PMID:27799534

  5. HIV Protease Inhibitors Alter Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing via β-Site Amyloid Precursor Protein Cleaving Enzyme-1 Translational Up-Regulation.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Patrick J; Akay-Espinoza, Cagla; Yee, Alan C; Briand, Lisa A; Erickson, Michelle A; Gelman, Benjamin B; Gao, Yan; Haughey, Norman J; Zink, M Christine; Clements, Janice E; Kim, Nicholas S; Van De Walle, Gabriel; Jensen, Brigid K; Vassar, Robert; Pierce, R Christopher; Gill, Alexander J; Kolson, Dennis L; Diehl, J Alan; Mankowski, Joseph L; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L

    2017-01-01

    Mounting evidence implicates antiretroviral (ARV) drugs as potential contributors to the persistence and evolution of clinical and pathological presentation of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in the post-ARV era. Based on their ability to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in various cell types, we hypothesized that ARV-mediated ER stress in the central nervous system resulted in chronic dysregulation of the unfolded protein response and altered amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing. We used in vitro and in vivo models to show that HIV protease inhibitor (PI) class ARVs induced neuronal damage and ER stress, leading to PKR-like ER kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α and enhanced translation of β-site APP cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1). In addition, PIs induced β-amyloid production, indicative of increased BACE1-mediated APP processing, in rodent neuroglial cultures and human APP-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells. Inhibition of BACE1 activity protected against neuronal damage. Finally, ARVs administered to mice and SIV-infected macaques resulted in neuronal damage and BACE1 up-regulation in the central nervous system. These findings implicate a subset of PIs as potential mediators of neurodegeneration in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

  6. Neutrophil Protease Cleavage of Von Willebrand Factor in Glomeruli - An Anti-thrombotic Mechanism in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Tati, Ramesh; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Manea Hedström, Minola; Mörgelin, Matthias; Wieslander, Jörgen; van Kooten, Cees; Karpman, Diana

    2017-02-01

    Adequate cleavage of von Willebrand factor (VWF) prevents formation of thrombi. ADAMTS13 is the main VWF-cleaving protease and its deficiency results in development of thrombotic microangiopathy. Besides ADAMTS13 other proteases may also possess VWF-cleaving activity, but their physiological importance in preventing thrombus formation is unknown. This study investigated if, and which, proteases could cleave VWF in the glomerulus. The content of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) was studied as a reflection of processes occurring in the subendothelial glomerular space. VWF was incubated with human GBMs and VWF cleavage was assessed by multimer structure analysis, immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. VWF was cleaved into the smallest multimers by the GBM, which contained ADAMTS13 as well as neutrophil proteases, elastase, proteinase 3 (PR3), cathepsin-G and matrix-metalloproteinase 9. The most potent components of the GBM capable of VWF cleavage were in the serine protease or metalloprotease category, but not ADAMTS13. Neutralization of neutrophil serine proteases inhibited GBM-mediated VWF-cleaving activity, demonstrating a marked contribution of elastase and/or PR3. VWF-platelet strings formed on the surface of primary glomerular endothelial cells, in a perfusion system, were cleaved by both elastase and the GBM, a process blocked by elastase inhibitor. Ultramorphological studies of the human kidney demonstrated neutrophils releasing elastase into the GBM. Neutrophil proteases may contribute to VWF cleavage within the subendothelium, adjacent to the GBM, and thus regulate thrombus size. This anti-thrombotic mechanism would protect the normal kidney during inflammation and could also explain why most patients with ADAMTS13 deficiency do not develop severe kidney failure.

  7. The neural cell adhesion molecules L1 and CHL1 are cleaved by BACE1 protease in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lujia; Barão, Soraia; Laga, Mathias; Bockstael, Katrijn; Borgers, Marianne; Gijsen, Harry; Annaert, Wim; Moechars, Diederik; Mercken, Marc; Gevaert, Kris; Gevaer, Kris; De Strooper, Bart

    2012-07-27

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme BACE1 is a prime drug target for Alzheimer disease. However, the function and the physiological substrates of BACE1 remain largely unknown. In this work, we took a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze the secretome of primary neurons after acute BACE1 inhibition, and we identified several novel substrate candidates for BACE1. Many of these molecules are involved in neuronal network formation in the developing nervous system. We selected the adhesion molecules L1 and CHL1, which are crucial for axonal guidance and maintenance of neural circuits, for further validation as BACE1 substrates. Using both genetic BACE1 knock-out and acute pharmacological BACE1 inhibition in mice and cell cultures, we show that L1 and CHL1 are cleaved by BACE1 under physiological conditions. The BACE1 cleavage sites at the membrane-proximal regions of L1 (between Tyr(1086) and Glu(1087)) and CHL1 (between Gln(1061) and Asp(1062)) were determined by mass spectrometry. This work provides molecular insights into the function and the pathways in which BACE1 is involved, and it will help to predict or interpret possible side effects of BACE1 inhibitor drugs in current clinical trials.

  8. Cleavage of spike protein of SARS coronavirus by protease factor Xa is associated with viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Lanying; Kao, Richard Y.; Zhou, Yusen; He, Yuxian; Zhao, Guangyu; Wong, Charlotte; Jiang, Shibo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Zheng, Bo-Jian . E-mail: bzheng@hkucc.hku.hk

    2007-07-20

    The spike (S) protein of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been known to recognize and bind to host receptors, whose conformational changes then facilitate fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membrane, leading to viral entry into target cells. However, other functions of SARS-CoV S protein such as proteolytic cleavage and its implications to viral infection are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the infection of SARS-CoV and a pseudovirus bearing the S protein of SARS-CoV was inhibited by a protease inhibitor Ben-HCl. Also, the protease Factor Xa, a target of Ben-HCl abundantly expressed in infected cells, was able to cleave the recombinant and pseudoviral S protein into S1 and S2 subunits, and the cleavage was inhibited by Ben-HCl. Furthermore, this cleavage correlated with the infectivity of the pseudovirus. Taken together, our study suggests a plausible mechanism by which SARS-CoV cleaves its S protein to facilitate viral infection.

  9. Proteases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A J

    2001-05-01

    The processes of growth and remodeling of cells and tissues in multicellular organisms require the breakdown of old protein molecules, in concert with the synthesis of new ones. For example, many newly-synthesized molecules require proteolytic processing to convert them to biologically active forms. Proteolysis can terminate the activity of a protein--e.g., capsases mediate apoptosis, which is a vital step in the life cycle of the cell. Proteolysis contributes to defense systems too, as the recognition of peptide fragments of foreign proteins triggers the immune response. Proteases are the class of enzymes involved in these important reactions. This unit discusses the general categories of proteases, and sets the stage for addition of overview units on cysteine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases, as well as protocol units featuring techniques for analyzing mammalian and yeast proteasomes and protease inhibitors, among other topics.

  10. Targeted delivery into motor nerve terminals of inhibitors for SNARE-cleaving proteases via liposomes coupled to an atoxic botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Edupuganti, Om P; Ovsepian, Saak V; Wang, Jiafu; Zurawski, Tomas H; Schmidt, James J; Smith, Leonard; Lawrence, Gary W; Dolly, J Oliver

    2012-07-01

    A targeted drug carrier (TDC) is described for transferring functional proteins or peptides into motor nerve terminals, a pivotal locus for therapeutics to treat neuromuscular disorders. It exploits the pronounced selectivity of botulinum neurotoxin type B (BoNT/B) for interacting with acceptors on these cholinergic nerve endings and becoming internalized. The gene encoding an innocuous BoNT/B protease-inactive mutant (BoTIM) was fused to that for core streptavidin, expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified protein was conjugated to surface-biotinylated liposomes. Such decorated liposomes, loaded with fluorescein as traceable cargo, acquired pronounced specificity for motor nerve terminals in isolated mouse hemidiaphragms and facilitated the intraneuronal transfer of the fluor, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Delivery of the protease light chain of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) via this TDC accelerated the onset of neuromuscular paralysis, indicative of improved translocation of this enzyme into the presynaptic cytosol with subsequent proteolytic inactivation of synaptosomal-associated protein of molecular mass 25 kDa (SNAP-25), an exocytotic soluble N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) essential for neurotransmitter release. BoTIM-coupled liposomes, loaded with peptide inhibitors of proteases, yielded considerable attenuation of the neuroparalytic effects of BoNT/A or BoNT/F as a result of their cytosolic transfer, the first in situ demonstration of the ability of designer antiproteases to suppress the symptoms of botulism ex vivo. Delivery of the BoNT/A inhibitor by liposomes targeted with the full-length BoTIM proved more effective than that mediated by its C-terminal neuroacceptor-binding domain. This demonstrated versatility of TDC for nonviral cargo transfer into cholinergic nerve endings has unveiled its potential for direct delivery of functional targets into motor nerve endings.

  11. Interference with nuclear factor kappaB signaling pathway by pathogen-encoded proteases: global and selective inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Andrea; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-02-01

    Pathogens have evolved a myriad of ways to abrogate and manipulate the host response to infections. Of the various mechanisms involved, pathogen-encoded and sometimes host-encoded proteases are an important category of virulence factors that cause robust changes on the host response by targeting key proteins along signaling cascades. The nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is a crucial regulatory mechanism for the cell, controlling the expression of survival, immune and proliferation genes. Proteases from pathogens of almost all types have been demonstrated to target and cleave members of the NF-κB signaling pathway at nearly every level. This review provides discussion of proteases targeting the most abundant NF-κB subunit, p65, and the impact of protease-mediated p65 cleavage on the immune responses and survival of the infected host cell. After examining various examples of protease interference, it becomes evident that the cleavage fragments produced by pathogen-driven proteolytic processing should be further characterized to determine whether they have novel and unique functions within the cell. The selective targeting of p65 and its effect on gene transcription reveals unique mechanisms by which pathogens acutely alter their microenvironment, and further research may open new opportunities for novel therapeutics to combat pathogens.

  12. Preserved Expression of mRNA Coding von Willebrand Factor–Cleaving Protease ADAMTS13 by Selenite and Activated Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Ekaney, Michael L; Bockmeyer, Clemens L; Sossdorf, Maik; Reuken, Philipp A; Conradi, Florian; Schuerholz, Tobias; Blaess, Markus F; Friedman, Scott L; Lösche, Wolfgang; Bauer, Michael; Claus, Ralf A

    2015-01-01

    In sepsis, the severity-dependent decrease of von Willebrand factor (VWF)–inactivating protease, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 13 (ADAMTS13), results in platelet aggregation and consumption, leading to sepsis-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and organ failure. Previous reports assessing its functional deficiency have pinpointed involvement of autoantibodies or mutations to propagate thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, mechanisms of acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency during host response remain unclear. To enhance understanding of ADAMTS13 deficiency in sepsis, we evaluated changes in expression of mRNA coding ADAMTS13 during septic conditions using primary cellular sources of the protease. We hypothesized that proinflammatory cytokines and constituents of serum from septic patients affect the transcriptional level of ADAMTS13 in vitro, and previously recommended therapeutic agents as adjunctive therapy for sepsis interact therewith. Cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), endothelial cells (HMEC) and human precision-cut liver slices as an ex vivo model were stimulated with sepsis prototypic cytokines, bacterial endotoxin and pooled serum obtained from septic patients. Stimulation resulted in a significant decrease in ADAMTS13 mRNA between 10% and 80% of basal transcriptional rates. Costimulation of selenite or recombinant activated protein C (APC) with serum prevented ADAMTS13 decrease in HSCs and increased ADAMTS13 transcripts in HMEC. In archived clinical samples, the activity of ADAMTS13 in septic patients treated with APC (n = 5) increased with an accompanying decrease in VWF propeptide as surrogate for improved endothelial function. In conclusion, proinflammatory conditions of sepsis repress mRNA coding ADAMTS13 and the ameliorating effect by selenite and APC may support the concept for identification of beneficial mechanisms triggered by these drugs at a molecular level. PMID:25860876

  13. Cleavage of eukaryotic initiation factor eIF5B by enterovirus 3C proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Breyne, Sylvain; Bonderoff, Jennifer M.; Chumakov, Konstantin M.; Lloyd, Richard E.; Hellen, Christopher U. T.

    2008-01-01

    The enteroviruses poliovirus (PV), Coxsackie B virus (CVB) and rhinovirus (HRV) are members of Picornaviridae that inhibit host cell translation early in infection. Enterovirus translation soon predominates in infected cells, but eventually also shuts off. This complex pattern of modulation of translation suggests regulation by a multifactorial mechanism. We report here that eIF5B is proteolytically cleaved during PV and CVB infection of cultured cells, beginning at 3 hours post-infection and increasing thereafter. Recombinant PV, CVB and HRV 3Cpro cleaved purified native rabbit eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 5B in vitro at a single site (VVEQ↓G, equivalent to VMEQ↓G479in human eIF5B) that is consistent with the cleavage specificity of enterovirus 3C proteases. Cleavage separates the N-terminal domain of eIF5B from its essential conserved central GTPase and C-terminal domains. 3Cpro-mediated cleavage of eIF5B may thus play an accessory role in the shut-off of translation that occurs in enterovirus-infected cells. PMID:18572216

  14. Bacterial toxins: an overview on bacterial proteases and their action as virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, I; Marques-Porto, R; Pereira, A S; Pereira, A; Perpetuo, E A

    2009-06-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity is a result of a combination of factors, including resistance to environmental threats and to the host's defenses, growth capability, localization in the host, tissue specificity, resource obtaining mechanisms and the bacterium's own defenses to aggression. A variety of bacterial components, often specific to each strain, are involved in the microorganism's survival, adhesion and growth in the host. Many of them are harmful and, therefore, are called virulence factors. The effects caused by the virulence factors determine the degree of aggressivity of the strain. In many cases the virulence factors are secreted proteins or enzymes, sometimes performing very specific functions. The enzymatic activity is directed to specific proteins from cell membranes, synaptic vesicle fusion proteins, among other important targets. One of the most toxic bacterial proteins is secreted by Clostridium botulinum, targeted to synaptic vesicle fusion proteins, cleaving them with a zinc-metalloprotease activity, which results in severe neurotoxic effects with a lethal dose as low as eight nanograms per kilogram of body weight. The tetanus neurotoxin acts in a similar way but is less active and Bacillus anthracis also presents a potent metalloprotease activity. In this work we describe a selection of these specially interesting and important bacterial proteins and proteases, stressing their relevance in the pathological process and in medical studies.

  15. The site-2 protease.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Robert B

    2013-12-01

    The site-2 protease (S2P) is an unusually-hydrophobic integral membrane protease. It cleaves its substrates, which are membrane-bound transcription factors, within membrane-spanning helices. Although structural information for S2P from animals is lacking, the available data suggest that cleavage may occur at or within the lipid bilayer. In mammalian cells, S2P is essential owing to its activation of the sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs); in the absence of exogenous lipid, cells lacking S2P cannot survive. S2P is also important in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, activating several different membrane-bound transcription factors. Human patients harboring reduction-of-function mutations in S2P exhibit an array of pathologies ranging from skin defects to neurological abnormalities. Surprisingly, Drosophila melanogaster lacking S2P are viable and fertile. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  16. Kinetic characterization of the protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor reaction with blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Swanson, Richard; Broze, George J; Olson, Steven T

    2008-10-31

    Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) is a recently identified member of the serpin superfamily that functions as a cofactor-dependent regulator of blood coagulation factors Xa (FXa) and XIa. Here we show that ZPI and its cofactor, protein Z (PZ), inhibit procoagulant membrane-bound factor Xa by the branched pathway acyl-intermediate trapping mechanism used by other serpins, but with significant variations of this mechanism that are unique to ZPI. Rapid kinetic analyses showed that the reaction proceeded by the initial assembly of a membrane-associated PZ-ZPI-FXa Michaelis complex (K(M) 53+/-5 nM) followed by conversion to a stable ZPI-FXa complex (k(lim) 1.2+/-0.1 s(-1)). Cofactor premixing experiments together with independent kinetic analyses of ZPI-PZ and factor Xa-PZ-membrane complex formation suggested that assembly of the Michaelis complex through either ZPI-PZ-lipid or factor Xa-PZ-lipid intermediates was rate-limiting. Reaction stoichiometry analyses and native PAGE showed that for every factor Xa molecule inhibited by ZPI, two serpin molecules were cleaved. Native PAGE and immunoblotting showed that PZ dissociated from ZPI once ZPI forms a stable complex with FXa, and kinetic analyses confirmed that PZ acted catalytically to accelerate the membrane-dependent ZPI-factor Xa reaction. The ZPI-FXa complex was only transiently stable and dissociated with a rate constant that showed a bell-shaped pH dependence indicative of participation of factor Xa active-site residues. The complex was detectable by SDS-PAGE when denatured at low pH, consistent with it being a kinetically trapped covalent acyl-intermediate. Together our findings show that ZPI functions like other serpins to regulate the activity of FXa but in a manner uniquely dependent on protein Z, procoagulant membranes, and pH.

  17. The serine protease Pic as a virulence factor of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Afonso G; Abe, Cecilia M; Nunes, Kamila O; Moraes, Claudia T P; Chavez-Dueñas, Lucia; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Barbosa, Angela S; Piazza, Roxane M F; Elias, Waldir P

    2016-01-01

    Autotransporter proteins (AT) are associated with bacterial virulence attributes. Originally identified in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), Shigella flexneri 2a and uropathogenic E. coli, the serine protease Pic is one of these AT. We have previously detected one atypical enteropathogenic E. coli strain (BA589) carrying the pic gene. In the present study, we characterized the biological activities of Pic produced by BA589 both in vitro and in vivo. Contrarily to other Pic-producers bacteria, pic in BA589 is located on a high molecular weight plasmid. PicBA589 was able to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes, cleave mucin and degrade complement system molecules. BA589 was able to colonize mice intestines, and an intense mucus production was observed. The BA589Δpic mutant lost the capacity to colonize as well as the above-mentioned in vitro activities. Thus, Pic represents an additional virulence factor in aEPEC strain BA589, associated with adherence, colonization and evasion from the innate immune system.

  18. Structure and mechanism of rhomboid protease.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ya; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Xue, Yi

    2013-05-31

    Rhomboid protease was first discovered in Drosophila. Mutation of the fly gene interfered with growth factor signaling and produced a characteristic phenotype of a pointed head skeleton. The name rhomboid has since been widely used to describe a large family of related membrane proteins that have diverse biological functions but share a common catalytic core domain composed of six membrane-spanning segments. Most rhomboid proteases cleave membrane protein substrates near the N terminus of their transmembrane domains. How these proteases function within the confines of the membrane is not completely understood. Recent progress in crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli rhomboid protease GlpG in complex with inhibitors has provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism of the protease and its conformational change. Improved biochemical assays have also identified a substrate sequence motif that is specifically recognized by many rhomboid proteases.

  19. The nuclear protein Sam68 is cleaved by the FMDV 3C protease redistributing Sam68 to the cytoplasm during FMDV infection of host cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection by a variety of viruses alters the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of certain host cell proteins. In our continued search for interacting factors, we reported the re-localization of RNA helicase A (RHA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in cells infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus ...

  20. Transcription Factor AP-2α Is Preferentially Cleaved by Caspase 6 and Degraded by Proteasome during Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nyormoi, Okot; Wang, Zhi; Doan, Dao; Ruiz, Maribelis; McConkey, David; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2001-01-01

    Several reports have linked activating protein 2α (AP-2α) to apoptosis, leading us to hypothesize that AP-2α is a substrate for caspases. We tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) on the expression of AP-2 in breast cancer cells. Here, we provide evidence that TNF-α downregulates AP-2α and AP-2γ expression posttranscriptionally during TNF-α-induced apoptosis. Both a general caspase antagonist (zVADfmk) and a caspase 6-preferred antagonist (zVEIDfmk) inhibited TNF-α-induced apoptosis and AP-2α downregulation. In vivo tests showed that AP-2α was cleaved by caspases ahead of the DNA fragmentation phase of apoptosis. Recombinant caspase 6 cleaved AP-2α preferentially, although caspases 1 and 3 also cleaved it, albeit at 50-fold or higher concentrations. Activated caspase 6 was detected in TNF-α-treated cells, thus confirming its involvement in AP-2α cleavage. All three caspases cleaved AP-2α at asp19 of the sequence asp-arg-his-asp (DRHD19). Mutating D19 to A19 abrogated AP-2α cleavage by all three caspases. TNF-α-induced cleavage of AP-2α in vivo led to AP-2α degradation and loss of DNA-binding activity, both of which were prevented by pretreatment with zVEIDfmk. AP-2α degradation but not cleavage was inhibited in vivo by PS-431 (a proteasome antagonist), suggesting that AP-2α is degraded subsequent to cleavage by caspase 6 or caspase 6-like enzymes. Cells transfected with green fluorescent protein-tagged mutant AP-2α are resistant to TNF-α-induced apoptosis, further demonstrating the link between caspase-mediated cleavage of AP-2α and apoptosis. This is the first report to demonstrate that degradation of AP-2α is a critical event in TNF-α-induced apoptosis. Since the DRHD sequence in vertebrate AP-2 is widely conserved, its cleavage by caspases may represent an important mechanism for regulating cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. PMID:11438643

  1. Protease inhibitors interfere with the necessary factors of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Troll, W

    1989-05-01

    Many tumor promoters are inflammatory agents that stimulate the formation of oxygen radicals (.O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in phagocytic neutrophils. The neutrophils use the oxygen radicals to kill bacteria, which are recognized by the cell membrane of phagocytic cells causing a signal to mount the oxygen response. The tumor promoter isolated from croton oil, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), mimics the signal, causing an oxygen radical release that is intended to kill bacteria; instead, it injures cells in the host. Oxygen radicals cause single strand breaks in DNA and modify DNA bases. These damaging reactions appear to be related to tumor promotion, as three types of chemopreventive agents, retinoids, onion oil, and protease inhibitors, suppress the induction of oxygen radicals in phagocytic neutrophils and suppress tumor promotion in skin cancer in mice. Protease inhibitors also suppress breast and colon cancers in mice. Protease inhibitors capable of inhibiting chymotrypsin show a greater suppression of the oxygen effect and are better suppressors of tumor promotion. In addition, oxygen radicals may be one of the many agents that cause activation of oncogenes. Since retinoids and protease inhibitors suppress the expression of the ras oncogene in NIH 3T3 cells, NIH 3T3 cells may serve as a relatively facile model for finding and measuring chemopreventive agents that interfere with the carcinogenic process.

  2. A protease-like permeability factor in guinea pig skin: immunologic identity with plasma Hageman factor.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T.; Cochrane, C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Vascular permeability enhancement activity of the protease-like permeability factor derived from guinea pig skin and of active guinea pig Hageman factor (beta HFa) were both inhibited by anti-guinea pig Hageman factor rabbit F(ab')2 antibody. The permeability activity of both factors was also absorbed on anti-Hageman factor F(ab')2-Sepharose beads. The latent form of the permeability factor derived from skin extracts produced a single immunoprecipitation line with anti-Hageman factor and gave a reaction of identity with a precipitation band developing between purified Hageman factor and anti-Hageman factor. The latent permeability factor in the fraction corrected the clotting activity of Hageman-factor-deficient human plasma. The clotting activity was also blocked by anti-Hageman factor F(ab')2 antibody. From these results, it was concluded that the skin permeability factor was immunologically and functionally indistinguishable from Hageman factor of plasma. Extracts were obtained from skin of guinea pigs given intravenous injections of 125I-guinea pig Hageman factor immediately before sacrifice to calculate the amount of Hageman factor in the extravascular tissue space of the skin. The pseudoglobulin fractions of the extracts containing a concentration of Hageman factor of approximately 9 microgram of Hageman factor per gram of skin. This was determined both by immunologic means and procoagulant activity. Only 4% of the Hageman factor in the extract was obtained from the intravascular plasma volume of the skin. Images Figure 1 PMID:7044129

  3. KLIKK proteases of Tannerella forsythia: putative virulence factors with a unique domain structure.

    PubMed

    Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Mizgalska, Danuta; Eick, Sigrum; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomics of virulent Tannerella forsythia ATCC 43037 and a close health-associated relative, Tannerella BU063, revealed, in the latter, the absence of an entire array of genes encoding putative secretory proteases that possess a nearly identical C-terminal domain (CTD) that ends with a -Lys-Leu-Ile-Lys-Lys motif. This observation suggests that these proteins, referred to as KLIKK proteases, may function as virulence factors. Re-sequencing of the loci of the KLIKK proteases found only six genes grouped in two clusters. All six genes were expressed by T. forsythia in routine culture conditions, although at different levels. More importantly, a transcript of each gene was detected in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) from periodontitis sites infected with T. forsythia indicating that the proteases are expressed in vivo. In each protein, a protease domain was flanked by a unique N-terminal profragment and a C-terminal extension ending with the CTD. Partially purified recombinant proteases showed variable levels of proteolytic activity in zymography gels and toward protein substrates, including collagen, gelatin, elastin, and casein. Taken together, these results indicate that the pathogenic strain of T. forsythia secretes active proteases capable of degrading an array of host proteins, which likely represents an important pathogenic feature of this bacterium.

  4. KLIKK proteases of Tannerella forsythia: putative virulence factors with a unique domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Mizgalska, Danuta; Eick, Sigrum; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomics of virulent Tannerella forsythia ATCC 43037 and a close health-associated relative, Tannerella BU063, revealed, in the latter, the absence of an entire array of genes encoding putative secretory proteases that possess a nearly identical C-terminal domain (CTD) that ends with a -Lys-Leu-Ile-Lys-Lys motif. This observation suggests that these proteins, referred to as KLIKK proteases, may function as virulence factors. Re-sequencing of the loci of the KLIKK proteases found only six genes grouped in two clusters. All six genes were expressed by T. forsythia in routine culture conditions, although at different levels. More importantly, a transcript of each gene was detected in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) from periodontitis sites infected with T. forsythia indicating that the proteases are expressed in vivo. In each protein, a protease domain was flanked by a unique N-terminal profragment and a C-terminal extension ending with the CTD. Partially purified recombinant proteases showed variable levels of proteolytic activity in zymography gels and toward protein substrates, including collagen, gelatin, elastin, and casein. Taken together, these results indicate that the pathogenic strain of T. forsythia secretes active proteases capable of degrading an array of host proteins, which likely represents an important pathogenic feature of this bacterium. PMID:25954253

  5. Regulation of factor XIa activity by platelets and alpha 1-protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, P N; Sinha, D; Kueppers, F; Seaman, F S; Blankstein, K B

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the complex interrelationships between platelets, Factor XIa, alpha 1-protease inhibitor and Factor IX activation. Platelets were shown to secrete an inhibitor of Factor XIa, and to protect Factor XIa from inactivation in the presence of alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the secreted platelet inhibitor. This protection of Factor XIa did not arise from the binding of Factor XIa to platelets, the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, or the inactivation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor by platelets. The formation of a complex between alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the active-site-containing light chain of Factor XIa was inhibited by activated platelets and by platelet releasates, but not by high molecular weight kininogen. These results support the hypothesis that platelets can regulate Factor XIa-catalyzed Factor IX activation by secreting an inhibitor of Factor XIa that may act primarily outside the platelet microenvironment and by protecting Factor XIa from inhibition, thereby localizing Factor IX activation to the platelet plug. Images PMID:3500185

  6. Release of Elastase from Purified Human Lung Mast Cells and Basophils. Identification as a Hageman Factor Cleaving Enzyme

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    heterogeneity and hyper- plasia in bleomycin -induced pulmonary fibrosis of rats. Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. 130:.797-902. 40. AGius, R. M., R. C. GoDFREY, and S. T...been shown to be elevated in human pulmonary disorders. Although the HF cleaving assay has been used to demonstrate the presence of functional elastase...FUJLMER, and R. G. CRYSTAL. 1979. Ultrastructure of pulmonary mast cells in patients with fibrotic lung disorders. Lab, Invest. 40-.717-34. 38

  7. Proteases from Entamoeba spp. and Pathogenic Free-Living Amoebae as Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Reyes-López, Magda; Ortiz-Estrada, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    The standard reference for pathogenic and nonpathogenic amoebae is the human parasite Entamoeba histolytica; a direct correlation between virulence and protease expression has been demonstrated for this amoeba. Traditionally, proteases are considered virulence factors, including those that produce cytopathic effects in the host or that have been implicated in manipulating the immune response. Here, we expand the scope to other amoebae, including less-pathogenic Entamoeba species and highly pathogenic free-living amoebae. In this paper, proteases that affect mucin, extracellular matrix, immune system components, and diverse tissues and cells are included, based on studies in amoebic cultures and animal models. We also include proteases used by amoebae to degrade iron-containing proteins because iron scavenger capacity is currently considered a virulence factor for pathogens. In addition, proteases that have a role in adhesion and encystation, which are essential for establishing and transmitting infection, are discussed. The study of proteases and their specific inhibitors is relevant to the search for new therapeutic targets and to increase the power of drugs used to treat the diseases caused by these complex microorganisms. PMID:23476670

  8. Suppression of Helicobacter pylori protease activity towards growth factors by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1997-09-01

    Infection with H. pylori is now recognized as a major factor in the pathogenesis of gastric disease. Here, we examined the susceptibility of epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) to degradation by H. pylori protease, and assessed the effect of a cytoprotective agent, sulglycotide, on this process. The 125I-labeled EGF, bFGF, TGF beta and PDGF were incubatet with H. pylori protease, obtained from the filtrates of saline washes of the bacterium culture, in the presence of 0-100 micrograms sulglycotide. The results showed that, under the assay conditions, H. pylori protease caused only 5% degradation of EGF and 7% degradation of bFGF. However, the protease evoked a 61.7% degradation of PDGF and a 62.3% degradation of TGF beta. Introduction of sulglycotide to the reaction assay system caused a dose-dependent inhibition in PDGF and TGF beta proteolysis by the H. pylori enzyme. The maximal inhibitory effect was obtained with sulglycotide at 100 micrograms/ml, at which dose an 84.4% decrease in PDGF and 88.3% decrease in TGF beta degradation was achieved. The results provide a strong evidence for the effectiveness of sulglycotide in the protection of gastric mucosal growth factors against degradation by H. pylori.

  9. Porcine Deltacoronavirus Nsp5 Antagonizes Type I Interferon Signaling by Cleaving STAT2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinyu; Wang, Dang; Zhou, Junwei; Pan, Ting; Chen, Jiyao; Yang, Yuting; Lv, Mengting; Ye, Xu; Peng, Guiqing; Fang, Liurong; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-03-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is an emerging swine enteropathogenic coronavirus. The first outbreak of PDCoV was announced from the United States in 2014, followed by reports in Asia. The nonstructural protein nsp5 is a 3C-like protease of coronavirus and our previous study showed that PDCoV nsp5 inhibits type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we found that PDCoV nsp5 significantly inhibited IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter activity and transcription of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), suggesting that PDCoV nsp5 also suppresses IFN signaling. Detailed analysis showed that nsp5 cleaved signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2), but not Janus kinase 1 (JAK1), tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2), STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9), key molecules of the JAK-STAT pathway. STAT2 cleavage was dependent on the protease activity of nsp5. Interestingly, nsp5 cleaved STAT2 at two sites, glutamine (Q) 685 and Q758, and similar cleavage was observed in PDCoV-infected cells. As expected, cleaved STAT2 impaired the ability to induce ISGs, demonstrating that STAT2 cleavage is an important mechanism utilized by PDCoV nsp5 to antagonize IFN signaling. We also discussed the substrate selection and binding mode of PDCoV nsp5 by homologous modeling of PDCoV nsp5 with the two cleaved peptide substrates. Taken together, our study demonstrates that PDCoV nsp5 antagonizes type I IFN signaling by cleaving STAT2 and provides structural insights to comprehend the cleavage mechanism of PDCoV nsp5, revealing a potential new function for PDCoV nsp5 in type I IFN signaling.IMPORTANCE The 3C-like protease encoded by nsp5 is a major protease of coronaviruses; thus it is an attractive target for development of anti-coronavirus drugs. Previous studies have revealed that the 3C-like protease of coronaviruses, including PDCoV and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), antagonizes type I IFN production by targeting NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO). Here

  10. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  11. Distinct and stage specific nuclear factors regulate the expression of falcipains, Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Sujatha; Chauhan, Virander S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2008-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases (falcipains) play indispensable roles in parasite infection and development, especially in the process of host erythrocyte rupture/invasion and hemoglobin degradation. No detailed molecular analysis of transcriptional regulation of parasite proteases especially cysteine proteases has yet been reported. In this study, using a combination of transient transfection assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), we demonstrate the presence of stage specific nuclear factors that bind to unique sequence elements in the 5'upstream regions of the falcipains and probably modulate the expression of cysteine proteases. Results Falcipains differ in their timing of expression and exhibit ability to compensate each other's functions at asexual blood stages of the parasite. Present study was undertaken to study the transcriptional regulation of falcipains. Transient transfection assay employing firefly luciferase as a reporter revealed that a ~1 kb sequence upstream of translational start site is sufficient for the functional transcriptional activity of falcipain-1 gene, while falcipain-2, -2' and -3 genes that exist within 12 kb stretch on chromosome 11 require ~2 kb upstream sequences for the expression of reporter luciferase activity. EMSA analysis elucidated binding of distinct nuclear factors to specific sequences within the 5'upstream regions of falcipain genes. Analysis of falcipains' 5'upstream regulatory regions did not reveal the presence of sequences known to bind general eukaryotic factors. However, we did find parasite specific sequence elements such as poly(dA) poly(dT) tracts, CCAAT boxes and a single 7 bp-G rich sequence, (A/G)NGGGG(C/A) in the 5' upstream regulatory regions of these genes, thereby suggesting the role(s) of Plasmodium specific transcriptional factors in the regulation of falcipain genes. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that expression of Plasmodium cysteine proteases is

  12. Roles of prenyl protein proteases in maturation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae a-factor.

    PubMed Central

    Boyartchuk, V L; Rine, J

    1998-01-01

    In eukaryotes small secreted peptides are often proteolytically cleaved from larger precursors. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae multiple proteolytic processing steps are required for production of mature 12-amino-acid a-factor from its 36-amino-acid precursor. This study provides additional genetic data supporting a direct role for Afc1p in cleavage of the carboxyl-terminal tripeptide from the CAAX motif of the prenylated a-factor precursor. In addition, Afc1p had a second role in a-factor processing that was independent of, and in addition to, its role in the carboxyl-terminal processing in vivo. Using ubiquitin-a-factor fusions we confirmed that the pro-region of the a-factor precursor was not required for production of the mature pheromone. However, the pro-region of the a-factor precursor contributed quantitatively to a-factor production. PMID:9725832

  13. Growth factor-binding proteases in the murine submaxillary gland: isolation of a cDNA clone.

    PubMed Central

    Ronne, H; Lundgren, S; Severinsson, L; Rask, L; Peterson, P A

    1983-01-01

    The submaxillary gland of the adult male mouse contains a number of serine proteases, several of which are involved in the proteolytic processing of precursors to growth factors and other biologically active polypeptides. Here we report the isolation and identification of a cDNA clone corresponding to one of the proteases, the type B of the epidermal growth factor-binding protein. A pronounced sequence homology was found between the predicted activation peptide of this protease and the NH2-terminal extension of the nerve growth factor alpha subunit, suggesting that the latter protein has an uncleaved activation peptide attached to its NH2 terminus. Images Fig. 1. PMID:11892812

  14. Protochlamydia Induces Apoptosis of Human HEp-2 Cells through Mitochondrial Dysfunction Mediated by Chlamydial Protease-Like Activity Factor

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Junji; Nakamura, Shinji; Ito, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Ishida, Kasumi; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Mitsutaka; Takahashi, Kaori; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Makoto; Nagai, Hiroki; Hayashida, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Obligate amoebal endosymbiotic bacterium Protochlamydia with ancestral pathogenic chlamydial features evolved to survive within protist hosts, such as Acanthamoba, 0.7–1.4 billion years ago, but not within vertebrates including humans. This observation raises the possibility that interactions between Protochlamydia and human cells may result in a novel cytopathic effect, leading to new insights into host-parasite relationships. Previously, we reported that Protochlamydia induces apoptosis of the immortalized human cell line, HEp-2. In this study, we attempted to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this apoptosis. We first confirmed that, upon stimulation with the bacteria, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was cleaved at an early stage in HEp-2 cells, which was dependent on the amount of bacteria. A pan-caspase inhibitor and both caspase-3 and -9 inhibitors similarly inhibited the apoptosis of HEp-2 cells. A decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential was also confirmed. Furthermore, lactacystin, an inhibitor of chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF), blocked the apoptosis. Cytochalasin D also inhibited the apoptosis, which was dependent on the drug concentration, indicating that bacterial entry into cells was required to induce apoptosis. Interestingly, Yersinia type III inhibitors (ME0052, ME0053, and ME0054) did not have any effect on the apoptosis. We also confirmed that the Protochlamydia used in this study possessed a homologue of the cpaf gene and that two critical residues, histidine-101 and serine-499 of C. trachomatis CPAF in the active center, were conserved. Thus, our results indicate that after entry, Protochlamydia-secreted CPAF induces mitochondrial dysfunction with a decrease of the membrane potential, followed by caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP cleavages for apoptosis. More interestingly, because C. trachomatis infection can block the apoptosis, our finding implies unique features of CPAF between pathogenic and primitive

  15. C3 dysregulation due to factor H deficiency is mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1 and MASP-3 independent in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ruseva, M M; Takahashi, M; Fujita, T; Pickering, M C

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled activation of the complement alternative pathway is associated with complement-mediated renal disease. Factor B and factor D are essential components of this pathway, while factor H (FH) is its major regulator. In complete FH deficiency, uncontrolled C3 activation through the alternative pathway results in plasma C3 depletion and complement-mediated renal disease. These are dependent on factor B. Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases 1 and 3 (MASP-1, MASP-3) have been shown recently to contribute to alternative pathway activation by cleaving pro-factor D to its active form, factor D. We studied the contribution of MASP-1 and MASP-3 to uncontrolled alternative pathway activation in experimental complete FH deficiency. Co-deficiency of FH and MASP-1/MASP-3 did not ameliorate either the plasma C3 activation or glomerular C3 accumulation in FH-deficient mice. Our data indicate that MASP-1 and MASP-3 are not essential for alternative pathway activation in complete FH deficiency. PMID:24279761

  16. TIL-type protease inhibitors may be used as targeted resistance factors to enhance silkworm defenses against invasive fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Youshan; Zhao, Ping; Liu, Huawei; Guo, Xiaomeng; He, Huawei; Zhu, Rui; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-02-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi penetrate the insect cuticle using their abundant hydrolases. These hydrolases, which include cuticle-degrading proteases and chitinases, are important virulence factors. Our recent findings suggest that many serine protease inhibitors, especially TIL-type protease inhibitors, are involved in insect resistance to pathogenic microorganisms. To clarify the molecular mechanism underlying this resistance to entomopathogenic fungi and identify novel genes to improve the silkworm antifungal capacity, we conducted an in-depth study of serine protease inhibitors. Here, we cloned and expressed a novel silkworm TIL-type protease inhibitor, BmSPI39. In activity assays, BmSPI39 potently inhibited the virulence protease CDEP-1 of Beauveria bassiana, suggesting that it might suppress the fungal penetration of the silkworm integument by inhibiting the cuticle-degrading proteases secreted by the fungus. Phenol oxidase activation studies showed that melanization is involved in the insect immune response to fungal invasion, and that fungus-induced excessive melanization is suppressed by BmSPI39 by inhibiting the fungal cuticle-degrading proteases. To better understand the mechanism involved in the inhibition of fungal virulence by protease inhibitors, their effects on the germination of B. bassiana conidia was examined. BmSPI38 and BmSPI39 significantly inhibited the germination of B. bassiana conidia. Survival assays showed that BmSPI38 and BmSPI39 markedly improved the survival rates of silkworms, and can therefore be used as targeted resistance proteins in the silkworm. These results provided new insight into the molecular mechanisms whereby insect protease inhibitors confer resistance against entomopathogenic fungi, suggesting their potential application in medicinal or agricultural fields.

  17. Simultaneous uncoupled expression and purification of the Dengue virus NS3 protease and NS2B co-factor domain.

    PubMed

    Shannon, A E; Chappell, K J; Stoermer, M J; Chow, S Y; Kok, W M; Fairlie, D P; Young, P R

    2016-03-01

    Dengue Virus (DENV) infection is responsible for the world's most significant insect-borne viral disease. Despite an increasing global impact, there are neither prophylactic nor therapeutic options available for the effective treatment of DENV infection. An attractive target for antiviral drugs is the virally encoded trypsin-like serine protease (NS3pro) and its associated cofactor (NS2B). The NS2B-NS3pro complex is responsible for cleaving the viral polyprotein into separate functional viral proteins, and is therefore essential for replication. Recombinant expression of an active NS2B-NS3 protease has primarily been based on constructs linking the C-terminus of the approximately 40 amino acid hydrophilic cofactor domain of NS2B to the N-terminus of NS3pro via a flexible glycine linker. The resulting complex can be expressed in high yield, is soluble and catalytically active and has been used for most in vitro screening, inhibitor, and X-ray crystallographic studies over the last 15 years. Despite extensive analysis, no inhibitor drug candidates have been identified yet. Moreover, the effect of the artificial linker introduced between the protease and its cofactor is unknown. Two alternate methods for bacterial expression of non-covalently linked, catalytically active, NS2B-NS3pro complex are described here along with a comparison of the kinetics of substrate proteolysis and binding affinities of substrate-based aldehyde inhibitors. Both expression methods produced high yields of soluble protein with improved substrate proteolysis kinetics and inhibitor binding compared to their glycine-linked equivalent. The non-covalent association between NS2B and NS3pro is predicted to be more relevant for examining inhibitors that target cofactor-protease interactions rather than the protease active site. Furthermore, these approaches offer alternative strategies for the high yield co-expression of other protein assemblies.

  18. Plasma Kallikrein Promotes Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation and Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle through Direct Activation of Protease-activated Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Rany T.; Keum, Joo-Seob; Lee, Mi-Hye; Wang, Bing; Gooz, Monika; Luttrell, Deirdre K.; Luttrell, Louis M.; Jaffa, Ayad A.

    2010-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system, along with the interlocking renin-angiotensin system, is a key regulator of vascular contractility and injury response. The principal effectors of the kallikrein-kinin system are plasma and tissue kallikreins, proteases that cleave high molecular weight kininogen to produce bradykinin. Most of the cellular actions of kallikrein (KK) are thought to be mediated by bradykinin, which acts via G protein-coupled B1 and B2 bradykinin receptors on VSMCs and endothelial cells. Here, we find that primary aortic vascular smooth muscle but not endothelial cells possess the ability to activate plasma prekallikrein. Surprisingly, exposing VSMCs to prekallikrein leads to activation of the ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade via a mechanism that requires kallikrein activity but does not involve bradykinin receptors. In transfected HEK293 cells, we find that plasma kallikrein directly activates G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 2, which possess consensus kallikrein cleavage sites, but not PAR4. In vascular smooth muscles, KK stimulates ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) 17 activity via a PAR1/2 receptor-dependent mechanism, leading sequentially to release of the endogenous ADAM17 substrates, amphiregulin and tumor necrosis factor-α, metalloprotease-dependent transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors, and metalloprotease and epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent ERK1/2 activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism of bradykinin-independent kallikrein action that may contribute to the regulation of vascular responses in pathophysiologic states, such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:20826789

  19. Secreted aspartic protease 2 of Candida albicans inactivates factor H and the macrophage factor H-receptors CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18).

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Eliška; Schneider, Andrea E; Sándor, Noémi; Lermann, Ulrich; Staib, Peter; Kremlitzka, Mariann; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Barz, Dagmar; Erdei, Anna; Józsi, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida albicans employs several mechanisms to interfere with the human complement system. This includes the acquisition of host complement regulators, the release of molecules that scavenge complement proteins or block cellular receptors, and the secretion of proteases that inactivate complement components. Secreted aspartic protease 2 (Sap2) was previously shown to cleave C3b, C4b and C5. C. albicans also recruits the complement inhibitor factor H (FH), but yeast-bound FH can enhance the antifungal activity of human neutrophils via binding to complement receptor type 3 (CR3). In this study, we characterized FH binding to human monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition studies with antibodies and siRNA targeting CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18), as well as analysis of colocalization of FH with these integrins indicated that both function as FH receptors on macrophages. Preincubation of C. albicans yeast cells with FH induced increased production of IL-1β and IL-6 in macrophages. Furthermore, FH enhanced zymosan-induced production of these cytokines. C. albicans Sap2 cleaved FH, diminishing its complement regulatory activity, and Sap2-treatment resulted in less detectable CR3 and CR4 on macrophages. These data show that FH enhances the activation of human macrophages when bound on C. albicans. However, the fungus can inactivate both FH and its receptors on macrophages by secreting Sap2, which may represent an additional means for C. albicans to evade the host innate immune system.

  20. Nucleotide cleaving agents and method

    DOEpatents

    Que, Jr., Lawrence; Hanson, Richard S.; Schnaith, Leah M. T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a unique series of nucleotide cleaving agents and a method for cleaving a nucleotide sequence, whether single-stranded or double-stranded DNA or RNA, using and a cationic metal complex having at least one polydentate ligand to cleave the nucleotide sequence phosphate backbone to yield a hydroxyl end and a phosphate end.

  1. Factor B Is the Second Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protease Zymogen in the Horseshoe Crab Coagulation Cascade.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Shibata, Toshio; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2015-07-31

    Factor B is a serine-protease zymogen in the horseshoe crab coagulation cascade, and it is the primary substrate for activated factor C, the LPS-responsive initiator of the cascade. Factor C is autocatalytically activated to α-factor C on LPS and is artificially converted to β-factor C, another activated form, by chymotrypsin. It is not known, however, whether LPS is required for the activation of factor B. Here we found that wild-type factor B expressed in HEK293S cells is activated by α-factor C, but not by β-factor C, in an LPS-dependent manner and that β-factor C loses the LPS binding activity of factor C through additional cleavage by chymotrypsin within the N-terminal LPS-binding region. Surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance analyses revealed that wild-type factor B binds to LPS with high affinity comparable with that of factor C, demonstrating that factor B is the second LPS-binding zymogen in the cascade. An LPS-binding site of wild-type factor B was found in the N-terminal clip domain, and the activation rate of a clip domain deletion mutant was considerably slower than that of wild-type factor B. Moreover, in the presence of LPS, Triton X-100 inhibited the activation of wild-type factor B by α-factor C. We conclude that the clip domain of factor B has an important role in localizing factor B to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria or LPS released from bacteria to initiate effective proteolytic activation by α-factor C.

  2. Factor B Is the Second Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protease Zymogen in the Horseshoe Crab Coagulation Cascade*

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Shibata, Toshio; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Factor B is a serine-protease zymogen in the horseshoe crab coagulation cascade, and it is the primary substrate for activated factor C, the LPS-responsive initiator of the cascade. Factor C is autocatalytically activated to α-factor C on LPS and is artificially converted to β-factor C, another activated form, by chymotrypsin. It is not known, however, whether LPS is required for the activation of factor B. Here we found that wild-type factor B expressed in HEK293S cells is activated by α-factor C, but not by β-factor C, in an LPS-dependent manner and that β-factor C loses the LPS binding activity of factor C through additional cleavage by chymotrypsin within the N-terminal LPS-binding region. Surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance analyses revealed that wild-type factor B binds to LPS with high affinity comparable with that of factor C, demonstrating that factor B is the second LPS-binding zymogen in the cascade. An LPS-binding site of wild-type factor B was found in the N-terminal clip domain, and the activation rate of a clip domain deletion mutant was considerably slower than that of wild-type factor B. Moreover, in the presence of LPS, Triton X-100 inhibited the activation of wild-type factor B by α-factor C. We conclude that the clip domain of factor B has an important role in localizing factor B to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria or LPS released from bacteria to initiate effective proteolytic activation by α-factor C. PMID:26109069

  3. Essential role of platelet activation via protease activated receptor 4 in tissue factor-initiated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Busso, Nathalie; Chobaz-Péclat, Veronique; Hamilton, Justin; Spee, Pieter; Wagtmann, Nicolai; So, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tissue factor (TF) activation of the coagulation proteases enhances inflammation in animal models of arthritis and endotoxemia, but the mechanism of this effect is not yet fully understood – in particular, whether this is primarily due to fibrin formation or through activation of protease activated receptors (PARs). Methods We induced extravascular inflammation by injection of recombinant soluble murine TF (sTF1–219) in the hind paw. The effects of thrombin inhibition, fibrinogen and platelet depletion were evaluated, as well as the effects of PAR deficiency using knockout mice deficient for each of the PARs. Results Injection of soluble TF provoked a rapid onset of paw swelling. Inflammation was confirmed histologically and by increased serum IL-6 levels. Inflammation was significantly reduced by depletion of fibrinogen (P < 0.05) or platelets (P = 0.015), and by treatment with hirudin (P = 0.04) or an inhibitor of activated factor VII (P < 0.001) compared with controls. PAR-4-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced paw swelling (P = 0.003). In contrast, a deficiency in either PAR-1, PAR-2 or PAR-3 did not affect the inflammatory response to soluble TF injection. Conclusion Our results show that soluble TF induces acute inflammation through a thrombin-dependent pathway and both fibrin deposition and platelet activation are essential steps in this process. The activation of PAR-4 on platelets is crucial and the other PARs do not play a major role in soluble TF-induced inflammation. PMID:18412955

  4. Role of Allergen Source-Derived Proteases in Sensitization via Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Protease activity is a characteristic common to many allergens. Allergen source-derived proteases interact with lung epithelial cells, which are now thought to play vital roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Allergen source-derived proteases act on airway epithelial cells to induce disruption of the tight junctions between epithelial cells, activation of protease-activated receptor-2, and the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin. These facilitate allergen delivery across epithelial layers and enhance allergenicity or directly activate the immune system through a nonallergic mechanism. Furthermore, they cleave regulatory cell surface molecules involved in allergic reactions. Thus, allergen source-derived proteases are a potentially critical factor in the development of allergic sensitization and appear to be strongly associated with heightened allergenicity. PMID:22523502

  5. Crystal Structure of the Protease-Resistant Core Domain of Yersinia Pestis Virulence Factor Yopr

    SciTech Connect

    Schubot,F.; Cherry, S.; Austin, B.; Tropea, J.; Waugh, D.

    2005-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the plague, employs a type III secretion system (T3SS) to secrete and translocate virulence factors into the cytoplasm of mammalian host cells. One of the secreted virulence factors is YopR. Little is known about the function of YopR other than that it is secreted into the extracellular milieu during the early stages of infection and that it contributes to virulence. Hoping to gain some insight into the function of YopR, we determined the crystal structure of its protease-resistant core domain, which consists of residues 38--149 out of 165 amino acids. The core domain is composed of five {alpha}-helices that display unexpected structural similarity with one domain of YopN, a central regulator of type III secretion in Y. pestis. This finding raises the possibility that YopR may play a role in the regulation of type III secretion.

  6. Purification and characterization of an immunoglobulin A1 protease from Bacteroides melaninogenicus.

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, S B; Kilian, M

    1984-01-01

    Attention has recently been focused on bacterial proteases with the capacity to cleave immunoglobulin A (IgA proteases) as possible pathogenic factors in bacterial meningitis, gonorrhoea, and destructive periodontal disease. Here, we describe a method for the rapid purification of a specific IgA1 protease from Bacteroides melaninogenicus. The IgA1 protease was purified 6,172-fold with a yield of 9% by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-ion exchange chromatography, and separation on a preparative TSK-G 3000SWG high-pressure gel permeation chromatography column. The enzyme was specific for human IgA1 and cleaved a prolyl-seryl peptide bond in the hinge region of the alpha 1 chain between residues 223 and 224. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 62,000, the isoelectric point was 5.0, and the Km was 3.4 X 10(-6). The enzyme was active over a broad pH range and had maximal activity at pH 5.0. B. melaninogenicus IgA1 protease was classified as a thiol protease on the basis of its inhibition by traditional protease inhibitors and the fact that it was active only under reducing conditions. Images PMID:6147309

  7. Growth factor and protease expression during different phases of healing after rabbit deep flexor tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Berglund, M E; Hart, D A; Reno, C; Wiig, M

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to contribute to the mapping of molecular events during flexor tendon healing, in particular the growth factors insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and MMP-13) and their inhibitors (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, TIMP-1 and TIMP-3, and the protease cathepsin K. In a rabbit model of flexor tendon injury, the mRNA expression for the growth factors, MMPs and TIMPs were measured in tendon and tendon sheath tissue at several time points (3, 6, 21, and 42 days) representing different phases of the healing process. We found that MMP-13 remained increased during the study period, whereas MMP-3 returned to normal levels within the first week after injury. TIMP-3 was down-regulated in the tendon sheaths. Cathepsin K was up-regulated in tendons and sheaths after injury. NGF was present in both tendons and sheaths, but unaltered. IGF-1 exhibited a late increase in the tendons, while VEGF was down-regulated at the later time points. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the presence of NGF in flexor tendons. MMP-13 expression appears to play a more protracted role in flexor tendon healing than MMP-3. The relatively low levels of endogenous IGF-1 and VEGF mRNA following injury support their potential beneficial role as exogenous modulators to optimize tendon healing and strength without increasing adhesion formation.

  8. Alcaligenes faecalis ZD02, a Novel Nematicidal Bacterium with an Extracellular Serine Protease Virulence Factor.

    PubMed

    Ju, Shouyong; Lin, Jian; Zheng, Jinshui; Wang, Shaoying; Zhou, Hongying; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-29

    Root knot nematodes (RKNs) are the world's most damaging plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs), and they can infect almost all crops. At present, harmful chemical nematicides are applied to control RKNs. Using microbial nematicides has been proposed as a better management strategy than chemical control. In this study, we describe a novel nematicidal bacterium named Alcaligenes faecalis ZD02. A. faecalis ZD02 was isolated from Caenorhabditis elegans cadavers and has nematostatic and nematicidal activity, as confirmed by C. elegans growth assay and life span assay. In addition, A. faecalis ZD02 fermentation broth showed toxicity against C. elegans and Meloidogyne incognita. To identify the nematicidal virulence factor, the genome of strain ZD02 was sequenced. By comparing all of the predicted proteins of strain ZD02 to reported nematicidal virulence factors, we determined that an extracellular serine protease (Esp) has potential to be a nematicidal virulence factor, which was confirmed by bioassay on C. elegans and M. incognita. Using C. elegans as the target model, we found that both A. faecalis ZD02 and the virulence factor Esp can damage the intestines of C. elegans. The discovery that A. faecalis ZD02 has nematicidal activity provides a novel bacterial resource for the control of RKNs.

  9. Alcaligenes faecalis ZD02, a Novel Nematicidal Bacterium with an Extracellular Serine Protease Virulence Factor

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Shouyong; Lin, Jian; Zheng, Jinshui; Wang, Shaoying; Zhou, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Root knot nematodes (RKNs) are the world's most damaging plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs), and they can infect almost all crops. At present, harmful chemical nematicides are applied to control RKNs. Using microbial nematicides has been proposed as a better management strategy than chemical control. In this study, we describe a novel nematicidal bacterium named Alcaligenes faecalis ZD02. A. faecalis ZD02 was isolated from Caenorhabditis elegans cadavers and has nematostatic and nematicidal activity, as confirmed by C. elegans growth assay and life span assay. In addition, A. faecalis ZD02 fermentation broth showed toxicity against C. elegans and Meloidogyne incognita. To identify the nematicidal virulence factor, the genome of strain ZD02 was sequenced. By comparing all of the predicted proteins of strain ZD02 to reported nematicidal virulence factors, we determined that an extracellular serine protease (Esp) has potential to be a nematicidal virulence factor, which was confirmed by bioassay on C. elegans and M. incognita. Using C. elegans as the target model, we found that both A. faecalis ZD02 and the virulence factor Esp can damage the intestines of C. elegans. The discovery that A. faecalis ZD02 has nematicidal activity provides a novel bacterial resource for the control of RKNs. PMID:26826227

  10. The kunitz protease inhibitor domain of protease nexin-2 inhibits factor XIa and murine carotid artery and middle cerebral artery thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenman; Li, Hongbo; Navaneetham, Duraiswamy; Reichenbach, Zachary W.; Tuma, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Coagulation factor XI (FXI) plays an important part in both venous and arterial thrombosis, rendering FXIa a potential target for the development of antithrombotic therapy. The kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain of protease nexin-2 (PN2) is a potent, highly specific inhibitor of FXIa, suggesting its possible role in the inhibition of FXI-dependent thrombosis in vivo. Therefore, we examined the effect of PN2KPI on thrombosis in the murine carotid artery and the middle cerebral artery. Intravenous administration of PN2KPI prolonged the clotting time of both human and murine plasma, and PN2KPI inhibited FXIa activity in both human and murine plasma in vitro. The intravenous administration of PN2KPI into WT mice dramatically decreased the progress of FeCl3-induced thrombus formation in the carotid artery. After a similar initial rate of thrombus formation with and without PN2KPI treatment, the propagation of thrombus formation after 10 minutes and the amount of thrombus formed were significantly decreased in mice treated with PN2KPI injection compared with untreated mice. In the middle cerebral artery occlusion model, the volume and fraction of ischemic brain tissue were significantly decreased in PN2KPI-treated compared with untreated mice. Thus, inhibition of FXIa by PN2KPI is a promising approach to antithrombotic therapy. PMID:22674803

  11. The human homologue of the yeast polyubiquitination factor Ufd2p is cleaved by caspase 6 and granzyme B during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, James A; Odin, Joseph A; White, Sarah M; Shaffer, David; Koff, Andrew; Casciola-Rosen, Livia; Rosen, Antony

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate that a human homologue of Ufd2p (a yeast protein that catalyses the formation of long polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in responses to environmental stress), UFD2 (ubiquitin fusion degradation protein-2), is cleaved during apoptosis induced by multiple stimuli, including UVB irradiation, Fas ligation, staurosporine treatment and cytotoxic lymphocyte granule-induced death. Caspase 6 and granzyme B efficiently cleave UFD2 [k(cat)/K(m)=(4-5) x 10(4) M(-1) x s(-1)] at Asp(123), whereas caspases 3 and 7 cleave UFD2 approx. 10-fold less efficiently immediately upstream at Asp(109). Thus UFD2 is added to the growing list of proteins with closely spaced caspase and granzyme B cleavage sites, suggesting the presence of a previously unrecognized, conserved motif. Both cleavage sites are contained and conserved within a novel 300-amino-acid N-terminal domain present in apparent UFD2 orthologues in mice and zebrafish, but absent in all UFD2 family members in lower eukaryotes. Full-length recombinant UFD2 exhibited ubiquitin-protein ligase ('E3')-like ubiquitination activity in vitro, but this activity was abolished in recombinant UFD2 truncated at the granzyme B/caspase 6 cleavage site. Cleavage of UFD2 by caspases or granzyme B within this putative regulatory N-terminal domain might have important functional consequences within the apoptotic cascade. PMID:11802788

  12. Distinct contribution of Toxoplasma gondii rhomboid proteases 4 and 5 to micronemal protein protease 1 activity during invasion.

    PubMed

    Rugarabamu, George; Marq, Jean-Baptiste; Guérin, Amandine; Lebrun, Maryse; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    Host cell entry by the Apicomplexa is associated with the sequential secretion of invasion factors from specialized apical organelles. Secretion of micronemal proteins (MICs) complexes by Toxoplasma gondii facilitates parasite gliding motility, host cell attachment and entry, as well as egress from infected cells. The shedding of MICs during these steps is mediated by micronemal protein proteases MPP1, MPP2 and MPP3. The constitutive activity of MPP1 leads to the cleavage of transmembrane MICs and is linked to the surface rhomboid protease 4 (ROM4) and possibly to rhomboid protease 5 (ROM5). To determine their importance and respective contribution to MPP1 activity, in this study ROM4 and ROM5 genes were abrogated using Cre-recombinase and CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease, respectively, and shown to be dispensable for parasite survival. Parasites lacking ROM4 predominantly engage in twirling motility and exhibit enhanced attachment and impaired invasion, whereas intracellular growth and egress is not affected. The substrates MIC2 and MIC6 are not cleaved in rom4-ko parasites, in contrast, intramembrane cleavage of AMA1 is reduced but not completely abolished. Shedding of MICs and invasion are not altered in the absence of ROM5; however, this protease responsible for the residual cleavage of AMA1 is able to cleave other AMA family members and exhibits a detectable contribution to invasion in the absence of ROM4.

  13. Purification and biophysical characterization of the core protease domain of anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gkazonis, Petros V.; Dalkas, Georgios A.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Vlamis-Gardikas, Alexios; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2010-06-04

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) stands for the major virulence factor of the anthrax disease. It comprises a 90 kDa highly specific metalloprotease, the anthrax lethal factor (LF). LF possesses a catalytic Zn{sup 2+} binding site and is highly specific against MAPK kinases, thus representing the most potent native biomolecule to alter and inactivate MKK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) kinases] signalling pathways. Given the importance of the interaction between LF and substrate for the development of anti-anthrax agents as well as the potential treatment of nascent tumours, the analysis of the structure and dynamic properties of the LF catalytic site are essential to elucidate its enzymatic properties. Here we report the recombinant expression and purification of a C-terminal part of LF (LF{sub 672-776}) that harbours the enzyme's core protease domain. The biophysical characterization and backbone assignments ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) of the polypeptide revealed a stable, well folded structure even in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}, suitable for high resolution structural analysis by NMR.

