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Sample records for factor enhances basal

  1. TEMPORAL VARIABILITY IN BASAL ISOPRENE EMISSION FACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variability in basal isoprene emission factor (micrograms C /g hr or nmol/ m2 sec, leaf temperature at 30 degrees C and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) at 1000 micromol/ m2 sec) was studied during the 1998 growing season at Duke Forest in the North Carolina Pie...

  2. TEMPORAL VARIABILITY IN BASAL ISOPRENE EMISSION FACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variability in basal isoprene emission factor (micrograms C /g hr or nmol/ m2 sec, leaf temperature at 30 degrees C and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) at 1000 micromol/ m2 sec) was studied during the 1998 growing season at Duke Forest in the North Carolina Pie...

  3. Radiation enhanced basal plane dislocation glide in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Eugene B.; Vergeles, Pavel S.; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    A movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth under low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) was studied by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocation segments were susceptible to irradiation and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) in the structure with strong pinning. A dislocation velocity under LEEBI with a beam current lower than 1 nA was estimated as about 10 nm/s. The results assuming the REDG for prismatic plane dislocations were presented.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of chicken cytochrome P450 2D49 basal expression by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Tang, Shulin; Dong, Linfeng; Chen, Qingmei; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Deng, Yiqun

    2014-03-01

    Chicken cytochrome P450 (CYP)2D49 is structurally and functionally related to human CYP2D6, which is an important drug-metabolizing enzyme. To date, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of this cytochrome. Through deletion analysis of the CYP2D49 promoter, we identified two putative degenerate CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-binding sites and an imperfect DR1 element (the site contains direct repeats of the hexamer AGGTCA separated by a one-nucleotide spacer motif) within regions -296/-274, -274/-226, and -226/-183, respectively, which may play critical roles in the transcriptional activation of the CYP2D49 gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that the putative C/EBP boxes and DR1 element in the CYP2D49 promoter are functional motifs that bind to C/EBPα and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α), respectively. Furthermore, we studied the functional importance and relationships of these transcription factor-binding sites by examining the effects of mutation and deletion of these regions on promoter activity. These studies revealed that the two C/EBP-binding sites show a compensatory relationship and work cooperatively with the DR1 element to modulate the transcription of CYP2D49. The results of overexpressing C/EBPα and HNF4α in culture cells further confirmed that both C/EBPα and HNF4α contribute significantly to sustaining a high level of CYP2D49 transcription. In conclusion, the data indicate that the constitutive hepatic expression of CYP2D49 is governed by both C/EBPα and HNF4α. Further studies will be required to fully characterize the molecular mechanisms that modulate CYP2D49 expression. © 2014 FEBS.

  5. Is cutaneous leishmaniasis a risk factor for basal cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Chisti, M; Almasri, R; Hamadah, I

    2016-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common epithelial neoplasm of skin. Risk factors for the development of BCC include intermittent intense sun exposure, radiation therapy, family history of BCC, immune suppression and fair complexion, especially red hair. It can originate in scars like small pox, vaccination, chicken pox or surgical scars. We present a case of basal cell carcinoma arising in a leishmania scar on the nose, sixty years after the primary lesion. Although rare, BCC's have arisen in leishmania scars. Thus the possibility of basal cell carcinoma should be considered while dealing with such patients. Even though a causal relationship, if any, cannot be ascertained at present.

  6. Age-associated changes in basal c-fos transcription factor binding activity in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tsou, H; Azhar, G; Lu, X G; Kovacs, S; Peacocke, M; Wei, J Y

    1996-12-15

    The early response proto-oncogene c-fos is expressed at very low levels in the mammalian heart at baseline. To further investigate the mechanism of altered c-fos expression with age, we studied in the basal state the binding of five transcription proteins to their cognate sites in the c-fos promoter/enhancer region, in adult and old F344 rats. Our results show a reduced binding of E2F and AP1 proteins to the c-fos promoter in aging hearts. The major calcium/cyclic AMP response element (CRE) and SP1 binding was unchanged. The only increase seen with age was in the serum response element (SRE) binding proteins. SRE is the point of convergence of different signal transduction pathways (via MAP kinases and the Rho family of GTPases) at the c-fos promoter. Increased SRE binding may reflect a compensation for a decreased binding of other transcription proteins to the c-fos promoter, alteration in the phosphorylation status of SRF, or a change in the ternary complex factors Elk 1 or SAP 1. Other possibilities include defects in the signal transduction pathways with aging, which combine to produce an overall negative balance in the function of the c-fos promoter despite the increased SRE binding activity. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have shown decreased c-fos expression with age. This may be due partly to alterations in the basal levels of transcription factor binding.

  7. Orexin A-induced enhancement of attentional processing in rats: role of basal forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zajo, Kristin N.; Fadel, Jim R.; Burk, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Orexins are neuropeptides released in multiple brain regions from neurons that originate within the lateral hypothalamus and contiguous perfornical area. The basal forebrain, a structure implicated in attentional processing, receives orexinergic inputs. Our previous work demonstrated that administration of an orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB-334867, systemically or via infusion directly into the basal forebrain, can disrupt performance in a task that places explicit demands on attentional processing. Objectives Given that the orexin-1 receptor binds orexin A with high affinity, we tested whether orexin A could enhance attention in rats. Methods Attentional performance was assessed using a task that required discrimination of variable duration visual signals from trials when no signal was presented. We also tested whether infusions of orexin A into the lateral ventricle could attenuate deficits following lesions of medial prefrontal cortical cholinergic projections that arise from the basal forebrain. Results Infusions of orexin A into the basal forebrain attenuated distracter-induced decreases in attentional performance. Orexin A attenuated deficits in lesioned animals when a visual distracter was presented. Conclusion The present results support the view that orexin A can enhance attentional performance via actions in the basal forebrain and may be beneficial for some conditions characterized by attentional dysfunction due to disruption of cortical cholinergic inputs. PMID:26534765

  8. Epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma in the United Kingdom: incidence, lifestyle factors, and comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Reinau, D; Surber, C; Jick, S S; Meier, C R

    2014-07-08

    Little is known about the epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, we calculated annual incidence rates. In a case-control analysis, we examined lifestyle factors and comorbidities. Incidence rose significantly between 2000 and 2011. Basal cell carcinoma risk was increased in alcohol drinkers (slightly) and immunocompromised patients, but reduced in smokers and individuals with abnormal weight. Basal cell carcinoma places a growing public health burden. Lifestyle factors do not play a major role in pathogenesis, but immunosuppression is important.

  9. Heat shock factor-4 (HSF-4a) represses basal transcription through interaction with TFIIF.

    PubMed

    Frejtag, W; Zhang, Y; Dai, R; Anderson, M G; Mivechi, N F

    2001-05-04

    The heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) regulate the expression of heat shock proteins (hsps), which are critical for normal cellular proliferation and differentiation. One of the HSFs, HSF-4, contains two alternative splice variants, one of which possesses transcriptional repressor properties in vivo. This repressor isoform inhibits basal transcription of hsps 27 and 90 in tissue culture cells. The molecular mechanisms of HSF-4a isoform-mediated transcriptional repression is unknown. Here, we present evidence that HSF-4a inhibits basal transcription in vivo when it is artificially targeted to basal promoters via the DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor, GAL4. By using a highly purified, reconstituted in vitro transcription system, we show that HSF-4a represses basal transcription at an early step during preinitiation complex assembly, as pre-assembled preinitiation complexes are refractory to the inhibitory effect on transcription. This repression occurs by the HSF-4a isoform, but not by the HSF-4b isoform, which we show is capable of activating transcription from a heat shock element-driven promoter in vitro. The repression of basal transcription by HSF-4a occurs through interaction with the basal transcription factor TFIIF. TFIIF interacts with a segment of HSF-4a that is required for the trimerization of HSF-4a, and deletion of this segment no longer inhibits basal transcription. These studies suggest that HSF-4a inhibits basal transcription both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, this is the first report identifying an interaction between a transcriptional repressor with the basal transcription factor TFIIF.

  10. Ataxia-Telangiectasia, Mutated (ATM)/Nuclear Factor κ light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling controls basal and DNA damage-induced transglutaminase 2 expression.

    PubMed

    Ai, Lingbao; Skehan, Ryan R; Saydi, John; Lin, Tong; Brown, Kevin D

    2012-05-25

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme that cross-links proteins and its overexpression, linked to a drug resistant phenotype, is commonly observed in cancer cells. Further, up-regulation of TG2 expression occurs during response to various forms of cell stress; however, the molecular mechanisms that drive inducible expression of the TG2 gene (TGM2) require elucidation. Here we show that genotoxic stress induces TG2 expression through the Ataxia-Telangiectasia, Mutated (ATM)/Nuclear Factor κ light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling pathway. We further document that NFκB is both necessary and sufficient to drive constitutive TG2 expression in cultured cell lines. Additionally, shRNA-mediated knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of the ATM kinase results in reduced constitutive TG2 expression and NFκB transcriptional activity. We document that the NFκB subunit p65 (RelA) interacts with two independent consensus NFκB binding sites within the TGM2 promoter, that mutation of either site or pharmacological inhibition of NFκB reduces TGM2 promoter activity, and genotoxic stress drives heightened association of p65 with the TGM2 promoter. Finally, we observed that knockdown of either p65 or ATM in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells expressing recombinant TG2 partially reduces resistance to doxorubicin, indicating that the drug resistance linked to overexpression of TG2 functions, in part, through p65 and ATM. This work establishes a novel ATM-dependent signaling loop where TG2 and NFκB activate each other resulting in sustained activation of NFκB and acquisition of a drug-resistant phenotype.

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor activity is necessary for mouse basal cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Brechbuhl, Heather M.; Li, Bilan; Smith, Russell W.

    2014-01-01

    ERB family receptors (EGFR, ERB-B2, ERB-B3, and ERB-B4) regulate epithelial cell function in many tissue types. In the human airway epithelium, changes in ERB receptor expression are associated with epithelial repair defects. However, the specific role(s) played by ERB receptors in repair have not been determined. We aimed to determine whether ERB receptors regulate proliferation of the tracheobronchial progenitor, the basal cell. Receptor tyrosine kinase arrays were used to evaluate ERB activity in normal and naphthalene (NA)-injured mouse trachea and in air-liquid interface cultures. Roles for epidermal growth factor (EGF), EGFR, and ERB-B2 in basal cell proliferation were evaluated in vitro. NA injury and transgenic expression of an EGFR-dominant negative (DN) receptor were used to evaluate roles for EGFR signaling in vivo. EGFR and ERB-B2 were active in normal and NA-injured trachea and were the only active ERB receptors detected in proliferating basal cells in vitro. EGF was necessary for basal cell proliferation in vitro. The EGFR inhibitor, AG1478, decreased proliferation by 99, and the Erb-B2 inhibitor, AG825, decreased proliferation by ∼66%. In vivo, EGFR-DN expression in basal cells significantly decreased basal cell proliferation after NA injury. EGF and EGFR are necessary for basal cell proliferation. The EGFR/EGFR homo- and the EGFR/ERB-B2 heterodimer account for ∼34 and 66%, respectively, of basal cell proliferation in vitro. Active EGFR is necessary for basal cell proliferation after NA injury. We conclude that EGFR activation is necessary for mouse basal cell proliferation and normal epithelial repair. PMID:25217659

  12. The co-factor of LIM domains (CLIM/LDB/NLI) maintains basal mammary epithelial stem cells and promotes breast tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Salmans, Michael L; Yu, Zhengquan; Watanabe, Kazuhide; Cam, Eric; Sun, Peng; Smyth, Padhraic; Dai, Xing; Andersen, Bogi

    2014-07-01

    Mammary gland branching morphogenesis and ductal homeostasis relies on mammary stem cell function for the maintenance of basal and luminal cell compartments. The mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the basal cell compartment are currently unknown. We explored these mechanisms in the basal cell compartment and identified the Co-factor of LIM domains (CLIM/LDB/NLI) as a transcriptional regulator that maintains these cells. Clims act within the basal cell compartment to promote branching morphogenesis by maintaining the number and proliferative potential of basal mammary epithelial stem cells. Clim2, in a complex with LMO4, supports mammary stem cells by directly targeting the Fgfr2 promoter in basal cells to increase its expression. Strikingly, Clims also coordinate basal-specific transcriptional programs to preserve luminal cell identity. These basal-derived cues inhibit epidermis-like differentiation of the luminal cell compartment and enhance the expression of luminal cell-specific oncogenes ErbB2 and ErbB3. Consistently, basal-expressed Clims promote the initiation and progression of breast cancer in the MMTV-PyMT tumor model, and the Clim-regulated branching morphogenesis gene network is a prognostic indicator of poor breast cancer outcome in humans.

  13. Cationic Phosphorus Dendrimer Enhances Photodynamic Activity of Rose Bengal against Basal Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Dabrzalska, Monika; Janaszewska, Anna; Zablocka, Maria; Mignani, Serge; Majoral, Jean Pierre; Klajnert-Maculewicz, Barbara

    2017-04-06

    In the last couple of decades, photodynamic therapy emerged as a useful tool in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma. However, it still meets limitations due to unfavorable properties of photosensitizers such as poor solubility or lack of selectivity. Dendrimers, polymers widely studied in biomedical field, may play a role as photosensitizer carriers and improve the efficacy of photodynamic treatment. Here, we describe the evaluation of an electrostatic complex of cationic phosphorus dendrimer and rose bengal in such aspects as singlet oxygen production, cellular uptake, and phototoxicity against three basal cell carcinoma cell lines. Rose bengal-cationic dendrimer complex in molar ratio 5:1 was compared to free rose bengal. Obtained results showed that the singlet oxygen production in aqueous medium was significantly higher for the complex than for free rose bengal. The cellular uptake of the complex was 2-7-fold higher compared to a free photosensitizer. Importantly, rose bengal, rose bengal-dendrimer complex, and dendrimer itself showed no dark toxicity against all three cell lines. Moreover, we observed that phototoxicity of the complex was remarkably enhanced presumably due to high cellular uptake. On the basis of the obtained results, we conclude that rose bengal-cationic dendrimer complex has a potential in photodynamic treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  14. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase p110δ promotes lumen formation through enhancement of apico-basal polarity and basal membrane organization

    PubMed Central

    Sar, Sokhavuth; Komaiha, Ola Hamze; Moyano, Romina; Rayal, Amel; Samuel, Didier; Shewan, Annette; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Mostov, Keith; Gassama-Diagne, Ama

    2016-01-01

    Signaling triggered by adhesion to the extracellular matrix plays a key role in the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and formation of lumens in glandular tissues. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in particular is known to influence the polarization process during epithelial cell morphogenesis. Here, using Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells grown in 3D culture, we show that the p110δ isoform of phosphoinositide 3-kinase colocalizes with focal adhesion proteins at the basal surface of polarized cells. Pharmacological, siRNA- or kinase-dead mediated inhibition of p110δ impair the early stages of lumen formation, resulting in inverted polarized cysts, with no laminin or type IV collagen assembly at cell/extracellular matrix contacts. p110δ also regulates the organization of focal adhesions and membrane localization of dystroglycan. Thus, we uncover a previously unrecognized role for p110δ in epithelial cells in the orientation of the apico-basal axis and lumen formation. PMID:25583025

  15. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Is a Promising Target for Enhancing Chemosensitivity of Basal-Like Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alan Prem; Loo, Ser Yue; Shin, Sung Won; Tan, Tuan Zea; Eng, Chon Boon; Singh, Rajeev; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Ong, Chee Wee; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Goh, Boon Cher; Park, Joo In; Thiery, Jean Paul; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Although earlier reports highlighted a tumor suppressor role for manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), recent evidence indicates increased expression in a variety of human cancers including aggressive breast carcinoma. In the present article, we hypothesized that MnSOD expression is significantly amplified in the aggressive breast carcinoma basal subtype, and targeting MnSOD could be an attractive strategy for enhancing chemosensitivity of this highly aggressive breast cancer subtype. Results: Using MDA-MB-231 and BT549 as a model of basal breast cancer cell lines, we show that knockdown of MnSOD decreased the colony-forming ability and sensitized the cells to drug-induced cell death, while drug resistance was associated with increased MnSOD expression. In an attempt to develop a clinically relevant approach to down-regulate MnSOD expression in patients with basal breast carcinoma, we employed activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) to repress MnSOD expression; PPARγ activation significantly reduced MnSOD expression, increased chemosensitivity, and inhibited tumor growth. Moreover, as a proof of concept for the clinical use of PPARγ agonists to decrease MnSOD expression, biopsies derived from breast cancer patients who had received synthetic PPARγ ligands as anti-diabetic therapy had significantly reduced MnSOD expression. Finally, we provide evidence to implicate peroxynitrite as the mechanism involved in the increased sensitivity to chemotherapy induced by MnSOD repression. Innovation and Conclusion: These data provide evidence to link increased MnSOD expression with the aggressive basal breast cancer, and underscore the judicious use of PPARγ ligands for specifically down-regulating MnSOD to increase the chemosensitivity of this subtype of breast carcinoma. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2326–2346. PMID:23964924

  16. Genetic removal of basal nitric oxide enhances contractile activity in isolated murine collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J

    2013-04-15

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating lymphatic contractile function and, consequently, lymph flow has been the subject of intense study. Despite this, the precise effects of NO on lymphatic contractile activity remain unclear. Recent hypotheses posit that basal levels of endogenous NO increase lymphatic contraction strength as a consequence of lowering frequency (i.e. positive lusitropy), whereas higher agonist-evoked concentrations of NO exert purely inhibitory effects on contractile function. We tested both hypotheses directly by isolating and cannulating collecting lymphatic vessels from genetically modified mice for ex vivo study. The effects of basal NO and agonist-evoked NO were evaluated, respectively, by exposing wild-type (WT), endothelial NO synthase (eNOS)(-/-) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS)(-/-) lymphatic vessels to controlled pressure steps followed by ACh doses. To compare with pharmacological inhibition of eNOS, we repeated both tests in the presence of l-NAME. Surprisingly, genetic removal of basal NO enhanced contraction amplitude significantly without increasing contraction frequency. Higher levels of NO production stimulated by ACh evoked dilation, decreased tone, slowed contraction frequency and reduced fractional pump flow. We conclude that basal NO specifically depresses contraction amplitude, and that greater NO production then inhibits all other aspects of contractile function. Further, this work demonstrates definitively that mouse collecting lymphatic vessels exhibit autonomous, large-amplitude contractions that respond to pressure similarly to collecting lymphatics of other mammalian species. At least in the peripheral lymphatic vasculature, NO production depresses contractile function, which influences lymph flow needed for fluid regulation, humoral immunity and cancer metastasis.

  17. [Histologic risk factors of basal cell carcinoma of the face, about 184 cases].

    PubMed

    Wavreille, O; Martin De Lassalle, E; Wavreille, G; Mortier, L; Martinot Duquennoy, V

    2012-12-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer in humans. The aim of our study was to determine the histologic risk factors involved in recurrence of basal cell carcinomas of the face. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with primary basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the face treated between March 2003 and December 2005. We analyzed the size of lateral and deep margins of tumor, histologic subtype, perineural invasion, and ulcerations. Clinical follow-up was observed until June 2011. We note that 184 cases of BCC were included. Eleven recurrences occurred during the follow-up, i.e. 6%. The population was divided into two groups according to histologic safety margins (1 mm for all basal cell carcinomas, 0.8 mm for nodular and 2 mm for aggressive-growth (AG-BCC) subtypes). There was a significant difference between groups in regards to cancer recurrence. Tumor size above 2 cm and presence of perineural invasion increased the risk of recurrence. Low histological safety margins appear to be critical on tumor recurrence. Depending on the tumor characteristics, and the patient, we advocate a re-excision in cases of histological safety margins inferior to 0.8 mm for the nodular subtypes and 2 mm for aggressive subtypes. Tumor size, and perineural invasion should be taken into consideration so as to make a well-informed decision between re-excision and a watching strategy in critical cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Nerve growth factor corrects developmental impairments of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in the trisomy 16 mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, P; Coyle, J T

    1991-01-01

    The trisomy 16 (Ts16) mouse, which shares genetic and phenotypic homologies with Down syndrome, exhibits impaired development of the basal forebrain cholinergic system. Basal forebrains obtained from Ts16 and euploid littermate fetuses at 15 days of gestation were dissociated and cultured in completely defined medium, with cholinergic neurons identified by choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity. The Ts16 cultures exhibited fewer ChAT-immunoreactive neurons, which were smaller and emitted shorter, smoother, and more simplified neurites than those from euploid littermates. Whereas the addition of beta-nerve growth factor (100 ng/ml) augmented the specific activity of ChAT and neuritic extension for both Ts16 and euploid cholinergic neurons, only Ts16 cultures exhibited an increase in the number and size of ChAT-immunoreactive neurons. Furthermore, Ts16 ChAT-immunoreactive neurites formed varicosities only in the presence of beta-nerve growth factor. Images PMID:2000385

  19. Convection-enhanced delivery improves MRI visualization of basal ganglia for stereotactic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bond, Aaron E; Dallapiazza, Robert F; Lopes, M Beatriz; Elias, W Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Stereotactic deep brain stimulation surgery is most commonly performed while patients are awake. This allows for intraoperative clinical assessment and electrophysiological target verification, thereby promoting favorable outcomes with few side effects. Intraoperative CT and MRI have challenged this concept of clinical treatment validation. Image-guided surgery is capable of delivering electrodes precisely to a planned, stereotactic target; however, these methods can be limited by low anatomical resolution even with sophisticated MRI modalities. The authors are developing a novel method using convection-enhanced delivery to safely manipulate the extracellular space surrounding common anatomical targets for surgery. By altering the extracellular content of deep subcortical structures and their associated white matter tracts, the MRI visualization of the basal ganglia can be improved to better define the anatomy. This technique could greatly improve the accuracy and success of stereotactic surgery, potentially eliminating the reliance on awake surgery. METHODS Observations were made in the clinical setting where vasogenic and cytotoxic edema improved the MRI visualization of the basal ganglia. These findings were replicated in the experimental setting using an FDA-approved intracerebral catheter that was stereotactically inserted into the thalamus or basal ganglia of 7 swine. Five swine were infused with normal saline, and 2 were infused with autologous CSF. Flow rates varied between 1 μl/min to 6 μl/min to achieve convective distributions. Concurrent MRI was performed at 15-minute intervals to monitor the volume of infusion and observe the imaging changes of the deep subcortical structures. The animals were then clinically observed, and necropsy was performed within 48 hours, 1 week, or 1 month for histological analysis. RESULTS In all animals, the white matter tracts became hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging as compared with basal ganglia nuclei

  20. Identifying enhanced cortico-basal ganglia loops associated with prolonged dance training.

    PubMed

    Li, Gujing; He, Hui; Huang, Mengting; Zhang, Xingxing; Lu, Jing; Lai, Yongxiu; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-06-02

    Studies have revealed that prolonged, specialized training combined with higher cognitive conditioning induces enhanced brain alternation. In particular, dancers with long-term dance experience exhibit superior motor control and integration with their sensorimotor networks. However, little is known about the functional connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activities in the sensorimotor network of dancers. Our study examined the functional connectivity density (FCD) of dancers with a mean period of over 10 years of dance training in contrast with a matched non-dancer group without formal dance training using resting-state fMRI scans. FCD was mapped and analyzed, and the functional connectivity (FC) analyses were then performed based on the difference of FCD. Compared to the non-dancers, the dancers exhibited significantly increased FCD in the precentral gyri, postcentral gyri and bilateral putamen. Furthermore, the results of the FC analysis revealed enhanced connections between the middle cingulate cortex and the bilateral putamen and between the precentral and the postcentral gyri. All findings indicated an enhanced functional integration in the cortico-basal ganglia loops that govern motor control and integration in dancers. These findings might reflect improved sensorimotor function for the dancers consequent to long-term dance training.

  1. Identifying enhanced cortico-basal ganglia loops associated with prolonged dance training

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gujing; He, Hui; Huang, Mengting; Zhang, Xingxing; Lu, Jing; Lai, Yongxiu; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Studies have revealed that prolonged, specialized training combined with higher cognitive conditioning induces enhanced brain alternation. In particular, dancers with long-term dance experience exhibit superior motor control and integration with their sensorimotor networks. However, little is known about the functional connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activities in the sensorimotor network of dancers. Our study examined the functional connectivity density (FCD) of dancers with a mean period of over 10 years of dance training in contrast with a matched non-dancer group without formal dance training using resting-state fMRI scans. FCD was mapped and analyzed, and the functional connectivity (FC) analyses were then performed based on the difference of FCD. Compared to the non-dancers, the dancers exhibited significantly increased FCD in the precentral gyri, postcentral gyri and bilateral putamen. Furthermore, the results of the FC analysis revealed enhanced connections between the middle cingulate cortex and the bilateral putamen and between the precentral and the postcentral gyri. All findings indicated an enhanced functional integration in the cortico-basal ganglia loops that govern motor control and integration in dancers. These findings might reflect improved sensorimotor function for the dancers consequent to long-term dance training. PMID:26035693

  2. Conjugation of extracellular matrix proteins to basal lamina analogs enhances keratinocyte attachment.

    PubMed

    Bush, Katie A; Downing, Brett R; Walsh, Sarah E; Pins, George D

    2007-02-01

    The dermal-epidermal junction of skin contains extracellular matrix proteins that are involved in initiating and controlling keratinocyte signaling events such as attachment, proliferation, and terminal differentiation. To characterize the relationship between extracellular matrix proteins and keratinocyte attachment, a biomimetic design approach was used to precisely tailor the surface of basal lamina analogs with biochemistries that emulate the native biochemical composition found at the dermal-epidermal junction. A high-throughput screening device was developed by our laboratory that allows for the simultaneous investigation of the conjugation of individual extracellular matrix proteins (e.g. collagen type I, collagen type IV, laminin, or fibronectin) as well as their effect on keratinocyte attachment, on the surface of an implantable collagen membrane. Fluorescence microscopy coupled with quantitative digital image analyses indicated that the extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to the collagen-GAG membranes in a dose-dependent manner. To determine the relationship between extracellular matrix protein signaling cues and keratinocyte attachment, cells were seeded on protein-conjugated collagen-GAG membranes and a tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay was used to quantify viable keratinocyte attachment. Our results indicate that keratinocyte attachment was significantly enhanced on the surfaces of collagen membranes that were conjugated with fibronectin and type IV collagen. These findings define a set of design parameters that will enhance keratinocyte binding efficiency on the surface of collagen membranes and ultimately improve the rate of epithelialization for dermal equivalents.

  3. Overexpression of CRABPI in suprabasal keratinocytes enhances the proliferation of epidermal basal keratinocytes in mouse skin topically treated with all-trans retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Han; Vivero, Marina; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether ectopic expression of CRABPI, a cellular retinoic acid binding protein, influenced the actions of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in transgenic (TG) mice. We targeted CRABPI to the basal vs. suprabasal layers of mouse epidermis by using the keratin 14 (K14) and keratin 10 (K10) promoters, respectively. Greater CRABPI protein levels were detected in the epidermis of adult transgenic(+) mice than in transgenic(-) mice for both transgenes. In adult mouse skin CRABPI overexpression in the basal or suprabasal keratinocytes did not cause morphological abnormalities, but did result in decreased CRABPII mRNA levels. Ectopically overexpressed CRABPI in suprabasal keratinocytes, but not in basal keratinocytes, enhanced the thickening of the epidermis induced by topical ATRA treatments (10 microM, 400 microl for 4 days) by 1.59+/-0.2-fold (p<0.05). ATRA treatment (10 microM) resulted in a 59.9+/-9.8% increase (p<0.05) in the BrdU labeling index in K10/FLAG-CRABPI TG(+) mice vs. TG(-) mice. Retinoid topical treatments reduced p27 and CYP26A1 mRNA levels in TG(+) and TG(-) mouse skin in K14 and K10/FLAG-CRABPI transgenic mice. As epidermal basal keratinocyte proliferation is stimulated by paracrine growth factors secreted by ATRA activated suprabasal keratinocytes, our results indicate that CRABPI overexpression in suprabasal keratinocytes enhances the physiological functions of ATRA.

  4. Overexpression of CRABPI in suprabasal keratinocytes enhances the proliferation of epidermal basal keratinocytes in mouse skin topically treated with all-trans retinoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.-H.; Vivero, Marina; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether ectopic expression of CRABPI, a cellular retinoic acid binding protein, influenced the actions of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in transgenic (TG) mice. We targeted CRABPI to the basal vs. suprabasal layers of mouse epidermis by using the keratin 14 (K14) and keratin 10 (K10) promoters, respectively. Greater CRABPI protein levels were detected in the epidermis of adult transgenic(+) mice than in transgenic(-) mice for both transgenes. In adult mouse skin CRABPI overexpression in the basal or suprabasal keratinocytes did not cause morphological abnormalities, but did result in decreased CRABPII mRNA levels. Ectopically overexpressed CRABPI in suprabasal keratinocytes, but not in basal keratinocytes, enhanced the thickening of the epidermis induced by topical ATRA treatments (10 {mu}M, 400 {mu}l for 4 days) by 1.59 {+-} 0.2-fold (p < 0.05). ATRA treatment (10 {mu}M) resulted in a 59.9 {+-} 9.8% increase (p < 0.05) in the BrdU labeling index in K10/FLAG-CRABPI TG(+) mice vs. TG(-) mice. Retinoid topical treatments reduced p27 and CYP26A1 mRNA levels in TG(+) and TG(-) mouse skin in K14 and K10/FLAG-CRABPI transgenic mice. As epidermal basal keratinocyte proliferation is stimulated by paracrine growth factors secreted by ATRA activated suprabasal keratinocytes, our results indicate that CRABPI overexpression in suprabasal keratinocytes enhances the physiological functions of ATRA.