  14. Structure-Based Library Design and Fragment Screening for the Identification of Reversible Complement Factor D Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vulpetti, Anna; Randl, Stefan; Rüdisser, Simon; Ostermann, Nils; Erbel, Paul; Mac Sweeney, Aengus; Zoller, Thomas; Salem, Bahaa; Gerhartz, Bernd; Cumin, Frederic; Hommel, Ulrich; Dalvit, Claudio; Lorthiois, Edwige; Maibaum, Jürgen

    2017-03-09

    Chronic dysregulation of alternative complement pathway activation has been associated with diverse clinical disorders including age-related macular degeneration and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinurea. Factor D is a trypsin-like serine protease with a narrow specificity for arginine in the P1 position, which catalyzes the first enzymatic reaction of the amplification loop of the alternative pathway. In this article, we describe two hit finding approaches leading to the discovery of new chemical matter for this pivotal protease of the complement system: in silico active site mapping for hot spot identification to guide rational structure-based design and NMR screening of focused and diverse fragment libraries. The wealth of information gathered by these complementary approaches enabled the identification of ligands binding to different subpockets of the latent Factor D conformation and was instrumental for understanding the binding requirements for the generation of the first known potent noncovalent reversible Factor D inhibitors.

  15. Expression and Purification of Haemophilus influenzae Rhomboid Intramembrane Protease GlpG for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Pankaj; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-04-01

    Rhomboid proteases are membrane-embedded proteases that cleave peptide bonds of transmembrane proteins. They play a variety of roles in cell signaling events. The rhomboid protease GlpG from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlpG) is a canonical form of rhomboid protease having six transmembrane segments. In this unit, detailed protocols are presented for optimization of hiGlpG expression using the araBAD promotor system in the pBAD vector. The parameters for optimization include concentration of inducing agent, induction temperature, and time. Optimization of these key factors led to the development of a protocol yielding 1.6 to 2.5 mg/liter protein purified after ion metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Further purification can include size exclusion chromatography (SEC).

  16. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  17. Torso-like mediates extracellular accumulation of Furin-cleaved Trunk to pattern the Drosophila embryo termini.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Travis K; Henstridge, Michelle A; Herr, Anabel; Moore, Karyn A; Whisstock, James C; Warr, Coral G

    2015-10-28

    Patterning of the Drosophila embryonic termini is achieved by localized activation of the Torso receptor by the growth factor Trunk. Governing this event is the perforin-like protein Torso-like, which is localized to the extracellular space at the embryo poles and has long been proposed to control localized proteolytic activation of Trunk. However, a protease involved in terminal patterning remains to be identified, and the role of Torso-like remains unknown. Here we find that Trunk is cleaved intracellularly by Furin proteases. We further show that Trunk is secreted, and that levels of extracellular Trunk are greatly reduced in torso-like null mutants. On the basis of these and previous findings, we suggest that Torso-like functions to mediate secretion of Trunk, thus providing the mechanism for spatially restricted activation of Torso. Our data represent an alternative mechanism for the spatial control of receptor signalling, and define a different role for perforin-like proteins in eukaryotes.

  18. Impaired inactivation of digestive proteases: The possible key factor for the high susceptibility of germ-free and antibiotic-treated animals to gut epithelial injury

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaofa

    2017-01-01

    Recent study shows that germ-free and antibiotic-treated animals are highly susceptible to gut epithelial injury. This paper addresses that impaired inactivation of digestive proteases may be the key factor for the increased susceptibility. PMID:28251033

  19. Impaired inactivation of digestive proteases: The possible key factor for the high susceptibility of germ-free and antibiotic-treated animals to gut epithelial injury.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofa

    2017-02-15

    Recent study shows that germ-free and antibiotic-treated animals are highly susceptible to gut epithelial injury. This paper addresses that impaired inactivation of digestive proteases may be the key factor for the increased susceptibility.

  20. Enhanced Peptide Stability Against Protease Digestion Induced by Intrinsic Factor Binding of a Vitamin B12 Conjugate of Exendin-4.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Ron L; Chepurny, Oleg G; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Holz, George G; Doyle, Robert P

    2015-09-08

    Peptide digestion from proteases is a significant limitation in peptide therapeutic development. It has been hypothesized that the dietary pathway of vitamin B12 (B12) may be exploited in this area, but an open question is whether B12-peptide conjugates bound to the B12 gastric uptake protein intrinsic factor (IF) can provide any stability against proteases. Herein, we describe a new conjugate of B12 with the incretin peptide exendin 4 that demonstrates picomolar agonism of the glugacon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1-R). Stability studies reveal that Ex-4 is digested by pancreatic proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin and by the kidney endopeptidase meprin β. Prebinding the B12 conjugate to IF, however, resulted in up to a 4-fold greater activity of the B12-Ex-4 conjugate relative to Ex-4, when the IF-B12-Ex-4 complex was exposed to 22 μg/mL of trypsin, 2.3-fold greater activity when exposed to 1.25 μg/mL of chymotrypsin, and there was no decrease in function at up to 5 μg/mL of meprin β.

  1. Inhibitory properties of separate recombinant Kunitz-type-protease-inhibitor domains from tissue-factor-pathway inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Petersen, L C; Bjørn, S E; Olsen, O H; Nordfang, O; Norris, F; Norris, K

    1996-01-15

    Tissue-factor-pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a multivalent inhibitor with three tandemly arranged Kunitz- type-protease-inhibitor (KPI) domains. Previous studies [Girard, Y. J., Warren, L. A., Novotny , W. F., Likert, K. M., Brown, S. G., Miletich, J. R & Broze, G. J. (1989) Nature 338, 518-520] by means of site-directed mutagenesis indicated that KPI domain 1 interacts with factor VIIa, that KPI domain 2 interacts with factor Xa, and that KPI domain 3 is apparently without inhibitory function. To elucidate the reaction mechanism of this complex inhibitor, we followed a different approach and studied the inhibitory properties of fragments of TFPI obtained by expression in yeast. Results obtained with TFPI-(1-161)-peptide and separate recombinant TFPI-KPI domains 1, 2 and 3 showed that KPI domain 1 inhibited factor VIIa/tissue factor (Ki = 250 nM), KPI domain 2 inhibited factor Xa (Ki = 90 nM), and that KPI domain 3 was without detectable inhibitory function. Studies with separate KPI domains also showed that KPI domain 2 was mainly responsible for inhibition of trypsin (Ki = 0.1 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki = 0.75 nM), whereas KPI domain 1 inhibited plasmin (Ki = 26 nM) and cathepsin G (Ki = 200 nM). The structural basis for the interaction between serine proteases and KPI domains is discussed in terms of putative three-dimensional models of the proteins derived by comparative molecular-modelling methods. Studies of factor Xa inhibition by intact TFPI (Ki approximately 0.02 nM) suggested that regions other than the contact area of the KPI domain, interacted strongly with factor Xa. Secondary-site interactions were crucial for TFPI inhibition of factor Xa but was of little or no importance for its inhibition of trypsin.

  2. Relation between Red Cell Distribution Width and Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Cleaving in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    van Breda, Fenna; Emans, Mireille E.; van der Putten, Karien; Braam, Branko; van Ittersum, Frans J.; Kraaijenhagen, Rob J.; de Borst, Martin H.; Vervloet, Marc; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In chronic kidney disease (CKD), both anemia and deregulated phosphate metabolism are common and predictive of adverse outcome. Previous studies suggest that iron status influences phosphate metabolism by modulating proteolytic cleavage of FGF23 into C-terminal fragments. Red cell distribution width (RDW) was recently identified as a strong prognostic determinant for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, independently of iron status. We assessed whether RDW is associated with FGF23 cleaving in CKD patients with heart failure. Materials and Methods The associations between RDW and either intact FGF23 (iFGF23), C-terminal FGF23 (cFGF23, reflecting iFGF23 and C-terminal fragments together) and the iFGF23/cFGF23 ratio were analyzed in 52 patients with CKD (eGFR 34,9 ± 13.9 ml/min/1.73m2) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Associations between RDW and FGF23 forms were studied by linear regression analysis adjusted for parameters of renal function, iron metabolism, phosphate metabolism and inflammation. Results Median cFGF23 levels were 197.5 [110–408.5] RU/ml, median iFGF23 levels were 107.3 [65.1–162.2] pg/ml and median FGF23 ratio was 0.80 [0.37–0.86]. Mean RDW was 14.1 ± 1.2%. cFGF23 and RDW were associated (β = 1.63x10-3, P <0.001), whereas iFGF23 and RDW were not (β = -1.38x10-3, P = 0.336). The iFGF23/cFGF23 ratio was inversely associated with RDW. The difference between cFGF23 and iFGF23 (cFGF23- iFGF23) was positively associated with RDW (β = 1.74x10-3, P< 0.001). The association between cFGF23 and RDW persisted upon multivariable linear regression analysis, adjusted for parameters of renal function, phosphate metabolism, iron metabolism and inflammation (β = 0.97x10-3, P = 0.047). Conclusion RDW is associated with cFGF23 but not with iFGF23 levels in patients with CKD and CHF. This suggests a connection between RDW and FGF23 catabolism, independent of iron status and inflammation. Future studies are needed to unravel underlying mechanisms

  3. Generating favorable growth factor and protease release profiles to enable extracellular matrix accumulation within an in vitro tissue engineering environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Battiston, Kyle G; Labow, Rosalind S; Simmons, Craig A; Santerre, J Paul

    2017-02-24

    Tissue engineering (particularly for the case of load-bearing cardiovascular and connective tissues) requires the ability to promote the production and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components (e.g., collagen, glycosaminoglycan and elastin). Although different approaches have been attempted in order to enhance ECM accumulation in tissue engineered constructs, studies of underlying signalling mechanisms that influence ECM deposition and degradation during tissue remodelling and regeneration in multi-cellular culture systems have been limited. The current study investigated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-monocyte co-culture systems using different VSMC:monocyte ratios, within a degradable polyurethane scaffold, to assess their influence on ECM generation and degradation processes, and to elucidate relevant signalling molecules involved in this in vitro vascular tissue engineering system. It was found that a desired release profile of growth factors (e.g. insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1)) and hydrolytic proteases (e.g. matrix-metalloproteinases 2, 9, 13 and 14 (MMP2, MMP9, MMP13 and MMP14)), could be achieved in co-culture systems, yielding an accumulation of ECM (specifically for 2:1 and 4:1 VSMC:monocyte culture systems). This study has significant implications for the tissue engineering field (including vascular tissue engineering), not only because it identified important cytokines and proteases that control ECM accumulation/degradation within synthetic tissue engineering scaffolds, but also because the established culture systems could be applied to improve the development of different types of tissue constructs.

  4. Inhibition of outer membrane proteases of the omptin family by aprotinin.

    PubMed

    Brannon, John R; Burk, David L; Leclerc, Jean-Mathieu; Thomassin, Jenny-Lee; Portt, Andrea; Berghuis, Albert M; Gruenheid, Samantha; Le Moual, Hervé

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial proteases are important virulence factors that inactivate host defense proteins and contribute to tissue destruction and bacterial dissemination. Outer membrane proteases of the omptin family, exemplified by Escherichia coli OmpT, are found in some Gram-negative bacteria. Omptins cleave a variety of substrates at the host-pathogen interface, including plasminogen and antimicrobial peptides. Multiple omptin substrates relevant to infection have been identified; nonetheless, an effective omptin inhibitor remains to be found. Here, we purified native CroP, the OmpT ortholog in the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Purified CroP was found to readily cleave both a synthetic fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrate and the murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide. In contrast, CroP was found to poorly activate plasminogen into active plasmin. Although classical protease inhibitors were ineffective against CroP activity, we found that the serine protease inhibitor aprotinin displays inhibitory potency in the micromolar range. Aprotinin was shown to act as a competitive inhibitor of CroP activity and to interfere with the cleavage of the murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide. Importantly, aprotinin was able to inhibit not only CroP but also Yersinia pestis Pla and, to a lesser extent, E. coli OmpT. We propose a structural model of the aprotinin-omptin complex in which Lys15 of aprotinin forms salt bridges with conserved negatively charged residues of the omptin active site.

  5. Development of a Cell-Based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Reporter for Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, R H; Steenblock, E R; Camarero, J A

    2007-03-22

    We report the construction of a cell-based fluorescent reporter for anthrax lethal factor (LF) protease activity using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This was accomplished by engineering an Escherichia coli cell line to express a genetically encoded FRET reporter and LF protease. Both proteins were encoded in two different expression plasmids under the control of different tightly controlled inducible promoters. The FRET-based reporter was designed to contain a LF recognition sequence flanked by the FRET pair formed by CyPet and YPet fluorescent proteins. The length of the linker between both fluorescent proteins was optimized using a flexible peptide linker containing several Gly-Gly-Ser repeats. Our results indicate that this FRET-based LF reporter was readily expressed in E. coli cells showing high levels of FRET in vivo in the absence of LF. The FRET signal, however, decreased 5 times after inducing LF expression in the same cell. These results suggest that this cell-based LF FRET reporter may be used to screen genetically encoded libraries in vivo against LF.

  6. Factors Associated with the Development of Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1 Infected Children Failing Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Melikian, George; van Dyk, Gisela; Thomas, Winifred; du Plessis, Nicolette M.; Avenant, Theunis

    2015-01-01

    Objective Limited data are available from the developing world on antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 infected children failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy, especially in the context of a high tuberculosis burden. We describe the proportion of children with drug resistance mutations after failed protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy as well as associated factors. Methods Data from children initiated on protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy with subsequent virological failure referred for genotypic drug resistance testing between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively analysed. Frequencies of drug resistance mutations were determined and associations with these mutations identified through logistic regression analysis. Results The study included 65 young children (median age 16.8 months [IQR 7.8; 23.3]) with mostly advanced clinical disease (88.5% WHO stage 3 or 4 disease), severe malnutrition (median weight-for-age Z-score -2.4 [IQR -3.7;-1.5]; median height-for-age Z-score -3.1 [IQR -4.3;-2.4]), high baseline HIV viral load (median 6.04 log10, IQR 5.34;6.47) and frequent tuberculosis co-infection (66%) at antiretroviral therapy initiation. Major protease inhibitor mutations were found in 49% of children and associated with low weight-for-age and height-for-age (p = 0.039; p = 0.05); longer duration of protease inhibitor regimens and virological failure (p = 0.001; p = 0.005); unsuppressed HIV viral load at 12 months of antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.001); tuberculosis treatment at antiretroviral therapy initiation (p = 0.048) and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor (p = 0.038). On multivariate analysis, cumulative months on protease inhibitor regimens and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor remained significant (p = 0.008; p = 0.033). Conclusion Major protease inhibitor resistance mutations were common in this study of HIV-1-infected children, with the timing of tuberculosis treatment and subsequent

  7. Upregulation of tissue factor in monocytes by cleaved high molecular weight kininogen is dependent on TNF-alpha and IL-1beta.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad M; Liu, Yuchuan; Khan, Munir E; Gilman, Megan L; Khan, Sabina T; Bromberg, Michael; Colman, Robert W

    2010-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis are associated with contact activation that results in cleavage of kininogen to form high molecular weight kininogen (HKa) and bradykinin. We have previously demonstrated that HKa can stimulate inflammatory cytokine and chemokine secretion from human monocytes. We now show that HKa can upregulate tissue factor antigen and procoagulant activity on human monocytes as a function of time (1-4 h) and HKa concentration (75-900 nM). The amino acid sequence responsible to block HKa effects is G440-H455. The HKa receptor macrophage-1 (Mac-1; CD11b18) is the binding site as shown by inhibition by a monoclonal antibody to CD11b/18. Chemical inhibitors of JNK, ERK, and p38 signaling pathways block cell signaling, as does an inhibitor to the transcription factor NF-kappaB. A combination of monoclonal antibodies to TNF-alpha and IL-1beta but neither alone inhibited the HKa induction of tissue factor. These results suggest that HKa mimics LPS by triggering a paracrine pathway in monocytes that depends on TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. Antibodies to kininogen or peptidomimetics might be a useful and safe therapy in inflammatory diseases or sepsis involving cytokines.

  8. Proteomics and phylogenetic analysis of the cathepsin L protease family of the helminth pathogen Fasciola hepatica: expansion of a repertoire of virulence-associated factors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark W; Tort, Jose F; Lowther, Jonathan; Donnelly, Sheila M; Wong, Emily; Xu, Weibo; Stack, Colin M; Padula, Matthew; Herbert, Ben; Dalton, John P

    2008-06-01

    Cathepsin L proteases secreted by the helminth pathogen Fasciola hepatica have functions in parasite virulence including tissue invasion and suppression of host immune responses. Using proteomics methods alongside phylogenetic studies we characterized the profile of cathepsin L proteases secreted by adult F. hepatica and hence identified those involved in host-pathogen interaction. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the Fasciola cathepsin L gene family expanded by a series of gene duplications followed by divergence that gave rise to three clades associated with mature adult worms (Clades 1, 2, and 5) and two clades specific to infective juvenile stages (Clades 3 and 4). Consistent with these observations our proteomics studies identified representatives from Clades 1, 2, and 5 but not from Clades 3 and 4 in adult F. hepatica secretory products. Clades 1 and 2 account for 67.39 and 27.63% of total secreted cathepsin Ls, respectively, suggesting that their expansion was positively driven and that these proteases are most critical for parasite survival and adaptation. Sequence comparison studies revealed that the expansion of cathepsin Ls by gene duplication was followed by residue changes in the S2 pocket of the active site. Our biochemical studies showed that these changes result in alterations in substrate binding and suggested that the divergence of the cathepsin L family produced a repertoire of enzymes with overlapping and complementary substrate specificities that could cleave host macromolecules more efficiently. Although the cathepsin Ls are produced as zymogens containing a prosegment and mature domain, all secreted enzymes identified by MS were processed to mature active enzymes. The prosegment region was highly conserved between the clades except at the boundary of prosegment and mature enzyme. Despite the lack of conservation at this section, sites for exogenous cleavage by asparaginyl endopeptidases and a Leu-Ser[downward arrow]His motif for

  9. Identification and characterization of a chymotrypsin-like serine protease from periodontal pathogen, Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Hockensmith, K; Dillard, K; Sanders, B; Harville, B A

    2016-11-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a bacteria associated with severe periodontal disease. This study reports identification and characterization of a membrane-associated serine protease from T. forsythia. The protease was isolated from T. forsythia membrane fractions and shown to cleave both gelatin and type I collagen. The protease was able to cleave both substrates over a wide range of pH values, however optimal cleavage occurred at pH 7.5 for gelatin and 8.0 for type I collagen. The protease was also shown to cleave both gelatin and type I collagen at the average reported temperature for the gingival sulcus however it showed a lack of thermal stability with a complete loss of activity by 60 °C. When treated with protease inhibitors the enzyme's activity could only be completely inhibited by serine protease inhibitors antipain and phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). Further characterization of the protease utilized serine protease synthetic peptides. The protease cleaved N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide but not Nα-benzoyl-dl-arginine p-nitroanilide (BAPNA) or N-methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val p-nitroanilide indicating that the protease is a chymotrypsin-like serine protease. Since type I collagen is a major component in the gingival tissues and periodontal ligament, identification and characterization of this enzyme provides important information regarding the role of T. forsythia in periodontal disease.

  10. Ni(ii) ions cleave and inactivate human alpha-1 antitrypsin hydrolytically, implicating nickel exposure as a contributing factor in pathologies related to antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wezynfeld, Nina Ewa; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bal, Wojciech; Frączyk, Tomasz

    2015-04-01

    Human alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is an abundant serum protein present at a concentration of 1.0-1.5 g L(-1). AAT deficiency is a genetic disease that manifests with emphysema and liver cirrhosis due to the accumulation of a misfolded AAT mutant in hepatocytes. Lung AAT amount is inversely correlated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a serious and often deadly condition, with increasing frequency in the aging population. Exposure to cigarette smoke and products of fossil fuel combustion aggravates AAT deficiency and COPD according to mechanisms that are not fully understood. Taking into account that these fumes contain particles that can release nickel to human airways and skin, we decided to investigate interactions of AAT with Ni(ii) ions within the paradigm of Ni(ii)-dependent peptide bond hydrolysis. We studied AAT protein derived from human blood using HPLC, SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry. These studies were aided by spectroscopic experiments on model peptides. As a result, we identified three hydrolysis sites in AAT. Two of them are present in the N-terminal part of the molecule next to each other (before Thr-13 and Ser-14 residues) and effectively form one N-terminal cleavage site. The single C-terminal cleavage site is located before Ser-285. The N-terminal hydrolysis was more efficient than the C-terminal one, but both abolished the ability of AAT to inhibit trypsin in an additive manner. Nickel ions bound to hydrolysis products demonstrated an ability to generate ROS. These results implicate Ni(ii) exposure as a contributing factor in AAT-related pathologies.

  11. An extracellular protease from Brevibacillus laterosporus G4 without parasporal crystals can serve as a pathogenic factor in infection of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaowei; Tian, Baoyu; Niu, Qiuhong; Yang, Jinkui; Zhang, Lemin; Zhang, Keqin

    2005-01-01

    Brevibacillus laterosporus is an aerobic spore-forming bacterium with the ability to produce canoe-shaped lamellar parasporal inclusions adjacent to spores. An isolate named G4 was identified as a B. laterosporus which does not produce parasporal crystals and shows significant toxic activity toward nematodes. Crude extracellular protein extract from culture supernatant of B. laterosporus G4 killed the nematodes within 12 h and finally destroyed the targets within 24 h, which suggested possible proteinaceous pathogeny. A homogeneous extracellular protease with nematicidal activities, purified by chromatography, confirmed the hypothesis that it might serve as a pathogenic factor during infection of the G4 strain. Characterization of the purified protease revealed a molecular mass of 30 kDa and optimum activity at pH 10 and 50 degrees C. The protease hydrolyzed relatively broad substrates including collagen and the cuticle of nematodes, and histopathological observations demonstrated the resulting destroyed nematode cuticle upon treatment by purified protease. Our present study reveals that extracellular protease, but not previously reported parasporal crystals, can be employed in infection against invertebrates by the B. laterosporus G4 strain.

  12. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Malm, Sven; Jusko, Monika; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI) is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and Factor H (FH). Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125)I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  13. Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and PAR4 differentially regulate factor V expression from human platelets.

    PubMed

    Duvernay, Matthew; Young, Summer; Gailani, David; Schoenecker, Jonathan; Hamm, Heidi E; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-04-01

    With the recent interest of protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and PAR4 as possible targets for the treatment of thrombotic disorders, we compared the efficacy of protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR4 in the generation of procoagulant phenotypes on platelet membranes. PAR4-activating peptide (AP)-stimulated platelets promoted thrombin generation in plasma up to 5 minutes earlier than PAR1-AP-stimulated platelets. PAR4-AP-mediated factor V (FV) association with the platelet surface was 1.6-fold greater than for PAR1-AP. Moreover, PAR4 stimulation resulted in a 3-fold greater release of microparticles, compared with PAR1 stimulation. More robust FV secretion and microparticle generation with PAR4-AP was attributable to stronger and more sustained phosphorylation of myosin light chain at serine 19 and threonine 18. Inhibition of Rho-kinase reduced PAR4-AP-mediated FV secretion and microparticle generation to PAR1-AP-mediated levels. Thrombin generation assays measuring prothrombinase complex activity demonstrated 1.5-fold higher peak thrombin levels on PAR4-AP-stimulated platelets, compared with PAR1-AP-stimulated platelets. Rho-kinase inhibition reduced PAR4-AP-mediated peak thrombin generation by 25% but had no significant effect on PAR1-AP-mediated thrombin generation. In conclusion, stimulation of PAR4 on platelets leads to faster and more robust thrombin generation, compared with PAR1 stimulation. The greater procoagulant potential is related to more efficient FV release from intracellular stores and microparticle production driven by stronger and more sustained myosin light chain phosphorylation. These data have implications about the role of PAR4 during hemostasis and are clinically relevant in light of recent efforts to develop PAR antagonists to treat thrombotic disorders.

  14. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  15. Macromolecular substrate affinity for free factor VIIa is independent of a buried protease domain N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Persson, Egon

    2006-03-03

    The initial recognition and binding of macromolecular substrates by factor VIIa (FVIIa) in complex with tissue factor has been shown to be mediated by areas distinct from the active site (so-called exosites). The present aim was to shed light on whether the N-terminal tail of the protease domain of FVIIa influences factor X (FX) binding, and whether the zymogen-like conformation of free FVIIa has a decreased affinity for FX compared to the active conformation. Two derivatives of FVIIa, one (FFR-FVIIa) with a stably buried N-terminus representing the active conformation of FVIIa and one (V154G-FVIIa) with a fully exposed N-terminus representing the zymogen-like conformation, were used as inhibitors of FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation. Their inhibitory capacities were very similar, with K(i) values not significantly different from the K(m) for FX. This indicates that the conformational state of the N-terminus does not affect FX binding or, alternatively, that the activation domain including the N-terminal insertion site is easily shifted to the stable conformation ensuing FX docking to the zymogen-like conformation. The net outcome is that FX binding to the zymogen-like form of FVIIa does not appear to be impaired.

  16. The aspartyl protease DDI2 activates Nrf1 to compensate for proteasome dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Shun; Irie, Taro; Hirayama, Shoshiro; Sakurai, Yasuyuki; Yashiroda, Hideki; Naguro, Isao; Ichijo, Hidenori; Hamazaki, Jun; Murata, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    In response to proteasome dysfunction, mammalian cells upregulate proteasome gene expression by activating Nrf1. Nrf1 is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident transcription factor that is continually retrotranslocated and degraded by the proteasome. Upon proteasome inhibition, Nrf1 escapes degradation and is cleaved to become active. However, the processing enzyme for Nrf1 remains obscure. Here we show that the aspartyl protease DNA-damage inducible 1 homolog 2 (DDI2) is required to cleave and activate Nrf1. Deletion of DDI2 reduced the cleaved form of Nrf1 and increased the full-length cytosolic form of Nrf1, resulting in poor upregulation of proteasomes in response to proteasome inhibition. These defects were restored by adding back wild-type DDI2 but not protease-defective DDI2. Our results provide a clue for blocking compensatory proteasome synthesis to improve cancer therapies targeting proteasomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18357.001 PMID:27528193

  17. Cleavage Entropy as Quantitative Measure of Protease Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E.; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G.; Margreiter, Michael A.; Spitzer, Gudrun M.; Wallnoefer, Hannes G.; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases) and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity. PMID:23637583

  18. Cleavage entropy as quantitative measure of protease specificity.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G; Margreiter, Michael A; Spitzer, Gudrun M; Wallnoefer, Hannes G; Liedl, Klaus R

    2013-04-01

    A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases) and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity.

  19. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-Contaminated Cell Lines Activate Primary Innate Immune Cells via a Protease-Sensitive Factor

    PubMed Central

    Heidegger, Simon; Jarosch, Alexander; Schmickl, Martina; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Hotz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma are a frequent and occult contaminant of cell cultures, whereby these prokaryotic organisms can modify many aspects of cell physiology, rendering experiments that are conducted with such contaminated cells problematic. Chronic Mycoplasma contamination in human monocytic cells lines has been associated with suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) function. In contrast, we show here that components derived from a Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell line can activate innate immunity in non-infected primary immune cells. Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 by dendritic cells in response to Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell components was critically dependent on the adapter protein MyD88 but only partially on TLR2. Unlike canonical TLR2 signaling that is triggered in response to the detection of Mycoplasma infection, innate immune activation by components of Mycoplasma-infected cells was inhibited by chloroquine treatment and sensitive to protease treatment. We further show that in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, soluble factors from Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cells induce the production of large amounts of IFN-α. We conclude that Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell lines release protein factors that can potently activate co-cultured innate immune cells via a previously unrecognized mechanism, thus limiting the validity of such co-culture experiments. PMID:26565413

  20. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-Contaminated Cell Lines Activate Primary Innate Immune Cells via a Protease-Sensitive Factor.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Jarosch, Alexander; Schmickl, Martina; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Hotz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma are a frequent and occult contaminant of cell cultures, whereby these prokaryotic organisms can modify many aspects of cell physiology, rendering experiments that are conducted with such contaminated cells problematic. Chronic Mycoplasma contamination in human monocytic cells lines has been associated with suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) function. In contrast, we show here that components derived from a Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell line can activate innate immunity in non-infected primary immune cells. Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 by dendritic cells in response to Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell components was critically dependent on the adapter protein MyD88 but only partially on TLR2. Unlike canonical TLR2 signaling that is triggered in response to the detection of Mycoplasma infection, innate immune activation by components of Mycoplasma-infected cells was inhibited by chloroquine treatment and sensitive to protease treatment. We further show that in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, soluble factors from Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cells induce the production of large amounts of IFN-α. We conclude that Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell lines release protein factors that can potently activate co-cultured innate immune cells via a previously unrecognized mechanism, thus limiting the validity of such co-culture experiments.

  1. Small-molecule inhibitors of lethal factor protease activity protect against anthrax infection.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Crown, Devorah; Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Kim, Seongjin; Johnson, Alan; Leysath, Clinton; Leppla, Stephen H

    2013-09-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, manifests its pathogenesis through the action of two secreted toxins. The bipartite lethal and edema toxins, a combination of lethal factor or edema factor with the protein protective antigen, are important virulence factors for this bacterium. We previously developed small-molecule inhibitors of lethal factor proteolytic activity (LFIs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy in a rat lethal toxin challenge model. In this work, we show that these LFIs protect against lethality caused by anthrax infection in mice when combined with subprotective doses of either antibiotics or neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that target edema factor. Significantly, these inhibitors provided protection against lethal infection when administered as a monotherapy. As little as two doses (10 mg/kg) administered at 2 h and 8 h after spore infection was sufficient to provide a significant survival benefit in infected mice. Administration of LFIs early in the infection was found to inhibit dissemination of vegetative bacteria to the organs in the first 32 h following infection. In addition, neutralizing antibodies against edema factor also inhibited bacterial dissemination with similar efficacy. Together, our findings confirm the important roles that both anthrax toxins play in establishing anthrax infection and demonstrate the potential for small-molecule therapeutics targeting these proteins.

  2. Hybrid proteins between Pseudomonas exotoxin A and poliovirus protease 2Apro.

    PubMed

    Novoa, I; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1994-11-21

    Two hybrid proteins between Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) and poliovirus protease 2Apro have been generated. One hybrid protein contains the poliovirus 2Apro sequence replacing the region of PE corresponding to amino acids 413-607. The other hybrid contains in addition the transforming growth factor sequence. The two hybrid proteins were efficiently synthesized in E. coli cells using the inducible pET vectors. Both hybrid toxins cleaved p220 (eIF-4 gamma) when the recombinant plasmids were transfected in COS cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus bearing the T7 RNA polymerase gene.

  3. EcpA, an extracellular protease, is a specific virulence factor required by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola but not by X. oryzae pv. oryzae in rice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hua-Song; Song, Xue; Zou, Li-Fang; Yuan, Liang; Li, Yu-Rong; Guo, Wei; Che, Yi-Zhou; Zhao, Wen-Xiang; Duan, Yong-Ping; Chen, Gong-You

    2012-09-01

    Previously, 12 protease-deficient mutants of the Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) RS105 strain were recovered from a Tn5-tagged mutant library. In the current study, the Tn5 insertion site in each mutant was mapped. Mutations in genes encoding components of the type II secretion apparatus, cAMP regulatory protein, integral membrane protease subunit, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase proenzyme and extracellular protease (ecpA(Xoc)) either partially or completely abolished extracellular protease activity (ECPA) and reduced virulence in rice. Transcription of ecpA(Xoc) was induced in planta in all the mutants except RΔecpA. Complementation of RΔecpA with ecpA(Xoc) in trans restored ECPA, virulence and bacterial growth in planta. Purified EcpA(Xoc) induced chlorosis- and necrosis-like symptoms similar to those induced by the pathogen when injected into rice leaves. Heterologous expression of ecpA(Xoc) conferred ECPA upon the vascular bacterium X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) and upon non-pathogenic Escherichia coli. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the C-terminal residues of EcpA in Xoo PXO99(A) and Xoc RS105 are different, and a frame shift in ecpA(Xoo) may explain the absence of EcpA activity in Xoo. Collectively, these results suggest that EcpA(Xoc) is a tissue-specific virulence factor for Xoc but not Xoo, although the two pathovars are closely related bacterial pathogens of rice.

  4. Polyglycine hydrolases: fungal b-lactamase-like endoproteases that cleave polyglycine regions within plant class IV chitinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyglycine hydrolases are secreted fungal proteases that cleave glycine-glycine peptide bonds in the inter-domain linker region of specific plant defense chitinases. Previously, we reported the catalytic activity of polyglycine hydrolases from the phytopathogens Epicoccum sorghi (Es-cmp) and Cochli...

  5. Robust substrate profiling method reveals striking differences in specificities of serum and lung fluid proteases.

    PubMed

    Watson, Douglas S; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Askew, David S; Kodukula, Krishna; Galande, Amit K

    2011-08-01

    Proteases are candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets for many diseases. Sensitive and robust techniques are needed to quantify proteolytic activities within the complex biological milieu. We hypothesized that a combinatorial protease substrate library could be used effectively to identify similarities and differences between serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), two body fluids that are clinically important for developing targeted therapies and diagnostics. We used a concise library of fluorogenic probes to map the protease substrate specificities of serum and BALF from guinea pigs. Differences in the proteolytic fingerprints of the two fluids were striking: serum proteases cleaved substrates containing cationic residues and proline, whereas BALF proteases cleaved substrates containing aliphatic and aromatic residues. Notably, cleavage of proline-containing substrates dominated all other protease activities in both human and guinea pig serum. This substrate profiling approach provides a foundation for quantitative comparisons of protease specificities between complex biological samples.

  6. Screen of Non-annotated Small Secreted Proteins of Pseudomonas syringae Reveals a Virulence Factor That Inhibits Tomato Immune Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Takayuki; Kaschani, Farnusch; Kovács, Judit; Tian, Fang; Kourelis, Jiorgos; Hong, Tram Ngoc; Colby, Tom; Shabab, Mohammed; Chawla, Rohini; Kumari, Selva; Ilyas, Muhammad; Hörger, Anja C.; Alfano, James R.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoDC3000) is an extracellular model plant pathogen, yet its potential to produce secreted effectors that manipulate the apoplast has been under investigated. Here we identified 131 candidate small, secreted, non-annotated proteins from the PtoDC3000 genome, most of which are common to Pseudomonas species and potentially expressed during apoplastic colonization. We produced 43 of these proteins through a custom-made gateway-compatible expression system for extracellular bacterial proteins, and screened them for their ability to inhibit the secreted immune protease C14 of tomato using competitive activity-based protein profiling. This screen revealed C14-inhibiting protein-1 (Cip1), which contains motifs of the chagasin-like protease inhibitors. Cip1 mutants are less virulent on tomato, demonstrating the importance of this effector in apoplastic immunity. Cip1 also inhibits immune protease Pip1, which is known to suppress PtoDC3000 infection, but has a lower affinity for its close homolog Rcr3, explaining why this protein is not recognized in tomato plants carrying the Cf-2 resistance gene, which uses Rcr3 as a co-receptor to detect pathogen-derived protease inhibitors. Thus, this approach uncovered a protease inhibitor of P. syringae, indicating that also P. syringae secretes effectors that selectively target apoplastic host proteases of tomato, similar to tomato pathogenic fungi, oomycetes and nematodes. PMID:27603016

  7. The lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin L regulates keratinocyte proliferation by control of growth factor recycling.

    PubMed

    Reinheckel, Thomas; Hagemann, Sascha; Dollwet-Mack, Susanne; Martinez, Elke; Lohmüller, Tobias; Zlatkovic, Gordana; Tobin, Desmond J; Maas-Szabowski, Nicole; Peters, Christoph

    2005-08-01

    Mice deficient for cathepsin L (CTSL) show epidermal hyperplasia due to a hyperproliferation of basal keratinocytes. Here we show that the critical function of CTSL in the skin is keratinocyte specific. This is revealed by transgenic re-expression of CTSL in the keratinocytes of ctsl-/- mice, resulting in a rescue of the ctsl-/- skin phenotype. Cultivation of primary mouse keratinocytes with fibroblast- and keratinocyte-conditioned media, as well as heterologous organotypic co-cultures of mouse fibroblasts and human keratinocytes, showed that the altered keratinocyte proliferation is caused primarily by CTSL-deficiency in keratinocytes. In the absence of EGF, wild type and CTSL-knockout keratinocytes proliferate with the same rates, while in presence of EGF, ctsl-/- keratinocytes showed enhanced proliferation compared with controls. Internalization and degradation of radioactively labeled EGF was identical in both ctsl-/- and ctsl+/+ keratinocytes. However, ctsl-/- keratinocytes recycled more EGF to the cell surface, where it is bound to the EGF-receptor, which is also more abundant in ctsl-/- cells. We conclude that the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes in CTSL-knockout mice is caused by an enhanced recycling of growth factors and growth factor receptors from the endosomes to the keratinocyte plasma membrane, which result in sustained growth stimulation.

  8. Effect of some factors used to the chicken meat preservation and processing on the protease activity.

    PubMed

    Przysiezna, E; Skrabka-Blotnicka, T

    1996-08-01

    The obtained results indicated that the cathepsin activity was higher by about 60% in the extract from thigh than from breast muscles. Freezing and defrosting (not stored) of chicken meat did not influence the breast muscle cathepsin activity while they caused a decrease of activity of about 20% in the case of thigh muscles. The increase in cathepsin activity was noticed in both kinds of muscles during storage at -20 degrees C up to 4 months (45.6% and 19.4% for thigh and breast muscles respectively). The activity of cathepsin in extract from 5 months stored meat reached 80% in case of breast muscles and 83% in case of thigh muscles in relation to control sample respectively. The cathepsin activity significantly increased during heating of breast muscles up to 60 degrees C, but in case of thigh muscles it was slightly higher than at 50 degrees C. The heating of cured chicken breast muscles up to 60 degrees C caused a non significant growth in cathepsin activity opposite to raw muscles. The cathepsin activity from all cured samples heated up to 70 degrees C were several times lower in relation to control samples. The cathepsin activity of both thigh and breast muscles were resistant to gamma radiation. The investigated factors caused changes in the activity of cathepsin but none of them caused its total inactivation. The changes of cathepsin activity depended on the kind of muscles and the kind and the value of acting factors.

  9. Proteases in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Peter N; Ahmad, Syed S

    2002-01-01

    The serine proteases, cofactors and cell-receptor molecules that comprise the haemostatic mechanism are highly conserved modular proteins that have evolved to participate in biochemical reactions in blood coagulation, anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Blood coagulation is initiated by exposure of tissue factor, which forms a complex with factor VIIa and factor X, which results in the generation of small quantities of thrombin and is rapidly shutdown by the tissue factor pathway inhibitor. The generation of these small quantities of thrombin then activates factor XI, resulting in a sequence of events that lead to the activation of factor IX, factor X and prothrombin. Sufficient thrombin is generated to effect normal haemostasis by converting fibrinogen into fibrin. The anticoagulant pathways that regulate blood coagulation include the protein C anticoagulant mechanism, the serine protease inhibitors in plasma, and the Kunitz-like inhibitors, tissue factor pathway inhibitor and protease nexin 2. Finally, the fibrinolytic mechanism that comprises the activation of plasminogen into plasmin prevents excessive fibrin accumulation by promoting local dissolution of thrombi and promoting wound healing by reestablishment of blood flow.

  10. The role of proteases in regulating Eph/ephrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Atapattu, Lakmali; Lackmann, Martin; Janes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Proteases regulate a myriad of cell functions, both in normal and disease states. In addition to protein turnover, they regulate a range of signaling processes, including those mediated by Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands. A variety of proteases is reported to directly cleave Ephs and/or ephrins under different conditions, to promote receptor and/or ligand shedding, and regulate receptor/ligand internalisation and signaling. They also cleave other adhesion proteins in response to Eph-ephrin interactions, to indirectly facilitate Eph-mediated functions. Proteases thus contribute to Eph/ephrin mediated changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, in cell morphology and in cell migration and invasion, in a manner which appears to be tightly regulated by, and co-ordinated with, Eph signaling. This review summarizes the current literature describing the function and regulation of protease activities during Eph/ephrin-mediated cell signaling. PMID:25482632

  11. Type II transmembrane serine proteases as potential targets for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Andrew S.; Varela, Fausto A.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is accompanied by increased protein and activity levels of extracellular cell-surface proteases that are capable of modifying the tumor micro-environment by directly cleaving the extracellular matrix, as well as activating growth factors and proinflammatory mediators involved in proliferation and invasion of cancer cells, and recruitment of inflammatory cells. These complex processes ultimately potentiate neoplastic progression leading to local tumor cell invasion, entry into the vasculature, and metastasis to distal sites. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression. In this review the knowledge collected over the past two decades about the molecular mechanisms underlying the pro-cancerous properties of selected TTSPs will be summarized. Furthermore, we will discuss how these insights may facilitate the translation into clinical settings in the future by specifically targeting TTSPs as part of novel cancer treatment regimens. PMID:27078673

  12. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.

    PubMed

    Spoerry, Christian; Hessle, Pontus; Lewis, Melanie J; Paton, Lois; Woof, Jenny M; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use.

  13. Conformational Lability in Serine Protease Active Sites: Structures of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator (HGFA) Alone and with the Inhibitory Domain from HGFA Inhibitor-1B

    SciTech Connect

    Shia, Steven; Stamos, Jennifer; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Fan, Bin; Wu, Judy; Corpuz, Raquel T.; Santell, Lydia; Lazarus, Robert A.; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2010-07-20

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) is a serine protease that converts hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) into its active form. When activated HGF binds its cognate receptor Met, cellular signals lead to cell growth, differentiation, and migration, activities which promote tissue regeneration in liver, kidney and skin. Intervention in the conversion of HGF to its active form has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit where HGF/Met activity is associated with tumorigenesis. To help identify ways to moderate HGF/Met effects, we have determined the molecular structure of the protease domain of HGFA. The structure we determined, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, with no pseudo-substrate or inhibitor bound is characterized by an unconventional conformation of key residues in the enzyme active site. In order to find whether this apparently non-enzymatically competent arrangement would persist in the presence of a strongly-interacting inhibitor, we also have determined, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, the X-ray structure of HGFA complexed with the first Kunitz domain (KD1) from the physiological inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 1B (HAI-1B). In this complex we observe a rearranged substrate binding cleft that closely mirrors the cleft of other serine proteases, suggesting an extreme conformational dynamism. We also characterize the inhibition of 16 serine proteases by KD1, finding that the previously reported enzyme specificity of the intact extracellular region of HAI-1B resides in KD1 alone. We find that HGFA, matriptase, hepsin, plasma kallikrein and trypsin are potently inhibited, and use the complex structure to rationalize the structural basis of these results.

  14. Interference with NF-κB signaling pathway by pathogen-encoded proteases: global and selective inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Andrea; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens have evolved a myriad of ways to abrogate and manipulate the host response to infections. Of the various mechanisms involved, pathogen-encoded and sometimes host-encoded proteases are an important category of virulence factors that cause robust changes on the host response by targeting key proteins along signaling cascades. The nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is a crucial regulatory mechanism for the cell, controlling the expression of survival, immune, and proliferation genes. Proteases from pathogens of almost all types have been demonstrated to target and cleave members of the NF-κB signaling pathway at nearly every level. This review provides discussion of proteases targeting the most abundant NF-κB subunit, p65, and the impact of protease-mediated p65 cleavage on the immune responses and survival of the infected host cell. After examining various examples of protease interference, it becomes evident that the cleavage fragments produced by pathogen-driven proteolytic processing should be further characterized to determine whether they have novel and unique functions within the cell. The selective targeting of p65 and its effect on gene transcription reveals unique mechanisms by which pathogens acutely alter their microenvironment and further research may open new opportunities for novel therapeutics to combat pathogens. PMID:26449378

  15. The structure of a universally employed enzyme: V8 protease from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lata; Leduc, Yvonne; Hayakawa, Koto; Delbaere, Louis T.J.

    2008-06-27

    V8 protease, an extracellular protease of Staphylococcus aureus, is related to the pancreatic serine proteases. The enzyme cleaves peptide bonds exclusively on the carbonyl side of aspartate and glutamate residues. Unlike the pancreatic serine proteases, V8 protease possesses no disulfide bridges. This is a major evolutionary difference, as all pancreatic proteases have at least two disulfide bridges. The structure of V8 protease shows structural similarity with several other serine proteases, specifically the epidermolytic toxins A and B from S. aureus and trypsin, in which the conformation of the active site is almost identical. V8 protease is also unique in that the positively charged N-terminus is involved in determining the substrate-specificity of the enzyme.

  16. Mirolase, a novel subtilisin-like serine protease from the periodontopathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Karim, Abdulkarim Y; Bryzek, Danuta; Enghild, Jan J; Thøgersen, Ida B; Koziel, Joanna; Potempa, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The genome of Tannerella forsythia, an etiological factor of chronic periodontitis, contains several genes encoding putative proteases. Here, we characterized a subtilisin-like serine protease of T. forsythia referred to as mirolase. Recombinant full-length latent promirolase [85 kDa, without its signal peptide (SP)] processed itself through sequential autoproteolytic cleavages into a mature enzyme of 40 kDa. Mirolase latency was driven by the N-terminal prodomain (NTP). In stark contrast to almost all known subtilases, the cleaved NTP remained non-covalently associated with mirolase, inhibiting its proteolytic, but not amidolytic, activity. Full activity was observed only after the NTP was gradually, and fully, degraded. Both activity and processing was absolutely dependent on calcium ions, which were also essential for enzyme stability. As a consequence, both serine protease inhibitors and calcium ions chelators inhibited mirolase activity. Activity assays using an array of chromogenic substrates revealed that mirolase specificity is driven not only by the substrate-binding subsite S1, but also by other subsites. Taken together, mirolase is a calcium-dependent serine protease of the S8 family with the unique mechanism of activation that may contribute to T. forsythia pathogenicity by degradation of fibrinogen, hemoglobin, and the antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

  17. Mirolase, a novel subtilisin-like serine protease from the periodontopathogen Tannerella forsythia

    PubMed Central

    Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Karim, Abdulkarim Y.; Bryzek, Danuta; Enghild, Jan J.; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Koziel, Joanna; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Tannerella forsythia, an etiologic factor of chronic periodontitis, contains several genes encoding putative proteases. Here, we characterized a subtilisin-like serine protease of T. forsythia referred to as mirolase. Recombinant full-length latent promirolase (85 kDa, without its signal peptide) processed itself through sequential autoproteolytic cleavages into a mature enzyme of 40 kDa. Mirolase latency was driven by the N-terminal prodomain (NTP). In stark contrast to almost all known subtilases, the cleaved NTP remained non-covalently associated with mirolase, inhibiting its proteolytic, but not amidolytic, activity. Full activity was observed only after the NTP was gradually, and fully, degraded. Both activity and processing was absolutely dependent on calcium ions, which were also essential for enzyme stability. As a consequence, both serine protease inhibitors and calcium ions chelators inhibited mirolase activity. Activity assays using an array of chromogenic substrates revealed that mirolase specificity is driven not only by the substrate-binding subsite S1, but also by other subsites. Taken together mirolase is a calcium-dependent serine protease of the S8 family with the unique mechanism of activation that may contribute to T. forsythia pathogenicity by degradation of fibrinogen, hemoglobin and the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. PMID:25391881

  18. Transcriptional activation of mouse mast cell Protease-7 by activin and transforming growth factor-beta is inhibited by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Funaba, Masayuki; Ikeda, Teruo; Murakami, Masaru; Ogawa, Kenji; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Sugino, Hiromu; Abe, Matanobu

    2003-12-26

    Previous studies have revealed that activin A and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) induced migration and morphological changes toward differentiation in bone marrow-derived cultured mast cell progenitors (BMCMCs). Here we show up-regulation of mouse mast cell protease-7 (mMCP-7), which is expressed in differentiated mast cells, by activin A and TGF-beta1 in BMCMCs, and the molecular mechanism of the gene induction of mmcp-7. Smad3, a signal mediator of the activin/TGF-beta pathway, transcriptionally activated mmcp-7. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a tissue-specific transcription factor predominantly expressed in mast cells, melanocytes, and heart and skeletal muscle, inhibited Smad3-mediated mmcp-7 transcription. MITF associated with Smad3, and the C terminus of MITF and the MH1 and linker region of Smad3 were required for this association. Complex formation between Smad3 and MITF was neither necessary nor sufficient for the inhibition of Smad3 signaling by MITF. MITF inhibited the transcriptional activation induced by the MH2 domain of Smad3. In addition, MITF-truncated N-terminal amino acids could associate with Smad3 but did not inhibit Smad3-mediated transcription. The level of Smad3 was decreased by co-expression of MITF but not of dominant-negative MITF, which resulted from proteasomal protein degradation. The changes in the level of Smad3 protein were paralleled by those in Smad3-mediated signaling activity. These findings suggest that MITF negatively regulates Smad-dependent activin/TGF-beta signaling in a tissue-specific manner.

  19. A New Class of Serine and Cysteine Protease Inhibitor with Chemotherapeutic Potential

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    also be used to produce a serine protease inhibitor. Similar to the cysteine inhibitors, a dipeptide side chain is attached to the ring which is...which relieves the 7 strain (Figure 3). Serine and cysteine proteases use a mechanism to cleave peptide bonds which involves addition of a catalytic...serine and cysteine proteases share a similar mechanism for hydrolyzing amide bonds , we expect that 4-heterocyclohexanones should be good inhibitors

  20. Secreted Aspergillus fumigatus Protease Alp1 Degrades Human Complement Proteins C3, C4, and C5▿

    PubMed Central

    Behnsen, Judith; Lessing, Franziska; Schindler, Susann; Wartenberg, Dirk; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Thoen, Marcel; Zipfel, Peter F.; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2010-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is a major cause of fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. Innate immunity plays an important role in the defense against infections. The complement system represents an essential part of the innate immune system. This cascade system is activated on the surface of A. fumigatus conidia and hyphae and enhances phagocytosis of conidia. A. fumigatus conidia but not hyphae bind to their surface host complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, and CFHR1, which control complement activation. Here, we show that A. fumigatus hyphae possess an additional endogenous activity to control complement activation. A. fumigatus culture supernatant efficiently cleaved complement components C3, C4, C5, and C1q as well as immunoglobulin G. Secretome analysis and protease inhibitor studies identified the secreted alkaline protease Alp1, which is present in large amounts in the culture supernatant, as the central molecule responsible for this cleavage. An alp1 deletion strain was generated, and the culture supernatant possessed minimal complement-degrading activity. Moreover, protein extract derived from an Escherichia coli strain overproducing Alp1 cleaved C3b, C4b, and C5. Thus, the protease Alp1 is responsible for the observed cleavage and degrades a broad range of different substrates. In summary, we identified a novel mechanism in A. fumigatus that contributes to evasion from the host complement attack. PMID:20498262

  1. Botulinum neurotoxin: a deadly protease with applications to human medicine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are some of the most potent biological toxins to humans. They are synthesized by the gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum. BoNT is secreted from the bacterium as a ~150 kDa polypeptide which is cleaved by bacterial or host proteases into a ~50 kD...

  2. Rabbit endogenous retrovirus-H encodes a functional protease.

    PubMed

    Voisset, Cécile; Myers, Richard E; Carne, Alex; Kellam, Paul; Griffiths, David J

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that 'human retrovirus-5' sequences found in human samples belong to a rabbit endogenous retrovirus family named RERV-H. A part of the gag-pro region of the RERV-H genome was amplified by PCR from DNA in human samples and several forms of RERV-H protease were expressed in bacteria. The RERV-H protease was able to cleave itself from a precursor protein and was also able to cleave the RERV-H Gag polyprotein precursor in vitro whereas a form of the protease with a mutation engineered into the active site was inactive. Potential N- and C-terminal autocleavage sites were characterized. The RERV-H protease was sensitive to pepstatin A, showing it to be an aspartic protease. Moreover, it was strongly inhibited by PYVPheStaAMT, a pseudopeptide inhibitor specific for Mason-Pfizer monkey virus and avian myeloblastosis-associated virus. A structural model of the RERV-H protease was constructed that, together with the activity data, confirms that this is a retroviral aspartic protease.

  3. Contribution of explicit solvent effects to the binding affinity of small-molecule inhibitors in blood coagulation factor serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Abel, Robert; Salam, Noeris K; Shelley, John; Farid, Ramy; Friesner, Richard A; Sherman, Woody

    2011-06-06

    The prevention of blood coagulation is important in treating thromboembolic disorders, and several serine proteases involved in the coagulation cascade have been classified as pharmaceutically relevant. Whereas structure-based drug design has contributed to the development of some serine protease inhibitors, traditional computational methods have not been able to fully describe structure-activity relationships (SAR). Here, we study the SAR for a number of serine proteases by using a method that calculates the thermodynamic properties (enthalpy and entropy) of the water that solvates the active site. We show that the displacement of water from specific subpockets (such as S1-4 and the ester binding pocket) of the active site by the ligand can govern potency, especially for cases in which small chemical changes (i.e., a methyl group or halogen) result in a substantial increase in potency. Furthermore, we describe how relative binding free energies can be estimated by combining the water displacement energy with complementary terms from an implicit solvent molecular mechanics description binding.

  4. Optimized catalytic DNA-cleaving ribozymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention discloses nucleic acid enzymes capable of cleaving nucleic acid molecules, including single-stranded DNA, in a site-specific manner under physiologic conditions, as well as compositions including same. The present invention also discloses methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions.

  5. Identification of proteolytic activities in ROS 17/2.8 cell lysates which cleave peptide substrates for protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Guidon, P T; Harrison, P

    1996-04-01

    We have observed two proteolytic activities in cell lysates from the rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line ROS 17/2.8 which are capable of cleaving a peptide substrate for protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation, and other peptides containing similar sequences. Both activities are inhibited by Pefabloc, a serine protease inhibitor, while one of the activities is inhibited by either EDTA or aprotinin. The protease inhibitors pepstatin, bestatin, E-64, leupeptin and phosphoramidon do not block either of these proteolytic activities.

  6. Functional Implications of Domain Organization Within Prokaryotic Rhomboid Proteases.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases are membrane embedded enzymes that cleave transmembrane substrates. This interesting class of enzyme and its water mediated substrate cleavage mechanism occurring within the hydrophobic lipid bilayer has drawn the attention of researchers. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous serine intramembrane proteases. Bacterial forms of rhomboid proteases are mainly composed of six transmembrane helices that are preceded by a soluble N-terminal domain. Several crystal structures of the membrane domain of the E. coli rhomboid protease ecGlpG have been solved. Independently, the ecGlpG N-terminal cytoplasmic domain structure was solved using both NMR and protein crystallography. Despite these structures, we still do not know the structure of the full-length protein, nor do we know the functional role of these domains in the cell. This chapter will review the structural and functional roles of the different domains associated with prokaryotic rhomboid proteases. Lastly, we will address questions remaining in the field.

  7. Aberrant mucosal mast cell protease expression in the enteric epithelium of nematode-infected mice lacking the integrin alphavbeta6, a transforming growth factor-beta1 activator.

    PubMed

    Knight, Pamela A; Brown, Jeremy K; Wright, Steven H; Thornton, Elisabeth M; Pate, Judith A; Miller, Hugh R P

    2007-10-01

    Infection of mice with the nematode Trichinella spiralis triggers recruitment and differentiation of intraepithelial intestinal mucosal mast cells expressing mouse mast cell protease 1 (Mcpt-1), which contributes to expulsion of the parasite. Expression of Mcpt-1 is transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-dependent in vitro. TGF-beta1, which is secreted within tissues as a biologically inactive complex with latency-associated peptide, requires extracellular modification to become functionally active. The integrin-alpha(nu)beta(6) mediates local activation of TGF-beta(1) in association with epithelia. Using T. spiralis-infected beta(6)(-/-) mice, we show accumulation of mucosal mast cells in the lamina propria of the small intestine with minimal recruitment into the epithelial compartment. This was accompanied by a coordinate reduction in expression of both Mcpt-1 and -2 in the jejunum and increased tryptase expression, whereas Mcpt-9 became completely undetectable. In contrast, the cytokine stem cell factor, a regulator of mast cell differentiation and survival, was significantly up-regulated in T. spiralis-infected beta(6)(-/-) mice compared with infected beta(6)(+/+) controls. Despite these changes, beta(6)(-/-) mice still appeared to expel the worms normally. We postulate that compromised TGF-beta(1) activation within the gastrointestinal epithelial compartment is a major, but not the only, contributing factor to the observed changes in mucosal mast cell protease and epithelial cytokine expression in beta(6)(-/-) mice.

  8. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  9. Biochemical Characterization of Recombinant Enterovirus 71 3C Protease with Fluorogenic Model Peptide Substrates and Development of a Biochemical Assay

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Luqing; Zhang, Shumei; Yang, Xi; Sun, Jixue; Li, Linfeng; Cui, Zhengjie; He, Qiuhong; Guo, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a primary pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), affects primarily infants and children. Currently, there are no effective drugs against HFMD. EV71 3C protease performs multiple tasks in the viral replication, which makes it an ideal antiviral target. We synthesized a small set of fluorogenic model peptides derived from cleavage sites of EV71 polyprotein and examined their efficiencies of cleavage by EV71 3C protease. The novel peptide P08 [(2-(N-methylamino)benzoyl) (NMA)-IEALFQGPPK(DNP)FR] was determined to be the most efficiently cleaved by EV71 3C protease, with a kinetic constant kcat/Km of 11.8 ± 0.82 mM−1 min−1. Compared with literature reports, P08 gave significant improvement in the signal/background ratio, which makes it an attractive substrate for assay development. A Molecular dynamics simulation study elaborated the interactions between substrate P08 and EV71 3C protease. Arg39, which is located at the bottom of the S2 pocket of EV71 3C protease, may participate in the proteolysis process of substrates. With an aim to evaluate EV71 3C protease inhibitors, a reliable and robust biochemical assay with a Z′ factor of 0.87 ± 0.05 was developed. A novel compound (compound 3) (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 1.89 ± 0.25 μM) was discovered using this assay, which effectively suppressed the proliferation of EV 71 (strain Fuyang) in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells with a highly selective index (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 4.54 ± 0.51 μM; 50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50] > 100 μM). This fast and efficient assay for lead discovery and optimization provides an ideal platform for anti-EV71 drug development targeting 3C protease. PMID:25421478

  10. Biochemical characterization of recombinant Enterovirus 71 3C protease with fluorogenic model peptide substrates and development of a biochemical assay.

    PubMed

    Shang, Luqing; Zhang, Shumei; Yang, Xi; Sun, Jixue; Li, Linfeng; Cui, Zhengjie; He, Qiuhong; Guo, Yu; Sun, Yuna; Yin, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a primary pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), affects primarily infants and children. Currently, there are no effective drugs against HFMD. EV71 3C protease performs multiple tasks in the viral replication, which makes it an ideal antiviral target. We synthesized a small set of fluorogenic model peptides derived from cleavage sites of EV71 polyprotein and examined their efficiencies of cleavage by EV71 3C protease. The novel peptide P08 [(2-(N-methylamino)benzoyl) (NMA)-IEALFQGPPK(DNP)FR] was determined to be the most efficiently cleaved by EV71 3C protease, with a kinetic constant kcat/Km of 11.8 ± 0.82 mM(-1) min(-1). Compared with literature reports, P08 gave significant improvement in the signal/background ratio, which makes it an attractive substrate for assay development. A Molecular dynamics simulation study elaborated the interactions between substrate P08 and EV71 3C protease. Arg39, which is located at the bottom of the S2 pocket of EV71 3C protease, may participate in the proteolysis process of substrates. With an aim to evaluate EV71 3C protease inhibitors, a reliable and robust biochemical assay with a Z' factor of 0.87 ± 0.05 was developed. A novel compound (compound 3) (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 1.89 ± 0.25 μM) was discovered using this assay, which effectively suppressed the proliferation of EV 71 (strain Fuyang) in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells with a highly selective index (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 4.54 ± 0.51 μM; 50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50] > 100 μM). This fast and efficient assay for lead discovery and optimization provides an ideal platform for anti-EV71 drug development targeting 3C protease.