  5. Neurotrophic Factors Rescue Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons and Improve Performance on a Spatial Learning Test

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Shang; Danandeh, Andalib; Baratta, Janie; Lin, Ching-Yi; Yu, Jen; Robertson, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether animals sustaining experimental damage to the basal forebrain cholinergic system would benefit from treatment with exogenous neurotrophic factors. Specifically, we set out to determine whether neurotrophic factors would rescue damaged cholinergic neurons and improve behavioral performance on a spatial learning and memory task. Adult rats received bilateral injections of either saline (controls) or 192 IgG-saporin to damage basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs). Two weeks later, animals received implants of an Alzet mini-pump connected to cannulae implanted bilaterally in the lateral ventricles. Animals received infusions of nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin 3 (NT3), a combination of NGF and NT3, or a saline control over a 4-week period. Compared to saline-treated controls, animals sustaining saporin-induced damage to BFCNs took significantly more trials to learn a delayed match to position task and also performed more poorly on subsequent tests, with increasing delays between test runs. In contrast, animals infused with neurotrophins after saporin treatment performed significantly better than animals receiving saline infusions; no differences were detected for performance scores among animals infused with NGF, NT3, or a combination of NGF and NT3. Studies of ChAT immunnocytochemical labeling of BFCNs revealed a reduction in the numbers of ChAT-positive neurons in septum, nucleus of diagonal band, and nucleus basalis in animals treated with saporin followed by saline infusions, whereas animals treated with infusions of NGF, NT3 or a combination of NGF and NT3 showed only modest reductions in ChAT-positive neurons. Together, these data support the notion that administration of neurotrophic factors can rescue basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and improve learning and memory performance in rats. PMID:24017996

  6. Neurotrophic factors rescue basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and improve performance on a spatial learning test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Shang; Danandeh, Andalib; Baratta, Janie; Lin, Ching-Yi; Yu, Jen; Robertson, Richard T

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated whether animals sustaining experimental damage to the basal forebrain cholinergic system would benefit from treatment with exogenous neurotrophic factors. Specifically, we set out to determine whether neurotrophic factors would rescue damaged cholinergic neurons and improve behavioral performance on a spatial learning and memory task. Adult rats received bilateral injections of either saline (controls) or 192 IgG-saporin to damage basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs). Two weeks later, animals received implants of an Alzet mini-pump connected to cannulae implanted bilaterally in the lateral ventricles. Animals received infusions of nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin 3 (NT3), a combination of NGF and NT3, or a saline control over a 4-week period. Compared to saline-treated controls, animals sustaining saporin-induced damage to BFCNs took significantly more trials to learn a delayed match to position task and also performed more poorly on subsequent tests, with increasing delays between test runs. In contrast, animals infused with neurotrophins after saporin treatment performed significantly better than animals receiving saline infusions; no differences were detected for performance scores among animals infused with NGF, NT3, or a combination of NGF and NT3. Studies of ChAT immunnocytochemical labeling of BFCNs revealed a reduction in the numbers of ChAT-positive neurons in septum, nucleus of diagonal band, and nucleus basalis in animals treated with saporin followed by saline infusions, whereas animals treated with infusions of NGF, NT3 or a combination of NGF and NT3 showed only modest reductions in ChAT-positive neurons. Together, these data support the notion that administration of neurotrophic factors can rescue basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and improve learning and memory performance in rats.

  7. Recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma with positive histopathological margins and related risk factors*

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Fernanda; Santamaría, Jesus Rodriguez; Garbers, Luiz Eduardo Fabricio de Melo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The best way to approach surgically removed basal cell carcinoma with positive histopathological margins is a controversial issue. Some authors believe that the more appropriate treatment is an immediate reoperation while others prefer a periodic follow up. The rates of recurrence are variable in literature, between 10% and 67%. OBJECTIVE To define the recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma with positive margins after surgery. Secondarily, identify morphological aspects that can suggest a more frequent tumoral recurrence. METHODS This was a retrospective and observational study made by analysis of medical records of 487 patients between January 2003 and December 2009 in Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná (HC-UFPR). From 402 basal cell carcinomas surgically treated, 41 fulfilled inclusion criteria and were evaluated for five years or more. Recurrence rate of these tumors was analyzed in all patients and clinical characteristics such as sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, ulceration, and histological type were evaluated in order to find if they were related to more common tumoral recurrence. RESULTS The rate of positive margins after surgery was 12.18%. There were five cases of tumoral recurrence in the observation group and three cases in the re-excision group. Tumor size, site, histological type, ulceration and type of positive margin did not differ statistically between groups. It was not possible to consider if these factors were important in recurrence rates. STUDY LIMITATIONS Ideally, a prospective study with a larger sample would be more accurate. CONCLUSION The treatment of choice in basal cell carcinoma with positive margins must be individualized to reduce recurrence rates. PMID:28225958

  8. Recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma with positive histopathological margins and related risk factors.

    PubMed

    Lara, Fernanda; Santamaría, Jesus Rodriguez; Garbers, Luiz Eduardo Fabricio de Melo

    2017-01-01

    The best way to approach surgically removed basal cell carcinoma with positive histopathological margins is a controversial issue. Some authors believe that the more appropriate treatment is an immediate reoperation while others prefer a periodic follow up. The rates of recurrence are variable in literature, between 10% and 67%. To define the recurrence rate of basal cell carcinoma with positive margins after surgery. Secondarily, identify morphological aspects that can suggest a more frequent tumoral recurrence. This was a retrospective and observational study made by analysis of medical records of 487 patients between January 2003 and December 2009 in Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná (HC-UFPR). From 402 basal cell carcinomas surgically treated, 41 fulfilled inclusion criteria and were evaluated for five years or more. Recurrence rate of these tumors was analyzed in all patients and clinical characteristics such as sex, age, tumor size, tumor site, ulceration, and histological type were evaluated in order to find if they were related to more common tumoral recurrence. The rate of positive margins after surgery was 12.18%. There were five cases of tumoral recurrence in the observation group and three cases in the re-excision group. Tumor size, site, histological type, ulceration and type of positive margin did not differ statistically between groups. It was not possible to consider if these factors were important in recurrence rates. Ideally, a prospective study with a larger sample would be more accurate. The treatment of choice in basal cell carcinoma with positive margins must be individualized to reduce recurrence rates.

  9. Basal nitric oxide production is enhanced by hydraulic pressure in cultured human trabecular cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, T.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Nitric oxide donors reduce intraocular pressure. Human trabecular cells in culture were examined for their nitric oxide production in response to hydraulic pressure.
METHODS—Human trabecular cells were cultured from trabeculum tissue fragments excised during trabeculectomy and exposed to hydraulic pressure change in a culture flask connected to a glass syringe. The pressure was exerted by automatic infusion of the piston of the syringe and monitored by a pressure gauge. The intracellular nitric oxide level was measured in real time with a nitric oxide binding fluorescent dye, diaminofluorescein-2.
RESULTS—Intracellular nitric oxide levels in cultured trabecular cells showed spontaneous fluctuation during 400 seconds of observation. Peak levels of intracellular nitric oxide were significantly higher at hydraulic pressure of 30, 40, and 50 mm Hg, compared with 0 and 25 mm Hg (p<0.0001, one way ANOVA, and p<0.05, Tukey-Kramer test). The fluctuation was completely abolished by the presence of N-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. The cultured trabecular cells were shown by immunohistochemistry to express brain nitric oxide synthase (bNOS).
CONCLUSION—Higher levels of hydraulic pressure enhanced basal production of nitric oxide in human trabecular cells. Nitric oxide would be a physiological mediator in the regulation of intraocular pressure.

 PMID:10837391

  10. Enhancing biological control of basal stem rot disease (Ganoderma boninense) in oil palm plantations.

    PubMed

    Susanto, A; Sudharto, P S; Purba, R Y

    2005-01-01

    Basal Stem Rot (BSR) disease caused by Ganoderma boninense is the most destructive disease in oil palm, especially in Indonesia and Malaysia. The available control measures for BSR disease such as cultural practices and mechanical and chemical treatment have not proved satisfactory due to the fact that Ganoderma has various resting stages such as melanised mycelium, basidiospores and pseudosclerotia. Alternative control measures to overcome the Ganoderma problem are focused on the use of biological control agents and planting resistant material. Present studies conducted at Indonesian Oil Palm Research Institute (IOPRI) are focused on enhancing the use of biological control agents for Ganoderma. These activities include screening biological agents from the oil palm rhizosphere in order to evaluate their effectiveness as biological agents in glasshouse and field trials, testing their antagonistic activities in large scale experiments and eradicating potential disease inoculum with biological agents. Several promising biological agents have been isolated, mainly Trichoderma harzianum, T. viride, Gliocladium viride, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bacillus sp. A glasshouse and field trial for Ganoderma control indicated that treatment with T. harzianum and G. viride was superior to Bacillus sp. A large scale trial showed that the disease incidence was lower in a field treated with biological agents than in untreated fields. In a short term programme, research activities at IOPRI are currently focusing on selecting fungi that can completely degrade plant material in order to eradicate inoculum. Digging holes around the palm bole and adding empty fruit bunches have been investigated as ways to stimulate biological agents.

  11. Structure of the complete elongation complex of RNA polymerase II with basal factors.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Haruhiko; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Shigematsu, Hideki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sekine, Shun-Ichi

    2017-09-01

    In the early stage of transcription, eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (Pol II) exchanges initiation factors with elongation factors to form an elongation complex for processive transcription. Here we report the structure of the Pol II elongation complex bound with the basal elongation factors Spt4/5, Elf1, and TFIIS. Spt4/5 (the Spt4/Spt5 complex) and Elf1 modify a wide area of the Pol II surface. Elf1 bridges the Pol II central cleft, completing a "DNA entry tunnel" for downstream DNA. Spt4 and the Spt5 NGN and KOW1 domains encircle the upstream DNA, constituting a "DNA exit tunnel." The Spt5 KOW4 and KOW5 domains augment the "RNA exit tunnel," directing the exiting nascent RNA. Thus, the elongation complex establishes a completely different transcription and regulation platform from that of the initiation complexes. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Why we can talk, debate, and change our minds: neural circuits, basal ganglia operations, and transcriptional factors.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Philip

    2014-12-01

    Ackermann et al. disregard attested knowledge concerning aphasia, Parkinson disease, cortical-to-striatal circuits, basal ganglia, laryngeal phonation, and other matters. Their dual-pathway model cannot account for "what is special about the human brain." Their human cortical-to-laryngeal neural circuit does not exist. Basal ganglia operations, enhanced by mutations on FOXP2, confer human motor-control, linguistic, and cognitive capabilities.

  13. LUC7L3/CROP inhibits replication of hepatitis B virus via suppressing enhancer II/basal core promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Ito, Masahiko; Sun, Suofeng; Chida, Takeshi; Nakashima, Kenji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    The core promoter of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome is a critical region for transcriptional initiation of 3.5 kb, pregenome and precore RNAs and for the viral replication. Although a number of host-cell factors that potentially regulate the viral promoter activities have been identified, the molecular mechanisms of the viral gene expression, in particular, regulatory mechanisms of the transcriptional repression remain elusive. In this study, we identified LUC7 like 3 pre-mRNA splicing factor (LUC7L3, also known as hLuc7A or CROP) as a novel interacting partner of HBV enhancer II and basal core promoter (ENII/BCP), key elements within the core promoter, through the proteomic screening and found that LUC7L3 functions as a negative regulator of ENII/BCP. Gene silencing of LUC7L3 significantly increased expression of the viral genes and antigens as well as the activities of ENII/BCP and core promoter. In contrast, overexpression of LUC7L3 inhibited their activities and HBV replication. In addition, LUC7L3 possibly contributes to promotion of the splicing of 3.5 kb RNA, which may also be involved in negative regulation of the pregenome RNA level. This is the first to demonstrate the involvement of LUC7L3 in regulation of gene transcription and in viral replication. PMID:27857158

  14. Cloning the promoter for transforming growth factor-beta type III receptor. Basal and conditional expression in fetal rat osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, C.; Chen, Y.; McCarthy, T. L.; Centrella, M.

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta binds to three high affinity cell surface molecules that directly or indirectly regulate its biological effects. The type III receptor (TRIII) is a proteoglycan that lacks significant intracellular signaling or enzymatic motifs but may facilitate transforming growth factor-beta binding to other receptors, stabilize multimeric receptor complexes, or segregate growth factor from activating receptors. Because various agents or events that regulate osteoblast function rapidly modulate TRIII expression, we cloned the 5' region of the rat TRIII gene to assess possible control elements. DNA fragments from this region directed high reporter gene expression in osteoblasts. Sequencing showed no consensus TATA or CCAAT boxes, whereas several nuclear factors binding sequences within the 3' region of the promoter co-mapped with multiple transcription initiation sites, DNase I footprints, gel mobility shift analysis, or loss of activity by deletion or mutation. An upstream enhancer was evident 5' proximal to nucleotide -979, and a silencer region occurred between nucleotides -2014 and -2194. Glucocorticoid sensitivity mapped between nucleotides -687 and -253, whereas bone morphogenetic protein 2 sensitivity co-mapped within the silencer region. Thus, the TRIII promoter contains cooperative basal elements and dispersed growth factor- and hormone-sensitive regulatory regions that can control TRIII expression by osteoblasts.

  15. Cloning the promoter for transforming growth factor-beta type III receptor. Basal and conditional expression in fetal rat osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, C.; Chen, Y.; McCarthy, T. L.; Centrella, M.

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta binds to three high affinity cell surface molecules that directly or indirectly regulate its biological effects. The type III receptor (TRIII) is a proteoglycan that lacks significant intracellular signaling or enzymatic motifs but may facilitate transforming growth factor-beta binding to other receptors, stabilize multimeric receptor complexes, or segregate growth factor from activating receptors. Because various agents or events that regulate osteoblast function rapidly modulate TRIII expression, we cloned the 5' region of the rat TRIII gene to assess possible control elements. DNA fragments from this region directed high reporter gene expression in osteoblasts. Sequencing showed no consensus TATA or CCAAT boxes, whereas several nuclear factors binding sequences within the 3' region of the promoter co-mapped with multiple transcription initiation sites, DNase I footprints, gel mobility shift analysis, or loss of activity by deletion or mutation. An upstream enhancer was evident 5' proximal to nucleotide -979, and a silencer region occurred between nucleotides -2014 and -2194. Glucocorticoid sensitivity mapped between nucleotides -687 and -253, whereas bone morphogenetic protein 2 sensitivity co-mapped within the silencer region. Thus, the TRIII promoter contains cooperative basal elements and dispersed growth factor- and hormone-sensitive regulatory regions that can control TRIII expression by osteoblasts.

  16. Exploring the roles of basal transcription factor 3 in eukaryotic growth and development.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Muhammad; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Mengyun; Tu, Jumin

    2015-01-01

    Basal transcription factor 3 (BTF3) has been reported to play a significant part in the transcriptional regulation linking with eukaryotes growth and development. Alteration in the BTF3 gene expression patterns or variation in their activities adds to the explanation of different signaling pathways and regulatory networks. Moreover, BTF3s often respond to numerous stresses, and subsequently they are involved in regulation of various mechanisms. BTF3 proteins also function through protein-protein contact, which can assist us to identify the multifaceted processes of signaling and transcriptional regulation controlled by BTF3 proteins. In this review, we discuss current advances made in starting to explore the roles of BTF3 transcription factors in eukaryotes especially in plant growth and development.

  17. Hypocretin/orexin antagonism enhances sleep-related adenosine and GABA neurotransmission in rat basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-DeRose, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Michael D; Nguyen, Alexander T; Warrier, Deepti R; Gulati, Srishti; Mathew, Thomas K; Neylan, Thomas C; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    Hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neurons provide excitatory input to wake-promoting brain regions including the basal forebrain (BF). The dual HCRT receptor antagonist almorexant (ALM) decreases waking and increases sleep. We hypothesized that HCRT antagonists induce sleep, in part, through disfacilitation of BF neurons; consequently, ALM should have reduced efficacy in BF-lesioned (BFx) animals. To test this hypothesis, rats were given bilateral IgG-192-saporin injections, which predominantly targets cholinergic BF neurons. BFx and intact rats were then given oral ALM, the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem (ZOL) or vehicle (VEH) at lights-out. ALM was less effective than ZOL at inducing sleep in BFx rats compared to controls. BF adenosine (ADO), γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA), and glutamate levels were then determined via microdialysis from intact, freely behaving rats following oral ALM, ZOL or VEH. ALM increased BF ADO and GABA levels during waking and mixed vigilance states, and preserved sleep-associated increases in GABA under low and high sleep pressure conditions. ALM infusion into the BF also enhanced cortical ADO release, demonstrating that HCRT input is critical for ADO signaling in the BF. In contrast, oral ZOL and BF-infused ZOL had no effect on ADO levels in either BF or cortex. ALM increased BF ADO (an endogenous sleep-promoting substance) and GABA (which is increased during normal sleep), and required an intact BF for maximal efficacy, whereas ZOL blocked sleep-associated BF GABA release, and required no functional contribution from the BF to induce sleep. ALM thus induces sleep by facilitating the neural mechanisms underlying the normal transition to sleep.

  18. Mechanisms underlying the basal forebrain enhancement of top-down and bottom-up attention.

    PubMed

    Avery, Michael C; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2014-03-01

    Both attentional signals from frontal cortex and neuromodulatory signals from basal forebrain (BF) have been shown to influence information processing in the primary visual cortex (V1). These two systems exert complementary effects on their targets, including increasing firing rates and decreasing interneuronal correlations. Interestingly, experimental research suggests that the cholinergic system is important for increasing V1's sensitivity to both sensory and attentional information. To see how the BF and top-down attention act together to modulate sensory input, we developed a spiking neural network model of V1 and thalamus that incorporated cholinergic neuromodulation and top-down attention. In our model, activation of the BF had a broad effect that decreases the efficacy of top-down projections and increased the reliance of bottom-up sensory input. In contrast, we demonstrated how local release of acetylcholine in the visual cortex, which was triggered through top-down gluatmatergic projections, could enhance top-down attention with high spatial specificity. Our model matched experimental data showing that the BF and top-down attention decrease interneuronal correlations and increase between-trial reliability. We found that decreases in correlations were primarily between excitatory-inhibitory pairs rather than excitatory-excitatory pairs and suggest that excitatory-inhibitory decorrelation is necessary for maintaining low levels of excitatory-excitatory correlations. Increased inhibitory drive via release of acetylcholine in V1 may then act as a buffer, absorbing increases in excitatory-excitatory correlations that occur with attention and BF stimulation. These findings will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underyling the BF's interactions with attention signals and influences on correlations.

  19. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    PubMed

    Vanti, Manuela; Gallastegui, Edurne; Respaldiza, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Gil, Alfonso; Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Jordan, Albert; Chávez, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR), which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  20. Basal Splicing Factors Regulate the Stability of Mature mRNAs in Trypanosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin Kumar; Carmi, Shai; Ben-Asher, Hiba Waldman; Tkacz, Itai Dov; Naboishchikov, Ilana; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression in trypanosomes is mainly regulated post-transcriptionally. Genes are transcribed as polycistronic mRNAs that are dissected by the concerted action of trans-splicing and polyadenylation. In trans-splicing, a common exon, the spliced leader, is added to all mRNAs from a small RNA. In this study, we examined by microarray analysis the transcriptome following RNAi silencing of the basal splicing factors U2AF65, SF1, and U2AF35. The transcriptome data revealed correlations between the affected genes and their splicing and polyadenylation signaling properties, suggesting that differential binding of these factors to pre-mRNA regulates trans-splicing and hence expression of specific genes. Surprisingly, all these factors were shown to affect not only splicing but also mRNA stability. Affinity purification of SF1 and U2AF35 complexes supported their role in mRNA stability. U2AF35 but not SF1 was shown to bind to ribosomes. To examine the role of splicing factors in mRNA stability, mutations were introduced into the polypyrimidine tract located in the 3′ UTR of a mini-gene, and the results demonstrate that U2AF65 binds to such a site and controls the mRNA stability. We propose that transcripts carrying splicing signals in their 3′ UTR bind the splicing factors and control their stability. PMID:23283975

  1. Basal and apical regulation of VEGF-A and placenta growth factor in the RPE/choroid and primary RPE

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Leyla; Flach, Janina; Lassen, Jens; Treumer, Felix; Roider, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family are strongly involved in pathological processes in the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) constitutively secrete VEGF-A, and the secretion of placental growth factor (PlGF) has also been described. RPE cells are strongly polarized cells with different secretome at the apical and basal side. In this study, we evaluated the basal and apical regulation of VEGF-A and PlGF secretion in RPE/choroid explants and primary RPE cells. Methods RPE/choroid tissue explants were prepared from porcine eyes and cultivated in modified Ussing chambers, separating apical (RPE) and basal (choroid) supernatant. Primary RPE cells were also prepared from porcine eyes and cultivated on Transwell plates. Explants and cells were treated with inhibitors for VEGFR-2 (SU1498), p38 (SB203580), and the transcription factors nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and SP-1 (mithramycin), respectively. VEGF-A and PlGF content was evaluated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, western blots were performed. Results In the RPE/choroid, VEGF-A can initially be found on the apical and basal sides with significantly more pronounced secretion on the basal side. VEGF-A secretion is differentially regulated on the apical and basal sides, with the inhibition of SP-1 and NF-κB showing strong effects apically and basally after 24 h and 48 h, the inhibition of p38 displaying its effect mainly on the basal side with some effect apically after 48 h, and the inhibition of VEGFR-2 reducing the secretion of VEGF only on the apical side at 24 h and 48 h. In the RPE cell culture, similar effects were found, with inhibition of NF-κB or SP-1 displaying a strong decrease in VEGF-A on both sides, and p38 inhibition displaying only an inhibitory effect on the basal side. In contrast, an apical effect of VEGFR-2 inhibition was not found. However, the

  2. Endothelin and endothelium-derived relaxing factor control of basal renovascular tone in hydronephrotic rat kidneys.

    PubMed Central

    Gulbins, E; Hoffend, J; Zou, A P; Dietrich, M S; Schlottmann, K; Cavarape, A; Steinhausen, M

    1993-01-01

    1. In order to investigate the control of renal vascular tone by endothelin (ET) and endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) under basal conditions, we infused intravenously anti-ET-1/3 antibodies (a-ET-1/3) and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in split hydronephrotic rat kidneys. 2. A 25 min I.V. infusion of a-ET-1/3 (4.0 x 10(-13) mol kg-1 min-1) induced a time-dependent vasodilatation of arcuate (16.5%) and interlobular arteries (18.6%) as well as an increase of glomerular blood flow (GBF) by 32%. 3. Inhibition of EDRF synthesis by L-NAME produced a marked vasoconstriction of arcuate arteries (17.1%) and efferent (20.1%) arterioles and a decrease of GBF by 43%. 4. Co-infusion of a-ET-1/3 and L-NAME induced efferent vasoconstriction by 19.5%, whereas preglomerular vessel diameters remained unchanged. 5. The specificity of a-ET-1/3 effects was confirmed by simultaneous I.V. application of a-ET-1/3 and ET-1 (160 ng I.V.) which produced no significant vascular effects. Injection of ET-1 alone constricted arcuate arteries and decreased glomerular blood flow by 25%. 6. Experiments in normal rat kidneys with a-ET-1/3 I.V. revealed an increase of renal blood flow by 21%. 7. Our results demonstrate a physiological control of basal vascular tone in larger preglomerular arterioles by ET and EDRF. Efferent arteriolar tone is predominantly controlled by EDRF. PMID:8271216

  3. The SOX11 transcription factor is a critical regulator of basal-like breast cancer growth, invasion, and basal-like gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jonathan H; Uray, Ivan P; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Tsimelzon, Anna; Savage, Michelle; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Brown, Powel H

    2016-03-15

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are aggressive breast cancers associated with poor survival. Defining the key drivers of BLBC growth will allow identification of molecules for targeted therapy. In this study, we performed a primary screen integrating multiple assays that compare transcription factor expression and activity in BLBC and non-BLBC at the RNA, DNA, and protein levels. This integrated screen identified 33 transcription factors that were elevated in BLBC in multiple assays comparing mRNA expression, DNA cis-element sequences, or protein DNA-binding activity. In a secondary screen to identify transcription factors critical for BLBC cell growth, 8 of the 33 candidate transcription factors (TFs) were found to be necessary for growth in at least two of three BLBC cell lines. Of these 8 transcription factors, SOX11 was the only transcription factor required for BLBC growth, but not for growth of non-BLBC cells. Our studies demonstrate that SOX11 is a critical regulator of multiple BLBC phenotypes, including growth, migration, invasion, and expression of signature BLBC genes. High SOX11 expression was also found to be an independent prognostic indicator of poor survival in women with breast cancer. These results identify SOX11 as a potential target for the treatment of BLBC, the most aggressive form of breast cancer.

  4. Female Estrogen-Related Factors and Incidence of Basal Cell Carcinoma in a Nationwide US Cohort.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Elizabeth K; Kitahara, Cari M; Ntowe, Estelle; Bowen, Emily M; Doody, Michele M; Alexander, Bruce H; Lee, Terrence; Little, Mark P; Linet, Martha S; Freedman, D Michal

    2015-12-01

    UV radiation exposure is the primary risk factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common human malignancy. Although the photosensitizing properties of estrogens have been recognized for decades, few studies have examined the relationship between reproductive factors or exogenous estrogen use and BCC. Using data from the US Radiologic Technologists Study, a large, nationwide, prospective cohort, we assessed the relationship between reproductive factors, exogenous estrogen use, and first primary BCC while accounting for sun exposure, personal sun sensitivity, and lifestyle factors for geographically dispersed women exposed to a wide range of ambient UV radiation. Elevated risk of BCC was associated with late age at natural menopause (hazard ratio [HR] for ≥ 55 years v 50 to 54 years, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.17) and any use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT; HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.30; P for trend for duration = .001). BCC risk was most increased among women reporting natural menopause who used MHT for 10 or more years versus women who never used MHT (HR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.35 to 2.87). Risk of BCC was not associated with age at menarche, parity, age at first birth, infertility, use of diethylstilbestrol by participant's mother, age at hysterectomy, or use of oral contraceptives. These analyses confirm a previous finding of increased risk of BCC associated with MHT. Novel findings of increased BCC risk associated with MHT in women experiencing natural menopause and for late age at natural menopause warrant further investigation. Users of MHT may constitute an additional high-risk group in need of more frequent skin cancer screening. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Basal-Cell Carcinoma Incidence and Associated Risk Factors in US Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Li, Wen-Qing; Li, Tricia; Qureshi, Abrar A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of data on basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) in the United States, since most national registries do not collect information on BCC. We evaluated BCC incidence trends and associated risk factors for BCC in 140,171 participants from a US female cohort, the Nurses' Health Study (1986–2006), and a US male cohort, the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study (1988–2006). Age-adjusted BCC incidence rates increased from 519 cases per 100,000 person-years to 1,019 cases per 100,000 person years for women and increased from 606 cases per 100,000 person-years to 1,488 cases per 100,000 person-years for men during the follow-up period. Cox proportional hazards analysis identified the following phenotypic risk factors for BCC in both cohorts: family history of melanoma, blond or red hair colors, higher number of extremity moles, higher susceptibility to sunburn as a child/adolescent, and higher lifetime number of severe/blistering sunburns. The multivariate-adjusted risk ratio for the highest quintile of cumulative midrange ultraviolet B flux exposure versus the lowest quintile was 3.18 (95% confidence interval: 2.70, 3.76) in women and 1.90 (95% confidence interval: 1.57, 2.29) in men. BCC incidence was generally higher in men than in women, and BCC risk was strongly associated with several phenotypic and exposure factors, including midrange ultraviolet B radiation, in our study populations. PMID:23828250

  6. Basal-cell carcinoma incidence and associated risk factors in U.S. women and men.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Li, Wen-Qing; Li, Tricia; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2013-09-15

    There is a paucity of data on basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) in the United States, since most national registries do not collect information on BCC. We evaluated BCC incidence trends and associated risk factors for BCC in 140,171 participants from a U.S. female cohort, the Nurses' Health Study (1986-2006), and a U.S. male cohort, the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study (1988-2006). Age-adjusted BCC incidence rates increased from 519 cases per 100,000 person-years to 1,019 cases per 100,000 person years for women and increased from 606 cases per 100,000 person-years to 1,488 cases per 100,000 person-years for men during the follow-up period. Cox proportional hazards analysis identified the following phenotypic risk factors for BCC in both cohorts: family history of melanoma, blond or red hair colors, higher number of extremity moles, higher susceptibility to sunburn as a child/adolescent, and higher lifetime number of severe/blistering sunburns. The multivariate-adjusted risk ratio for the highest quintile of cumulative midrange ultraviolet B flux exposure versus the lowest quintile was 3.18 (95% confidence interval: 2.70, 3.76) in women and 1.90 (95% confidence interval: 1.57, 2.29) in men. BCC incidence was generally higher in men than in women, and BCC risk was strongly associated with several phenotypic and exposure factors, including midrange ultraviolet B radiation, in our study populations.