  11. A computational modeling and molecular dynamics study of the Michaelis complex of human protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and factor Xa (FXa)

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Vasudevan; Lee, Chang Jun; Lin, Ping; Duke, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and antithrombin III (AT3) are members of the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors that inhibit factor Xa (FXa) and other proteases in the coagulation pathway. While experimental structural information is available for the interaction of AT3 with FXa, at present there is no structural data regarding the interaction of ZPI with FXa, and the precise role of this interaction in the blood coagulation pathway is poorly understood. In an effort to gain a structural understanding of this system, we have built a solvent equilibrated three-dimensional structural model of the Michaelis complex of human ZPI/FXa using homology modeling, protein–protein docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods. Preliminary analysis of interactions at the complex interface from our simulations suggests that the interactions of the reactive center loop (RCL) and the exosite surface of ZPI with FXa are similar to those observed from X-ray crystal structure-based simulations of AT3/FXa. However, detailed comparison of our modeled structure of ZPI/FXa with that of AT3/FXa points to differences in interaction specificity at the reactive center and in the stability of the inhibitory complex, due to the presence of a tyrosine residue at the P1 position in ZPI, instead of the P1 arginine residue in AT3. The modeled structure also shows specific structural differences between AT3 and ZPI in the heparin-binding and flexible N-terminal tail regions. Our structural model of ZPI/FXa is also compatible with available experimental information regarding the importance for the inhibitory action of certain basic residues in FXa. PMID:19172319

  12. Lysosomal protease expression in mature enamel.

    PubMed

    Tye, Coralee E; Lorenz, Rachel L; Bartlett, John D

    2009-01-01

    The enamel matrix proteins (amelogenin, enamelin and ameloblastin) are degraded by matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-4 during enamel development and mature enamel is virtually protein free. The precise mechanism of removal and degradation of the enamel protein cleavage products from the matrix, however, remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that receptor-mediated endocytosis allows for the cleaved proteins to be removed from the matrix during enamel formation and then transported to the lysosome for further degradation. This study aims to identify lysosomal proteases that are present in maturation-stage enamel organ. RNA from first molars of 11-day-old mice was collected and expression was initially assessed by RT-PCR and then quantified by qPCR. The pattern of expression of selected proteases was assessed by immunohistochemical staining of demineralized mouse incisors. With the exception of cathepsin G, all lysosomal proteases assessed were expressed in maturation-stage enamel organ. Identified proteases included cathepsins B, D, F, H, K, L, O, S and Z. Tripeptidyl peptidases I and II as well as dipeptidyl peptidases I, II, III and IV were also found to be expressed. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that the maturation-stage ameloblasts express cathepsins L and S and tripeptidyl peptidase II. Our results suggest that the ameloblasts are enriched by a large number of lysosomal proteases at maturation that are likely involved in the degradation of the organic matrix.

  13. Structures of native and complexed complement factor D: implications of the atypical His57 conformation and self-inhibitory loop in the regulation of specific serine protease activity.

    PubMed

    Jing, H; Babu, Y S; Moore, D; Kilpatrick, J M; Liu, X Y; Volanakis, J E; Narayana, S V

    1998-10-09

    Factor D is a serine protease essential for the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. The structures of native factor D and a complex formed with isatoic anhydride inhibitor were determined at resolution of 2.3 and 1.5 A, respectively, in an isomorphous monoclinic crystal form containing one molecule per asymmetric unit. The native structure was compared with structures determined previously in a triclinic cell containing two molecules with different active site conformations. The current structure shows greater similarity with molecule B in the triclinic cell, suggesting that this may be the dominant factor D conformation in solution. The major conformational differences with molecule A in the triclinic cell are located in four regions, three of which are close to the active site and include some of the residues shown to be critical for factor D catalytic activity. The conformational flexibility associated with these regions is proposed to provide a structural basis for the previously proposed substrate-induced reversible conformational changes in factor D. The high-resolution structure of the factor D/isatoic anhydride complex reveals the binding mode of the mechanism-based inhibitor. The higher specificity towards factor D over trypsin and thrombin is based on hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitor benzyl ring and the aliphatic side-chain of Arg218 that is salt bridged with Asp189 at the bottom of the primary specificity (S1) pocket. Comparison of factor D structural variants with other serine protease structures revealed the presence of a unique "self-inhibitory loop". This loop (214-218) dictates the resting-state conformation of factor D by (1) preventing His57 from adopting active tautomer conformation, (2) preventing the P1 to P3 residues of the substrate from forming anti-parallel beta-sheets with the non-specific substrate binding loop, and (3) blocking the accessibility of Asp189 to the positive1y charged P1 residue of the

  14. Enterovirus 71 Protease 2Apro Targets MAVS to Inhibit Anti-Viral Type I Interferon Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei; Xi, Xueyan; Lei, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Cui, Sheng; Wang, Jianwei; Jin, Qi; Zhao, Zhendong

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the major causative pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Its pathogenicity is not fully understood, but innate immune evasion is likely a key factor. Strategies to circumvent the initiation and effector phases of anti-viral innate immunity are well known; less well known is whether EV71 evades the signal transduction phase regulated by a sophisticated interplay of cellular and viral proteins. Here, we show that EV71 inhibits anti-viral type I interferon (IFN) responses by targeting the mitochondrial anti-viral signaling (MAVS) protein—a unique adaptor molecule activated upon retinoic acid induced gene-I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation associated gene (MDA-5) viral recognition receptor signaling—upstream of type I interferon production. MAVS was cleaved and released from mitochondria during EV71 infection. An in vitro cleavage assay demonstrated that the viral 2A protease (2Apro), but not the mutant 2Apro (2Apro-110) containing an inactivated catalytic site, cleaved MAVS. The Protease-Glo assay revealed that MAVS was cleaved at 3 residues between the proline-rich and transmembrane domains, and the resulting fragmentation effectively inactivated downstream signaling. In addition to MAVS cleavage, we found that EV71 infection also induced morphologic and functional changes to the mitochondria. The EV71 structural protein VP1 was detected on purified mitochondria, suggesting not only a novel role for mitochondria in the EV71 replication cycle but also an explanation of how EV71-derived 2Apro could approach MAVS. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel strategy employed by EV71 to escape host anti-viral innate immunity that complements the known EV71-mediated immune-evasion mechanisms. PMID:23555247

  15. Induced Neural Differentiation of MMP-2 Cleaved (RADA)4 Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Koss, K; Tsui, C; Unsworth, L D

    2016-12-10

    (RADA)4 self-assembling peptides (SAPs) are promising for neural nanoscaffolds with on-demand drug delivery capabilities due to their automated synthesis, in-situ assembly, and potential for interaction with and release of biomolecules. Neuroinflammation cued on-demand drug release, due to up-regulated proteases, may well be vital in the treatment of several neurological diseases. In these conditions, releasing neurotrophic growth factors (NTFs) could potentially lead to neuroprotection and neurogenesis. As such, (RADA)4 was made with the high and low activity matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) cleaved sequences, GPQG+IASQ (CP1) and GPQG+PAGQ (CP2), the brain-derived NTF secretion stimulating peptide MVG (DP1) and the ciliary NTF analogue DGGL (DP2). PC-12 cell culture was performed to assess bioactive substrate cell adhesion and NTF specific neuronal differentiation. The laminin-derived IKVAV peptide, known for neural cell attachment and interaction, was tethered to (RADA)4-IKVAV and mixed in increasing increments with (RADA)4 for this purpose. With 1 nanomolar MMP-2 treatment, product formation was observed to increase over a three day period, with (RADA)4/(RADA)4-CP1/CP2 mixture, however there was little difference between groups. Smaller CP1/CP2 concentrations displayed comparable (RADA)4 nanoscale morphology to higher concentrations. Acetylcholine esterase and neural differentiation was observed over 3 days with 1 nM MMP-2 treatment according to the following makeup: 8/1/1 (RADA)4/(RADA)4-IKVAV/(RADA)4-CP1/CP2-DP1/DP2. Signalling gradually increased in all groups, and neurite outgrowth was visible after three days.

  16. Crystal structure of a complex between Serratia marcescens metallo-protease and an inhibitor from Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    PubMed

    Baumann, U; Bauer, M; Létoffé, S; Delepelaire, P; Wandersman, C

    1995-05-05

    The crystal structure of the complex between the 50 kDa metallo-endoproteinase from Serratia marcescens (SMP), a member of the metzincin superfamily, and an inhibitor from Erwinia chrysanthemi (Inh) was solved by molecular replacement using the known structure of SMP, and refined at 2.30 A resolution to a crystallographic R-factor of 0.195. The E. chrysanthemi inhibitor folds into a compact eight-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel of simple up-down topology such as is found for members of the retinol binding protein family. It mainly interacts with the protease via its five N-terminal residues, which insert into the active site cleft, occupying the S' sites. The first N-terminal residue, SerI1, is partially cleaved off by the protease, while SerI2 makes a hydrogen bond with the catalytically active glutamic acid, Glu177, of the protease. Further interactions are made between one face of the inhibitor formed by the strands s3, s4 and s5 and the protease segment 218 to 228, which is located immediately after the characteristic "Met-turn" of the metzincins.

  17. Identification and Characterization of IgdE, a Novel IgG-degrading Protease of Streptococcus suis with Unique Specificity for Porcine IgG*

    PubMed Central

    Spoerry, Christian; Seele, Jana; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph G.; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a major endemic pathogen of pigs causing meningitis, arthritis, and other diseases. Zoonotic S. suis infections are emerging in humans causing similar pathologies as well as severe conditions such as toxic shock-like syndrome. Recently, we discovered an IdeS family protease of S. suis that exclusively cleaves porcine IgM and represents the first virulence factor described, linking S. suis to pigs as their natural host. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel, unrelated protease of S. suis that exclusively targets porcine IgG. This enzyme, designated IgdE for immunoglobulin G-degrading enzyme of S. suis, is a cysteine protease distinct from previous characterized streptococcal immunoglobulin degrading proteases of the IdeS family and mediates efficient cleavage of the hinge region of porcine IgG with a high degree of specificity. The findings that all S. suis strains investigated possess the IgG proteolytic activity and that piglet serum samples contain specific antibodies against IgdE strongly indicate that the protease is expressed in vivo during infection and represents a novel and putative important bacterial virulence/colonization determinant, and a thus potential therapeutic target. PMID:26861873

  18. Post-translational control of genetic circuits using Potyvirus proteases

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Jesus; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic engineering projects often require control over when a protein is degraded. To this end, we use a fusion between a degron and an inactivating peptide that can be added to the N-terminus of a protein. When the corresponding protease is expressed, it cleaves the peptide and the protein is degraded. Three protease:cleavage site pairs from Potyvirus are shown to be orthogonal and active in exposing degrons, releasing inhibitory domains and cleaving polyproteins. This toolbox is applied to the design of genetic circuits as a means to control regulator activity and degradation. First, we demonstrate that a gate can be constructed by constitutively expressing an inactivated repressor and having an input promoter drive the expression of the protease. It is also shown that the proteolytic release of an inhibitory domain can improve the dynamic range of a transcriptional gate (200-fold repression). Next, we design polyproteins containing multiple repressors and show that their cleavage can be used to control multiple outputs. Finally, we demonstrate that the dynamic range of an output can be improved (8-fold to 190-fold) with the addition of a protease-cleaved degron. Thus, controllable proteolysis offers a powerful tool for modulating and expanding the function of synthetic gene circuits. PMID:27298256

  19. Inhibition of Aeromonas sobria serine protease (ASP) by α2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoji; Wada, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Hidetomo; Irie, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Yamanaka, Hiroyasu; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Eto, Masatoshi; Imamura, Takahisa

    2012-10-01

    ASP is a serine protease secreted by Aeromonas sobria. ASP cleaves various plasma proteins, which is associated with onset of sepsis complications, such as shock and blood coagulation disorder. To investigate a host defense mechanism against this virulence factor, we examined the plasma for ASP inhibitor(s). Human plasma inhibited ASP activity for azocasein, which was almost completely abolished by treating plasma with methylamine, which inactivates α2-macroglobulin (α2-MG). The ASP-inhibitor complex in ASP-added plasma was not detected by immunoblotting using anti-ASP antibody; however, using gel filtration of the plasma ASP activity for an oligopeptide, the ASP substrate was eluted in the void fraction (Mw>200 000), suggesting ASP trapping by α2-MG. Indeed, human α2-MG inhibited ASP azocaseinolytic activity in a dose-dependent manner, rapidly forming a complex with the ASP. Fibrinogen degradation by ASP was completely inhibited in the presence of α2-MG. α1-Protease inhibitor, antithrombin, and α2-plasmin inhibitor neither inhibited ASP activity nor formed a complex with ASP. Surprisingly, ASP degraded these plasma serine protease inhibitors. Thus, α2-MG is the major ASP inhibitor in the human plasma and can limit ASP virulence activities in A. sobria infection sites. However, as shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, slow ASP inhibition by α2-MG in plasma may indicate insufficient ASP control in vivo.

  20. Poliovirus 2A protease triggers a selective nucleo-cytoplasmic redistribution of splicing factors to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Enrique; Castelló, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, José M

    2013-01-01

    Poliovirus protease 2A (2A(pro)) obstructs host gene expression by reprogramming transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory events during infection. Here we demonstrate that expression of 2A(pro) induces a selective nucleo-cytoplasm translocation of several important RNA binding proteins and splicing factors. Subcellular fractionation studies, together with immunofluorescence microscopy revealed an asymmetric distribution of HuR and TIA1/TIAR in 2A(pro) expressing cells, which modulates splicing of the human Fas exon 6. Consistent with this result, knockdown of HuR or overexpression of TIA1/TIAR, leads to Fas exon 6 inclusion in 2A(pro)-expressing cells. Therefore, poliovirus 2A(pro) can target alternative pre-mRNA splicing by regulating protein shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

  1. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  2. Bax oligomerization in mitochondrial membranes requires tBid (caspase-8-cleaved Bid) and a mitochondrial protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roucou, Xavier; Montessuit, Sylvie; Antonsson, Bruno; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2002-01-01

    In response to various apoptotic stimuli, Bax, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, is oligomerized and permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane to apoptogenic factors, including cytochrome c. Bax oligomerization can also be induced by incubating isolated mitochondria containing endogenous Bax with recombinant tBid (caspase-8-cleaved Bid) in vitro. The mechanism by which Bax oligomerizes under these conditions is still unknown. To address this question, recombinant human full-length Bax was purified as a monomeric protein. Bax failed to oligomerize spontaneously in isolated mitochondria or in liposomes composed of either cardiolipin or lipids extracted from mitochondria. However, in the presence of tBid, the protein formed large complexes in mitochondrial membranes and induced the release of cytochrome c. tBid also induced Bax oligomerization in isolated mitochondrial outer membranes, but not in other membranes, such as plasma membranes or microsomes. Moreover, tBid-induced Bax oligomerization was inhibited when mitochondria were pretreated with protease K. The presence of the voltage-dependent anion channel was not required either for Bax oligomerization or for Bax-induced cytochrome c release. Finally, Bax oligomerization was reconstituted in proteoliposomes made from mitochondrial membrane proteins. These findings imply that tBid is necessary but not sufficient for Bax oligomerization; a mitochondrial protein is also required. PMID:12193163

  3. Emerging technologies for protease engineering: New tools to clear out disease.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Jennifer L; Daugherty, Patrick S; O'Malley, Michelle A

    2017-01-01

    Proteases regulate many biological processes through their ability to activate or inactive their target substrates. Because proteases catalytically turnover proteins and peptides, they present unique opportunities for use in biotechnological and therapeutic applications. However, many proteases are capable of cleaving multiple physiological substrates. Therefore their activity, expression, and localization are tightly controlled to prevent unwanted proteolysis. Currently, the use of protease therapeutics has been limited to a handful of proteases with narrow substrate specificities, which naturally limits their toxicity. Wider application of proteases is contingent upon the development of methods for engineering protease selectivity, activity, and stability. Recent advances in the development of high-throughput, bacterial and yeast-based methods for protease redesign have yielded protease variants with novel specificities, reduced toxicity, and increased resistance to inhibitors. Here, we highlight new tools for protease engineering, including methods suitable for the redesign of human secreted proteases, and future opportunities to exploit the catalytic activity of proteases for therapeutic benefit. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 33-38. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Shared functions in vivo of a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-linked aspartyl protease, Mkc7, and the proprotein processing protease Kex2 in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Komano, H; Fuller, R S

    1995-01-01

    The MKC7 gene was isolated as a multicopy suppressor of the cold-sensitive growth phenotype of a yeast kex2 mutant, which lacks the protease that cleaves pro-alpha-factor and other secretory proproteins at pairs of basic residues in a late Golgi compartment in yeast. MKC7 encodes an aspartyl protease most closely related to product of the YAP3 gene, a previously isolated multicopy suppressor of the pro-alpha-factor processing defect of a kex2 null. Multicopy MKC7 suppressed the alpha-specific mating defect of a kex2 null as well as multicopy YAP3 did, but multicopy YAP3 was a relatively weak suppressor of kex2 cold sensitivity. Overexpression of MKC7 resulted in production of a membrane-associated proteolytic activity that cleaved an internally quenched fluorogenic peptide substrate on the carboxyl side of a Lys-Arg site. Treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C shifted Mkc7 activity from the detergent to the aqueous phase in a Triton X-114 phase separation, indicating that membrane attachment of Mkc7 is mediated by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. Although disruption of MKC7 or YAP3 alone resulted in no observable phenotype, mkc7 yap3 double disruptants exhibited impaired growth at 37 degrees C. Disruption of MKC7 and YAP3 in a kex2 null mutant resulted in profound temperature sensitivity and more generalized cold sensitivity. The synergism of mkc7, yap3, and kex2 null mutations argues that Mkc7 and Yap3 are authentic processing enzymes whose functions overlap those of Kex2 in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7479877

  5. Ubiquitin-specific protease 7 expression is a prognostic factor in epithelial ovarian cancer and correlates with lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming; Yu, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7) is a common target of herpesviruses and is important in the DNA damage response, which is also upregulated in several cancers, including prostate, colon, liver, and lung cancers. However, less is known about its expression in ovarian cancer tissues. The role of USP7 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has not yet been investigated. Materials and methods We recruited 141 patients from Linyi People’s Hospital between June 1999 and June 2013, all pathologically diagnosed with primary EOC. Their clinical data were collected, and the expression of USP7 in the tumor tissues was determined using immunohistochemistry. The correlations between USP7 expression and the clinicopathological variables of patients with EOC were assessed using Spearman’s rank correlation test. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to identify the prognosis value of USP7. The function of USP7 in the EOC cells was also detected in vitro. Results Among the 141 cases, USP7 expression was high in 59 EOC samples (41.8%), and was significantly correlated with lymphatic invasion; USP7 can act as independent prognostic indicator for the overall survival (OS) of EOC, and its high expression was associated with poor OS rate. The RNA inteference and overexpression assays indicated that USP7 can positively regulate the ovarian cell vitality and invasion process. Conclusion Patients with EOC expressing high level of USP7 have worse OS compared with those with low USP7 expression. USP7 may be involved in the proliferation and invasion of EOC cells, and USP7 expression can serve as an independent predictor of EOC. PMID:27051296

  6. HDV-like self-cleaving ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Chiu-Ho T

    2011-01-01

    HDV ribozymes catalyze their own scission from the transcript during rolling circle replication of the hepatitis delta virus. In vitro selection of self-cleaving ribozymes from a human genomic library revealed an HDV-like ribozyme in the second intron of the human CPEB3 gene and recent results suggest that this RNA affects episodic memory performance. Bioinformatic searches based on the secondary structure of the HDV/CPEB3 fold yielded numerous functional ribozymes in a wide variety of organisms. Genomic mapping of these RNAs suggested several biological roles, one of which is the 5′ processing of non-LTR retrotransposons. The family of HDV-like ribozymes thus continues to grow in numbers and biological importance. PMID:21734469

  7. Mesotrypsin has evolved four unique residues to cleave trypsin inhibitors as substrates [Mesotrypsin has evolved to cleave trypsin inhibitors as substrates using four unique residues

    SciTech Connect

    Alloy, Alexandre P.; Kayode, Olumide; Wang, Ruiying; Hockla, Alexandra; Soares, Alexei S.; Radisky, Evette S.

    2015-07-14

    Human mesotrypsin is highly homologous to other mammalian trypsins, and yet it is functionally unique in possessing resistance to inhibition by canonical serine protease inhibitors and in cleaving these inhibitors as preferred substrates. Arg-193 and Ser-39 have been identified as contributors to the inhibitor resistance and cleavage capability of mesotrypsin, but it is not known whether these residues fully account for the unusual properties of mesotrypsin. Here, we use human cationic trypsin as a template for engineering a gain of catalytic function, assessing mutants containing mesotrypsin-like mutations for resistance to inhibition by bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and amyloid precursor protein Kunitz protease inhibitor (APPI), and for the ability to hydrolyze these inhibitors as substrates. We find that Arg-193 and Ser-39 are sufficient to confer mesotrypsin-like resistance to inhibition; however, compared with mesotrypsin, the trypsin-Y39S/G193R double mutant remains 10-fold slower at hydrolyzing BPTI and 2.5-fold slower at hydrolyzing APPI. We identify two additional residues in mesotrypsin, Lys-74 and Asp-97, which in concert with Arg-193 and Ser-39 confer the full catalytic capability of mesotrypsin for proteolysis of BPTI and APPI. Novel crystal structures of trypsin mutants in complex with BPTI suggest that these four residues function cooperatively to favor conformational dynamics that assist in dissociation of cleaved inhibitors. Our results reveal that efficient inhibitor cleavage is a complex capability to which at least four spatially separated residues of mesotrypsin contribute. As a result, these findings suggest that inhibitor cleavage represents a functional adaptation of mesotrypsin that may have evolved in response to positive selection pressure.

  8. Mesotrypsin has evolved four unique residues to cleave trypsin inhibitors as substrates [Mesotrypsin has evolved to cleave trypsin inhibitors as substrates using four unique residues

    DOE PAGES

    Alloy, Alexandre P.; Kayode, Olumide; Wang, Ruiying; ...

    2015-07-14

    Human mesotrypsin is highly homologous to other mammalian trypsins, and yet it is functionally unique in possessing resistance to inhibition by canonical serine protease inhibitors and in cleaving these inhibitors as preferred substrates. Arg-193 and Ser-39 have been identified as contributors to the inhibitor resistance and cleavage capability of mesotrypsin, but it is not known whether these residues fully account for the unusual properties of mesotrypsin. Here, we use human cationic trypsin as a template for engineering a gain of catalytic function, assessing mutants containing mesotrypsin-like mutations for resistance to inhibition by bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and amyloid precursormore » protein Kunitz protease inhibitor (APPI), and for the ability to hydrolyze these inhibitors as substrates. We find that Arg-193 and Ser-39 are sufficient to confer mesotrypsin-like resistance to inhibition; however, compared with mesotrypsin, the trypsin-Y39S/G193R double mutant remains 10-fold slower at hydrolyzing BPTI and 2.5-fold slower at hydrolyzing APPI. We identify two additional residues in mesotrypsin, Lys-74 and Asp-97, which in concert with Arg-193 and Ser-39 confer the full catalytic capability of mesotrypsin for proteolysis of BPTI and APPI. Novel crystal structures of trypsin mutants in complex with BPTI suggest that these four residues function cooperatively to favor conformational dynamics that assist in dissociation of cleaved inhibitors. Our results reveal that efficient inhibitor cleavage is a complex capability to which at least four spatially separated residues of mesotrypsin contribute. As a result, these findings suggest that inhibitor cleavage represents a functional adaptation of mesotrypsin that may have evolved in response to positive selection pressure.« less

  9. A survey of IgA protease production among clinical isolates of Proteeae.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Albrechtsen, M; Kerr, M A

    1988-01-01

    A collection of 100 strains of Proteeae, in which all species within the tribe were represented, was examined for IgA protease production. The strains were isolated from various clinical specimens from sick and healthy persons in several countries. IgA protease-producing strains were not found amongst species of Providencia and Morganella but were common in Proteus spp. All the strains of P. mirabilis and P. penneri and many of the strains of P. vulgaris examined produced an EDTA-sensitive protease that cleaved the IgA heavy chain outside the hinge region. The proteus enzyme was different in this respect from the EDTA-sensitive, hinge-cutting proteases of other bacteria. The ability to produce IgA protease was unrelated to the O antigenicity, biotype or bacteriocin type of the strain. IgA protease production may be an important virulence mechanism for Proteus strains.

  10. Proteolytic processing of a precursor protein for a growth-promoting peptide by a subtilisin serine protease in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Renu; Liu, Jian-Xiang; Howell, Stephen H

    2008-10-01

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are secreted, sulfated peptide hormones derived from larger prepropeptide precursors. Proteolytic processing of one of the precursors, AtPSK4, was demonstrated by cleavage of a preproAtPSK4-myc transgene product to AtPSK4-myc. Cleavage of proAtPSK4 was induced by placing root explants in tissue culture. The processing of proAtPSK4 was dependent on AtSBT1.1, a subtilisin-like serine protease, encoded by one of 56 subtilase genes in Arabidopsis. The gene encoding AtSBT1.1 was up-regulated following the transfer of root explants to tissue culture, suggesting that activation of the proteolytic machinery that cleaves proAtPSK4 is dependent on AtSBT1.1 expression. We also demonstrated that a fluorogenic peptide representing the putative subtilase recognition site in proAtPSK4 is cleaved in vitro by affinity-purified AtSBT1.1. An alanine scan through the recognition site peptide indicated that AtSBT1.1 is fairly specific for the AtPSK4 precursor. Thus, this peptide growth factor, which promotes callus formation in culture, is proteolytically cleaved from its precursor by a specific plant subtilase encoded by a gene that is up-regulated during the process of transferring root explants to tissue culture.

  11. Antagonistic effects of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzymes 1 and 2 on beta-amyloid peptide production in cells.

    PubMed

    Basi, Guriqbal; Frigon, Normand; Barbour, Robin; Doan, Tam; Gordon, Grace; McConlogue, Lisa; Sinha, Sukanto; Zeller, Michelle

    2003-08-22

    The deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in the brain is a pathologic feature of Alzheimer's disease. The beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), an integral membrane aspartyl protease responsible for cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the beta-site, promotes A beta production. A second integral membrane aspartyl protease related to BACE1, referred to as beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 2 (BACE2) has also been demonstrated to cleave APP at the beta-cleavage site in transfected cells. The role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production remains unresolved. We investigated the role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production in cells by selective inactivation of its transcripts using RNA interference. We are able to reduce steady state levels for mRNA for each enzyme by >85%, and protein amounts by 88-94% in cells. Selective inactivation of BACE1 by RNA interference results in decreased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells, as expected. Selective inactivation of BACE2 by RNAi results in increased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells. Simultaneous targeting of both enzymes by RNA interference does not have any net effect on A beta released from cells. Our observations of changes in APP metabolism and A beta are consistent with a role of BACE2 in suppressing A beta production in cells that co-express both enzymes.

  12. A Membrane Protease Regulates Energy Production in Macrophages by Activating Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1 via a Non-proteolytic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takeharu; Seiki, Motoharu

    2010-01-01

    Most cells produce ATP in the mitochondria by oxidative phosphorylation. However, macrophages, which are major players in the innate immune system, use aerobic glycolysis to produce ATP. HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) regulates expression of glycolysis-related genes and maintains macrophage glycolytic activity. However, it is unclear how HIF-1 activity is maintained in macrophages during normoxia. In this study, we found that macrophages lacking membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP-14), a potent invasion-promoting protease, exhibited considerably lower ATP levels than wild-type cells. HIF-1 was activated by an unanticipated function of MT1-MMP, which led to the stimulation of ATP production via glycolysis. The cytoplasmic tail of MT1-MMP bound to FIH-1 (factor inhibiting HIF-1), which led to the inhibition of the latter by its recently identified inhibitor, Mint3/APBA3. We have thus identified a new function of MT1-MMP to mediate production of ATP so as to support energy-dependent macrophage functions by a previously unknown non-proteolytic mechanism. PMID:20663879

  13. Function, therapeutic potential and cell biology of BACE proteases: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Vassar, Robert; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Haass, Christian; Kennedy, Matthew E; Rajendran, Lawrence; Wong, Philip C; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F

    2014-07-01

    The β-site APP cleaving enzymes 1 and 2 (BACE1 and BACE2) were initially identified as transmembrane aspartyl proteases cleaving the amyloid precursor protein (APP). BACE1 is a major drug target for Alzheimer's disease because BACE1-mediated cleavage of APP is the first step in the generation of the pathogenic amyloid-β peptides. BACE1, which is highly expressed in the nervous system, is also required for myelination by cleaving neuregulin 1. Several recent proteomic and in vivo studies using BACE1- and BACE2-deficient mice demonstrate a much wider range of physiological substrates and functions for both proteases within and outside of the nervous system. For BACE1 this includes axon guidance, neurogenesis, muscle spindle formation, and neuronal network functions, whereas BACE2 was shown to be involved in pigmentation and pancreatic β-cell function. This review highlights the recent progress in understanding cell biology, substrates, and functions of BACE proteases and discusses the therapeutic options and potential mechanism-based liabilities, in particular for BACE inhibitors in Alzheimer's disease. The protease BACE1 is a major drug target in Alzheimer disease. Together with its homolog BACE2, both proteases have an increasing number of functions within and outside of the nervous system. This review highlights recent progress in understanding cell biology, substrates, and functions of BACE proteases and discusses the therapeutic options and potential mechanism-based liabilities, in particular for BACE inhibitors in Alzheimer disease.

  14. Quantitative serine protease assays based on formation of copper(II)-oligopeptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-01-07

    A quantitative protease assay based on the formation of a copper-oligopeptide complex is developed. In this assay, when a tripeptide GGH fragment is cleaved from an oligopeptide chain by serine proteases, the tripeptide quickly forms a pink GGH/Cu(2+) complex whose concentration can be determined quantitatively by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Therefore, activities of serine proteases can be determined from the formation rate of the GGH/Cu(2+) complex. This principle can be used to detect the presence of serine protease in a real-time manner, or measure proteolytic activities of serine protease cleaving different oligopeptide substrates. For example, by using this assay, we demonstrate that trypsin, a model serine protease, is able to cleave two oligopeptides GGGGKGGH () and GGGGRGGH (). However, the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for is higher than that of (6.4 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)vs. 1.3 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)). This result shows that trypsin is more specific toward arginine (R) than lysine (K) in the oligopeptide sequence.

  15. Proteases as therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Charles S.; Page, Michael J.; Madison, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are an expanding class of drugs that hold great promise. The U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has approved 12 protease therapies, and a number of next generation or completely new proteases are in clinical development. Although they are a well-recognized class of targets for inhibitors, proteases themselves have not typically been considered as a drug class despite their application in the clinic over the last several decades; initially as plasma fractions and later as purified products. Although the predominant use of proteases has been in treating cardiovascular disease, they are also emerging as useful agents in the treatment of sepsis, digestive disorders, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, retinal disorders, psoriasis and other diseases. In the present review, we outline the history of proteases as therapeutics, provide an overview of their current clinical application, and describe several approaches to improve and expand their clinical application. Undoubtedly, our ability to harness proteolysis for disease treatment will increase with our understanding of protease biology and the molecular mechanisms responsible. New technologies for rationally engineering proteases, as well as improved delivery options, will expand greatly the potential applications of these enzymes. The recognition that proteases are, in fact, an established class of safe and efficacious drugs will stimulate investigation of additional therapeutic applications for these enzymes. Proteases therefore have a bright future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:21406063

  16. Enterovirus 71 Infection Cleaves a Negative Regulator for Viral Internal Ribosomal Entry Site-Driven Translation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Lien; Kung, Yu-An; Weng, Kuo-Feng; Lin, Jing-Yi; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2013-01-01

    Far-upstream element-binding protein 2 (FBP2) is an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that negatively regulates enterovirus 71 (EV71) translation. This study shows that EV71 infection cleaved FBP2. Live EV71 and the EV71 replicon (but not UV-inactivated virus particles) induced FBP2 cleavage, suggesting that viral replication results in FBP2 cleavage. The results also showed that virus-induced proteasome, autophagy, and caspase activity co-contribute to EV71-induced FBP2 cleavage. Using FLAG-fused FBP2, we mapped the potential cleavage fragments of FBP2 in infected cells. We also found that FBP2 altered its function when its carboxyl terminus was cleaved. This study presents a mechanism for virus-induced cellular events to cleave a negative regulator for viral IRES-driven translation. PMID:23345520

  17. Preparation and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies against chlamydial protease-like activity factor to detect Chlamydia pneumoniae antigen in early pediatric pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Ding, T; Chen, Z; Fang, H; Li, H; Lu, H; Wu, Y

    2015-07-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae causes diseases in humans, including community-acquired pneumonia, bronchitis, and sinusitis. It is also associated with atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated novel materials with which to develop a sensitive and specific method to identify early C. pneumoniae infection, to allow more effective clinical treatment and prevention. We prepared novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a recombinant protein equivalent to the immunodominant region of chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF) from C. pneumoniae. The mAbs specifically reacted with the endogenous CPAF antigen of the C. pneumoniae type strain in immunoblotting and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assays, but did not react with C. trachomatis type strains or genital secretions from patients with acute C. trachomatis infection. The mAb with the highest titer was used to develop a new IIF assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect the C. pneumoniae antigen in clinical specimens from child patients suspected of pneumonia. The sensitivity, specificity, and concordance rate of the mAb-based IIF and ELISA tests were compared with those of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our results show that these mAbs have excellent specificity and may be used to develop new screening tools for the diagnosis of early pediatric pneumonia.

  18. Diacylglycerol kinase delta and protein kinase C(alpha) modulate epidermal growth factor receptor abundance and degradation through ubiquitin-specific protease 8.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinjin; Crotty, Tracy M; Reichert, Ethan; Carraway, Kermit L; Stafforini, Diana M; Topham, Matthew K

    2010-03-05

    Many human epithelial cancers are characterized by abnormal activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is often caused by its excessive expression in tumor cells. The abundance of EGFR is modulated, in part, by its ubiquitination, which targets it for degradation. The components responsible for adding ubiquitin to EGFR are well characterized, but this is a reversible process, and the mechanisms that modulate the removal of ubiquitin from the EGFR are not well known. We found that de-ubiquitination of EGFR was regulated by diacylglycerol kinase delta (DGKdelta), a lipid kinase that terminates diacylglycerol signaling. In DGKdelta-deficient cells, ubiquitination of EGFR was enhanced, which attenuated the steady-state levels of EGFR and promoted its ligand-induced degradation. These effects were not caused by changes in the ubiquitinating apparatus, but instead were due to reduced expression of the de-ubiquitinase, ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8). Depletion of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha), a target of diacylglycerol, rescued the levels of USP8 and normalized EGFR degradation in DGKdelta-deficient cells. Moreover, the effects of PKCalpha were caused by its inhibition of Akt, which stabilizes USP8. Our data indicate a novel mechanism where DGKdelta and PKCalpha modulate the levels of ubiquitinated EGFR through Akt and USP8.

  19. Stapling of the botulinum type A protease to growth factors and neuropeptides allows selective targeting of neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Jason; Ferrari, Enrico; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Cuijpers, Sabine A G; Gu, Chunjing; Vallis, Yvonne; O'Brien, John; Davletov, Bazbek

    2013-07-01

    Precise cellular targeting of macromolecular cargos has important biotechnological and medical implications. Using a recently established 'protein stapling' method, we linked the proteolytic domain of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) to a selection of ligands to target neuroendocrine tumor cells. The botulinum proteolytic domain was chosen because of its well-known potency to block the release of neurotransmitters and hormones. Among nine tested stapled ligands, the epidermal growth factor was able to deliver the botulinum enzyme into pheochromocytoma PC12 and insulinoma Min6 cells; ciliary neurotrophic factor was effective on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and Neuro2A cells, whereas corticotropin-releasing hormone was active on pituitary AtT-20 cells and the two neuroblastoma cell lines. In neuronal cultures, the epidermal growth factor- and ciliary neurotrophic factor-directed botulinum enzyme targeted distinct subsets of neurons whereas the whole native neurotoxin targeted the cortical neurons indiscriminately. At nanomolar concentrations, the retargeted botulinum molecules were able to inhibit stimulated release of hormones from tested cell lines suggesting their application for treatments of neuroendocrine disorders.

  20. Secretory expression of thermostable alkaline protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus FI by using native signal peptide and α-factor secretion signal in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Latiffi, Amaliawati Ahmad; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Oslan, Siti Nurbaya; Basri, Mahiran

    2013-01-01

    The thermostable alkaline protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus F1 has high potential for industrial applications, and attempt to produce the enzyme in yeast for higher yield was undertaken. Secretory expression of F1 protease through yeast system could improve enzyme's capability, thus simplifying the purification steps. Mature and full genes of F1 protease were cloned into Pichia pastoris expression vectors (pGAPZαB and pPICZαB) and transformed into P. pastoris strains (GS115 and SMD1168H) via electroporation method. Recombinant F1 protease under regulation constitutive GAP promoter revealed that the highest expression was achieved after 72 h cultivation. While inducible AOX promoter showed that 0.5% (v/v) methanol was the best to induce expression. It was proven that constitutive expression strategy was better than inducible system. The α-secretion signal from the plasmid demonstrated higher secretory expression level of F1 protease as compared to native Open Reading Frame (ORF) in GS115 strain (GE6GS). Production medium YPTD was found to be the best for F1 protease expression with the highest yield of 4.13 U/mL. The protein was expressed as His-tagged fusion protein with a size about 34 kDa.

  1. Histone H4 is cleaved by granzyme A during staurosporine-induced cell death in B-lymphoid Raji cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Phil Young; Park, Byoung Chul; Chi, Seung Wook; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Sunhong; Cho, Sayeon; Kang, Seongman; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Sung Goo

    2016-01-01

    Granzyme A (GzmA) was first identified as a cytotoxic T lymphocyte protease protein with limited tissue expression. A number of cellular proteins are known to be cleaved by GzmA, and its function is to induce apoptosis. Histones H1, H2B, and H3 were identified as GzmA substrates during apoptotic cell death. Here, we demonstrated that histone H4 was cleaved by GzmA during staurosporine-induced cell death; however, in the presence of caspase inhibitors, staurosporine-treated Raji cells underwent necroptosis instead of apoptosis. Furthermore, histone H4 cleavage was blocked by the GzmA inhibitor nafamostat mesylate and by GzmA knockdown using siRNA. These results suggest that histone H4 is a novel substrate for GzmA in staurosporine-induced cells. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(10): 560-565] PMID:27439606

  2. The roles of intramembrane proteases in protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Sibley, L David

    2013-12-01

    Intramembrane proteolysis is widely conserved throughout different forms of life, with three major types of proteases being known for their ability to cleave peptide bonds directly within the transmembrane domains of their substrates. Although intramembrane proteases have been extensively studied in humans and model organisms, they have only more recently been investigated in protozoan parasites, where they turn out to play important and sometimes unexpected roles. Signal peptide peptidases are involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control and signal peptide degradation from exported proteins. Recent studies suggest that repurposing inhibitors developed for blocking presenilins may be useful for inhibiting the growth of Plasmodium, and possibly other protozoan parasites, by blocking signal peptide peptidases. Rhomboid proteases, originally described in the fly, are also widespread in parasites, and are especially expanded in apicomplexans. Their study in parasites has revealed novel roles that expand our understanding of how these proteases function. Within this diverse group of parasites, rhomboid proteases contribute to processing of adhesins involved in attachment, invasion, intracellular replication, phagocytosis, and immune evasion, placing them at the vertex of host-parasite interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  3. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  4. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa Junior, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications.

  5. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  6. Serine proteases inhibiting cyanopeptides.

    PubMed

    Radau, G

    2000-08-01

    There are many compounds inhibiting serine proteases which play an important role in the human organism. This article reviews publications on the low-molecular weight, serine protease inhibitory cyanopeptides and reports on new developments in establishing structure-activity relationships.

  7. Engineering of TEV protease variants by yeast ER sequestration screening (YESS) of combinatorial libraries

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Li; Gebhard, Mark C.; Li, Qing; Taft, Joseph M.; Georgiou, George; Iverson, Brent L.

    2013-01-01

    Myriad new applications of proteases would be enabled by an ability to fine-tune substrate specificity and activity. Herein we present a general strategy for engineering protease selectivity and activity by capitalizing on sequestration of the protease to be engineered within the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A substrate fusion protein composed of yeast adhesion receptor subunit Aga2, selection and counterselection substrate sequences, multiple intervening epitope tag sequences, and a C-terminal ER retention sequence is coexpressed with a protease library. Cleavage of the substrate fusion protein by the protease eliminates the ER retention sequence, facilitating transport to the yeast surface. Yeast cells that display Aga2 fusions in which only the selection substrate is cleaved are isolated by multicolor FACS with fluorescently labeled antiepitope tag antibodies. Using this system, the Tobacco Etch Virus protease (TEV-P), which strongly prefers Gln at P1 of its canonical ENLYFQ↓S substrate, was engineered to recognize selectively Glu or His at P1. Kinetic analysis indicated an overall 5,000-fold and 1,100-fold change in selectivity, respectively, for the Glu- and His-specific TEV variants, both of which retained high catalytic turnover. Human granzyme K and the hepatitis C virus protease were also shown to be amenable to this unique approach. Further, by adjusting the signaling strategy to identify phosphorylated as opposed to cleaved sequences, this unique system was shown to be compatible with the human Abelson tyrosine kinase. PMID:23589865

  8. Engineering of TEV protease variants by yeast ER sequestration screening (YESS) of combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Gebhard, Mark C; Li, Qing; Taft, Joseph M; Georgiou, George; Iverson, Brent L

    2013-04-30

    Myriad new applications of proteases would be enabled by an ability to fine-tune substrate specificity and activity. Herein we present a general strategy for engineering protease selectivity and activity by capitalizing on sequestration of the protease to be engineered within the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A substrate fusion protein composed of yeast adhesion receptor subunit Aga2, selection and counterselection substrate sequences, multiple intervening epitope tag sequences, and a C-terminal ER retention sequence is coexpressed with a protease library. Cleavage of the substrate fusion protein by the protease eliminates the ER retention sequence, facilitating transport to the yeast surface. Yeast cells that display Aga2 fusions in which only the selection substrate is cleaved are isolated by multicolor FACS with fluorescently labeled antiepitope tag antibodies. Using this system, the Tobacco Etch Virus protease (TEV-P), which strongly prefers Gln at P1 of its canonical ENLYFQ↓S substrate, was engineered to recognize selectively Glu or His at P1. Kinetic analysis indicated an overall 5,000-fold and 1,100-fold change in selectivity, respectively, for the Glu- and His-specific TEV variants, both of which retained high catalytic turnover. Human granzyme K and the hepatitis C virus protease were also shown to be amenable to this unique approach. Further, by adjusting the signaling strategy to identify phosphorylated as opposed to cleaved sequences, this unique system was shown to be compatible with the human Abelson tyrosine kinase.

  9. Purification of a Factor from Human Placenta That Stimulates Capillary Endothelial Cell Protease Production, DNA Synthesis, and Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscatelli, David; Presta, Marco; Rifkin, Daniel B.

    1986-04-01

    A protein that stimulates the production of plasminogen activator and latent collagenase in cultured bovine capillary endothelial cells has been purified 106-fold from term human placenta by using a combination of heparin affinity chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and gel chromatography. The purified molecule has a molecular weight of 18,700 as determined by NaDodSO4/PAGE under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. The purified molecule stimulates the production of plasminogen activator and latent collagenase in a dose-dependent manner between 0.1 and 10 ng of protein/ml. The purified protein also stimulates DNA synthesis and chemotaxis in capillary endothelial cells in the same concentration range. Thus, this molecule has all of the properties predicted for an angiogenic factor.

  10. Axonal Cleaved Caspase-3 Regulates Axon Targeting and Morphogenesis in the Developing Auditory Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Rotschafer, Sarah E.; Allen-Sharpley, Michelle R.; Cramer, Karina S.

    2016-01-01

    Caspase-3 is a cysteine protease that is most commonly associated with cell death. Recent studies have shown additional roles in mediating cell differentiation, cell proliferation and development of cell morphology. We investigated the role of caspase-3 in the development of chick auditory brainstem nuclei during embryogenesis. Immunofluorescence from embryonic days E6–13 revealed that the temporal expression of cleaved caspase-3 follows the ascending anatomical pathway. The expression is first seen in the auditory portion of VIIIth nerve including central axonal regions projecting to nucleus magnocellularis (NM), then later in NM axons projecting to nucleus laminaris (NL), and subsequently in NL dendrites. To examine the function of cleaved caspase-3 in chick auditory brainstem development, we blocked caspase-3 cleavage in developing chick embryos with the caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK from E6 to E9, then examined NM and NL morphology and NM axonal targeting on E10. NL lamination in treated embryos was disorganized and the neuropil around NL contained a significant number of glial cells normally excluded from this region. Additionally, NM axons projected into inappropriate portions of NL in Z-DEVD-FMK treated embyros. We found that the presence of misrouted axons was associated with more severe NL disorganization. The effects of axonal caspase-3 inhibition on both NL morphogenesis and NM axon targeting suggest that these developmental processes are coordinated, likely through communication between axons and their targets. PMID:27822180

  11. Role of cockroach proteases in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Page, Kristen

    2012-10-01

    Allergic asthma is on the rise in developed countries, and cockroach exposure is a major risk factor for the development of asthma. In recent years, a number of studies have investigated the importance of allergen-associated proteases in modulating allergic airway inflammation. Many of the studies have suggested the importance of allergen-associated proteases as having a direct role on airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells. In most cases, activation of the protease activated receptor (PAR)-2 has been implicated as a mechanism behind the potent allergenicity associated with cockroaches. In this review, we focus on recent evidence linking cockroach proteases to activation of a variety of cells important in allergic airway inflammation and the role of PAR-2 in this process. We will highlight recent data exploring the potential mechanisms involved in the biological effects of the allergen.

  12. Overexpression of miRNA-221 promotes cell proliferation by targeting the apoptotic protease activating factor-1 and indicates a poor prognosis in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Li, Qiang; Huang, He; Li, Yinguang; Li, Li; Hou, Wenhui; You, Zeshan

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding, endogenous RNAs involved in cancer development and progression. MicroRNA-221 (mir-221) has been reported to have both an oncogenic and tumor-suppressive role in human tumors, but the role of miR-221 in ovarian cancer is poorly understood. In the present study, the expression levels of miR-221 and the apoptosis protease activating factor 1 (APAF1) protein in 63 samples of ovarian cancer tissues and the cell lines, IOSE25, A2780, OVCAR3, SKOV3 and 3AO were detected by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot analysis, respectively. Cell proliferation was measured using Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8); cell migration and invasion were detected using a Transwell assay; cell apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry and Hoechst staining, and a luciferase assay was performed to verify a putative target site of miR-221 in the 3′-UTR of APAF1 mRNA. Expression of miR-221 was upregulated in ovarian cancer tissues. Patients with increased miR-221 expression levels had a reduced disease-free survival (P=0.0014) and overall survival (P=0.0058) compared with those with low miR-221 expression. Transfection of SKOV3 and A2780 cell lines with miR-221 inhibitor induced APAF1 protein expression, suppressed cell proliferation and migration and promoted tumor cell apoptosis. In conclusion, the APAF1 gene was confirmed as a direct target of miR-221 and overexpression of APAF1 suppressed ovarian cancer cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in vitro. These findings indicate that miR-221-APAF1 should be studied further as a potential new diagnostic or prognostic biomarker for ovarian cancer. PMID:28350128

  13. Proteomic Substrate Identification for Membrane Proteases in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Stephan A.; Scilabra, Simone D.; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell communication in the brain is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including proteolysis. Membrane-bound proteases generate signaling molecules from membrane-bound precursor proteins and control the length and function of cell surface membrane proteins. These proteases belong to different families, including members of the “a disintegrin and metalloprotease” (ADAM), the beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzymes (BACE), membrane-type matrix metalloproteases (MT-MMP) and rhomboids. Some of these proteases, in particular ADAM10 and BACE1 have been shown to be essential not only for the correct development of the mammalian brain, but also for myelination and maintaining neuronal connections in the adult nervous system. Additionally, these proteases are considered as drug targets for brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), schizophrenia and cancer. Despite their biomedical relevance, the molecular functions of these proteases in the brain have not been explored in much detail, as little was known about their substrates. This has changed with the recent development of novel proteomic methods which allow to identify substrates of membrane-bound proteases from cultured cells, primary neurons and other primary brain cells and even in vivo from minute amounts of mouse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This review summarizes the recent advances and highlights the strengths of the individual proteomic methods. Finally, using the example of the Alzheimer-related proteases BACE1, ADAM10 and γ-secretase, as well as ADAM17 and signal peptide peptidase like 3 (SPPL3), we illustrate how substrate identification with novel methods is instrumental in elucidating broad physiological functions of these proteases in the brain and other organs. PMID:27790089

  14. Photoactivated Spatiotemporally-Responsive Nanosensors of in Vivo Protease Activity.

    PubMed

    Dudani, Jaideep S; Jain, Piyush K; Kwong, Gabriel A; Stevens, Kelly R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2015-12-22

    Proteases play diverse and important roles in physiology and disease, including influencing critical processes in development, immune responses, and malignancies. Both the abundance and activity of these enzymes are tightly regulated and highly contextual; thus, in order to elucidate their specific impact on disease progression, better tools are needed to precisely monitor in situ protease activity. Current strategies for detecting protease activity are focused on functionalizing synthetic peptide substrates with reporters that emit detection signals following peptide cleavage. However, these activity-based probes lack the capacity to be turned on at sites of interest and, therefore, are subject to off-target activation. Here we report a strategy that uses light to precisely control both the location and time of activity-based sensing. We develop photocaged activity-based sensors by conjugating photolabile molecules directly onto peptide substrates, thereby blocking protease cleavage by steric hindrance. At sites of disease, exposure to ultraviolet light unveils the nanosensors to allow proteases to cleave and release a reporter fragment that can be detected remotely. We apply this spatiotemporally controlled system to probe secreted protease activity in vitro and tumor protease activity in vivo. In vitro, we demonstrate the ability to dynamically and spatially measure metalloproteinase activity in a 3D model of colorectal cancer. In vivo, veiled nanosensors are selectively activated at the primary tumor site in colorectal cancer xenografts to capture the tumor microenvironment-enriched protease activity. The ability to remotely control activity-based sensors may offer a valuable complement to existing tools for measuring biological activity.

  15. Structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic studies of specificity designed HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvizo, Oscar; Mittal, Seema; Mayo, Stephen L.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-10-23

    HIV-1 protease recognizes and cleaves more than 12 different substrates leading to viral maturation. While these substrates share no conserved motif, they are specifically selected for and cleaved by protease during viral life cycle. Drug resistant mutations evolve within the protease that compromise inhibitor binding but allow the continued recognition of all these substrates. While the substrate envelope defines a general shape for substrate recognition, successfully predicting the determinants of substrate binding specificity would provide additional insights into the mechanism of altered molecular recognition in resistant proteases. We designed a variant of HIV protease with altered specificity using positive computational design methods and validated the design using X-ray crystallography and enzyme biochemistry. The engineered variant, Pr3 (A28S/D30F/G48R), was designed to preferentially bind to one out of three of HIV protease's natural substrates; RT-RH over p2-NC and CA-p2. In kinetic assays, RT-RH binding specificity for Pr3 increased threefold compared to the wild-type (WT), which was further confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Crystal structures of WT protease and the designed variant in complex with RT-RH, CA-p2, and p2-NC were determined. Structural analysis of the designed complexes revealed that one of the engineered substitutions (G48R) potentially stabilized heterogeneous flap conformations, thereby facilitating alternate modes of substrate binding. Our results demonstrate that while substrate specificity could be engineered in HIV protease, the structural pliability of protease restricted the propagation of interactions as predicted. These results offer new insights into the plasticity and structural determinants of substrate binding specificity of the HIV-1 protease.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae serine protease HtrA, but not SFP or PrtA, is a major virulence factor in pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Bootsma, Hester J; Zomer, Aldert; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Hermans, Peter W M; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen in pneumonia. Serine protease orthologs expressed by a variety of bacteria have been found of importance for virulence. Previous studies have identified two serine proteases in S. pneumoniae, HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) and PrtA (cell wall-associated serine protease A), that contributed to virulence in models of pneumonia and intraperitoneal infection respectively. We here sought to identify additional S. pneumoniae serine proteases and determine their role in virulence. The S. pneumoniae D39 genome contains five putative serine proteases, of which HtrA, Subtilase Family Protein (SFP) and PrtA were selected for insertional mutagenesis because they are predicted to be secreted and surface exposed. Mutant D39 strains lacking serine proteases were constructed by in-frame insertion deletion mutagenesis. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal infection of mice with wild-type or mutant D39. After high dose infection, only D39ΔhtrA showed reduced virulence, as reflected by strongly reduced bacterial loads, diminished dissemination and decreased lung inflammation. D39ΔprtA induced significantly less lung inflammation together with smaller infiltrated lung surface, but without influencing bacterial loads. After low dose infection, D39ΔhtrA again showed strongly reduced bacterial loads; notably, pneumococcal burdens were also modestly lower in lungs after infection with D39Δsfp. These data confirm the important role for HtrA in S. pneumoniae virulence. PrtA contributes to lung damage in high dose pneumonia; it does not however contribute to bacterial outgrowth in pneumococcal pneumonia. SFP may facilitate S. pneumoniae growth after low dose infection.

  17. Bacterial proteases and virulence.

    PubMed

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated with the proteases either encoded within the same polypeptide or on separate subunits. In contrast, substrate recognition by extracellular proteases is less selective and therefore these enzymes are generally expressed as zymogens to prevent premature proteolytic activity that would be detrimental to the cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host.

  18. Myelin Basic Protein Cleaves Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 and Promotes Neuritogenesis and Cell Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, David; Loers, Gabriele; Kleene, Ralf; Oezen, Iris; Kataria, Hardeep; Katagihallimath, Nainesh; Braren, Ingke; Harauz, George; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    The cell adhesion molecule L1 is a Lewisx-carrying glycoprotein that plays important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Here we show that myelin basic protein (MBP) binds to L1 in a Lewisx-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MBP is released by murine cerebellar neurons as a sumoylated dynamin-containing protein upon L1 stimulation and that this MBP cleaves L1 as a serine protease in the L1 extracellular domain at Arg687 yielding a transmembrane fragment that promotes neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cell culture. L1-induced neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival are reduced in MBP-deficient cerebellar neurons and in wild-type cerebellar neurons in the presence of an MBP antibody or L1 peptide containing the MBP cleavage site. Genetic ablation of MBP in shiverer mice and mutagenesis of the proteolytically active site in MBP or of the MBP cleavage site within L1 as well as serine protease inhibitors and an L1 peptide containing the MBP cleavage site abolish generation of the L1 fragment. Our findings provide evidence for novel functions of MBP in the nervous system. PMID:24671420

  19. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  20. An Efficient Catalytic DNA that Cleaves L-RNA

    PubMed Central

    Tram, Kha; Xia, Jiaji; Gysbers, Rachel; Li, Yingfu

    2015-01-01

    Many DNAzymes have been isolated from synthetic DNA pools to cleave natural RNA (D-RNA) substrates and some have been utilized for the design of aptazyme biosensors for bioanalytical applications. Even though these biosensors perform well in simple sample matrices, they do not function effectively in complex biological samples due to ubiquitous RNases that can efficiently cleave D-RNA substrates. To overcome this issue, we set out to develop DNAzymes that cleave L-RNA, the enantiomer of D-RNA, which is known to be completely resistant to RNases. Through in vitro selection we isolated three L-RNA-cleaving DNAzymes from a random-sequence DNA pool. The most active DNAzyme exhibits a catalytic rate constant ~3 min-1 and has a structure that contains a kissing loop, a structural motif that has never been observed with D-RNA-cleaving DNAzymes. Furthermore we have used this DNAzyme and a well-known ATP-binding DNA aptamer to construct an aptazyme sensor and demonstrated that this biosensor can achieve ATP detection in biological samples that contain RNases. The current work lays the foundation for exploring RNA-cleaving DNAzymes for engineering biosensors that are compatible with complex biological samples. PMID:25946137

  1. Intramembrane protease PARL defines a negative regulator of PINK1- and PARK2/Parkin-dependent mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Cathrin; Lorenz, Holger; Hehn, Beate; Lemberg, Marius K

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PINK1 and PARK2/Parkin are a main risk factor for familial Parkinson disease. While the physiological mechanism of their activation is unclear, these proteins have been shown in tissue culture cells to serve as a key trigger for autophagy of depolarized mitochondria. Here we show that ablation of the mitochondrial rhomboid protease PARL leads to retrograde translocation of an intermembrane space-bridging PINK1 import intermediate. Subsequently, it is rerouted to the outer membrane in order to recruit PARK2, which phenocopies mitophagy induction by uncoupling agents. Consistent with a role of this retrograde translocation mechanism in neurodegenerative disease, we show that pathogenic PINK1 mutants which are not cleaved by PARL affect PINK1 kinase activity and the ability to induce PARK2-mediated mitophagy. Altogether we suggest that PARL is an important intrinsic player in mitochondrial quality control, a system substantially impaired in Parkinson disease as indicated by reduced removal of damaged mitochondria in affected patients.

  2. MIB–MIP is a mycoplasma system that captures and cleaves immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Arfi, Yonathan; Minder, Laetitia; Di Primo, Carmelo; Le Roy, Aline; Ebel, Christine; Coquet, Laurent; Claverol, Stephane; Vashee, Sanjay; Jores, Joerg; Blanchard, Alain; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are “minimal” bacteria able to infect humans, wildlife, and a large number of economically important livestock species. Mycoplasma infections include a spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from simple fever to fulminant inflammatory diseases with high mortality rates. These infections are mostly chronic, suggesting that mycoplasmas have developed means to evade the host immune response. Here we present and functionally characterize a two-protein system from Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies capri that is involved in the capture and cleavage of IgG. The first component, Mycoplasma Ig binding protein (MIB), is an 83-kDa protein that is able to tightly bind to the Fv region of a wide range of IgG. The second component, Mycoplasma Ig protease (MIP), is a 97-kDa serine protease that is able to cleave off the VH domain of IgG. We demonstrate that MIB is necessary for the proteolytic activity of MIP. Cleavage of IgG requires a sequential interaction of the different partners of the system: first MIB captures the IgG, and then MIP is recruited to the MIB–IgG complex, enabling protease activity. MIB and MIP are encoded by two genes organized in tandem, with homologs found in the majority of pathogenic mycoplasmas and often in multiple copies. Phylogenetic studies suggest that genes encoding the MIB–MIP system are specific to mycoplasmas and have been disseminated by horizontal gene transfer. These results highlight an original and complex system targeting the host immunoglobulins, playing a potentially key role in the immunity evasion by mycoplasmas. PMID:27114507

  3. The paired basic amino acid-cleaving enzyme 4 (PACE4) is involved in the maturation of insulin receptor isoform B: an opportunity to reduce the specific insulin receptor-dependent effects of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2).

    PubMed

    Kara, Imène; Poggi, Marjorie; Bonardo, Bernadette; Govers, Roland; Landrier, Jean-François; Tian, Sun; Leibiger, Ingo; Day, Robert; Creemers, John W M; Peiretti, Franck

    2015-01-30

    Gaining the full activity of the insulin receptor (IR) requires the proteolytic cleavage of its proform by intra-Golgi furin-like activity. In mammalian cells, IR is expressed as two isoforms (IRB and IRA) that are responsible for insulin action. However, only IRA transmits the growth-promoting and mitogenic effects of insulin-like growth factor 2. Here we demonstrate that the two IR isoforms are similarly cleaved by furin, but when this furin-dependent maturation is inefficient, IR proforms move to the cell surface where the proprotein convertase PACE4 selectively supports IRB maturation. Therefore, in situations of impaired furin activity, the proteolytic maturation of IRB is greater than that of IRA, and accordingly, the amount of phosphorylated IRB is also greater than that of IRA. We highlight the ability of a particular proprotein convertase inhibitor to effectively reduce the maturation of IRA and its associated mitogenic signaling without altering the signals emanating from IRB. In conclusion, the selective PACE4-dependent maturation of IRB occurs when furin activity is reduced; accordingly, the pharmacological inhibition of furin reduces IRA maturation and its mitogenic potential without altering the insulin effects.

  4. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N.; Martins, Rafael M.; Braz, Gloria R.C.; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  5. S1 Pocket of a Bacterially Derived Subtilisin-like Protease Underpins Effective Tissue Destruction*

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wilson; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Kennan, Ruth M.; Reeve, Shane B.; Steer, David L.; Reboul, Cyril; Smith, A. Ian; Pike, Robert N.; Rood, Julian I.; Whisstock, James C.; Porter, Corrine J.