  7. Induction of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression by transforming growth factor-β1 in human basal cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Yu; Sheen, Yi-Shuan; Cha, Shih-Ting; Hu, Yeh-Fang; Tan, Ching-Ting; Chiu, Hsien-Ching; Chang, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Min-Wei; Kuo, Min-Liang; Jee, Shiou-Hwa

    2013-11-01

    Higher CXCR4 expression enhances basal cell carcinoma (BCC) invasion and angiogenesis. The underlying mechanism of increased CXCR4 expression in invasive BCC is still not well understood. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the regulation of CXCR4 expression in invasive BCC. We used qRT-PCR, RT-PCR, Western blot, and flow cytometric analyses to examine different CXCR4 levels among the clinical samples, co-cultured BCC cells and BCC cells treated with recombinant transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Immunohistochemical studies were used to demonstrate the correlation between TGF-β1 and CXCR4 expressions. The signal transduction pathway and transcriptional regulation were confirmed by treatments with chemical inhibitors, neutralizing antibodies, or short interfering RNAs, as well as luciferase reporter activity. Invasive BCC has higher TGF-β1 and CTGF levels compared to non-invasive BCC. Non-contact dermal fibroblasts co-culture with human BCC cells also increases the expression of CXCR4 in BCC cells. Treatment with recombinant human TGF-β1, but not CTGF, enhanced the CXCR4 levels in time- and dose-dependent manners. The protein level and surface expression of CXCR4 in human BCC cells was increased by TGF-β1 treatment. TGF-β1 was intensely expressed in the surrounding fibroblasts of invasive BCC and was positively correlated with the CXCR4 expression of BCC cells. The transcriptional regulation of CXCR4 by TGF-β1 is mediated by its binding to the TGF-β receptor II and phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2)-ETS-1 pathway. TGF-β1 induces upregulation of CXCR4 in human BCC cells by phosphorylation of ERK1/2-ETS-1 pathway. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk factors for basal cell carcinoma in a southern Brazilian population: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gon, Airton; Minelli, Lorivaldo

    2011-10-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer to occur in Caucasian populations, and its incidence is increasing. Despite its frequency, there is a paucity of data on risk factors for BCC in some regions. This study investigated the association between pigmentary characteristics, distinctive patterns of solar exposure, habits and lifestyle, and risk for BCC among patients attending a dermatology center in a region in southern Brazil. We conducted a hospital-based, case-control study that included 127 case patients with histologically confirmed BCC and 280 cancer-free control subjects with other dermatologic conditions, observed between January 2006 and December 2007. The study was conducted using a questionnaire and physical examination by a dermatologist. Relative risks were estimated using exposure odds ratios generated by cross-tabulation and logistic regression models. Risk for BCC was associated with family history of skin cancer, Fitzpatrick skin type I, and the presence of actinic keratoses, solar lentigines, leukoderma, and elastosis romboidalis nuchae. No effect was found for different patterns of solar exposure, eye, hair or skin color, exposure to non-solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR), or lifestyle-related habits such as sunscreen use and cigarette smoking. The results of this study suggest that skin type and family history of skin cancer may be important in establishing risk for developing BCC. Additionally, the detection by clinical examination of skin markers related to UVR action is important in establishing which patients are more likely to develop BCC. © 2011 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Nerve growth factor enhances sleep in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Krueger, J M

    1999-04-02

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) elicits rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) in cats. Removal of NGF receptor-positive cholinergic basal forebrain neurons inhibits REMS in rats. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of NGF on sleep and brain temperature (Tbr) in rabbits. Male rabbits were implanted with electroencephalograph (EEG) electrodes, a brain thermistor and an intraventricular (i.c.v.) guide cannula. Rabbits received human beta-NGF i.c.v. (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 or 10 microg] and on a separate day, 25 microl pyrogen-free saline i.c.v. as control. EEG and Tbr were recorded for 23 h after injections. The highest two doses of NGF increased both non-REMS and REMS across the 23-h recording period. REMS was enhanced dose-dependently. Tbr was not affected by any dose of NGF. These results suggest that NGF is involved in both REMS and non-REMS regulation.

  10. ΔNp63 promotes stem cell activity in mammary gland development and basal-like breast cancer by enhancing Fzd7 expression and Wnt signalling.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Rumela; Wei, Yong; Hwang, Julie; Hang, Xiang; Andres Blanco, Mario; Choudhury, Abrar; Tiede, Benjamin; Romano, Rose-Anne; DeCoste, Christina; Mercatali, Laura; Ibrahim, Toni; Amadori, Dino; Kannan, Nagarajan; Eaves, Connie J; Sinha, Satrajit; Kang, Yibin

    2014-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cancer is populated and maintained by tumour-initiating cells (TICs) with stem-like properties similar to those of adult tissue stem cells. Despite recent advances, the molecular regulatory mechanisms that may be shared between normal and malignant stem cells remain poorly understood. Here we show that the ΔNp63 isoform of the Trp63 transcription factor promotes normal mammary stem cell (MaSC) activity by increasing the expression of the Wnt receptor Fzd7, thereby enhancing Wnt signalling. Importantly, Fzd7-dependent enhancement of Wnt signalling by ΔNp63 also governs tumour-initiating activity of the basal subtype of breast cancer. These findings establish ΔNp63 as a key regulator of stem cells in both normal and malignant mammary tissues and provide direct evidence that breast cancer TICs and normal MaSCs share common regulatory mechanisms.

  11. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Study of 4-ATP on Gold Nanoparticles for Basal Cell Carcinoma Fingerprint Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quynh, Luu Manh; Nam, Nguyen Hoang; Kong, K.; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Notingher, I.; Henini, M.; Luong, Nguyen Hoang

    2016-05-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman signals of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) attached to the surface of colloidal gold nanoparticles with size distribution of 2 to 5 nm were used as a labeling agent to detect basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin. The enhanced Raman band at 1075 cm-1 corresponding to the C-S stretching vibration in 4-ATP was observed during attachment to the surface of the gold nanoparticles. The frequency and intensity of this band did not change when the colloids were conjugated with BerEP4 antibody, which specifically binds to BCC. We show the feasibility of imaging BCC by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, scanning the 1075 cm-1 band to detect the distribution of 4-ATP-coated gold nanoparticles attached to skin tissue ex vivo.

  12. Enhancing neuroplasticity in the basal ganglia: the role of exercise in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Petzinger, Giselle M; Fisher, Beth E; Van Leeuwen, Jon-Eric; Vukovic, Marta; Akopian, Garnik; Meshul, Charlie K; Holschneider, Daniel P; Nacca, Angelo; Walsh, John P; Jakowec, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical trials have suggested that exercise is beneficial for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the underlying mechanisms and potential for disease modification are currently unknown. This review presents current findings from our laboratories in patients with PD and animal models. The data indicate that alterations in both dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, induced by activity-dependent (exercise) processes, may mitigate the cortically driven hyper-excitability in the basal ganglia normally observed in the parkinsonian state. These insights have potential to identify novel therapeutic treatments capable of reversing or delaying disease progression in PD.

  13. Basal and postprandial change in serum fibroblast growth factor-21 concentration in type 1 diabetic mellitus and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Zibar, Karin; Blaslov, Kristina; Bulum, Tomislav; Ćuća, Jadranka Knežević; Smirčić-Duvnjak, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) appears to have an important role in glucose and lipid metabolism. FGF-21 secretion is mainly determined by nutritional status. The aim of this study was to measure basal and postprandial FGF-21 and postprandial change of FGF-21 concentration in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients and in healthy controls, and to investigate the differences between the groups. The cross-sectional study included 30 C-peptide negative T1DM patients, median age 37 years (20-59), disease duration 22 years (3-45), and nine healthy controls, median age 30 years (27-47). Basal and postprandial FGF-21 concentrations were measured by ELISA. The associations of FGF-21 with glucose, lipids, and insulin were analyzed. Individuals with T1DM showed significantly lower basal FGF-21 concentration (P=0.046) when compared with healthy controls (median value 28.2 vs 104 pg/mL) and had significantly different postprandial change (∆ 30'-0') of FGF-21 (P=0.006) in comparison with healthy controls (median value -1.1 vs -20.5 pg/mL). The glucose and lipid status did not correlate with FGF-21. In healthy controls, postprandial insulin level correlated with basal FGF-21 (ρ=0.7, P=0.036). Multiple regression analysis showed that they are independently associated after adjustment for confounding factors (β=1.824, P=0.04). We describe the pathological pattern of basal and postprandial change of FGF-21 secretion not associated with glucose, lipid levels, or insulin therapy in patients with T1DM. Since FGF-21 has numerous protective metabolic effects in the experimental model, the lower basal FGF-21 concentration in T1DM patients opens the question about the potential role of recombinant FGF-21 therapy.

  14. Factors associated with basal insulin dose in Japanese children and young adult type 1 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Tomomi; Kawamura, Tomoyuki; Kashihara, Yoneo; Hirose, Masakazu; Higashide, Takashi; Tsuruhara, Akitoshi; Fujimoto, Hiroki; Noi, Kaori; Shintaku, Haruo

    2012-06-06

    Aims/Introduction:  The daily basal insulin doses/body weight and the daily basal insulin doses/total daily insulin doses of Japanese type 1 diabetes mellitus patients are less than those of Western type 1 diabetes mellitus patients. It is known that Western meals are richer in fat than Japanese meals. We speculated that fat intake might be associated with basal insulin dose in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients.   Forty-one outpatients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (20 males, 21 females, mean age 15.9) were enrolled. Variables investigated included: gender, SDS-BMI, HbA1c, duration of diabetes, therapy (MDI or CSII), insulin doses and meal contents. Meal contents were recorded for 3 days using a digital camera. Correlation and multiple regression analyses were performed for all subjects and each age group.   The mean daily basal insulin doses/total daily insulin doses was 0.35. In the multiple regression analysis among all subjects, when daily basal insulin doses/body weight was used as a dependent variable, fat energy ratio of the meal was obtained as an entered variable (P = 0.001). This tendency was particularly strong among the patients aged 14 or above (P < 0.001, standardized coefficient β = 0.683).   In the type 1 diabetes patients who are aged 14 or above, an association between daily basal insulin doses/body weight and fat energy ratio of meal was suggested. This may explain the aforementioned expectation of increased fat intakes making higher basal insulin doses. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.2011.00171.x, 2011).

  15. Enhanced basal and disorderly growth hormone secretion distinguish acromegalic from normal pulsatile growth hormone release.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, M L; Pincus, S M; Johnson, M L; Matthews, D H; Faunt, L M; Vance, M L; Thorner, M O; Veldhuis, J D

    1994-01-01

    Pulses of growth hormone (GH) release in acromegaly may arise from hypothalamic regulation or from random events intrinsic to adenomatous tissue. To distinguish between these possibilities, serum GH concentrations were measured at 5-min intervals for 24 h in acromegalic men and women with active (n = 19) and inactive (n = 9) disease and in normal young adults in the fed (n = 20) and fasted (n = 16) states. Daily GH secretion rates, calculated by deconvolution analysis, were greater in patients with active acromegaly than in fed (P < 0.05) but not fasted normal subjects. Significant basal (nonpulsatile) GH secretion was present in virtually all active acromegalics but not those in remission or in fed and fasted normal subjects. A recently introduced scale- and model-independent statistic, approximate entropy (ApEn), was used to test for regularity (orderliness) in the GH data. All but one acromegalic had ApEn values greater than the absolute range in normal subjects, indicating reduced orderliness of GH release; ApEn distinguished acromegalic from normal GH secretion (fed, P < 10(-12); fasted, P < 10(-7)) with high sensitivity (95%) and specificity (100%). Acromegalics in remission had ApEn scores larger than those of normal subjects (P < 0.0001) but smaller than those of active acromegalics (P < 0.001). The coefficient of variation of successive incremental changes in GH concentrations was significantly lower in acromegalics than in normal subjects (P < 0.001). Fourier analysis in acromegalics revealed reduced fractional amplitudes compared to normal subjects (P < 0.05). We conclude that GH secretion in acromegaly is highly irregular with disorderly release accompanying significant basal secretion. Images PMID:8083369

  16. Basal insulin hypersecretion in insulin-resistant Zucker diabetic and Zucker fatty rats: role of enhanced fuel metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y P; Cockburn, B N; Pugh, W; Polonsky, K S

    1999-07-01

    The biochemical mechanisms responsible for basal hyperinsulinemia in insulin-resistant states have not been fully defined. We therefore studied pancreatic beta-cell function in vitro to characterize the relative importance of fuel metabolism or secretion via a constitutive pathway in the maintenance of high basal insulin secretion in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Zucker fatty (ZF) rats. Insulin secretion from ZF (10+/-1.8 v 5+/-0.6 pmol/ng DNA/h) and ZDF (30+/-4 v 7+/-0.8 pmol/ng DNA/h) islets at 2.8 mmol/L glucose was two to four times greater than secretion from islets of lean littermate control rats. In response to a decreasing glucose concentration (from 12 to 0 mmol/L), a paradoxical increase in insulin secretion was observed in perfused ZDF rat pancreas. Insulin secretion at 2.8 mmol/L glucose was suppressed approximately 70% to 80% in islets from ZDF and ZF rats following exposure to diazoxide, a K+-adenosine triphosphate (K(ATP)) channel opener that inhibits membrane depolarization, or rotenone and oligomycin, agents that inhibit ATP production, or by incubation at 23 degrees C. Inhibition of glycolysis with mannoheptulose, 2-deoxyglucose, and iodoacetate or fatty acid oxidation with a carnitine palmitoyltransferase I inhibitor also significantly inhibited basal insulin secretion in islets of ZDF and ZF rats but not their lean littermates. Furthermore, the glycolytic flux at 2.8 mmol/L glucose was significantly higher in ZDF islets versus ZDF lean littermate (ZLC) islets (2.2+/-0.1 v 3.7+/-0.3 pmol/ng DNA/2 h, P < .01) and was suppressed by mannoheptulose. In ZDF and ZF islets, high basal insulin secretion was maintained despite a 50% reduction in the rate of proinsulin/insulin biosynthesis at 2.8 mmol/L glucose. The rate of proinsulin to insulin conversion and the ratio of proinsulin to insulin secretion by islets of ZDF rats were similar to the values in the lean littermates. Thus, basal hypersecretion in these two insulin-resistant models appears to be

  17. Basal serum tryptase is not a risk factor for immediate-type drug hypersensitivity during childhood.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, Ozlem; Karaatmaca, Betul; Arik Yilmaz, Ebru; Sahiner, Umit M; Sackesen, Cansın; Sekerel, Bulent E; Soyer, Ozge

    2016-11-01

    High serum basal tryptase (sBT) levels have been identified as a risk factor for both venom- and food-induced severe allergic reactions. The aim of this study was to compare sBT levels in children with different severity of actual drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) with those of age- and sex-matched controls without any history of DHRs. Patients between 0 and 18 years of age with a history of immediate-type DHRs manifested in 0-6 h after the culprit drug intake were included. Following ENDA (European Network for Drug Allergy) inquiries, patients were evaluated with skin and/or provocation tests to define the actual drug-hypersensitive patients. Serum BT levels were determined for both patients and controls. Of 345 children, 106 patients (30.7%) [(58.5% male), median age (interquartile range) 8.0 years (4.2-12.2)] were diagnosed as drug hypersensitive. Ninety-eight controls were also included. The sBT levels of drug-hypersensitive patients with and without anaphylaxis and the control group were similar [2.6 (2.0-3.6) μg/l vs. 2.8 (1.6-4.3) μg/l vs. 2.6 (1.8-3.6) μg/l, respectively, (p > 0.05)]. The sBT levels of the patients with sole cutaneous symptoms 2.8 (1.6-4.3) μg/l, mild anaphylaxis 3.0 (1.9-4.9) μg/l, and moderate-to-severe anaphylaxis 2.6 (2.0-3.6) μg/l were also comparable (p > 0.05). The onset of DHRs [those occurring in 1 h (n = 87) or in 1-6 h (n = 19) after the drug intake], positive results with skin tests with the culprit drug, or the classification of the patients according to different age groups [(0-2 years), (2-6 years), (6-12 years), (12-18 years)] did not correlate with sBT levels. The sBT levels in children with actual drug hypersensitivity would not be a risk factor for severe systemic reactions on the contrary to children with allergic reactions to food or insect venom. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Vascular Risk Factors and Diseases Modulate Deficits of Reward-Based Reversal Learning in Acute Basal Ganglia Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wicking, Manon; Bellebaum, Christian; Hermann, Dirk M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Besides motor function, the basal ganglia have been implicated in feedback learning. In patients with chronic basal ganglia infarcts, deficits in reward-based reversal learning have previously been described. Methods We re-examined the acquisition and reversal of stimulus-stimulus-reward associations and acquired equivalence in eleven patients with acute basal ganglia stroke (8 men, 3 women; 57.8±13.3 years), whose performance was compared eleven healthy subjects of comparable age, sex distribution and education, who were recruited outside the hospital. Eleven hospitalized patients with a similar vascular risk profile as the stroke patients but without stroke history served as clinical control group. Results In a neuropsychological assessment 7±3 days post-stroke, verbal and spatial short-term and working memory and inhibition control did not differ between groups. Compared with healthy subjects, control patients with vascular risk factors exhibited significantly reduced performance in the reversal phase (F[2,30] = 3.47; p = 0.044; post-hoc comparison between risk factor controls and healthy controls: p = 0.030), but not the acquisition phase (F[2,30] = 1.01; p = 0.376) and the acquired equivalence (F[2,30] = 1.04; p = 0.367) tasks. In all tasks, the performance of vascular risk factor patients closely resembled that of basal ganglia stroke patients. Correlation studies revealed a significant association of the number of vascular risk factors with reversal learning (r = -0.33, p = 0.012), but not acquisition learning (r = -0.20, p = 0.121) or acquired equivalence (r = -0.22, p = 0.096). Conclusions The previously reported impairment of reward-based learning may be attributed to vascular risk factors and associated diseases, which are enriched in stroke patients. This study emphasizes the necessity of appropriate control subjects in cognition studies. PMID:27163585

  19. Significant Risk Factors for Postoperative Enlargement of Basal Ganglia Hematoma after Frameless Stereotactic Aspiration: Antiplatelet Medication and Concomitant IVH.

    PubMed

    Son, Wonsoo; Park, Jaechan

    2017-09-01

    Frameless stereotactic aspiration of a hematoma can be the one of the treatment options for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in the basal ganglia. Postoperative hematoma enlargement, however, can be a serious complication of intracranial surgery that frequently results in severe neurological deficit and even death. Therefore, it is important to identify the risk factors of postoperative hematoma growth. During a 13-year period, 101 patients underwent minimally invasive frameless stereotactic aspiration for basal ganglia hematoma. Patients were classified into two groups according to whether or not they had postoperative hematoma enlargement in a computed tomography scan. Baseline demographic data and several risk factors, such as hypertension, preoperative hematoma growth, antiplatelet medication, presence of concomitant intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), were analysed via a univariate statistical study. Nine of 101 patients (8.9%) showed hematoma enlargement after frameless stereotactic aspiration. Among the various risk factors, concomitant IVH and antiplatelet medication were found to be significantly associated with postoperative enlargement of hematomas. In conclusion, our study revealed that aspirin use and concomitant IVH are factors associated with hematoma enlargement subsequent to frameless stereotactic aspiration for basal ganglia hematoma.

  20. Neurogenesis upregulation on the healthy hemisphere after stroke enhances compensation for age-dependent decrease of basal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adamczak, Joanna; Aswendt, Markus; Kreutzer, Christina; Rotheneichner, Peter; Riou, Adrien; Selt, Marion; Beyrau, Andreas; Uhlenküken, Ulla; Diedenhofen, Michael; Nelles, Melanie; Aigner, Ludwig; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Hoehn, Mathias

    2017-03-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide with no treatment for the chronic phase available. Interestingly, an endogenous repair program comprising inflammation and neurogenesis is known to modulate stroke outcome. Several studies have shown that neurogenesis decreases with age but the therapeutic importance of endogenous neurogenesis for recovery from cerebral diseases has been indicated as its ablation leads to stroke aggravation and worsened outcome. A detailed characterization of the neurogenic response after stroke related to ageing would help to develop novel and targeted therapies. In an innovative approach, we used the DCX-Luc mouse, a transgenic model expressing luciferase in doublecortin-positive neuroblasts, to monitor the neurogenic response following middle cerebral artery occlusion over three weeks in three age groups (2, 6, 12months) by optical imaging while the stroke lesion was monitored by quantitative MRI. The individual longitudinal and noninvasive time profiles provided exclusive insight into age-dependent decrease in basal neurogenesis and neurogenic upregulation in response to stroke which are not accessible by conventional BrdU-based measures of cell proliferation. For cortico-striatal strokes the maximal upregulation occurred at 4days post stroke followed by a continuous decrease to basal levels by three weeks post stroke. Older animals effectively compensated for reduced basal neurogenesis by an enhanced sensitivity to the cerebral lesion, resulting in upregulated neurogenesis levels approaching those measured in young mice. In middle aged and older mice, but not in the youngest ones, additional upregulation of neurogenesis was observed in the contralateral healthy hemisphere. This further substantiates the increased propensity of older brains to respond to lesion situation. Our results clearly support the therapeutic relevance of endogenous neurogenesis for stroke recovery and particularly in older brains.

  1. Enhanced basal lubrication and the contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to future sea-level rise

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Sarah R.; Payne, Antony J.; Bartholomew, Ian D.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Edwards, Tamsin L.; Fettweis, Xavier; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Goelzer, Heiko; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Huybrechts, Philippe; Mair, Douglas W. F.; Nienow, Peter W.; Perego, Mauro; Price, Stephen F.; Smeets, C. J. P. Paul; Sole, Andrew J.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; Zwinger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We assess the effect of enhanced basal sliding on the flow and mass budget of the Greenland ice sheet, using a newly developed parameterization of the relation between meltwater runoff and ice flow. A wide range of observations suggest that water generated by melt at the surface of the ice sheet reaches its bed by both fracture and drainage through moulins. Once at the bed, this water is likely to affect lubrication, although current observations are insufficient to determine whether changes in subglacial hydraulics will limit the potential for the speedup of flow. An uncertainty analysis based on our best-fit parameterization admits both possibilities: continuously increasing or bounded lubrication. We apply the parameterization to four higher-order ice-sheet models in a series of experiments forced by changes in both lubrication and surface mass budget and determine the additional mass loss brought about by lubrication in comparison with experiments forced only by changes in surface mass balance. We use forcing from a regional climate model, itself forced by output from the European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM5) global climate model run under scenario A1B. Although changes in lubrication generate widespread effects on the flow and form of the ice sheet, they do not affect substantial net mass loss; increase in the ice sheet’s contribution to sea-level rise from basal lubrication is projected by all models to be no more than 5% of the contribution from surface mass budget forcing alone. PMID:23940337

  2. Enhanced basal lubrication and the contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to future sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Sarah R; Payne, Antony J; Bartholomew, Ian D; van den Broeke, Michiel R; Edwards, Tamsin L; Fettweis, Xavier; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Goelzer, Heiko; Hoffman, Matthew J; Huybrechts, Philippe; Mair, Douglas W F; Nienow, Peter W; Perego, Mauro; Price, Stephen F; Smeets, C J P Paul; Sole, Andrew J; van de Wal, Roderik S W; Zwinger, Thomas

    2013-08-27

    We assess the effect of enhanced basal sliding on the flow and mass budget of the Greenland ice sheet, using a newly developed parameterization of the relation between meltwater runoff and ice flow. A wide range of observations suggest that water generated by melt at the surface of the ice sheet reaches its bed by both fracture and drainage through moulins. Once at the bed, this water is likely to affect lubrication, although current observations are insufficient to determine whether changes in subglacial hydraulics will limit the potential for the speedup of flow. An uncertainty analysis based on our best-fit parameterization admits both possibilities: continuously increasing or bounded lubrication. We apply the parameterization to four higher-order ice-sheet models in a series of experiments forced by changes in both lubrication and surface mass budget and determine the additional mass loss brought about by lubrication in comparison with experiments forced only by changes in surface mass balance. We use forcing from a regional climate model, itself forced by output from the European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM5) global climate model run under scenario A1B. Although changes in lubrication generate widespread effects on the flow and form of the ice sheet, they do not affect substantial net mass loss; increase in the ice sheet's contribution to sea-level rise from basal lubrication is projected by all models to be no more than 5% of the contribution from surface mass budget forcing alone.

  3. Analysis of the CYC/TB1 class of TCP transcription factors in basal angiosperms and magnoliids.

    PubMed

    Horn, Stefanie; Pabón-Mora, Natalia; Theuß, Vanessa S; Busch, Andrea; Zachgo, Sabine

    2015-02-01

    Flower monosymmetry contributes to specialized interactions between plants and their insect pollinators. In the magnoliids, flower monosymmetry is exhibited only in the Aristolochiaceae (Piperales). Aristolochia flowers develop a calyx-derived monosymmetric perianth that enhances pollination success by a flytrap mechanism. Aristolochia arborea forms additionally a special perianth outgrowth that mimics a mushroom to attract flies, the mushroom mimicry structure (MMS). In core eudicots, members of the CYC2 clade of TCP transcription factors are key regulators of corolla monosymmetry establishment. The CYC2 clade arose via core eudicot-specific duplications from ancestral CYC/TB1 genes. CYC/TB1 genes are also thought to affect monosymmetry formation in early diverging eudicot and monocot species. Here, we demonstrate that CYC/TB1 genes, named CYC-like genes (CYCL) are present in basal angiosperms and magnoliids. Expression analyses in A. arborea indicate that CYCL genes participate in perianth and MMS differentiation processes and do not support a CYCL gene function in initial flower monosymmetry formation. Heterologous CYCL and CYC2 gene overexpression studies in Arabidopsis show that Aristolochia CYCL proteins only perform a CYC2-like function when the CYCL TCP domain is replaced by a CYC2 domain. Comparative TCP domain analyses revealed that an LxxLL motif, known to mediate protein-protein interactions, evolved in the second helix of the TCP domain in the CYC2 lineage and contributes to CYC2-related functions. Our data imply that divergent evolution of the CYC/TB1 lineages caused significant changes in their coding regions, which together with cis-regulatory changes established the key CYC2 function in regulating eudicot flower monosymmetry.

  4. The barley HvNAC6 transcription factor affects ABA accumulation and promotes basal resistance against powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Jun; Perera, Venura; Christiansen, Michael W; Holme, Inger B; Gregersen, Per L; Grant, Murray R; Collinge, David B; Lyngkjær, Michael F

    2013-12-01

    Barley HvNAC6 is a member of the plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC2) transcription factor family and we have shown previously that it acts as a positive regulator of basal resistance in barley against the biotrophic pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). In this study, we use a transgenic approach to constitutively silence HvNAC6 expression, using RNA interference (RNAi), to investigate the in vivo functions of HvNAC6 in basal resistance responses in barley in relation to the phytohormone ABA. The HvNAC6 RNAi plants displayed reduced HvNAC6 transcript levels and were more susceptible to Bgh than wild-type plants. Application of exogenous ABA increased basal resistance against Bgh in wild-type plants, but not in HvNAC6 RNAi plants, suggesting that ABA is a positive regulator of basal resistance which depends on HvNAC6. Silencing of HvNAC6 expression altered the light/dark rhythm of ABA levels which were, however, not influenced by Bgh inoculation. The expression of the two ABA biosynthetic genes HvNCED1 and HvNCED2 was compromised, and transcript levels of the ABA conjugating HvBG7 enzyme were elevated in the HvNAC6 RNAi lines, but this effect was not clearly associated with transgene-mediated resistance. Together, these data support a function of HvNAC6 as a regulator of ABA-mediated defence responses for maintenance of effective basal resistance against Bgh.

  5. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) autocrine enhance breast cancer cells survival.

    PubMed

    Tiong, Kai Hung; Tan, Boon Shing; Choo, Heng Lungh; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Hii, Ling-Wei; Tan, Si Hoey; Khor, Nelson Tze Woei; Wong, Shew Fung; See, Sze-Jia; Tan, Yuen-Fen; Rosli, Rozita; Cheong, Soon-Keng; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2016-09-06

    Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive tumor subtype with poor prognosis. The discovery of underlying mechanisms mediating tumor cell survival, and the development of novel agents to target these pathways, is a priority for patients with basal-like breast cancer. From a functional screen to identify key drivers of basal-like breast cancer cell growth, we identified fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) as a potential mediator of cell survival. We found that FGFR4 mediates cancer cell survival predominantly via activation of PI3K/AKT. Importantly, a subset of basal-like breast cancer cells also secrete fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), a canonical ligand specific for FGFR4. siRNA-mediated silencing of FGF19 or neutralization of extracellular FGF19 by anti-FGF19 antibody (1A6) decreases AKT phosphorylation, suppresses cancer cell growth and enhances doxorubicin sensitivity only in the FGFR4+/FGF19+ breast cancer cells. Consistently, FGFR4/FGF19 co-expression was also observed in 82 out of 287 (28.6%) primary breast tumors, and their expression is strongly associated with AKT phosphorylation, Ki-67 staining, higher tumor stage and basal-like phenotype. In summary, our results demonstrated the presence of an FGFR4/FGF19 autocrine signaling that mediates the survival of a subset of basal-like breast cancer cells and suggest that inactivation of this autocrine loop may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for future treatment of breast cancers.

  6. Butylidenephthalide Blocks Potassium Channels and Enhances Basal Tension in Isolated Guinea-Pig Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsin-Te; Yang, You-Lan; Chen, Wan-Chen; Chen, Chi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Butylidenephthalide (Bdph, 30~300 μM), a constituent of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort., significantly enhanced tension in isolated guinea-pig trachea. In this study, we investigate the mechanism(s) of Bdph-induced contraction in the tissue. Isolated trachea was bathed in 5 mL of Krebs solution containing indomethacin (3 μM), and its tension changes were isometrically recorded. Cromakalim (3 μM), an ATP-dependent K+ channel opener, significantly antagonized the Bdph-induced enhancement of baseline tension. Bdph (300 μM) also significantly antagonized cromakalim-induced relaxation. Bdph (300 μM) did not significantly influence the antagonistic effects of glibenclamide (GBC, 1 μM) and tetraethylammonium (TEA, 8 mM) against the cromakalim-induced relaxation. However, Bdph (300 μM) and 4-aminopiridine (4-AP, 5 mM), a blocker of Kv1 family of K+ channels, in combination significantly rightward shifted the log concentration-relaxation curve of cromakalim. The antagonistic effect of the combination almost equals the sum of the individual effects of Bdph and 4-AP, suggesting that the antagonistic mechanism of Bdph may be similar to that of 4-AP. All calcium channel blockers influenced neither the baseline tension nor antagonistic effect of Bdph against cromakalim. In conclusion, Bdph may be similar to 4-AP, a blocker of Kv1 family of K+ channels, to enhance the baseline tension of guinea-pig trachea. PMID:25114927

  7. DNA dynamics play a role as a basal transcription factor in the positioning and regulation of gene transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Boian S; Gelev, Vladimir; Yoo, Sang Wook; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Bishop, Alan R; Rasmussen, Kim Ø; Usheva, Anny

    2010-04-01

    We assess the role of DNA breathing dynamics as a determinant of promoter strength and transcription start site (TSS) location. We compare DNA Langevin dynamic profiles of representative gene promoters, calculated with the extended non-linear PBD model of DNA with experimental data on transcription factor binding and transcriptional activity. Our results demonstrate that DNA dynamic activity at the TSS can be suppressed by mutations that do not affect basal transcription factor binding-DNA contacts. We use this effect to establish the separate contributions of transcription factor binding and DNA dynamics to transcriptional activity. Our results argue against a purely 'transcription factor-centric' view of transcription initiation, suggesting that both DNA dynamics and transcription factor binding are necessary conditions for transcription initiation.

  8. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver.

    PubMed

    Fusakio, Michael E; Willy, Jeffrey A; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T; Al Baghdadi, Rana J T; Adams, Christopher M; Anthony, Tracy G; Wek, Ronald C

    2016-05-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins-PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6-is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera.

  9. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Fusakio, Michael E.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T.; Al Baghdadi, Rana J. T.; Adams, Christopher M.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins—PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6—is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera. PMID:26960794

  10. Selective attentional enhancement and inhibition of fronto-posterior connectivity by the basal ganglia during attention switching.

    PubMed

    van Schouwenburg, Martine R; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Cools, Roshan

    2015-06-01

    The prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia interact to selectively gate a desired action. Recent studies have shown that this selective gating mechanism of the basal ganglia extends to the domain of attention. Here, we investigate the nature of this action-like gating mechanism for attention using a spatial attention-switching paradigm in combination with functional neuroimaging and dynamic causal modeling. We show that the basal ganglia guide attention by focally releasing inhibition of task-relevant representations, while simultaneously inhibiting task-irrelevant representations by selectively modulating prefrontal top-down connections. These results strengthen and specify the role of the basal ganglia in attention. Moreover, our findings have implications for psychological theorizing by suggesting that inhibition of unattended sensory regions is not only a consequence of mutual suppression, but is an active process, subserved by the basal ganglia.

  11. Estrogen receptors colocalize with low-affinity nerve growth factor receptors in cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain.

    PubMed Central

    Toran-Allerand, C D; Miranda, R C; Bentham, W D; Sohrabji, F; Brown, T J; Hochberg, R B; MacLusky, N J

    1992-01-01

    The rodent and primate basal forebrain is a target of a family of endogenous peptide signaling molecules, the neurotrophins--nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin 3--and of the gonadal steroid hormone estrogen, both of which have been implicated in cholinergic function. To investigate whether or not these ligands may act on the same neurons in the developing and adult rodent basal forebrain, we combined autoradiography with 125I-labeled estrogen and either nonisotopic in situ hybridization histochemistry or immunohistochemistry. We now report colocalization of intranuclear estrogen binding sites with the mRNA and immunoreactive protein for the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor, which binds all three neurotrophins, and for the cholinergic marker enzyme choline acetyltransferase (acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). Colocalization of estrogen and low-affinity nerve growth factor receptors implies that their ligands may act on the same neuron, perhaps synergistically, to regulate the expression of specific genes or gene networks that may influence neuronal survival, differentiation, regeneration, and plasticity. That cholinergic neurons in brain regions subserving cognitive functions may be regulated not only by the neurotrophins but also by estrogen may have considerable relevance for the development and maintenance of neural substrates of cognition. If estrogen-neurotrophin interactions are important for survival of target neurons, then clinical conditions associated with estrogen deficiency could contribute to the atrophy or death of these neurons. These findings have implications for the subsequent decline in those differentiated neural functions associated with aging and Alzheimer disease. Images PMID:1316615

  12. POMC and TP53 genetic variability and risk of basal cell carcinoma of skin: Interaction between host and genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Rizzato, Cosmeri; Scherer, Dominique; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Hemminki, Kari; Canzian, Federico; Kumar, Rajiv; Campa, Daniele

    2011-07-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most common neoplasm among the Caucasian population of the western world. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced p53 activation promotes cutaneous pigmentation by increasing transcriptional activity of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in the skin. Induction of POMC/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) activates the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), resulting in skin pigmentation. The tumor suppressor p53 is a key player in stress responses that preserve genomic stability, responding to a variety of insults including DNA damage, hypoxia, metabolic stress and oncogene activation. Malfunction of the p53 pathway is an almost universal hallmark of human tumors. Polymorphisms in the gene encoding p53 (TP53) alter its transcriptional activity, which in turn may influence the UV radiation-induced tanning response. The aim of the present work is to test association between POMC and TP53 genetic variability, the possible interplay with host factors and the risk of basal cell carcinoma of skin. We covered the variability of the two genes we used 17 tagging polymorphisms in 529 BCC cases and 532 healthy controls. We have also tested the possible interactions between the genetic variants and three known risk factors for BCC: skin complexion, sun effect and skin response to sun exposure. We did not observe any statistically significant association between SNPs in these two genes and BCC risk overall, nor interactions of SNPs with known BCC risk factors. However we found that, in the group of subjects with lower sun exposure, carriers of one copy of the C allele of the TP53 SNP rs12951053 had a decreased risk of BCC (OR=0.28, 95% CI 0.12-0.62, P=0.002). We have observed that the interplay of an environmental risk factor and one polymorphism in TP53 gene could modulate the risk of BCC. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. β-GPA treatment leads to elevated basal metabolic rate and enhanced hypoxic exercise tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Ross, Trenton T; Overton, Jeffrey D; Houmard, Katelyn F; Kinsey, Stephen T

    2017-03-01

    Treatments that increase basal metabolic rate (BMR) and enhance exercise capacity may be useful therapeutic approaches for treating conditions such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and associated circulatory problems. β-guanidinopropionic acid (β-GPA) supplementation decreases high-energy phosphate concentrations, such as ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) resulting in an energetic challenge that is similar to both exercise programs and hypoxic conditions. In this study, we administered β-GPA to mice for 2 or 6 weeks, and investigated the effect on muscle energetic status, body and muscle mass, muscle capillarity, BMR, and normoxic and hypoxic exercise tolerance (NET and HET, respectively). Relative [PCr] and PCr/ATP ratios significantly decreased during both treatment times in the β-GPA fed mice compared to control mice. Body mass, muscle mass, and muscle fiber size significantly decreased after β-GPA treatment, whereas muscle capillarity and BMR were significantly increased in β-GPA fed mice. NET significantly decreased in the 2-week treatment, but was not significantly different in the 6-week treatment. HET significantly decreased in 2-week treatment, but in contrast to NET, significantly increased in the 6-week-treated mice compared to control mice. We conclude that β-GPA induces a cellular energetic response in skeletal muscle similar to that of chronic environmental hypoxia, and this energetic perturbation leads to elevated BMR and increased hypoxic exercise capacity in the absence of hypoxic acclimation. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  14. Oligo-carrageenan kappa increases NADPH, ascorbate and glutathione syntheses and TRR/TRX activities enhancing photosynthesis, basal metabolism, and growth in Eucalyptus trees

    PubMed Central

    González, Alberto; Moenne, Fabiola; Gómez, Melissa; Sáez, Claudio A.; Contreras, Rodrigo A.; Moenne, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    In order to analyze the effect of OC kappa in redox status, photosynthesis, basal metabolism and growth in Eucalyptus globulus, trees were treated with water (control), with OC kappa at 1 mg mL−1, or treated with inhibitors of NAD(P)H, ascorbate (ASC), and glutathione (GSH) syntheses and thioredoxin reductase (TRR) activity, CHS-828, lycorine, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), and auranofin, respectively, and with OC kappa, and cultivated for 4 months. Treatment with OC kappa induced an increase in NADPH, ASC, and GSH syntheses, TRR and thioredoxin (TRX) activities, photosynthesis, growth and activities of basal metabolism enzymes such as rubisco, glutamine synthetase (GlnS), adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), involved in C, N, and S assimilation, respectively, Krebs cycle and purine/pyrimidine synthesis enzymes. Treatment with inhibitors and OC kappa showed that increases in ASC, GSH, and TRR/TRX enhanced NADPH synthesis, increases in NADPH and TRR/TRX enhanced ASC and GSH syntheses, and only the increase in NADPH enhanced TRR/TRX activities. In addition, the increase in NADPH, ASC, GSH, and TRR/TRX enhanced photosynthesis and growth. Moreover, the increase in NADPH, ASC and TRR/TRX enhanced activities of rubisco, Krebs cycle, and purine/pyrimidine synthesis enzymes, the increase in GSH, NADPH, and TRR/TRX enhanced APR activity, and the increase in NADPH and TRR/TRX enhanced GlnS activity. Thus, OC kappa increases NADPH, ASC, and GSH syntheses leading to a more reducing redox status, the increase in NADPH, ASC, GSH syntheses, and TRR/TRX activities are cross-talking events leading to activation of photosynthesis, basal metabolism, and growth in Eucalyptus trees. PMID:25352851

  15. Redox Regulation by Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2: Gatekeeping for the Basal and Diabetes-Induced Expression of Thioredoxin-Interacting Protein

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoqing; Ma, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor activated by a range of oxidants and electrophiles. The transcriptional response to endogenous oxidative cues by Nrf2 plays an important role in mammalian redox physiology and oxidative pathology. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in the heart where it leads to apoptosis and ultimately cardiomyopathy. Here we investigated the mechanism by which Nrf2 suppresses oxidative stress in diabetic mouse heart. Knockout (KO) of Nrf2 induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in KO heart; diabetes further increased oxidative damage. A pathway-focused gene array revealed that Nrf2 controls the expression of 24 genes in the heart, including the gene encoding thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). Nrf2 suppressed the basal expression of Txnip in the heart and blocked induction of Txnip by high glucose by binding to an antioxidant response element (ARE) (−1286 to −1276) of the Txnip promoter. Binding of Nrf2 to ARE also suppressed the binding of MondoA to the carbohydrate response element with or without high glucose. TXNIP promoted reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis by inhibiting thioredoxin. On the other hand, Nrf2 boosted thioredoxin activity by inhibiting Txnip. The findings revealed, for the first time, that Nrf2 is a key gatekeeper of Txnip transcription, suppressing both its basal expression and MondoA-driven induction to control the thioredoxin redox signaling in diabetes. PMID:22869588

  16. Cisplatin- and UV-damaged DNA lure the basal transcription factor TFIID/TBP.

    PubMed Central

    Vichi, P; Coin, F; Renaud, J P; Vermeulen, W; Hoeijmakers, J H; Moras, D; Egly, J M

    1997-01-01

    A connection between transcription and DNA repair was demonstrated previously through the characterization of TFIIH. Using filter binding as well as in vitro transcription challenge competition assays, we now show that the promoter recognition factor TATA box-binding protein (TBP)/TFIID binds selectively to and is sequestered by cisplatin- or UV-damaged DNA, either alone or in the context of a larger protein complex including TFIIH. Computer-assisted 3D structural analysis reveals a remarkable similarity between the structure of the TATA box as found in its TBP complex and that of either platinated or UV-damaged oligonucleotides. Thus, cisplatin-treated or UV-irradiated DNA could be used as a competing binding site which may lure TBP/TFIID away from its normal promoter sequence, partially explaining the phenomenon of DNA damage-induced inhibition of RNA synthesis. Consistent with an involvement of damaged DNA-specific binding of TBP in inhibiting transcription, we find that microinjection of additional TBP in living human fibroblasts alleviates the reduction in RNA synthesis after UV irradiation. Future anticancer drugs could be designed with the consideration of lesion recognition by TBP and their ability to reduce transcription. PMID:9405373

  17. Cisplatin- and UV-damaged DNA lure the basal transcription factor TFIID/TBP.

    PubMed

    Vichi, P; Coin, F; Renaud, J P; Vermeulen, W; Hoeijmakers, J H; Moras, D; Egly, J M

    1997-12-15

    A connection between transcription and DNA repair was demonstrated previously through the characterization of TFIIH. Using filter binding as well as in vitro transcription challenge competition assays, we now show that the promoter recognition factor TATA box-binding protein (TBP)/TFIID binds selectively to and is sequestered by cisplatin- or UV-damaged DNA, either alone or in the context of a larger protein complex including TFIIH. Computer-assisted 3D structural analysis reveals a remarkable similarity between the structure of the TATA box as found in its TBP complex and that of either platinated or UV-damaged oligonucleotides. Thus, cisplatin-treated or UV-irradiated DNA could be used as a competing binding site which may lure TBP/TFIID away from its normal promoter sequence, partially explaining the phenomenon of DNA damage-induced inhibition of RNA synthesis. Consistent with an involvement of damaged DNA-specific binding of TBP in inhibiting transcription, we find that microinjection of additional TBP in living human fibroblasts alleviates the reduction in RNA synthesis after UV irradiation. Future anticancer drugs could be designed with the consideration of lesion recognition by TBP and their ability to reduce transcription.

  18. Free Radicals Enhance Basal Release of D-[exp 3H]Aspartate from Cerebral Cortical Synaptosomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    release of neurotransmit - ter with exposure to peroxide-generated free radicals (Gilman et al., 1992). A similar increase in basal re- lease is...cortical iron injection: a model for post- traumatic epilepsy . Ann. Neurol. 4, 329-336. Willmore L. J., Hiramatsu M., Kochi H., and Mori A. (1983) For

  19. MicroRNA-27a regulates basal transcription by targeting the p44 subunit of general transcription factor IIH

    PubMed Central

    Portal, Maximiliano M.

    2011-01-01

    General transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is a complex RNA polymerase II basal transcription factor comprising 10 different polypeptides that display activities involved in transcription and DNA repair processes. Although biochemical studies have uncovered TFIIH importance, little is known about how the mRNAs that code for TFIIH subunits are regulated. Here it is shown that mRNAs encoding seven of the TFIIH subunits (p34, p44, p52, p62, XPB, CDK7, and p8) are regulated at the posttranscriptional level in a Dicer-dependent manner. Indeed, abolition of the miRNA pathway induces abnormal accumulation, stabilization, and translational activation of these seven mRNAs. Herein, miR-27a was identified as a key regulator of p44 mRNA. Moreover, miR-27a was shown to destabilize the p44 subunit of the TFIIH complex during the G2-M phase, thereby modulating the transcriptional shutdown observed during this transition. This work is unique in providing a demonstration of global transcriptional regulation through the action of a single miRNA. PMID:21558443

  20. Nod factor enhances calcium uptake by soybean.

    PubMed

    Supanjani, S; Habib, A; Mabood, F; Lee, K D; Donnelly, D; Smith, D L

    2006-01-01

    Inoculation with rhizobia or application of Nod factors (lipo-chitooligosaccharides, LCOs) causes transient increases in cytosolic calcium concentration in root hairs of legume plants. We conducted experiments to evaluate whether application of LCO and inoculation with rhizobia improved (45)CaCl(2) uptake into soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) leaves. Roots of soybean seedlings with one developing trifoliolate were immersed in Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal liquid medium containing treatment solutions and (45)CaCl(2), and the plants were incubated under continuous light. After 24 h, leaf samples were taken, and their radioactivity levels were determined. Addition of NodBj-V (C18:1 MeFuc) at a concentration of 10(-7) M increased (45)Ca(2+) uptake. Inoculation with genistein-induced Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 532C and USDA3 also increased (45)Ca(2+) uptake; whereas, inoculation with strain Bj-168, a nodC-mutant incapable of producing LCO, did not. Rhizobia that do not normally nodulate soybean, i.e. Rhizobium leguminosarum, and Sinorhizobium meliloti did not affect calcium uptake, nor did the tetramer or pentamer of chitosan, or lumichrome. Surprisingly, Rhizobium sp. NGR234, which can nodulate some types of soybean, although without effective N(2)-fixation, also did not affect calcium uptake. This work suggests that the rhizobial symbiosis, in addition to its known role in provision of nitrogen fixation, also improves early calcium uptake into soybean plants.

  1. Genomic and functional uniqueness of the TNF receptor-associated factor gene family in amphioxus, the basal chordate.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Liu, Tong; Huang, Shengfeng; Wu, Tao; Huang, Ling; Liu, Huiling; Tao, Xin; Yang, Manyi; Wu, Kui; Yu, Yanhong; Dong, Meiling; Xu, Anlong

    2009-10-01

    The TNF-associated factor (TRAF) family, the crucial adaptor group in innate immune signaling, increased to 24 in amphioxus, the oldest lineage of the Chordata. To address how these expanded molecules evolved to adapt to the changing TRAF mediated signaling pathways, here we conducted genomic and functional comparisons of four distinct amphioxus TRAF groups with their human counterparts. We showed that lineage-specific duplication and rearrangement were responsible for the expansion of amphioxus TRAF1/2 and 3 lineages, whereas TRAF4 and 6 maintained a relatively stable genome and protein structure. Amphioxus TRAF1/2 and 3 molecules displayed various expression patterns in response to microbial infection, and some of them can attenuate the NF-kappaB activation mediated by human TRAF2 and 6. Amphioxus TRAF4 presented two unique functions: activation of the NF-kappaB pathway and involvement in somite formation. Although amphioxus TRAF6 was conserved in activating NF-kappaB pathway for antibacterial defense, the mechanism was not the same as that observed in humans. In summary, our findings reveal the evolutionary uniqueness of the TRAF family in this basal chordate, and suggest that genomic duplication and functional divergence of the TRAF family are important for the current form of the TRAF-mediated signaling pathways in humans.

  2. A host basal transcription factor is a key component for infection of rice by TALE-carrying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meng; Ke, Yinggen; Huang, Renyan; Ma, Ling; Yang, Zeyu; Chu, Zhaohui; Xiao, Jinghua; Li, Xianghua; Wang, Shiping

    2016-07-29

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are sequence-specific DNA binding proteins found in a range of plant pathogenic bacteria, where they play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. However, it has been unclear how TALEs, after they have been injected into the host cells, activate transcription of host genes required for infection success. Here, we show that the basal transcription factor IIA gamma subunit TFIIAγ5 from rice is a key component for infection by the TALE-carrying bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent for bacterial blight. Direct interaction of several TALEs with TFIIAγ5 is required for activation of disease susceptibility genes. Conversely, reduced expression of the TFIIAγ5 host gene limits the induction of susceptibility genes and thus decreases bacterial blight symptoms. Suppression or mutation of TFIIAγ5 can also reduce bacterial streak, another devastating disease of rice caused by TALE-carrying X. oryzae pv. oryzicola. These results have important implications for formulating a widely applicable strategy with which to improve resistance of plants to TALE-carrying pathogens.

  3. A host basal transcription factor is a key component for infection of rice by TALE-carrying bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Meng; Ke, Yinggen; Huang, Renyan; Ma, Ling; Yang, Zeyu; Chu, Zhaohui; Xiao, Jinghua; Li, Xianghua; Wang, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are sequence-specific DNA binding proteins found in a range of plant pathogenic bacteria, where they play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. However, it has been unclear how TALEs, after they have been injected into the host cells, activate transcription of host genes required for infection success. Here, we show that the basal transcription factor IIA gamma subunit TFIIAγ5 from rice is a key component for infection by the TALE-carrying bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent for bacterial blight. Direct interaction of several TALEs with TFIIAγ5 is required for activation of disease susceptibility genes. Conversely, reduced expression of the TFIIAγ5 host gene limits the induction of susceptibility genes and thus decreases bacterial blight symptoms. Suppression or mutation of TFIIAγ5 can also reduce bacterial streak, another devastating disease of rice caused by TALE-carrying X. oryzae pv. oryzicola. These results have important implications for formulating a widely applicable strategy with which to improve resistance of plants to TALE-carrying pathogens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19605.001 PMID:27472897

  4. Co-factor-enhanced food allergy.

    PubMed

    Cardona, V; Luengo, O; Garriga, T; Labrador-Horrillo, M; Sala-Cunill, A; Izquierdo, A; Soto, L; Guilarte, M

    2012-10-01

    Alcohol, exercise or non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs (NSAID) are frequently mentioned as amplifiers of food allergic reactions but only individual cases or small series have been previously published. Descriptive study including 74 cases of suspected co-factor enhanced food allergy, assessed by skin-prick tests, specific IgE and oral challenges. Anaphylaxis accounted for 85.1% of reactions. In 99% of cases culprit food allergens were plant-derived, mainly vegetables and cereals. NSAID were involved in 58%, exercise in 52.7% and alcohol in 12.2%. Lipid transfer protein was the most frequently involved allergen. Co-factor enhanced food allergy should be considered when assessing food, alcohol, exercise and NSAID allergic reactions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Enhancing thermoelectric power factor at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebarjadi, Mona

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we review some of the ideas relevant to Peltier cooling at room temperatures and below. We identify challenges and directions for thermoelectric refrigeration. We also point out that measures other than ZT, should be used for active cooling cycle where heat is pumped from hot to cold. Finally, we review several strategies proposed in the past by our group and others to enhance the thermoelectric power factor.

  6. Expression of thyroid transcription factor-1 is associated with a basal-like phenotype in breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Klingen, Tor A; Chen, Ying; Suhrke, Pål; Stefansson, Ingunn M; Gundersen, Marian D; Akslen, Lars A

    2013-05-15

    The differential diagnosis between primary and secondary breast cancers might be difficult, especially in poorly differentiated tumors. Thyroid Transcription Factor-1 (TTF-1) has been regarded as a reliable marker for lung or thyroid origin, with only occasional positive staining in other tumors. However, positive cases have recently been reported among primary breast carcinomas. Here, we analyzed expression of TTF-1 protein (clone SPT24) by immunohistochemical staining of sections from paraffin embedded tumor samples in 247 primary breast cancers from the population-based Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. Positive staining (weak or strong) was observed in 7 cases (2,8%). As novel observations, positivity was demonstrated more frequently in estrogen receptor negative cases (14,0% vs. 1,4%; p = 0,004), highly proliferative tumors (8,8% vs. 1,1%; p = 0,008), tumors with a basal-like phenotype by showing expression of CK5/6 and/or P-cadherin (11,1% vs. 1,4%; p = 0,01), and tumors with blood vessel invasion (9,7% vs. 1,9%; p = 0,04). Also, TTF-1 was associated with histological grade 3 tumors compared with grade 1 or 2 tumors (7,7% vs. 1,5%; p = 0,04) as well as lymph node positive cases (5,2% vs. 1,8%; p = 0,03). Our population-based findings indicate that TTF-1 may be positive in approximately 3% of primary breast cancers, and positivity indicates an association with adverse prognostic factors. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/8313753509421182.

  7. Electric dipole moment enhancement factor of thallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porsev, Sergey; Safronova, Marianna; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2012-06-01

    A number of extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict electric dipole moments (EDM) of particles that may be observable with the present state-of-the art experiments. The EDMs arise from the violations of both parity and time-reversal invariance. The electron EDM is enhanced in certain atomic and molecular systems. One of the most stringent limits on the electron EDM de was obtained from the experiments with ^205Tl: de<1.6 10-27e cm [Regan et al., PRL 88, 071805 (2002)]. This result crucially depend on the calculated value of the effective electric field on the valence electron. In the case of Tl this effective field is proportional to the applied field E0, Eeff= K,0. The goal of this work is to resolve the present controversy in the value of the EDM enhancement factor K in Tl. We have carried out several calculations by different high-precision methods, studied previously omitted corrections, as well as tested our methodology on other parity conserving quantities. We find the EDM enhancement factor of Tl to be equal to -573(20). This value is 20% larger than the recently published result of Nataraj et al. [PRL 106, 200403 (2011)] but agrees very well with several earlier results.

  8. CIA2 deficiency results in impaired oxidative stress response and enhanced intracellular basal UPR activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Hua-Zhen; Niu, Yu-Jie; Yuan, Yuan; Fang, Bing-Xiong; Liu, Yi-Na; Cai, Lu-Hui; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Liu, Xin-Guang

    2015-03-01

    Yeast Cia2p is a component of the cytosolic Fe/S protein assembly (CIA) machinery. Initial studies of the CIA machinery were performed in yeast, but the precise role of Cia2p in this eukaryote is still unknown. We report that CIA2 deficiency results in impaired oxidative stress response, as evidenced by increased sensitivity to the oxidant cumene hydroperoxide (CHP), impaired activities of superoxide dismutases and aconitase and decreased replicative lifespan in the mutants. Moreover, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were significantly increased in CIA2-deficient cells after treatment with CHP. We also show that CIA2-deficient cells display an increased resistance to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as evidenced by the upregulated splicing of the mRNA of HAC1, which encodes a functional transcription factor that regulates the transcription of unfolded protein response (UPR) target genes, suggesting enhanced intracellular UPR activity. Furthermore, the transcription of several canonical UPR target genes is strongly induced in CIA2-deficient cells as compared with wild-type controls. Taken together, these results suggest the involvement of Cia2p in oxidative and ER stress responses in yeast. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Regulation of Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 Transcription Factors by Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    She, Hua; Mao, Zixu

    2011-01-01

    Various isoforms of myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) constitute a group of nuclear proteins found to play important roles in increasing types of cells. In neurons, MEF2s are required to regulate neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, as well as survival. MEF2s promote the survival of several types of neurons under different conditions. In cellular models, negative regulation of MEF2s by stress and toxic signals contributes to neuronal death. In contrast, enhancing MEF2 activity not only protects cultured primary neurons from death in vitro but also attenuates the loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta in a 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. In this work, the mechanisms of regulation of MEF2 function by several well-known neurotoxins and their implications in various neurodegenerative diseases are reviewed. PMID:21741404

  10. Degranulation, density, and distribution of mast cells in the rat thalamus: a light and electron microscopic study in basal conditions and after intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Florenzano, F; Bentivoglio, M

    2000-09-04

    In the adult rat brain mast cells reside selectively in the thalamus. We investigated thalamic mast cells stained by acidic toluidine blue or pinacyanol, and with histamine immunocytochemistry, focusing on their state of activity revealed by degranulation. Mast cells exhibited perivascular prevalence and high quantitative variability, between cases and in different sections, with no asymmetry or topographical selectivity in thalamic nuclei. Pinacyanol, alone or with erythrosine, stained mast cells with higher sensitivity than toluidine blue. However, toluidine blue was highly predictive of pinacyanol staining and provided the best resolution of mast cell cytoplasmic features. Histamine immunocytochemistry labeled 61% of pinacyanol-stained mast cells. Intensely toluidine blue-stained granulated cells, as well as cells exhibiting different degrees of degranulation that paralleled lighter staining, were observed. The response of thalamic mast cells to intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) and control cytochrome-c injections was evaluated after 2, 24, and 72 hours. No obvious changes in mast cell number or distribution were found after treatment, but massive degranulation was frequently observed after NGF administration. Significant decrease of staining intensity of mast cells, supporting enhanced degranulation, was documented in NGF-treated animals by quantitative image analysis. Ultrastructural features of mast cell degranulation, with granule coalescence and matrix dissolution, were detected in untreated and NGF-treated cases. The findings point out that mast cells are active in the thalamus in basal conditions and that NGF has the potential to elicit long-lasting degranulation of thalamic mast cells in vivo, exerting a direct effect and/or priming these cells to react to endogenous stimuli.