    2011-01-01

    The ovine footrot pathogen, Dichelobacter nodosus, secretes three subtilisin-like proteases that play an important role in the pathogenesis of footrot through their ability to mediate tissue destruction. Virulent and benign strains of D. nodosus secrete the basic proteases BprV and BprB, respectively, with the catalytic domain of these enzymes having 96% sequence identity. At present, it is not known how sequence variation between these two putative virulence factors influences their respective biological activity. We have determined the high resolution crystal structures of BprV and BprB. These data reveal that that the S1 pocket of BprV is more hydrophobic but smaller than that of BprB. We show that BprV is more effective than BprB in degrading extracellular matrix components of the host tissue. Mutation of two residues around the S1 pocket of BprB to the equivalent residues in BprV dramatically enhanced its proteolytic activity against elastin substrates. Application of a novel approach for profiling substrate specificity, the Rapid Endopeptidase Profiling Library (REPLi) method, revealed that both enzymes prefer cleaving after hydrophobic residues (and in particular P1 leucine) but that BprV has more restricted primary substrate specificity than BprB. Furthermore, for P1 Leu-containing substrates we found that BprV is a significantly more efficient enzyme than BprB. Collectively, these data illuminate how subtle changes in D. nodosus proteases may significantly influence tissue destruction as part of the ovine footrot pathogenesis process. PMID:21990366

  6. A family of serine proteases expressed exclusively in myelo-monocytic cells specifically processes the nuclear factor-kappa B subunit p65 in vitro and may impair human immunodeficiency virus replication in these cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Two groups of U937 promonocytic cells were obtained by limiting dilution cloning which differed strikingly in their ability to support human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) replication. "Plus" clones replicated the virus efficiently, whereas "minus" clones did not. We examined these clones for differences in nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B activity which might account for the observed phenomenon. Stimulation of plus clones liberated the classical p50-p65 complex from cytoplasmic pools, whereas minus clones produced an apparently novel, faster- migrating complex, as judged by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. It is surprising that the faster-migrating complex was composed also of p50 and p65. However, the p65 subunit was COOH-terminally truncated, as shown by immunoprecipitation. The truncation resulted from limited proteolysis of p65 during cellular extraction which released particular lysosomal serine proteases, such as elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase 3. These specific proteases are coordinately expressed and were present exclusively in the minus U937 clones, but not in the plus clones, as demonstrated in the case of cathepsin G. In addition, these proteases were detected in certain subclones of THP-1 and HL-60 cells and in primary monocytes, in each case correlating with the truncated from of p65. We demonstrate in vitro cleavage of p65 by purified elastase and cathepsin G. It is possible that particular serine proteases may have inhibiting effects on the replication of HIV-1 in myelo-monocytic cells. The data also demonstrate that special precautions must be taken when making extracts from myelo-monocytic cells. PMID:7931077

  7. The Spl Serine Proteases Modulate Staphylococcus aureus Protein Production and Virulence in a Rabbit Model of Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Salgado-Pabon, Wilmara; Meyerholz, David K.; White, Mark J.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Spl proteases are a group of six serine proteases that are encoded on the νSaβ pathogenicity island and are unique to Staphylococcus aureus. Despite their interesting biochemistry, their biological substrates and functions in virulence have been difficult to elucidate. We found that an spl operon mutant of the community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 strain LAC induced localized lung damage in a rabbit model of pneumonia, characterized by bronchopneumonia observed histologically. Disease in the mutant-infected rabbits was restricted in distribution compared to that in wild-type USA300-infected rabbits. We also found that SplA is able to cleave the mucin 16 glycoprotein from the surface of the CalU-3 lung cell line, suggesting a possible mechanism for wild-type USA300 spreading pneumonia to both lungs. Investigation of the secreted and surface proteomes of wild-type USA300 and the spl mutant revealed multiple alterations in metabolic proteins and virulence factors. This study demonstrates that the Spls modulate S. aureus physiology and virulence, identifies a human target of SplA, and suggests potential S. aureus targets of the Spl proteases. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile human pathogen that produces an array of virulence factors, including several proteases. Of these, six proteases called the Spls are the least characterized. Previous evidence suggests that the Spls are expressed during human infection; however, their function is unknown. Our study shows that the Spls are required for S. aureus to cause disseminated lung damage during pneumonia. Further, we present the first example of a human protein cut by an Spl protease. Although the Spls were predicted not to cut staphylococcal proteins, we also show that an spl mutant has altered abundance of both secreted and surface-associated proteins. This work provides novel insight into the function of Spls during infection and their potential ability to degrade

  8. Comparison of flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers as treatment sources for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, Timothy M. Foster, Thomas H.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: For interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) of bulky tumors, careful treatment planning is required in order to ensure that a therapeutic dose is delivered to the tumor, while minimizing damage to surrounding normal tissue. In clinical contexts, iPDT has typically been performed with either flat cleaved or cylindrical diffusing optical fibers as light sources. Here, the authors directly compare these two source geometries in terms of the number of fibers and duration of treatment required to deliver a prescribed light dose to a tumor volume. Methods: Treatment planning software for iPDT was developed based on graphics processing unit enhanced Monte Carlo simulations. This software was used to optimize the number of fibers, total energy delivered by each fiber, and the position of individual fibers in order to deliver a target light dose (D{sub 90}) to 90% of the tumor volume. Treatment plans were developed using both flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers, based on tissue volumes derived from CT data from a head and neck cancer patient. Plans were created for four cases: fixed energy per fiber, fixed number of fibers, and in cases where both or neither of these factors were fixed. Results: When the number of source fibers was fixed at eight, treatment plans based on flat cleaved fibers required each to deliver 7180–8080 J in order to deposit 90 J/cm{sup 2} in 90% of the tumor volume. For diffusers, each fiber was required to deliver 2270–2350 J (333–1178 J/cm) in order to achieve this same result. For the case of fibers delivering a fixed 900 J, 13 diffusers or 19 flat cleaved fibers at a spacing of 1 cm were required to deliver the desired dose. With energy per fiber fixed at 2400 J and the number of fibers fixed at eight, diffuser fibers delivered the desired dose to 93% of the tumor volume, while flat cleaved fibers delivered this dose to 79%. With both energy and number of fibers allowed to vary, six diffusers delivering 3485–3600 J

  9. Lipopolysaccharide and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibit Interferon Signaling in Hepatocytes by Increasing Ubiquitin-Like Protease 18 (USP18) Expression

    PubMed Central

    MacParland, Sonya A.; Ma, Xue-Zhong; Chen, Limin; Khattar, Ramzi; Cherepanov, Vera; Selzner, Markus; Feld, Jordan J.; Selzner, Nazia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inflammation may be maladaptive to the control of viral infection when it impairs interferon (IFN) responses, enhancing viral replication and spread. Dysregulated immunity as a result of inappropriate innate inflammatory responses is a hallmark of chronic viral infections such as, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that expression of an IFN-stimulated gene (ISG), ubiquitin-like protease (USP)18 is upregulated in chronic HCV infection, leading to impaired hepatocyte responses to IFN-α. We examined the ability of inflammatory stimuli, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10 to upregulate hepatocyte USP18 expression and blunt the IFN-α response. Human hepatoma cells and primary murine hepatocytes were treated with TNF-α/LPS/IL-6/IL-10 and USP18, phosphorylated (p)-STAT1 and myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (Mx1) expression was determined. Treatment of Huh7.5 cells and primary murine hepatocytes with LPS and TNF-α, but not IL-6 or IL-10, led to upregulated USP18 expression and induced an IFN-α refractory state, which was reversed by USP18 knockdown. Liver inflammation was induced in vivo using a murine model of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury led to an induction of USP18 expression in liver tissue and promotion of lymphocytic choriomeningitis replication. These data demonstrate that certain inflammatory stimuli (TNF-α and LPS) but not others (IL-6 and IL-10) target USP18 expression and thus inhibit IFN signaling. These findings represent a new paradigm for how inflammation alters hepatic innate immune responses, with USP18 representing a potential target for intervention in various inflammatory states. IMPORTANCE Inflammation may prevent the control of viral infection when it impairs the innate immune response, enhancing viral replication and spread. Blunted immunity as a result of

  10. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jong W; Hoffman, Sandy; Beal, Allison M; Dykon, Angela; Ringenberg, Michael A; Hughes, Anna C; Dare, Lauren; Anderson, Amber D; Finger, Joshua; Kasparcova, Viera; Rickard, David; Berger, Scott B; Ramanjulu, Joshi; Emery, John G; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Foley, Kevin P

    2015-01-01

    CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo.

  11. [Chloroplast Deg proteases].

    PubMed

    Grabsztunowicz, Magda; Luciński, Robert; Baranek, Małgorzata; Sikora, Bogna; Jackowski, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    For some chloroplast proteases ATP binding and hydrolysis is not necessary for their catalytic activity, most probably because even strongly unfolded substrates may penetrate their catalytic chamber. Deg1, 2, 5 and 8 are the best known of Arabidopsis thaliana ATP- independent chloroplast proteases, encoded by orthologues of genes coding for DegP, DegQ and DegS proteases of Escherichia coli. Current awareness in the area of structure and functions of chloroplast Degs is much more limited vs the one about their bacterial counterparts. Deg5 and Deg8 form a catalytic heterododecamer which is loosely attached to luminal side of thylakoid membrane. The complex catalyses--supported by Deg1 and one of FtsH proteases--the degradation of PsbA damaged due to plant exposition to elevated irradiance and thus these protease are of key importance for the plants' sensitivity to photoinhibition. Deg2 role in the disposal of damaged PsbA has not been elucidated. Recombinant Deg1 may degrade PsbO and plastocyanin in vitro but it is not clear whether this reaction is performed in vivo as well.

  12. Activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria in the human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Influenza is an acute infection of the respiratory tract, which affects each year millions of people. Influenza virus infection is initiated by the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) through receptor binding and fusion of viral and endosomal membranes. HA is synthesized as a precursor protein and requires cleavage by host cell proteases to gain its fusion capacity. Although cleavage of HA is crucial for virus infectivity, little was known about relevant proteases in the human airways for a long time. Recent progress in the identification and characterization of HA-activating host cell proteases has been considerable however and supports the idea of targeting HA cleavage as a novel approach for influenza treatment. Interestingly, certain bacteria have been demonstrated to support HA activation either by secreting proteases that cleave HA or due to activation of cellular proteases and thereby may contribute to virus spread and enhanced pathogenicity. In this review, we give an overview on activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria with the main focus on recent progress on HA cleavage by proteases HAT and TMPRSS2 in the human airway epithelium. In addition, we outline investigations of HA-activating proteases as potential drug targets for influenza treatment.

  13. STS-30 MS Cleave monitors fluids experiment apparatus (FEA) equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 Mission Specialist (MS) Mary L. Cleave monitors fluids experiment apparatus (FEA) equipment and conducts materials science experiments on Atlantis', Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104's, middeck. FEA equipment is in configuration for 'Floating Zone Crystal Growth and Purification' experiment. Cleave looks up from portable laptop computer with FEA-2, 35mm camera, and 8mm video camcorder positioned above her in aft locker location. Cleave, wearing polo shirt and light blue flight coveralls, uses knee board note pad to make additional notations. Rockwell International (RI) through its Space Transportation Systems Division, Downey, California, is engaged in a joint endeavor agreement (JEA) with NASA's Office of Commercial Programs in the field for floating zone crystal growth research.

  14. Extracellular Bacterial Proteases in Chronic Wounds: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Bacterial biofilms are considered to be responsible for over 80% of persistent infections, including chronic lung infections, osteomyelitis, periodontitis, endocarditis, and chronic wounds. Over 60% of chronic wounds are colonized with bacteria that reside within a biofilm. The exaggerated proteolytic environment of chronic wounds, more specifically elevated matrix metalloproteinases, is thought to be one of the possible reasons as to why chronic wounds fail to heal. However, the role of bacterial proteases within chronic wounds is not fully understood. Recent Advances: Recent research has shown that bacterial proteases can enable colonization and facilitate bacterial immune evasion. The inhibition of bacterial proteases such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase B (LasB) has resulted in the disruption of the bacterial biofilm in vitro. P. aeruginosa is thought to be a key pathogen in chronic wound infection, and therefore, the disruption of these biofilms, potentially through the targeting of P. aeruginosa bacterial proteases, is an attractive therapeutic endeavor. Critical Issues: Disrupting biofilm formation through the inhibition of bacterial proteases may lead to the dissemination of bacteria from the biofilm, allowing planktonic cells to colonize new sites within the wound. Future Directions: Despite a plethora of evidence supporting the role of bacterial proteases as virulence factors in infection, there remains a distinct lack of research into the effect of bacterial proteases in chronic wounds. To assess the viability of targeting bacterial proteases, future research should aim to understand the role of these proteases in a variety of chronic wound subtypes. PMID:27785379

  15. Extracellular Bacterial Proteases in Chronic Wounds: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed

    Suleman, Louise

    2016-10-01

    Significance: Bacterial biofilms are considered to be responsible for over 80% of persistent infections, including chronic lung infections, osteomyelitis, periodontitis, endocarditis, and chronic wounds. Over 60% of chronic wounds are colonized with bacteria that reside within a biofilm. The exaggerated proteolytic environment of chronic wounds, more specifically elevated matrix metalloproteinases, is thought to be one of the possible reasons as to why chronic wounds fail to heal. However, the role of bacterial proteases within chronic wounds is not fully understood. Recent Advances: Recent research has shown that bacterial proteases can enable colonization and facilitate bacterial immune evasion. The inhibition of bacterial proteases such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase B (LasB) has resulted in the disruption of the bacterial biofilm in vitro. P. aeruginosa is thought to be a key pathogen in chronic wound infection, and therefore, the disruption of these biofilms, potentially through the targeting of P. aeruginosa bacterial proteases, is an attractive therapeutic endeavor. Critical Issues: Disrupting biofilm formation through the inhibition of bacterial proteases may lead to the dissemination of bacteria from the biofilm, allowing planktonic cells to colonize new sites within the wound. Future Directions: Despite a plethora of evidence supporting the role of bacterial proteases as virulence factors in infection, there remains a distinct lack of research into the effect of bacterial proteases in chronic wounds. To assess the viability of targeting bacterial proteases, future research should aim to understand the role of these proteases in a variety of chronic wound subtypes.

  16. Cloning of the gene encoding streptococcal immunoglobulin A protease and its expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, J V; Plaut, A G; Fishman, Y; Wright, A

    1988-01-01

    We have identified and cloned a 6-kilobase-pair segment of chromosomal DNA from Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556 that encodes immunoglobulin A (IgA) protease activity when cloned into Escherichia coli. The enzyme specified by the iga gene in plasmid pJG1 accumulates in the periplasm of E. coli MM294 cells and has a substrate specificity for human IgA1 identical to that of native S. sanguis protease. Hybridization experiments with probes from within the encoding DNA showed no detectable homology at the nucleotide sequence level with chromosomal DNA of gram-negative bacteria that excrete IgA protease. Moreover, the S. sanguis iga gene probes showed no detectable hybridization with chromosomal DNA of S. pneumoniae, although the IgA proteases of these two streptococcal species cleaved the identical peptide bond in the human IgA1 heavy-chain hinge region. Images PMID:3294181

  17. Evaluation on Potential Contributions of Protease Activated Receptors Related Mediators in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zeng, Xiaoning; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) have been recognized as a distinctive four-member family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be cleaved by certain serine proteases. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the role of PARs in allergic inflammation, the fundamental pathologic changes of allergy, but the potential roles of PARs in allergy remain obscure. Since many of these proteases are produced and actively involved in the pathologic process of inflammation including exudation of plasma components, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tissue damage and repair, PARs appear to make important contribution to allergy. The aim of the present review is to summarize the expression of PARs in inflammatory and structural cells, the influence of agonists or antagonists of PARs on cell behavior, and the involvement of PARs in allergic disorders, which will help us to better understand the roles of serine proteases and PARs in allergy. PMID:24876677

  18. Membrane proteases in the bacterial protein secretion and quality control pathway.

    PubMed

    Dalbey, Ross E; Wang, Peng; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2012-06-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of proteins that are permanently or transiently associated with the cytoplasmic membrane is crucially important for a wide range of essential processes in bacteria. This applies in particular to the secretion of proteins and to membrane protein quality control. Major progress has been made in elucidating the structure-function relationships of many of the responsible membrane proteases, including signal peptidases, signal peptide hydrolases, FtsH, the rhomboid protease GlpG, and the site 1 protease DegS. These enzymes employ very different mechanisms to cleave substrates at the cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic membrane surfaces or within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights the different ways that bacterial membrane proteases degrade their substrates, with special emphasis on catalytic mechanisms and substrate delivery to the respective active sites.

  19. Caspase-Cleaved Tau Co-Localizes with Early Tangle Markers in the Human Vascular Dementia Brain

    PubMed Central

    Day, Ryan J.; Mason, Maria J.; Thomas, Chloe; Poon, Wayne W.; Rohn, Troy T.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second most common form of dementia in the United States and is characterized as a cerebral vessel vascular disease that leads to ischemic episodes. Whereas the relationship between caspase-cleaved tau and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been previously described, whether caspase activation and cleavage of tau occurs in VaD is presently unknown. To investigate a potential role for caspase-cleaved tau in VaD, we analyzed seven confirmed cases of VaD by immunohistochemistry utilizing a well-characterized antibody that specifically detects caspase-cleaved tau truncated at Asp421. Application of this antibody (TauC3) revealed consistent labeling within NFTs, dystrophic neurites within plaque-rich regions and corpora amylacea (CA) in the human VaD brain. Labeling of CA by the TauC3 antibody was widespread throughout the hippocampus proper, was significantly higher compared to age matched controls, and co-localized with ubiquitin. Staining of the TauC3 antibody co-localized with MC-1, AT8, and PHF-1 within NFTs. Quantitative analysis indicated that roughly 90% of PHF-1-labeled NFTs contained caspase-cleaved tau. In addition, we documented the presence of active caspase-3 within plaques, blood vessels and pretangle neurons that co-localized with TauC3. Collectively, these data support a role for the activation of caspase-3 and proteolytic cleavage of TauC3 in VaD providing further support for the involvement of this family of proteases in NFT pathology. PMID:26161867

  20. A Genomic Analysis of Rat Proteases and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Proteases perform important roles in multiple biological and pathological processes. The availability of the rat genome sequence has facilitated the analysis of the complete protease repertoire or degradome of this model organism. The rat degradome consists of at least 626 proteases and homologs, which are distributed into 24 aspartic, 160 cysteine, 192 metallo, 221 serine, and 29 threonine proteases. This distribution is similar to that of the mouse degradome but is more complex than that of the human degradome composed of 561 proteases and homologs. This increased complexity of rat proteases mainly derives from the expansion of several families, including placental cathepsins, testases, kallikreins, and hematopoietic serine proteases, involved in reproductive or immunological functions. These protease families have also evolved differently in rat and mouse and may contribute to explain some functional differences between these closely related species. Likewise, genomic analysis of rat protease inhibitors has shown some differences with mouse protease inhibitors and the expansion of families of cysteine and serine protease inhibitors in rodents with respect to human. These comparative analyses may provide new views on the functional diversity of proteases and inhibitors and contribute to the development of innovative strategies for treating proteolysis diseases. PMID:15060002

  1. The omptins of Yersinia pestis and Salmonella enterica cleave the reactive center loop of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1.

    PubMed

    Haiko, Johanna; Laakkonen, Liisa; Juuti, Katri; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Korhonen, Timo K

    2010-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) and a key molecule that regulates fibrinolysis by inactivating human plasminogen activators. Here we show that two important human pathogens, the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis and the enteropathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, inactivate PAI-1 by cleaving the R346-M347 bait peptide bond in the reactive center loop. No cleavage of PAI-1 was detected with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, an oral/fecal pathogen from which Y. pestis has evolved, or with Escherichia coli. The cleavage and inactivation of PAI-1 were mediated by the outer membrane proteases plasminogen activator Pla of Y. pestis and PgtE protease of S. enterica, which belong to the omptin family of transmembrane endopeptidases identified in Gram-negative bacteria. Cleavage of PAI-1 was also detected with the omptins Epo of Erwinia pyrifoliae and Kop of Klebsiella pneumoniae, which both belong to the same omptin subfamily as Pla and PgtE, whereas no cleavage of PAI-1 was detected with omptins of Shigella flexneri or E. coli or the Yersinia chromosomal omptins, which belong to other omptin subfamilies. The results reveal a novel serpinolytic mechanism by which enterobacterial species expressing omptins of the Pla subfamily bypass normal control of host proteolysis.

  2. Understanding the specificity of serpin-protease complexes through interface analysis.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Qudsia; Kapil, Charu; Singh, Poonam; Kumari, Vineeta; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2015-01-01

    Serpins such as antithrombin, heparin cofactor II, plasminogen activator inhibitor, antitrypsin, antichymotrypsin, and neuroserpin are involved in important biological processes by inhibiting specific serine proteases. Initially, the protease recognizes the mobile reactive loop of the serpin eliciting conformational changes, where the cleaved loop together with the protease inserts into β-sheet A, translocating the protease to the opposite side of inhibitor leading to its inactivation. Serpin interaction with proteases is governed mainly by the reactive center loop residues (RCL). However, in some inhibitory serpins, exosite residues apart from RCL have been shown to confer protease specificity. Further, this forms the basis of multi-specificity of some serpins, but the residues and their dimension at interface in serpin-protease complexes remain elusive. Here, we present a comprehensive structural analysis of the serpin-protease interfaces using bio COmplexes COntact MAPS (COCOMAPS), PRotein Interface Conservation and Energetics (PRICE), and ProFace programs. We have carried out interface, burial, and evolutionary analysis of different serpin-protease complexes. Among the studied complexes, non-inhibitory serpins exhibit larger interface region with greater number of residue involvement as compared to the inhibitory serpins. On comparing the multi-specific serpins (antithrombin and antitrypsin), a difference in the interface area and residue number was observed, suggestive of a differential mechanism of action of these serpins in regulating their different target proteases. Further, detailed study of these multi-specific serpins listed few essential residues (common in all the complexes) and certain specificity (unique to each complex) determining residues at their interfaces. Structural mapping of interface residues suggested that individual patches with evolutionary conserved residues in specific serpins determine their specificity towards a particular protease.

  3. Proteolysis of bacterial membrane proteins by Neisseria gonorrhoeae type 2 immunoglobulin A1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Shoberg, R J; Mulks, M H

    1991-01-01

    The immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases of Neisseria gonorrhoeae have been defined as having human IgA1 as their single permissive substrate. However, in recent years there have been reports of other proteins which are susceptible to the proteolytic activity of these enzymes. To examine the possibility that gonococcal membrane proteins are potential substrates for these enzymes, isolated outer and cytoplasmic membranes of N. gonorrhoeae were treated in vitro with exogenous pure IgA1 protease. Analysis of silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of outer membranes indicated that there were two outer membrane proteins of 78 and 68 kDa which were cleaved by IgA1 protease in vitro in GCM 740 (a wild-type strain) and in two isogenic IgA1 protease-negative variants. Similar results were observed with a second gonococcal strain, F62, and its isogenic IgA1 protease-negative derivative. When GCM 740 cytoplasmic membranes were treated with protease, three minor proteins of 24.5, 23.5, and 21.5 kDa were cleaved. In addition, when outer membranes of Escherichia coli DH1 were treated with IgA1 protease, several proteins were hydrolyzed. While the identities of all of these proteolyzed proteins are unknown, the data presented indicate that there are several proteins found in the isolated membranes of gram-negative bacteria which are permissive in vitro substrates for gonococcal IgA1 protease. Images PMID:1713195

  4. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  5. Calpain 1 cleaves and inactivates prostacyclin synthase in mesenteric arteries from diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Randriamboavonjy, Voahanginirina; Kyselova, Anastasia; Elgheznawy, Amro; Zukunft, Sven; Wittig, Ilka; Fleming, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of co-morbidities including an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. The activation of Ca(2+)-activated proteases of the calpain family has been implicated in platelet activation associated with diabetes and this study aimed to determine the role of calpain activation in the development of endothelial dysfunction. Diabetes induction in mice attenuated acetylcholine-induced relaxation of mesenteric artery rings, an effect prevented in mice receiving a calpain inhibitor. A nitric oxide-independent but diclofenac-sensitive component of the relaxation-response was altered and correlated with a loss of prostacyclin (PGI2) generation and reduced vascular levels of PGI2 synthase. Calpain inhibition was also able to restore PGI2 synthase levels and PGI2 generation in arteries from diabetic animals. The effects of diabetes were reproduced in vitro by a combination of high glucose and palmitate, which elicited calpain activation, PGI2 synthase cleavage and inactivation as well as endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice. PGI2 cleavage was not observed in arteries from calpain 1(-/-) mice or mice overexpressing the endogenous calpain inhibitor calpastatin. Finally, proteomic analyses revealed that calpain 1 cleaved the C-terminal domain of PGI2 synthase close to the catalytic site of the enzyme. These data demonstrate that diabetes leads to the activation of calpain 1 in mesenteric arteries and can initiate endothelial dysfunction by cleaving and inactivating the PGI2 synthase. Given that calpain inhibition prevented diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries, calpains represent an interesting therapeutic target for the prevention of cardiovascular complication of diabetes.

  6. BACE2, a beta -secretase homolog, cleaves at the beta site and within the amyloid-beta region of the amyloid-beta precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Farzan, M; Schnitzler, C E; Vasilieva, N; Leung, D; Choe, H

    2000-08-15

    Production of amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) is initiated by a beta-secretase that cleaves the Abeta precursor protein (APP) at the N terminus of Abeta (the beta site). A recently identified aspartyl protease, BACE, cleaves the beta site and at residue 11 within the Abeta region of APP. Here we show that BACE2, a BACE homolog, cleaves at the beta site and more efficiently at a different site within Abeta. The Flemish missense mutation of APP, implicated in a form of familial Alzheimer's disease, is adjacent to this latter site and markedly increases Abeta production by BACE2 but not by BACE. BACE and BACE2 respond identically to conservative beta-site mutations, and alteration of a common active site Arg inhibits beta-site cleavage but not cleavage within Abeta by both enzymes. These data suggest that BACE2 contributes to Abeta production in individuals bearing the Flemish mutation, and that selective inhibition of these highly similar proteases may be feasible and therapeutically advantageous.

  7. Rice tungro spherical virus polyprotein processing: identification of a virus-encoded protease and mutational analysis of putative cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Thole, V; Hull, R

    1998-07-20

    Rice tungro spherical virus encodes a large polyprotein containing motifs with sequence similarity to viral serine-like proteases and RNA polymerases. Polyclonal antisera raised against domains of the putative protease and polymerase in fusion with glutathione S-transferase detected a protein of about 35 kDa and, in very low amounts, a protein of about 70 kDa, respectively, in extracts from infected plants. In in vitro transcription/translation systems and in Escherichia coli we demonstrated a proteolytic activity in the C-terminal region of the polyprotein. This protease rapidly cleaved its polyprotein precursors in vitro. Mutating a potential cleavage site located N-terminal to the protease domain, Gln2526-Asp2527, diminished processing. The transversion mutation at the putative C-terminal cleavage site of the protease, at Gln2852-Ala2853, led to a delayed and partial processing.

  8. Effect of proteases on the. beta. -thromboglobulin radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Donlon, M.A.

    1985-02-11

    Rat peritoneal mast cells and mast cell granules were evaluated by radioimmunoassay for the presence of ..beta..-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4. The initial assays indicated that a ..beta..-thromboglobulin cross reacting material was released from mast cells by compound 48/80 in a similar dose-dependent manner as histamine release. The material was also found to be associated with purified granules. However, the use of protease inhibitors in the buffers completely abolished the positive assays. Further evaluation of the effects of various proteases on the ..beta..-thromboglobulin assay indicated that elastase would also generate a false positive assay which could then be neutralized by the use of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin as a protease inhibitor. There was no protease effect on the platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay which always showed no detectable amounts with mast cells, granules or proteases. These results clearly indicate the artifactual positive assays which can arise when using certain radioimmunoassay tests in the presence of cell proteases. The use of protease inhibitors is a necessary control when applying a radioimmunoassay to a system with potentially active proteases. 24 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Taspase1: a 'misunderstood' protease with translational cancer relevance.

    PubMed

    Wünsch, D; Hahlbrock, A; Jung, S; Schirmeister, T; van den Boom, J; Schilling, O; Knauer, S K; Stauber, R H

    2016-06-30

    Proteolysis is not only a critical requirement for life, but the executing enzymes also play important roles in numerous pathological conditions, including cancer. Therefore, targeting proteases is clearly relevant for improving cancer patient care. However, to effectively control proteases, a profound knowledge of their mechanistic function as well as their regulation and downstream signalling in health and disease is required. The highly conserved protease Threonine Aspartase1 (Taspase1) is overexpressed in numerous liquid and solid malignancies and was characterized as a 'non-oncogene addiction' protease. Although Taspase1 was shown to cleave various regulatory proteins in humans as well as leukaemia provoking mixed lineage leukaemia fusions, our knowledge on its detailed functions and the underlying mechanisms contributing to cancer is still incomplete. Despite superficial similarity to type 2 asparaginases as well as Ntn proteases, such as the proteasome, Taspase1-related research so far gives us the picture of a unique protease exhibiting special features. Moreover, neither effective genetic nor chemical inhibitors for this enzyme are available so far, thus hampering not only to further dissect Taspase1's pathobiological functions but also precluding the assessment of its clinical impact. Based on recent insights, we here critically review the current knowledge of Taspase1's structure-function relationship and its mechanistic relevance for tumorigenesis obtained from in vitro and in vivo cancer models. We provide a comprehensive overview of tumour entities for which Taspase1 might be of predictive and therapeutic value, and present the respective experimental evidence. To stimulate progress in the field, a comprehensive overview of Taspase1 targeting approaches is presented, including coverage of Taspase1-related patents. We conclude by discussing future inhibition strategies and relevant challenges, which need to be resolved by the field.

  10. RNA-Cleaving DNA Enzymes with Altered Regio- or Enantioselectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    In vitro evolution methods were used to obtain DNA enzymes that cleave either a 2',5' - phosphodiester following a wibonucleotide or a 3',5' -phosphodiester following an L-ribonucleotide. Both enzymes can operate in an intermolecular reaction format with multiple turnover. The DNA enzyme that cleaves a 2',5' -phosphodiester exhibits a k(sub cat) of approx. 0.01/ min and catalytic efficiency, k(sub cat)/k(sub m) of approx. 10(exp 5)/ M min. The enzyme that cleaves an L-ribonudeotide is about 10-fold slower and has a catalytic efficiency of approx. 4 x 10(exp 5)/ M min. Both enzymes require a divalent metal cation for their activity and have optimal catalytic rate at pH 7-8 and 35-50 C. In a comparison of each enzyme s activity with either its corresponding substrate that contains an unnatural ribonudeotide or a substrate that instead contains a standard ribonucleotide, the 2',5' -phosphodiester-deaving DNA enzyme exhibited a regioselectivity of 6000- fold, while the L-ribonucleotide-cleaving DNA enzyme exhibited an enantioselectivity of 50-fold. These molecules demonstrate how in vitro evolution can be used to obtain regio- and enantioselective catalysts that exhibit specificities for nonnatural analogues of biological compounds.

  11. Proteases in bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ingmer, Hanne; Brøndsted, Lone

    2009-11-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for protein quality control under adverse conditions experienced in the host, as well as for the timely degradation of central virulence regulators. We have focused on the contribution of the conserved Lon, Clp, HtrA and FtsH proteases to pathogenesis and have highlighted common biological processes for which their activities are important for virulence.

  12. Proteasome dysfunction triggers activation of SKN-1A/Nrf1 by the aspartic protease DDI-1

    PubMed Central

    Lehrbach, Nicolas J; Ruvkun, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Proteasomes are essential for protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. To preserve cellular function, transcription of proteasome subunit genes is induced in response to proteasome dysfunction caused by pathogen attacks or proteasome inhibitor drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this response requires SKN-1, a transcription factor related to mammalian Nrf1/2. Here, we use comprehensive genetic analyses to identify the pathway required for C. elegans to detect proteasome dysfunction and activate SKN-1. Genes required for SKN-1 activation encode regulators of ER traffic, a peptide N-glycanase, and DDI-1, a conserved aspartic protease. DDI-1 expression is induced by proteasome dysfunction, and we show that DDI-1 is required to cleave and activate an ER-associated isoform of SKN-1. Mammalian Nrf1 is also ER-associated and subject to proteolytic cleavage, suggesting a conserved mechanism of proteasome surveillance. Targeting mammalian DDI1 protease could mitigate effects of proteasome dysfunction in aging and protein aggregation disorders, or increase effectiveness of proteasome inhibitor cancer chemotherapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17721.001 PMID:27528192

  13. Flotillins bind to the dileucine sorting motif of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 and influence its endosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    John, Bincy A; Meister, Melanie; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2014-04-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is a protease that participates in the amyloidogenic cleavage of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein. Trafficking of BACE1 has been shown to be largely mediated by an acidic cluster dileucine motif in its cytoplasmic tail. This sorting signal functions both in endocytosis and endosomal sorting/recycling of BACE1 by providing a binding site for various sorting factors, such as the Golgi-localizing γ-ear containing ADP ribosylation factor binding (GGA) proteins that mediate BACE1 sorting within endosomes. Because flotillin-1 has been suggested to bind to BACE1 cytoplasmic tail, we analyzed the role of flotillins in BACE1 sorting. We show that flotillin-1 directly binds to the dileucine motif in the cytoplasmic tail of BACE1, whereas flotillin-2 binding is mainly mediated by its interaction with flotillin-1. Depletion of flotillins results in altered subcellular localization of BACE1 in endosomes and stabilization of BACE1 protein. Furthermore, amyloidogenic processing of Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein is increased. Flotillins compete with GGA proteins for binding to the dileucine motif in the BACE1 tail, suggesting that they play an important role in endosomal sorting of BACE1. The present study shows for the first time that flotillins are involved in endosomal sorting of BACE1. Because the endosomal localization of BACE1 affects its function as the β-secretase by increasing amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein, flotillins may play a novel role in Alzheimer's disease. The present study is the first to show that flotillins bind to a canonical sorting signal and influence the binding of endosomal sorting factors onto cargo tails.

  14. Hepacivirus NS3/4A Proteases Interfere with MAVS Signaling in both Their Cognate Animal Hosts and Humans: Implications for Zoonotic Transmission.

    PubMed

    Anggakusuma; Brown, Richard J P; Banda, Dominic H; Todt, Daniel; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Steinmann, Eike; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Multiple novel members of the genus Hepacivirus have recently been discovered in diverse mammalian species. However, to date, their replication mechanisms and zoonotic potential have not been explored in detail. The NS3/4A serine protease of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is critical for cleavage of the viral polyprotein. It also cleaves the cellular innate immune adaptor MAVS, thus decreasing interferon (IFN) production and contributing to HCV persistence in the human host. To investigate the conservation of fundamental aspects of the hepaciviral life cycle, we explored if MAVS cleavage and suppression of innate immune signaling represent a common mechanism employed across different clades of the genus Hepacivirus to enhance viral replication. To estimate the zoonotic potential of these nonhuman hepaciviruses, we assessed if their NS3/4A proteases were capable of cleaving human MAVS. NS3/4A proteases of viruses infecting colobus monkeys, rodents, horses, and cows cleaved the MAVS proteins of their cognate hosts and interfered with the ability of MAVS to induce the IFN-β promoter. All NS3/4A proteases from nonhuman viruses readily cleaved human MAVS. Thus, NS3/4A-dependent cleavage of MAVS is a conserved replication strategy across multiple clades within the genus Hepacivirus Human MAVS is susceptible to cleavage by these nonhuman viral proteases, indicating that it does not pose a barrier for zoonotic transmission of these viruses to humans.

  15. Laundry performance of subtilisin proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A M; Showell, M S; Venegas, M G; Barnett, B L; Wertz, W C

    1996-01-01

    Effective laundry protease performance against susceptible stains depends upon both the enzyme itself and the environment in which it must work. In order to technically design superior laundry proteases, a model for protease's mechanism of action in detergents was developed which has been substantiated through-the-wash. While evaluation of this model and/or a given protease's effectiveness could be judged by a variety of methods, the utility of using visual wash performance comparisons, analytical, and stain characterization studies is described. Finally, data comparing the performance of wild type Subtilisin proteases with mutants designed via the projected model are given, demonstrating possible utility of the system.

  16. Secreted Proteases Control Autolysin-mediated Biofilm Growth of Staphylococcus aureus*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Krishnan, Vengadesan; Macon, Kevin; Manne, Kartik; Narayana, Sthanam V. L.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, a commensal of humans, secretes Esp protease to prevent Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and colonization. Blocking S. aureus colonization may reduce the incidence of invasive infectious diseases; however, the mechanism whereby Esp disrupts biofilms is unknown. We show here that Esp cleaves autolysin (Atl)-derived murein hydrolases and prevents staphylococcal release of DNA, which serves as extracellular matrix in biofilms. The three-dimensional structure of Esp was revealed by x-ray crystallography and shown to be highly similar to that of S. aureus V8 (SspA). Both atl and sspA are necessary for biofilm formation, and purified SspA cleaves Atl-derived murein hydrolases. Thus, S. aureus biofilms are formed via the controlled secretion and proteolysis of autolysin, and this developmental program appears to be perturbed by the Esp protease of S. epidermidis. PMID:23970550

  17. Protease activation of the entomocidal protoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki.

    PubMed

    Andrews, R E; Bibilos, M M; Bulla, L A

    1985-10-01

    Two isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki were examined which produced different levels of intracellular proteases. Although the crystals from both strains had comparable toxicity, one of the strains, LB1, had a strong polypeptide band at 68,000 molecular weight in the protein from the crystal; in the other, HD251, no such band was evident. When the intracellular proteases in both strains were measured, strain HD251 produced less than 10% of the proteolytic activity found in LB1. These proteases were primarily neutral metalloproteases, although low levels of other proteases were detected. In LB1, the synthesis of protease increased as the cells began to sporulate; however, in HD251, protease activity appeared much later in the sporulation cycle. The protease activity in strain LB1 was very high when the cells were making crystal toxin, whereas in HD251 reduced proteolytic activity was present during crystal toxin synthesis. The insecticidal toxin (molecular weight, 68,000) from both strains could be prepared by cleaving the protoxin (molecular weight, 135,000) with trypsin, followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The procedure described gave quantitative recovery of toxic activity, and approximately half of the total protein was recovered. Calculations show that these results correspond to stoichiometric conversion of protoxin to insecticidal toxin. The toxicities of whole crystals, soluble crystal protein, and purified toxin from both strains were comparable.

  18. Antimicrobial proteins and peptides in human lung diseases: A friend and foe partnership with host proteases.

    PubMed

    Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Andrault, Pierre-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Lung antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are major sentinels of innate immunity by preventing microbial colonization and infection. Nevertheless bactericidal activity of AMPs against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is compromised in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF) and asthma. Evidence is accumulating that expression of harmful human serine proteases, matrix metalloproteases and cysteine cathepsins is markedely increased in these chronic lung diseases. The local imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors compromises lung tissue integrity and function, by not only degrading extracellular matrix components, but also non-matrix proteins. Despite the fact that AMPs are somewhat resistant to proteolytic degradation, some human proteases cleave them efficiently and impair their antimicrobial potency. By contrast, certain AMPs may be effective as antiproteases. Host proteases participate in concert with bacterial proteases in the degradation of key innate immunity peptides/proteins and thus may play immunomodulatory activities during chronic lung diseases. In this context, the present review highlights the current knowledge and recent discoveries on the ability of host enzymes to interact with AMPs, providing a better understanding of the role of human proteases in innate host defense.

  19. Structure of the catalytic domain of the hepatitis C virus NS2-3 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz,I.; Marcotrigiano, J.; Dentzer, T.; Rice, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus is a major global health problem affecting an estimated 170 million people worldwide. Chronic infection is common and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is no vaccine available and current therapies have met with limited success. The viral RNA genome encodes a polyprotein that includes two proteases essential for virus replication. The NS2-3 protease mediates a single cleavage at the NS2/NS3 junction, whereas the NS3-4A protease cleaves at four downstream sites in the polyprotein. NS3-4A is characterized as a serine protease with a chymotrypsin-like fold, but the enzymatic mechanism of the NS2-3 protease remains unresolved. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the NS2-3 protease at 2.3 Angstroms resolution. The structure reveals a dimeric cysteine protease with two composite active sites. For each active site, the catalytic histidine and glutamate residues are contributed by one monomer, and the nucleophilic cysteine by the other. The carboxy-terminal residues remain coordinated in the two active sites, predicting an inactive post-cleavage form. Proteolysis through formation of a composite active site occurs in the context of the viral polyprotein expressed in mammalian cells. These features offer unexpected insights into polyprotein processing by hepatitis C virus and new opportunities for antiviral drug design.

  20. Analyzing Protease Specificity and Detecting in Vivo Proteolytic Events Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Nitin; Hixson, Kim K.; Culley, David E.; Smith, Richard D.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2010-07-01

    While trypsin remains the most commonly used protease in mass spectrometry, other proteases may be employed for increasing peptide-coverage or generating overlapping peptides. Knowledge of the accurate specifcity rules of these proteases is helpful for database search tools to detect peptides, and becomes crucial when mass spectrometry is used to discover in vivo proteolytic cleavages. In this study, we use tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the specifcity rules of selected proteases and describe MS- Proteolysis, a software tool for identifying putative sites of in vivo proteolytic cleavage. Our analysis suggests that the specifcity rules for some commonly used proteases can be improved, e.g., we find that V8 protease cuts not only after Asp and Glu, as currently expected, but also shows a smaller propensity to cleave after Gly for the conditions tested in this study. Finally, we show that comparative analysis of multiple proteases can be used to detect putative in vivo proteolytic sites on a proteome-wide scale.

  1. Conformer and pharmacophore based identification of peptidomimetic inhibitors of chikungunya virus nsP2 protease.

    PubMed

    Dhindwal, Sonali; Kesari, Pooja; Singh, Harvijay; Kumar, Pravindra; Tomar, Shailly

    2016-12-02

    Chikungunya virus nsP2 replication protein is a cysteine protease, which cleaves the nonstructural nsP1234 polyprotein into functional replication components. The cleavage and processing of nsP1234 by nsP2 protease is essential for the replication and proliferation of the virus. Thus, ChikV nsP2 protease is a promising target for antiviral drug discovery. In this study, the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of ChikV nsP2 protease (PDB ID: 4ZTB) was used for structure based identification and rational designing of peptidomimetic inhibitors against nsP2 protease. The interactions of the junction residues of nsP3/4 polyprotein in the active site of nsP2 protease have been mimicked to identify and design potential inhibitory molecules. Molecular docking of the nsP3/4 junction peptide in the active site of ChikV nsP2 protease provided the structural insight of the probable binding mode of nsP3/4 peptide and pigeonholed the molecular interactions critical for the substrate binding. Further, the shape and pharmacophoric properties of the viral nsP3/4 substrate peptide were taken into consideration and the mimetic molecules were identified and designed. The designed mimetic compounds were then analyzed by docking and their binding affinity was assessed by molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Phage-protease-peptide: a novel trifecta enabling multiplex detection of viable bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, S D; Tilton, L; Serrano, M A C; Wang, M; Vachet, R W; Nugen, S R

    2015-10-01

    Bacteriophages represent rapid, readily targeted, and easily produced molecular probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Molecular biology techniques have allowed researchers to make significant advances in the bioengineering of bacteriophage to further improve speed and sensitivity of detection. Despite their host specificity, bacteriophages have not been meaningfully leveraged in multiplex detection of bacterial pathogens. We propose a proof-of-principal phage-based scheme to enable multiplex detection. Our scheme involves bioengineering bacteriophage to carry a gene for a specific protease, which is expressed during infection of the target cell. Upon lysis, the protease is released to cleave a reporter peptide, and the signal detected. Here we demonstrate the successful (i) modification of T7 bacteriophage to carry tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease; (ii) expression of TEV protease by Escherichia coli following infection by our modified T7, an average of 2000 units of protease per phage are produced during infection; and (iii) proof-of-principle detection of E. coli in 3 h after a primary enrichment via TEV protease activity using a fluorescent peptide and using a designed target peptide for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. This proof-of-principle can be translated to other phage-protease-peptide combinations to enable multiplex bacterial detection and readily adopted on multiple platforms, like MALDI-TOF MS or fluorescent readers, commonly found in labs.

  3. The Proteolytic Activation of (H3N2) Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin Is Facilitated by Different Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Nora; Bergmann, Silke; Kösterke, Nadine; Lambertz, Ruth L. O.; Keppner, Anna; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Weiß, Siegfried; Hummler, Edith; Hatesuer, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cleavage of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) by host cell proteases is necessary for viral activation and infectivity. In humans and mice, members of the type II transmembrane protease family (TTSP), e.g., TMPRSS2, TMPRSS4, and TMPRSS11d (HAT), have been shown to cleave influenza virus HA for viral activation and infectivity in vitro. Recently, we reported that inactivation of a single HA-activating protease gene, Tmprss2, in knockout mice inhibits the spread of H1N1 influenza viruses. However, after infection of Tmprss2 knockout mice with an H3N2 influenza virus, only a slight increase in survival was observed, and mice still lost body weight. In this study, we investigated an additional trypsin-like protease, TMPRSS4. Both TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 are expressed in the same cell types of the mouse lung. Deletion of Tmprss4 alone in knockout mice does not protect them from body weight loss and death upon infection with H3N2 influenza virus. In contrast, Tmprss2−/− Tmprss4−/− double-knockout mice showed a remarkably reduced virus spread and lung pathology, in addition to reduced body weight loss and mortality. Thus, our results identified TMPRSS4 as a second host cell protease that, in addition to TMPRSS2, is able to activate the HA of H3N2 influenza virus in vivo. IMPORTANCE Influenza epidemics and recurring pandemics are responsible for significant global morbidity and mortality. Due to high variability of the virus genome, resistance to available antiviral drugs is frequently observed, and new targets for treatment of influenza are needed. Host cell factors essential for processing of the virus hemagglutinin represent very suitable drug targets because the virus is dependent on these host factors for replication. We reported previously that Tmprss2-deficient mice are protected against H1N1 virus infections, but only marginal protection against H3N2 virus infections was observed. Here we show that deletion of two host protease genes, Tmprss2 and

  4. The solution structure of the simian foamy virus protease reveals a monomeric protein.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Maximilian J; Wöhrl, Birgitta M; Rösch, Paul; Schweimer, Kristian

    2008-08-01

    In contrast to orthoretroviruses, foamy viruses (FVs) express their Pol polyprotein from a separate pol-specific transcript. Only the integrase domain is cleaved off, leading to a protease-reverse transcriptase (PR-RT) protein. We purified the separate PR domain (PRshort) of simian FV from macaques by expressing the recombinant gene in Escherichia coli. Sedimentation analyses and size exclusion chromatography indicate that PRshort is a stable monomer in solution. This allowed us to determine the structure of the PRshort monomer using 1426 experimental restraints derived from NMR spectroscopy. The superposition of 20 conformers resulted in a backbone atom rmsd of 0.55 A for residues Gln8-Leu93. Although the overall folds are similar, the macaque simian FV PRshort reveals significant differences in the dimerization interface relative to other retroviral PRs, such as HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) PR, which appear to be rather stable dimers. Especially the flap region and the N- and C-termini of PRshort are highly flexible. Neglecting these regions, the backbone atom rmsd drops to 0.32 A, highlighting the good definition of the central part of the protein. To exclude that the monomeric state of PRshort is due to cleaving off the RT, we purified the complete PR-RT and performed size exclusion chromatography. Our data show that PR-RT is also monomeric. We thus conclude adoption of a monomeric state of PR-RT to be a regulatory mechanism to inhibit PR activity before virus assembly in order to reduce packaging problems. Dimerization might therefore be triggered by additional viral or cellular factors.

  5. Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine micelles sustain the activity of Dengue non-structural (NS) protein 3 protease domain fused with the full-length NS2B.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiwei; Li, Qingxin; Joy, Joma; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Ruiz-Carrillo, David; Hill, Jeffrey; Lescar, Julien; Kang, Congbao

    2013-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the flavivirus genus, affects 50-100 million people in tropical and sub-tropical regions. The DENV protease domain is located at the N-terminus of the NS3 protease and requires for its enzymatic activity a hydrophilic segment of the NS2B that acts as a cofactor. The protease is an important antiviral drug target because it plays a crucial role in virus replication by cleaving the genome-coded polypeptide into mature functional proteins. Currently, there are no drugs to inhibit DENV protease activity. Most structural and functional studies have been conducted using protein constructs containing the NS3 protease domain connected to a soluble segment of the NS2B membrane protein via a nine-residue linker. For in vitro structural and functional studies, it would be useful to produce a natural form of the DENV protease containing the NS3 protease domain and the full-length NS2B protein. Herein, we describe the expression and purification of a natural form of DENV protease (NS2BFL-NS3pro) containing the full-length NS2B protein and the protease domain of NS3 (NS3pro). The protease was expressed and purified in detergent micelles necessary for its folding. Our results show that this purified protein was active in detergent micelles such as lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine (LMPC). These findings should facilitate further structural and functional studies of the protease and will facilitate drug discovery targeting DENV.

  6. ADAM17 cleaves CD16b (FcγRIIIb) in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Wu, Jianming; Newton, Robert; Bahaie, Nooshin S.; Long, Chunmei; Walcheck, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    CD16b (FcγRIIIb) is exclusively expressed by human neutrophils and binds IgG in immune complexes. Cell surface CD16b undergoes efficient ectodomain shedding upon neutrophil activation and apoptosis. Indeed, soluble CD16b is present at high levels in the plasma of healthy individuals, which appears to be maintained by the daily turnover of apoptotic neutrophils. At this time, the principal protease responsible for CD16b shedding is not known. We show that CD16b plasma levels were significantly decreased in patients administered a selective inhibitor targeting the metalloproteases ADAM10 and ADAM17. Additional analysis with inhibitors selective for ADAM10 or ADAM17 revealed that only inhibition of ADAM17 significantly blocked the cleavage of CD16b following neutrophil activation and apoptosis. CD16b shedding by ADAM17 was further demonstrated using a unique ADAM17 function-blocking mAb and a cell-based ADAM17 reconstitution assay. Unlike human CD16, however, mouse CD16 did not undergo efficient ectodomain shedding upon neutrophil stimulation or apoptosis, indicating that this mechanism cannot be modeled in normal mice. Taken together, our findings are the first to directly demonstrate that ADAM17 cleaves CD16 in human leukocytes. PMID:23228566

  7. Substrate-Induced Conformational Changes Occur in All Cleaved Forms of Caspase-6

    SciTech Connect

    S Vaidya; E Velazquez-Delgado; G Abbruzzese; J Hardy

    2011-12-31

    Caspase-6 is an apoptotic cysteine protease that also governs disease progression in Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases. Caspase-6 is of great interest as a target for treatment of these neurodegenerative diseases; however, the molecular basis of caspase-6 function and regulation remains poorly understood. In the recently reported structure of caspase-6, the 60's and 130's helices at the base of the substrate-binding groove extend upward, in a conformation entirely different from that of any other caspase. Presently, the central question about caspase-6 structure and function is whether the extended conformation is the catalytically competent conformation or whether the extended helices must undergo a large conformational rearrangement in order to bind substrate. We have generated a series of caspase-6 cleavage variants, including a novel constitutively two-chain form, and determined crystal structures of caspase-6 with and without the intersubunit linker. This series allows evaluation of the role of the prodomain and intersubunit linker on caspase-6 structure and function before and after substrate binding. Caspase-6 is inherently more stable than closely related caspases. Cleaved caspase-6 with both the prodomain and the linker present is the most stable, indicating that these two regions act in concert to increase stability, but maintain the extended conformation in the unliganded state. Moreover, these data suggest that caspase-6 undergoes a significant conformational change upon substrate binding, adopting a structure that is more like canonical caspases.

  8. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cleavage and Inactivation of Human Serine Protease Inhibitors by the Bacterial SPATE Protease EspPα from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, André; Joerss, Hanna; Brockmeyer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    EspPα and EspI are serine protease autotransporters found in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. They both belong to the SPATE autotransporter family and are believed to contribute to pathogenicity via proteolytic cleavage and inactivation of different key host proteins during infection. Here, we describe the specific cleavage and functional inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) by EspPα and compare this activity with the related SPATE EspI. Serpins are structurally related proteins that regulate vital protease cascades, such as blood coagulation and inflammatory host response. For the rapid determination of serpin cleavage sites, we applied direct MALDI-TOF-MS or ESI-FTMS analysis of coincubations of serpins and SPATE proteases and confirmed observed cleavage positions using in-gel-digest of SDS-PAGE-separated degradation products. Activities of both serpin and SPATE protease were assessed in a newly developed photometrical assay using chromogenic peptide substrates. EspPα cleaved the serpins α1-protease inhibitor (α1-PI), α1-antichymotrypsin, angiotensinogen, and α2-antiplasmin. Serpin cleavage led to loss of inhibitory function as demonstrated for α1-PI while EspPα activity was not affected. Notably, EspPα showed pronounced specificity and cleaved procoagulatory serpins such as α2-antiplasmin while the anticoagulatory antithrombin III was not affected. Together with recently published research, this underlines the interference of EspPα with hemostasis or inflammatory responses during infection, while the observed interaction of EspI with serpins is likely to be not physiologically relevant. EspPα-mediated serpin cleavage occurred always in flexible loops, indicating that this structural motif might be required for substrate recognition. PMID:25347319

  9. Large lateral movement of transmembrane helix S5 is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid intramembrane protease.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi; Ha, Ya

    2013-06-07

    Rhomboids represent an evolutionarily ancient protease family. Unlike most other proteases, they are polytopic membrane proteins and specialize in cleaving transmembrane protein substrates. The polar active site of rhomboid protease is embedded in the membrane and normally closed. For the bacterial rhomboid GlpG, it has been proposed that one of the transmembrane helices (S5) of the protease can rotate to open a lateral gate, enabling substrate to enter the protease from inside the membrane. Here, we studied the conformational change in GlpG by solving the cocrystal structure of the protease with a mechanism-based inhibitor. We also examined the lateral gating model by cross-linking S5 to a neighboring helix (S2). The crystal structure shows that inhibitor binding displaces a capping loop (L5) from the active site but causes only minor shifts in the transmembrane helices. Cross-linking S5 and S2, which not only restricts the lateral movement of S5 but also prevents substrate from passing between the two helices, does not hinder the ability of the protease to cleave a membrane protein substrate in detergent solution and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Taken together, these data suggest that a large lateral movement of the S5 helix is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid protease.

  10. Structure of the Autocatalytic Cysteine Protease Domain of Potyvirus Helper-component Proteinase*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bihong; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2011-01-01

    The helper-component proteinase (HC-Pro) of potyvirus is involved in polyprotein processing, aphid transmission, and suppression of antiviral RNA silencing. There is no high resolution structure reported for any part of HC-Pro, hindering mechanistic understanding of its multiple functions. We have determined the crystal structure of the cysteine protease domain of HC-Pro from turnip mosaic virus at 2.0 Å resolution. As a protease, HC-Pro only cleaves a Gly-Gly dipeptide at its own C terminus. The structure represents a postcleavage state in which the cleaved C terminus remains tightly bound at the active site cleft to prevent trans activity. The structure adopts a compact α/β-fold, which differs from papain-like cysteine proteases and shows weak similarity to nsP2 protease from Venezuelan equine encephalitis alphavirus. Nevertheless, the catalytic cysteine and histidine residues constitute an active site that is highly similar to these in papain-like and nsP2 proteases. HC-Pro recognizes a consensus sequence YXVGG around the cleavage site between the two glycine residues. The structure delineates the sequence specificity at sites P1–P4. Structural modeling and covariation analysis across the Potyviridae family suggest a tryptophan residue accounting for the glycine specificity at site P1′. Moreover, a surface of the protease domain is conserved in potyvirus but not in other genera of the Potyviridae family, likely due to extra functional constrain. The structure provides insight into the catalysis mechanism, cis-acting mode, cleavage site specificity, and other functions of the HC-Pro protease domain. PMID:21543324

  11. From proteases to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Neurath, H

    2001-04-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950-2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments).

  12. From proteases to proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, Hans

    2001-01-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950–2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments). PMID:11274481

  13. Biochemical analysis of hatchet self-cleaving ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sanshu; Lünse, Christina E.; Harris, Kimberly A.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Hatchet RNAs are members of a novel self-cleaving ribozyme class that was recently discovered by using a bioinformatics search strategy. The consensus sequence and secondary structure of this class includes 13 highly conserved and numerous other modestly conserved nucleotides interspersed among bulges linking four base-paired substructures. A representative hatchet ribozyme from a metagenomic source requires divalent ions such as Mg2+ to promote RNA strand scission with a maximum rate constant of ∼4 min−1. As with all other small self-cleaving ribozymes discovered to date, hatchet ribozymes employ a general mechanism for catalysis involving the nucleophilic attack of a ribose 2′-oxygen atom on an adjacent phosphorus center. Kinetic characteristics of the reaction demonstrate that members of this ribozyme class have an essential requirement for divalent metal ions and that they might have a complex active site that employs multiple catalytic strategies to accelerate RNA cleavage by internal phosphoester transfer. PMID:26385510

  14. Quantum wire structures by MBE overgrowth on a cleaved edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Loren; Störmer, H. L.; West, K.; Baldwin, K. W.

    1991-05-01

    We have recently demonstrated the existence of a high mobility (6.1×10 5 cm 2/V·s) two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the (110) vicinal surface formed by cleaving [L. Pfeiffer et al., Appl. Phys. Letters 56 (1990) 1697] a (100) GaAs wafer. We have now expanded this work to modulation-doped overgrowth on the cleaved edge of a multiperiod superlattice. We report here the first observation of the quantum Hall characteristics in such a two-dimensional system containing an atomically precise 71 Å GaAs by 31 Å Al 0.24Ga 0.76As compositional superlattice. The onset of Shubnikov-De Haas oscillations occurs at only 3000 G, implying the Landau cyclotron orbits are phase coherent over diameters as large as 5000 Å, corresponding to more than 200 GaAs/AlGaAs interface crossings.

  15. Function, therapeutic potential and cell biology of BACE proteases: current status and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Vassar, Robert; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Haass, Christian; Kennedy, Matthew E.; Rajendran, Lawrence; Wong, Philip C.; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.

    2014-01-01

    The β-site APP cleaving enzymes 1 and 2 (BACE1 and BACE2) were initially identified as transmembrane aspartyl proteases cleaving the amyloid precursor protein (APP). BACE1 is a major drug target for Alzheimer’s disease because BACE1-mediated cleavage of APP is the first step in the generation of the pathogenic amyloid-β peptides. BACE1, which is highly expressed in the nervous system, is also required for myelination by cleaving neuregulin 1. Several recent proteomic and in vivo studies usingBACE1-andBACE2-deficient mice demonstrate a much wider range of physiological substrates and functions for both proteases within and outside of the nervous system. For BACE1 this includes axon guidance, neurogenesis, muscle spindle formation, and neuronal network functions, whereas BACE2 was shown to be involved in pigmentation and pancreatic β-cell function. This review highlights the recent progress in understanding cell biology, substrates, and functions of BACE proteases and discusses the therapeutic options and potential mechanism-based liabilities, in particular for BACE inhibitors in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24646365

  16. CpaA a novel protease from Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates deregulates blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Derek; Law, Robert; Warren, Sarah; Samis, John A; Kumar, Ayush

    2014-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that displays high antibiotic resistance. It causes a variety of infections including pneumonias and sepsis which may result in disseminated intravascular coagulation. In this work, we identify and characterize a novel secreted, zinc-dependent, metallo-endopeptidase CpaA (coagulation targeting metallo-endopeptidase of Acinetobacter baumannii) which deregulates human blood coagulation in vitro and thus is likely to contribute to A. baumannii virulence. Three quarters of the clinical isolates tested (n = 16) had the cpaA gene; however, it was absent from two type strains, A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and A. baumannii ATCC 19606. The CpaA protein was purified from one clinical isolate and was able to cleave purified factor (F) V and fibrinogen and reduce the coagulation activity of FV in human plasma. CpaA-treated plasma showed reduced clotting activity in contact pathway-activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) assays, but increased clotting activity in tissue factor pathway prothrombin time (PT) assays. A significant portion of clinically relevant A. baumannii isolates secrete a protease which targets and deregulates the coagulation system.

  17. T. thermophila group I introns that cleave amide bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to nucleic acid enzymes or enzymatic RNA molecules that are capable of cleaving a variety of bonds, including phosphodiester bonds and amide bonds, in a variety of substrates. Thus, the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecules are capable of functioning as nucleases and/or peptidases. The present invention also relates to compositions containing the disclosed enzymatic RNA molecule and to methods of making, selecting, and using such enzymes and compositions.

  18. The Inflammatory Actions of Coagulant and Fibrinolytic Proteases in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuliga, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aside from their role in hemostasis, coagulant and fibrinolytic proteases are important mediators of inflammation in diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. The blood circulating zymogens of these proteases enter damaged tissue as a consequence of vascular leak or rupture to become activated and contribute to extravascular coagulation or fibrinolysis. The coagulants, factor Xa (FXa), factor VIIa (FVIIa), tissue factor, and thrombin, also evoke cell-mediated actions on structural cells (e.g., fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) or inflammatory cells (e.g., macrophages) via the proteolytic activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs). Plasmin, the principle enzymatic mediator of fibrinolysis, also forms toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) activating fibrin degradation products (FDPs) and can release latent-matrix bound growth factors such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Furthermore, the proteases that convert plasminogen into plasmin (e.g., urokinase plasminogen activator) evoke plasmin-independent proinflammatory actions involving coreceptor activation. Selectively targeting the receptor-mediated actions of hemostatic proteases is a strategy that may be used to treat inflammatory disease without the bleeding complications of conventional anticoagulant therapies. The mechanisms by which proteases of the coagulant and fibrinolytic systems contribute to extravascular inflammation in disease will be considered in this review. PMID:25878399

  19. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation.