  11. SSR504734 enhances basal expression of prepulse inhibition but exacerbates the disruption of prepulse inhibition by apomorphine

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Philipp; Zhang, Weining; Yee, Benjamin K.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Inhibition of glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) elevates extracellular glycine and can thus increase N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) excitability in the brain. The potent GlyT1 inhibitor, SSR504734, has also been shown to potentiate the behavioural effects of direct and indirect dopamine agonists. Thus, an acute systemic dose of SSR504734 was sufficient to exacerbate the motor-stimulant effect of the dopamine releaser amphetamine in C57BL/6 mice, even though SSR504734 alone exerted no significant effect on motor activity. Objectives Here, we explore if SSR504734 might modulate dopamine-dependent sensory gating in the paradigm of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex. Methods Experiment 1 characterized the effect of SSR504734 (10 and 30 mg/kg i.p.) on PPI expression when administered alone. Experiments 2 and 3 investigated the impact of SSR504734 when administered in conjunction with the dopamine receptor agonist, apomorphine (1 and 2 mg/kg s.c.), which is known to reliably disrupt PPI. Results When administered alone, acute SSR504734 enhanced PPI only at 30 mg/kg – a dose that has been shown to improve cognitive functions including working memory, which has been linked to enhanced NMDAR function resulting from the elevation of extracellular glycine. However, this effect did not allow SSR504734 to antagonise the PPI-disruptive effect of apomorphine. At the lower dose of 10 mg/kg – that was insufficient to enhance PPI when administered alone - SSR504734 even exacerbated the deleterious effect of apomorphine on PPI. Conclusions The therapeutic potential of GlyT1 inhibition against distinct behavioural/cognitive deficiency might require different magnitudes of GlyT1 inhibition. [246 words] PMID:23736281

  12. Loss of function of FATTY ACID DESATURASE7 in tomato enhances basal aphid resistance in a salicylate-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Avila, Carlos A; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio M; Jia, Lingling; Navarre, Duroy A; Chen, Zhaorigetu; Howe, Gregg A; Meng, Qing-Wei; Smith, Jonathon E; Goggin, Fiona L

    2012-04-01

    We report here that disruption of function of the ω-3 FATTY ACID DESATURASE7 (FAD7) enhances plant defenses against aphids. The suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2) mutation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), which eliminates the function of FAD7, reduces the settling behavior, survival, and fecundity of the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). Likewise, the antisense suppression of LeFAD7 expression in wild-type tomato plants reduces aphid infestations. Aphid resistance in the spr2 mutant is associated with enhanced levels of salicylic acid (SA) and mRNA encoding the pathogenesis-related protein P4. Introduction of the Naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase transgene, which suppresses SA accumulation, restores wild-type levels of aphid susceptibility to spr2. Resistance in spr2 is also lost when we utilize virus-induced gene silencing to suppress the expression of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1), a positive regulator of many SA-dependent defenses. These results indicate that FAD7 suppresses defenses against aphids that are mediated through SA and NPR1. Although loss of function of FAD7 also inhibits the synthesis of jasmonate (JA), the effects of this desaturase on aphid resistance are not dependent on JA; other mutants impaired in JA synthesis (acx1) or perception (jai1-1) show wild-type levels of aphid susceptibility, and spr2 retains aphid resistance when treated with methyl jasmonate. Thus, FAD7 may influence JA-dependent defenses against chewing insects and SA-dependent defenses against aphids through independent effects on JA synthesis and SA signaling. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants Atfad7-2 and Atfad7-1fad8 also show enhanced resistance to the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) compared with wild-type controls, indicating that FAD7 influences plant-aphid interactions in at least two plant families.

  13. Transcription factor p63 controls the reserve status but not the stemness of horizontal basal cells in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schnittke, Nikolai; Herrick, Daniel B.; Lin, Brian; Peterson, Jesse; Coleman, Julie H.; Packard, Adam I.; Jang, Woochan; Schwob, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Adult tissue stem cells can serve two broad functions: to participate actively in the maintenance and regeneration of a tissue or to wait in reserve and participate only when activated from a dormant state. The adult olfactory epithelium, a site for ongoing, life-long, robust neurogenesis, contains both of these functional stem cell types. Globose basal cells (GBCs) act as the active stem cell population and can give rise to all the differentiated cells found in the normal tissue. Horizontal basal cells (HBCs) act as reserve stem cells and remain dormant unless activated by tissue injury. Here we show that HBC activation following injury by the olfactotoxic gas methyl bromide is coincident with the down-regulation of protein 63 (p63) but anticipates HBC proliferation. Gain- and loss-of-function studies show that this down-regulation of p63 is necessary and sufficient for HBC activation. Moreover, activated HBCs give rise to GBCs that persist for months and continue to act as bona fide stem cells by participating in tissue maintenance and regeneration over the long term. Our analysis provides mechanistic insight into the dynamics between tissue stem cell subtypes and demonstrates that p63 regulates the reserve state but not the stem cell status of HBCs. PMID:26305958

  14. An evolutionarily conserved Myostatin proximal promoter/enhancer confers basal levels of transcription and spatial specificity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grade, Carla Vermeulen Carvalho; Salerno, Mônica Senna; Schubert, Frank R; Dietrich, Susanne; Alvares, Lúcia Elvira

    2009-10-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass, and Mstn mutations are responsible for the double muscling phenotype observed in many animal species. Moreover, Mstn is a positive regulator of adult muscle stem cell (satellite cell) quiescence, and hence, Mstn is being targeted in therapeutic approaches to muscle diseases. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying Mstn regulation, we searched for the gene's proximal enhancer and promoter elements, using an evolutionary approach. We identified a 260-bp-long, evolutionary conserved region upstream of tetrapod Mstn and teleost mstn b genes. This region contains binding sites for TATA binding protein, Meis1, NF-Y, and for CREB family members, suggesting the involvement of cAMP in Myostatin regulation. The conserved fragment was able to drive reporter gene expression in C2C12 cells in vitro and in chicken somites in vivo; both normally express Mstn. In contrast, the reporter construct remained silent in the avian neural tube that normally does not express Mstn. This suggests that the identified element serves as a minimal promoter, harboring some spatial specificity. Finally, using bioinformatic approaches, we identified additional genes in the human genome associated with sequences similar to the Mstn proximal promoter/enhancer. Among them are genes important for myogenesis. This suggests that Mstn and these genes may form a synexpression group, regulated by a common signaling pathway.

  15. TT Mutant Homozygote of Kruppel-like Factor 5 Is a Key Factor for Increasing Basal Metabolic Rate and Resting Metabolic Rate in Korean Elementary School Children.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Ran; Kwon, In-Su; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Lee, Myoungsook

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the contribution of genetic variations of KLF5 to basal metabolic rate (BMR) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) and the inhibition of obesity in Korean children. A variation of KLF5 (rs3782933) was genotyped in 62 Korean children. Using multiple linear regression analysis, we developed a model to predict BMR in children. We divided them into several groups; normal versus overweight by body mass index (BMI) and low BMR versus high BMR by BMR. There were no differences in the distributions of alleles and genotypes between each group. The genetic variation of KLF5 gene showed a significant correlation with several clinical factors, such as BMR, muscle, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and insulin. Children with the TT had significantly higher BMR than those with CC (p = 0.030). The highest muscle was observed in the children with TT compared with CC (p = 0.032). The insulin and C-peptide values were higher in children with TT than those with CC (p= 0.029 vs. p = 0.004, respectively). In linear regression analysis, BMI and muscle mass were correlated with BMR, whereas insulin and C-peptide were not associated with BMR. In the high-BMR group, we observed that higher muscle, fat mass, and C-peptide affect the increase of BMR in children with TT (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.018, respectively), while Rohrer's index could explain the usual decrease in BMR (adjust r(2) = 1.000, p < 0.001, respectively). We identified a novel association between TT of KLF5 rs3782933 and BMR in Korean children. We could make better use of the variation within KLF5 in a future clinical intervention study of obesity.

  16. SG2-Type R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor MYB15 Controls Defense-Induced Lignification and Basal Immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chezem, William R; Memon, Altamash; Li, Fu-Shuang; Weng, Jing-Ke; Clay, Nicole K

    2017-08-01

    Lignification of cell wall appositions is a conserved basal defense mechanism in the plant innate immune response. However, the genetic pathway controlling defense-induced lignification remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate the Arabidopsis thaliana SG2-type R2R3-MYB transcription factor MYB15 as a regulator of defense-induced lignification and basal immunity. Loss of MYB15 reduces the content but not the composition of defense-induced lignin, whereas constitutive expression of MYB15 increases lignin content independently of immune activation. Comparative transcriptional and metabolomics analyses implicate MYB15 as necessary for the defense-induced synthesis of guaiacyl lignin and the basal synthesis of the coumarin metabolite scopoletin. MYB15 directly binds to the secondary wall MYB-responsive element consensus sequence, which encompasses the AC elements, to drive lignification. The myb15 and lignin biosynthetic mutants show increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, consistent with defense-induced lignin having a major role in basal immunity. A scopoletin biosynthetic mutant also shows increased susceptibility independently of immune activation, consistent with a role in preformed defense. Our results support a role for phenylalanine-derived small molecules in preformed and inducible Arabidopsis defense, a role previously dominated by tryptophan-derived small molecules. Understanding the regulatory network linking lignin biosynthesis to plant growth and defense will help lignin engineering efforts to improve the production of biofuels and aromatic industrial products as well as increase disease resistance in energy and agricultural crops. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Semax, an analogue of adrenocorticotropin (4-10), binds specifically and increases levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in rat basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Dolotov, Oleg V; Karpenko, Ekaterina A; Seredenina, Tamara S; Inozemtseva, Lyudmila S; Levitskaya, Natalia G; Zolotarev, Yuriy A; Kamensky, Andrey A; Grivennikov, Igor A; Engele, Juergen; Myasoedov, Nikolay F

    2006-04-01

    The heptapeptide Semax (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro) is an analogue of the N-terminal fragment (4-10) of adrenocorticotropic hormone which, after intranasal application, has profound effects on learning and memory formation in rodents and humans, and also exerts marked neuroprotective effects. A clue to the molecular mechanism underlying this neurotropic action was recently given by the observation that Semax stimulates the synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a potent modulator of synaptic plasticity, in astrocytes cultured from rat basal forebrain. In the present study, we investigated whether Semax affects BDNF levels in rat basal forebrain upon intranasal application of the peptide. In addition, we examined whether cell membranes isolated from this brain region contained binding sites for Semax. The binding of tritium-labelled Semax was found to be time dependent, specific and reversible. Specific Semax binding required calcium ions and was characterized by a mean+/-SEM dissociation constant (KD) of 2.4+/-1.0 nm and a BMAX value of 33.5+/-7.9 fmol/mg protein. Sandwich immunoenzymatic analysis revealed that Semax applied intranasally at 50 and 250 microg/kg bodyweight resulted in a rapid increase in BDNF levels after 3 h in the basal forebrain, but not in the cerebellum. These results point to the presence of specific binding sites for Semax in the rat basal forebrain. In addition, these findings indicate that the cognitive effects exerted by Semax might be associated, at least in part, with increased BDNF protein levels in this brain region.

  18. [Clinical study and risk factors for recurrence of basal cell carcinoma of the eyelid: results of a Tunisian series and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Knani, L; Romdhane, O; Ben Rayana, N; Mahjoub, H; Ben Hadj Hamida, F

    2014-02-01

    To report our results of treatment of eyelid basal cell carcinomas and evaluate risk factors for recurrence. We carried out a retrospective study of 172 basal cell carcinomas in 168 patients, treated in the Ophthalmology department of Sousse University Medical Center (Tunisia), from January 1987 to July 2012. Initial treatment was surgical excision with a standard margin of 4mm or a single radiation treatment. When excision was incomplete, we had the choice between further excision, radiotherapy or a "wait and see" approach. Mean follow-up in our study was 11.5 months with range from 1 month to 14 years. We treated 169 tumors in 165 patients, with three patients out of 168 having refused the proposed treatment. Primary radiotherapy was performed in 4 cases in patients presenting with large tumors and refusing disfiguring surgery. For the 165 other tumors (95.9%), surgical excision was performed. Surgical margins were clear in 106 cases (64.2%) and positive in 37 cases (22.4%). No residual tumor was noted in 2 cases for which biopsy was initially performed, and margins could not be visualized in 20 cases (12.1%) due to the small size or fragmentation of the specimen. For the incompletely excised tumors, we performed a second excision in three cases (8%), radiotherapy in 11 cases (29.7%) and a "wait and see" approach in 22 cases (59.4%). The recurrence rate was 6.9%, with a mean time of 32.8 months until recurrence. Basal cell carcinoma represents the most frequent malignant tumor of the eyelids. Surgery remains the standard treatment. The "wait and see" approach offers an interesting option for the management of incompletely excised basal cell carcinoma, especially with low risk lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Binding of a 100-kDa ubiquitous factor to the human prolactin promoter is required for its basal and hormone-regulated activity.

    PubMed

    Peers, B; Nalda, A M; Monget, P; Voz, M L; Belayew, A; Martial, J A

    1992-11-15

    cAMP strongly stimulates the activity of the human prolactin (hPRL) promoter. We have previously shown that two types of cis-element are required for this cAMP regulation; binding sites for the pituitary-specific factor Pit-1, and the sequence spanning nucleotides -115 to -85 (named sequence A). Sequence A contains the TGACG motif found in the consensus sequence of the cAMP-responsive element (CRE). In this study, we show that a mutation in the TGACG motif of sequence A strongly reduces not only the cAMP regulation but also the Ca2+ regulation and basal activity of the hPRL promoter. Furthermore, gel-shift assays indicate that the mutation prevents binding of a ubiquitous factor which is not the CRE-binding protein. Southwestern experiments suggest that this ubiquitous factor's molecular mass is approximately 100 kDa. We conclude that binding of a 100-kDa ubiquitous factor to sequence A is required for full basal and hormonal regulation of hPRL-promoter activity.

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis, anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, and risk of squamous cell and basal cell skin cancer: cohort study based on nationwide prospectively recorded data from Sweden.

    PubMed

    Raaschou, Pauline; Simard, Julia F; Asker Hagelberg, Charlotte; Askling, Johan

    2016-01-28

    To investigate the risk of squamous cell and basal cell skin cancer in patients with rheumatoid arthritis naive to biologic drugs, in patients starting tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor treatment, and in the general population. Population based cohort study. Nationwide data from Sweden. Cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis naive to biologics (n=46 409), cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting TNF inhibitor treatment as first biologic in 1998-2012 (n=12 558), and matched general population comparator cohort, identified through national quality of care and health registers. Hazard ratio of first in situ or invasive squamous cell skin cancer (1998-2012) and first basal cell cancer (2004-12). For basal cell cancer, the hazard ratio was 1.22 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.41) comparing biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients with the general population and 1.14 (0.98 to 1.33; 236 v 1587 events) comparing TNF inhibitor treated patients with biologics-naive patients. For squamous cell cancer, the hazard ratio was 1.88 (1.74 to 2.03) comparing biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients with the general population and 1.30 (1.10 to 1.55; 191 v 847 events) comparing TNF inhibitors with biologics-naive patients; the latter translated to an annual number needed to harm in the order of 1600. Among people with a history of squamous cell or basal cell cancer, TNF inhibitors did not further increase risks. A small to moderately increased risk of basal cell cancer was seen in biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients, with no further effect of TNF inhibitors. For squamous cell cancer, the risk was nearly doubled in biologics-naive patients, with a further 30% increase in risk among patients treated with TNF inhibitors; this translates to one additional case for every 1600 years of treatment experience, assuming that this association reflected causality. Vigilance regarding skin malignancies may be advisable in rheumatoid arthritis

  1. Factors affecting enhanced video quality preferences

    PubMed Central

    Satgunam, PremNandhini; Woods, Russell L; Bronstad, P Matthew; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    The development of video quality metrics requires methods for measuring perceived video quality. Most such metrics are designed and tested using databases of images degraded by compression and scored using opinion ratings. We studied video quality preferences for enhanced images of normally-sighted participants using the method of paired comparisons with a thorough statistical analysis. Participants (n=40) made pair-wise comparisons of high definition (HD) video clips enhanced at four different levels using a commercially available enhancement device. Perceptual scales were computed with binary logistic regression to estimate preferences for each level and to provide statistical inference of the differences among levels and the impact of other variables. While moderate preference for enhanced videos was found, two unexpected effects were also uncovered: (1) Participants could be broadly classified into two groups: those who preferred enhancement ("Sharp") and those who disliked enhancement ("Smooth"). (2) Enhancement preferences depended on video content, particularly for human faces to be enhanced less. The results suggest that algorithms to evaluate image quality (at least for enhancement) may need to be adjusted or applied differentially based on video content and viewer preferences. The possible impact of similar effects on image quality of compressed video needs to be evaluated. PMID:24107400

  2. Transcription factor Sp1 is necessary for basal calmodulin gene transcription and for its selective stimulation by insulin.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S S; Palazzolo, M R; Takahashi, T; Raghow, R

    1997-11-01

    Insulin positively regulates transcription of rat calmodulin (CaM) I gene and activates the low Km cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE). To elucidate the mechanism of transcriptional regulation, rat hepatoma (H-411E) cells were transfected with DNA constructs containing the putative CaM promoters coupled to a luciferase reporter and challenged with insulin. Activation of the full length 1835 bp rat CaM I promoter containing all three Sp1 sites or truncated promoters with combinations of one to three of the Sp1 sites was studied in Sp1 deficient Drosophilia SL2 cells and in SL2 cells co-transfected with an Sp1 expression vector and re-challenged with insulin. Our results demonstrate that Sp1 is obligatory for basal activation of the CaM promoter. The maximal insulin stimulation of CaM promoter is elicited only if it contains at least two Sp1 sites.

  3. Mutations in ACTRT1 and its enhancer RNA elements lead to aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling in inherited and sporadic basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Bal, Elodie; Park, Hyun-Sook; Belaid-Choucair, Zakia; Kayserili, Hülya; Naville, Magali; Madrange, Marine; Chiticariu, Elena; Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Cagnard, Nicolas; Kuonen, Francois; Bachmann, Daniel; Huber, Marcel; Le Gall, Cindy; Côté, Francine; Hanein, Sylvain; Rosti, Rasim Özgür; Aslanger, Ayca Dilruba; Waisfisz, Quinten; Bodemer, Christine; Hermine, Olivier; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Labeille, Bruno; Caux, Frédéric; Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Philip, Nicole; Levy, Nicolas; Taieb, Alain; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Headon, Denis J; Gyapay, Gabor; Magnaldo, Thierry; Fraitag, Sylvie; Crollius, Hugues Roest; Vabres, Pierre; Hohl, Daniel; Munnich, Arnold; Smahi, Asma

    2017-09-04

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common human cancer, results from aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Although most cases of BCC are sporadic, some forms are inherited, such as Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndrome (BDCS)-a cancer-prone genodermatosis with an X-linked, dominant inheritance pattern. We have identified mutations in the ACTRT1 gene, which encodes actin-related protein T1 (ARP-T1), in two of the six families with BDCS that were examined in this study. High-throughput sequencing in the four remaining families identified germline mutations in noncoding sequences surrounding ACTRT1. These mutations were located in transcribed sequences encoding enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) and were shown to impair enhancer activity and ACTRT1 expression. ARP-T1 was found to directly bind to the GLI1 promoter, thus inhibiting GLI1 expression, and loss of ARP-T1 led to activation of the Hedgehog pathway in individuals with BDCS. Moreover, exogenous expression of ACTRT1 reduced the in vitro and in vivo proliferation rates of cell lines with aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. In summary, our study identifies a disease mechanism in BCC involving mutations in regulatory noncoding elements and uncovers the tumor-suppressor properties of ACTRT1.

  4. Basal forebrain activation enhances between-trial reliability of low-frequency local field potentials (LFP) and spiking activity in tree shrew primary visual cortex (V1).

    PubMed

    De Luna, Paolo; Veit, Julia; Rainer, Gregor

    2017-06-28

    Brain state has profound effects on neural processing and stimulus encoding in sensory cortices. While the synchronized state is dominated by low-frequency local field potential (LFP) activity, low-frequency LFP power is suppressed in the desynchronized state, where a concurrent enhancement in gamma power is observed. Recently, it has been shown that cortical desynchronization co-occurs with enhanced between-trial reliability of spiking activity in sensory neurons, but it is currently unclear whether this effect is also evident in LFP signals. Here, we address this question by recording both spike trains and LFP in primary visual cortex during natural movie stimulation, and using isoflurane anesthesia and basal forebrain (BF) electrical activation as proxies for synchronized and desynchronized brain states. We show that indeed, low-frequency LFP modulations ("LFP events") also occur more reliably following BF activation. Interestingly, while being more reliable, these LFP events are smaller in amplitude compared to those generated in the synchronized brain state. We further demonstrate that differences in reliability of spiking activity between cortical states can be linked to amplitude and probability of LFP events. The correlated temporal dynamics between low-frequency LFP and spiking response reliability in visual cortex suggests that these effects may both be the result of the same neural circuit activation triggered by BF stimulation, which facilitates switching between processing of incoming sensory information in the desynchronized and reverberation of internal signals in the synchronized state.

  5. Adherent basal plate myometrial fibers in the delivered placenta as a risk factor for development of subsequent placenta accreta.

    PubMed

    Linn, Rebecca L; Miller, Emily S; Lim, Grace; Ernst, Linda M

    2015-12-01

    Placenta accreta is implantation of chorionic tissue directly upon the myometrium without normal intervening decidua. The clinical significance of myometrial fibers attached to the basal plate (BPMYO) has yet to be fully elucidated. To determine the importance of depth and quantity of BPMYO in predicting subsequent accreta in the next pregnancy. Women with placentas from two successive pregnancies submitted for pathologic evaluation were included. 50 cases had clinical and/or pathologic diagnosis of accreta in an index pregnancy. 100 controls had no evidence of accreta in an index pregnancy. H&E slides were re-reviewed and stage of accreta/BPMYO was determined. The stages were defined as: Stage 0-no BPMYO; Stage 1-BPMYO with intervening decidua; Stage 2 < 2 decidual cells separating myometrium from chorionic tissue; Stage 3-accreta; Stage 4-increta; Stage 5-percreta. The amount of BPMYO for each placenta was quantified. Prior placentas of cases were twice as likely to have BPMYO compared to controls (84%vs42%, P < 0.001). The frequency of stage 1 BPMYO was not significantly different between the two groups (46%v40%, P = 0.489), but cases were more likely to have higher stages of BPMYO (stage 2-3) in a prior placenta (38%vs2%, P < 0.001). A significantly higher number of BPMYO foci and a larger proportion of BPMYO on the basal plate (6.2%vs0.7%, P < 0.001) in cases compared to controls. Small amounts and low stage BPMYO (stage 1) may be common; however, higher stages of BPMYO (stage 2-3) and greater quantities of BPMYO in a delivered placenta are significantly associated with the subsequent development of accreta. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Short-term ethanol exposure causes imbalanced neurotrophic factor allocation in the basal forebrain cholinergic system: a novel insight into understanding the initial processes of alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takanori; Kusaka, Takashi; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Ohta, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Shingo; Warita, Katsuhiko; Jamal, Mostofa; Wang, Zhi-Yu; Ueki, Masaaki; Liu, Jun-Qian; Yakura, Tomiko; Tamai, Motoki; Sumitani, Kazunori; Hosomi, Naohisa; Takeuchi, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol ingestion affects both motor and cognitive functions. One brain system that is influenced by ethanol is the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic projection system, which projects to diverse neocortical and limbic areas. The BF is associated with memory and cognitive function. Our primary interest is the examination of how regions that receive BF cholinergic projections are influenced by short-term ethanol exposure through alterations in the mRNA levels of neurotrophic factors [nerve growth factor/TrkA, brain-derived neurotrophic factor/TrkB, and glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)/GDNF family receptor α1]. Male BALB/C mice were fed a liquid diet containing 5 % (v/v) ethanol. Pair-fed control mice were maintained on an identical liquid diet, except that the ethanol was isocalorically substituted with sucrose. Mice exhibiting signs of ethanol intoxication (stages 1-2) were used for real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses. Among the BF cholinergic projection regions, decreased levels of GDNF mRNA and increased levels of TrkB mRNA were observed in the basal nucleus, and increased levels of TrkB mRNA were observed in the cerebral cortex. There were no significant alterations in the levels of expression of relevant neurotrophic factors in the septal nucleus and hippocampus. Given that neurotrophic factors function in retrograde/anterograde or autocrine/paracrine mechanisms and that BF cholinergic projection regions are neuroanatomically connected, these findings suggested that an imbalanced allocation of neurotrophic factor ligands and receptors is an initial phenomenon in alcohol addiction. The exact mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in the BF cholinergic system are unknown. However, our results provide a novel notion for the understanding of the initial processes in alcohol addiction.

  7. Mechanism of enhanced fibroblast arachidonic acid metabolism by mononuclear cell factor.

    PubMed Central

    Whiteley, P J; Needleman, P

    1984-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with an infiltration of mononuclear cells, fibroblast proliferation, and elevated levels of prostaglandin (PG) E2. Mononuclear cell conditioned factor (MNCF) medium (5%) stimulated a 100-fold increase in basal human dermal fibroblast PGE2 release over 48 h as compared with fibroblasts that were incubated with control medium (conditioned medium prepared without cells). The MNCF-induced PGE2 production was suppressed by protein synthesis inhibitors. Fibroblasts pretreated with control medium released PGE2 only modestly in response to 1 nM bradykinin for 1 h (basal, 50 +/- 7 pg PGE2/micrograms protein; stimulated, 104 +/- 12 pg PGE2/micrograms protein), whereas cells that had been pretreated with MNCF showed a greatly facilitated bradykinin-induced release of PGE2. (basal, 297 +/- 59 pg PGE2/micrograms protein; stimulated, 866 +/- 85 pg PGE2/micrograms protein). The exaggerated agonist response is not specific for bradykinin because platelet-derived growth factor elicits a similar response. Exogenous arachidonic acid conversion to PGE2 was also facilitated (two- to threefold) by MNCF pretreatment as compared with control. Both the enhanced agonist-stimulated and exogenous arachidonic acid-induced PGE2 release from the MNCF pretreated cells were inhibited by actinomyin D or cycloheximide. A kinetic study of microsomal cyclooxygenase prepared from fibroblasts pretreated with MNCF showed a threefold increase in the maximum velocity (Vmax) but the same Michaelis constant (Km) as control-treated cells. This augmented arachidonic acid metabolism and subsequent enhanced PGE2 production may play an important role in macrophage-fibroblast interactions at sites of inflammation. PMID:6439745

  8. The evolutionary origin of the Runx/CBFbeta transcription factors – Studies of the most basal metazoans

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Members of the Runx family of transcriptional regulators, which bind DNA as heterodimers with CBFβ, are known to play critical roles in embryonic development in many triploblastic animals such as mammals and insects. They are known to regulate basic developmental processes such as cell fate determination and cellular potency in multiple stem-cell types, including the sensory nerve cell progenitors of ganglia in mammals. Results In this study, we detect and characterize the hitherto unexplored Runx/CBFβ genes of cnidarians and sponges, two basal animal lineages that are well known for their extensive regenerative capacity. Comparative structural modeling indicates that the Runx-CBFβ-DNA complex from most cnidarians and sponges is highly similar to that found in humans, with changes in the residues involved in Runx-CBFβ dimerization in either of the proteins mirrored by compensatory changes in the binding partner. In situ hybridization studies reveal that Nematostella Runx and CBFβ are expressed predominantly in small isolated foci at the base of the ectoderm of the tentacles in adult animals, possibly representing neurons or their progenitors. Conclusion These results reveal that Runx and CBFβ likely functioned together to regulate transcription in the common ancestor of all metazoans, and the structure of the Runx-CBFβ-DNA complex has remained extremely conserved since the human-sponge divergence. The expression data suggest a hypothesis that these genes may have played a role in nerve cell differentiation or maintenance in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. PMID:18681949

  9. Manus Track Preservation Bias as a Key Factor for Assessing Trackmaker Identity and Quadrupedalism in Basal Ornithopods

    PubMed Central

    Castanera, Diego; Vila, Bernat; Razzolini, Novella L.; Falkingham, Peter L.; Canudo, José I.; Manning, Phillip L.; Galobart, Àngel

    2013-01-01

    Background The Las Cerradicas site (Tithonian–Berriasian), Teruel, Spain, preserves at least seventeen dinosaur trackways, some of them formerly attributed to quadrupedal ornithopods, sauropods and theropods. The exposure of new track evidence allows a more detailed interpretation of the controversial tridactyl trackways as well as the modes of locomotion and taxonomic affinities of the trackmakers. Methodology/Principal Findings Detailed stratigraphic analysis reveals four different levels where footprints have been preserved in different modes. Within the tridactyl trackways, manus tracks are mainly present in a specific horizon relative to surface tracks. The presence of manus tracks is interpreted as evidence of an ornithopod trackmaker. Cross-sections produced from photogrammetric digital models show different depths of the pes and manus, suggesting covariance in loading between the forelimbs and the hindlimbs. Conclusions/Significance Several features (digital pads, length/width ratio, claw marks) of some ornithopod pes tracks from Las Cerradicas are reminiscent of theropod pedal morphology. This morphological convergence, combined with the shallow nature of the manus tracks, which reduces preservation potential, opens a new window into the interpretation of these tridactyl tracks. Thus, trackmaker assignations during the Jurassic–Cretaceous interval of purported theropod trackways may potentially represent ornithopods. Moreover, the Las Cerradicas trackways are further evidence for quadrupedalism among some basal small- to medium-sized ornithopods from this time interval. PMID:23349817

  10. Studying electric field enhancement factor of the nanostructured emission surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zartdinov, A. N.; Nikiforov, K. A.

    2016-08-01

    Mathematical model of nanostructured field emission surface is proposed. In order to determine geometrical parameters of the surface structure digital processing of scanning electron microscopy images was used. Effective value of local electrical field enhancement factor is defined and calculated within the Fowler-Nordheim theory. It was found effective enhancement factor decreases as the applied electrical field increases for a fixed geometry.