  20. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    SciTech Connect

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas; Choi, Kyung H.

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  1. Inhibition of influenza virus infection and hemagglutinin cleavage by the protease inhibitor HAI-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Chung, Changik; Cyphers, Soreen Y.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Marcano, Valerie C.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza HA cleavage activation. • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza virus infection. • Comparative analysis of HAI-2 for vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type-1. • Analysis of the activity of HAI-2 in a mouse model of influenza. - Abstract: Influenza virus remains a significant concern to public health, with the continued potential for a high fatality pandemic. Vaccination and antiviral therapeutics are effective measures to circumvent influenza virus infection, however, multiple strains have emerged that are resistant to the antiviral therapeutics currently on the market. With this considered, investigation of alternative antiviral therapeutics is being conducted. One such approach is to inhibit cleavage activation of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is an essential step in the viral replication cycle that permits viral-endosome fusion. Therefore, targeting trypsin-like, host proteases responsible for HA cleavage in vivo may prove to be an effective therapeutic. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 2 (HAI-2) is naturally expressed in the respiratory tract and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin-like serine proteases, some of which have been determined to cleave HA. In this study, we demonstrate that HAI-2 is an effective inhibitor of cleavage of HA from the human-adapted H1 and H3 subtypes. HAI-2 inhibited influenza virus H1N1 infection in cell culture, and HAI-2 administration showed protection in a mouse model of influenza. HAI-2 has the potential to be an effective, alternative antiviral therapeutic for influenza.

  2. Serine protease inhibitors suppress pancreatic endogenous proteases and modulate bacterial neutral proteases.

    PubMed

    Nduaguibe, Chikodili C; Bentsi-Barnes, Kwamina; Mullen, Yoko; Kandeel, Fouad; Al-Abdullah, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Pefabloc, Trasylol and Urinary Trypsin Inhibitor (UTI) have been reported to be effective serine protease inhibitors that impair pancreatic endogenous proteases resulting in improved islet yield. Here we evaluated the effect of these inhibitors on endogenous proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase), bacterial neutral proteases (thermolysin and neutral protease) and islet isolation digestion samples. Protease activity was measured using a fluorimetric assay and islet function was assessed by dynamic perifusion. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase were significantly inhibited by Pefabloc and UTI. Trasylol showed strong inhibitory effects on trypsin and chymotrypsin but also decreased thermolysin activity. UTI was found to inhibit the activity of endogenous proteases and increase the activity of bacterial neutral proteases. Human islets exposed to Pefabloc had reduced insulin response, unlike Trasylol or UTI, which had no detrimental effect on insulin secretion. Although Trasylol was an effective inhibitor of endogenous proteases, FDA regulatory issues preclude its use in clinical application and thus in the isolation process. UTI has the greatest potential because it impairs endogenous pancreatic proteases and enhances digestion enzymes.

  3. Transient ECM protease activity promotes synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Magnowska, Marta; Gorkiewicz, Tomasz; Suska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent proteolysis at a synapse has been recognized as a pivotal factor in controlling dynamic changes in dendritic spine shape and function; however, excessive proteolytic activity is detrimental to the cells. The exact mechanism of control of these seemingly contradictory outcomes of protease activity remains unknown. Here, we reveal that dendritic spine maturation is strictly controlled by the proteolytic activity, and its inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor (Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 – TIMP-1). Excessive proteolytic activity impairs long-term potentiation of the synaptic efficacy (LTP), and this impairment could be rescued by inhibition of protease activity. Moreover LTP is altered persistently when the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit protease activity is abrogated, further demonstrating the role of such inhibition in the promotion of synaptic plasticity under well-defined conditions. We also show that dendritic spine maturation involves an intermediate formation of elongated spines, followed by their conversion into mushroom shape. The formation of mushroom-shaped spines is accompanied by increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio of glutamate receptors. Altogether, our results identify inhibition of protease activity as a critical regulatory mechanism for dendritic spines maturation. PMID:27282248

  4. A computational module assembled from different protease family motifs identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a putative prolyl peptidase with a serine protease scaffold.

    PubMed

    Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Shukla, Manish; Oda, Masataka; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Minda, Renu; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Goñi, Félix M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes have evolved several mechanisms to cleave peptide bonds. These distinct types have been systematically categorized in the MEROPS database. While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular reuse of catalytic units. We have previously established a computational method to detect functions in proteins based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the catalytic residues (CLASP). CLASP identified a promiscuous serine protease scaffold in alkaline phosphatases (AP) and a scaffold recognizing a β-lactam (imipenem) in a cold-active Vibrio AP. Subsequently, we defined a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. Here, we assemble a module which encapsulates the multifarious motifs used by protease families listed in the MEROPS database. Since APs and proteases are an integral component of outer membrane vesicles (OMV), we sought to query other OMV proteins, like phospholipase C (PLC), using this search module. Our analysis indicated that phosphoinositide-specific PLC from Bacillus cereus is a serine protease. This was validated by protease assays, mass spectrometry and by inhibition of the native phospholipase activity of PI-PLC by the well-known serine protease inhibitor AEBSF (IC50 = 0.018 mM). Edman degradation analysis linked the specificity of the protease activity to a proline in the amino terminal, suggesting that the PI-PLC is a prolyl peptidase. Thus, we propose a computational method of extending protein families based on the spatial and electrostatic congruence of active site residues.

  5. A protease-activated receptor 2 agonist (AC-264613) suppresses interferon regulatory factor 5 and decreases interleukin-12p40 production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages: Role of p53.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has a key role in the production of interleukin (IL)-12 by macrophages. IRF5 is also a central mediator of toll-like receptor signaling and is a direct target of p53. Activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) upregulates p53 and suppresses apoptosis. This study investigated the influence of human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and PAR-2 agonists on expression of IRF5 and IL-12p40 by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophages showed upregulation of IRF5 expression, while HNE reduced expression of p53 and IRF5 in a concentration-dependent manner. HNE also caused a concentration-dependent decrease of IRF5 in macrophages transfected with small interfering RNA to silence p53, while silencing of β-arrestin 2 blunted the reduction of p53 or IRF5 by HNE. Incubation of macrophages with a PAR-2 agonist, AC-264613, caused a decrease of IRF5 expression and also significantly reduced p53 protein expression. HNE upregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and caused transactivation of TLR4, while AC-264613 did not promote TLR4 transactivation. In conclusion, the PAR-2 agonist AC-264613 attenuated IRF5-associated IL-12p40 production by macrophages.

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence factors involved in subversion of leukocytes and microbial dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Zenobia, Camille; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-01-01

    The oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has special nutrient requirements due to its asaccharolytic nature subsisting on small peptides cleaved from host proteins. Using proteases and other virulence factors, P. gingivalis thrives as a component of a polymicrobial community in nutritionally favorable inflammatory environments. In this regard, P. gingivalis has a number of strategies that subvert the host immune response in ways that promote its colonization and facilitate the outgrowth of the surrounding microbial community. The focus of this review is to discuss at the molecular level how P. gingivalis subverts leukocytes to create a favorable environment for a select community of bacteria that, in turn, adversely affects the periodontal tissues.

  7. PROSPER: An Integrated Feature-Based Tool for Predicting Protease Substrate Cleavage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Andrew J.; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to catalytically cleave protein substrates after synthesis is fundamental for all forms of life. Accordingly, site-specific proteolysis is one of the most important post-translational modifications. The key to understanding the physiological role of a protease is to identify its natural substrate(s). Knowledge of the substrate specificity of a protease can dramatically improve our ability to predict its target protein substrates, but this information must be utilized in an effective manner in order to efficiently identify protein substrates by in silico approaches. To address this problem, we present PROSPER, an integrated feature-based server for in silico identification of protease substrates and their cleavage sites for twenty-four different proteases. PROSPER utilizes established specificity information for these proteases (derived from the MEROPS database) with a machine learning approach to predict protease cleavage sites by using different, but complementary sequence and structure characteristics. Features used by PROSPER include local amino acid sequence profile, predicted secondary structure, solvent accessibility and predicted native disorder. Thus, for proteases with known amino acid specificity, PROSPER provides a convenient, pre-prepared tool for use in identifying protein substrates for the enzymes. Systematic prediction analysis for the twenty-four proteases thus far included in the database revealed that the features we have included in the tool strongly improve performance in terms of cleavage site prediction, as evidenced by their contribution to performance improvement in terms of identifying known cleavage sites in substrates for these enzymes. In comparison with two state-of-the-art prediction tools, PoPS and SitePrediction, PROSPER achieves greater accuracy and coverage. To our knowledge, PROSPER is the first comprehensive server capable of predicting cleavage sites of multiple proteases within a single substrate sequence using

  8. Expression of IgA Proteases by Haemophilus influenzae in the Respiratory Tract of Adults With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Kirkham, Charmaine; Jones, Megan M.; Sethi, Sanjay; Kong, Yong; Pettigrew, Melinda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Immunoglobulin (Ig)A proteases of Haemophilus influenzae are highly specific endopeptidases that cleave the hinge region of human IgA1 and also mediate invasion and trafficking in human respiratory epithelial cells, facilitating persistence of H. influenzae. Little is known about the expression of IgA proteases in clinical settings of H. influenzae infection. Methods. We identified and characterized IgA protease genes in H. influenzae and studied their expression and proteolytic specificity, in vitro and in vivo in 169 independent strains of H. influenzae collected longitudinally over 10 years from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Results. The H. influenzae pangenome has 2 alleles of IgA protease genes; all strains have igaA, and 40% of strains have igaB. Each allele has 2 variants with differing proteolytic specificities for human IgA1. A total of 88% of 169 strains express IgA protease activity. Expression of the 4 forms of IgA protease varies among strains. Based on the presence of IgA1 fragments in sputum samples, each of the different forms of IgA protease is selectively expressed in the human airways during infection. Conclusions. Four variants of IgA proteases are variably expressed by H. influenzae during infection of the human airways. PMID:25995193

  9. Regulation of visceral adipose tissue-derived serine protease inhibitor by nutritional status, metformin, gender and pituitary factors in rat white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    González, C R; Caminos, J E; Vázquez, M J; Garcés, M F; Cepeda, L A; Angel, A; González, A C; García-Rendueles, M E; Sangiao-Alvarellos, S; López, M; Bravo, S B; Nogueiras, R; Diéguez, C

    2009-07-15

    Visceral adipose tissue-derived serine protease inhibitor (vaspin) is a recently discovered adipocytokine mainly secreted from visceral adipose tissue, which plays a main role in insulin sensitivity. In this study, we have investigated the regulation of vaspin gene expression in rat white adipose tissue (WAT) in different physiological (nutritional status, pregnancy, age and gender) and pathophysiological (gonadectomy, thyroid status and growth hormone deficiency) settings known to be associated with energy homeostasis and alterations in insulin sensitivity. We have determined vaspin gene expression by real-time PCR. Vaspin was decreased after fasting and its levels were partially recovered after leptin treatment. Chronic treatment with metformin increased vaspin gene expression. Vaspin mRNA expression reached the highest peak at 45 days in both sexes after birth and its expression was higher in females than males, but its levels did not change throughout pregnancy. Finally, decreased levels of growth hormone and thyroid hormones suppressed vaspin expression. These findings suggest that WAT vaspin mRNA expression is regulated by nutritional status, and leptin seems to be the nutrient signal responsible for those changes. Vaspin is influenced by age and gender, and its expression is increased after treatment with insulin sensitizers. Finally, alterations in pituitary functions modify vaspin levels. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating vaspin will provide new insights into the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome.

  10. MALT1 cleaves the E3 ubiquitin ligase HOIL-1 in activated T cells, generating a dominant negative inhibitor of LUBAC-induced NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Elton, Lynn; Carpentier, Isabelle; Staal, Jens; Driege, Yasmine; Haegman, Mira; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-02-01

    Human paracaspase 1 (PCASP1), better known as mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation 1 (MALT1), plays a key role in immunity and inflammation by regulating gene expression in lymphocytes and other immune cell types. Deregulated MALT1 activity has been implicated in autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and certain types of lymphoma. As a scaffold MALT1 assembles downstream signaling proteins for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, while its proteolytic activity further enhances NF-κB activation by cleaving NF-κB inhibitory proteins. MALT1 also processes and inactivates a number of mRNA destabilizing proteins, which further fine-tunes gene expression. MALT1 protease inhibitors are currently developed for therapeutic targeting. Here we show that T cell activation, as well as overexpression of the oncogenic fusion protein API2-MALT1, induces the MALT1-mediated cleavage of haem-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase 1 (HOIL-1). In addition, to acting as a K48-polyubiquitin specific E3 ubiquitin ligase for different substrates, HOIL-1 co-operates in a catalytic-independent manner with the E3 ubiquitin ligase HOIL-1L interacting protein (HOIP) as part of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC). Intriguingly, cleavage of HOIL-1 does not directly abolish its ability to support HOIP-induced NF-κB signaling, which is still mediated by the N-terminal cleavage fragment, but generates a C-terminal fragment with LUBAC inhibitory properties. We propose that MALT1-mediated HOIL-1 cleavage provides a gain-of-function mechanism that is involved in the negative feedback regulation of NF-κB signaling.

  11. Mycobacterial Caseinolytic Protease Gene Regulator ClgR Is a Substrate of Caseinolytic Protease

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mycobacterial caseinolytic protease ClpP1P2 is a degradative protease that recently gained interest as a genetically and pharmacologically validated drug target for tuberculosis. The first whole-cell active ClpP1P2 inhibitor, the human proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, is currently undergoing lead optimization to introduce selectivity for the bacterial target. How inhibition of ClpP1P2 translates into whole-cell antimicrobial activity is little understood. Previous work has shown that the caseinolytic protease gene regulator ClgR is an activator of the clpP1P2 genes and also suggested that this transcription factor may be a substrate of the protease. Here, we employ promoter activity reporters and direct mRNA level measurements showing that bortezomib treatment of Mycobacterium bovis BCG increased transcription of clpP1P2 and other ClgR-dependent promoters, suggesting that inhibition of ClpP1P2 increases cellular ClgR levels. Then, we carried out red fluorescent protein-ClgR fusion analyses to show that ClgR is indeed a substrate of ClpP1P2 and to identify ClgR’s C-terminal nonapeptide APVVSLAVA as the signal sufficient for recognition and efficient protein degradation by ClpP1P2. Interestingly, accumulation of ClgR appears to be toxic for bacilli, suggesting a mechanism for how pharmacological inhibition of ClpP1P2 protease activity by bortezomib translates into whole-cell antibacterial activity. IMPORTANCE With 9 million new cases and more than 1 million deaths per year, tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the biggest infectious disease killer globally. New drugs for the treatment of the drug-resistant forms of the disease are needed. Recently, a new target-lead couple, the mycobacterial protease ClpP1P2 and the human anticancer drug bortezomib, was identified. However, we know little about how expression of this protease is regulated, which proteins in the bacterium it degrades, how the protease recognizes its target proteins

  12. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  13. Protease specificity determination by using cellular libraries of peptide substrates (CLiPS).

    PubMed

    Boulware, Kevin T; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2006-05-16

    We report a general combinatorial approach to identify optimal substrates of a given protease by using quantitative kinetic screening of cellular libraries of peptide substrates (CLiPS). A whole-cell protease activity assay was developed by displaying fluorescent reporter substrates on the surface of Escherichia coli as N-terminal fusions. This approach enabled generation of substrate libraries of arbitrary amino acid composition and length that are self-renewing. Substrate hydrolysis by a target protease was measured quantitatively via changes in whole-cell fluorescence by using FACS. FACS enabled efficient screening to identify optimal substrates for a given protease and characterize their cleavage kinetics. The utility of CLiPS was demonstrated by determining the substrate specificity of two unrelated proteases, caspase-3 and enteropeptidase (or enterokinase). CLiPS unambiguously identified the caspase-3 consensus cleavage sequence DXVDG. Enteropeptidase was unexpectedly promiscuous, but exhibited a preference for substrates with the motif (D/E)RM, which were cleaved substantially faster than the canonical DDDDK recognition sequence, widely used for protein purification. CLiPS provides a straightforward and versatile approach to determine protease specificity and discover optimal substrates on the basis of cleavage kinetics.

  14. IgA1 proteases of Haemophilus influenzae: cloning and characterization in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Bricker, J; Mulks, M H; Plaut, A G; Moxon, E R; Wright, A

    1983-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is one of several bacterial pathogens known to release IgA1 proteases into the extracellular environment. Each H. influenzae isolate produces one of at least three distinct types of these enzymes that differ in the specific peptide bond they cleave in the hinge region of human IgA1. We have isolated the gene specifying type 1 IgA1 protease from a total genomic library of H. influenzae, subcloned it into plasmid vectors, and introduced these vectors into Escherichia coli K-12. The enzyme synthesized by E. coli was active and had the same specificity as that of the H. influenzae donor. Unlike that of the donor, E. coli protease activity accumulated in the periplasm rather than being transported extracellularly. The position of the protease gene in H. influenzae DNA and its direction of transcription was approximated by deletion mapping. Tn5 insertions, and examination of the polypeptides synthesized by minicells. A 1-kilobase probe excised from the IgA1 protease gene hybridized with DNA restriction fragments of all H. influenzae serogroups but not with DNA of a nonpathogenic H. parainfluenzae species known to be IgA1 protease negative. Images PMID:6341996

  15. Structure-function relationship of Chikungunya nsP2 protease: A comparative study with papain.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekaran; Kutumbarao, Nidamarthi H V; Suhitha, Sivasubramanian; Velmurugan, Devadasan

    2016-11-07

    Chikungunya virus is a growing human pathogen transmitted by mosquito bite. It causes fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, joint pain, headache, and swelling in the joints. Its replication and propagation depend on the protease activity of the Chikungunya virus-nsP2 protein, which cleaves the nsP1234 polyprotein replication complex into individual functional units. The N-terminal segment of papain is structurally identical with the Chikungunya virus-nsP2 protease. Hence, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to compare molecular mechanism of these proteases. The Chikungunya virus-snP2 protease shows more conformational changes and adopts an alternate conformation. However, N-terminal segment of these two proteases has identical active site scaffold with the conserved catalytic diad. Hence, some of the non-peptide inhibitors of papain were used for induced fit docking at the active site of the nsP2 to assess the binding mode. In addition, the peptides that connect different domains/protein in Chikungunya virus poly-protein were also subjected for docking. The overall results suggest that the active site scaffold is the same in both the proteases and a possibility exists to experimentally assess the efficacy of some of the papain inhibitors to inhibit the Chikungunya virus-nsP2.

  16. Development of marine biotechnology as a resource for novel proteases and their role in modern biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Homaei, Ahmad; Lavajoo, Fatemeh; Sariri, Reyhaneh

    2016-07-01

    Marine environment consists of the largest sources diversified genetic pool of material with an enormous potential for a wide variety of enzymes including proteases. A protease hydrolyzes the peptide bond and most of proteases possess many industrial applications. Marine proteases differ considerably from those found in internal or external organs of invertebrates and vertebrates. In common with all enzymes, external factors such as temperature, pH and type of media are important for the activity, catalytic efficiency, stability and proper functioning of proteases. In this review valuable characteristics of proteases in marine organisms and their applications are gathered from a wide literature survey. Considering their biochemical significance and their increasing importance in biotechnology, a thorough understanding of marine proteases functioning could be of prime importance.

  17. The paracaspase MALT1 cleaves the LUBAC subunit HOIL1 during antigen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Douanne, Tiphaine; Gavard, Julie; Bidère, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Antigen-receptor-mediated activation of lymphocytes relies on a signalosome comprising CARMA1 (also known as CARD11), BCL10 and MALT1 (the CBM complex). The CBM activates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcription factors by recruiting the 'linear ubiquitin assembly complex' (LUBAC), and unleashes MALT1 paracaspase activity. Although MALT1 enzyme shapes NF-κB signaling, lymphocyte activation and contributes to lymphoma growth, the identity of its substrates continues to be elucidated. Here, we report that the LUBAC subunit HOIL1 (also known as RBCK1) is cleaved by MALT1 following antigen receptor engagement. HOIL1 is also constitutively processed in the 'activated B-cell-like' (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which exhibits aberrant MALT1 activity. We further show that the overexpression of MALT1-insensitive HOIL1 mitigates T-cell-receptor-mediated NF-κB activation and subsequent cytokine production in lymphocytes. Thus, our results unveil HOIL1 as a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation cleaved by MALT1. This cleavage could therefore constitute an appealing therapeutic target for modulating immune responses.

  18. Graphene Visualizes the Ion Distribution on Air-Cleaved Mica.

    PubMed

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Sotthewes, Kai; Siekman, Martin H; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Poelsema, Bene

    2017-03-06

    The distribution of potassium (K(+)) ions on air-cleaved mica is important in many interfacial phenomena such as crystal growth, self-assembly and charge transfer on mica. However, due to experimental limitations to nondestructively probe single ions and ionic domains, their exact lateral organization is yet unknown. We show, by the use of graphene as an ultra-thin protective coating and scanning probe microscopies, that single potassium ions form ordered structures that are covered by an ice layer. The K(+) ions prefer to minimize the number of nearest neighbour K(+) ions by forming row-like structures as well as small domains. This trend is a result of repulsive ionic forces between adjacent ions, weakened due to screening by the surrounding water molecules. Using high resolution conductive atomic force microscopy maps, the local conductance of the graphene is measured, revealing a direct correlation between the K(+) distribution and the structure of the ice layer. Our results shed light on the local distribution of ions on the air-cleaved mica, solving a long-standing enigma. They also provide a detailed understanding of charge transfer from the ionic domains towards graphene.

  19. The nature of the air-cleaved mica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Hugo K.; Thomson, Neil H.

    2016-06-01

    The accepted image of muscovite mica is that of an inert and atomically smooth surface, easily prepared by cleavage in an ambient atmosphere. Consequently, mica is extensively used a model substrate in many fundamental studies of surface phenomena and as a substrate for AFM imaging of biomolecules. In this review we present evidence from the literature that the above picture is not quite correct. The mica used in experimental work is almost invariably cleaved in laboratory air, where a reaction between the mica surface, atmospheric CO2 and water occurs immediately after cleavage. The evidence suggests very strongly that as a result the mica surface becomes covered by up to one formula unit of K2CO3 per nm2, which is mobile under humid conditions, and crystallises under drier conditions. The properties of mica in air or water vapour cannot be fully understood without reference to the surface K2CO3, and many studies of the structure of adsorbed water on mica surfaces may need to be revisited. With this new insight, however, the air-cleaved mica should provide exciting opportunities to study phenomena such as two-dimensional ion diffusion, electrolyte effects on surface conductivity, and two-dimensional crystal nucleation.

  20. Laser cleaving on glass sheets with multiple laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yen-Liang; Lin, Jehnming

    2008-05-01

    A multiple laser system consisting of CO 2 line-shaped and Nd-YAG pulsed lasers was applied to cleave a soda-lime glass substrate in this study. Due to an increase of absorption coefficient of the wavelength of 1.06 μm for Nd-YAG laser on the soda-lime glass at high temperatures, the glass sheets were preheated by the CO 2 line-shaped laser and followed with the pulsed Nd-YAG laser to generate a mixture fracture mode on the substrate. The stress distribution on the glass substrate cleaved by the multiple laser beams has been analyzed. An uncoupled thermal-elastic analysis based on the finite-element method (FEM) was made. The numerical results show that the stress field of the fracture region is caused by a complex stress state and the cleavages are significantly affected by the pulsed laser. A clean cut of the soda-lime glass substrate could be obtained due to a large shear stress state on the cutting direction with the pulsed laser radiated on the glass substrate.

  1. Graphene Visualizes the Ion Distribution on Air-Cleaved Mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Sotthewes, Kai; Siekman, Martin H.; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2017-03-01

    The distribution of potassium (K+) ions on air-cleaved mica is important in many interfacial phenomena such as crystal growth, self-assembly and charge transfer on mica. However, due to experimental limitations to nondestructively probe single ions and ionic domains, their exact lateral organization is yet unknown. We show, by the use of graphene as an ultra-thin protective coating and scanning probe microscopies, that single potassium ions form ordered structures that are covered by an ice layer. The K+ ions prefer to minimize the number of nearest neighbour K+ ions by forming row-like structures as well as small domains. This trend is a result of repulsive ionic forces between adjacent ions, weakened due to screening by the surrounding water molecules. Using high resolution conductive atomic force microscopy maps, the local conductance of the graphene is measured, revealing a direct correlation between the K+ distribution and the structure of the ice layer. Our results shed light on the local distribution of ions on the air-cleaved mica, solving a long-standing enigma. They also provide a detailed understanding of charge transfer from the ionic domains towards graphene.

  2. Graphene Visualizes the Ion Distribution on Air-Cleaved Mica

    PubMed Central

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Sotthewes, Kai; Siekman, Martin H.; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of potassium (K+) ions on air-cleaved mica is important in many interfacial phenomena such as crystal growth, self-assembly and charge transfer on mica. However, due to experimental limitations to nondestructively probe single ions and ionic domains, their exact lateral organization is yet unknown. We show, by the use of graphene as an ultra-thin protective coating and scanning probe microscopies, that single potassium ions form ordered structures that are covered by an ice layer. The K+ ions prefer to minimize the number of nearest neighbour K+ ions by forming row-like structures as well as small domains. This trend is a result of repulsive ionic forces between adjacent ions, weakened due to screening by the surrounding water molecules. Using high resolution conductive atomic force microscopy maps, the local conductance of the graphene is measured, revealing a direct correlation between the K+ distribution and the structure of the ice layer. Our results shed light on the local distribution of ions on the air-cleaved mica, solving a long-standing enigma. They also provide a detailed understanding of charge transfer from the ionic domains towards graphene. PMID:28262710

  3. Management of protease inhibitor-associated hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Penzak, Scott R; Chuck, Susan K

    2002-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated serum levels of triglycerides and reduced levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, has been recognized in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It is thought that elevated levels of circulating cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-alpha, may alter lipid metabolism in patients with HIV infection. Protease inhibitors, such as saquinavir, indinavir and ritonavir, have been found to decrease mortality and improve quality of life in patients with HIV infection. However, these drugs have been associated with a syndrome of fat redistribution, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. Elevations in serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, along with dyslipidemia that typically occurs in patients with HIV infection, may predispose patients to complications such as premature atherosclerosis and pancreatitis. It has been estimated that hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia occur in greater than 50% of protease inhibitor recipients after 2 years of therapy, and that the risk of developing hyperlipidemia increases with the duration of treatment with protease inhibitors. In general, treatment of hyperlipidemia should follow National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines; efforts should be made to modify/control coronary heart disease risk factors (i.e. smoking; hypertension; diabetes mellitus) and maximize lifestyle modifications, primarily dietary intervention and exercise, in these patients. Where indicated, treatment usually consists of either pravastatin or atorvastatin for patients with elevated serum levels of LDL-C and/or total cholesterol. Atorvastatin is more potent in lowering serum total cholesterol and triglycerides compared with other hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, but it is also associated with more drug interactions compared with pravastatin. Simvastatin

  4. Carbonic anhydrases, EPF2 and a novel protease mediate CO2 control of stomatal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engineer, Cawas B.; Ghassemian, Majid; Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Peck, Scott C.; Hu, Honghong; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-09-01

    Environmental stimuli, including elevated carbon dioxide levels, regulate stomatal development; however, the key mechanisms mediating the perception and relay of the CO2 signal to the stomatal development machinery remain elusive. To adapt CO2 intake to water loss, plants regulate the development of stomatal gas exchange pores in the aerial epidermis. A diverse range of plant species show a decrease in stomatal density in response to the continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 (ref. 4). To date, one mutant that exhibits deregulation of this CO2-controlled stomatal development response, hic (which is defective in cell-wall wax biosynthesis, ref. 5), has been identified. Here we show that recently isolated Arabidopsis thaliana β-carbonic anhydrase double mutants (ca1 ca4) exhibit an inversion in their response to elevated CO2, showing increased stomatal development at elevated CO2 levels. We characterized the mechanisms mediating this response and identified an extracellular signalling pathway involved in the regulation of CO2-controlled stomatal development by carbonic anhydrases. RNA-seq analyses of transcripts show that the extracellular pro-peptide-encoding gene EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 2 (EPF2), but not EPF1 (ref. 9), is induced in wild-type leaves but not in ca1 ca4 mutant leaves at elevated CO2 levels. Moreover, EPF2 is essential for CO2 control of stomatal development. Using cell-wall proteomic analyses and CO2-dependent transcriptomic analyses, we identified a novel CO2-induced extracellular protease, CRSP (CO2 RESPONSE SECRETED PROTEASE), as a mediator of CO2-controlled stomatal development. Our results identify mechanisms and genes that function in the repression of stomatal development in leaves during atmospheric CO2 elevation, including the carbonic-anhydrase-encoding genes CA1 and CA4 and the secreted protease CRSP, which cleaves the pro-peptide EPF2, in turn repressing stomatal development. Elucidation of these mechanisms advances the understanding of

  5. Staphylococcus aureus protease: a probe of exposed, non-basic histone sequences in nucleosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rill, R.L.; Oosterhof, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    The digestion of histones in chicken erythrocyte nucleosome cores and chromatin by Staphylococcus aureus protease was examined. This protease cleaves specifically at acidic residues and prefers glu-X bonds under the conditions used. Only 1 of 24 glutamic and 2 of 13 aspartic acids among all four core histones are located in basic, amino-terminal tails, hence staph. protease is a highly specific probe of exposed non-basic sequences. Staph. protease readily degraded H1, H5, and H3; moderately degraded H2b, and only slightly degraded H2a and H4 in nucleosomes and nucleosome cores. Electrophoresis of core histone fragments from limited digests showed that most glutamic acids were inaccessible, but at least five sites in non-basic sequences were readily cleaved. Tentative assignments of these fragments based on comparisons with products from limited digests of pure histones suggested that most accessible sites in nucleosome cores occur in H3. The most probable sites of H3 cutting are glutamic acids at positions 51, 60, 73, 94, and 97. At least one site in H2b, probably the equivalent of glu-105 in the calf H2b sequence, was accessible. No sites in H2a and H4 appeared highly accessible. H5 was readily cleaved at a site near the amino-terminus. These data substantiate the other evidence that non-basic core histone sequences are located primarily in the nucleosome interior, but that H3 binds to the ends of core DNA and thereby is partly exposed as the upper and lower surfaces of the disk-shaped core.

  6. Enteric bacterial proteases in inflammatory bowel disease- pathophysiology and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Ian M; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2013-01-01

    Numerous reports have identified a dysbiosis in the intestinal microbiota in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), yet the mechanism(s) in which this complex microbial community initiates or perpetuates inflammation remains unclear. The purpose of this review is to present evidence for one such mechanism that implicates enteric microbial derived proteases in the pathogenesis of IBD. We highlight and discuss studies demonstrating that proteases and protease receptors are abundant in the digestive system. Additionally, we investigate studies demonstrating an association between increased luminal protease activity and activation of protease receptors, ultimately resulting in increased intestinal permeability and exacerbation of colitis in animal models as well as in human IBD. Proteases are essential for the normal functioning of bacteria and in some cases can serve as virulence factors for pathogenic bacteria. Although not classified as traditional virulence factors, proteases originating from commensal enteric bacteria also have a potential association with intestinal inflammation via increased enteric permeability. Reports of increased protease activity in stools from IBD patients support a possible mechanism for a dysbiotic enteric microbiota in IBD. A better understanding of these pathways and characterization of the enteric bacteria involved, their proteases, and protease receptors may pave the way for new therapeutic approaches for these diseases.

  7. Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase cleaves malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101). Implications for gametocytogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Michael; Russo, Crystal; Li, Xuerong; Chishti, Athar H.

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • PfSPP is an ER resident protease. • PfSPP is expressed both as a monomer and dimer. • The signal peptide of HSP101 is the first known substrate of PfSPP. • Reduced PfSPP activity may significantly affect ER homeostasis. - Abstract: Previously we described the identification of a Plasmodium falciparum signal peptide peptidase (PfSPP) functioning at the blood stage of malaria infection. Our studies also demonstrated that mammalian SPP inhibitors prevent malaria parasite growth at the late-ring/early trophozoite stage of intra-erythrocytic development. Consistent with its role in development, we tested the hypothesis that PfSPP functions at the endoplasmic reticulum of P.falciparum where it cleaves membrane-bound signal peptides generated following the enzyme activity of signal peptidase. The localization of PfSPP to the endoplasmic reticulum was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. Biochemical analysis indicated the existence of monomer and dimer forms of PfSPP in the parasite lysate. A comprehensive bioinformatics screen identified several candidate PfSPP substrates in the parasite genome. Using an established transfection based in vivo luminescence assay, malaria heat shock protein 101 (HSP101) was identified as a substrate of PfSPP, and partial inhibition of PfSPP correlated with the emergence of gametocytes. This finding unveils the first known substrate of PfSPP, and provides new perspectives for the function of intra-membrane proteolysis at the erythrocyte stage of malaria parasite life cycle.

  8. Proteases from psychrotrophs: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kasana, Ramesh Chand

    2010-05-01

    Proteases are hydrolytic enzymes which catalyze the total hydrolysis of proteins in to amino acids. Although proteolytic enzymes can be obtained from animals and plants but microorganisms are the preferred source for industrial applications in view of scientific and economical advantage. Among various groups of microbes, psychrotrophs are ideal candidates for enzymes production keeping in mind that enzymes active at low temperature and stable under alkaline condition, in presence of oxidants and detergents are in large demand as laundry additive. The proteases from psychrotrophs also find application in environmental bioremediation, food and molecular biology. During the previous two decades, proteases from psychrotrophs have received increased attention because of their wide range of applications, but the full potential of psychrotrophic proteases has not been exploited. This review focuses attention on the present status of knowledge on the production, optimization, molecular characteristics, applications, substrate specificity, and crystal structure of psychrotrophic proteases. The review will help in making strategies for exploitation of psychrotrophic protease resources and improvement of enzymes to obtain more robust proteases of industrial and biotechnological significance.

  9. Selection of suitable detergents for obtaining an active dengue protease in its natural form from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liew, Lynette Sin Yee; Lee, Michelle Yueqi; Wong, Ying Lei; Cheng, Jinting; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-05-01

    Dengue protease is a two-component enzyme and is an important drug target against dengue virus. The protease activity and protein stability of dengue nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) require a co-factor region from a four-span membrane protein NS2B. A natural form of dengue protease containing full-length NS2B and NS3 protease domain NS2BFL-NS3pro will be useful for dengue drug discovery. In current study, detergents that can be used for protease purification were tested. Using a water soluble protease construct, 39 detergents were selected for both NS2B and NS2BFL-NS3pro purification. The results showed that 18 detergents were able to sustain the activity of the natural dengue protease and 11 detergents could be used for NS2B purification. The results obtained in this study will be useful for biochemical and biophysical studies on dengue protease.

  10. Gelatinase B is diabetogenic in acute and chronic pancreatitis by cleaving insulin.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Francis J; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Martens, Erik; Ballaux, Florence; Geboes, Karel; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2003-05-01

    Genetic, endocrine, and environmental factors contribute to the development of diabetes. Much information has been gathered on the homeostasis mechanisms of glucose regulation by insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Here we demonstrate high expression levels of gelatinase B (matrix metalloproteinase-9, MMP-9) by neutrophils in acute pancreatitis and by ductular epithelial cells in chronic pancreatitis. Because gelatinase B processes cytokines and chemokines, we investigated whether and how gelatinase B cleaves insulin. Pure human neutrophil gelatinase B was found to destroy insulin by cleavage at 10 sites. Pancreatic islet and ductular cells are relatively spared in comparison with the complete destruction of acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas in chronic pancreatitis. High expression levels of gelatinase B are maintained in the immediate proximity of insulin-secreting beta cells. Consequently, diabetes may be worsened by enzymatic degradation of insulin by gelatinase B and by the consequent enhancement of the autoimmune process. Gelatinase B is diabetogenic in acute and chronic pancreatitis by cleaving insulin.

  11. Association of circulating factor seven activating protease (FSAP) and of oral Omega-3 fatty acids supplements with clinical outcome in patients with atrial fibrillation: the OMEGA-AF study.

    PubMed

    Parahuleva, Mariana S; Kanse, Sandip; Hölschermann, Hans; Zheleva, Kirila; Zandt, Daniel; Worsch, Michael; Parviz, Behnoush; Güttler, Norbert; Tillmanns, Harald; Böning, Andreas; Erdogan, Ali

    2014-04-01

    Factor VII Activating Protease (FSAP) activates factor VII (FVII) as well as pro-urokinase (uPA). Our goal was to evaluate the relation between plasma levels of FSAP and clinical instability in atrial fibrillation (AF) and possible effects of oral omega-3 fatty acids (FA) supplements. 101 patients with persistent AF were analyzed in the OMEGA-AF Study. Plasma FSAP levels were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment with omega-3 FA. The median FSAP antigen concentration, in contrast to FSAP activity, was higher in patients with persistent AF. The maintenance of SR after successful cardioversion (CV) did not lead to a normalization of FSAP concentration. Supplementation with omega-3 FA but not placebo significantly reduced elevated FSAP concentration. Furthermore, elevated FSAP levels did not indicate a significantly increased risk of recurrence of AF after electrical CV or cardiovascular clinical events during 1 year of follow-up. Plasma FSAP concentration was increased in patients with AF and may be involved in the pathogenesis of this condition. The possible effects of omega-3 FA on clinical AF potential could be linked with modulation of circulating FSAP levels.

  12. Cathepsin proteases in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are important for the growth and survival of apicomplexan parasites that infect humans. The apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii expresses five members of the C1 family of cysteine proteases, including one cathepsin L-like (TgCPL), one cathepsin B-like (TgCPB), and three cathepsin C-like (TgCPC1, 2 and 3) proteases. Recent genetic, biochemical and structural studies reveal that cathepsins function in microneme and rhoptry protein maturation, host cell invasion, replication, and nutrient acquisition.. Here, we review the key features and roles of T. gondii cathepsins and discuss the therapeutic potential for specific inhibitor development. PMID:21660658

  13. An 11-kDa form of human immunodeficiency virus protease expressed in Escherichia coli is sufficient for enzymatic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, M C; Lim, J J; Heimer, E P; Kramer, R A

    1988-01-01

    In order to define the protease domain of human immunodeficiency virus 1, various regions of the pol open reading frame were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Antiserum directed against the conserved retroviral protease active site was used to identify pol precursor and processed species containing the presumed protease domain. The smallest product that accumulates is about 11 kDa as measured by NaDodSO4/PAGE. This size agrees with that predicted from the presence in this region of two Phe-Pro sequences, which is one of the cleavage sites recognized by HIV protease. DNA encoding only the predicted 11-kDa protein was cloned, bypassing the need for autoprocessing, and the protein was expressed to a high level in E. coli. This form is active as demonstrated by its ability to specifically cleave protease-deficient pol protein in vivo in E. coli. Extracts of E. coli containing the 11-kDa protease also process human immunodeficiency virus gag substrates in vitro. These results demonstrate that the 11-kDa protease is sufficient for enzymatic activity and are consistent with a major role for this form in virus maturation. Images PMID:3282230

  14. Presenilin-like GxGD membrane proteases have dual roles as proteolytic enzymes and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ivana Y; Hu, Jian; Ha, Ya; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2015-03-06

    The GxGD proteases function to cleave protein substrates within the membrane. As these proteases contain multiple transmembrane domains typical of ion channels, we examined if GxGD proteases also function as ion channels. We tested the putative dual function by examining two archeobacterial GxGD proteases (PSH and FlaK), with known three-dimensional structures. Both are in the same GxGD family as presenilin, a protein mutated in Alzheimer Disease. Here, we demonstrate that PSH and FlaK form cation channels in lipid bilayers. A mutation that affected the enzymatic activity of FlaK rendered the channel catalytically inactive and altered the ion selectivity, indicating that the ion channel and the catalytic activities are linked. We report that the GxGD proteases, PSH and FlaK, are true "chanzymes" with interdependent ion channel and protease activity conferred by a single structural domain embedded in the membrane, supporting the proposal that higher-order proteases, including presenilin, have channel function.

  15. Chemistry and biology of self-cleaving ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Randi M.; Polanco, Julio A.; Lupták, Andrej

    2015-01-01

    Self-cleaving ribozymes were discovered thirty years ago, but their biological distribution and catalytic mechanisms are only beginning to be defined. Each ribozyme family is defined by a distinct structure with unique active sites accelerating the same transesterification reaction across the families. Biochemical studies show that general acid-base catalysis is the most common mechanism of self-cleavage, but metal ions and metabolites can be employed as cofactors. Ribozymes have been discovered in highly diverse genomic contexts throughout nature, from viroids to vertebrates. Their biological roles include self-scission during rolling-circle replication of RNA genomes, co-transcriptional processing of retrotransposons, and metabolite-dependent gene expression regulation in bacteria. Other examples, including highly conserved mammalian ribozymes, suggest that many new biological roles are yet to be discovered. PMID:26481500

  16. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  17. Regulation of intestinal permeability: The role of proteases

    PubMed Central

    Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Ceuleers, Hannah; Witters, Leonie; Patteet, Eveline; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; De Meester, Ingrid; De Man, Joris G; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal barrier is - with approximately 400 m2 - the human body’s largest surface separating the external environment from the internal milieu. This barrier serves a dual function: permitting the absorption of nutrients, water and electrolytes on the one hand, while limiting host contact with noxious luminal antigens on the other hand. To maintain this selective barrier, junction protein complexes seal the intercellular space between adjacent epithelial cells and regulate the paracellular transport. Increased intestinal permeability is associated with and suggested as a player in the pathophysiology of various gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gastrointestinal tract is exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous proteases, both in the lumen and in the mucosa. There is increasing evidence to suggest that a dysregulation of the protease/antiprotease balance in the gut contributes to epithelial damage and increased permeability. Excessive proteolysis leads to direct cleavage of intercellular junction proteins, or to opening of the junction proteins via activation of protease activated receptors. In addition, proteases regulate the activity and availability of cytokines and growth factors, which are also known modulators of intestinal permeability. This review aims at outlining the mechanisms by which proteases alter the intestinal permeability. More knowledge on the role of proteases in mucosal homeostasis and gastrointestinal barrier function will definitely contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for permeability-related diseases.

  18. Protease inhibitors and proteolytic signalling cascades in insects.

    PubMed

    Gubb, David; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Barcena, Laura; Troxler, Laurent; Fullaondo, Ane

    2010-12-01

    Proteolytic signalling cascades control a wide range of physiological responses. In order to respond rapidly, protease activity must be maintained at a basal level: the component zymogens must be sequentially activated and actively degraded. At the same time, signalling cascades must respond precisely: high target specificity is required. The insects have a wide range of trapping- and tight-binding protease inhibitors, which can regulate the activity of individual proteases. In addition, the interactions between component proteases of a signalling cascade can be modified by serine protease homologues. The suicide-inhibition mechanism of serpin family inhibitors gives rapid turnover of both protease and inhibitor, but target specificity is inherently broad. Similarly, the TEP/macroglobulins have extremely broad target specificity, which suits them for roles as hormone transport proteins and sensors of pathogenic virulence factors. The tight-binding inhibitors, on the other hand, have a lock-and-key mechanism capable of high target specificity. In addition, proteins containing multiple tight-binding inhibitory domains may act as scaffolds for the assembly of signalling complexes. Proteolytic cascades regulated by combinations of different types of inhibitor could combine the rapidity of suicide-inhibitors with the specificity lock-and-key inhibitors. This would allow precise control of physiological responses and may turn out to be a general rule.

  19. Non-erythroid alpha-spectrin breakdown by calpain and interleukin 1 beta-converting-enzyme-like protease(s) in apoptotic cells: contributory roles of both protease families in neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Nath, R; Raser, K J; Stafford, D; Hajimohammadreza, I; Posner, A; Allen, H; Talanian, R V; Yuen, P; Gilbertsen, R B; Wang, K K

    1996-01-01

    The cytoskeletal protein non-erythroid alpha-spectrin is well documented as an endogenous calpain substrate, especially under pathophysiological conditions. In cell necrosis (e.g. maitotoxin-treated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells), alpha-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) of 150 kDa and 145 kDa were produced by cellular calpains. In contrast, in neuronal cells undergoing apoptosis (cerebellar granule neurons subjected to low potassium and SH-SY5Y cells treated with staurosporine), an additional SBDP of 120 kDa was also observed. The formation of the 120 kDa SBDP was insensitive to calpain inhibitors but was completely blocked by an interleukin 1 beta-converting-enzyme (ICE)-like protease inhibitor, Z-Asp-CH2OC(O)-2,6-dichlorobenzene. Autolytic activation of both calpain and the ICE homologue CPP32 was also observed in apoptotic cells. alpha-Spectrin can also be cleaved in vitro by purified calpains to produce the SBDP doublet of 150/145 kDa and by ICE and ICE homologues [ICH-1, ICH-2 and CPP32(beta)] to produce a 150 kDa SBDP. In addition, CPP32 and ICE also produced a 120 kDa SBDP. Furthermore inhibition of either ICE-like protease(s) or calpain protects both granule neurons and SH-SY5Y cells against apoptosis. Our results suggest that both protease families participate in the expression of neuronal apoptosis. PMID:8920967

  20. Juggling jobs: roles and mechanisms of multifunctional protease inhibitors in plants.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Holz, Friederike M; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-05-01

    Multifunctional protease inhibitors juggle jobs by targeting different enzymes and thereby often controlling more than one biological process. Here, we discuss the biological functions, mechanisms and evolution of three types of multifunctional protease inhibitors in plants. The first type is double-headed inhibitors, which feature two inhibitory sites targeting proteases with different specificities (e.g. Bowman-Birk inhibitors) or even different hydrolases (e.g. α-amylase/protease inhibitors preventing both early germination and seed predation). The second type consists of multidomain inhibitors which evolved by intragenic duplication and are released by processing (e.g. multicystatins and potato inhibitor II, implicated in tuber dormancy and defence, respectively). The third type consists of promiscuous inhibitory folds which resemble mouse traps that can inhibit different proteases cleaving the bait they offer (e.g. serpins, regulating cell death, and α-macroglobulins). Understanding how multifunctional inhibitors juggle biological jobs increases our knowledge of the connections between the networks they regulate. These examples show that multifunctionality evolved independently from a remarkable diversity of molecular mechanisms that can be exploited for crop improvement and provide concepts for protein design.

  1. Expression of sea anemone equistatin in potato. Effects of plant proteases on heterologous protein production.

    PubMed

    Outchkourov, Nikolay S; Rogelj, Boris; Strukelj, Borut; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2003-09-01

    Plants are increasingly used as production platforms of various heterologous proteins, but rapid protein turnover can seriously limit the steady-state expression level. Little is known about specific plant proteases involved in this process. In an attempt to obtain potato (Solanum tuberosum cv Desirée) plants resistant to Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) larvae, the protease inhibitor equistatin was expressed under the control of strong, light-inducible and constitutive promoters and was targeted to the secretory pathway with and without endoplasmic reticulum retention signal. All constructs yielded similar stepwise protein degradation patterns, which considerably reduced the amount of active inhibitor in planta and resulted in insufficient levels for resistance against Colorado potato beetle larvae. Affinity purification of the degradation products and N-terminal sequencing allowed the identification of the amino acid P(1)-positions (asparagine [Asn]-13, lysine-56, Asn-82, and arginine-151) that were cleaved in planta. The proteases involved in the equistatin degradation were characterized with synthetic substrates and inhibitors. Kininogen domain 3 completely inhibited equistatin degradation in vitro. The results indicate that arginine/lysine-specific and legumain-type Asn-specific cysteine proteases seriously impede the functional accumulation of recombinant equistatin in planta. General strategies to improve the resistance to proteases of heterologous proteins in plants are proposed.

  2. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Rosin, C D; Belew, R K; Morris, G M; Olson, A J; Goodsell, D S

    1999-02-16

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site-the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible.

  3. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Christopher D.; Belew, Richard K.; Morris, Garrett M.; Olson, Arthur J.; Goodsell, David S.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site—the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible. PMID:9990030

  4. Proteases from Canavalia ensiformis: Active and Thermostable Enzymes with Potential of Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rayane Natshe; Gozzini Barbosa, Suellen Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of leaves, seeds, roots, and stem from a tropical legume, C. ensiformis, were prepared employing buffers and detergent in aqueous solution. Leaf extracts had the highest protein content and the most pronounced peptidase activity with optimal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. All extracts exhibited peaks of activity at various pH values, suggesting the presence of distinctive classes of proteases. N-α-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrolysis was maximal at 30°C to 60°C and peptidase activity from all extracts presented very good thermal stability after 24 h incubation at 70°C. C. ensiformis proteases exhibited molecular masses of about 200–57, 40–37, and 20–15 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. These enzymes cleaved hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, casein, and gelatin at different levels. Serine and metalloproteases are the major proteases in C. ensiformis extracts, modulated by divalent cations, stable at 1% of surfactant Triton X-100 and at different concentrations of the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol. Thus, C. ensiformis expresses a particular set of proteases in distinctive organs with high activity and stability, making this legume an important source of proteases with biotechnological potential. PMID:27630776

  5. Structural Evidence for Regulation and Specificity of Flaviviral Proteases and Evolution of the Flaviviridae Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshin,A.; Shiryaev, S.; Strongin, A.; Liddington, R.

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the flavivirus family, including West Nile Virus (WNV) and Dengue Virus (DV), are growing global threats for which there are no specific treatments. The two-component flaviviral enzyme NS2B-NS3 cleaves the viral polyprotein precursor within the host cell, a process that is required for viral replication. Here, we report the crystal structure of WNV NS2B-NS3pro both in a substrate-free form and in complex with the trypsin inhibitor aprotinin/BPTI. We show that aprotinin binds in a substrate-mimetic fashion in which the productive conformation of the protease is fully formed, providing evidence for an 'induced fit' mechanism of catalysis and allowing us to rationalize the distinct substrate specificities of WNV and DV proteases. We also show that the NS2B cofactor of WNV can adopt two very distinct conformations and that this is likely to be a general feature of flaviviral proteases, providing further opportunities for regulation. Finally, by comparing the flaviviral proteases with the more distantly related Hepatitis C virus, we provide insights into the evolution of the Flaviviridae fold. Our work should expedite the design of protease inhibitors to treat a range of flaviviral infections.

  6. Structure, Mechanism and Inhibition of γ-Secretase and Presenilin-Like Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Presenilin is the catalytic component of γ-secretase, a complex aspartyl protease and a founding member of intramembrane-cleaving proteases. γ-Secretase is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease and a top target for therapeutic intervention. However, the protease complex processes a variety of transmembrane substrates, including the Notch receptor, raising concerns about toxicity. Nevertheless, γ-secretase inhibitors and modulators have been identified that allow Notch processing and signalling to continue, and promising compounds are entering clinical trials. Molecular and biochemical studies offer a model for how this protease hydrolyzes transmembrane domains in the confines of the lipid bilayer. Progress has also been made toward structure elucidation of presenilin and the γ-secretase complex by electron microscopy as well as by studying cysteine-mutant presenilins. The signal peptide peptidase (SPP) family of proteases are distantly related to presenilins. However, the SPPs work as single polypeptides without the need for cofactors and otherwise appear to be simple model systems for presenilin in the γ-secretase complex. SPP biology, structure, and inhibition will also be discussed. PMID:20482315

  7. The natural killer cell serine protease gene Lmet1 maps to mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Thia, K.Y.T.; Smyth, M.J.; Jenkins, N.A.; Gilbert, D.J.; Copeland, N.G.

    1995-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes play a key role in immune responses against viruses and tumors. Lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis by both cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells is often associated with the formation of membrane lesions on target cells caused by exocytosis of cytoplasmic granule serine proteases and a pore-forming protein, perforin. A variety of granzymes have been found to reside within the cytoplasmic granules of cytotoxic lymphocytes, but unlike perforin, isolated serine proteases are not intrinsically lytic. However, a role for serine proteases in cellular cytotoxicity has been supported by the ability of protease inhibitors to completely abrogate lymphocyte cytotoxicity, and the demonstration that serine proteases can initiate DNA fragmentation in target cells transfected or pretreated with a sublytic concentration of perforin. Granzymes cloned in human, mouse, and rat encode four granzyme activities and all are expressed in either T cells, their thymic precursors, and/or NK cells. In particular, a rat granzyme that cleaves after methionine residues, but not phenylalanine residues and its human equivalent, human Met-ase 1, are unique granzymes with restricted expression in CD3-NK cells. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Application of Protease Technology in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews background on proteases and their functions, their physiological significance in skin, and the potential implications of incorporating specific proteases and protease blends into dermatological products, including skin care formulations. The history of protease blend formulations used in wound model studies and for other disorders is reviewed. In vitro data with use of a specific 3-protease blend with evaluation of the impact on various skin proteins and peptides is also discussed in this article. PMID:23882305

  9. The Serine Protease Pic From Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Mediates Immune Evasion by the Direct Cleavage of Complement Proteins.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Afonso G; Fraga, Tatiana R; Granados Martínez, Adriana P; Kondo, Marcia Y; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela S; Elias, Waldir P

    2015-07-01

    Enteroaggregative and uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri 2a, and the hybrid enteroaggregative/Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strain (O104:H4) are important pathogens responsible for intestinal and urinary tract infections, as well as sepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. They have in common the production of a serine protease called Pic. Several biological roles for Pic have been described, including protection of E. coli DH5α from complement-mediated killing. Hereby we showed that Pic significantly reduces complement activation by all 3 pathways. Pic cleaves purified C3/C3b and other proteins from the classic and lectin pathways, such as C4 and C2. Cleavage fragments of C3, C4, and C2 were also observed with HB101(pPic1) culture supernatants, and C3 cleavage sites were mapped by fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptides. Experiments using human serum as a source of complement proteins confirmed Pic proteolytic activity on these proteins. Furthermore, Pic works synergistically with the human complement regulators factor I and factor H, promoting inactivation of C3b. In the presence of both regulators, further degradation of C3 α' chain was observed. Therefore, Pic may contribute to immune evasion of E. coli and S. flexneri, favoring invasiveness and increasing the severity of the disorders caused by these pathogens.

  10. Fabrication of submicron devices on the (011) cleave surface of a cleaved-edge-overgrowth GaAs/AlGaAs crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, A. M.; Zhang, Hao; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2012-03-01

    We describe the fabrication of submicron devices on the (011) cleave surface of a GaAs heterostructure crystal, in which this surface is extremely narrow. Special purpose devices are produced, which take advantage of the unique characteristics of cleaved-edge-overgrowth. The successful fabrication relies on understanding the surface tension of the electron beam polymethyl methacrylate resist, the workable degree of variation in resist thickness, and on gluing the crystal onto a backing substrate to increase structural strength. We demonstrate functional gate-controlled quantum point contact constrictions placed 9 μm from one edge of the cleave surface.

  11. Chloroplast Proteases: Updates on Proteolysis within and across Suborganellar Compartments1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated from the endosymbiosis of ancestral cyanobacteria and maintain transcription and translation machineries for around 100 proteins. Most endosymbiont genes, however, have been transferred to the host nucleus, and the majority of the chloroplast proteome is composed of nucleus-encoded proteins that are biosynthesized in the cytosol and then imported into chloroplasts. How chloroplasts and the nucleus communicate to control the plastid proteome remains an important question. Protein-degrading machineries play key roles in chloroplast proteome biogenesis, remodeling, and maintenance. Research in the past few decades has revealed more than 20 chloroplast proteases, which are localized to specific suborganellar locations. In particular, two energy-dependent processive proteases of bacterial origin, Clp and FtsH, are central to protein homeostasis. Processing endopeptidases such as stromal processing peptidase and thylakoidal processing peptidase are involved in the maturation of precursor proteins imported into chloroplasts by cleaving off the amino-terminal transit peptides. Presequence peptidases and organellar oligopeptidase subsequently degrade the cleaved targeting peptides. Recent findings have indicated that not only intraplastidic but also extraplastidic processive protein-degrading systems participate in the regulation and quality control of protein translocation across the envelopes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the major chloroplast proteases in terms of type, suborganellar localization, and diversification. We present details of these degradation processes as case studies according to suborganellar compartment (envelope, stroma, and thylakoids). Key questions and future directions in this field are discussed. PMID:27288365

  12. German cockroach frass proteases modulate the innate immune response via activation of protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Day, Scottie B; Zhou, Ping; Ledford, John R; Page, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    Allergen exposure can induce an early innate immune response; however, the mechanism by which this occurs has not been addressed. In this report, we demonstrate a role for the active serine proteases in German cockroach (GC) feces (frass) and protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 in modulating the innate immune response. A single exposure of GC frass induced inflammatory cytokine production and cellular infiltration in the airways of mice. In comparison, exposure to protease-depleted GC frass resulted in diminution of inflammatory cytokine production and airway neutrophilia, but had no effect on macrophage infiltration. Selective activation of PAR-2 confirmed that PAR-2 was sufficient to induce airway inflammation. Exposure of GC frass to PAR-2-deficient mice led to decreased immune responses to GC frass compared to wild-type mice. Using the macrophage as an early marker of the innate immune response, we found that GC frass induced significant release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha from primary alveolar macrophages. This effect was dependent on the intrinsic proteases in GC frass. We confirmed GC frass-induced cytokine expression was mediated by activation of NF-kappaB and ERK in a macrophage cell line. Collectively, these data suggest a central role for GC frass protease-PAR-2 activation in regulating the innate immune response through the activation of alveolar macrophages. Understanding the potential role of protease-PAR-2 activation as a danger signal or adjuvant could yield attractive therapeutic targets.

  13. A metagenomic alkaline protease from saline habitat: cloning, over-expression and functional attributes.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Megha K; Singh, Satya P

    2013-02-01

    Metagenomics has opened new horizon to unlock the biotechnological potential for novel enzymes. An alkaline protease gene was obtained from the total environmental DNA extracted from a saline habitat. After cloning and sequencing, it was identified that the protease gene related to uncultivable bacteria (HM219181). The protease was over expressed at 6h of induction with optimum induction at 1mM IPTG and 27°C. The purified enzyme was characterized with respect to various factors; temperature, pH, NaCl and chemical denaturant. The sequence analysis indicated a hydrophobic tendency of the protein, while the predicted 3D structure indicated the enzyme as a serine protease.

  14. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Sweatt, J David

    2011-08-17

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes-coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example-have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  15. Diketone cleaving enzyme Dke1 production by Acinetobacter johnsonii--optimization of fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Hannes; Mandl, Thomas; Steiner, Walter

    2004-01-08

    The main objective of this work was the optimization of the production of the novel dioxygenase diketone cleaving enzyme (Dke1) from Acinetobacter johnsonii. Acetylacetone was used as an inducer for enzyme production. In the first step, the growth medium was optimized by using screening designs for finding the optimal carbon and nitrogen source. In the second step, a genetic algorithm was used to optimize the concentrations of all medium components. After six generations the stopping criterion was reached and a growth medium was obtained which produced sixteen times more enzyme than the starting medium. In the next step, an addition profile for the inducer acetylacetone was developed to further increase enzyme production by using a genetic algorithm. In this case, after four generations the stopping criterion was fulfilled. By using the obtained optimal addition profile Dke1 activity was enhanced from 826 to 2584Ul(-1). In comparison to the starting conditions activity could even be increased by a factor of 50.

  16. Restoration by T4 ligase of DNA sequences sensitive to "flush" cleaving restriction enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mottes, M; Morandi, C; Cremaschi, S; Sgaramella, V

    1977-07-01

    Fouteen "flush"-ended segments originate from the action of the restriction endonuclease Hae III of Haemophilus aegiptius on the DNA of the colicinogenic factor ColE 1 (A. Oka and M. Takanami, Nature, 264, 191, 1976). They are joined by the T4 polynucleotide ligase. The reaction can be monitored by gel electrophoresis, electron microscopy and resistance to phosphatase of the 5'-32P labelled ends. The joined products are a random recombination of the original segments, and can be cleaved by the same Hae III endonuclease to restore the exact electrophoretic pattern of the Hae III-cut ColE 1 DNA. In a properly diluted mixture of 5'-32P segments treated with T4 ligase, the level of phosphatase resistance is very close to the frequency of circle-formation as determined by electron microscopy: thus, the joining of the "flush"-ends involves the formation of circular structures covalently closed in both strands.

  17. Recombinant production of TEV cleaved human parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Audu, Christopher O; Cochran, Jared C; Pellegrini, Maria; Mierke, Dale F

    2013-08-01

    The parathyroid hormone, PTH, is responsible for calcium and phosphate ion homeostasis in the body. The first 34 amino acids of the peptide maintain the biological activity of the hormone and is currently marketed for calcium imbalance disorders. Although several methods for the production of recombinant PTH(1-34) have been reported, most involve the use of cleavage conditions that result in a modified peptide or unfavorable side products. Herein, we detail the recombinant production of (15) N-enriched human parathyroid hormone, (15) N PTH(1-34), generated via a plasmid vector that gives reasonable yield, low-cost protease cleavage (leaving the native N-terminal serine in its amino form), and purification by affinity and size exclusion chromatography. We characterize the product by multidimensional, heteronuclear NMR, circular dichroism, and LC/MS.