  11. Factors associated with reaching or not reaching target HbA1c after initiation of basal or premixed insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J; Schmitt, H; Jiang, H H; Ivanyi, T

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate factors associated with reaching or not reaching target glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels by analysing the respective contributions of fasting hyperglycaemia (FHG), also referred to as basal hyperglycaemia, vs postprandial hyperglycaemia (PHG) before and after initiation of a basal or premixed insulin regimen in patients with type 2 diabetes. This post-hoc analysis of insulin-naïve patients in the DURABLE study randomised to receive either insulin glargine or insulin lispro mix 25 evaluated the percentages of patients achieving a target HbA1c of <7.0% (<53mmol/mol) per baseline HbA1c quartiles, and the effect of each insulin regimen on the relative contributions of PHG and FHG to overall hyperglycaemia. Patients had comparable demographic characteristics and similar HbA1c and FHG values at baseline in each HbA1c quartile regardless of whether they reached the target HbA1c. The higher the HbA1c quartile, the greater was the decrease in HbA1c, but also the smaller the percentage of patients achieving the target HbA1c. HbA1c and FHG decreased more in patients reaching the target, resulting in significantly lower values at endpoint in all baseline HbA1c quartiles with either insulin treatment. Patients not achieving the target HbA1c had slightly higher insulin doses, but lower total hypoglycaemia rates. Smaller decreases in FHG were associated with not reaching the target HbA1c, suggesting a need to increase basal or premixed insulin doses to achieve targeted fasting plasma glucose and improve patient response before introducing more intensive prandial insulin regimens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of basal JNK activity by small interfering RNAs enhances cisplatin sensitivity and decreases DNA repair in T98G glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Parra, Eduardo; Gutiérrez, Luis; Ferreira, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of basal Jun kinase (JNK) activity by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) enhances cisplatin sensitivity and decreases DNA repair in T98G glioblastoma cells. Although the JNK pathway has been extensively studied in recent years, little is known concerning the signaling pathways that control their expression in glioma cells. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs) in the regulation of T98G glioblastoma cells treated with cisplatin in the presence or absence of siRNAs against JNK1 and JNK2. Addition of either small interfering JNK1-siRNA or JNK2-siRNA induced decreased DNA repair and sensitized the T98G glioblastoma cells to the DNA damaging drug cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum). This effect was associated with reduced cell survival and loss of anchorage‑independent colony formation. The results indicate that effective inhibition of the JNK pathway significantly sensitizes glioblastoma cells to cisplatin, a compound of proven clinical value whose spectrum of application is limited by resistance phenomena.

  13. The human airway epithelial basal cell transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Neil R; Shaykhiev, Renat; Walters, Matthew S; Wang, Rui; Zwick, Rachel K; Ferris, Barbara; Witover, Bradley; Salit, Jacqueline; Crystal, Ronald G

    2011-05-04

    The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population. Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the "human airway basal cell signature" as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels. The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem/progenitor cells of the human airway epithelium.

  14. The Human Airway Epithelial Basal Cell Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Zwick, Rachel K.; Ferris, Barbara; Witover, Bradley; Salit, Jacqueline; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population. Methodology/Principal Findings Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the “human airway basal cell signature” as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels. Conclusion/Significance The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem

  15. Cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate basal and tumour necrosis factor-α-induced regulation of myosin light chain kinase gene activity

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Dongmei; Ma, Thomas Y

    2008-01-01

    The patients with Crohn's disease (CD) have a ‘leaky gut’ manifested by an increase in intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) permeability. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a proto-typical pro-inflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in intestinal inflammation of CD. An important pro-inflammatory action of TNF-α is to cause a functional opening of intestinal TJ barrier. Previous studies have shown that TNF-α increase in TJ permeability was regulated by an increase in myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) gene activity and protein expression. The major aim of this study was to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate basal and TNF-α-induced increase in MLCK gene activity. By progressive 5′ deletion, minimal MLCK promoter was localized between −313 to +118 on MLCK promoter. A p53 binding site located within minimal promoter region was identified as an essential determinant for basal promoter activity. A 4 bp start site and a 5 bp downstream promoter element were required for MLCK gene activity. TNF-α-induced increase in MLCK promoter activity was mediated by NF-κB activation. There were eight κB binding sites on MLCK promoter. The NF-κB1 site at +48 to +57 mediated TNF-α-induced increase in MLCK promoter activity. The NF-κB2 site at −325 to −316 had a repressive role on promoter activity. The opposite effects on promoter activity were due to differences in the NF-κB dimer type binding to the κB sites. p50/p65 dimer preferentially binds to the NF-κB1 site and up-regulates promoter activity; while p50/p50 dimer preferentially binds to the NF-κB2 site and down-regulates promoter activity. In conclusion, we have identified the minimal MLCK promoter region, essential molecular determinants and molecular mechanisms that mediate basal and TNF-α-induced modulation of MLCK promoter activity in Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. These studies provide novel insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum basal levels is not affected by power training in mobility-limited older adults - A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hvid, L G; Nielsen, M K F; Simonsen, C; Andersen, M; Caserotti, P

    2017-04-06

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potential important factor involved in neuroplasticity, and may be a mediator for eliciting adaptations in neuromuscular function and physical function in older individuals following physical training. As power training taxes the neural system to a very high extent, it may be particularly effective in terms of eliciting increases in systemic BDNF levels. We examined the effects of 12weeks of power training on mature BDNF (mBDNF) and total BDNF (tBDNF) in mobility-limited older adults from the Healthy Ageing Network of Competence (HANC) study. We included 47 older men and women: n=22 in the training group (TG: progressive high intensity power training, 2 sessions per week; age 82.7±5.4years, 55% women) and n=25 in the control group (CG: no interventions; age 82.2±4.5years, 76% women). Following overnight fasting, basal serum levels of mBDNF and tBDNF were assessed (human ELISA kits) at baseline and post-intervention. At baseline, mBDNF and tBDNF levels were comparable in the two groups, TG and CG. Post-intervention, no significant within-group or between-group changes were observed in mBDNF or tBDNF. Moreover, when divided into responder tertiles based upon changes in mBDNF and tBDNF (i.e. decliners, maintainers, improvers), respectively, comparable findings were observed for TG and CG. Altogether, basal systemic levels of serum mBDNF and tBDNF are not affected in mobility-limited older adults following 12-weeks of power training, and do not appear to be a major mechanistic factor mediating neuroplasticity in mobility-limited older adults.

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment of tissue-engineered mucosa enhances secretion of angiogenic factors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tra, Wendy Maria Wilhelmina; Spiegelberg, Linda; Tuk, Bastiaan; Hovius, Steven Eric Ruden; Perez-Amodio, Soledad

    2014-05-01

    The survival of tissue-engineered mucosa (TEM) after implantation is mostly dependent on the presence of blood vessels for continuous oxygen supply. Therefore the stimulation of vascularization of TEM is essential to improve survival in vivo. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, used to improve wound healing, stimulates the secretion of angiogenic factors. In this study we evaluated the effect of daily HBO treatments on TEM for 1, 3, or 5 consecutive days. Overall histology with hematoxylin-eosin staining showed no apparent changes after one treatment. After three and five HBO treatments, the basal layer became irregular and pyknotic cells were observed. Measurements of the viable epithelium showed significant thinning after one and five treatments, however, proliferation was not affected. The angiogenic factors keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGFbasic), and placental growth factor (PlGF) were significantly increased after one HBO treatment, whereas after three treatments a significant decrease of FGFbasic and PlGF was seen. After five treatments KGF, PlGF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were significantly increased. One HBO treatment of TEM enhances the secretion of important angiogenic factors, hereby potentially improving the survival rate after in vivo implantation.

  18. Transcription factors mediate long-range enhancer-promoter interactions.

    PubMed

    Nolis, Ilias K; McKay, Daniel J; Mantouvalou, Eva; Lomvardas, Stavros; Merika, Menie; Thanos, Dimitris

    2009-12-01

    We examined how remote enhancers establish physical communication with target promoters to activate gene transcription in response to environmental signals. Although the natural IFN-beta enhancer is located immediately upstream of the core promoter, it also can function as a classical enhancer element conferring virus infection-dependent activation of heterologous promoters, even when it is placed several kilobases away from these promoters. We demonstrated that the remote IFN-beta enhancer "loops out" the intervening DNA to reach the target promoter. These chromatin loops depend on sequence-specific transcription factors bound to the enhancer and the promoter and thus can explain the specificity observed in enhancer-promoter interactions, especially in complex genetic loci. Transcription factor binding sites scattered between an enhancer and a promoter can work as decoys trapping the enhancer in nonproductive loops, thus resembling insulator elements. Finally, replacement of the transcription factor binding sites involved in DNA looping with those of a heterologous prokaryotic protein, the lambda repressor, which is capable of loop formation, rescues enhancer function from a distance by re-establishing enhancer-promoter loop formation.

  19. Protein profile of basal prostate epithelial progenitor cells--stage-specific embryonal antigen 4 expressing cells have enhanced regenerative potential in vivo.

    PubMed

    Höfner, Thomas; Klein, Corinna; Eisen, Christian; Rigo-Watermeier, Teresa; Haferkamp, Axel; Sprick, Martin R

    2016-04-01

    The long-term propagation of basal prostate progenitor cells ex vivo has been very difficult in the past. The development of novel methods to expand prostate progenitor cells in vitro allows determining their cell surface phenotype in greater detail. Mouse (Lin(-)Sca-1(+) CD49f(+) Trop2(high)-phenotype) and human (Lin(-) CD49f(+) TROP2(high)) basal prostate progenitor cells were expanded in vitro. Human and mouse cells were screened using 242 anti-human or 176 antimouse monoclonal antibodies recognizing the cell surface protein profile. Quantitative expression was evaluated at the single-cell level using flow cytometry. Differentially expressed cell surface proteins were evaluated in conjunction with the known CD49f(+)/TROP2(high) phenotype of basal prostate progenitor cells and characterized by in vivo sandwich-transplantation experiments using nude mice. The phenotype of basal prostate progenitor cells was determined as CD9(+)/CD24(+)/CD29(+)/CD44(+)/CD47(+)/CD49f(+)/CD104(+)/CD147(+)/CD326(+)/Trop2(high) of mouse as well as human origin. Our analysis revealed several proteins, such as CD13, Syndecan-1 and stage-specific embryonal antigens (SSEAs), as being differentially expressed on murine and human CD49f(+) TROP2(+) basal prostate progenitor cells. Transplantation experiments suggest that CD49f(+) TROP2(high) SSEA-4(high) human prostate basal progenitor cells to be more potent to regenerate prostate tubules in vivo as compared with CD49f(+) TROP2(high) or CD49f(+) TROP2(high) SSEA-4(low) cells. Determination of the cell surface protein profile of functionally defined murine and human basal prostate progenitor cells reveals differentially expressed proteins that may change the potency and regenerative function of epithelial progenitor cells within the prostate. SSEA-4 is a candidate cell surface marker that putatively enables a more accurate identification of the basal PESC lineage.

  20. Reduced insulin-receptor mediated modulation of striatal dopamine release by basal insulin as a possible contributing factor to hyperdopaminergia in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Hahn, Margaret; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Gerretsen, Philip; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and chronic neuropsychiatric disorder which affects 1% of the world population. Using the brain imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET) it has been demonstrated that persons with schizophrenia have greater dopamine transmission in the striatum compared to healthy controls. However, little progress has been made as to elucidating other biological mechanisms which may account for this hyperdopaminergic state in this disease. Studies in animals have demonstrated that insulin receptors are expressed on midbrain dopamine neurons, and that insulin from the periphery acts on these receptors to modify dopamine transmission in the striatum. This is pertinent given that several lines of evidence suggest that insulin receptor functioning may be abnormal in the brains of persons with schizophrenia. Post-mortem studies have shown that persons with schizophrenia have less than half the number of cortical insulin receptors compared to healthy persons. Moreover, these post-mortem findings are unlikely due to the effects of antipsychotic treatment; studies in cell lines and animals suggest antipsychotics enhance insulin receptor functioning. Further, hyperinsulinemia - even prior to antipsychotic use - seems to be related to less psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Collectively, these data suggest that midbrain insulin receptor functioning may be abnormal in persons with schizophrenia, resulting in reduced insulin-mediated regulation of dopamine transmission in the striatum. Such a deficit may account for the hyperdopaminergic state observed in these patients and would help guide the development of novel treatment strategies. We hypothesize that, (i) insulin receptor expression and/or function is reduced in midbrain dopamine neurons in persons with schizophrenia, (ii) basal insulin should reduce dopaminergic transmission in the striatum via these receptors, and (iii) this modulation of dopaminergic transmission by basal insulin

  1. Novel role of Engrailed 1 as a prosurvival transcription factor in basal-like breast cancer and engineering of interference peptides block its oncogenic function

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, A S; Graves, L M; Blancafort, P

    2014-01-01

    Basal-like breast tumors are aggressive cancers associated with high proliferation and metastasis. Chemotherapy is currently the only treatment option; however, resistance often occurs resulting in recurrence and patient death. Some extremely aggressive cancers are also associated with hypoxia, inflammation and high leukocyte infiltration. Herein, we discovered that the neural-specific transcription factor, Engrailed 1 (EN1), is exclusively overexpressed in these tumors. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of EN1 triggered potent and selective cell death. In contrast, ectopic overexpression of EN1 in normal cells activated survival pathways and conferred resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Exogenous expression of EN1 cDNA reprogrammed the breast epithelial cells toward a long-lived, neural-like phenotype displaying dopaminergic markers. Gene expression microarrays demonstrated that the EN1 cDNA altered transcription of a high number of inflammatory molecules, notably chemokines and chemokine receptors, which could mediate prosurvival pathways. To block EN1 function, we engineered synthetic interference peptides (iPeps) comprising the EN1-specific sequences that mediate essential protein-protein interactions necessary for EN1 function and an N-terminal cell-penetrating peptide/nuclear localization sequence. These EN1-iPeps rapidly mediated a strong apoptotic response in tumor cells overexpressing EN1, with no toxicity to normal or non EN1-expressing cells. Delivery of EN1-iPeps into basal-like cancer cells significantly decreased the fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of chemotherapeutic drugs routinely used to treat breast cancer. Lastly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that EN1-iPeps captured targets involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Importantly, the EN1-iPeps bound the glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) target, which

  2. Targeted delivery of nerve growth factor to the cholinergic basal forebrain of Alzheimer's disease patients: application of a second-generation encapsulated cell biodelivery device.

    PubMed

    Eyjolfsdottir, Helga; Eriksdotter, Maria; Linderoth, Bengt; Lind, Göran; Juliusson, Bengt; Kusk, Philip; Almkvist, Ove; Andreasen, Niels; Blennow, Kaj; Ferreira, Daniel; Westman, Eric; Nennesmo, Inger; Karami, Azadeh; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Kadir, Ahmadul; Nordberg, Agneta; Sundström, Erik; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Wall, Anders; Wiberg, Maria; Winblad, Bengt; Seiger, Åke; Wahlberg, Lars; Almqvist, Per

    2016-07-07

    Targeted delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) has emerged as a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to its regenerative effects on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. This hypothesis has been tested in patients with AD using encapsulated cell biodelivery of NGF (NGF-ECB) in a first-in-human study. We report our results from a third-dose cohort of patients receiving second-generation NGF-ECB implants with improved NGF secretion. Four patients with mild to moderate AD were recruited to participate in an open-label, phase Ib dose escalation study with a 6-month duration. Each patient underwent stereotactic implant surgery with four NGF-ECB implants targeted at the cholinergic basal forebrain. The NGF secretion of the second-generation implants was improved by using the Sleeping Beauty transposon gene expression technology and an improved three-dimensional internal scaffolding, resulting in production of about 10 ng NGF/device/day. All patients underwent successful implant procedures without complications, and all patients completed the study, including implant removal after 6 months. Upon removal, 13 of 16 implants released NGF, 8 implants released NGF at the same rate or higher than before the implant procedure, and 3 implants failed to release detectable amounts of NGF. Of 16 adverse events, none was NGF-, or implant-related. Changes from baseline values of cholinergic markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) correlated with cortical nicotinic receptor expression and Mini Mental State Examination score. Levels of neurofilament light chain (NFL) protein increased in CSF after NGF-ECB implant, while glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) remained stable. The data derived from this patient cohort demonstrate the safety and tolerability of sustained NGF release by a second-generation NGF-ECB implant to the basal forebrain, with uneventful surgical implant and removal of NGF-ECB implants in a new dosing cohort of four patients with AD. Clinical

  3. Novel role of Engrailed 1 as a prosurvival transcription factor in basal-like breast cancer and engineering of interference peptides block its oncogenic function.

    PubMed

    Beltran, A S; Graves, L M; Blancafort, P

    2014-09-25

    Basal-like breast tumors are aggressive cancers associated with high proliferation and metastasis. Chemotherapy is currently the only treatment option; however, resistance often occurs resulting in recurrence and patient death. Some extremely aggressive cancers are also associated with hypoxia, inflammation and high leukocyte infiltration. Herein, we discovered that the neural-specific transcription factor, Engrailed 1 (EN1), is exclusively overexpressed in these tumors. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of EN1 triggered potent and selective cell death. In contrast, ectopic overexpression of EN1 in normal cells activated survival pathways and conferred resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Exogenous expression of EN1 cDNA reprogrammed the breast epithelial cells toward a long-lived, neural-like phenotype displaying dopaminergic markers. Gene expression microarrays demonstrated that the EN1 cDNA altered transcription of a high number of inflammatory molecules, notably chemokines and chemokine receptors, which could mediate prosurvival pathways. To block EN1 function, we engineered synthetic interference peptides (iPeps) comprising the EN1-specific sequences that mediate essential protein-protein interactions necessary for EN1 function and an N-terminal cell-penetrating peptide/nuclear localization sequence. These EN1-iPeps rapidly mediated a strong apoptotic response in tumor cells overexpressing EN1, with no toxicity to normal or non EN1-expressing cells. Delivery of EN1-iPeps into basal-like cancer cells significantly decreased the fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of chemotherapeutic drugs routinely used to treat breast cancer. Lastly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that EN1-iPeps captured targets involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Importantly, the EN1-iPeps bound the glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) target, which

  4. Enhancement factor in low-coherence enhanced backscattering and its applications for characterizing experimental skin carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingjing; Xu, Zhengbin; Song, Qinghai; Konger, Raymond L.; Kim, Young L.

    2010-05-01

    We experimentally study potential mechanisms by which the enhancement factor in low-coherence enhanced backscattering (LEBS) can probe subtle variations in radial intensity distribution in weakly scattering media. We use enhanced backscattering of light by implementing either (1) low spatial coherence illumination or (2) multiple spatially independent detections using a microlens array under spatially coherent illumination. We show that the enhancement factor in these configurations is a measure of the integrated intensity within the localized coherence or detection area, which can exhibit strong dependence on small perturbations in scattering properties. To further evaluate the utility of the LEBS enhancement factor, we use a well-established animal model of cutaneous two-stage chemical carcinogenesis. In this pilot study, we demonstrate that the LEBS enhancement factor can be substantially altered at a stage of preneoplasia. Our animal result supports the idea that early carcinogenesis can cause subtle alterations in the scattering properties that can be captured by the LEBS enhancement factor. Thus, the LEBS enhancement factor has the potential as an easily measurable biomarker in skin carcinogenesis.

  5. Diagnosing the Ice Crystal Enhancement Factor in the Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Xiping; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Matsui, Toshihisa; Xie, Shaocheng; Lang, Stephen; Zhang, Minghua; Starr, David O'C; Li, Xiaowen; Simpson, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    Recent modeling studies have revealed that ice crystal number concentration is one of the dominant factors in the effect of clouds on radiation. Since the ice crystal enhancement factor and ice nuclei concentration determine the concentration, they are both important in quantifying the contribution of increased ice nuclei to global warming. In this study, long-term cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations are compared with field observations to estimate the ice crystal enhancement factor in tropical and midlatitudinal clouds, respectively. It is found that the factor in tropical clouds is 10 3-104 times larger than that of mid-latitudinal ones, which makes physical sense because entrainment and detrainment in the Tropics are much stronger than in middle latitudes. The effect of entrainment/detrainment on the enhancement factor, especially in tropical clouds, suggests that cloud microphysical parameterizations should be coupled with subgrid turbulence parameterizations within CRMs to obtain a more accurate depiction of cloud-radiative forcing.

  6. The Helicobacter pylori Anti-Sigma Factor FlgM Is Predominantly Cytoplasmic and Cooperates with the Flagellar Basal Body Protein FlhA ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Melanie; Borchert, Sophie; Niehus, Eike; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Gripp, Eugenia; Bajceta, Afrodita; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Hughes, Kelly T.; Josenhans, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori requires flagellar motility and orientation to persist actively in its habitat. A particular feature of flagella in most Helicobacter species including H. pylori is a membraneous flagellar sheath. The anti-sigma factor FlgM of H. pylori is unusual, since it lacks an N-terminal domain present in other FlgM homologs, e.g., FlgM of Salmonella spp., whose regulatory function is intimately coupled to its secretion through the flagellar type III secretion system. The aim of the present study was to characterize the localization and secretion of the short H. pylori FlgM in the presence of a flagellar sheath and to elucidate its interaction with other flagellar proteins, such as the basal body protein FlhA, which was previously shown to cooperate with FlgM for regulation. H. pylori FlgM was only released into the medium in minor amounts in wild-type bacteria, where the bulk amount of the protein was retained in the cytoplasm. Some FlgM was detected in the flagellar fraction. FlgM was expressed in flhA mutants and was less soluble and differentially localized in bacterial fractions of the flhA mutant in comparison to wild-type bacteria. FlgM-green fluorescent protein and FlgM-V5 translational fusions were generated and expressed in H. pylori. FlgM displayed a predominantly polar distribution and interacted with the C-terminal domain of FlhA (FlhAC). We suggest that, in H. pylori, FlgM secretion may not be paramount for its regulatory function and that protein interactions at the flagellar basal body may determine the turnover and localization of functional FlgM. PMID:19465658

  7. Increases in mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in the frontal cortex and basal forebrain during chronic sleep restriction in rats: possible role in initiating allostatic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, J K; Deurveilher, S; Currie, R W; Fawcett, J P; Semba, K

    2014-09-26

    Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) has various negative consequences on cognitive performance and health. Using a rat model of CSR that uses alternating cycles of 3h of sleep deprivation (using slowly rotating activity wheels) and 1h of sleep opportunity continuously for 4 days ('3/1' protocol), we previously observed not only homeostatic but also allostatic (adaptive) sleep responses to CSR. In particular, non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) electroencephalogram (EEG) delta power, an index of sleep intensity, increased initially and then declined gradually during CSR, with no rebound during a 2-day recovery period. To study underlying mechanisms of these allostatic responses, we examined the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is known to regulate NREMS EEG delta activity, during the same CSR protocol. Mature BDNF protein levels were measured in the frontal cortex and basal forebrain, two brain regions involved in sleep and EEG regulation, and the hippocampus, using Western blot analysis. Adult male Wistar rats were housed in motorized activity wheels, and underwent the 3/1 CSR protocol for 27 h, for 99 h, or for 99 h followed by 24h of recovery. Additional rats were housed in either locked wheels (locked wheel controls [LWCs]) or unlocked wheels that rats could rotate freely (wheel-running controls [WRCs]). BDNF levels did not differ between WRC and LWC groups. BDNF levels were increased, compared to the control levels, in all three brain regions after 27 h, and were increased less strongly after 99 h, of CSR. After 24h of recovery, BDNF levels were at the control levels. This time course of BDNF levels parallels the previously reported changes in NREMS delta power during the same CSR protocol. Changes in BDNF protein levels in the cortex and basal forebrain may be part of the molecular mechanisms underlying allostatic sleep responses to CSR.

  8. Hyperspectral anomaly detection using enhanced global factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paciencia, Todd J.; Bauer, Kenneth W.

    2016-05-01

    Dimension reduction techniques have become one popular unsupervised approach used towards detecting anomalies in hyperspectral imagery. Although demonstrating promising results in the literature on specific images, these methods can become difficult to directly interpret and often require tuning of their parameters to achieve high performance on a specific set of images. This lack of generality is also compounded by the need to remove noise and atmospheric absorption spectral bands from the image prior to detection. Without a process for this band selection and to make the methods adaptable to different image compositions, performance becomes difficult to maintain across a wider variety of images. Here, we present a framework that uses factor analysis to provide a robust band selection and more meaningful dimension reduction with which to detect anomalies in the imagery. Measurable characteristics of the image are used to create an automated decision process that allows the algorithm to adjust to a particular image, while maintaining high detection performance. The framework and its algorithms are detailed, and results are shown for forest, desert, sea, rural, urban, anomaly-sparse, and anomaly-dense imagery types from different sensors. Additionally, the method is compared to current state-of-the-art methods and is shown to be computationally efficient.

  9. Subsequent squamous- and basal-cell carcinomas in kidney-transplant recipients after the first skin cancer: cumulative incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wisgerhof, Hermina C; Edelbroek, Jeroen R J; de Fijter, Johan W; Haasnoot, Geert W; Claas, Frans H J; Willemze, Rein; Bavinck, Jan N Bouwes

    2010-05-27

    The risk of skin cancer is highly increased in kidney-transplant recipients (KTR), but the risk of subsequent skin cancers is less well studied. The aim of this study was to estimate the cumulative incidence of subsequent squamous- and basal-cell carcinomas (BCCs) and to analyze potential risk factors. All histologically confirmed skin cancers between 1966 and 2006 were included in the study and counted. Cumulative incidences of subsequent squamous- and BCCs were calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. For the analyses of risk factors, we used Cox proportional hazard analyses. A total of 239 (13%) of 1906 KTR developed skin cancer of whom 222 were diagnosed in our hospital. Altogether 167 (75%) of these 222 patients developed multiple skin cancers. The cumulative incidence of a second skin cancer increased from 32%, 1 year, to 59%, 3 years, and 72%, 5 years after the first skin cancer. KTR who started with squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC) mainly developed SCC and recipients who started with BCC mainly developed BCC as second skin cancer. Immunosuppression with azathioprine in combination with prednisone was associated with a significantly increased risk of subsequent SCCs but not with subsequent BCCs. Skin cancer multiplicity is common in KTR. Patients with a first skin cancer are at increased risk for more skin cancers and need to be carefully checked for subsequent skin cancers.

  10. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic condition. The gene linked to the syndrome is known as PTCH (" ...

  11. BMP9 (bone morphogenetic protein 9) induces NGF as an autocrine/paracrine cholinergic trophic factor in developing basal forebrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Aletta C; Mellott, Tiffany J; Lopez-Coviella, Ignacio; Tallini, Yvonne N; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Follettie, Maximillian T; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof

    2010-06-16

    Acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis and release from basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN) innervating the cerebral cortex and hippocampus are essential processes for normal learning, memory and attention. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 9 is a cholinergic differentiation factor in the developing septum that increases ACh synthesis and choline acetyltransferase (Chat) gene expression both in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the possible induction of cholinergic trophic factors by BMP9 in murine septal cells. Nerve growth factor (NGF) protein expression and secretion into the medium was increased in cultured embryonic septal cells treated with BMP9, and partially mediated BMP9-induced acetylcholine production and Chat gene expression. BMP9-induced Ngf gene expression was detected in postmitotic cells, required new protein synthesis and was blocked by BMP type I receptor inhibition. Cholinergic neurons were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting based on either transgenic expression of green fluorescent protein driven by the Chat promoter or NGF receptor (p75) immunostaining. Although both noncholinergic and cholinergic neurons in untreated cultures expressed similar low levels of Ngf, increased Ngf gene expression was restricted to Chat-positive neurons in BMP9-treated cultures. Likewise, similar levels of Ngf mRNA were detected in p75-negative and p75-positive septal cells, yet only p75-positive BFCN increased their Ngf gene expression when treated with BMP9, and only these cells expressed the Alk1 BMP receptor. The data suggest an autocrine/paracrine role for NGF in the development and/or maintenance of BFCN and imply that the stimulation of NGF production and release contributes to the cholinergic-supportive properties of BMP9.

  12. Elastic enhancement factor: From mesoscopic systems to macroscopic analogous devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Valentin V.; Zhirov, Oleg V.

    2015-05-01

    Excess of probabilities of elastic processes over inelastic ones is a characteristic feature of the chaotic resonance scattering predicted by the random matrix theory (RMT). Quantitatively, this phenomenon is characterized by the elastic enhancement factor F(β ) that is, essentially, a typical ratio of elastic and inelastic cross sections. Being measured experimentally, this quantity can provide important information on the character of dynamics of the complicated intermediate open system formed on the intermediate stage of various resonance scattering processes. We discuss properties of the enhancement factor in a wide scope from mesoscopoic systems as, for example, heavy nuclei to macroscopic electromagnetic analogous devices imitating two-dimensional quantum billiards. We demonstrate a substantial qualitative distinction between the elastic enhancement factor's peculiarities in these two cases. A complete analytical solution is found for the case of systems without time-reversal symmetry and only a few equivalent open scattering channels.

  13. Imaging basal ganglia function

    PubMed Central

    BROOKS, DAVID J.

    2000-01-01

    In this review, the value of functional imaging for providing insight into the role of the basal ganglia in motor control is reviewed. Brain activation findings in normal subjects and Parkinson's disease patients are examined and evidence supporting the existence for functionally independent distributed basal ganglia-frontal loops is presented. It is argued that the basal ganglia probably act to focus and filter cortical output, optimising the running of motor programs. PMID:10923986

  14. Phenomenological local field enhancement factor distributions around electromagnetic hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Ru, E. C.; Etchegoin, P. G.

    2009-05-01

    We propose a general phenomenological description of the enhancement factor distribution for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and other related phenomena exploiting large local field enhancements at hot spots. This description extends naturally the particular case of a single (fixed) hot spot, and it is expected to be "universal" for many classes of common SERS substrates containing a collection of electromagnetic hot spots with varying geometrical parameters. We further justify it from calculations with generalized Mie theory. The description studied here provides a useful starting point for a qualitative (and semiquantitative) understanding of experimental data and, in particular, the analysis of the statistics of single-molecule SERS events.

  15. Opening of an RNA polymerase II promoter occurs in two distinct steps and requires the basal transcription factors IIE and IIH.

    PubMed

    Holstege, F C; van der Vliet, P C; Timmers, H T

    1996-04-01

    We have studied promoter opening in assays reconstituted with purified RNA polymerase II and basal transcription factors. We found that creating a region of heteroduplex DNA around the start site of the adenovirus major late (AdML) promoter circumvents the requirement for TFIIE and TFIIH in transcription. The critical size and position of the heteroduplex region that alleviates the requirement for TFIIE and TFIIH is six nucleotides, from -4 to +2. Promoter opening was investigated directly with potassium permanganate (KMnO4), a chemical probe specific for single-stranded thymidines. We found that KMnO4-detectable opening of the AdML promoter requires the presence of the complete pre-initiation complex, DBpolFEH, and that opening occurs in two discrete steps. First, dependent on ATP but prior to initiation, the -9 to +1 region becomes single-stranded. Second, formation of the first phosphodiester bond results in expansion of the open region to the +8 position. Our results lead to a model in which the critical function of the TFIIH-associated DNA helicases is to create a single-stranded region. This gives RNA polymerase II access to the nucleotides of the template strand and allows expansion of the open region upon formation of the first phosphodiester bond.

  16. Opening of an RNA polymerase II promoter occurs in two distinct steps and requires the basal transcription factors IIE and IIH.

    PubMed Central

    Holstege, F C; van der Vliet, P C; Timmers, H T

    1996-01-01

    We have studied promoter opening in assays reconstituted with purified RNA polymerase II and basal transcription factors. We found that creating a region of heteroduplex DNA around the start site of the adenovirus major late (AdML) promoter circumvents the requirement for TFIIE and TFIIH in transcription. The critical size and position of the heteroduplex region that alleviates the requirement for TFIIE and TFIIH is six nucleotides, from -4 to +2. Promoter opening was investigated directly with potassium permanganate (KMnO4), a chemical probe specific for single-stranded thymidines. We found that KMnO4-detectable opening of the AdML promoter requires the presence of the complete pre-initiation complex, DBpolFEH, and that opening occurs in two discrete steps. First, dependent on ATP but prior to initiation, the -9 to +1 region becomes single-stranded. Second, formation of the first phosphodiester bond results in expansion of the open region to the +8 position. Our results lead to a model in which the critical function of the TFIIH-associated DNA helicases is to create a single-stranded region. This gives RNA polymerase II access to the nucleotides of the template strand and allows expansion of the open region upon formation of the first phosphodiester bond. Images PMID:8612591

  17. Promoter occupancy of the basal class I transcription factor A differs strongly between active and silent VSG expression sites in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tu N; Müller, Laura S M; Park, Sung Hee; Siegel, T Nicolai; Günzl, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Monoallelic expression within a gene family is found in pathogens exhibiting antigenic variation and in mammalian olfactory neurons. Trypanosoma brucei, a lethal parasite living in the human bloodstream, expresses variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) from 1 of 15 bloodstream expression sites (BESs) by virtue of a multifunctional RNA polymerase I. The active BES is transcribed in an extranucleolar compartment termed the expression site body (ESB), whereas silent BESs, located elsewhere within the nucleus, are repressed epigenetically. The regulatory mechanisms, however, are poorly understood. Here we show that two essential subunits of the basal class I transcription factor A (CITFA) predominantly occupied the promoter of the active BES relative to that of a silent BES, a phenotype that was maintained after switching BESs in situ. In these experiments, high promoter occupancy of CITFA was coupled to high levels of both promoter-proximal RNA abundance and RNA polymerase I occupancy. Accordingly, fluorescently tagged CITFA-7 was concentrated in the nucleolus and the ESB. Because a ChIP-seq analysis found that along the entire BES, CITFA-7 is specifically enriched only at the promoter, our data strongly indicate that monoallelic BES transcription is activated by a mechanism that functions at the level of transcription initiation.

  18. Somatic Cell Fusions Reveal Extensive Heterogeneity in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying; Subedee, Ashim; Bloushtain-Qimron, Noga; Savova, Virginia; Krzystanek, Marcin; Li, Lewyn; Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Zak, Alexander; Flacker, Mary Jo; Li, Mei; Lin, Jessica J; Sukumar, Saraswati; Suzuki, Hiromu; Long, Henry; Szallasi, Zoltan; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Maruyama, Reo; Polyak, Kornelia

    2015-06-16

    Basal-like and luminal breast tumors have distinct clinical behavior and molecular profiles, yet the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. To interrogate processes that determine these distinct phenotypes and their inheritance pattern, we generated somatic cell fusions and performed integrated genetic and epigenetic (DNA methylation and chromatin) profiling. We found that the basal-like trait is generally dominant and is largely defined by epigenetic repression of luminal transcription factors. Definition of super-enhancers highlighted a core program common in luminal cells but a high degree of heterogeneity in basal-like breast cancers that correlates with clinical outcome. We also found that protein extracts of basal-like cells are sufficient to induce a luminal-to-basal phenotypic switch, implying a trigger of basal-like autoregulatory circuits. We determined that KDM6A might be required for luminal-basal fusions, and we identified EN1, TBX18, and TCF4 as candidate transcriptional regulators of the luminal-to-basal switch. Our findings highlight the remarkable epigenetic plasticity of breast cancer cells.

  19. Basal cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and location of the cancer. Early treatment by a dermatologist may result in a cure ... is required to watch for new sites of basal cell cancer.

  20. Effective Factors in Enhancing School Manager's Job Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Mirzamani, S. Mahmoud; Esfahani, Hamideh Darb

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examines the effective factors in enhancing school manager's job motivation from viewpoint of school mangers, teachers, education department managerial and staff experts in teaching, and also identifies and prioritizes each of these factors and indicators. Method For selecting a representative sample and increasing measurement precision, 587 people were selected using classified random sampling. The measurement tool was a 79-questionnaire made by the researcher. The questionnaire was collected using motivation theories and observing the findings of previous researches. Then, according to the three-stage Delphi technique, the questionnaire was sent to experts in education. The reliability of instruments was measured by calculating Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, and total reliability of the test was 0.99; the validity of the instrument was assessed by factor analysis (Construct Validity) and its load factor was 0.4 which was high. Results The results from factor analysis shows that the effective factors in enhancing manager's job motivation are as follows: self- actualization (51%) including 28 indices; social factor (7/9%) including 22 indices; self-esteem (3.2%) including 17 indices; job desirable features (2.2%) including 4 indices; physiologic (1.8%) including 4 indices; and job richness (1.6%) including 4 indices. Conclusions The results show that the six mentioned factors determine 68% of the total variance of manager's motivation. PMID:22952541

  1. Domestic Wood Products Manufacturing Trends and Factors to Enhance Competitiveness

    Treesearch

    Urs Buehlmann; Matthew Bumgardner; Albert Schuler; Rich Christianson; Rich Christianson

    2003-01-01

    There is little question that imports have captured a substantial portion of the domestic furniture market. However, there is much speculation and concern as to the future of this and related industries. This study sought to obtain industry perspectives of trends in domestic manufacturing and importing, and to identify factors that can enhance domestic competitiveness...

  2. Nanoparticle Properties and Synthesis Effects on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Enhancement Factor: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has enabled researchers to map the specific chemical makeup of surfaces, solutions, and even cells. However, the inherent insensitivity of the technique makes it difficult to use and statistically complicated. When Raman active molecules are near gold or silver nanoparticles, the Raman intensity is significantly amplified. This phenomenon is referred to as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The extent of SERS enhancement is due to a variety of factors such as nanoparticle size, shape, material, and configuration. The choice of Raman reporters and protective coatings will also influence SERS enhancement. This review provides an introduction to how these factors influence signal enhancement and how to optimize them during synthesis of SERS nanoparticles. PMID:25884017

  3. WRKY72-type transcription factors contribute to basal immunity in tomato and Arabidopsis as well as gene-for-gene resistance mediated by the tomato R gene Mi-1.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Kishor K; Atamian, Hagop S; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Eulgem, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    WRKY transcription factors play a central role in transcriptional reprogramming associated with plant immune responses. However, due to functional redundancy, typically the contribution of individual members of this family to immunity is only subtle. Using microarray analysis, we found that the paralogous tomato WRKY genes SlWRKY72a and b are transcriptionally up-regulated during disease resistance mediated by the R gene Mi-1. Virus-induced gene silencing of these two genes in tomato resulted in a clear reduction of Mi-1-mediated resistance as well as basal defense against root-knot nematodes (RKN) and potato aphids. Using Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants, we found that their Arabidopsis ortholog, AtWRKY72, is also required for full basal defense against RKN as well as to the oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Despite their similar roles in basal defense against RKN in both tested plant species, WRKY72-type transcription factors in tomato, but not in Arabidopsis, clearly contributed to basal defense against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Of the five R genes that we tested in tomato and Arabidopsis, only Mi-1 appeared to be dependent on WRKY72-type transcription factors. Interestingly, AtWRKY72 target genes, identified by microarray analysis of H. arabidopsidis-triggered transcriptional changes, appear to be largely non-responsive to analogs of the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA). Thus, similarly to Mi-1, which in part acts independently of SA, AtWRKY72 appears to utilize SA-independent defense mechanisms. We propose that WRKY72-type transcription factors play a partially conserved role in basal defense in tomato and Arabidopsis, a function that has been recruited to serve Mi-1-dependent immunity.

  4. Finding electromagnetic and chemical enhancement factors of surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Dvoynenko, Mykhaylo M; Wang, Juen-Kai

    2007-12-15

    The authors report two methods to determine electromagnetic and chemical enhancement factors in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which are based on saturation property and decay dynamics of photoluminescence and concurrent measurements of photoluminescence and resonance Raman scattering intensities. Considerations for experimental implementation are discussed. This study is expected to facilitate the understanding of SERS mechanisms and the advancement of the usage of SERS in chemical and biological sensor applications.

  5. Silibinin and its 2,3-dehydro-derivative inhibit basal cell carcinoma growth via suppression of mitogenic signaling and transcription factors activation.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Cynthia; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Chapla; Wempe, Michael F; Biedermann, David; Valentová, Kateřina; Kren, Vladimir; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide, and its current treatment options are insufficient and toxic. Surprisingly, unlike several other malignancies, chemopreventive efforts against BCC are almost lacking. Silibinin, a natural agent from milk thistle seeds, has shown strong efficacy against several cancers including ultraviolet radiation-induced skin (squamous) cancer; however, its potential activity against BCC is not yet examined. Herein, for the first time, we report the efficacy of silibinin and its oxidation product 2,3-dehydrosilibinin (DHS) against BCC both in vitro and in vivo using ASZ (p53 mutated) and BSZ (p53 deleted) cell lines derived from murine BCC tumors. Both silibinin and DHS significantly inhibited cell growth and clonogenicity while inducing apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with DHS showing higher activity at lower concentrations. Both agents also inhibited the mitogenic signaling by reducing EGFR, ERK1/2, Akt, and STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed the activation of transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1. More importantly, in an ectopic allograft model, oral administration of silibinin and DHS (200 mg/kg body weight) strongly inhibited the ASZ tumor growth by 44% and 71% (P < 0.05), respectively, and decreased the expression of proliferation biomarkers (PCNA and cyclin D1) as well as NF-κB p50 and c-Fos in the tumor tissues. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence for the efficacy and usefulness of silibinin and its derivative DHS against BCC, and suggest the need for additional studies with these agents in pre-clinical and clinical BCC chemoprevention and therapy models. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mass Enhancement Factor and Fermi Surface in YCo 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shingo; Harima, Hisatomo

    1998-08-01

    An FLAPW electronic structure and Fermi surfaces are calculated for YCo2.Mass enhancement factor is also calculated based on the Fermi liquid theory.Investigations are performed by treating the Fermi energy as a parameteraccording to a previous study.Reasonable mass enhancement is obtained by assuming the Fermi liquidtheory resulting in a reasonable range of values of Udd for Co-d electrons.The same calculation for CeCo2 reveals that CeCo2 is a differentmagnetic system.

  7. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lanoue, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly occurring cancer in the world and overall incidence is still on the rise. While typically a slow-growing tumor for which metastases is rare, basal cell carcinoma can be locally destructive and disfiguring. Given the vast prevalence of this disease, there is a significant overall burden on patient well-being and quality of life. The current mainstay of basal cell carcinoma treatment involves surgical modalities, such as electrodessication and curettage, excision, cryosurgery, and Mohs micrographic surgery. Such methods are typically reserved for localized basal cell carcinoma and offer high five-year cure rates, but come with the risk of functional impairment, disfigurement, and scarring. Here, the authors review the evidence and indications for nonsurgical treatment modalities in cases where surgery is impractical, contraindicated, or simply not desired by the patient. PMID:27386043

  8. Sommerfeld-enhanced J -factors for dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddy, Kimberly K.; Kumar, Jason; Strigari, Louis E.; Wang, Mei-Yu

    2017-06-01

    For models in which dark matter annihilation is Sommerfeld-enhanced, the annihilation cross section increases at low relative velocities. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) have low characteristic dark matter particle velocities and are thus ideal candidates to study such models. In this paper, we model the dark matter phase space of dSphs as isotropic and spherically symmetric and determine the J factors for several of the most important targets for indirect dark matter searches. For Navarro-Frenk-White density profiles, we quantify the scatter in the J factor arising from the astrophysical uncertainty in the dark matter potential. We show that, in Sommerfeld-enhanced models, the ordering of the most promising dSphs may be different relative to the standard case of velocity-independent cross sections. This result can have important implications for derived upper limits on the annihilation cross section, or on possible signals, from dSphs.

  9. Q -factor enhancement in all-dielectric anisotropic nanoresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-11-01

    It is proposed and demonstrated that the Q factor of optical resonators can be significantly enhanced by introducing an extra anisotropic cladding. We study the optical resonances of all-dielectric core-shell nanoresonators and show that radially anisotropic claddings can be employed to squeeze more energy into the core area, leading to stronger light confinement and thus significant Q -factor enhancement. We further demonstrate that the required homogenous claddings of unusual anisotropy parameters can be realized through all-dielectric multilayered isotropic structures. It is expected that the mechanism we have revealed not only offers extra flexibilities of resonance manipulations for conventional dielectric structures, but also may shed new light onto investigations into unconventional nanostructures consisting of two-dimensional materials that are intrinsically highly anisotropic.

  10. Large linewidth-enhancement factor in a microchip laser

    SciTech Connect

    Szwaj, Christophe; Lacot, Eric; Hugon, Olivier

    2004-09-01

    We evidence experimentally that the linewidth-enhancement factor {alpha} can take a rather large value ({alpha}{approx_equal}1) for a nonsemiconductor laser, here a Nd{sup 3+}: YAG microchip laser. This measure is performed using an original and simple method adapted to this kind of laser and based on the variations of the laser relaxation frequency when the laser is subjected to an optical feedback.

  11. Elevated SP-1 transcription factor expression and activity drives basal and hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Karl; Onion, David; Kumari, Rajendra; Watson, Susan A; Knox, Alan J

    2012-11-16

    VEGF plays a central role in angiogenesis in cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors have increased microvascular density, localized hypoxia, and high VEGF expression levels; however, there is a lack of understanding of how oncogenic and tumor microenvironment changes such as hypoxia lead to greater VEGF expression in lung and other cancers. We show that NSCLC cells secreted higher levels of VEGF than normal airway epithelial cells. Actinomycin D inhibited all NSCLC VEGF secretion, and VEGF minimal promoter-luciferase reporter constructs were constitutively active until the last 85 base pairs before the transcription start site containing three SP-1 transcription factor-binding sites; mutation of these VEGF promoter SP-1-binding sites eliminated VEGF promoter activity. Furthermore, dominant negative SP-1, mithramycin A, and SP-1 shRNA decreased VEGF promoter activity, whereas overexpression of SP-1 increased VEGF promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated SP-1, p300, and PCA/F histone acetyltransferase binding and histone H4 hyperacetylation at the VEGF promoter in NSCLC cells. Cultured NSCLC cells expressed higher levels of SP-1 protein than normal airway epithelial cells, and double-fluorescence immunohistochemistry showed a strong correlation between SP-1 and VEGF in human NSCLC tumors. In addition, hypoxia-driven VEGF expression in NSCLC cells was SP-1-dependent, with hypoxia increasing SP-1 activity and binding to the VEGF promoter. These studies are the first to demonstrate that overexpression of SP-1 plays a central role in hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion.

  12. Elevated SP-1 Transcription Factor Expression and Activity Drives Basal and Hypoxia-induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, Karl; Onion, David; Kumari, Rajendra; Watson, Susan A.; Knox, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    VEGF plays a central role in angiogenesis in cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors have increased microvascular density, localized hypoxia, and high VEGF expression levels; however, there is a lack of understanding of how oncogenic and tumor microenvironment changes such as hypoxia lead to greater VEGF expression in lung and other cancers. We show that NSCLC cells secreted higher levels of VEGF than normal airway epithelial cells. Actinomycin D inhibited all NSCLC VEGF secretion, and VEGF minimal promoter-luciferase reporter constructs were constitutively active until the last 85 base pairs before the transcription start site containing three SP-1 transcription factor-binding sites; mutation of these VEGF promoter SP-1-binding sites eliminated VEGF promoter activity. Furthermore, dominant negative SP-1, mithramycin A, and SP-1 shRNA decreased VEGF promoter activity, whereas overexpression of SP-1 increased VEGF promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated SP-1, p300, and PCA/F histone acetyltransferase binding and histone H4 hyperacetylation at the VEGF promoter in NSCLC cells. Cultured NSCLC cells expressed higher levels of SP-1 protein than normal airway epithelial cells, and double-fluorescence immunohistochemistry showed a strong correlation between SP-1 and VEGF in human NSCLC tumors. In addition, hypoxia-driven VEGF expression in NSCLC cells was SP-1-dependent, with hypoxia increasing SP-1 activity and binding to the VEGF promoter. These studies are the first to demonstrate that overexpression of SP-1 plays a central role in hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion. PMID:22992725

  13. Wavelet Speech Enhancement Based on Nonnegative Matrix Factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Syu-Siang; Chern, Alan; Tsao, Yu; Hung, Jeih-weih; Lu, Xugang; Lai, Ying-Hui; Su, Borching

    2016-08-01

    For most of the state-of-the-art speech enhancement techniques, a spectrogram is usually preferred than the respective time-domain raw data since it reveals more compact presentation together with conspicuous temporal information over a long time span. However, the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) that creates the spectrogram in general distorts the original signal and thereby limits the capability of the associated speech enhancement techniques. In this study, we propose a novel speech enhancement method that adopts the algorithms of discrete wavelet packet transform (DWPT) and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) in order to conquer the aforementioned limitation. In brief, the DWPT is first applied to split a time-domain speech signal into a series of subband signals without introducing any distortion. Then we exploit NMF to highlight the speech component for each subband. Finally, the enhanced subband signals are joined together via the inverse DWPT to reconstruct a noise-reduced signal in time domain. We evaluate the proposed DWPT-NMF based speech enhancement method on the MHINT task. Experimental results show that this new method behaves very well in prompting speech quality and intelligibility and it outperforms the convnenitional STFT-NMF based method.

  14. Epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chinem, Valquiria Pessoa; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm in humans and its incidence has increased over the last decades. Its high frequency significantly burdens the health system, making the disease a public health issue. Despite the low mortality rates and the rare occurrence of metastases, the tumor may be locally invasive and relapse after treatment, causing significant morbidity. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the main environmental risk factor associated with its cause. However, other elements of risk are described, such as light skin phototypes, advanced age, family history of skin carcinoma, light eyes and blond hair, freckles in childhood and immunosuppression. Behavioral aspects such as occupational sun exposure, rural labor and sunburns at a young age also play a role. Between 30% and 75% of the sporadic cases are associated with patched hedgehog gene mutation, but other genetic changes are also described. The tumor is commonly found in concomitance with skin lesions related to chronic sun exposure, such as actinic keratoses, solar lentigines and facial telangiectasia. The prevention of basal cell carcinoma is based on the knowledge of risk factors, early diagnosis and treatment, as well as on the adoption of specific measures, particularly in susceptible populations. The authors present a review of the epidemiology of basal cell carcinoma.

  15. c-fos sequence necessary for basal expression and induction by epidermal growth factor, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate and the calcium ionophore.

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, T M; Prywes, R; Roeder, R G

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the sequence requirements for induction of the human c-fos gene by epidermal growth factor (EGF), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA), and the calcium ionophore A23187 by transfecting c-fos promoter mutants into HeLa and A431 cells. Induction by both EGF and TPA in HeLa cells required the presence of the c-fos enhancer located at -317 to -298 relative to the mRNA cap site. A23187, however, did not induce expression of the transfected gene, even though it strongly induced expression of the endogenous gene, suggesting that it has different requirements for induction than do EGF and TPA. We have also investigated the role of promoter sequences downstream of the enhancer in general expression and induction of c-fos. A sequence between -97 and -76, which includes an 8-base-pair perfect direct repeat, was needed for efficient general expression but not for induction of the gene. A factor in nuclear extracts that bound specifically to this sequence was detected by a gel mobility shift assay. A 7-base-pair sequence, located between -63 and -57 relative to the mRNA cap site and previously shown to be important for general expression of mouse c-fos, was also important for general expression of the human gene. In addition, this element was important for inducibility by EGF and TPA, since induction was significantly reduced when internal deletion mutants that retained the enhancer but lacked the -63 to -57 sequence element were analyzed in transfecting assays. Images PMID:3119989

  16. LMO2 Enhances Lamellipodia/Filopodia Formation in Basal-Type Breast Cancer Cells by Mediating ARP3-Profilin1 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ye; Wu, Chao; Zhu, Tianhui; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background The human LMO2 gene was first cloned from an acute T lymphocytic leukemia patient; it is primarily expressed in hematopoietic and vascular endothelial systems, and functions as a pivotal transcriptional regulator during embryonic hematopoiesis and angiogenesis. However, some recent reports indicated that LMO2 is widely expressed in many tissues and tumors, predominantly in cytoplasm, and revealed complicated functions on tumor behaviors in a variety of cancer types. As an adaptor molecule, binding partners and function details of LMO2 in these solid tumors need to be further investigated. Material/Methods In this study, we used yeast two-hybrid method to screen potential LMO2 interacting partners, MBP-pulldown, and co-immunoprecipitation assay to confirm protein-protein interactions, and confocal microscopy to reveal the subcellular localization of relevant proteins and actin cytoskeleton changes in relevant cells. Results We found that ARP3 and profilin1 were 2 binding partners of LMO2, primarily in cytoplasm. LMO2. Functionally, LMO2 mediated the assembly of a complex including ARP3, profilin1, and actin monomer, increased actin monomer binding to profilin1, and promoted lamellipodia/filopodia formation in basal-type breast cancer cells. Conclusions Our data indicate a novel functional mechanism of LMO2 in facilitating the delivery of actin monomers to the branched microfilament and increasing lamellipodia/filopodia formation in basal-type breast cancer cells, suggesting a cancer-promoting role of LMO2 in a subtype-dependent manner and its potential as a subtype-specific biomarker for clinical treatment of breast cancers. PMID:28170369

  17. Myocyte enhancer factor 2c, an osteoblast transcription factor identified by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-enhanced mineralization.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Alexandre S; Stephens, Sebastien R; Hobbs, Carl; Hutmacher, Deitmar W; Bacic-Welsh, Desa; Woodruff, Maria Ann; Morrison, Nigel A

    2011-08-26

    Rapid mineralization of cultured osteoblasts could be a useful characteristic in stem cell-mediated therapies for fracture and other orthopedic problems. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a small amphipathic solvent molecule capable of stimulating cell differentiation. We report that, in primary human osteoblasts, DMSO dose-dependently enhanced the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers alkaline phosphatase activity and extracellular matrix mineralization. Furthermore, similar DMSO-mediated mineralization enhancement was observed in primary osteoblast-like cells differentiated from mouse mesenchymal cells derived from fat, a promising source of starter cells for cell-based therapy. Using a convenient mouse pre-osteoblast model cell line MC3T3-E1, we further investigated this phenomenon showing that numerous osteoblast-expressed genes were elevated in response to DMSO treatment and correlated with enhanced mineralization. Myocyte enhancer factor 2c (Mef2c) was identified as the transcription factor most induced by DMSO, among the numerous DMSO-induced genes, suggesting a role for Mef2c in osteoblast gene regulation. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of Mef2c in osteoblast-like cells in mouse mandible, cortical, and trabecular bone. shRNAi-mediated Mef2c gene silencing resulted in defective osteoblast differentiation, decreased alkaline phosphatase activity, and matrix mineralization and knockdown of osteoblast specific gene expression, including osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein. A flow on knockdown of bone-specific transcription factors, Runx2 and osterix by shRNAi knockdown of Mef2c, suggests that Mef2c lies upstream of these two important factors in the cascade of gene expression in osteoblasts.

  18. Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2C, an Osteoblast Transcription Factor Identified by Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO)-enhanced Mineralization*

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Alexandre S.; Stephens, Sebastien R.; Hobbs, Carl; Hutmacher, Deitmar W.; Bacic-Welsh, Desa; Woodruff, Maria Ann; Morrison, Nigel A.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid mineralization of cultured osteoblasts could be a useful characteristic in stem cell-mediated therapies for fracture and other orthopedic problems. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a small amphipathic solvent molecule capable of stimulating cell differentiation. We report that, in primary human osteoblasts, DMSO dose-dependently enhanced the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers alkaline phosphatase activity and extracellular matrix mineralization. Furthermore, similar DMSO-mediated mineralization enhancement was observed in primary osteoblast-like cells differentiated from mouse mesenchymal cells derived from fat, a promising source of starter cells for cell-based therapy. Using a convenient mouse pre-osteoblast model cell line MC3T3-E1, we further investigated this phenomenon showing that numerous osteoblast-expressed genes were elevated in response to DMSO treatment and correlated with enhanced mineralization. Myocyte enhancer factor 2c (Mef2c) was identified as the transcription factor most induced by DMSO, among the numerous DMSO-induced genes, suggesting a role for Mef2c in osteoblast gene regulation. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of Mef2c in osteoblast-like cells in mouse mandible, cortical, and trabecular bone. shRNAi-mediated Mef2c gene silencing resulted in defective osteoblast differentiation, decreased alkaline phosphatase activity, and matrix mineralization and knockdown of osteoblast specific gene expression, including osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein. A flow on knockdown of bone-specific transcription factors, Runx2 and osterix by shRNAi knockdown of Mef2c, suggests that Mef2c lies upstream of these two important factors in the cascade of gene expression in osteoblasts. PMID:21652706

  19. Sludge pretreatment chemistry evaluation: Enhanced sludge washing separation factors

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, N.G.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the work conducted in Fiscal Year 1994 by the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Treatment Science Task. The main purpose of this task, is to provide the technical basis and scientific understanding to support TWRS baseline decisions and actions, such as the development of an enhanced sludge washing process to reduce the volume of waste that will require high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. One objective within the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask was to establish wash factors for various SST (single-shell tank) sludges. First, analytical data were compiled from existing tank waste characterization reports. These data were summarized on tank-specific worksheets that provided a uniform format for reviewing and comparing data, as well as the means to verify whether the data set for each tank was complete. Worksheets were completed for 27 SST wastes. The analytical water wash data provided tank-specific information about the fraction of each component that dissolves with water, i.e., an estimate of tank-specific wash factors for evaluating tank-by-tank processing. These wash data were then used collectively to evaluate some of the wash factors that are assumed for the overall SST waste inventory; specifically, wash factors for elements that would be found primarily in sludges. The final step in this study was to incorporate the characterization and wash factor data into a spreadsheet that provides insight into the effect of enhanced sludge washing on individual tank sludges as well as for groups of sludges that may be representative of different waste types. Spreadsheet results include the estimated mass and percentage of each element that would be removed with washing and leaching. Furthermore, estimated compositions are given of the final wash and leach streams and residual solids, in terms of both concentration and dry weight percent.

  20. Epidemiology of basal-like breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Robert C; Newman, Beth; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Moorman, Patricia G; Conway, Kathleen; Dressler, Lynn G; Smith, Lisa V; Labbok, Miriam H; Geradts, Joseph; Bensen, Jeannette T; Jackson, Susan; Nyante, Sarah; Livasy, Chad; Carey, Lisa; Earp, H Shelton; Perou, Charles M

    2008-05-01

    Risk factors for the newly identified "intrinsic" breast cancer subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive/estrogen receptor-negative) were determined in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based, case-control study of African-American and white women. Immunohistochemical markers were used to subtype 1,424 cases of invasive and in situ breast cancer, and case subtypes were compared to 2,022 controls. Luminal A, the most common subtype, exhibited risk factors typically reported for breast cancer in previous studies, including inverse associations for increased parity and younger age at first full-term pregnancy. Basal-like cases exhibited several associations that were opposite to those observed for luminal A, including increased risk for parity and younger age at first term full-term pregnancy. Longer duration breastfeeding, increasing number of children breastfed, and increasing number of months breastfeeding per child were each associated with reduced risk of basal-like breast cancer, but not luminal A. Women with multiple live births who did not breastfeed and women who used medications to suppress lactation were at increased risk of basal-like, but not luminal A, breast cancer. Elevated waist-hip ratio was associated with increased risk of luminal A in postmenopausal women, and increased risk of basal-like breast cancer in pre- and postmenopausal women. The prevalence of basal-like breast cancer was highest among premenopausal African-American women, who also showed the highest prevalence of basal-like risk factors. Among younger African-American women, we estimate that up to 68% of basal-like breast cancer could be prevented by promoting breastfeeding and reducing abdominal adiposity.