  18. Structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping; Hawley, Marilyn; Bauer, Eric D; Stockum, Phil B; Manoharan, Hari C

    2009-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution STM images for a uranium compound taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the USb{sub 2} crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. The a and b dimensions were equal, with the atoms arranged in a cubic pattern. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the DOS measured by STM. Some strange features observed in the STM will be discussed in conjunction with ab initio calculations. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the power of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques combined with a theoretical underpinning to determine the surface atomic structure and properties of actinide materials, such as the quasi 2-dimensional uranium dipnictide USb{sub 2} single crystal, thereby contributing to the understanding of their surface structural and electronic properties. The members of this interesting UX{sub 2} (X=P, As, Sb, Bi) series of compounds display dual localized and itinerant 5f electron behavior within the same compound due to the hybridization of the 5f orbitals with the conduction band. With the exception of UO{sub 2}, which has to be studied at elevated temperature to generate enough carriers for STM imaging, STM techniques have not been applied successfully to the characterization of the surface atomic structure of any other single crystal actinide compound, to the best of our knowledge. However, STM has been used to a limited extent for the study of some cerium compounds. STM probes electronic properties at the atomic level and can directly provide information about the local density of filled and empty states (LDOS) states simultaneously. A STM topograph provides the local atomic arrangement and spacing of the atoms on the surface, local defect structures (e.g. steps, vacancies, and kink sites) and the presence of contaminants

  19. Regulation of Hepatocyte Growth Factor in Mice with Pneumonia by Peptidases and Trans-Alveolar Flux

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Wilfred W.; Xu, Xiang; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Le, Catherine; McDonald, Donald M.; Caughey, George H.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promotes lung epithelial repair after injury. Because prior studies established that human neutrophil proteases inactivate HGF in vitro, we predicted that HGF levels decrease in lungs infiltrated with neutrophils and that injury is less severe in lungs lacking HGF-inactivating proteases. After establishing that mouse neutrophil elastase cleaves mouse HGF in vitro, we tested our predictions in vivo by examining lung pathology and HGF in mice infected with Mycoplasma pulmonis, which causes neutrophilic tracheobronchitis and pneumonia. Unexpectedly, pneumonia severity was similar in wild type and dipeptidylpeptidase I-deficient (Dppi-/-) mice lacking neutrophil serine protease activity. To assess how this finding related to our prediction that Dppi-activated proteases regulate HGF levels, we measured HGF in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue from Dppi+/+ and Dppi-/- mice. Contrary to prediction, HGF levels were higher in lavage fluid from infected mice. However, serum and tissue concentrations were not different in infected and uninfected mice, and HGF lung transcript levels did not change. Increased HGF correlated with increased albumin in lavage fluid from infected mice, and immunostaining failed to detect increased lung tissue expression of HGF in infected mice. These findings are consistent with trans-alveolar flux rather than local production as the source of increased HGF in lavage fluid. However, levels of intact HGF from infected mice, normalized for albumin concentration, were two-fold higher in Dppi-/- versus Dppi+/+ lavage fluid, suggesting regulation by Dppi-activated proteases. Consistent with the presence of active HGF, increased expression of activated receptor c-Met was observed in infected tissues. These data suggest that HGF entering alveoli from the bloodstream during pneumonia compensates for destruction by Dppi-activated inflammatory proteases to allow HGF to contribute to epithelial repair. PMID

  20. A Legionella Effector Disrupts Host Cytoskeletal Structure by Cleaving Actin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Wenhan; Tan, Yunhao; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates intracellularly in protozoan and human hosts. Successful colonization and replication of this pathogen in host cells requires the Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system, which translocates approximately 300 effector proteins into the host cell to modulate various cellular processes. In this study, we identified RavK as a Dot/Icm substrate that targets the host cytoskeleton and reduces actin filament abundance in mammalian cells upon ectopic expression. RavK harbors an H95EXXH99 motif associated with diverse metalloproteases, which is essential for the inhibition of yeast growth and for the induction of cell rounding in HEK293T cells. We demonstrate that the actin protein itself is the cellular target of RavK and that this effector cleaves actin at a site between residues Thr351 and Phe352. Importantly, RavK-mediated actin cleavage also occurs during L. pneumophila infection. Cleavage by RavK abolishes the ability of actin to form polymers. Furthermore, an F352A mutation renders actin resistant to RavK-mediated cleavage; expression of the mutant in mammalian cells suppresses the cell rounding phenotype caused by RavK, further establishing that actin is the physiological substrate of RavK. Thus, L. pneumophila exploits components of the host cytoskeleton by multiple effectors with distinct mechanisms, highlighting the importance of modulating cellular processes governed by the actin cytoskeleton in the intracellular life cycle of this pathogen. PMID:28129393

  1. Mast Cell Proteases and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongyan; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions but are also now recognized for their important contributions to a number of disparate inflammatory conditions through the release of inflammatory mediators, serglycin and other proteoglycans, and proteases. Because these tissue resident inflammatory cells express proteases in such great abundance and their enzymatic activity results in cleavage of a multitude of proteins and peptides, which in turn modify tissue function, their substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and mode of action have become the subjects of great interest. Although mast cell protease-dependent proteolysis is critical to host defense against invading pathogens, regulation of these hydrolytic enzymes is essential to limiting self-induced damage as well. Indeed, dysregulated release of mast cell proteases is now recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory conditions including asthma, abdominal aortic aneurysm formation, vessel damage in atherosclerosis and hypertension, arthritis, and ischemia/reperfusion injury. Understanding how mast cell proteases contribute to inflammation will thus help unravel molecular mechanisms that underlie such immunologic disorders and will help identify new therapeutic targets for drug development. PMID:22125569

  2. Streptococcus agalactiae CspA is a serine protease that inactivates chemokines.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Joshua D; Shelver, Daniel W

    2009-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) remains a leading cause of invasive infections in neonates and has emerged as a pathogen of the immunocompromised and elderly populations. The virulence mechanisms of GBS are relatively understudied and are still poorly understood. Previous evidence indicated that the GBS cspA gene is necessary for full virulence and the cleavage of fibrinogen. The predicted cspA product displays homology to members of the extracellular cell envelope protease family. CXC chemokines, many of which can recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, are important signaling peptides of the immune system. In this study, we purified CspA and demonstrated that it readily cleaved the CXC chemokines GRO-alpha, GRO-beta, GRO-gamma, neutrophil-activating peptide 2 (NAP-2), and granulocyte chemotactic protein 2 (GCP-2) but did not cleave interleukin-8. CspA did not cleave a panel of other test substrates, suggesting that it possesses a certain degree of specificity. CXC chemokines also underwent cleavage by whole GBS cells in a cspA-dependent manner. CspA abolished the abilities of three representative CXC chemokines, GRO-gamma, NAP-2, and GCP-2, to attract and activate neutrophils. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicated that CspA is a serine protease with S575 at its active site. D180 was also implicated as part of the signature serine protease catalytic triad, and both S575 and D180 were required for both N-terminal and C-terminal autocatalytic processing of CspA.

  3. Role of class 1 serine protease autotransporter in the pathogenesis of Citrobacter rodentium colitis.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Santiago, Araceli; Smith, Rachel; Smith, Mark; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-06-01

    A growing family of virulence factors called serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) are secreted by Shigella, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli pathotypes. SPATEs are subdivided into class 1 and class 2 based on structural features and phylogenetics. Class 1 SPATEs induce cytopathic effects in numerous epithelial cell lines, and several have been shown to cleave the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in vitro. However, to date the in vivo role of class 1 SPATEs in enteric pathogenesis is unknown. Citrobacter rodentium, a natural mouse pathogen, has recently been shown to harbor class 1 and class 2 SPATEs. To better understand the contribution of class 1 SPATEs in enteric infection, we constructed a class 1 SPATE null mutant (Δcrc1) in C. rodentium. Upon infection of C57BL/6 mice, the Δcrc1 mutant exhibited a hypervirulent, hyperinflammatory phenotype compared with its parent, accompanied by greater weight loss and a trend toward increased mortality in young mice; the effect was reversed when the crc1 gene was restored. Using flow cytometry, we observed increased infiltration of T cells, B cells, and neutrophils into the lamina propria of the distal colon in mice fed the Δcrc1 mutant, starting as early as 5 days after infection. No significant difference in epithelial cytotoxicity was observed. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis of distal colonic tissue on day 10 postinfection showed significant increases in mRNA encoding cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-1β, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) but not in mRNA encoding IL-17, IL-4, or IL-10 in the Δcrc1 mutant-infected mice. Our data suggest a previously unsuspected role for class 1 SPATEs in enteric infection.

  4. Serine protease SP105 activates prophenoloxidase in Asian corn borer melanization, and is regulated by serpin-3

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yuan; Hong, Fang; Liu, Qizhi; An, Chunju

    2017-01-01

    Melanization reaction, resulting from the activation of prophenoloxidase, is a vital immune response in insects for encapsulating and killing the invasive organisms. Prophenoloxidase needs to be proteolytically activated by its upstream prophenoloxidase-activating protease (PAP) in melanization. Identification and characterization of PAPs facilitates the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in insect immunity. We here cloned a full-length cDNA for a serine protease, named as SP105, from Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée). The open reading frame of SP105 encodes 424-amino acid residue protein with a 19-residue signal peptide. Sequence comparison indicates that SP105 is most similar to Manduca sexta PAP3, a defined prophenoloxidase-activating protease. qRT-PCR analysis showed that SP105 mRNA levels increased significantly after a bacterial injection. Recombinant SP105 directly cleaved and activated Asian corn borer prophenoloxidase and therefore acted as the prophenoloxidase-activating protease. Additionally, SP105 formed SDS-stable complexes with a serine protease inhibitor, serpin-3, and its activity in activating prophenoloxidase was efficiently inhibited by serpin-3. Our work thus illustrated a prophenoloxidase-activating protease and revealed its regulation by serpin-3. The results would allow further advances in the understanding of the melanization in Asian corn borer and other insects. PMID:28358031

  5. Identification of a mutant locus that bypasses the BsgA protease requirement for social development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Cusick, John K; Hager, Elizabeth; Gill, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    The BsgA protease is required for the earliest morphological changes observed in Myxococcus xanthus development. We hypothesize that the BsgA protease is required to cleave an inhibitor of the developmental program, and isolation of genetic bypass suppressors of a bsgA mutant was used to identify signaling components controlling development downstream of the BsgA protease. Strain M955 was created by transposon mutagenesis of a bsgA mutant followed by screening for strains that could develop despite the absence of the BsgA protease. Strain M955 was able to aggregate, form fruiting bodies, and partially restored the production of viable spores in comparison to the parental bsgA mutant. The bsgA Tn5Ω955 strain partially restored developmental expression to a subset of genes normally induced during development, and expressed one developmentally induced fusion at higher amounts during vegetative growth in comparison to wild-type cells. The transposon in strain M955 was localized to a Ribonuclease D homolog that appears to exist in an operon with a downstream aminopeptidase-encoding gene. The identification of a third distinct bypass suppressor of the BsgA protease suggests that the BsgA protease may regulate a potentially complex pathway during the initiation of the M. xanthus developmental program.

  6. Factor IX Amagasaki: A new mutation in the catalytic domain resulting in the loss of both coagulant and esterase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Toshiyuki; Iwanaga, Sadaaki ); Sakai, Toshiyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Naka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazukuni; Yoshioka, Akira; Fukui, Hiromu ); Mitsui, Kotoko; Kamiya, Kensyu; Umeyama, Hideaki )

    1991-11-26

    Factor IX Amagasaki (AMG) is a naturally occurring mutant of factor IX having essentially no coagulant activity, even though normal levels of antigen are detected in plasma. Factor IX AMG was purified from the patient's plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography with an anti-factor IX monoclonal antibody column. Factor IX AMG was cleaved normally by factor VIIa-tissue factor complex, yielding a two-chain factor IXa. Amino acid composition and sequence analysis of one of the tryptic peptides isolated from factor IX AMG revealed that Gly-311 had been replaced by Glu. The authors identified a one-base substitution of guanine to adenine in exon VIII by amplifying exon VIII using the polymerase chain reaction method and sequencing the product. This base mutation also supported the replacement of Gly-311 by Glu. In the purified system, factor IXa AMG did not activate for factor X in the presence of factor VIII, phospholipids, and Ca{sup 2+}, and no esterase activity toward Z-Arg-p-nitrobenzyl ester was observed. The model building of the serine protease domain of factor IXa suggests that the Gly-311 {yields} Glu exchange would disrupt the specific conformational state in the active site environment, resulting in the substrate binding site not forming properly. This is the first report to show the experimental evidence for importance of a highly conserved Gly-142 (chymotrypsinogen numbering) located in the catalytic site of mammalian serine proteases so far known.

  7. Biased signaling by peptide agonists of protease activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Kok, W Mei; Lim, Junxian; Wu, Kai-Chen; Liu, Ligong; Hill, Timothy A; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2017-02-07

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is associated with metabolism, obesity, inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, cancer and other diseases. The extracellular N-terminus of PAR2 is a common target for multiple proteases, which cleave it at different sites to generate different N-termini that activate different PAR2-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. There are no synthetic PAR2 ligands that reproduce the same signaling profiles and potencies as proteases. Structure-activity relationships here for 26 compounds spanned a signaling bias over 3 log units, culminating in three small ligands as biased agonist tools for interrogating PAR2 functions. DF253 (2f-LAAAAI-NH2) triggered PAR2-mediated calcium release (EC50 2 μM) but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation (EC50 > 100 μM) in CHO cells transfected with hPAR2. AY77 (Isox-Cha-Chg-NH2) was a more potent calcium-biased agonist (EC50 40 nM, Ca2+; EC50 2 μM, ERK1/2), while its analogue AY254 (Isox-Cha-Chg-A-R-NH2) was an ERK-biased agonist (EC50 2 nM, ERK1/2; EC50 80 nM, Ca2+). Signaling bias led to different functional responses in human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT29). AY254, but not AY77 or DF253, attenuated cytokine-induced caspase 3/8 activation, promoted scratch-wound healing and induced IL-8 secretion, all via PAR2-ERK1/2 signaling. Different ligand components were responsible for different PAR2 signaling and functions, clues that can potentially lead to drugs that modulate different pathway-selective cellular and physiological responses.

  8. Functional protease profiling for laboratory based diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Bassel; Costina, Victor; Buchheidt, Dieter; Reinwald, Mark; Neumaier, Michael; Findeisen, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) remains difficult to diagnose in immunocompromised patients, because diagnostic criteria according to EORTC/MSG guidelines are often not met and have low sensitivity. Hence there is an urgent need to improve diagnostic procedures by developing novel approaches. In the present study, we present a proof of concept experiment for the monitoring of Aspergillus associated protease activity in serum specimens for diagnostic purpose. Synthetic peptides that are selectively cleaved by proteases secreted from Aspergillus species were selected from our own experiments and published data. These so called reporter peptides (RP, n=5) were added to serum specimens from healthy controls (HC, n=101) and patients with proven (IA, n=9) and possible (PIA, n=144) invasive aspergillosis. Spiked samples were incubated ex vivo under strictly standardized conditions. Proteolytic fragments were analyzed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Spiked specimens of IA patients had highest concentrations of RP-fragments followed by PIA and HC. The median signal intensity was 116.546 (SD, 53.063) for IA and 5.009 (SD, 8.432) for HC. A cut-off >36.910 was chosen that performed with 100% specificity and sensitivity. Patients with PIA had either values above [53% (76/144)] or below [47% (67/144)] this chosen cut-off. The detection of respective reporter peptide fragments can easily be performed by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry. In this proof of concept study we were able to demonstrate that serum specimens of patients with IA have increased proteolytic activity towards selected reporter peptides. However, the diagnostic value of functional protease profiling has to be validated in further prospective studies. It is likely that a combination of existing and new methods will be required to achieve optimal performance for diagnosis of IA in the future.

  9. Design and synthesis of irreversible inhibitors of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protease.

    PubMed

    Roqué Rosell, Núria R; Mokhlesi, Ladan; Milton, Nicholas E; Sweeney, Trevor R; Zunszain, Patricia A; Curry, Stephen; Leatherbarrow, Robin J

    2014-01-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly infectious and economically devastating disease of livestock. The FMDV genome is translated as a single polypeptide precursor that is cleaved into functional proteins predominantly by the highly conserved viral 3C protease, making this enzyme an attractive target for antiviral drugs. A peptide corresponding to an optimal substrate has been modified at the C-terminus, by the addition of a warhead, to produce irreversible inhibitors that react as Michael acceptors with the enzyme active site. Further investigation highlighted key structural determinants for inhibition, with a positively charged P2 being particularly important for potency.

  10. Visceral hypersensitivity in inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome: The role of proteases

    PubMed Central

    Ceuleers, Hannah; Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Hanning, Nikita; Heirbaut, Jelena; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; De Man, Joris G; De Meester, Ingrid; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2016-01-01

    Proteases, enzymes catalyzing the hydrolysis of peptide bonds, are present at high concentrations in the gastrointestinal tract. Besides their well-known role in the digestive process, they also function as signaling molecules through the activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs). Based on their chemical mechanism for catalysis, proteases can be classified into several classes: serine, cysteine, aspartic, metallo- and threonine proteases represent the mammalian protease families. In particular, the class of serine proteases will play a significant role in this review. In the last decades, proteases have been suggested to play a key role in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity, which is a major factor contributing to abdominal pain in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and/or irritable bowel syndrome. So far, only a few preclinical animal studies have investigated the effect of protease inhibitors specifically on visceral sensitivity while their effect on inflammation is described in more detail. In our accompanying review we describe their effect on gastrointestinal permeability. On account of their promising results in the field of visceral hypersensitivity, further research is warranted. The aim of this review is to give an overview on the concept of visceral hypersensitivity as well as on the physiological and pathophysiological functions of proteases herein. PMID:28058009

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa protease IV degrades surfactant proteins and inhibits surfactant host defense and biophysical functions.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Jaret L; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Thibodeaux, Brett A; O'Callaghan, Richard J; Wright, Jo Rae

    2005-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant has two distinct functions within the lung: reduction of surface tension at the air-liquid interface and participation in innate host defense. Both functions are dependent on surfactant-associated proteins. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is primarily responsible for respiratory dysfunction and death in cystic fibrosis patients and is also a leading pathogen in nosocomial pneumonia. P. aeruginosa secretes a number of proteases that contribute to its virulence. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa protease IV degrades surfactant proteins and results in a reduction in pulmonary surfactant host defense and biophysical functions. Protease IV was isolated from cultured supernatant of P. aeruginosa by gel chromatography. Incubation of cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with protease IV resulted in degradation of surfactant proteins (SP)-A, -D, and -B. SPs were degraded in a time- and dose-dependent fashion by protease IV, and degradation was inhibited by the trypsin-like serine protease inhibitor Nalpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine-chloromethyl ketone (TLCK). Degradation by protease IV inhibited SP-A- and SP-D-mediated bacterial aggregation and uptake by macrophages. Surfactant treated with protease IV was unable to reduce surface tension as effectively as untreated surfactant, and this effect was inhibited by TLCK. We speculate that protease IV may be an important contributing factor to the development and propagation of acute lung injury associated with P. aeruginosa via loss of surfactant function within the lung.

  12. IFN-λ gene polymorphisms as predictive factors in chronic hepatitis C treatment-naive patients without access to protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Daniele Blasquez; Cader, Samária Ali; Porto, Luís Cristóvão

    2015-10-01

    The single nucleotides polymorphisms analyses in the regions near the IL28B gene in patients chronically infected with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) are an important predictive factor for sustained virological response (SVR). The aim was to assess the predictive value of the polymorphisms of the IL28B/IFNL3 gene in patients chronically infected with genotype 1 for the viral clearance obtained after initial treatment including admixed populations. A systematic review was conducted, using a meta-analysis in the PubMed, Embase, LILACS, and SCIELO using MesH and DECS in 42 studies. The parameters were IL28B polymorphisms, rs12979860, rs8099917, and rs12980275, SVR ratio, and OR (odds ratio). OR and confidence Interval of 95% (95%CI), were calculated by fixed or random effects models. Heterogeneity, sensitivity analysis, and publication bias were also performed. Significant differences were noted between carriers groups with the major versus minor allele at rs12979860 CC versus CT/TT-genotype (OR = 4.18; 95%CI = 3.37-5.17), rs8099917 TT versus TG/GG-genotype (OR = 4.07; 95%CI = 2.94-5.63), and rs12980275 AA versus AA/AG-genotype (OR = 5.34; 95%CI = 1.60-17.82). There was selection bias in the rs8099917 analysis (Egger's regression P = 0.049), which reversed after performing a sensitivity analysis (P = 0.510). The incorporation of SNP analyses in IL28B/IFNL3 gene during the diagnosis process in Brazil should be used as a complementary tool to determine the appropriate treatment for HCV genotype 1. Here, we confirm that the rs12979860 CC, rs8099917 TT, and rs12980275 AA genotype-carriers have favorable responses to standard therapy, including two studies with Brazilian population, and this information should be considered.

  13. Genetic and biochemical analysis of gonococcal IgA1 protease: cloning in Escherichia coli and construction of mutants of gonococci that fail to produce the activity.

    PubMed Central

    Koomey, J M; Gill, R E; Falkow, S

    1982-01-01

    The biological significance of bacterial extracellular proteases that specifically cleave human IgA1 is unknown. We have prepared a gene bank of gonococcal chromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli K-12 using a cosmid cloning system. Among these clones, we have identified and characterized an E. coli strain that elaborates an extracellular endopeptidase that is indistinguishable from gonococcal IgA1 protease in its substrate specificity and action on human IgA1. Analysis of recombinant plasmids and examination of plasmid-specific peptides in minicells have shown that the IgA1 protease activity in E. coli is associated with expression of a Mr 140,000 peptide. We have isolated IgA1 protease-deficient mutants of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by reintroduction of physically defined deletions of the cloned gene into the gonococcal chromosome by transformation. Images PMID:6818556

  14. Cytomegalovirus protease targeted prodrug development.

    PubMed

    Sabit, Hairat; Dahan, Arik; Sun, Jing; Provoda, Chester J; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Hilfinger, John H; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a prevalent virus that infects up to 90% of the population. The goal of this research is to determine if small molecular prodrug substrates can be developed for a specific HCMV encoded protease and thus achieve site-specific activation. HCMV encodes a 256 amino acid serine protease that is responsible for capsid assembly, an essential process for herpes virus production. The esterase activity of the more stable HCMV A143T/A144T protease mutant was evaluated with model p-nitrophenol (ONp) esters, Boc-Xaa-ONp (Ala, Leu, Ile, Val, Gln, Phe at the Xaa position). We demonstrate that the A143T/A144T mutant has esterase activity toward specific small ester compounds, e.g., Boc-L-Ala-ONp. Mono amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of ganciclovir (GCV) were also synthesized and evaluated for hydrolysis by the A143T/A144T protease mutant in solution. Hydrolysis of these prodrugs was also evaluated in Caco-2 cell homogenates, human liver microsomes (HLMs), and rat and human plasma. For the selectivity potential of the prodrugs, the hydrolysis ratio was evaluated as a percentage of prodrug hydrolyzed by the HCMV protease over the percentages of prodrug hydrolyses by Caco-2 cell homogenates, HLMs, and human/rat plasma. A dipeptide prodrug of ganciclovir, Ac-l-Gln-l-Ala-GCV, emerged as a potential selective prodrug candidate. The results of this research demonstrate that targeting prodrugs for activation by a specific protease encoded by the infectious HCMV pathogen may be achievable.

  15. During Infection, Theiler's Virions Are Cleaved by Caspases and Disassembled into Pentamers

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sevim Yildiz; Son, Kyung-No

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infected macrophages in spinal cords of mice persistently infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) undergo apoptosis, resulting in restricted virus yields, as do infected macrophages in culture. Apoptosis of murine macrophages in culture occurs via the intrinsic pathway later in infection (>10 h postinfection [p.i.]) after maximal virus titers (150 to 200 PFU/cell) have been reached, with loss of most infectious virus (<5 PFU/cell) by 20 to 24 h p.i. Here, we show that BeAn virus RNA replication, translation, polyprotein processing into final protein products, and assembly of protomers and pentamers in infected M1-D macrophages did not differ from those processes in TMEV-infected BHK-21 cells, which undergo necroptosis. However, the initial difference from BHK-21 cell infection was seen at 10 to 12 h p.i., where virions from the 160S peak in sucrose gradients had incompletely processed VP0 (compared to that in infected BHK-21 cells). Thereafter, there was a gradual loss of the 160S virion peak in sucrose gradients, with replacement by a 216S peak that was observed to contain pentamers among lipid debris in negatively stained grids by electron microscopy. After infection or incubation of purified virions with activated caspase-3 in vitro, 13- and 17-kDa capsid peptide fragments were observed and were predicted by algorithms to contain cleavage sites within proteins by cysteine-dependent aspartate-directed proteases. These findings suggest that caspase cleavage of sites in exposed capsid loops of assembled virions occurs contemporaneously with the onset and progression of apoptosis later in the infection. IMPORTANCE Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection in mice results in establishment of virus persistence in the central nervous system and chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease, providing an experimental animal model for multiple sclerosis. Virus persistence takes place primarily in macrophages recruited into the

  16. Active protease mapping in 2DE gels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Russell, Pamela J

    2009-01-01

    Proteases act as the molecular mediators of many vital biological processes. To understand the function of each protease, it needs to be separated from other proteins and characterized in its natural, biologically active form. In the method described in this chapter, proteases in a biological sample are separated under nonreducing conditions in 2DE gels. A specific small protease substrate, tagged with a fluorescent dye, is copolymerized into the SDS gel in the second dimension. After electrophoresis, the proteins are renatured by washing the gel with Triton X-100 solution or Milli Q water to remove SDS. The gel is then incubated in a protease assay buffer. The hydrolysis of the tagged specific substrate by the renatured protease releases the free fluorescent dye, which fluoresces in situ. The fluorescent spots indicate the location of the specific proteases in the gel and the specificity of the proteases.

  17. The HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain is cleaved by matriptase to produce a chemotactic peptide that acts through FPR2.

    PubMed

    Wood, Matthew P; Cole, Amy L; Eade, Colleen R; Chen, Li-Mei; Chai, Karl X; Cole, Alexander M

    2014-07-01

    Several aspects of HIV-1 virulence and pathogenesis are mediated by the envelope protein gp41. Additionally, peptides derived from the gp41 ectodomain have been shown to induce chemotaxis in monocytes and neutrophils. Whereas this chemotactic activity has been reported, it is not known how these peptides could be produced under biological conditions. The heptad repeat 1 (HR1) region of gp41 is exposed to the extracellular environment and could therefore be susceptible to proteolytic processing into smaller peptides. Matriptase is a serine protease expressed at the surface of most epithelia, including the prostate and mucosal surfaces. Here, we present evidence that matriptase efficiently cleaves the HR1 portion of gp41 into a 22-residue chemotactic peptide MAT-1, the sequence of which is highly conserved across HIV-1 clades. We found that MAT-1 induced migration of primary neutrophils and monocytes, the latter of which act as a cellular reservoir of HIV during early stage infection. We then used formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) and FPR2 inhibitors, along with HEK 293 cells, to demonstrate that MAT-1 can induce chemotaxis specifically using FPR2, a receptor found on the surface of monocytes, macrophages and neutrophils. These findings are the first to identify a proteolytic cleavage product of gp41 with chemotactic activity and highlight a potential role for matriptase in HIV-1 transmission and infection at epithelial surfaces and within tissue reservoirs of HIV-1.

  18. [Brain-derived neurotrophic factor: from nerve growth factor to modulator of brain plasticity in cognitive processes and psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Laske, C; Eschweiler, G W

    2006-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family and plays an important role in neuronal survival and plasticity in the CNS. The proform of BDNF (pro-BDNF) is secreted and cleaved extracellularly by the serine protease plasmin to mature BDNF, which potentiates synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation. Recent findings in animal models suggest an involvement of BDNF and its genetic functional single nucleotide polymorphism in the pathogenesis of different psychiatric diseases including depression, mania, schizophrenia, eating disorders, dementia, and Huntington's disease. In the brain and serum, BDNF is modulated by different factors. It is downregulated by stress and upregulated by learning processes, several antidepressive treatments, physical activity, and dietary restriction. Measurement of BDNF serum concentrations may be of diagnostic value. Additionally, the influence of different strategies for BDNF allocation seems to be relevant for the treatment and prevention of the above psychiatric disorders.

  19. [Cytokines and proteases involved in pathogenesis of COPD].

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Atsuyo; Osanai, Kazuhiro

    2011-10-01

    COPD is characterized by persistence of chronic inflammation in small airways and alveoli. Macrophages, neutrophils, and a specialized subset of T lymphocytes orchestrate the mild inflammation. This article focuses on humoral factors such as cytokines and chemokines that recruit these inflammatory and immune cells to the lungs, and proteases/antiproteases that ultimately cause structural derangement in the terminal respiratory zones. In addition to the classical protease and antiprotease imbalance hypothesis, alveolar homeostasis abnormality that comes from imbalance of lung constitutional cell apoptosis and regeneration may play a role in emphysema development. Also, autoimmunity to elastin degradation products may take part in the disease.

  20. Non-proteolytic functions of microbial proteases increase pathological complexity.

    PubMed

    Jarocki, Veronica M; Tacchi, Jessica L; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2015-03-01

    Proteases are enzymes that catalyse hydrolysis of peptide bonds thereby controlling the shape, size, function, composition, turnover and degradation of other proteins. In microbes, proteases are often identified as important virulence factors and as such have been targets for novel drug design. It is emerging that some proteases possess additional non-proteolytic functions that play important roles in host epithelia adhesion, tissue invasion and in modulating immune responses. These additional "moonlighting" functions have the potential to obfuscate data interpretation and have implications for therapeutic design. Moonlighting enzymes comprise a subcategory of multifunctional proteins that possess at least two distinct biological functions on a single polypeptide chain. Presently, identifying moonlighting proteins relies heavily on serendipitous empirical data with clues arising from proteins lacking signal peptides that are localised to the cell surface. Here, we describe examples of microbial proteases with additional non-proteolytic functions, including streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B, PepO and C5a peptidases, mycoplasmal aminopeptidases, mycobacterial chaperones and viral papain-like proteases. We explore how these non-proteolytic functions contribute to host cell adhesion, modulate the coagulation pathway, assist in non-covalent folding of proteins, participate in cell signalling, and increase substrate repertoire. We conclude by describing how proteomics has aided in moonlighting protein discovery, focusing attention on potential moonlighters in microbial exoproteomes.

  1. Synthesis of macrocyclic trypanosomal cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen Ting; Lira, Ricardo; Hansell, Elizabeth; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R

    2008-11-15

    The importance of cysteine proteases in parasites, compounded with the lack of redundancy compared to their mammalian hosts makes proteases attractive targets for the development of new therapeutic agents. The binding mode of K11002 to cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi was used in the design of conformationally constrained inhibitors. Vinyl sulfone-containing macrocycles were synthesized via olefin ring-closing metathesis and evaluated against cruzain and the closely related cysteine protease, rhodesain.

  2. Fluorigenic substrates for the protease activities of botulinum neurotoxins, serotypes A, B, and F.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, James J; Stafford, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    The seven botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are zinc metalloproteases that cleave neuronal proteins involved in neurotransmitter release and are among the most toxic natural products known. High-throughput BoNT assays are needed for use in antibotulinum drug discovery and to characterize BoNT protease activities. Compared to other proteases, BoNTs exhibit unusually stringent substrate requirements with respect to amino acid sequences and polypeptide lengths. Nonetheless, we have devised a strategy for development of fluorigenic BoNT protease assays, based on earlier structure-function studies, that has proven successful for three of the seven serotypes: A, B, and F. In synthetic peptide substrates, the P(1) and P(3)' residues were substituted with 2,4-dinitrophenyl-lysine and S-(N-[4-methyl-7-dimethylamino-coumarin-3-yl]-carboxamidomethyl)-cysteine, respectively. By monitoring the BoNT-catalyzed increase in fluorescence over time, initial hydrolysis rates could be obtained in 1 to 2 min when BoNT concentrations were 60 ng/ml (about 1 nM) or higher. Each BoNT cleaved its fluorigenic substrate at the same location as in the neuronal target protein, and kinetic constants indicated that the substrates were selective and efficient. The fluorigenic assay for BoNT B was used to characterize a new competitive inhibitor of BoNT B protease activity with a K(i) value of 4 micro M. In addition to real-time activity measurements, toxin concentration determinations, and kinetic studies, the BoNT substrates described herein may be directly incorporated into automated high-throughput assay systems to screen large numbers of compounds for potential antibotulinum drugs.

  3. Structure and protective efficacy of the Staphylococcus aureus autocleaving protease EpiP

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Misty L.; Prachi, Prachi; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Ruan, Jiapeng; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Giraldi, Monica; Biagini, Massimiliano; Liberatori, Sabrina; Savino, Silvana; Bagnoli, Fabio; Anderson, Wayne F.; Grandi, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Despite the global medical needs associated with Staphylococcus aureus infections, no licensed vaccines are currently available. We identified and characterized a protein annotated as an epidermin leader peptide processing serine protease (EpiP), as a novel S. aureus vaccine candidate. In addition, we determined the structure of the recombinant protein (rEpiP) by X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure revealed that rEpiP was cleaved somewhere between residues 95 and 100, and we found that the cleavage occurs through an autocatalytic intramolecular mechanism. The protein expressed by S. aureus cells also appeared to undergo a similar processing event. To determine whether the protein acts as a serine protease, we mutated the hypothesized catalytic serine 393 residue to alanine, generating rEpiP-S393A. The crystal structure of this mutant protein showed that the polypeptide chain was not cleaved and was not interacting stably with the active site. Indeed, rEpiP-S393A was shown to be impaired in its protease activity. Mice vaccinated with rEpiP were protected from S. aureus infection (34% survival, P=0.0054). Moreover, the protective efficacy generated by rEpiP and rEpiP-S393A was comparable, implying that the noncleaving mutant could be used for vaccination purposes.—Kuhn, M. L., Prachi, P., Minasov, G., Shuvalova, L., Ruan, J., Dubrovska, I., Winsor, J., Giraldi, M., Biagini, M., Liberatori, S., Savino, S., Bagnoli, F., Anderson, W. F., Grandi, G. Structure and protective efficacy of the Staphylococcus aureus autocleaving protease EpiP. PMID:24421400

  4. Plant cysteine proteases that evoke itch activate protease-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V.B.; Lerner, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bromelain, ficin and papain are cysteine proteases from plants that produce itch upon injection into skin. Their mechanism of action has not been considered previously. Objectives To determine the mechanism by which these proteases function. Methods The ability of these proteases to activate protease-activated receptors was determined by ratiometric calcium imaging. Results We show here that bromelain, ficin and papain activate protease-activated receptors 2 and 4. Conclusions Bromelain, ficin and papain function as signalling molecules and activate protease-activated receptors. Activation of these receptors is the likely mechanism by which these proteases evoke itch. PMID:20491769

  5. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  6. Extracellular Proteolysis of Apolipoprotein E (apoE) by Secreted Serine Neuronal Protease

    PubMed Central

    Tamboli, Irfan Y.; Heo, Dongeun; Rebeck, G. William

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, brain apolipoprotein E (apoE) is secreted and lipidated by astrocytes, then taken up by neurons via receptor mediated endocytosis. Free apoE is either degraded in intraneuronal lysosomal compartments or released. Here we identified a novel way by which apoE undergoes proteolysis in the extracellular space via a secreted neuronal protease. We show that apoE is cleaved in neuronal conditioned media by a secreted serine protease. This apoE cleavage was inhibited by PMSF and α1-antichymotrypsin, but not neuroserpin-1 or inhibitors of thrombin and cathepsin G, supporting its identity as a chymotrypsin like protease. In addition, apoE incubation with purified chymotrypsin produced a similar pattern of apoE fragments. Analysis of apoE fragments by mass spectrometry showed cleavages occuring at the C-terminal side of apoE tryptophan residues, further supporting our identification of cleavage by chymotrypsin like protease. Hippocampal neurons were more efficient in mediating this apoE cleavage than cortical neurons. Proteolysis of apoE4 generated higher levels of low molecular weight fragments compared to apoE3. Primary glial cultures released an inhibitor of this proteolytic activity. Together, these studies reveal novel mechanism by which apoE can be regulated and therefore could be useful in designing apoE directed AD therapeutic approaches. PMID:24675880

  7. Activity, specificity, and probe design for the smallpox virus protease K7L.

    PubMed

    Aleshin, Alexander E; Drag, Marcin; Gombosuren, Naran; Wei, Ge; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Satterthwait, Arnold C; Strongin, Alex Y; Liddington, Robert C; Salvesen, Guy S

    2012-11-16

    The K7L gene product of the smallpox virus is a protease implicated in the maturation of viral proteins. K7L belongs to protease Clan CE, which includes distantly related cysteine proteases from eukaryotes, pathogenic bacteria, and viruses. Here, we describe its recombinant high level expression, biochemical mechanism, substrate preference, and regulation. Earlier studies inferred that the orthologous I7L vaccinia protease cleaves at an AG-X motif in six viral proteins. Our data for K7L suggest that the AG-X motif is necessary but not sufficient for optimal cleavage activity. Thus, K7L requires peptides extended into the P7 and P8 positions for efficient substrate cleavage. Catalytic activity of K7L is substantially enhanced by homodimerization, by the substrate protein P25K as well as by glycerol. RNA and DNA also enhance cleavage of the P25K protein but not of synthetic peptides, suggesting that nucleic acids augment the interaction of K7L with its protein substrate. Library-based peptide preference analyses enabled us to design an activity-based probe that covalently and selectively labels K7L in lysates of transfected and infected cells. Our study thus provides proof-of-concept for the design of inhibitors and probes that may contribute both to a better understanding of the role of K7L in the virus life cycle and the design of novel anti-virals.

  8. Secreted proteases from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 degrade porcine gelatin, hemoglobin and immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed Central

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; Serrano, J J; Garcia, C; de la Garza, M

    1994-01-01

    It was found that 48 hour cultures of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae secreted proteases into the medium. Electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels (10%) copolymerized with porcine gelatin (0.1%), of the 70% (NH4)2SO4 precipitate from the culture supernatants, displayed protease activities of different molecular weights: > 200, 200, 90, 80, 70 and 50 kDa. They had activity over a broad range of pHs (4-8), with an optimal pH of 6-7. All were inhibited by 10 mM EDTA, and reactivated by 10 mM calcium. They were stable at -20 degrees C for more than a month. The proteases also degraded porcine IgA and porcine, human, and bovine hemoglobin, although they appeared to be less active against the hemoglobins. The IgA was totally cleaved in 48 h, using supernatants concentrated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone or the 70% (NH4)2SO4. Extracellular proteases could play a role in virulence. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:8004545

  9. Osteopontin is cleaved at multiple sites close to its integrin-binding motifs in milk and is a novel substrate for plasmin and cathepsin D.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Brian; Schack, Lotte; Kläning, Eva; Sørensen, Esben S

    2010-03-12

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a highly modified integrin-binding protein present in most tissues and body fluids where it has been implicated in numerous biological processes. A significant regulation of OPN function is mediated through phosphorylation and proteolytic processing. Proteolytic cleavage by thrombin and matrix metalloproteinases close to the integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp sequence modulates the function of OPN and its integrin binding properties. In this study, seven N-terminal OPN fragments originating from proteolytic cleavage have been characterized from human milk. Identification of the cleavage sites revealed that all fragments contained the Arg-Gly-Asp(145) sequence and were generated by cleavage of the Leu(151)-Arg(152), Arg(152)-Ser(153), Ser(153)-Lys(154), Lys(154)-Ser(155), Ser(155)-Lys(156), Lys(156)-Lys(157), or Phe(158)-Arg(159) peptide bonds. Six cleavages cannot be ascribed to thrombin or matrix metalloproteinase activity, whereas the cleavage at Arg(152)-Ser(153) matches thrombin specificity for OPN. The principal protease in milk, plasmin, hydrolyzed the same peptide bond as thrombin, but its main cleavage site was identified to be Lys(154)-Ser(155). Another endogenous milk protease, cathepsin D, cleaved the Leu(151)-Arg(152) bond. OPN fragments corresponding to plasmin activity were also identified in urine showing that plasmin cleavage of OPN is not restricted to milk. Plasmin, but not cathepsin D, cleavage of OPN increased cell adhesion mediated by the alpha(V)beta(3)- or alpha(5)beta(1)-integrins. Similar cellular adhesion was mediated by plasmin and thrombin-cleaved OPN showing that plasmin can be a potent regulator of OPN activity. These data show that OPN is highly susceptible to cleavage near its integrin-binding motifs, and the protein is a novel substrate for plasmin and cathepsin D.

  10. Role of Fibrinogen and Protease-Activated Receptors in Acute Xenobiotic-Induced Cholestatic Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Luyendyk, James P.; Mackman, Nigel; Sullivan, Bradley P.

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)–induced cholestatic liver injury causes tissue factor (TF)–dependent coagulation in mice, and TF deficiency reduces ANIT-induced liver injury. However, the mechanism whereby TF contributes to hepatotoxicity in this model is not known. Utilizing pharmacological and genetic strategies, we evaluated the contribution of fibrinogen and two distinct receptors for thrombin, protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and PAR-4, in a model of acute ANIT hepatotoxicity. ANIT administration (60 mg/kg, po) caused a marked induction of the genes encoding the three fibrinogen chains (α, β, and γ) in liver, an increase in plasma fibrinogen, and concurrent deposition of thrombin-cleaved fibrin in liver. Partial depletion of circulating fibrinogen with ancrod did not impact ANIT hepatotoxicity. However, complete fibrin(ogen) deficiency significantly reduced serum alanine aminotransferase activity and hepatocellular necrosis in ANIT-treated mice. ANIT-induced hepatocellular necrosis was similar in PAR-1−/− mice compared with PAR-1+/+ mice. Interestingly, the progression of ANIT-induced hepatocellular necrosis was significantly reduced in PAR-4−/− mice and by administration of an inhibitory PAR-4 pepducin (P4Pal-10, 0.5 mg/kg, sc) to wild-type mice 8 h after ANIT treatment. Interestingly, a distinct lesion, parenchymal-type peliosis, was also observed in PAR-4−/− mice treated with ANIT and in mice that were given P4Pal-10 prior to ANIT administration. The results suggest that fibrin(ogen), but not PAR-1, contributes to the progression of ANIT hepatotoxicity in mice. Moreover, the data suggest a dual role for PAR-4 in ANIT hepatotoxicity, both mediating an early protection against peliosis and contributing to the progression of hepatocellular necrosis. PMID:20974703

  11. Identification, functional expression and enzymic analysis of two distinct CaaX proteases from Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cadiñanos, Juan; Schmidt, Walter K; Fueyo, Antonio; Varela, Ignacio; López-Otín, Carlos; Freije, José M P

    2003-03-15

    Post-translational processing of proteins such as the Ras GTPases, which contain a C-terminal CaaX motif (where C stands for cysteine, a for aliphatic and X is one of several amino acids), includes prenylation, proteolytic removal of the C-terminal tripeptide and carboxy-methylation of the isoprenyl-cysteine residue. In the present study, we report the presence of two distinct CaaX-proteolytic activities in membrane extracts from Caenorhabditis elegans, which are sensitive to EDTA and Tos-Phe-CH(2)Cl (tosylphenylalanylchloromethane; 'TPCK') respectively. A protein similar to the mammalian and yeast farnesylated-proteins converting enzyme-1 (FACE-1)/Ste24p CaaX metalloprotease, encoded by a hypothetical gene (CeFACE-1/C04F12.10) found in C. elegans chromosome I, probably accounts for the EDTA-sensitive activity. An orthologue of FACE-2/Rce1p, the enzyme responsible for the proteolytic maturation of Ras oncoproteins and other prenylated substrates, probably accounts for the Tos-Phe-CH(2)Cl-sensitive activity, even though the gene for FACE-2/Rce1 has not been previously identified in this model organism. We have identified a previously overlooked gene in C. elegans chromosome V, which codes for a 266-amino-acid protein (CeFACE-2) with 30% sequence identity to human FACE-2/Rce1. We show that both CeFACE-1 and CeFACE-2 have the ability to promote production of the farnesylated yeast pheromone a -factor in vivo and to cleave a farnesylated peptide in vitro. These results indicate that CeFACE-1 and CeFACE-2 are bona fide CaaX proteases and support the evolutionary conservation of this proteolytic system in eukaryotes.

  12. Identification, functional expression and enzymic analysis of two distinct CaaX proteases from Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Cadiñanos, Juan; Schmidt, Walter K; Fueyo, Antonio; Varela, Ignacio; López-Otín, Carlos; Freije, José M P

    2003-01-01

    Post-translational processing of proteins such as the Ras GTPases, which contain a C-terminal CaaX motif (where C stands for cysteine, a for aliphatic and X is one of several amino acids), includes prenylation, proteolytic removal of the C-terminal tripeptide and carboxy-methylation of the isoprenyl-cysteine residue. In the present study, we report the presence of two distinct CaaX-proteolytic activities in membrane extracts from Caenorhabditis elegans, which are sensitive to EDTA and Tos-Phe-CH(2)Cl (tosylphenylalanylchloromethane; 'TPCK') respectively. A protein similar to the mammalian and yeast farnesylated-proteins converting enzyme-1 (FACE-1)/Ste24p CaaX metalloprotease, encoded by a hypothetical gene (CeFACE-1/C04F12.10) found in C. elegans chromosome I, probably accounts for the EDTA-sensitive activity. An orthologue of FACE-2/Rce1p, the enzyme responsible for the proteolytic maturation of Ras oncoproteins and other prenylated substrates, probably accounts for the Tos-Phe-CH(2)Cl-sensitive activity, even though the gene for FACE-2/Rce1 has not been previously identified in this model organism. We have identified a previously overlooked gene in C. elegans chromosome V, which codes for a 266-amino-acid protein (CeFACE-2) with 30% sequence identity to human FACE-2/Rce1. We show that both CeFACE-1 and CeFACE-2 have the ability to promote production of the farnesylated yeast pheromone a -factor in vivo and to cleave a farnesylated peptide in vitro. These results indicate that CeFACE-1 and CeFACE-2 are bona fide CaaX proteases and support the evolutionary conservation of this proteolytic system in eukaryotes. PMID:12487630

  13. Discovery of the 3-Imino-1,2,4-thiadiazinane 1,1-Dioxide Derivative Verubecestat (MK-8931)-A β-Site Amyloid Precursor Protein Cleaving Enzyme 1 Inhibitor for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jack D; Li, Sarah W; Brunskill, Andrew P J; Chen, Xia; Cox, Kathleen; Cumming, Jared N; Forman, Mark; Gilbert, Eric J; Hodgson, Robert A; Hyde, Lynn A; Jiang, Qin; Iserloh, Ulrich; Kazakevich, Irina; Kuvelkar, Reshma; Mei, Hong; Meredith, John; Misiaszek, Jeffrey; Orth, Peter; Rossiter, Lana M; Slater, Meagan; Stone, Julie; Strickland, Corey O; Voigt, Johannes H; Wang, Ganfeng; Wang, Hongwu; Wu, Yusheng; Greenlee, William J; Parker, Eric M; Kennedy, Matthew E; Stamford, Andrew W

    2016-12-08

    Verubecestat 3 (MK-8931), a diaryl amide-substituted 3-imino-1,2,4-thiadiazinane 1,1-dioxide derivative, is a high-affinity β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitor currently undergoing Phase 3 clinical evaluation for the treatment of mild to moderate and prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Although not selective over the closely related aspartyl protease BACE2, verubecestat has high selectivity for BACE1 over other key aspartyl proteases, notably cathepsin D, and profoundly lowers CSF and brain Aβ levels in rats and nonhuman primates and CSF Aβ levels in humans. In this annotation, we describe the discovery of 3, including design, validation, and selected SAR around the novel iminothiadiazinane dioxide core as well as aspects of its preclinical and Phase 1 clinical characterization.

  14. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and Their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    PROTEASES; PROTEASE INHIBITORS; STORED-PRODUCT INISECTS; TRIBOLIUM CASIANEUH; MIDGUT PROTEASES; TENEBRIO MOLITOR MIDGUT-PROTEASES; LOCUST CAECAL...separation and identification of numerous midgut proteases in Tenebrio and Tribolium . The PAGE-gelatin matrix revealed the inhibitory effect of BBI...the proteinaceous trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor from soybeans) on several Tribolium proteases - an effect which was not detectable in inhibition

  15. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 20 Regulates the Reciprocal Functions of β-Arrestin2 in Toll-like Receptor 4-promoted Nuclear Factor κB (NFκB) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Zhang, Lisheng; Wu, Jiao-Hui; Han, Sang-oh; Brian, Leigh; Freedman, Neil J.; Shenoy, Sudha K.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) promotes vascular inflammatory disorders such as neointimal hyperplasia and atherosclerosis. TLR4 triggers NFκB signaling through the ubiquitin ligase TRAF6 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6). TRAF6 activity can be impeded by deubiquitinating enzymes like ubiquitin-specific protease 20 (USP20), which can reverse TRAF6 autoubiquitination, and by association with the multifunctional adaptor protein β-arrestin2. Although β-arrestin2 effects on TRAF6 suggest an anti-inflammatory role, physiologic β-arrestin2 promotes inflammation in atherosclerosis and neointimal hyperplasia. We hypothesized that anti- and proinflammatory dimensions of β-arrestin2 activity could be dictated by β-arrestin2's ubiquitination status, which has been linked with its ability to scaffold and localize activated ERK1/2 to signalosomes. With purified proteins and in intact cells, our protein interaction studies showed that TRAF6/USP20 association and subsequent USP20-mediated TRAF6 deubiquitination were β-arrestin2-dependent. Generation of transgenic mice with smooth muscle cell-specific expression of either USP20 or its catalytically inactive mutant revealed anti-inflammatory effects of USP20 in vivo and in vitro. Carotid endothelial denudation showed that antagonizing smooth muscle cell USP20 activity increased NFκB activation and neointimal hyperplasia. We found that β-arrestin2 ubiquitination was promoted by TLR4 and reversed by USP20. The association of USP20 with β-arrestin2 was augmented when β-arrestin2 ubiquitination was prevented and reduced when β-arrestin2 ubiquitination was rendered constitutive. Constitutive β-arrestin2 ubiquitination also augmented NFκB activation. We infer that pro- and anti-inflammatory activities of β-arrestin2 are determined by β-arrestin2 ubiquitination and that changes in USP20 expression and/or activity can therefore regulate inflammatory responses, at least in part, by defining the ubiquitination

  16. Fabrication of Submicron Devices on the (011) Cleave Surface of a Cleaved-Edge-Overgrowth GaAs/AlGaAs Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Kenneth; Chang, Albert

    2013-03-01

    We describe the fabrication of submicron devices on the (011)cleave surface of a GaAs heterostructure crystal, in which this surface is extremely narrow. Special purpose devices are produced, which take advantage of the unique characteristics of Cleaved-Edge-Overgrowth. The successful fabrication relies on understanding the surface tension of the electron beam PMMA resist, the workable degree of variation in resist thickness, and on gluing the crystal onto a backing substrate to increase structural strength. We demonstrate a functional gate-controlled point contact constriction placed 9 um from one edge of the cleave surface. This technique may enable the study of fractional quantum Hall fluid in a novel structure. Work supported by NSFDMR-0701948

  17. Optimisation of the detection of bacterial proteases using adsorbed immunoglobulins as universal substrates.

    PubMed

    Abuknesha, Ram A; Jeganathan, Fiona; Wildeboer, Dirk; Price, Robert G

    2010-06-15

    Bacterial proteases, Type XXIV from Bacillus licheniformens and Type XIV from Streptomyces griseus, were used to investigate the utility and optimisation of a solid phase assay for proteases, using immunoglobulin proteins as substrates. Immunoglobulins IgA and IgG were adsorbed on to surfaces of ELISA plates and exposed to various levels of the bacterial proteases which led to digestion and desorption of proportional amounts of the immunoglobulins. The assay signal was developed by measuring the remaining proteins on the polystyrene surface with appropriate enzyme-labelled anti-immunoglobulin reagents. The assay was fully optimised in terms of substrate levels employing ELISA techniques to titrate levels of adsorbed substrates and protease analytes. The critical factor which influences assay sensitivity was found to be the substrate concentration, the levels of adsorbed immunoglobulins. The estimated detection limits for protease XXIV and XIV were 10micro units/test and 9micro units/test using IgA as a substrate. EC(50) values were calculated as 213 and 48micro units/test for each protease respectively. Using IgG as a substrate, the estimated detection limits were 104micro units/test for protease XXIV and 9micro units/test for protease XIV. EC(50) values were calculated at 529micro units/test and 28micro units/test for protease XXIV and XIV respectively. The solid phase protease assay required no modification of the substrates and the adsorption step is merely simple addition of immunoglobulins to ELISA plates. Adsorption of the immunoglobulins to polystyrene enabled straightforward separation of reaction mixtures prior to development of assay signal. The assay exploits the advantages of the technical facilities of ELISA technology and commercially available reagents enabling the detection and measurement of a wide range of proteases. However, the key issue was found to be that in order to achieve the potential performance of the simple assay, optimisation of the

  18. Characterization of two cysteine proteases secreted by Blastocystis ST7, a human intestinal parasite.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Texier, Catherine; Poirier, Philippe; Viscogliosi, Eric; Tan, Kevin S W; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2012-09-01

    Blastocystis spp. are unicellular anaerobic intestinal parasites of both humans and animals and the most prevalent ones found in human stool samples. Their association with various gastrointestinal disorders raises the questions of its pathogenicity and of the molecular mechanisms involved. Since secreted proteases are well-known to be implicated in intestinal parasite virulence, we intended to determine whether Blastocystis spp. possess such pathogenic factors. In silico analysis of the Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7) genome sequence highlighted 22 genes coding proteases which were predicted to be secreted. We characterized the proteolytic activities in the secretory products of Blastocystis ST7 using specific protease inhibitors. Two cysteine proteases, a cathepsin B and a legumain, were identified in the parasite culture supernatant by gelatin zymographic SDS-PAGE gel and MS/MS analysis. These proteases might act on intestinal cells and disturb gut function. This work provides serious molecular candidates to link Blastocystis spp. and intestinal disorders.

  19. Efficient proteolysis and application of an alkaline protease from halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Srivastava, A K; Khare, S K

    2014-10-03

    A salt-stable alkaline protease from moderately halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9, isolated from the western coast of India, is described. This protease was capable of efficiently removing silver from used/waste X-Ray films, as well as hydrolyzing defatted soy flour with 31% degree of hydrolysis (DH). Production of the protease was optimized by using response surface methodology. Ca(2+) and NaCl were the most critical factors in enhancing the yield. Under optimized culture conditions, a maximum of 369 U protease/mL was obtained, which is quite comparable to the yields of commercial proteases. The elevated production level coupled with ability to efficiently hydrolyze protein-laden soy flour and complete recovery of silver from used X-Ray films makes it a prospective industrial enzyme.

  20. A novel class of cysteine protease inhibitors: solution structure of staphostatin A from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Grzegorz; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Stec-Niemczyk, Justyna; Bochtler, Matthias; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Adam; Holak, Tad A

    2003-11-25

    A series of secreted proteases are included among the virulence factors documented for Staphylococcus aureus. In light of increasing antibiotic resistance of this dangerous human pathogen, these proteases are considered as suitable targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The recent discovery of staphostatins, endogenous, highly specific, staphylococcal cysteine protease inhibitors, opened a possibility for structure-based design of low molecular weight analogues. Moreover, the crystal structure of staphostatin B revealed a distinct folding pattern and an unexpected, substrate-like binding mode. The solution structure of staphostatin A reported here confirms that staphostatins constitute a novel, distinct class of cysteine protease inhibitors. In addition, the structure knowledge-based mutagenesis studies shed light on individual structural features of staphostatin A, the inhibition mechanism, and the determinants of distinct specificity of staphostatins toward their target proteases.

  1. Bacterial proteases in IBD and IBS.

    PubMed

    Steck, Natalie; Mueller, Kerstin; Schemann, Michael; Haller, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    Proteases play a decisive role in health and disease. They fulfil diverse functions and have been associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The current knowledge focuses on host-derived proteases including matrix metalloproteinases, various serine proteases and cathepsins. The possible contribution of bacterial proteases has been largely ignored in the pathogenesis of IBD and IBS, although there is increasing evidence, especially demonstrated for proteases from pathogenic bacteria. The underlying mechanisms extend to proteases from commensal bacteria which may be relevant for disease susceptibility. The intestinal microbiota and its proteolytic capacity exhibit the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD and IBS. This review highlights the relevance of host- and bacteria-derived proteases and their signalling mechanisms.

  2. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  3. Functional analysis of rhomboid proteases during Toxoplasma invasion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bang; Buguliskis, Jeffrey S; Lee, Tobie D; Sibley, L David

    2014-10-21

    Host cell invasion by Toxoplasma gondii and other apicomplexan parasites requires transmembrane adhesins that mediate binding to receptors on the substrate and host cell to facilitate motility and invasion. Rhomboid proteases (ROMs) are thought to cleave adhesins within their transmembrane segments, thus allowing the parasite to disengage from receptors and completely enter the host cell. To examine the specific roles of individual ROMs during invasion, we generated single, double, and triple knockouts for the three ROMs expressed in T. gondii tachyzoites. Analysis of these mutants demonstrated that ROM4 is the primary protease involved in adhesin processing and host cell invasion, whereas ROM1 or ROM5 plays negligible roles in these processes. Deletion of ROM4 blocked the shedding of adhesins such as MIC2 (microneme protein 2), causing them to accumulate on the surface of extracellular parasites. Increased surface adhesins led to nonproductive attachment, altered gliding motility, impaired moving junction formation, and reduced invasion efficiency. Despite the importance of ROM4 for efficient invasion, mutants lacking all three ROMs were viable and MIC2 was still efficiently removed from the surface of invaded mutant parasites, implying the existence of ROM-independent mechanisms for adhesin removal during invasion. Collectively, these results suggest that although ROM processing of adhesins is not absolutely essential, it is important for efficient host cell invasion by T. gondii. Importance: Apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii express surface proteins that bind host cell receptors to aid invasion. Many of these adhesins are subject to cleavage by rhomboid proteases (ROMs) within their transmembrane segments during invasion. Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of adhesin cleavage for parasite invasion and proposed that the ROMs responsible for processing would be essential for parasite survival. In T. gondii, ROM5 was thought to be the

  4. Structural determinants of MALT1 protease activity.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Christian; Leder, Lukas; Blank, Jutta; Bernardi, Anna; Melkko, Samu; Decock, Arnaud; D'Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Erbel, Paulus; Hughes, Nicola; Freuler, Felix; Nikolay, Rainer; Alves, Juliano; Bornancin, Frederic; Renatus, Martin

    2012-05-25

    The formation of the CBM (CARD11-BCL10-MALT1) complex is pivotal for antigen-receptor-mediated activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Signaling is dependent on MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1), which not only acts as a scaffolding protein but also possesses proteolytic activity mediated by its caspase-like domain. It remained unclear how the CBM activates MALT1. Here, we provide biochemical and structural evidence that MALT1 activation is dependent on its dimerization and show that mutations at the dimer interface abrogate activity in cells. The unliganded protease presents itself in a dimeric yet inactive state and undergoes substantial conformational changes upon substrate binding. These structural changes also affect the conformation of the C-terminal Ig-like domain, a domain that is required for MALT1 activity. Binding to the active site is coupled to a relative movement of caspase and Ig-like domains. MALT1 binding partners thus may have the potential of tuning MALT1 protease activity without binding directly to the caspase domain.

  5. Prevalence of genes encoding extracellular proteases in Staphylococcus aureus - important targets triggering immune response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zdzalik, Michal; Karim, Abdulkarim Y; Wolski, Krzysztof; Buda, Pawel; Wojcik, Kinga; Brueggemann, Sarah; Wojciechowski, Piotr; Eick, Sigrun; Calander, Ann-Marie; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Kubica, Malgorzata; Polakowska, Klaudia; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Wladyka, Benedykt; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2012-11-01

    Proteases of Staphylococcus aureus have long been considered to function as important virulence factors, although direct evidence of the role of particular enzymes remains incomplete and elusive. Here, we sought to provide a collective view of the prevalence of extracellular protease genes in genomes of commensal and pathogenic strains of S. aureus and their expression in the course of human and mouse infection. Data on V8 protease, staphopains A and B, aureolysin, and the recently described and poorly characterized group of six Spl proteases are provided. A phylogenetically diverse collection of 167 clinical isolates was analyzed, resulting in the comprehensive genetic survey of the prevalence of protease-encoding genes. No correlation between identified gene patterns with specific infections was established. Humoral response against the proteases of interest was examined in the sera derived from human patients and from a model mouse infection. The analysis suggests that at least some, if not all, tested proteases are expressed and secreted during the course of infection. Overall, the results presented in this study support the hypothesis that the secretory proteases as a group may contribute to the virulence of S. aureus.

  6. Interdomain Contacts and the Stability of Serralysin Protease from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Morrison, Anneliese J; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2015-01-01

    The serralysin family of bacterial metalloproteases is associated with virulence in multiple modes of infection. These extracellular proteases are members of the Repeats-in-ToXin (RTX) family of toxins and virulence factors, which mediated virulence in E. coli, B. pertussis, and P. aeruginosa, as well as other animal and plant pathogens. The serralysin proteases are structurally dynamic and their folding is regulated by calcium binding to a C-terminal domain that defines the RTX family of proteins. Previous studies have suggested that interactions between N-terminal sequences and this C-terminal domain are important for the high thermal and chemical stabilities of the RTX proteases. Extending from this, stabilization of these interactions in the native structure may lead to hyperstabilization of the folded protein. To test this hypothesis, cysteine pairs were introduced into the N-terminal helix and the RTX domain and protease folding and activity were assessed. Under stringent pH and temperature conditions, the disulfide-bonded mutant showed increased protease activity and stability. This activity was dependent on the redox environment of the refolding reaction and could be blocked by selective modification of the cysteine residues before protease refolding. These data demonstrate that the thermal and chemical stability of these proteases is, in part, mediated by binding between the RTX domain and the N-terminal helix and demonstrate that stabilization of this interaction can further stabilize the active protease, leading to additional pH and thermal tolerance.

  7. Interdomain Contacts and the Stability of Serralysin Protease from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Morrison, Anneliese J.; Thibodeau, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    The serralysin family of bacterial metalloproteases is associated with virulence in multiple modes of infection. These extracellular proteases are members of the Repeats-in-ToXin (RTX) family of toxins and virulence factors, which mediated virulence in E. coli, B. pertussis, and P. aeruginosa, as well as other animal and plant pathogens. The serralysin proteases are structurally dynamic and their folding is regulated by calcium binding to a C-terminal domain that defines the RTX family of proteins. Previous studies have suggested that interactions between N-terminal sequences and this C-terminal domain are important for the high thermal and chemical stabilities of the RTX proteases. Extending from this, stabilization of these interactions in the native structure may lead to hyperstabilization of the folded protein. To test this hypothesis, cysteine pairs were introduced into the N-terminal helix and the RTX domain and protease folding and activity were assessed. Under stringent pH and temperature conditions, the disulfide-bonded mutant showed increased protease activity and stability. This activity was dependent on the redox environment of the refolding reaction and could be blocked by selective modification of the cysteine residues before protease refolding. These data demonstrate that the thermal and chemical stability of these proteases is, in part, mediated by binding between the RTX domain and the N-terminal helix and demonstrate that stabilization of this interaction can further stabilize the active protease, leading to additional pH and thermal tolerance. PMID:26378460

  8. Similar proportions of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease-producing streptococci in initial dental plaque of selectively IgA-deficient and normal individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, J; Friman, V; Kilian, M

    1993-01-01

    By comparing the initial colonization of cleaned teeth in immunoglobulin A (IgA)-deficient, IgM-compensating individuals with that in normal individuals, no significant difference in the proportion of IgA1 protease-producing streptococci was found. Thus, as one of several bacterial means of immune evasion, the ability to cleave secretory IgA1 does not appear essential to the successful adherence of oral streptococci. PMID:8359924

  9. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells is mediated via caspase-dependent and independent mechanisms involving calpain and caspase-3 proteases as well as apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) and this process is inhibited by equine estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, YueMei; Bhavnani, Bhagu R

    2006-01-01

    Background Glutamate, a major excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter, causes apoptotic neuronal cell death at high concentrations. Our previous studies have shown that depending on the neuronal cell type, glutamate-induced apoptotic cell death was associated with regulation of genes such as Bcl-2, Bax, and/or caspase-3 and mitochondrial cytochrome c. To further delineate the intracellular mechanisms, we have investigated the role of calpain, an important calcium-dependent protease thought to be involved in apoptosis along with mitochondrial apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) and caspase-3 in primary cortical cells and a mouse hippocampal cell line HT22. Results Glutamate-induced apoptotic cell death in neuronal cells was associated with characteristic DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, activation of calpain and caspase-3 as well as the upregulation and/or translocation of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol and nuclei. Our results reveal that primary cortical cells and HT22 cells display different patterns of regulation of these genes/proteins. In primary cortical cells, glutamate induces activation of calpain, caspase-3 and translocation of AIF from mitochondria to cytosol and nuclei. In contrast, in HT22 cells, only the activation of calpain and upregulation and translocation of AIF occurred. In both cell types, these processes were inhibited/reversed by 17β-estradiol and Δ8,17β-estradiol with the latter being more potent. Conclusion Depending upon the neuronal cell type, at least two mechanisms are involved in glutamate-induced apoptosis: a caspase-3-dependent pathway and a caspase-independent pathway involving calpain and AIF. Since HT22 cells lack caspase-3, glutamate-induced apoptosis is mediated via the caspase-independent pathway in this cell line. Kinetics of this apoptotic pathway further indicate that calpain rather than caspase-3, plays a critical role in the glutamate-induced apoptosis. Our studies further indicate that glutamate- induced changes

  10. A 24-kDa cloned zinc metalloprotease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is common to all serotypes and cleaves actin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuéllar, C; Montañez, C; Tenorio, V; Reyes-Esparza, J; Durán, M J; Negrete, E; Guerrero, A; de la Garza, M

    2000-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes pleuropneumonia in swine. This bacterium secretes proteases that degrade porcine hemoglobin and IgA in vitro. To further characterize A. pleuropneumoniae proteases, we constructed a genomic library expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha, and selected a clone that showed proteolytic activity. The recombinant plasmid carries an 800-base pair A. pleuropneumoniae gene sequence that.codes for a 24-kDa polypeptide. A 350-base pair PstI fragment from the sequence hybridized at high stringency with DNA from 12 serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae, but not with DNA from Actinobacillus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida A or D, or E. coli DH5alpha, thus showing specificity for A. pleuropneumoniae. The expressed polypeptide was recognized as an antigen by convalescent-phase pig sera. Furthermore, a polyclonal antiserum developed against the purified polypeptide recognized an A. pleuropneumoniae oligomeric protein in both crude-extract and cell-free culture media. This recombinant polypeptide cleaved azocoll, gelatin, and actin. Inhibition of the proteolytic activity by diethylpyrocarbonate suggests that this polypeptide is a zinc metalloprotease. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:10805246

  11. Impact of the Pla protease substrate α2-antiplasmin on the progression of primary pneumonic plague.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Justin L; Schroeder, Jay A; Zimbler, Daniel L; Bellows, Lauren E; Lathem, Wyndham W

    2015-12-01

    Many pathogens usurp the host hemostatic system during infection to promote pathogenesis. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, expresses the plasminogen activator protease Pla, which has been shown in vitro to target and cleave multiple proteins within the fibrinolytic pathway, including the plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin (A2AP). It is not known, however, if Pla inactivates A2AP in vivo; the role of A2AP during respiratory Y. pestis infection is not known either. Here, we show that Y. pestis does not appreciably cleave A2AP in a Pla-dependent manner in the lungs during experimental pneumonic plague. Furthermore, following intranasal infection with Y. pestis, A2AP-deficient mice exhibit no difference in survival time, bacterial burden in the lungs, or dissemination from wild-type mice. Instead, we found that in the absence of Pla, A2AP contributes to the control of the pulmonary inflammatory response during infection by reducing neutrophil recruitment and cytokine production, resulting in altered immunopathology of the lungs compared to A2AP-deficient mice. Thus, our data demonstrate that A2AP is not significantly affected by the Pla protease during pneumonic plague, and although A2AP participates in immune modulation in the lungs, it has limited impact on the course or ultimate outcome of the infection.

  12. Engineered tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease active in the secretory pathway of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cesaratto, Francesca; López-Requena, Alejandro; Burrone, Oscar R; Petris, Gianluca

    2015-10-20

    Tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) is a unique endopeptidase with stringent substrate specificity. TEVp has been widely used as a purified protein for in vitro applications, but also as a biological tool directly expressing it in living cells. To adapt the protease to diverse applications, several TEVp mutants with different stability and enzymatic properties have been reported. Herein we describe the development of a novel engineered TEVp mutant designed to be active in the secretory pathway. While wild type TEVp targeted to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells is synthetized as an N-glycosylated and catalytically inactive enzyme, a TEVp mutant with selected mutations at two verified N-glycosylation sites and at an exposed cysteine was highly efficient. This mutant was very active in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of living cells and can be used as a biotechnological tool to cleave proteins within the secretory pathway. As an immediate practical application we report the expression of a complete functional monoclonal antibody expressed from a single polypeptide, which was cleaved by our TEVp mutant into the two antibody chains and secreted as an assembled and functional molecule. In addition, we show active TEVp mutants lacking auto-cleavage activity.

  13. Electron gas quality at various (110)-GaAs interfaces as benchmark for cleaved edge overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedi, S.; Reichl, C.; Berl, M.; Alt, L.; Maier, A.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-12-01

    We study molecular beam epitaxial growth on the unusual (110) surface of GaAs substrates as prerequisite for cleaved edge overgrown structures. We present the first systematic comparison of the quality of two dimensional electron systems on simultaneously overgrown (110) GaAs monitor wafers with ex situ as well as in situ cleaved (110) facets. Our study confirms that characterization of the monitor wafer is a valid benchmark for the magnetotransport characteristics of structures grown on cleaved facets. We show that deviating results can be traced back to (110) substrates of lower quality. We also demonstrate that the roughness of the in situ cleaved facets is decisive for the quality of the induced electron gas.

  14. Characterization of the laser cleaving on glass sheets with a line-shape laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Zan; Lin, Jehnming

    2007-07-01

    A CO 2 laser with a line-shape beam was used to cleave a soda-lime glass substrate at various beam-rotation angles to the cutting direction. The stress distribution on the glass substrate cleaved by the laser beam has been analyzed in this study. An uncoupled thermal-elastic analysis was achieved by the ABAQUS software based on the finite element method. The numerical results show that the stress field of the fracture is caused by a complex stress state and the cleavages are significantly affected by the heat diffusion and beam rotation angle. At the rotation angle of zero degree to the cleaving direction, the phenomena of the chip formation have been found due to a large temperature gradient at the cleaving depth of the glass substrate.

  15. Serpin1 and WSCP differentially regulate the activity of the cysteine protease RD21 during plant development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rustgi, Sachin; Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Reinbothe, Christiane; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen

    2017-02-28

    Proteolytic enzymes (proteases) participate in a vast range of physiological processes, ranging from nutrient digestion to blood coagulation, thrombosis, and beyond. In plants, proteases are implicated in host recognition and pathogen infection, induced defense (immunity), and the deterrence of insect pests. Because proteases irreversibly cleave peptide bonds of protein substrates, their activity must be tightly controlled in time and space. Here, we report an example of how nature evolved alternative mechanisms to fine-tune the activity of a cysteine protease dubbed RD21 (RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION-21). One mechanism in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana studied here comprises irreversible inhibition of RD21's activity by Serpin1, whereas the other mechanism is a result of the reversible inhibition of RD21 activity by a Kunitz protease inhibitor named water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP). Activity profiling, complex isolation, and homology modeling data revealed unique interactions of RD21 with Serpin1 and WSCP, respectively. Expression studies identified only partial overlaps in Serpin1 and WSCP accumulation that explain how RD21 contributes to the innate immunity of mature plants and arthropod deterrence of seedlings undergoing skotomorphogenesis and greening.

  16. BspK, a Serine Protease from the Predatory Bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus with Utility for Analysis of Therapeutic Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bratanis, Eleni; Molina, Henrik; Naegeli, Andreas; Collin, Mattias; Lood, Rolf

    2017-02-15

    The development of therapeutic and diagnostic antibodies is a rapidly growing field of research, being the fastest expanding group of products on the pharmaceutical market, and appropriate quality controls are crucial for their application. We have identified and characterized the serine protease termed BspK (Bdellovibrio serine protease K) from Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and here show its activity on antibodies. Mutation of the serine residue at position 230 rendered the protease inactive. Further investigations of BspK enzymatic characteristics revealed autoproteolytic activity, resulting in numerous cleavage products. Two of the autoproteolytic cleavage sites in the BspK fusion protein were investigated in more detail and corresponded to cleavage after K28 and K210 in the N- and C-terminal parts of BspK, respectively. Further, BspK displayed stable enzymatic activity on IgG within the pH range of 6.0 to 9.5 and was inhibited in the presence of ZnCl2 BspK demonstrated preferential hydrolysis of human IgG1 compared to other immunoglobulins and isotypes, with hydrolysis of the heavy chain at position K226 generating two separate Fab fragments and an intact IgG Fc domain. Finally, we show that BspK preferentially cleaves its substrates C-terminally to lysines similar to the protease LysC. However, BspK displays a unique cleavage profile compared to several currently used proteases on the market.

  17. Construction, expression, and characterization of a novel fully activated recombinant single-chain hepatitis C virus protease.

    PubMed Central

    Taremi, S. S.; Beyer, B.; Maher, M.; Yao, N.; Prosise, W.; Weber, P. C.; Malcolm, B. A.

    1998-01-01

    Efficient proteolytic processing of essential junctions of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyprotein requires a heterodimeric complex of the NS3 bifunctional protease/helicase and the NS4A accessory protein. A single-chain recombinant form of the protease has been constructed in which NS4A residues 21-32 (GSVVIVGRIILS) were fused in frame to the amino terminus of the NS3 protease domain (residues 3-181) through a tetrapeptide linker. The single-chain recombinant protease has been overexpressed as a soluble protein in E. coli and purified to homogeneity by a combination of metal chelate and size-exclusion chromatography. The single-chain recombinant protease domain shows full proteolytic activity cleaving the NS5A-5B synthetic peptide substrate, DTEDVVCCSMSYTWTGK with a Km and k(cat) of 20.0 +/- 2.0 microM and 9.6 +/- 2.0 min(-1), respectively; parameters identical to those of the authentic NS3(1-631)/NS4A(1-54) protein complex generated in eukaryotic cells (Sali DL et al., 1998, Biochemistry 37:3392-3401). PMID:9792101

  18. Improved fabrication of HgI/sub 2/ nuclear radiation detectors by machine-cleaving

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, A.; Burger, A.; Schieber, M.; Vandenberg, L.; Yellon, W.B.; Alkire, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The perfection of machine-cleaved sections from HgI/sub 2/ bulk crystals was examined. The perfection of the machine-cleaved sections as established by gamma diffraction rocking curves was found to be much better than the perfection of hand-cleaved sections or as grown thin platelets, reaching a perfection similar to that of the wire-sawn sections of HgI/sub 2/. A correlation between the perfection and the thickness of the machine-cleaved section was also found, i.e., the thicker the cleaved-section the more perfect it is. The reproducibility of the fabrication was significantly improved by using machine cleaving in the process of fabrication. Large single crystals of HgI/sub 2/ weighing 20 to 200 g, can be grown from the vapor phase using the TOM Technique. In order to fabricate nuclear radiation detectors from these single crystals, thin sections of about 0.4 to 0.8 mm thickness have to be prepared. Up till now, the state-of-the-art of fabricating HgI/sub 2/ nuclear radiation detectors involved two methods to get thin sections from the large single crystals: (1) hand-cleaving using a razor-blade and (2) solution wire sawing. The chemical wire sawing method involves a loss of about 50% of the crystal volume and is usually followed by a chemical polishing process which involves a significant loss of volume of the original volume. This procedure is complicated and wasteful. The traditional fabrication method, i.e., hand-cleaving followed by rapid nonselective chemical etching, is simpler and less wasteful.

  19. Nelfinavir: fourth protease inhibitor approved.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to nelfinavir in both adult and pediatric formulations. Agouron, the manufacturer, used innovative computerized drug design techniques to discover, design, and refine the nelfinavir molecule. Nelfinavir is marketed under the trade name Viracept, and costs $5,000 per year. Early clinical trials find it to be as powerful as the other protease inhibitors, but with a different resistance profile. The drug has relatively few drug indications; however, several compounds have been contraindicated.

  20. Protease Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    acid synthase, which contains a serine hydrolase domain. We identified a lead inhibitor of this domain of fatty acid synthase, called Orlistat, which...SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Prostate cancer, tumor biology, protease, proteomics, transgenic, 20 animal model, fatty acid synthase, orlistat 16...the enzymes we identified is fatty acid synthase. Fatty acid synthase is the sole enzyme responsible for the cellular synthesis of fatty acids . This

  1. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET) has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. PMID:20234801

  2. In vitro evolution of distinct self-cleaving ribozymes in diverse environments

    PubMed Central

    Popović, Milena; Fliss, Palmer S.; Ditzler, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro evolution experiments have long been used to evaluate the roles of RNA in both modern and ancient biology, and as a tool for biotechnology applications. The conditions under which these experiments have been conducted, however, do not reflect the range of cellular environments in modern biology or our understanding of chemical environments on the early earth, when the atmosphere and oceans were largely anoxic and soluble Fe2+ was abundant. To test the impact of environmental factors relevant to RNA's potential role in the earliest forms of life, we evolved populations of self-cleaving ribozymes in an anoxic atmosphere with varying pH in the presence of either Fe2+ or Mg2+. Populations evolved under these different conditions are dominated by different sequences and secondary structures, demonstrating global differences in the underlying fitness landscapes. Comparisons between evolutionary outcomes and catalytic activities also indicate that Mg2+ can readily take the place of Fe2+ in supporting the catalysis of RNA cleavage at neutral pH, but not at lower pH. These results highlight the importance of considering the specific environments in which functional biopolymers evolve when evaluating their potential roles in the origin of life, extant biology, or biotechnology. PMID:26130717

  3. Delta-secretase cleaves amyloid precursor protein and regulates the pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhentao; Song, Mingke; Liu, Xia; Su Kang, Seong; Duong, Duc M.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Cao, Xuebing; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E.; Ping Yu, Shan; Jia, Jianping; Levey, Allan I.; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    The age-dependent deposition of amyloid-β peptides, derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite age being the greatest risk factor for AD, the molecular mechanisms linking ageing to APP processing are unknown. Here we show that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP), a pH-controlled cysteine proteinase, is activated during ageing and mediates APP proteolytic processing. AEP cleaves APP at N373 and N585 residues, selectively influencing the amyloidogenic fragmentation of APP. AEP is activated in normal mice in an age-dependent manner, and is strongly activated in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model and human AD brains. Deletion of AEP from 5XFAD or APP/PS1 mice decreases senile plaque formation, ameliorates synapse loss, elevates long-term potentiation and protects memory. Blockade of APP cleavage by AEP in mice alleviates pathological and behavioural deficits. Thus, AEP acts as a δ-secretase, contributing to the age-dependent pathogenic mechanisms in AD. PMID:26549211

  4. Identification of SlpB, a Cytotoxic Protease from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nicholas A.; Hunt, Kristin M.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Zhang, Liang; Thibodeau, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens causes ocular infections in healthy individuals. Secreted protease activity was characterized from 44 ocular clinical isolates, and a higher frequency of protease-positive strains was observed among keratitis isolates than among conjunctivitis isolates. A positive correlation between protease activity and cytotoxicity to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro was determined. Deletion of prtS in clinical keratitis isolate K904 reduced, but did not eliminate, cytotoxicity and secreted protease production. This indicated that PrtS is necessary for full cytotoxicity to ocular cells and implied the existence of another secreted protease(s) and cytotoxic factors. Bioinformatic analysis of the S. marcescens Db11 genome revealed three additional open reading frames predicted to code for serralysin-like proteases noted here as slpB, slpC, and slpD. Induced expression of prtS and slpB, but not slpC and slpD, in strain PIC3611 rendered the strain cytotoxic to a lung carcinoma cell line; however, only prtS induction was sufficient for cytotoxicity to a corneal cell line. Strain K904 with deletion of both prtS and slpB genes was defective in secreted protease activity and cytotoxicity to human cell lines. PAGE analysis suggests that SlpB is produced at lower levels than PrtS. Purified SlpB demonstrated calcium-dependent and AprI-inhibited protease activity and cytotoxicity to airway and ocular cell lines in vitro. Lastly, genetic analysis indicated that the type I secretion system gene, lipD, is required for SlpB secretion. These genetic data introduce SlpB as a new cytotoxic protease from S. marcescens. PMID:25939509

  5. Identification of SlpB, a Cytotoxic Protease from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Robert M Q; Stella, Nicholas A; Hunt, Kristin M; Brothers, Kimberly M; Zhang, Liang; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2015-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens causes ocular infections in healthy individuals. Secreted protease activity was characterized from 44 ocular clinical isolates, and a higher frequency of protease-positive strains was observed among keratitis isolates than among conjunctivitis isolates. A positive correlation between protease activity and cytotoxicity to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro was determined. Deletion of prtS in clinical keratitis isolate K904 reduced, but did not eliminate, cytotoxicity and secreted protease production. This indicated that PrtS is necessary for full cytotoxicity to ocular cells and implied the existence of another secreted protease(s) and cytotoxic factors. Bioinformatic analysis of the S. marcescens Db11 genome revealed three additional open reading frames predicted to code for serralysin-like proteases noted here as slpB, slpC, and slpD. Induced expression of prtS and slpB, but not slpC and slpD, in strain PIC3611 rendered the strain cytotoxic to a lung carcinoma cell line; however, only prtS induction was sufficient for cytotoxicity to a corneal cell line. Strain K904 with deletion of both prtS and slpB genes was defective in secreted protease activity and cytotoxicity to human cell lines. PAGE analysis suggests that SlpB is produced at lower levels than PrtS. Purified SlpB demonstrated calcium-dependent and AprI-inhibited protease activity and cytotoxicity to airway and ocular cell lines in vitro. Lastly, genetic analysis indicated that the type I secretion system gene, lipD, is required for SlpB secretion. These genetic data introduce SlpB as a new cytotoxic protease from S. marcescens.

  6. Downregulation of an Entamoeba histolytica rhomboid protease reveals roles in regulating parasite adhesion and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Baxt, Leigh A; Rastew, Elena; Bracha, Rivka; Mirelman, David; Singh, Upinder

    2010-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a deep-branching eukaryotic pathogen. Rhomboid proteases are intramembrane serine proteases, which cleave transmembrane proteins in, or in close proximity to, their transmembrane domain. We have previously shown that E. histolytica contains a single functional rhomboid protease (EhROM1) and has unique substrate specificity. EhROM1 is present on the trophozoite surface and relocalizes to internal vesicles during erythrophagocytosis and to the base of the cap during surface receptor capping. In order to further examine the biological function of EhROM1 we downregulated EhROM1 expression by >95% by utilizing the epigenetic silencing mechanism of the G3 parasite strain. Despite the observation that EhROM1 relocalized to the cap during surface receptor capping, EhROM1 knockdown [ROM(KD)] parasites had no gross changes in cap formation or complement resistance. However, ROM(KD) parasites demonstrated decreased host cell adhesion, a result recapitulated by treatment of wild-type parasites with DCI, a serine protease inhibitor with activity against rhomboid proteases. The reduced adhesion phenotype of ROM(KD) parasites was noted exclusively with healthy cells, and not with apoptotic cells. Additionally, ROM(KD) parasites had decreased phagocytic ability with reduced ingestion of healthy cells, apoptotic cells, and rice starch. Decreased phagocytic ability is thus independent of the reduced adhesion phenotype, since phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was reduced despite normal adhesion levels. The defect in host cell adhesion was not explained by altered expression or localization of the heavy subunit of the Gal/GalNAc surface lectin. These results suggest no significant role of EhROM1 in complement resistance but unexpected roles in parasite adhesion and phagocytosis.

  7. Hemoglobinase activity of the lysine gingipain protease (Kgp) of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J P; Dawson, J A; Hannis, J C; Muddiman, D; Macrina, F L

    1999-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal disease pathogen, forms black-pigmented colonies on blood agar. Pigmentation is believed to result from accumulation of iron protoporphyrin IX (FePPIX) derived from erythrocytic hemoglobin. The Lys-X (Lys-gingipain) and Arg-X (Arg-gingipain) cysteine proteases of P. gingivalis bind and degrade erythrocytes. We have observed that mutations abolishing activity of the Lys-X-specific cysteine protease, Kgp, resulted in loss of black pigmentation of P. gingivalis W83. Because the hemagglutinating and hemolytic potentials of mutant strains were reduced but not eliminated, we hypothesized that this protease played a role in acquisition of FePPIX from hemoglobin. In contrast to Arg-gingipain, Lys-gingipain was not inhibited by hemin, suggesting that this protease played a role near the cell surface where high concentrations of hemin confer the black pigmentation. Human hemoglobin contains 11 Lys residues in the alpha chain and 10 Lys residues in the beta chain. In contrast, there are only three Arg residues in each of the alpha and beta chains. These observations are consistent with human hemoglobin being a preferred substrate for Lys-gingipain but not Arg-gingipain. The ability of the Lys-gingipain to cleave human hemoglobin at Lys residues was confirmed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of hemoglobin fragments resulting from digestion with the purified protease. We were able to detect several of the predicted hemoglobin fragments rendered by digestion with purified Lys-gingipain. Thus, we postulate that the Lys-gingipain of P. gingivalis is a hemoglobinase which plays a role in heme and iron uptake by effecting the accumulation of FePPIX on the bacterial cell surface.

  8. Structural and Functional Determinants of γ-Secretase, an Intramembrane Protease Implicated in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fraering, Patrick C

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of neurodegenerative diseases in humans, characterized by the progressive accumulation and aggregation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in brain regions subserving memory and cognition. These 39-43 amino acids long peptides are generated by the sequential proteolytic cleavages of the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases, with the latter being the founding member of a new class of intramembrane-cleaving proteases (I-CliPs) characterized by their intramembranous catalytic residues hydrolyzing the peptide bonds within the transmembrane regions of their respective substrates. These proteases include the S2P family of metalloproteases, the Rhomboid family of serine proteases, and two aspartyl proteases: the signal peptide peptidase (SPP) and γ-secretase. In sharp contrast to Rhomboid and SPP that function as a single component, γ-secretase is a multi-component protease with complex assembly, maturation and activation processes. Recently, two low-resolution three-dimensional structures of γ-secretase and three high-resolution structures of the GlpG rhomboid protease have been obtained almost simultaneously by different laboratories. Although these proteases are unrelated by sequence or evolution, they seem to share common functional and structural mechanisms explaining how they catalyze intramembrane proteolysis. Indeed, a water-containing chamber in the catalytic cores of both γ-secretase and GlpG rhomboid provides the hydrophilic environment required for proteolysis and a lateral gating mechanism controls substrate access to the active site. The studies that have identified and characterized the structural determinants critical for the assembly and activity of the γ-secretase complex are reviewed here. PMID:19415127

  9. Cleavage of Treponema denticola PrcA polypeptide to yield protease complex-associated proteins Prca1 and Prca2 is dependent on PrtP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Young; Bian, Xue-Lin; Wong, Grace W K; Hannam, Pauline M; McBride, Barry C; Fenno, J Christopher

    2002-07-01

    Analysis of potential virulence factors of oral spirochetes focuses on surface and secreted proteins. The Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like protease (CTLP) is implicated in degradation of host cell molecules and contributes to tissue invasion. The CTLP complex, composed of the 72-kDa PrtP protein and two auxiliary proteins with molecular masses of approximately 40 and 30 kDa, is also involved in localization and oligomerization of the T. denticola major surface protein (Msp). The larger auxiliary protein was reported to be encoded by an open reading frame (ORF2) directly upstream of prtP. The deduced 39-kDa translation product of ORF2 contains a sequence matching the N-terminal sequence determined from one of the CTLP complex proteins. No proteins with significant homology are known, nor was information available on the third protein of the complex. DNA sequence analysis showed that ORF2 extended an additional 852 bp upstream of the reported sequence. The complete gene, designated prcA, encodes a predicted N-terminally-acylated polypeptide of approximately 70 kDa. Isogenic mutants with mutations in prtP, prcA, and prcA-prtP all lacked CTLP protease activity. The prcA mutant lacked all three CTLP proteins. The prcA-prtP mutant produced only a C-terminally-truncated 62-kDa PrcA protein. The prtP mutant produced a full-length 70-kDa PrcA. Immunoblot analysis of recombinant PrcA constructs confirmed that PrcA is cleaved to yield the two smaller proteins of the CTLP complex, designated PrcA1 and PrcA2. These data indicate that PrtP is required for cleavage of PrcA and suggest that this cleavage may be required for formation or stability of outer membrane complexes.

  10. Cleavage of Treponema denticola PrcA Polypeptide To Yield Protease Complex-Associated Proteins Prca1 and Prca2 Is Dependent on PrtP

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si Young; Bian, Xue-Lin; Wong, Grace W. K.; Hannam, Pauline M.; McBride, Barry C.; Fenno, J. Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of potential virulence factors of oral spirochetes focuses on surface and secreted proteins. The Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like protease (CTLP) is implicated in degradation of host cell molecules and contributes to tissue invasion. The CTLP complex, composed of the 72-kDa PrtP protein and two auxiliary proteins with molecular masses of approximately 40 and 30 kDa, is also involved in localization and oligomerization of the T. denticola major surface protein (Msp). The larger auxiliary protein was reported to be encoded by an open reading frame (ORF2) directly upstream of prtP. The deduced 39-kDa translation product of ORF2 contains a sequence matching the N-terminal sequence determined from one of the CTLP complex proteins. No proteins with significant homology are known, nor was information available on the third protein of the complex. DNA sequence analysis showed that ORF2 extended an additional 852 bp upstream of the reported sequence. The complete gene, designated prcA, encodes a predicted N-terminally-acylated polypeptide of approximately 70 kDa. Isogenic mutants with mutations in prtP, prcA, and prcA-prtP all lacked CTLP protease activity. The prcA mutant lacked all three CTLP proteins. The prcA-prtP mutant produced only a C-terminally-truncated 62-kDa PrcA protein. The prtP mutant produced a full-length 70-kDa PrcA. Immunoblot analysis of recombinant PrcA constructs confirmed that PrcA is cleaved to yield the two smaller proteins of the CTLP complex, designated PrcA1 and PrcA2. These data indicate that PrtP is required for cleavage of PrcA and suggest that this cleavage may be required for formation or stability of outer membrane complexes. PMID:12081957

  11. Biofluid proteases profiling in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Fábio; Ferreira, Rita; Amado, Francisco; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of protease relevance in biologic systems beyond catabolism of proteins and peptides to amino acids has stimulated interest as to their role in the pathogenesis of several disorders including diabetes mellitus (DM). Evaluation of proteases and the assessment of their activity in biofluids are fundamental to elucidate these proteolytic systems in DM and its related complications. In contrast to traditional immunoassay or substrate based approaches that targeted specific proteases and their inhibitors, the field of degradomics has provided a comprehensive approach to study these enzymes. Although the degradome contains over 500 proteases, very few have been associated with DM and its micro- and macrovascular complications. In this paper, we review these proteases and their respective inhibitors with emphasis on DM. It is likely that future research will expand these initial studies and look to develop high throughput automated technologies to identify and characterize biofluid proteases of diagnostic and prognostic value in other pathologies.

  12. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents.

    PubMed

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Pitzler, Christian; Körfer, Georgette; Jakob, Felix; Ronny Martinez; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-12-25

    Proteases are essential ingredients in modern laundry detergents. Over the past 30 years, subtilisin proteases employed in the laundry detergent industry have been engineered by directed evolution and rational design to tailor their properties towards industrial demands. This comprehensive review discusses recent success stories in subtilisin protease engineering. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents comprise simultaneous improvement of thermal resistance and activity at low temperatures, a rational strategy to modulate pH profiles, and a general hypothesis for how to increase promiscuous activity towards the production of peroxycarboxylic acids as mild bleaching agents. The three protease engineering campaigns presented provide in-depth analysis of protease properties and have identified principles that can be applied to improve or generate enzyme variants for industrial applications beyond laundry detergents.

  13. Bacterial proteases: targets for diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaman, W E; Hays, J P; Endtz, H P; Bikker, F J

    2014-07-01

    Proteases are essential for the proliferation and growth of bacteria, and are also known to contribute to bacterial virulence. This makes them interesting candidates as diagnostic and therapeutic targets for infectious diseases. In this review, the authors discuss the most recent developments and potential applications for bacterial proteases in the diagnosis and treatment of bacterial infections. Current and future bacterial protease targets are described and their limitations outlined.

  14. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  15. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  16. A Trichomonas vaginalis Rhomboid Protease and Its Substrate Modulate Parasite Attachment and Cytolysis of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riestra, Angelica M.; Gandhi, Shiv; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Urban, Sinisa; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular eukaryotic parasite that causes the most common, non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Although disease burden is high, molecular mechanisms underlying T. vaginalis pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a family of putative T. vaginalis rhomboid proteases and demonstrate catalytic activity for two, TvROM1 and TvROM3, using a heterologous cell cleavage assay. The two T. vaginalis intramembrane serine proteases display different subcellular localization and substrate specificities. TvROM1 is a cell surface membrane protein and cleaves atypical model rhomboid protease substrates, whereas TvROM3 appears to localize to the Golgi apparatus and recognizes a typical model substrate. To identify TvROM substrates, we interrogated the T. vaginalis surface proteome using both quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Of the nine candidates identified, TVAG_166850 and TVAG_280090 were shown to be cleaved by TvROM1. Comparison of amino acid residues surrounding the predicted cleavage sites of TvROM1 substrates revealed a preference for small amino acids in the predicted transmembrane domain. Over-expression of TvROM1 increased attachment to and cytolysis of host ectocervical cells. Similarly, mutations that block the cleavage of a TvROM1 substrate lead to its accumulation on the cell surface and increased parasite adherence to host cells. Together, these data indicate a role for TvROM1 and its substrate(s) in modulating attachment to and lysis of host cells, which are key processes in T. vaginalis pathogenesis. PMID:26684303

  17. A Trichomonas vaginalis Rhomboid Protease and Its Substrate Modulate Parasite Attachment and Cytolysis of Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Riestra, Angelica M; Gandhi, Shiv; Sweredoski, Michael J; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Urban, Sinisa; Johnson, Patricia J

    2015-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular eukaryotic parasite that causes the most common, non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Although disease burden is high, molecular mechanisms underlying T. vaginalis pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a family of putative T. vaginalis rhomboid proteases and demonstrate catalytic activity for two, TvROM1 and TvROM3, using a heterologous cell cleavage assay. The two T. vaginalis intramembrane serine proteases display different subcellular localization and substrate specificities. TvROM1 is a cell surface membrane protein and cleaves atypical model rhomboid protease substrates, whereas TvROM3 appears to localize to the Golgi apparatus and recognizes a typical model substrate. To identify TvROM substrates, we interrogated the T. vaginalis surface proteome using both quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic approaches. Of the nine candidates identified, TVAG_166850 and TVAG_280090 were shown to be cleaved by TvROM1. Comparison of amino acid residues surrounding the predicted cleavage sites of TvROM1 substrates revealed a preference for small amino acids in the predicted transmembrane domain. Over-expression of TvROM1 increased attachment to and cytolysis of host ectocervical cells. Similarly, mutations that block the cleavage of a TvROM1 substrate lead to its accumulation on the cell surface and increased parasite adherence to host cells. Together, these data indicate a role for TvROM1 and its substrate(s) in modulating attachment to and lysis of host cells, which are key processes in T. vaginalis pathogenesis.

  18. Mechanistic peptidomics: factors that dictate specificity in the formation of endogenous peptides in human milk.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Andres; Dallas, David C; Contreras, Stephanie; Chee, Sabrina; Parker, Evan A; Sun, Xin; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Barile, Daniela; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2014-12-01

    An extensive mass spectrometry analysis of the human milk peptidome has revealed almost 700 endogenous peptides from 30 different proteins. Two in-house computational tools were created and used to visualize and interpret the data through both alignment of the peptide quasi-molecular ion intensities and estimation of the differential enzyme participation. These results reveal that the endogenous proteolytic activity in the mammary gland is remarkably specific and well conserved. Certain proteins-not necessarily the most abundant ones-are digested by the proteases present in milk, yielding endogenous peptides from selected regions. Our results strongly suggest that factors such as the presence of specific proteases, the position and concentration of cleavage sites, and, more important, the intrinsic disorder of segments of the protein drive this proteolytic specificity in the mammary gland. As a consequence of this selective hydrolysis, proteins that typically need to be cleaved at specific positions in order to exert their activity are properly digested, and bioactive peptides encoded in certain protein sequences are released. Proteins that must remain intact in order to maintain their activity in the mammary gland or in the neonatal gastrointestinal tract are unaffected by the hydrolytic environment present in milk. These results provide insight into the intrinsic structural mechanisms that facilitate the selectivity of the endogenous milk protease activity and might be useful to those studying the peptidomes of other biofluids.

  19. Contribution of Aspartic Proteases in Candida Virulence. Protease Inhibitors against Candida Infections.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Małgorzata, Bondaryk; Zbigniew, Ochal

    2016-08-09

    Candida species are the major opportunistic human pathogens accounting for 70-90% of all invasive fungal infections. Candida spp, especially C. albicans, are able to produce and secrete hydrolytic enzymes, particularly aspartic proteases (Saps). These enzymes production is an evolutionary adaptation of pathogens to utilize nutrients and survive in host. Sap1-10 are believed to contribute to the adhesion and invasion of host tissues through the degradation of cell surface structures. Aspartic proteases control several steps in innate immune evasion and they degrade proteins related to immunological defense (antibodies, complement and cytokines), allowing the fungus to escape from the first line of host defense. The existing ways to identify potential drug targets rely on specific subset like virulence genes, transcriptional and stress response factors. Candida virulence factors like Sap isoenzymes can be pivotal targets for drug development. The identification of mechanism of a non-canonical inflammasome exerted by Saps could open novel therapeutic strategies to dampen hyperinflammatory response in candidiasis.

  20. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  1. Quantitative Characterization of the Activation Steps of Mannan-binding Lectin (MBL)-associated Serine Proteases (MASPs) Points to the Central Role of MASP-1 in the Initiation of the Complement Lectin Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Megyeri, Márton; Harmat, Veronika; Major, Balázs; Végh, Ádám; Balczer, Júlia; Héja, Dávid; Szilágyi, Katalin; Datz, Dániel; Pál, Gábor; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Dobó, József

    2013-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine proteases, MASP-1 and MASP-2, have been thought to autoactivate when MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes bind to pathogens triggering the complement lectin pathway. Autoactivation of MASPs occurs in two steps: 1) zymogen autoactivation, when one proenzyme cleaves another proenzyme molecule of the same protease, and 2) autocatalytic activation, when the activated protease cleaves its own zymogen. Using recombinant catalytic fragments, we demonstrated that a stable proenzyme MASP-1 variant (R448Q) cleaved the inactive, catalytic site Ser-to-Ala variant (S646A). The autoactivation steps of MASP-1 were separately quantified using these mutants and the wild type enzyme. Analogous mutants were made for MASP-2, and rate constants of the autoactivation steps as well as the possible cross-activation steps between MASP-1 and MASP-2 were determined. Based on the rate constants, a kinetic model of lectin pathway activation was outlined. The zymogen autoactivation rate of MASP-1 is ∼3000-fold higher, and the autocatalytic activation of MASP-1 is about 140-fold faster than those of MASP-2. Moreover, both activated and proenzyme MASP-1 can effectively cleave proenzyme MASP-2. MASP-3, which does not autoactivate, is also cleaved by MASP-1 quite efficiently. The structure of the catalytic region of proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q was solved at 2.5 Å. Proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q readily cleaves synthetic substrates, and it is inhibited by a specific canonical inhibitor developed against active MASP-1, indicating that zymogen MASP-1 fluctuates between an inactive and an active-like conformation. The determined structure provides a feasible explanation for this phenomenon. In summary, autoactivation of MASP-1 is crucial for the activation of MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes, and in the proenzymic phase zymogen MASP-1 controls the process. PMID:23386610

  2. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor and Src family kinases in proliferation of renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shougang; Kinsey, Gilbert R; Rasbach, Kyle; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2008-03-01

    Our recent studies have shown that proliferation of renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) in the absence of growth factors requires activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. We sought to identify the endogenous EGF receptor ligand and investigate the mechanism(s) by which RPTC proliferate in different models. RPTC expressed both pro- and cleaved forms of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) and several metalloproteinases (MMP-2, -3, -9, and ADAM10, ADAM17) that have been reported to cleave HB-EGF. Treatment of RPTC with CRM 197, an inhibitor of HB-EGF binding to the EGF receptor, or downregulation of HB-EGF with small interfering RNA inhibited RPTC proliferation following plating. Furthermore, GM6001 (pan-MMP inhibitor), tumor-necrosis factor protease inhibitor-1 (TAPI-1; MMP and ADAM17 inhibitor), and GW280264X (ADAM10 and -17 inhibitor), but not GI254023X (ADAM10 inhibitor), attenuated the proliferation after plating. Although EGF receptor activation is required for RPTC proliferation after oxidant injury, CRM197, GM6001, and TAPI-1 did not block this response. In contrast, inhibition of Src with PP1 blocked EGF receptor activation and RPTC proliferation after oxidant injury. In addition, PP1 treatment attenuated HB-EGF-enhanced RPTC proliferation. We suggest that RPTC proliferation after plating is mediated by HB-EGF produced through an autocrine/paracrine mechanism and RPTC proliferation following oxidant injury is mediated by Src without involvement of HB-EGF.

  3. The Apoptogenic Toxin AIP56 Is a Metalloprotease A-B Toxin that Cleaves NF-κb P65

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniela S.; Pereira, Liliana M. G.; Moreira, Ana R.; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Brito, Rui M.; Faria, Tiago Q.; Zornetta, Irene; Montecucco, Cesare; Oliveira, Pedro; Azevedo, Jorge E.; Pereira, Pedro J. B.; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; do Vale, Ana; dos Santos, Nuno M. S.

    2013-01-01

    AIP56 (apoptosis-inducing protein of 56 kDa) is a major virulence factor of Photobacterium damselae piscicida (Phdp), a Gram-negative pathogen that causes septicemic infections, which are among the most threatening diseases in mariculture. The toxin triggers apoptosis of host macrophages and neutrophils through a process that, in vivo, culminates with secondary necrosis of the apoptotic cells contributing to the necrotic lesions observed in the diseased animals. Here, we show that AIP56 is a NF-κB p65-cleaving zinc-metalloprotease whose catalytic activity is required for the apoptogenic effect. Most of the bacterial effectors known to target NF-κB are type III secreted effectors. In contrast, we demonstrate that AIP56 is an A-B toxin capable of acting at distance, without requiring contact of the bacteria with the target cell. We also show that the N-terminal domain cleaves NF-κB at the Cys39-Glu40 peptide bond and that the C-terminal domain is involved in binding and internalization into the cytosol. PMID:23468618

  4. Commentary on the role of treatment-related HIV compensatory mutations on increasing virulence: new discoveries twenty years since the clinical testing of protease inhibitors to block HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Arts, Eric J

    2012-10-03

    Approximately 20 years has passed since the first human trial with HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Protease inhibitors set the stage for combination therapy in the mid-1990s but are now rarely used in first-line combination therapy and reserved for salvage therapy. Initially, resistance to protease inhibitors was deemed unlikely due to the small enzymatic target with limited genetic diversity, the extended drug binding site in protease, and the need to cleave multiple sites in the HIV-1 precursor proteins. However, a highly protease inhibitor-resistant virus can emerge during treatment and is found to harbor a collection of primary drug-resistant mutations near the drug and/or substrate binding site as well as secondary mutations that compensate for fitness loss. For years, the research field has debated the impact of these secondary mutations on the emergence rates of high-level protease inhibitor resistance. A recent study poses a more pertinent question, related to disease progression in patients newly infected with a virus harboring secondary protease inhibitor-associated polymorphisms. The authors of that study show that increased rates of disease progression, inferred by increased viral loads and decreased CD4 cell counts, correlate with a fitness score of the infecting virus. The modeled fitness scores increased with an accumulation of these secondary protease inhibitors mutations, and not because of any one specific polymorphism.

  5. Enzyme specificity and effects of gyroxin, a serine protease from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, on protease-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Camila M; Kondo, Marcia Y; Nering, Marcela B; Gouvêa, Iuri E; Okamoto, Débora; Andrade, Douglas; da Silva, José Alberto A; Prieto da Silva, Alvaro R B; Yamane, Tetsuo; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Lapa, Antônio J; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa R

    2014-03-01

    Gyroxin is a serine protease displaying a thrombin-like activity found in the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Typically, intravenous injection of purified gyroxin induces a barrel rotation syndrome in mice. The serine protease thrombin activates platelets aggregation by cleaving and releasing a tethered N-terminus peptide from the G-protein-coupled receptors, known as protease-activated receptors (PARs). Gyroxin also presents pro-coagulant activity suggested to be dependent of PARs activation. In the present work, the effects of these serine proteases, namely gyroxin and thrombin, on PARs were comparatively studied by characterizing the hydrolytic specificity and kinetics using PARs-mimetic FRET peptides. We show for the first time that the short (sh) and long (lg) peptides mimetizing the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 activation sites are all hydrolyzed by gyroxin exclusively after the Arg residues. Thrombin also hydrolyzes PAR-1 and -4 after the Arg residue, but hydrolyzes sh and lg PAR-3 after the Lys residue. The kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin using sh and lg PAR-4 mimetic peptides were at least 2150 and 400 times smaller than those determined for thrombin, respectively. For the sh and lg PAR-2 mimetic peptides the kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin were at least 6500 and 2919 times smaller than those determined for trypsin, respectively. The kcat/KM values for gyroxin using the PAR-1 and -3 mimetic peptides could not be determined due to the extreme low hydrolysis velocity. Moreover, the functional studies of the effects of gyroxin on PARs were conducted in living cells using cultured astrocytes, which express all PARs. Despite the ability to cleavage the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 peptides, gyroxin was unable to activate the PARs expressed in astrocytes as determined by evaluating the cytosolic calcium mobilization. On the other hand, we also showed that gyroxin is able to interfere with the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin or

  6. Antigen receptor-induced B lymphocyte apoptosis mediated via a protease of the caspase family.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, S; Liou, H C

    1998-02-01

    An extensive body of data, in a variety of systems, denoted the caspase family of proteases as a key player in the execution of programmed cell death. This family consists of cysteine proteases that cleave after asparagine-containing motifs. It is well established that the caspases are essential for the apoptosis mediated by Fas (CD95) and TNF receptor p55, molecules that contain the "death domain" in the cytoplasmic tail. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the antigen receptor-mediated cell death in B lymphocytes, a process instrumental in negative selection of potentially autoreactive B cells. Here, we investigated the involvement of caspases in cell death triggered via the antigen receptor in B lymphocytes (BCR) by using specific inhibitors. Initially, we used a well-established cell line, CH31, which is a model of B cell tolerance, to demonstrate that these proteases indeed participate in the BCR-induced apoptotic pathway. Next, we confirmed the physiological relevance of the caspase-mediated cell death pathway in splenic B cell populations isolated ex vivo that were induced to undergo apoptosis by extensive cross-linking of their BCR. Most interestingly, our data demonstrated that caspases regulate not only the nuclear DNA fragmentation, but also the surface membrane phosphatidylserine translocation as well as the degradation of a specific nuclear substrate. Taken together, this report supports the hypothesis that regulation of the caspase family is crucial in controlling the life/death decision in B lymphocytes mediated by the antigen receptor signal transduction.

  7. A noncovalent class of papain-like protease/deubiquitinase inhibitors blocks SARS virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Ratia, Kiira; Pegan, Scott; Takayama, Jun; Sleeman, Katrina; Coughlin, Melissa; Baliji, Surendranath; Chaudhuri, Rima; Fu, Wentao; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Johnson, Michael E.; Baker, Susan C.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2008-10-27

    We report the discovery and optimization of a potent inhibitor against the papain-like protease (PLpro) from the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV). This unique protease is not only responsible for processing the viral polyprotein into its functional units but is also capable of cleaving ubiquitin and ISG15 conjugates and plays a significant role in helping SARS-CoV evade the human immune system. We screened a structurally diverse library of 50,080 compounds for inhibitors of PLpro and discovered a noncovalent lead inhibitor with an IC{sub 50} value of 20 {mu}M, which was improved to 600 nM via synthetic optimization. The resulting compound, GRL0617, inhibited SARS-CoV viral replication in Vero E6 cells with an EC{sub 50} of 15 {mu}M and had no associated cytotoxicity. The X-ray structure of PLpro in complex with GRL0617 indicates that the compound has a unique mode of inhibition whereby it binds within the S4-S3 subsites of the enzyme and induces a loop closure that shuts down catalysis at the active site. These findings provide proof-of-principle that PLpro is a viable target for development of antivirals directed against SARS-CoV, and that potent noncovalent cysteine protease inhibitors can be developed with specificity directed toward pathogenic deubiquitinating enzymes without inhibiting host DUBs.

  8. Cockroach protease allergen induces allergic airway inflammation via epithelial cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sagar L.; Agrawal, Komal; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2017-01-01

    Protease allergens are known to enhance allergic inflammation but their exact role in initiation of allergic reactions at mucosal surfaces still remains elusive. This study was aimed at deciphering the role of serine protease activity of Per a 10, a major cockroach allergen in initiation of allergic inflammation at mucosal surfaces. We demonstrate that Per a 10 increases epithelial permeability by disruption of tight junction proteins, ZO-1 and occludin, and enhances the migration of Monocyte derived dendritic cell precursors towards epithelial layer as exhibited by trans-well studies. Per a 10 exposure also leads to secretion of IL-33, TSLP and intracellular Ca2+ dependent increase in ATP levels. Further, in vivo experiments revealed that Per a 10 administration in mice elevated allergic inflammatory parameters along with high levels of IL-33, TSLP, IL-1α and uric acid in the mice lungs. We next demonstrated that Per a 10 cleaves CD23 (low affinity IgE receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified B cells and CD25 (IL-2 receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified T cells in an activity dependent manner, which might favour Th2 responses. In conclusion, protease activity of Per a 10 plays a significant role in initiation of allergic airway inflammation at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:28198394

  9. Homology modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation studies to investigate role of cysteine protease from Xanthomonas campestris in degradation of Aβ peptide.

    PubMed

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Jalkute, Chidambar B; Barage, Sagar H; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2013-12-01

    Cysteine protease is known to degrade amyloid beta peptide which is a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease. This cleavage mechanism has not been studied in detail at the atomic level. Hence, a three-dimensional structure of cysteine protease from Xanthomonas campestris was constructed by homology modeling using Geno3D, SWISS-MODEL, and MODELLER 9v7. All the predicted models were analyzed by PROCHECK and PROSA. Three-dimensional model of cysteine protease built by MODELLER 9v7 shows similarity with human cathepsin B crystal structure. This model was then used further for docking and simulation studies. The molecular docking study revealed that Cys17, His87, and Gln88 residues of cysteine protease form an active site pocket similar to human cathepsin B. Then the docked complex was refined by molecular dynamic simulation to confirm its stable behavior over the entire simulation period. The molecular docking and MD simulation studies showed that the sulfhydryl hydrogen atom of Cys17 of cysteine protease interacts with carboxylic oxygen of Lys16 of Aβ peptide indicating the cleavage site. Thus, the cysteine protease model from X. campestris having similarity with human cathepsin B crystal structure may be used as an alternate approach to cleave Aβ peptide a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Immunoglobulins in Nasal Secretions of Healthy Humans: Structural Integrity of Secretory Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) and Occurrence of Neutralizing Antibodies to IgA1 Proteases of Nasal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeby, Line; Rasmussen, Trine Tang; Reinholdt, Jesper; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    Certain bacteria, including overt pathogens as well as commensals, produce immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases. By cleaving IgA1, including secretory IgA1, in the hinge region, these enzymes may interfere with the barrier functions of mucosal IgA antibodies, as indicated by experiments in vitro. Previous studies have suggested that cleavage of IgA1 in nasal secretions may be associated with the development and perpetuation of atopic disease. To clarify the potential effect of IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal cavity, we have analyzed immunoglobulin isotypes in nasal secretions of 11 healthy humans, with a focus on IgA, and at the same time have characterized and quantified IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal flora of the subjects. Samples in the form of nasal wash were collected by using a washing liquid that contained lithium as an internal reference. Dilution factors and, subsequently, concentrations in undiluted secretions could thereby be calculated. IgA, mainly in the secretory form, was found by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to be the dominant isotype in all subjects, and the vast majority of IgA (median, 91%) was of the A1 subclass, corroborating results of previous analyses at the level of immunoglobulin-producing cells. Levels of serum-type immunoglobulins were low, except for four subjects in whom levels of IgG corresponded to 20 to 66% of total IgA. Cumulative levels of IgA, IgG, and IgM in undiluted secretions ranged from 260 to 2,494 (median, 777) μg ml−1. IgA1 protease-producing bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Streptococcus mitis biovar 1) were isolated from the nasal cavities of seven subjects at 2.1 × 103 to 7.2 × 106 CFU per ml of undiluted secretion, corresponding to 0.2 to 99.6% of the flora. Nevertheless, α-chain fragments characteristic of IgA1 protease activity were not detected in secretions from any subject by immunoblotting. Neutralizing antibodies to IgA1 proteases of autologous

  11. Expanding proteome coverage with orthogonal-specificity α-Lytic proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jesse G.; Kim, Sangtae; Maltby, David A.; Ghassemian, Majid; Bandeira, Nuno; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2014-03-01

    Bottom-up proteomics studies traditionally involve proteome digestion with a single protease, trypsin. However, trypsin alone does not generate peptides that encompass the entire proteome. Alternative proteases have been explored, but most have specificity for charged amino acid side chains. Therefore, additional proteases that improve proteome coverage by cleavage at sequences complimentary to trypsin may increase proteome coverage. We demonstrate the novel application of two proteases for bottom-up proteomics: wild type alpha-lytic protease (WaLP), and an active site mutant of WaLP, M190A alpha-lytic protease (MaLP). We assess several relevant factors including MS/MS fragmentation, peptide length, peptide yield, and protease specificity. By combining data from separate digestions with trypsin, LysC, WaLP, and MaLP, proteome coverage was increased 101% compared to trypsin digestion alone. To demonstrate how the gained sequence coverage can access additional PTM information, we show identification of a number of novel phosphorylation sites in the S. pombe proteome and include an illustrative example from the protein MPD2, wherein two novel sites are identified, one in a tryptic peptide too short to identify and the other in a sequence devoid of tryptic sites. The specificity of WaLP and MaLP for aliphatic amino acid side chains was particularly valuable for coverage of membrane protein sequences, which increased 350% when the data from trypsin, LysC, WaLP, and MaLP were combined.

  12. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Michael B; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiaoning; Shanks, Robert M; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions.

  13. Nematicidal Bacteria Associated to Pinewood Nematode Produce Extracellular Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Romeu; Verissimo, Paula; Santos, Susana S.; Fonseca, Luís; Abrantes, Isabel M. O.; Morais, Paula V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria associated with the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, a pathogen of trees and the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD) may play a role in the disease. In order to evaluate their role (positive or negative to the tree), strains isolated from the track of nematodes from infected Pinus pinaster trees were screened, in vitro, for their nematicidal potential. The bacterial products, from strains more active in killing nematodes, were screened in order to identify and characterize the nematicidal agent. Forty-seven strains were tested and, of these, 21 strains showed capacity to produce extracellular products with nematicidal activity. All Burkholderia strains were non-toxic. In contrast, all Serratia strains except one exhibited high toxicity. Nematodes incubated with Serratia strains showed, by SEM observation, deposits of bacteria on the nematode cuticle. The most nematicidal strain, Serratia sp. A88copa13, produced proteases in the supernatant. The use of selective inhibitors revealed that a serine protease with 70 kDa was majorly responsible for the toxicity of the supernatant. This extracellular serine protease is different phylogenetically, in size and biochemically from previously described proteases. Nematicidal assays revealed differences in nematicidal activity of the proteases to different species of Bursaphelenchus, suggesting its usefulness in a primary screen of the nematodes. This study offers the basis for further investigation of PWD and brings new insights on the role bacteria play in the defense of pine trees against B. xylophilus. Understanding all the factors involved is important in order to develop strategies to control B. xylophilus dispersion. PMID:24244546

  14. Production and functional activity of a recombinant von Willebrand factor-A domain from human complement factor B.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S C; Hinshelwood, J; Perkins, S J; Sim, R B

    1999-01-01

    Factor B is a five-domain 90 kDa serine protease proenzyme which is part of the human serum complement system. It binds to other complement proteins C3b and properdin, and is activated by the protease factor D. The fourth domain of factor B is homologous to the type A domain of von Willebrand Factor (vWF-A). A full-length human factor B cDNA clone was used to amplify the region encoding the vWF-A domain (amino acids 229-444 of factor B). A fusion protein expression system was then used to generate it in high yield in Escherichia coli, where thrombin cleavage was used to separate the vWF-A domain from its fusion protein partner. A second vWF-A domain with improved stability and solubility was created using a Cys(267)-->Ser mutation and a four-residue C-terminal extension of the first vWF-A domain. The recombinant domains were investigated by analytical gel filtration, sucrose density centrifugation and analytical ultracentrifugation, in order to show that both domains were monomeric and possessed compact structures that were consistent with known vWF-A crystal structures. This expression system and its characterization permitted the first investigation of the function of the isolated vWF-A domain. It was able to inhibit substantially the binding of (125)I-labelled factor B to immobilized C3b. This demonstrated both the presence of a C3b binding site in this portion of factor B and a ligand-binding property of the vWF-A domain. The site at which factor D cleaves factor B is close to the N-terminus of both recombinant vWF-A domains. Factor D was shown to cleave the vWF-A domain in the presence or absence of C3b, whereas the cleavage of intact factor B under the same conditions occurs only in the presence of C3b. PMID:10477273

  15. Bacterial proteases from the intracellular vacuole niche; protease conservation and adaptation for pathogenic advantage.

    PubMed

    Huston, Wilhelmina M

    2010-06-01

    Proteases with important roles for bacterial pathogens that specifically reside within intracellular vacuoles are frequently homologous to those that have important virulence functions for other bacteria. Research has identified that some of these conserved proteases have evolved specialized functions for intracellular vacuole-residing bacteria. Unique proteases with pathogenic functions have also been described from Chlamydia, Mycobacteria, and Legionella. These findings suggest that there are further novel functions for proteases from these bacteria that remain to be described. This review summarizes the recent findings of novel protease functions from the intracellular human pathogenic bacteria that reside exclusively in vacuoles.

  16. ATP-dependent incorporation of 20S protease into the 26S complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, E; Ganoth, D; Armon, T; Hershko, A

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-dependent 26S protease complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin is formed by the assembly of three factors in an ATP-requiring process. We now identify one of the factors as the 20S "multicatalytic" protease, a complex of low molecular weight subunits widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. Comparison of the subunit compositions of purified 20S and 26S complexes indicates that the former is an integral part of the latter. By the use of detergent treatment to activate latent protease activity, we show that the 20S protease becomes incorporated into the 26S complex in the ATP-dependent assembly process. It thus seems that the 20S protease is the "catalytic core" of the 26S complex of the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway. Images PMID:2554287

  17. Crystallization of mutants of Turnip yellow mosaic virus protease/ubiquitin hydrolase designed to prevent protease self-recognition.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Maya; Bressanelli, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Processing of the polyprotein of Turnip yellow mosaic virus is mediated by the protease PRO. PRO cleaves at two places, one of which is at the C-terminus of the PRO domain of another polyprotein molecule. In addition to this processing activity, PRO possesses an ubiquitin hydrolase (DUB) activity. The crystal structure of PRO has previously been reported in its polyprotein-processing mode with the C-terminus of one PRO inserted into the catalytic site of the next PRO, generating PRO polymers in the crystal packing of the trigonal space group. Here, two mutants designed to disrupt specific PRO-PRO interactions were generated, produced and purified. Crystalline plates were obtained by seeding and cross-seeding from initial `sea urchin'-like microcrystals of one mutant. The plates diffracted to beyond 2 Å resolution at a synchrotron source and complete data sets were collected for the two mutants. Data processing and analysis indicated that both mutant crystals belonged to the same monoclinic space group, with two molecules of PRO in the asymmetric unit.

  18. Inhibition of quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by human serum paraoxonase.

    PubMed

    Aybey, Aynur; Demirkan, Elif

    2016-02-01

    The role of quorum sensing (QS) in the regulation of virulence factor production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is well established. Increased antibiotic resistance in this bacterium has led to the search for new treatment options, and inhibition of the QS system has been explored for potential therapeutic benefits. If the use of QS inhibitory agents were to lead to a reduction in bacterial virulence, new approaches in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections could be further developed. Accordingly, we examined whether human serum paraoxonase 1 (hPON1), which uses lactonase activity to hydrolyse N-acyl homoserine lactones, could cleave P. aeruginosa-derived signalling molecules. hPON1 was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (Sepharose 4B-L-tyrosine-1-naphthylamine). Different concentrations of hPON1 were found to reduce various virulence factors including pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, elastase, staphylolytic LasA protease and alkaline protease. Although treatment with 0.1-10 mg hPON1 ml(-1) did not show a highly inhibitory effect on elastase and staphylolytic LasA protease production, it resulted in good inhibitory effects on alkaline protease production at concentrations as low as 0.1 mg ml(-1). hPON1 also reduced the production of pyocyanin and rhamnolipid at a concentration of 1.25 mg ml(-1 )(within a range of 0.312-5 mg ml(-1)). In addition, rhamnolipid, an effective biosurfactant reported to stimulate the biodegradation of hydrocarbons, was able to degrade oil only in the absence of hPON1.

  19. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  20. The factor VIIIa C2 domain (residues 2228-2240) interacts with the factor IXa Gla domain in the factor Xase complex.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Tetsuhiro; Nogami, Keiji; Nishiya, Katsumi; Takeyama, Masahiro; Ogiwara, Kenichi; Sakata, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Akira; Shima, Midori

    2009-02-06

    Factor VIIIa functions as a cofactor for factor IXa in the phospholipid surface-dependent activation of factor X. Both the C2 domain of factor VIIIa and the Gla domain of factor IXa are involved in phospholipid binding and are required for the activation of factor X. In this study, we have examined the close relationship between these domains in the factor Xase complex. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based and surface plasmon resonance-based assays in the absence of phospholipid showed that Glu-Gly-Arg active site-modified factor IXa bound to immobilized recombinant C2 domain (rC2) dose-dependently (Kd = 108 nm). This binding ability was optimal under physiological conditions. A monoclonal antibody against the Gla domain of factor IXa inhibited binding by approximately 95%, and Gla domainless factor IXa failed to bind to rC2. The addition of monoclonal antibody or rC2 with factor VIIIa inhibited factor IXa-catalyzed factor X activation in the absence of phospholipid. Inhibition was not evident, however, in similar experiments in the absence of factor VIIIa, indicating that the C2 domain interacted with the Gla domain of factor IXa. A fragment designated C2-(2182-2259), derived from V8 protease-cleaved rC2, bound to Glu-Gly-Arg active site-modified factor IXa. Competitive assays, using overlapping synthetic peptides encompassing residues 2182-2259, demonstrated that peptide 2228-2240 significantly inhibited both this binding and factor Xa generation, independently of phospholipid. Our results indicated that residues 2228-2240 in the factor VIIIa C2 domain constitutes an interactive site for the Gla domain of factor IXa. The findings provide the first evidence for an essential role for this interaction in factor Xase assembly.

  1. The Zinc-Dependent Protease Activity of the Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Lebeda, Frank J.; Cer, Regina Z.; Mudunuri, Uma; Stephens, Robert; Singh, Bal Ram; Adler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT, serotypes A-G) are some of the most toxic proteins known and are the causative agents of botulism. Following exposure, the neurotoxin binds and enters peripheral cholinergic nerve endings and specifically and selectively cleaves one or more SNARE proteins to produce flaccid paralysis. This review centers on the kinetics of the Zn-dependent proteolytic activities of these neurotoxins, and briefly describes inhibitors, activators and factors underlying persistence of toxin action. Some of the structural, enzymatic and inhibitor data that are discussed here are available at the botulinum neurotoxin resource, BotDB (http://botdb.abcc.ncifcrf.gov). PMID:22069621

  2. Enabling Low Cost Biopharmaceuticals: A Systematic Approach to Delete Proteases from a Well-Known Protein Production Host Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Christopher P.; Huuskonen, Anne; Wahl, Ramon; Westerholm-Parvinen, Ann; Kanerva, Anne; Hänninen, Anna-Liisa; Salovuori, Noora; Penttilä, Merja; Natunen, Jari; Ostermeier, Christian; Helk, Bernhard; Saarinen, Juhani; Saloheimo, Markku

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei has tremendous capability to secrete proteins. Therefore, it would be an excellent host for producing high levels of therapeutic proteins at low cost. Developing a filamentous fungus to produce sensitive therapeutic proteins requires that protease secretion is drastically reduced. We have identified 13 major secreted proteases that are related to degradation of therapeutic antibodies, interferon alpha 2b, and insulin like growth factor. The major proteases observed were aspartic, glutamic, subtilisin-like, and trypsin-like proteases. The seven most problematic proteases were sequentially removed from a strain to develop it for producing therapeutic proteins. After this the protease activity in the supernatant was dramatically reduced down to 4% of the original level based upon a casein substrate. When antibody was incubated in the six protease deletion strain supernatant, the heavy chain remained fully intact and no degradation products were observed. Interferon alpha 2b and insulin like growth factor were less stable in the same supernatant, but full length proteins remained when incubated overnight, in contrast to the original strain. As additional benefits, the multiple protease deletions have led to faster strain growth and higher levels of total protein in the culture supernatant. PMID:26309247

  3. Inherent dynamics within the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic fever virus protease are localized to the same region as substrate interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Capodagli, Glenn; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Holliday, Michael; Isern, Nancy G.; Zhang, Fengli; Pegan, Scott D.

    2015-05-01

    Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is one of several lethal viruses that encodes for a viral ovarian tumor domain (vOTU), which serves to cleave and remove multiple proteins involved in cellular signaling such as ubiquitin (Ub) and interferon stimulated gene produce 15 (ISG15). Such manipulation of the host cell machinery serves to downregulate the host response and, therefore, complete characterization of these proteases is important. While several structures of the CCHFV vOTU protease have been solved, both free and bound to Ub and ISG15, few structural differences have been found and little insight has been gained as to the dynamic plasticity of this protease. Therefore, we have used NMR relaxation experiments to probe the dynamics of CCHV vOTU, both alone and in complex with Ub, thereby discovering a highly dynamic protease that exhibits conformational exchange within the same regions found to engage its Ub substrate. These experiments reveal a structural plasticity around the N-terminal regions of CCHV vOTU, which are unique to vOTUs, and provide a rationale for engaging multiple substrates with the same binding site.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Viral and Host Cell Substrate Recognition by Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Keith P.; Laine, Jennifer M.; Deveau, Laura M.; Cao, Hong; Massi, Francesca; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2011-08-16

    Hepatitis C NS3/4A protease is a prime therapeutic target that is responsible for cleaving the viral polyprotein at junctions 3-4A, 4A4B, 4B5A, and 5A5B and two host cell adaptor proteins of the innate immune response, TRIF and MAVS. In this study, NS3/4A crystal structures of both host cell cleavage sites were determined and compared to the crystal structures of viral substrates. Two distinct protease conformations were observed and correlated with substrate specificity: (i) 3-4A, 4A4B, 5A5B, and MAVS, which are processed more efficiently by the protease, form extensive electrostatic networks when in complex with the protease, and (ii) TRIF and 4B5A, which contain polyproline motifs in their full-length sequences, do not form electrostatic networks in their crystal complexes. These findings provide mechanistic insights into NS3/4A substrate recognition, which may assist in a more rational approach to inhibitor design in the face of the rapid acquisition of resistance.

  5. Cleavage Specificity Analysis of Six Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases (TTSPs) Using PICS with Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, François; Leduc, Richard; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. Methodology/Principal Finding To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS). Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin) to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P) and C-terminal prime (P’) sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1′ position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. Conclusions Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1′ positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity. PMID:25211023

  6. Scrapie protein degradation by cysteine proteases in CD11c+ dendritic cells and GT1-1 neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Luhr, Katarina M; Nordström, Elin K; Löw, Peter; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Taraboulos, Albert; Kristensson, Krister

    2004-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) of the CD11c(+) myeloid phenotype have been implicated in the spread of scrapie in the host. Previously, we have shown that CD11c(+) DC can cause a rapid degradation of proteinase K-resistant prion proteins (PrP(Sc)) in vitro, indicating a possible role of these cells in the clearance of PrP(Sc). To determine the mechanisms of PrP(Sc) degradation, CD11c(+) DC that had been exposed to PrP(Sc) derived from a neuronal cell line (GT1-1) infected with scrapie (ScGT1-1) were treated with a battery of protease inhibitors. Following treatment with the cysteine protease inhibitors (2S,3S)-trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-3-methylbutane (E-64c), its ethyl ester (E-64d), and leupeptin, the degradation of PrP(Sc) was inhibited, while inhibitors of serine and aspartic and metalloproteases (aprotinin, pepstatin, and phosphoramidon) had no effect. An endogenous degradation of PrP(Sc) in ScGT1-1 cells was revealed by inhibiting the expression of cellular PrP (PrP(C)) by RNA interference, and this degradation could also be inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors. Our data show that PrP(Sc) is proteolytically cleaved preferentially by cysteine proteases in both CD11c(+) DC and ScGT1-1 cells and that the degradation of PrP(Sc) by proteases is different from that of PrP(C). Interference by protease inhibitors with DC-induced processing of PrP(Sc) has the potential to modify prion spread, clearance, and immunization in a host.

  7. Diverse enzymatic specificities of digestive proteases, 'intestains', enable Colorado potato beetle larvae to counteract the potato defence mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gruden, Kristina; Popovic, Tatjana; Cimerman, Nina; Krizaj, Igor; Strukelj, Borut

    2003-02-01

    In response to insect attack, high levels of proteinase inhibitors are synthesised in potato leaves. This can cause inefficient protein digestion in insects, leading to reduced growth, delayed development and lower fecundity. It has been suggested that Colorado potato beetle overcomes this defence mechanism by inducing the production of a set of cysteine proteases that are resistant to potato proteinase inhibitors. Experiments with gut extracts showed that these proteases have unusual inhibition profiles as they are not inhibited by most of the cystatins but are strongly inhibited by thyropins. In this study we have isolated three cysteine proteases from adapted guts of Colorado potato beetle larvae, named intestains 1, 2 and 3, the first cysteine proteases known to be involved in extracellular protein digestion. The N-terminal sequences suggest their classification into the papain family. Intestains differ in substrate specificities and inhibitory profiles. Their substrate specificities suggest that intestains 1 and 2 are general digestive enzymes, while intestain 3 has a more specific function. The inhibitory profile of intestain 1 is similar to that of proteases of the papain family. However, the Ki values for the interaction of intestain 2 with the same set of inhibitors are several hundred fold higher, which would enable the enzyme to circumvent the potato defence mechanism characterised by high concentrations of protease inhibitors in attacked potato leaves. A further, different strategy of the Colorado potato beetle to avoid potato defence is exhibited by intestain 3, which is able to cleave off the N-terminus of model cystatin and thus inactivate the inhibitor. These results suggest that the Colorado potato beetle combines different strategies to counteract plant defence mechanisms.

  8. Proteases of an early colonizer can hinder Streptococcus mutans colonization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, B-Y; Deutch, A; Hong, J; Kuramitsu, H K

    2011-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary cariogen that produces several virulence factors that are modulated by a competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) signaling system. In this study, we sought to determine if proteases produced by early dental plaque colonizers such as Streptococcus gordonii interfere with the subsequent colonization of S. mutans BM71 on the existing streptococcal biofilms. We demonstrated that S. mutans BM71 colonized much less efficiently in vitro on streptococcal biofilms than on Actinomyces naeslundii biofilms. Several oral streptococci, relative to A. naeslundii, produced proteases that inactivated the S. mutans CSP. We further demonstrated that cell protein extracts from S. gordonii, but not from A. naeslundii, interfered with S. mutans BM71 colonization. In addition, S. mutans BM71 colonized more efficiently on the sgc protease knockout mutant of S. gordonii than on the parent biofilms. In conclusion, proteases of early colonizers can interfere with subsequent colonization by S. mutans in vitro.

  9. Molecular Determinants of MecA as a Degradation Tag for the ClpCP Protease*

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Ziqing; Wang, Feng; Qi, Yutao; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Hu, Qi; Li, Han; Wu, Jiawei; Shi, Yigong

    2009-01-01

    Regulated proteolysis by ATP-dependent proteases is universal in all living cells. In Bacillus subtilis, the degradation of the competence transcription factor ComK is mediated by a ternary complex involving the adaptor protein MecA and the ATP-dependent protease ClpCP. Here we demonstrate that a C-terminal, 98-amino acid domain of MecA (residues 121–218) serves as a non-recycling, degradation tag and targets a variety of fusion proteins to the ClpCP protease for degradation. MecA-(121–218) facilitates productive oligomerization of ClpC, stimulates the ATPase activity of ClpC, and allows the activated ClpC complex to stably associate with ClpP. Importantly, the ClpCP protease undergoes dynamic cycles of assembly and disassembly, which are triggered by association with MecA and the degradation of MecA, respectively. PMID:19767395

  10. γ-secretase composed of PS1/Pen2/Aph1a can cleave Notch and APP in the absence of Nicastrin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guojun; Liu, Zhenyi; Ilagan, Ma. Xenia G.; Kopan, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    γ-secretase is a multiprotein intramembrane-cleaving protease with a growing list of protein substrates including the Notch receptors and the amyloid precursor protein. The four components of γ-secretase complex - presenilin (PS), nicastrin (NCT), Pen2, and Aph1 - are all thought to be essential for activity. The catalytic domain resides within PS proteins; NCT has been suggested to be critical for substrate recognition; the contributions of Pen2 and Aph1 remain unclear. The role of NCT has been challenged recently by the observation that a critical residue (E332) in NCT, thought to be essential for γ-secretase activity, is instead involved in complex maturation. Here we report that NCT is dispensable for γ-secretase activity. NCT-independent γ-secretase activity can be detected in two independent NCT-deficient MEF lines, and blocked by the γ-secretase inhibitors DAPT and L-685,458. This catalytic activity requires prior ectodomain shedding of the substrate, and can cleave ligand-activated endogenous Notch receptors, indicating presence at the plasma membrane. siRNA knockdown experiments demonstrated that NCT-independent γ-secretase activity requires the presence of PS1, Pen2 and Aph1a but can tolerate knockdown of PS2 or Aph1b. We conclude that a PS1/Pen2/Aph1a trimeric complex is an active enzyme, displaying similar biochemical properties to those of γ-secretase and roughly 50% of its activity when normalized to PS1 NTF levels. This PS1/Pen2/Aph1a complex, however, is highly unstable. Thus, NCT acts to stabilize γ-secretase, but is not required for substrate recognition. PMID:20130175

  11. Sulfation of von Willebrand factor

    SciTech Connect

    Carew, J.A.; Browning, P.J.; Lynch, D.C. )

    1990-12-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein essential for normal hemostasis. We have discovered that cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells incorporate inorganic sulfate into vWF. Following immunoisolation and analysis by polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, metabolically labeled vWF was found to have incorporated (35S)-sulfate into all secreted multimer species. The time course of incorporation shows that sulfation occurs late in the biosynthesis of vWF, near the point at which multimerization occurs. Quantitative analysis suggests the presence, on average, of one molecule of sulfate per mature vWF subunit. Virtually all the detectable sulfate is released from the mature vWF subunit by treatment with endoglycosidases that remove asparagine-linked carbohydrates. Sulfated carbohydrate was localized first to the N-terminal half of the mature subunit (amino acids 1 through 1,365) by partial proteolytic digestion with protease V8; and subsequently to a smaller fragment within this region (amino acids 273 through 511) by sequential digestions with protease V8 and trypsin. Thus, the carbohydrate at asparagine 384 and/or 468 appears to be the site of sulfate modification. Sodium chlorate, an inhibitor of adenosine triphosphate-sulfurylase, blocks sulfation of vWF without affecting either the ability of vWF to assemble into high molecular weight multimers or the ability of vWF multimers to enter Weible-Palade bodies. The stability of vWF multimers in the presence of an endothelial cell monolayer also was unaffected by the sulfation state. Additionally, we have found that the cleaved propeptide of vWF is sulfated on asparagine-linked carbohydrate.

  12. SARS hCoV papain-like protease is a unique Lys48 linkage-specific di-distributive deubiquitinating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Békés, Miklós; Rut, Wioletta; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Mulder, Monique P C; Ovaa, Huib; Drag, Marcin; Lima, Christopher D; Huang, Tony T

    2015-06-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) and the Ub-like (Ubl) modifier interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) participate in the host defence of viral infections. Viruses, including the severe acute respiratory syndrome human coronavirus (SARS hCoV), have co-opted Ub-ISG15 conjugation pathways for their own advantage or have evolved effector proteins to counter pro-inflammatory properties of Ub-ISG15-conjugated host proteins. In the present study, we compare substrate specificities of the papain-like protease (PLpro) from the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) hCoV to the related protease from SARS, SARS PLpro. Through biochemical assays, we show that, similar to SARS PLpro, MERS PLpro is both a deubiquitinating (DUB) and a deISGylating enzyme. Further analysis of the intrinsic DUB activity of these viral proteases revealed unique differences between the recognition and cleavage specificities of polyUb chains. First, MERS PLpro shows broad linkage specificity for the cleavage of polyUb chains, whereas SARS PLpro prefers to cleave Lys48-linked polyUb chains. Secondly, MERS PLpro cleaves polyUb chains in a 'mono-distributive' manner (one Ub at a time) and SARS PLpro prefers to cleave Lys48-linked polyUb chains by sensing a di-Ub moiety as a minimal recognition element using a 'di-distributive' cleavage mechanism. The di-distributive cleavage mechanism for SARS PLpro appears to be uncommon among USP (Ub-specific protease)-family DUBs, as related USP family members from humans do not display such a mechanism. We propose that these intrinsic enzymatic differences between SARS and MERS PLpro will help to identify pro-inflammatory substrates of these viral DUBs and can guide in the design of therapeutics to combat infection by coronaviruses.

  13. Neural ECM proteases in learning and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Tsilibary, Effie; Tzinia, Athina; Radenovic, Lidija; Stamenkovic, Vera; Lebitko, Tomasz; Mucha, Mariusz; Pawlak, Robert; Frischknecht, Renato; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies implicate extracellular proteases in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. The data are especially strong for such serine proteases as thrombin, tissue plasminogen activator, neurotrypsin, and neuropsin as well as matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-9 in particular. The role of those enzymes in the aforementioned phenomena is supported by the experimental results on the expression patterns (at the gene expression and protein and enzymatic activity levels) and functional studies, including knockout mice, specific inhibitors, etc. Counterintuitively, the studies have shown that the extracellular proteolysis is not responsible mainly for an overall degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and loosening perisynaptic structures, but rather allows for releasing signaling molecules from the ECM, transsynaptic proteins, and latent form of growth factors. Notably, there are also indications implying those enzymes in the major neuropsychiatric disorders, probably by contributing to synaptic aberrations underlying such diseases as schizophrenia, bipolar, autism spectrum disorders, and drug addiction.

  14. Cockroach induces inflammatory responses through protease-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kota; Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to cockroaches is a major risk factor for asthma. Products from cockroaches may contain proteases and ligands for pattern recognition receptors. These molecules may activate airway inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, that are involved in asthma. Among inner-city children, cockroach allergens play an especially important role in increasing asthma morbidity. The molecular mechanism for this association between cockroach exposure and asthma is not fully understood. Enzymatic activities from cockroaches activate inflammatory cells in the airways and may also exacerbate certain human airway diseases, such as asthma. We recently reported that cockroach extracts contain pepstatin A-sensitive proteases that activate PAR-2 and induce activation and degranulation of human eosinophils. This review focuses on the effects of cockroach on various inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, epithelial cells, fibroblasts, dendritic cells, and T cells, in allergic reactions.

  15. Protease and Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD. PMID:20879045

  16. Protease and protease-activated receptor-2 signaling in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Lee, Seung Hun

    2010-11-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/ PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD.

  17. Modification of the Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin binding phenotype by V8 protease.

    PubMed Central

    McGavin, M J; Zahradka, C; Rice, K; Scott, J E

    1997-01-01

    The amount of cell surface fibronectin (Fn)-binding protein (FnBP) adhesin expressed by Staphylococcus aureus is maximal during exponential growth but disappears rapidly as the culture progresses into stationary phase. To identify factors responsible for the loss of cell surface FnBP, a culture of S. aureus L170, which shows high levels of Fn binding, was supplemented at the time of inoculation with concentrated stationary-phase supernatant from S. aureus L530, a strain which binds Fn poorly. The resulting exponential-phase cells were devoid of FnBP. The factor responsible for this activity was purified from the culture supernatant and identified as V8 protease. When cultured with 375 ng of exogenous V8 protease ml(-1), exponential-phase cells of S. aureus L170 were devoid of cell surface FnBP, and concentrations as low as 23 ng x ml(-1) resulted in reduced amounts of FnBP. Addition of the protease inhibitor alpha2-macroglobulin to the culture medium prevented the growth-phase-dependent loss of cell surface FnBP, whereas growth with exogenous V8 protease resulted in reduced adherence to the solid-phase N-terminal fragment of Fn and to the extracellular matrix synthesized by fetal rabbit lung fibroblasts. Although FnBP was extremely sensitive to V8 protease, exogenous protease did not exert a significant influence on the amount of cell surface protein A. However, a limited number of other high-molecular-weight cell surface proteins were also sensitive to V8 protease. Therefore, both the adhesive phenotype and cell surface protein profile of S. aureus can be modified by V8 protease activity. PMID:9199429

  18. Interspecific Differences between D. pulex and D. magna in Tolerance to Cyanobacteria with Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kuster, Christian J.; Von Elert, Eric

    2013-01-01

    It is known that cyanobacteria negatively affect herbivores due to their production of toxins such as protease inhibitors. In the present study we investigated potential interspecific differences between two major herbivores, Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex, in terms of their tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors. Seven clones each of D. magna and of D. pulex were isolated from different habitats in Europe and North America. To test for interspecific differences in the daphnids’ tolerance to cyanobacteria, their somatic and population growth rates were determined for each D. magna and D. pulex clone after exposure to varying concentrations of two Microcystis aeruginosa strains. The M. aeruginosa strains NIVA and PCC− contained either chymotrypsin or trypsin inhibitors, but no microcystins. Mean somatic and population growth rates on a diet with 20% NIVA were significantly more reduced in D. pulex than in D. magna. On a diet with 10% PCC−, the population growth of D. pulex was significantly more reduced than that of D. magna. This indicates that D. magna is more tolerant to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors than D. pulex. The reduction of growth rates was possibly caused by an interference of cyanobacterial inhibitors with proteases in the gut of Daphnia, as many other conceivable factors, which might have been able to explain the reduced growth, could be excluded as causal factors. Protease assays revealed that the sensitivities of chymotrypsins and trypsins to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors did not differ between D. magna and D. pulex. However, D. magna exhibited a 2.3-fold higher specific chymotrypsin activity than D. pulex, which explains the observed higher tolerance to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors of D. magna. The present study suggests that D. magna may control the development of cyanobacterial blooms more efficiently than D. pulex due to differences in their tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors. PMID:23650523

  19. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh, M.A.; Soares, A.; Navaneetham, D.; Sinha, D.; Walsh, P. N.; Radisky, E. S.

    2010-11-19

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P1 and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin {center_dot} APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  20. Purification, characterization and gene cloning of Da-36, a novel serine protease from Deinagkistrodon acutus venom.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Ye, Feng-Ping; Wang, Jie; Liao, Guo-Yang; Zhang, Yun; Fan, Quan-Shui; Lee, Wen-Hui

    2013-06-01

    A serine protease termed Da-36 was isolated from crude venom of Deinagkistrodon acutus. The enzyme was a single chain protein with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 on SDS-PAGE with an isoelectric point of 6.59. Da-36 could clot human plasma by cleaving the Aα, Bβ and γ chains of fibrinogen and also exhibited arginine esterase activity. The proteolytic activity of Da-36 toward TAME was strongly inhibited by PMSF and moderately affected by benzamidine and aprotinin, indicating that it was a serine protease. Meanwhile, Da-36 showed stability with wide temperature (20-50 °C) and pH value ranges (pH 6-10). Divalent metal ions of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+) had no effects but Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) inhibited the arginine esterase activity of Da-36. Total DNA was extracted directly from the lyophilized crude venom and the gene (5.5 kbp) coding for Da-36 had been successfully cloned. Sequence analysis revealed that the Da-36 gene contained five exons and four introns. The mature Da-36 was encoded by four separate exons. The deduced mature amino acid sequence of Da-36 was in good agreement with the determined N-terminal sequence of the purified protein and shared high homology with other serine proteases isolated from different snake venoms. Blast search using amino acid sequence of Da-36 against public database revealed that Da-36 showed a maximal identity of 90% with both Dav-X (Swiss-Prot: Q9I8W9.1) and thrombin-like protein 1 (GenBank: AAW56608.1) from the same snake species, indicating that Da-36 is a novel serine protease.

  1. Biochemical characterization of a new glycosylated protease from Euphorbia cf. lactea latex.

    PubMed

    Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Sojikul, Punchapat; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2015-07-01

    A dimeric protease designated as EuP-82 was purified from Euphorbia cf. lactea latex. Since its proteolytic activity was inhibited by a serine protease specific inhibitor (PMSF), EuP-82 was classified as a serine protease. N-glycan deglycosylation tests revealed that EuP-82 was a glycosylated protein. MALDI-TOF MS showed that EuP-82 was a homodimer, which was its active form. The optimal conditions for fibrinogenolytic activity were at pH 11 and 35 °C. EuP-82 enzyme had broad range of pH stability from 4 to 12. Moreover, the enzyme was still active in the presence of reducing agent (β-mercaptoethanol). EuP-82 was a proline-rich enzyme (about 20.69 mol%). Increased proline production can be found in higher plants in response to both biotic and abiotic stresses, high proline in the molecule of EuP-82 might stabilize its activity, structure and folding. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequences and peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) of EuP-82, the enzyme was identified as a new serine protease. The digested products from EuP-82 cleavage of human fibrinogen were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and PMF. The results confirmed that EuP-82 could digest all subunits of human fibrinogen. EuP-82 cleaved fibrinogen with a Michaelis constant (Km) of 3.30 ± 0.26 μM; a maximal velocity (Vmax) of 400.9 ± 0.85 ng min(-1); and a catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) of 121.5 ± 9.25 ng μM(-1) min(-1). EuP-82 has potential for use in medicinal treatment, for example thrombosis, since the enzyme had fibrinogenolytic activity and high stability.

  2. Delivery of a Protease-Activated Cytolytic Peptide Prodrug by Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jallouk, Andrew P; Palekar, Rohun U; Marsh, Jon N; Pan, Hua; Pham, Christine T N; Schlesinger, Paul H; Wickline, Samuel A

    2015-08-19

    Melittin is a cytolytic peptide derived from bee venom that inserts into lipid membranes and oligomerizes to form membrane pores. Although this peptide is an attractive candidate for treatment of cancers and infectious processes, its nonspecific cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity have limited its therapeutic applications. Several groups have reported the development of cytolytic peptide prodrugs that only exhibit cytotoxicity following activation by site-specific proteases. However, systemic administration of these constructs has proven difficult because of their poor pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we present a platform for the design of protease-activated melittin derivatives that may be used in conjunction with a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle delivery system. Although native melittin was substantially hemolytic (HD50: 1.9 μM) and cytotoxic (IC50: 2.4 μM), the prodrug exhibited 2 orders of magnitude less hemolytic activity (HD50: > 100 μM) and cytotoxicity (IC50: > 100 μM). Incubation with matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) led to cleavage of the prodrug at the expected site and restoration of hemolytic activity (HD50: 3.4 μM) and cytotoxicity (IC50: 8.1 μM). Incubation of the prodrug with perfluorocarbon nanoparticles led to stable loading of 10,250 peptides per nanoparticle. Nanoparticle-bound prodrug was also cleaved and activated by MMP-9, albeit at a fourfold slower rate. Intravenous administration of prodrug-loaded nanoparticles in a mouse model of melanoma significantly decreased tumor growth rate (p = 0.01). Because MMPs and other proteases play a key role in cancer invasion and metastasis, this platform holds promise for the development of personalized cancer therapies directed toward a patient's individual protease expression profile.

  3. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    M Salameh; A Soares; D Navaneetham; D Sinha; P Walsh; E Radisky

    2011-12-31

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P{sub 1} and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin-APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  4. Activity of purified hepatitis C virus protease NS3 on peptide substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Steinkühler, C; Urbani, A; Tomei, L; Biasiol, G; Sardana, M; Bianchi, E; Pessi, A; De Francesco, R

    1996-01-01

    The protease domain of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS3 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and shown to be active on peptides derived from the sequence of the NS4A-NS4B junction. Experiments were carried out to optimize protease activity. Buffer requirements included the presence of detergent, glycerol, and dithiothreitol, pH between 7.5 and 8.5, and low ionic strength. C- and N-terminal deletion experiments defined a peptide spanning from the P6 to the P4' residue as a suitable substrate. Cleavage kinetics were subsequently measured by using decamer P6-P4' peptides corresponding to all intermolecular cleavage sites of the HCV polyprotein. The following order of cleavage efficiency, in terms of kcat/Km, was determined: NS5A-NS5B > NS4A-NS4B >> NS4B-NS5A. A 14-mer peptide containing residues 21 to 34 of the protease cofactor NS4A (Pep4A 21-34), when added in stoichiometric amounts, was shown to increase cleavage rates of all peptides, the largest effect (100-fold) being observed on the hydrolysis of the NS4B-NS5A decamer. From the kinetic analysis of cleavage data, we conclude that (i) primary structure is an important determinant of the efficiency with which each site is cleaved during polyprotein processing, (ii) slow cleavage of the NS4B-NS5A site in the absence of NS4A is due to low binding affinity of the enzyme for this site, and (iii) formation of a 1:1 complex between the protease and Pep4A 21-34 is sufficient and required for maximum activation. PMID:8794305

  5. Cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus counteracts dietary protease inhibitors by modulating propeptides of major digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J-E; Lovingshimer, M R; Salzman, R A; Presnail, J K; Lu, A L; Koiwa, H; Zhu-Salzman, K

    2007-06-01

    Cowpea bruchids, when challenged by consumption of the soybean cysteine protease inhibitor scN, reconfigure expression of their major CmCP digestive proteases and resume normal feeding and development. Previous evidence indicated that insects selectively induced CmCPs from subfamily B, that were more efficient in autoprocessing and possessed not only higher proteolytic, but also scN-degrading activities. In contrast, dietary scN only marginally up-regulated genes from the more predominant CmCP subfamily A that were inferior to subfamily B. To gain further molecular insight into this adaptive adjustment, we performed domain swapping between the two respective subfamily members B1 and A16, the latter unable to autoprocess or degrade scN even after intermolecular processing. Swapping the propeptides did not qualitatively alter autoprocessing in either protease isoform. Incorporation of either the N- (pAmBA) or C-terminal (pAmAB) mature B1 segment into A16, however, was sufficient to prime autoprocessing of A16 to its mature form. Further, the swap at the N-terminal mature A16 protein region (pAmBA) resulted in four amino acid changes. Replacement of these amino acid residues by the corresponding B1 residues, singly and pair-wise, revealed that autoprocessing activation in pAmBA resulted from cumulative and/or coordinated individual effects. Bacterially expressed isolated propeptides (pA16 and pB1) differed in their ability to inhibit mature B1 enzyme. Lower inhibitory activity in pB1 is likely attributable to its lack of protein stability. This instability in the cleaved propeptide is necessary, although insufficient by itself, for scN-degradation by the mature B1 enzyme. Taken together, cowpea bruchids modulate proteolysis of their digestive enzymes by controlling proCmCP cleavage and propeptide stability, which explains at least in part the plasticity cowpea bruchids demonstrate in response to protease inhibitors.

  6. Cysteine digestive peptidases function as post-glutamine cleaving enzymes in tenebrionid stored product pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereals have storage proteins with high amounts of the amino acids glutamine and proline. Therefore, storage pests need to have digestive enzymes that are efficient in hydrolyzing these types of proteins. Post-glutamine cleaving peptidases (PGP) were isolated from the midgut of the stored product pe...

  7. Localization of two post-proline cleaving peptidases in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two soluble post-proline cleaving peptidase activities, PPCP1 and PPCP2, were demonstrated in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae with the substrate benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanyl-L-proline p-nitroanilide. Both activities were serine peptidases. PPCP1 was active in acidic buffers, with maximum activit...

  8. FeCl3-catalyzed self-cleaving deprotection of methoxyphenylmethyl-protected alcohols.

    PubMed

    Sawama, Yoshinari; Masuda, Masahiro; Asai, Shota; Goto, Ryota; Nagata, Saori; Nishimura, Shumma; Monguchi, Yasunari; Sajiki, Hironao

    2015-02-06

    4-Methoxyphenylmethyl ethers are widely utilized as alcohol protecting groups. FeCl3 effectively catalyzes the deprotection of methoxyphenylmethyl-type ethers in a self-cleaving manner to produce oligomeric derivatives and alcohols. Remarkably, the highly pure mother alcohols can be obtained without silica gel column chromatography by using the 2,4-dimethoxyphenylmethyl group as a protective group.

  9. Simple bioseparations using self-cleaving elastin-like polypeptide tags.

    PubMed

    Banki, Mahmoud Reza; Feng, Liang; Wood, David W

    2005-09-01

    We introduce a new method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli using self-cleaving elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) fusion tags without the need for affinity chromatography or proteolytic tag removal. Using this method we obtained high purity, activity and reasonable yields for ten diverse target proteins.

  10. Cysteine Proteases from Bloodfeeding Arthropod Ectoparasites

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Daniel; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Calvo, Eric; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been discovered in various bloodfeeding ectoparasites. Here, we assemble the available information about the function of these peptidases and reveal their role in hematophagy and parasite development. While most of the data shed light on key proteolytic events that play a role in arthropod physiology, we also report on the association of cysteine proteases with arthropod vectorial capacity. With emphasis on ticks, specifically Ixodes ricinus, we finally propose a model about the contribution of cysteine peptidases to blood digestion, and how their concerted action with other tick midgut proteases leads to the absorbance of nutrients by the midgut epithelial cells. PMID:21660665

  11. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.; Mayer, M.

    1982-08-15

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with /sup 14/C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease I activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition.

  12. Cathepsin F Cysteine Protease of the Human Liver Fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Morales, Maria E.; Mann, Victoria H.; Parriott, Sandi K.; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Robinson, Mark W.; To, Joyce; Dalton, John P.; Loukas, Alex; Brindley, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    autocatalytically process and activate to a mature enzyme, trans-processing by Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L cleaved the prosegment of Ov-CF-1, releasing a mature cathepsin F with activity against the peptide Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec >50 times that of the zymogen. Immunocytochemistry using antibodies raised against the recombinant enzyme showed that Ov-CF-1 is expressed in the gut of the mature hermaphroditic fluke and also in the reproductive structures, including vitelline glands, egg, and testis. Ov-CF-1 was detected in bile duct epithelial cells surrounding the flukes several weeks after infection of hamsters with O. viverrini and, in addition, had accumulated in the secondary (small) bile ducts where flukes cannot reach due to their large size. Conclusions/Significance A cathepsin F cysteine protease of the human liver fluke O. viverrini has been characterized at the gene and protein level. Secretion of this protease may contribute to the hepatobiliary abnormalities, including cholangiocarcinogenesis, observed in individuals infected with this parasite. PMID:19308250

  13. MALT1 Protease Activation Triggers Acute Disruption of Endothelial Barrier Integrity via CYLD Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Klei, Linda R; Hu, Dong; Panek, Robert; Alfano, Danielle N; Bridwell, Rachel E; Bailey, Kelly M; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine I; Concel, Vincent J; Hess, Emily M; Van Beek, Matthew; Delekta, Phillip C; Gu, Shufang; Watkins, Simon C; Ting, Adrian T; Gough, Peter J; Foley, Kevin P; Bertin, John; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M; Lucas, Peter C

    2016-09-27

    Microvascular endothelial cells maintain a tight barrier to prevent passage of plasma and circulating immune cells into the extravascular tissue compartment, yet endothelial cells respond rapidly to vasoactive substances, including thrombin, allowing transient paracellular permeability. This response is a cornerstone of acute inflammation, but the mechanisms responsible are still incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that thrombin triggers MALT1 to proteolytically cleave cylindromatosis (CYLD). Fragmentation of CYLD results in microtubule disruption and a cascade of events leading to endothelial cell retraction and an acute permeability response. This finding reveals an unexpected role for the MALT1 protease, which previously has been viewed mostly as a driver of pro-inflammatory NF-κB signaling in lymphocytes. Thus, MALT1 not only promotes immune cell activation but also acutely regulates endothelial cell biology, actions that together facilitate tissue inflammation. Pharmacologic inhibition of MALT1 may therefore have synergistic impact by targeting multiple disparate steps in the overall inflammatory response.

  14. Cell entry by a novel European filovirus requires host endosomal cysteine proteases and Niemann-Pick C1

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Melinda; Ndungo, Esther; Jangra, Rohit K.; Cai, Yingyun; Postnikova, Elena; Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Dye, John M.; de Arellano, Eva Ramírez; Negredo, Ana; Palacios, Gustavo; Kuhn, Jens H.; Chandran, Kartik

    2014-01-01

    Lloviu virus (LLOV), a phylogenetically divergent filovirus, is the proposed etiologic agent of die-offs of Schreiber’s long-fingered bats (Miniopterus schreibersii) in western Europe. Studies of LLOV remain limited because the infectious agent has not yet been isolated. Here, we generated a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the LLOV spike glycoprotein (GP) and used it to show that LLOV GP resembles other filovirus GP proteins in structure and function. LLOV GP must be cleaved by endosomal cysteine proteases during entry, but is much more protease-sensitive than EBOV GP. The EBOV/MARV receptor, Niemann Pick C1 (NPC1), is also required for LLOV entry, and its second luminal domain is recognized with high affinity by a cleaved form of LLOV GP, suggesting that receptor binding would not impose a barrier to LLOV infection of humans and non-human primates. The use of NPC1 as an intracellular entry receptor may be a universal property of filoviruses. PMID:25310500

  15. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application.

  16. Purification and characterization of a prothrombin-activating protease from Nephila clavata.

    PubMed

    Joo, Han-Seung; Park, Gun-Chun; Cho, Woo Ri; Tak, Eunsik; Paik, Seung R; Chang, Chung-Soon

    2002-03-01

    We report upon the purification and characterization of a novel prothrombin-activating enzyme from the body fluid (total homogenates of isolated digestive tract without eggs, spinnerets and silk glands) of the spider, Nephila clavata by a combination of acetone fractionation, ion exchange, and Soybean trypsin inhibitor-Sepharose chromatography. Analysis of the purified enzyme with SDS-PAGE and gel filtration revealed a single polypeptide chain with an apparent molecular weight of 24kDa. The proteolytic activity of the enzyme was stable up to 50 degrees C, however, it became unstable over 55 degrees C. The enzyme had an optimum pH of 8, and Ca(2+) was not required for the enzyme activity. According to inhibition profiles obtained with several serine protease inhibitors such as PMSF and benzamidine, the purified protease is a member of the serine proteases. Bz-Ile-Glu(gamma-OR)- Gly-Arg-pNA and Z-Arg-Gly-Arg-pNA which are known as substrates for factor Xa, were hydrolyzed favorably by the enzyme. And the Nephila protease could produce thrombin from prothrombin at nM range, and form the turbid ring using fibrinogen-agarose plate. The results obtained confirmed that the purified protease is a potent prothrombin-activating activity belonging to the family of serine protease.

  17. Role of an extracellular neutral protease in infection against nematodes by Brevibacillus laterosporus strain G4.

    PubMed

    Tian, Baoyu; Yang, Jinkui; Lian, Lihui; Wang, Chunyan; Li, Ning; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2007-02-01

    Proteases have been proposed as virulence factors in microbial pathogenicity against nematodes. However, what kinds of extracellular proteases from these pathogens and how they contribute to the pathogenesis of infections against nematode in vivo remain largely unknown. A previous analysis using a strain with a deletion in an extracellular alkaline protease BLG4 gene from Brevibacillus laterosporus demonstrated that BLG4 was responsible for the majority of nematicidal activity by destroying host's cuticle. In recent studies, a neutral protease NPE-4, purified from the mutant BLG4-6, was found to be responsible for the majority of the remaining EDTA-inhibited protease activity. However, the purified NPE-4 and recombinant NPE-4 in a related species Bacillus subtilis showed little nematicidal activity in vitro and were unable to degrade the intact cuticle of the host. It is interesting to note that the addition of NPE-4 improved the pathogenicity of crude enzyme extract from wild-type B. laterosporus but had no effect on the BLG4-deficient mutant. This result suggests that NPE-4 functions in the presence of protease BLG4. Moreover, NPE-4 could degrade proteins from the inner layer of purified cuticles from nematode Panagrellus redivivus in vitro. These results indicated that the two different bacterial extracellular proteases might play differential roles at different stages of infection or a synthetic role in penetration of nematode cuticle in B. laterosporus. This is among the first reports to systematically evaluate and define the roles of different bacterial extracellular proteases in infection against nematodes.

  18. Bacillus anthracis Overcomes an Amino Acid Auxotrophy by Cleaving Host Serum Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, Austen; Swick, Michelle C.; Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Pomerantsev, Andrei; Lyons, C. Rick; Koehler, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria sustain an infection by acquiring nutrients from the host to support replication. The host sequesters these nutrients as a growth-restricting strategy, a concept termed “nutritional immunity.” Historically, the study of nutritional immunity has centered on iron uptake because many bacteria target hemoglobin, an abundant circulating protein, as an iron source. Left unresolved are the mechanisms that bacteria use to attain other nutrients from host sources, including amino acids. We employed a novel medium designed to mimic the chemical composition of human serum, and we show here that Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, proteolyzes human hemoglobin to liberate essential amino acids which enhance its growth. This property can be traced to the actions of InhA1, a secreted metalloprotease, and extends to at least three other serum proteins, including serum albumin. The results suggest that we must also consider proteolysis of key host proteins to be a way for bacterial pathogens to attain essential nutrients, and we provide an experimental framework to determine the host and bacterial factors involved in this process. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens acquire nutrients during infection are poorly understood. Here we used a novel defined medium that approximates the chemical composition of human blood serum, blood serum mimic (BSM), to better model the nutritional environment that pathogens encounter during bacteremia. Removing essential amino acids from BSM revealed that two of the most abundant proteins in blood—hemoglobin and serum albumin—can satiate the amino acid requirement for Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. We further demonstrate that hemoglobin is proteolyzed by the secreted protease InhA1. These studies highlight that common blood proteins can be a nutrient source for bacteria. They also challenge the historical view that hemoglobin is solely an iron source for

  19. Protease Mediated Anti-Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    anticancer therapy and focal light illumination is expected to be an effective treatment with reduced phototoxicity given the quenched state of the...to months following photodynamic therapy (PDT). Herein, we report a novel design of protease-mediated photosensitization by which phototoxicity can...W81XWH-05-1-0515 TITLE: Protease Mediated Anti-Cancer Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ching-Hsuan Tung CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  20. Acid protease production in fungal root endophytes.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Michael S; Fraser, Erica; Kernaghan, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Fungal endophytes are ubiquitous in healthy root tissue, but little is known about their ecosystem functions, including their ability to utilize organic nutrient sources such as proteins. Root-associated fungi may secrete proteases to access the carbon and mineral nutrients within proteins in the soil or in the cells of their plant host. We compared the protein utilization patterns of multiple isolates of the root endophytes Phialocephala fortinii s.l., Meliniomyces variabilis and Umbelopsis isabellina with those of two ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, Hebeloma incarnatulum and Laccaria bicolor, and the wood-decay fungus Irpex lacteus at pH values of 2-9 on liquid BSA media. We also assessed protease activity using a fluorescently labeled casein assay and gelatin zymography and characterized proteases using specific protease inhibitors. I. lacteus and U. isabellina utilized protein efficiently, while the ECM fungi exhibited poor protein utilization. ECM fungi secreted metallo-proteases and had pH optima above 4, while other fungi produced aspartic proteases with lower pH optima. The ascomycetous root endophytes M. variabilis and P. fortinii exhibited intermediate levels of protein utilization and M. variabilis exhibited a very low pH optimum. Comparing proteolytic profiles between fungal root endophytes and fungi with well defined ecological roles provides insight into the ecology of these cryptic root associates.

  1. PCSK9: an enigmatic protease.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Dayami

    2008-04-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) plays a critical role in cholesterol metabolism by controlling the levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that circulate in the bloodstream. Several gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations in the PCSK9 gene, that occur naturally, have been identified and linked to hypercholesterolemia and hypocholesterolemia, respectively. PCSK9 expression has been shown to be regulated by sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) and statins similar to other genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis. The most critical finding concerning PCSK9 is that this protease is able to influence the number of LDL receptor molecules expressed on the cell surface. Studies have demonstrated that PCSK9 acts mainly by enhancing degradation of LDL receptor protein in the liver. Inactivation of PCSK9 in mice reduces plasma cholesterol levels primarily by increasing hepatic expression of LDL receptor protein and thereby accelerating clearance of circulating LDL cholesterol. The objective of this review is to summarize the current information related to the regulation and function of PCSK9 and to identify gaps in our present knowledge.

  2. The protease activity of yeast separase (esp1) is required for anaphase spindle elongation independently of its role in cleavage of cohesin.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Chris; Segal, Marisa; Reed, Steven I

    2008-04-01

    Separase is a caspase-family protease required for the metaphase-anaphase transition in eukaryotes. In budding yeast, the separase ortholog, Esp1, has been shown to cleave a subunit of cohesin, Mcd1 (Scc1), thereby releasing sister chromatids from cohesion and allowing anaphase. However, whether Esp1 has other substrates required for anaphase has been controversial. Whereas it has been reported that cleavage of Mcd1 is sufficient to trigger anaphase in the absence of Esp1 activation, another study using a temperature-sensitive esp1 mutant concluded that depletion of Mcd1 was not sufficient for anaphase in the absence of Esp1 function. Here we revisit the issue and demonstrate that neither depletion of Mcd1 nor ectopic cleavage of Mcd1 by Tev1 protease is sufficient to support anaphase in an esp1 temperature-sensitive mutant. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of the Esp1 protease is required for this Mcd1-independent anaphase function. These data suggest that another protein, possibly a spindle-associated protein, is cleaved by Esp1 to allow anaphase. Such a function is consistent with the previous observation that Esp1 localizes to the mitotic spindle during anaphase.

  3. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. |

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  4. The nuclear protein Sam68 is cleaved by the FMDV 3C protease redistributing Sam68 to the cytoplasm during FMDV infection of host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Paul; Schafer, Elizabeth A.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2012-03-30

    Picornavirus infection can lead to disruption of nuclear pore traffic, shut-off of cell translation machinery, and cleavage of proteins involved in cellular signal transduction and the innate response to infection. Here, we demonstrated that the FMDV 3C{sup pro} induced the cleavage of nuclear RNA-binding protein Sam68 C-terminus containing the nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Consequently, it stimulated the redistribution of Sam68 to the cytoplasm. The siRNA knockdown of Sam68 resulted in a 1000-fold reduction in viral titers, which prompted us to study the effect of Sam68 on FMDV post-entry events. Interestingly, Sam68 interacts with the internal ribosomal entry site within the 5 Prime non-translated region of the FMDV genome, and Sam68 knockdown decreased FMDV IRES-driven activity in vitro suggesting that it could modulate translation of the viral genome. The results uncover a novel role for Sam68 in the context of picornaviruses and the proteolysis of a new cellular target of the FMDV 3C{sup pro}.

  5. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  6. Friction imprint effect in mechanically cleaved BaTiO{sub 3} (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Christian J.; Ebeling, Daniel; Solares, Santiago D.; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2014-09-28

    Adsorption, chemisorption, and reconstruction at the surfaces of ferroelectric materials can all contribute toward the pinning of ferroelectric polarization, which is called the electrical imprint effect. Here, we show that the opposite is also true: freshly cleaved, atomically flat surfaces of (001) oriented BaTiO{sub 3} exhibit a persistent change in surface chemistry that is driven by ferroelectric polarization. This surface modification is explored using lateral force microscopy (LFM), while the ferroelectric polarization is probed using piezoresponse force microscopy. We find that immediately after cleaving BaTiO{sub 3}, LFM reveals friction contrast between ferroelectric domains. We also find that this surface modification remains after the ferroelectric domain distribution is modified, resulting in an imprint of the original ferroelectric domain distribution on the sample surface. This friction imprint effect has implications for surface patterning as well as ferroelectric device operation and failure.

  7. A widespread self-cleaving ribozyme class is revealed by bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Adam; Weinberg, Zasha; Chen, Andy G. Y.; Kim, Peter B.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2013-01-01

    Ribozymes are noncoding RNAs that promote chemical transformations with rate enhancements approaching those of protein enzymes. Although ribozymes are likely to have been abundant during the RNA world era, only ten classes are known to exist among contemporary organisms. We report the discovery and analysis of an additional self-cleaving ribozyme class, called twister, which is present in many species of bacteria and eukarya. Nearly 2700 twister ribozymes were identified that conform to a secondary structure consensus that is small yet complex, with three stems conjoined by internal and terminal loops. Two pseudoknots provide tertiary structure contacts that are critical for catalytic activity. The twister ribozyme motif provides another example of a natural RNA catalyst and calls attention to the potentially varied biological roles of this and other classes of widely distributed self-cleaving RNAs. PMID:24240507

  8. Human dipeptidyl peptidase III acts as a post-proline-cleaving enzyme on endomorphins.

    PubMed

    Barsun, Marina; Jajcanin, Nina; Vukelić, Bojana; Spoljarić, Jasminka; Abramić, Marija

    2007-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is a zinc exopeptidase with an implied role in the mammalian pain-modulatory system owing to its high affinity for enkephalins and localisation in the superficial laminae of the spinal cord dorsal horn. Our study revealed that this human enzyme hydrolyses opioid peptides belonging to three new groups, endomorphins, hemorphins and exorphins. The enzymatic hydrolysis products of endomorphin-1 were separated and quantified by capillary electrophoresis and the kinetic parameters were determined for human DPP III and rat DPP IV. Both peptidases cleave endomorphin-1 at comparable rates, with liberation of the N-terminal Tyr-Pro. This is the first evidence of DPP III acting as an endomorphin-cleaving enzyme.

  9. Inactivation of Streptococcus pyogenes extracellular cysteine protease significantly decreases mouse lethality of serotype M3 and M49 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lukomski, S; Sreevatsan, S; Amberg, C; Reichardt, W; Woischnik, M; Podbielski, A; Musser, J M

    1997-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been implicated as important virulence factors in a wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, but little direct evidence has been presented to support this notion. Virtually all strains of the human bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes express a highly conserved extracellular cysteine protease known as streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB). Two sets of isogenic strains deficient in SpeB cysteine protease activity were constructed by integrational mutagenesis using nonreplicating recombinant plasmids containing a truncated segment of the speB gene. Immunoblot analyses and enzyme assays confirmed that the mutant derivatives were deficient in expression of enzymatically active SpeB cysteine protease. To test the hypothesis that the cysteine protease participates in host mortality, we assessed the ability of serotype M3 and M49 wild-type strains and isogenic protease-negative mutants to cause death in outbred mice after intraperitoneal inoculation. Compared to wild-type parental organisms, the serotype M3 speB mutant lost virtually all ability to cause mouse death (P < 0.00001), and similarly, the virulence of the M49 mutant was detrimentally altered (P < 0.005). The data unambiguously demonstrate that the streptococcal enzyme is a virulence factor, and thereby provide additional evidence that microbial cysteine proteases are critical in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:9169486

  10. An uncleavable form of pro–scatter factor suppresses tumor growth and dissemination in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mazzone, Massimiliano; Basilico, Cristina; Cavassa, Silvia; Pennacchietti, Selma; Risio, Mauro; Naldini, Luigi; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Michieli, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Scatter factor (SF), also known as hepatocyte growth factor, is ubiquitously present in the extracellular matrix of tissues in the form of an inactive precursor (pro-SF). In order to acquire biological activity, pro-SF must be cleaved by specific proteases present on the cell surface. The mature form of SF controls invasive cues in both physiological and pathological processes through activation of its receptor, the Met tyrosine kinase. By substituting a single amino acid in the proteolytic site, we engineered an unprocessable form of pro-SF (uncleavable SF). Using lentivirus vector technology, we achieved local or systemic delivery of uncleavable SF in mice. We provide evidence that (a) uncleavable SF inhibits both protease-mediated pro-SF conversion and active SF–induced Met activation; (b) local expression of uncleavable SF in tumors suppresses tumor growth, impairs tumor angiogenesis, and prevents metastatic dissemination; and (c) systemic expression of uncleavable SF dramatically inhibits the growth of transplanted tumors and abolishes the formation of spontaneous metastases without perturbing vital physiological functions. These data show that proteolytic activation of pro-SF is a limiting step in tumor progression, thus suggesting a new strategy for the treatment or prevention of the malignant conversion of neoplastic lesions. PMID:15545993

  11. An uncleavable form of pro-scatter factor suppresses tumor growth and dissemination in mice.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Massimiliano; Basilico, Cristina; Cavassa, Silvia; Pennacchietti, Selma; Risio, Mauro; Naldini, Luigi; Comoglio, Paolo M; Michieli, Paolo

    2004-11-01

    Scatter factor (SF), also known as hepatocyte growth factor, is ubiquitously present in the extracellular matrix of tissues in the form of an inactive precursor (pro-SF). In order to acquire biological activity, pro-SF must be cleaved by specific proteases present on the cell surface. The mature form of SF controls invasive cues in both physiological and pathological processes through activation of its receptor, the Met tyrosine kinase. By substituting a single amino acid in the proteolytic site, we engineered an unprocessable form of pro-SF (uncleavable SF). Using lentivirus vector technology, we achieved local or systemic delivery of uncleavable SF in mice. We provide evidence that (a) uncleavable SF inhibits both protease-mediated pro-SF conversion and active SF-induced Met activation; (b) local expression of uncleavable SF in tumors suppresses tumor growth, impairs tumor angiogenesis, and prevents metastatic dissemination; and (c) systemic expression of uncleavable SF dramatically inhibits the growth of transplanted tumors and abolishes the formation of spontaneous metastases without perturbing vital physiological functions. These data show that proteolytic activation of pro-SF is a limiting step in tumor progression, thus suggesting a new strategy for the treatment or prevention of the malignant conversion of neoplastic lesions.

  12. Role of CpSUB1, a subtilisin-like protease, in Cryptosporidium parvum infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wanyiri, Jane W; Techasintana, Patsharaporn; O'Connor, Roberta M; Blackman, Michael J; Kim, Kami; Ward, Honorine D

    2009-04-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium is a significant cause of diarrheal disease worldwide. Previously, we reported that a Cryptosporidium parvum subtilisin-like serine protease activity with furin-type specificity cleaves gp40/15, a glycoprotein that is proteolytically processed into gp40 and gp15, which are implicated in mediating infection of host cells. Neither the enzyme(s) responsible for the protease activity in C. parvum lysates nor those that process gp40/15 are known. There are no furin or other proprotein convertase genes in the C. parvum genome. However, a gene encoding CpSUB1, a subtilisin-like serine protease, is present. In this study, we cloned the CpSUB1 genomic sequence and expressed and purified the recombinant prodomain. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of RNA from C. parvum-infected HCT-8 cells revealed that CpSUB1 is expressed throughout infection in vitro. In immunoblots, antiserum to the recombinant CpSUB1 prodomain revealed two major bands, of approximately 64 kDa and approximately 48 kDa, for C. parvum lysates and proteins "shed" during excystation. In immunofluorescence assays, the antiserum reacted with the apical region of sporozoites and merozoites. The recombinant prodomain inhibited protease activity and processing of recombinant gp40/15 by C. parvum lysates but not by furin. Since prodomains are often selective inhibitors of their cognate enzymes, these results suggest that CpSUB1 may be a likely candidate for the protease activity in C. parvum and for processing of gp40/15. Importantly, the recombinant prodomain inhibited C. parvum infection of HCT-8 cells. These studies indicate that CpSUB1 plays a significant role in infection of host cells by the parasite and suggest that this enzyme may serve as a target for intervention.

  13. Antiviral Potential of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Enterovirus A71 via Inhibition of Viral 2A Protease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Ying; Huang, An-Cheng; Hour, Mann-Jen; Huang, Su-Hua; Kung, Szu-Hao; Chen, Chao-Hsien; Chen, I-Chieh; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) in the Picornaviridae family causes hand-foot-and-mouth disease, aseptic meningitis, severe central nervous system disease, even death. EV-A71 2A protease cleaves Type I interferon (IFN)-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1) to block IFN-induced Jak/STAT signaling. This study investigated anti-EV-A7l activity and synergistic mechanism(s) of a novel furoquinoline alkaloid compound CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β. Anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 alone and in combination with IFN-β were evaluated by inhibitory assays of virus-induced apoptosis, plaque formation, and virus yield. CW-33 showed antiviral activities with an IC50 of near 200 μM in EV-A71 plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. While, anti-EV-A71 activities of CW-33 combined with 100 U/mL IFN-β exhibited a synergistic potency with an IC50 of approximate 1 μM in plaque reduction and virus yield inhibition assays. Molecular docking revealed CW-33 binding to EV-A71 2A protease active sites, correlating with an inhibitory effect of CW33 on in vitro enzymatic activity of recombinant 2A protease (IC50 = 53.1 μM). Western blotting demonstrated CW-33 specifically inhibiting 2A protease-mediated cleavage of IFNAR1. CW-33 also recovered Type I IFN-induced Tyk2 and STAT1 phosphorylation as well as 2′,5′-OAS upregulation in EV-A71 infected cells. The results demonstrated CW-33 inhibiting viral 2A protease activity to reduce Type I IFN antagonism of EV-A71. Therefore, CW-33 combined with a low-dose of Type I IFN could be applied in developing alternative approaches to treat EV-A71 infection. PMID:26090728

  14. Stress Conditions Increase Vimentin Cleavage by Omi/HtrA2 Protease in Human Primary Neurons and Differentiated Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Bérangère; Tajhizi, Mehdi; Alkhatib, Dareen; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt; Wiehager, Birgitta; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Sundström, Erik; Winblad, Bengt; Tjernberg, Lars O; Behbahani, Homira

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunctional Omi/HtrA2, a mitochondrial serine protease, has been implicated in various neurodegenerative disorders. Despite the wealth of evidence on the roles of Omi/HtrA2 in apoptosis, little is known about its cytosolic targets, the cleavage of which could account for the observed morphological changes such as cytoskeletal reorganizations in axons. By proteomic analysis, vimentin was identified as a substrate for Omi/HtrA2 and we have reported increased Omi/HtrA2 protease activity in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Here, we investigated a possible link between Omi/HtrA2 and vimentin cleavage, and consequence of this cleavage on mitochondrial distribution in neurons. In vitro protease assays showed vimentin to be cleaved by Omi/HtrA2 protease, and proximity ligation assay demonstrated an increased interaction between Omi/HtrA2 and vimentin in human primary neurons upon stress stimuli. Using differentiated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, we showed that Omi/HtrA2 under several different stress conditions induces cleavage of vimentin in wild-type as well as SH-SY5Y cells transfected with amyloid precursor protein with the Alzheimer disease-associated Swedish mutation. After stress treatment, inhibition of Omi/HtrA2 protease activity by the Omi/HtrA2 specific inhibitor, Ucf-101, reduced the cleavage of vimentin in wild-type cells. Following altered vimentin filaments integrity by stress stimuli, mitochondria was redistributed in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells and human primary neurons. In summary, the findings outlined in this paper suggest a role of Omi/HtrA2 in modulation of vimentin filamentous structure in neurons. Our results provide important findings for understanding the biological role of Omi/HtrA2 activity during stress conditions, and give knowledge of interplay between Omi/HtrA2 and vimentin which might affect mitochondrial distribution in neurons.

  15. Recess integration of micro-cleaved laser diode platelets with dielectric waveguides on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, Clifton G., Jr.; Rumpler, Joseph J.; Barkley, Edward R.; Perkins, James M.; Famenini, Shaya

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing research directed at integrating 1.55 μm III-V ridge waveguide gain elements (i.e. diode lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers) co-axially aligned with, and coupled to, silicon oxy-nitride waveguides on silicon substrates is presented. The integration techniques used are highly modular and consistent with fabricating waveguides on Si-CMOS wafers and doing the integration of the III-V gain elements after all standard front- and back-end Si processing has been completed. A novel micro-cleaving technique is used to produce active ridge waveguide platelets on the order of 6 µm thick and 100 μm wide, with precisely controlled lengths, in the current work 300 +/- 1 μm, and cleaved end facets. Typical ridge guide micro-cleaved platelet lasers have thresholds under 30 mA. Micro-cleaved platelets are bonded within dielectric recesses etched through the oxy-nitride (SiO xN y) waveguides on a wafer so the ridge and SiO xN y waveguides are co-axially aligned. Transmission measurements indicate coupling losses are as low as 5 db with air filling the gaps between the waveguide ends, and measurements made through filled gaps indicate that the coupling losses can be reduced to below 1.5 dB with a high index (n = 2.2) dielectric fill. Simulations indicate that with further optimization of the mode profile in the III-V waveguide the loss can be reduced to below 1 dB. The paper concludes with a discussion of device design and optimization for co-axial recess integration, and with a comparison of co-axial coupling with the hybrid evanescent vertical coupling III-V/Si integration approach recently introduced by researchers at UCSB and Intel.