  1. –2518 A/G MCP-1 but not –403 G/A RANTES gene polymorphism is associated with enhanced risk of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zabłotna, Monika; Szczerkowska-Dobosz, Aneta; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna; Sokolowska-Wojdylo, Malgorzata; Nowicki, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polymorphic variants of MCP-1 and RANTES genes and their protein serum levels have been implicated in the increased risk and severity of several malignancies. However, the subject has not been explored in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) patients so far. Aim To investigate the association between monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) (–2518 A/G) and RANTES (–403 G/A) polymorphism and risk and clinical course of BCC. Material and methods The study group consisted of 150 unrelated patients with BCC and 140 healthy, unrelated, age- and sex-matched volunteers. The polymorphisms were analysed using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction method (ARMS-PCR) and single specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR). Serum cytokine levels were measured with ELISA. Results The presence of the MCP-1 –2518 GG genotype was statistically more frequent in BCC patients and it increased the risk of BCC (OR = 2.63, p = 0.003). Genotype –330 GG was statistically more common in patients with less advanced tumours (OR = 2.8, p = 0.017). Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 serum level was statistically higher with GG genotype. In the BCC group MCP-1 serum levels were decreased. Neither polymorphic variants of RANTES nor the chemokine serum concentration differed significantly between the study groups. Conclusions These findings suggest that –2518 A/G MCP-1 polymorphism may be involved in BCC pathogenesis. PMID:27881944

  2. Reappraisal of the Electric Dipole Moment Enhancement Factor for Thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Nataraj, H. S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.; Mukherjee, D.

    2011-05-20

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) enhancement factor of atomic Tl is of considerable interest as it has been used in determining the most accurate limit on the electron EDM to date. However, its value varies from -179 to -1041 in different approximations. In view of the large uncertainties associated with many of these calculations, we perform an accurate calculation employing the relativistic coupled-cluster theory and obtain -466, which in combination with the most accurate measurement of Tl EDM [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 071805 (2002)] yields a new limit for the electron EDM: |d{sub e}|<2.0x10{sup -27}e cm.

  3. Transcription factor-induced enhancer modulations during cell fate conversions.

    PubMed

    van Oevelen, C; Kallin, E M; Graf, T

    2013-10-01

    The activity of transcription factors (TFs) has empowered the reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and alternative lineages. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these processes has expanded our understanding of how novel gene expression programs become activated while old ones are silenced. How TFs modify chromatin and activate requisite enzymes during these processes has recently been discussed in several excellent reviews. Here we discuss the questions of how ectopically expressed TFs access chromatin to modulate enhancers and establish a novel transcriptome during cell reprogramming, lineage conversions and differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of triple-negative and basal-like canine mammary carcinomas using four basal markers.

    PubMed

    Kim, N H; Lim, H Y; Im, K S; Kim, J H; Sur, J-H

    2013-05-01

    Molecular-based classification of canine mammary carcinomas (CMCs) has been a recent research focus. In human breast cancer, triple-negative and basal-like phenotypes are distinct molecular subgroups that are known for their poor prognosis, but these tumours are not yet well defined in the dog. The aim of this study was to determine whether CMCs include triple-negative and basal-like phenotypes by immunohistochemical assessment of expression of the oestrogen receptor (OR), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and four basal markers, cytokeratin (CK) 14, CK5/6, p63 and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this study of 241 CMCs, 45 triple-negative tumours (OR(-), PR(-) and HER2(-)) were identified and this phenotype was associated with an unfavourable prognosis. In these tumours, the expression of CK14, CK5/6 and EGFR was related to clinicopathological parameters, while the expression of p63 was not relevant. The majority of the triple-negative tumours were of the basal-like phenotype, given that 75.6% of them expressed more than two basal markers. However, three of the basal markers were not uniformly expressed; therefore, the proportion of the basal-like phenotype was altered on the basis of the selection of the markers. Although both triple-negative and basal-like phenotypes are distinct entities in CMC, further study is needed to differentiate one from the other.

  5. Life beyond the Basal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, Jeanne; Carbone, Carole

    1987-01-01

    Reading is a tool for learning. The goal for the teaching of reading must be to produce lovers of reading. A holistic approach should replace exclusive dependence on basal readers. Effective methods are the following: (1) language experience approach; (2) word banks; (3) pattern books; (4) sustained silent reading; and (5) directed…

  6. National plan to enhance aviation safety through human factors improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foushee, Clay

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this section of the plan is to establish a development and implementation strategy plan for improving safety and efficiency in the Air Traffic Control (ATC) system. These improvements will be achieved through the proper applications of human factors considerations to the present and future systems. The program will have four basic goals: (1) prepare for the future system through proper hiring and training; (2) develop a controller work station team concept (managing human errors); (3) understand and address the human factors implications of negative system results; and (4) define the proper division of responsibilities and interactions between the human and the machine in ATC systems. This plan addresses six program elements which together address the overall purpose. The six program elements are: (1) determine principles of human-centered automation that will enhance aviation safety and the efficiency of the air traffic controller; (2) provide new and/or enhanced methods and techniques to measure, assess, and improve human performance in the ATC environment; (3) determine system needs and methods for information transfer between and within controller teams and between controller teams and the cockpit; (4) determine how new controller work station technology can optimally be applied and integrated to enhance safety and efficiency; (5) assess training needs and develop improved techniques and strategies for selection, training, and evaluation of controllers; and (6) develop standards, methods, and procedures for the certification and validation of human engineering in the design, testing, and implementation of any hardware or software system element which affects information flow to or from the human.

  7. Ultrasound harmonic enhanced imaging using eigenspace-based coherence factor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua

    2016-12-01

    Tissue harmonic imaging (THI) utilizes harmonic signals generating within the tissue as the result of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation. With inadequate transmitting acoustic energy, THI is incapable to detect the small objects since poor harmonic signals have been generated. In most cases, high transmission energy cannot be guaranteed because of the imaging safety issue or specific imaging modality such as the plane wave imaging (PWI). Discrimination of small point targets such as calcification, however, is particularly important in the ultrasound diagnosis. Few efforts have been made to pursue the THI with high resolution and good small target visibility at the same time. In this paper, we proposed a new eigenspace-based coherence factor (ESBCF) beamformer to solve this problem. A new kind of coherence factor (CF), named as ESBCF, is firstly proposed to detect the point targets. The detected region-of-interest (ROI) is then enhanced adaptively by using a newly developed beamforming method. The ESBCF combines the information from signal eigenspace and coherence factor by expanding the CF to the covariance matrix of signal. Analogous to the image processing but in the radio frequency (RF) data domain, the proposed method fully utilizes the information from the fundamental and harmonic components. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated by simulation and phantom experiments. The improvement of the point contrast ratio (PCR) is 7.6dB in the simulated data, and 6.0dB in the phantom experiment. Thanks to the improved small point detection ability of the ESBCF, the proposed beamforming algorithm can enhance the PCR considerably and maintain the high resolution of the THI at the same time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Harmonic demodulation and minimum enhancement factors in field-enhanced near-field optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Scarpettini, A F; Bragas, A V

    2015-01-01

    Field-enhanced scanning optical microscopy relies on the design and fabrication of plasmonic probes which had to provide optical and chemical contrast at the nanoscale. In order to do so, the scattering containing the near-field information recorded in a field-enhanced scanning optical microscopy experiment, has to surpass the background light, always present due to multiple interferences between the macroscopic probe and sample. In this work, we show that when the probe-sample distance is modulated with very low amplitude, the higher the harmonic demodulation is, the better the ratio between the near-field signal and the interferometric background results. The choice of working at a given n harmonic is dictated by the experiment when the signal at the n + 1 harmonic goes below the experimental noise. We demonstrate that the optical contrast comes from the nth derivative of the near-field scattering, amplified by the interferometric background. By modelling the far and near field we calculate the probe-sample approach curves, which fit very well the experimental ones. After taking a great amount of experimental data for different probes and samples, we conclude with a table of the minimum enhancement factors needed to have optical contrast with field-enhanced scanning optical microscopy. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. [Factors enhancing teachers' occupational wellbeing scale: psychometric analysis].

    PubMed

    Woynarowska-Sołdan, Magdalena; Wyziak-Białowolska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to elaborate the Factors Enhancing Teachers' Occupational Wellbeing Scale for use with teachers from health promoting schools and to provide its psychometric analysis. The sample consisted of 270 teachers from the health promoting schools. The instrument consisted of 45 statements divided into five subscales (working conditions, teachers' community, students and parents' community, organization and workload, professional competences), which are measured from two points of view: assessment of a current situation (a 5-point rating scale from 5 (strongly yes) to 1 (strongly no)) and assessment of needs for the improvement (a 5-point rating scale from 1 (no need) do 5 (very strong need)). Psychometric analysis included the assessment of: reliability (using Cronbach-alpha coefficient), theoretical validity (factor analysis with principal axis extraction) and construct validity (using data concerning self-assessment of general occupational being and assessment of general occupational being of other teachers at school, two hypothesis were tested) and unidimensionality (principal component analysis). Cronbach's a for subscales, assessment of a current situation: 0.75-0.86, and for subscales assessment of needs for the improvement: 0.80-0.93. Factor structure of the scale was convergent with the expected one. Construct validity of the subscales was satisfactory--all hypotheses were confirmed. All subscales were also unidimensional. Psychometric analysis of the scale gave satisfactory results concerning its quality. The scale can be used as a tool in staffs health promotion, especially in the health promoting schools.

  10. Perceptual factors that influence use of computer enhanced visual displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, David; Boehm-Davis, Debbie

    1993-01-01

    This document is the final report for the NASA/Langley contract entitled 'Perceptual Factors that Influence Use of Computer Enhanced Visual Displays.' The document consists of two parts. The first part contains a discussion of the problem to which the grant was addressed, a brief discussion of work performed under the grant, and several issues suggested for follow-on work. The second part, presented as Appendix I, contains the annual report produced by Dr. Ann Fulop, the Postdoctoral Research Associate who worked on-site in this project. The main focus of this project was to investigate perceptual factors that might affect a pilot's ability to use computer generated information that is projected into the same visual space that contains information about real world objects. For example, computer generated visual information can identify the type of an attacking aircraft, or its likely trajectory. Such computer generated information must not be so bright that it adversely affects a pilot's ability to perceive other potential threats in the same volume of space. Or, perceptual attributes of computer generated and real display components should not contradict each other in ways that lead to problems of accommodation and, thus, distance judgments. The purpose of the research carried out under this contract was to begin to explore the perceptual factors that contribute to effective use of these displays.

  11. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Young, Christian D.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B.; Gatza, Michael L.; Morrison, Meghan M.; Moore, Preston D.; Whitwell, Corbin A.; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E.; Silva, Grace O.; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A.; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J.; Perou, Charles M.; Weaver, Alissa M.; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A.; Chang, Jenny C.; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. PMID:25953087

  12. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian D; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B; Gatza, Michael L; Morrison, Meghan M; Moore, Preston D; Whitwell, Corbin A; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E; Silva, Grace O; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J; Perou, Charles M; Weaver, Alissa M; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Chang, Jenny C; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Bud detachment in hydra requires activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor and a Rho–ROCK–myosin II signaling pathway to ensure formation of a basal constriction

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Oliver; Apel, David; Steinmetz, Patrick; Lange, Ellen; Hopfenmüller, Simon; Ohler, Kerstin; Sudhop, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hydra propagates asexually by exporting tissue into a bud, which detaches 4 days later as a fully differentiated young polyp. Prerequisite for detachment is activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling. The mechanism which enables constriction and tissue separation within the monolayered ecto‐ and endodermal epithelia is unknown. Results: Histological sections and staining of F‐actin by phalloidin revealed conspicuous cell shape changes at the bud detachment site indicating a localized generation of mechanical forces and the potential enhancement of secretory functions in ectodermal cells. By gene expression analysis and pharmacological inhibition, we identified a candidate signaling pathway through Rho, ROCK, and myosin II, which controls bud base constriction and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Specific regional myosin phosphorylation suggests a crucial role of ectodermal cells at the detachment site. Inhibition of FGFR, Rho, ROCK, or myosin II kinase activity is permissive for budding, but represses myosin phosphorylation, rearrangement of F‐actin and constriction. The young polyp remains permanently connected to the parent by a broad tissue bridge. Conclusions: Our data suggest an essential role of FGFR and a Rho‐ROCK‐myosin II pathway in the control of cell shape changes required for bud detachment. Developmental Dynamics 246:502–516, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:28411398

  14. Multiethnic Literature; Supplements for Basal Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florez-Tighe, Viola; And Others

    Children's literature can be used effectively to enrich the reading content of basal reading materials with stories and information by and about ethnic minorities. Developing an ethnic cultural web for a literary selection can stimulate language and enhance the thought processes of students. Using the webbing process, elementary school students…

  15. Temperature dependence of the enhancement factor of cidnp created by the photolysis of benzoyl peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Terazima, Masahide; Azumi, Tohru

    1990-03-01

    The enhancement factor of the nuclear polarization created by the photolysis of benzoyl peroxide in CDCl 3 is measured at various temperatures. The experimental enhancement factor agrees with the theoretical value calculated by the theory proposed by Pedersen and Freed. Further, the temperature dependence of the enhancement factor is well interpreted by the continuous diffusion model.

  16. Genetic dissection of basal defence responsiveness in accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shakoor; Van Hulten, Marieke; Martin, Janet; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M; Ton, Jurriaan

    2011-07-01

    Basal resistance involves a multitude of pathogen- and herbivore-inducible defence mechanisms, ranging from localized callose deposition to systemic defence gene induction by salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA). In this study, we have explored and dissected genetic variation in the responsiveness of basal defence mechanisms within a selection of Arabidopsis accessions. Responsiveness of JA-induced PDF1.2 gene expression was associated with enhanced basal resistance against the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina and the herbivore Spodoptera littoralis. Conversely, accessions showing augmented PR-1 induction upon SA treatment were more resistant to the hemi-biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, and constitutively expressed defence-related transcription factor (TF) genes. Unexpectedly, accessions with primed responsiveness to SA deposited comparatively little callose after treatment with microbe-associated molecular patterns. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified two loci regulating flagellin-induced callose and one locus regulating SA-induced PR-1 expression. The latter QTL was found to contribute to basal resistance against P. syringae. None of the defence regulatory QTLs influenced plant growth, suggesting that the constitutive defence priming conferred by these loci is not associated with major costs on plant growth. Our study demonstrates that natural variation in basal resistance can be exploited to identify genetic loci that prime the plant's basal defence arsenal.

  17. Great enhancements in the thermoelectric power factor of BiSbTe nanostructured films with well-ordered interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiu-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Hua; Kuo, Yung-Kang

    2013-08-07

    An innovative concept of twin-enhanced thermoelectricity was proposed to fundamentally resolve the high electrical resistance while not degrading the phonon scattering of the thermoelectric nanoassemblies. Under this frame, a variety of highly oriented and twinned bismuth antimony telluride (BixSb2-xTe3) nanocrystals were successfully fabricated by a large-area pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) technique on insulated silicon substrates at various deposition temperatures. The significant presence of the nonbasal- and basal-plane twins across the hexagonal BiSbTe nanocrystals, which were experimentally and systematically observed for the first time, evidently contributes to the unusually high electrical conductivity of ~2700 S cm(-1) and the power factor of ~25 μW cm(-1) K(-2) as well as the relatively low thermal conductivity of ~1.1 W m(-1) K(-1) found in these nanostructured films.

  18. A phagocytosis-enhancing factor in human plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Gigli, I; Wintroub, B U; Goetzl, E J

    1976-01-01

    A phagocytosis-enhancing factor (PEF) with the capacity to stimulate the ingestion of sensitized sheep erythrocytes by human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leucocytes has been isolated from human plasma by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and filtration on Sephadex G-150 and Sephadex G-100. PEF is a protein of approximately 70,000 molecular weight which is susceptible to inactivation by heating at 60 degrees or by tryptic digestion. PEF promotes phagocytosis of erythrocytes sensitized with intact 7S antibody or bearing the C3b complement fragment, but not of unsensitized erythrocytes or erythrocytes sensitized with 19S antibody. The specificity of PEF interaction with target erythrocytes and the persistence of its stimulatory effect after the target cells are washed suggest that it promotes phagocytosis by an action on the erythrocytes. PMID:1027715

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Samay; Horstmann, Sarah A.; Richens, Tiffany R.; Tanaka, Takeshi; Doe, Jenna M.; Boe, Darren M.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Janssen, William J.; Lee, Chun G.; Elias, Jack A.; Bratton, Donna; Tuder, Rubin M.; Henson, Peter M.; Vandivier, R. William

    2012-01-01

    Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the lung by alveolar macrophages is important for the maintenance of tissue structure and function. Lung tissue from humans with emphysema contains increased numbers of apoptotic cells and decreased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Mice treated with VEGF receptor inhibitors have increased numbers of apoptotic cells and develop emphysema. We hypothesized that VEGF regulates apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages (AM) via its interaction with VEGF receptor 1 (VEGF R1). Our data show that the uptake of apoptotic cells by murine AMs and human monocyte-derived macrophages is inhibited by depletion of VEGF and that VEGF activates Rac1. Antibody blockade or pharmacological inhibition of VEGF R1 activity also decreased apoptotic cell uptake ex vivo. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF significantly enhanced apoptotic cell uptake by AMs in vivo. These results indicate that VEGF serves a positive regulatory role via its interaction with VEGF R1 to activate Rac1 and enhance AM apoptotic cell clearance. PMID:22307908

  20. Genetic Factors for Enhancement of Nicotine Levels in Cultivated Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingwu; Lewis, Ramsey S.; Shi, Junli; Song, Zhongbang; Gao, Yulong; Li, Wenzheng; Chen, Hongxia; Qu, Rongda

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine has practical applications relating to smoking cessation devices and alternative nicotine products. Genetic manipulation for increasing nicotine content in cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) may be of value for industrial purposes, including the possibility of enhancing the efficiency of nicotine extraction. Biotechnological approaches have been evaluated in connection with this objective, but field-based results are few. Here, we report characterization of two genes encoding basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs), NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b from tobacco. Overexpression of NtMYC2a increased leaf nicotine levels in T1 transgenic lines approximately 2.3-fold in greenhouse-grown plants of tobacco cultivar ‘NC 95′. Subsequent field testing of T2 and T3 generations of transgenic NtMYC2a overexpression lines showed nicotine concentrations were 76% and 58% higher than control lines, respectively. These results demonstrated that the increased nicotine trait was stably inherited to the T2 and T3 generations, indicating the important role that NtMYC2a plays in regulating nicotine accumulation in N. tabacum and the great potential of NtMYC2a overexpression in tobacco plants for industrial nicotine production. Collected data in this study also indicated a negative feedback inhibition of nicotine biosynthesis. Further enhancement of nicotine accumulation in tobacco leaf may require modification of the processes of nicotine transport and deposition. PMID:26626731

  1. Loss of Function of FATTY ACID DESATURASE7 in Tomato Enhances Basal Aphid Resistance in a Salicylate-Dependent Manner1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Carlos A.; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio M.; Jia, Lingling; Navarre, Duroy A.; Chen, Zhaorigetu; Howe, Gregg A.; Meng, Qing-Wei; Smith, Jonathon E.; Goggin, Fiona L.

    2012-01-01

    We report here that disruption of function of the ω-3 FATTY ACID DESATURASE7 (FAD7) enhances plant defenses against aphids. The suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2) mutation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), which eliminates the function of FAD7, reduces the settling behavior, survival, and fecundity of the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). Likewise, the antisense suppression of LeFAD7 expression in wild-type tomato plants reduces aphid infestations. Aphid resistance in the spr2 mutant is associated with enhanced levels of salicylic acid (SA) and mRNA encoding the pathogenesis-related protein P4. Introduction of the Naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase transgene, which suppresses SA accumulation, restores wild-type levels of aphid susceptibility to spr2. Resistance in spr2 is also lost when we utilize virus-induced gene silencing to suppress the expression of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1), a positive regulator of many SA-dependent defenses. These results indicate that FAD7 suppresses defenses against aphids that are mediated through SA and NPR1. Although loss of function of FAD7 also inhibits the synthesis of jasmonate (JA), the effects of this desaturase on aphid resistance are not dependent on JA; other mutants impaired in JA synthesis (acx1) or perception (jai1-1) show wild-type levels of aphid susceptibility, and spr2 retains aphid resistance when treated with methyl jasmonate. Thus, FAD7 may influence JA-dependent defenses against chewing insects and SA-dependent defenses against aphids through independent effects on JA synthesis and SA signaling. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants Atfad7-2 and Atfad7-1fad8 also show enhanced resistance to the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) compared with wild-type controls, indicating that FAD7 influences plant-aphid interactions in at least two plant families. PMID:22291202

  2. The number of components of enhancement contributing to short-term synaptic plasticity at the neuromuscular synapse during patterned nerve Stimulation progressively decreases as basal release probability is increased from low to normal levels by changing extracellular Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Holohean, Alice M; Magleby, Karl L

    2011-05-11

    Presynaptic short-term plasticity (STP) dynamically modulates synaptic strength in a reversible manner on a timescale of milliseconds to minutes. For low basal vesicular release probability (prob0), four components of enhancement, F1 and F2 facilitation, augmentation (A), and potentiation (P), increase synaptic strength during repetitive nerve activity. For release rates that exceed the rate of replenishment of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of synaptic vesicles, depression of synaptic strength, observed as a rundown of postsynaptic potential amplitudes, can also develop. To understand the relationship between enhancement and depression at the frog (Rana pipiens) neuromuscular synapse, data obtained over a wide range of prob0 using patterned stimulation are analyzed with a hybrid model to reveal the components of STP. We find that F1, F2, A, P, and depletion of the RRP all contribute to STP during repetitive nerve activity at low prob0. As prob0 is increased by raising Ca(o)(2+) (extracellular Ca2+), specific components of enhancement no longer contribute, with first P, then A, and then F2 becoming undetectable, even though F1 continues to enhance release. For levels of prob0 that lead to appreciable depression, only F1 and depletion of the RRP contribute to STP during rundown, and for low stimulation rates, F2 can also contribute. These observations place prob0-dependent limitations on which components of enhancement contribute to STP and suggest some fundamental mechanistic differences among the components. The presented model can serve as a tool to readily characterize the components of STP over wide ranges of prob0.

  3. GABAergic Interneuron Differentiation in the Basal Forebrain Is Mediated through Direct Regulation of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Isoforms by Dlx Homeobox Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Le, Trung N; Zhou, Qing-Ping; Cobos, Inma; Zhang, Shunzhen; Zagozewski, Jamie; Japoni, Sara; Vriend, Jerry; Parkinson, Tracie; Du, Guoyan; Rubenstein, John L; Eisenstat, David D

    2017-09-06

    GABA is the key inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cortex but regulation of its synthesis during forebrain development is poorly understood. In the telencephalon, members of the distal-less (Dlx) homeobox gene family are expressed in, and regulate the development of, the basal ganglia primodia from which many GABAergic neurons originate and migrate to other forebrain regions. The Dlx1/Dlx2 double knock-out mice die at birth with abnormal cortical development, including loss of tangential migration of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons to the neocortex (Anderson et al., 1997a). We have discovered that specific promoter regulatory elements of glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms (Gad1 and Gad2), which regulate GABA synthesis from the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, are direct transcriptional targets of both DLX1 and DLX2 homeoproteins in vivo Further gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that both DLX1 and DLX2 are necessary and sufficient for Gad gene expression. DLX1 and/or DLX2 activated the transcription of both Gad genes, and defects in Dlx function disrupted the differentiation of GABAergic interneurons with global reduction in GABA levels in the forebrains of the Dlx1/Dlx2 double knock-out mouse in vivo Identification of Gad genes as direct Dlx transcriptional targets is significant; it extends our understanding of Dlx gene function in the developing forebrain beyond the regulation of tangential interneuron migration to the differentiation of GABAergic interneurons arising from the basal telencephalon, and may help to unravel the pathogenesis of several developmental brain disorders.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. We show that Dlx1/Dlx2 homeobox genes regulate GABA synthesis during forebrain development through direct activation of glutamic acid decarboxylase enzyme isoforms that convert glutamate to GABA. This discovery helps explain how Dlx mutations result in abnormal

  4. Enhancing the efficiency of bortezomib conjugated to pegylated gold nanoparticles: an in vitro study on human pancreatic cancer cells and adenocarcinoma human lung alveolar basal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Sílvia Castro; Almeida, Gabriela M; Santos-Silva, Filipe; Pereira, Maria Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A N

    2016-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles have become promising vectors for cancer diagnosis and treatment. The present study investigates the effect of bortezomib (BTZ), a proteasome inhibitor, conjugated with pegylated gold nanoparticles (PEGAuNPs) in pancreatic and lung cancer cells. Synthesized gold nanoparticles (PEGAuNPs) were conjugated with bortezomib antitumor drug. We investigated the cytotoxicity induced by BTZ conjugated with functionalized gold nanoparticles in vitro, in the human pancreatic (S2-013) and lung (A549) cancer cell lines. We found an efficient of conjugation of BTZ with PEGAuNPs. In vitro assays showed that after 72 h' incubation with PEGAuNPs-BTZ cancer cells revealed alterations in morphology; also for S2-013 and A549 cancer cells, the IC50 value of free BTZ is respectively 1.5 and 4.3 times higher than the IC50 value of PEGAuNPs-BTZ. Furthermore, for TERT-HPNE, the IC50 value is around 63 times lower for free BTZ than the conjugated nanovehicle. Cell growth inhibition results showed a remarkable enhancement in the effect of BTZ when conjugated with AuNPs. Our findings showed that conjugation with PEGAuNPs enhance the BTZ growth-inhibition effect on human cancer cells (S2-013 and A549) and decreases its toxicity against normal cells (TERT-HPNE).

  5. Enhancement factor statistics of surface enhanced Raman scattering in multiscale heterostructures of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Suitable metal nanostructures may induce surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors (EFs) large-enough to reach single-molecule sensitivity. However, the gap hot-spot EF probability density function (PDF) has the character of a long-tail distribution, which dramatically mines the reproducibility of SERS experiments. Herein, we carry out electrodynamic calculations based on a 3D finite element method of two plasmonic nanostructures, combined with Monte Carlo simulations of the EF statistics under different external conditions. We compare the PDF produced by a homodimer of nanoparticles with that provided by a self-similar trimer. We show that the PDF is sensitive to the spatial distribution of near-field enhancement specifically supported by the nanostructure geometry. Breaking the symmetry of the plasmonic system is responsible for inducing particular modulations of the PDF tail resembling a multiple Poisson distribution. We also study the influence that molecular diffusion towards the hottest hot-spot, or selective hot-spot targeting, might have on the EF PDF. Our results quantitatively assess the possibility of designing the response of a SERS substrate so as to contain the intrinsic EF PDF variance and significantly improving, in principle, the reproducibility of SERS experiments.

  6. Basal Dendrites of Layer-III Pyramidal Neurons do not Scale with Changes in Cortical Magnification Factor in Macaque Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Oga, Tomofumi; Okamoto, Tsuguhisa; Fujita, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1) are systematically arranged across the cortical surface according to the location of their receptive fields (RFs), forming a visuotopic (or retinotopic) map. Within this map, the foveal visual field is represented by a large cortical surface area, with increasingly peripheral visual fields gradually occupying smaller cortical areas. Although cellular organization in the retina, such as the spatial distribution of ganglion cells, can partially account for the eccentricity-dependent differences in the size of cortical representation, whether morphological differences exist across V1 neurons representing different eccentricities is unclear. In particular, morphological differences in dendritic field diameter might contribute to the magnified representation of the central visual field. Here, we addressed this question by measuring the basal dendritic arbors of pyramidal neurons of layer-IIIC and adjoining layer III sublayers (in the Hassler’s nomenclature) in macaque V1. We labeled layer-III pyramidal neurons at various retinotopic positions in V1 by injecting lightly fixed brain tissue with intracellular dye, and then compared dendritic morphology across regions in the retinotopic map representing 0–20° of eccentricity. The dendritic field area, total dendritic length, number of principal dendrites, branching complexity, spine density and total number of spines were all consistent across different retinotopic regions of V1. These results indicate that dendrites in layer-III pyramidal neurons are relatively homogeneous according to these morphometric parameters irrespective of their locations in this portion of the retinotopic map. The homogeneity of dendritic morphology in these neurons suggests that the emphasis of central visual field representation is not attributable to changes in the basal dendritic arbors of pyramidal neurons in layer III, but is likely the result of successive processes earlier in the

  7. Basal Dendrites of Layer-III Pyramidal Neurons do not Scale with Changes in Cortical Magnification Factor in Macaque Primary Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Oga, Tomofumi; Okamoto, Tsuguhisa; Fujita, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1) are systematically arranged across the cortical surface according to the location of their receptive fields (RFs), forming a visuotopic (or retinotopic) map. Within this map, the foveal visual field is represented by a large cortical surface area, with increasingly peripheral visual fields gradually occupying smaller cortical areas. Although cellular organization in the retina, such as the spatial distribution of ganglion cells, can partially account for the eccentricity-dependent differences in the size of cortical representation, whether morphological differences exist across V1 neurons representing different eccentricities is unclear. In particular, morphological differences in dendritic field diameter might contribute to the magnified representation of the central visual field. Here, we addressed this question by measuring the basal dendritic arbors of pyramidal neurons of layer-IIIC and adjoining layer III sublayers (in the Hassler's nomenclature) in macaque V1. We labeled layer-III pyramidal neurons at various retinotopic positions in V1 by injecting lightly fixed brain tissue with intracellular dye, and then compared dendritic morphology across regions in the retinotopic map representing 0-20° of eccentricity. The dendritic field area, total dendritic length, number of principal dendrites, branching complexity, spine density and total number of spines were all consistent across different retinotopic regions of V1. These results indicate that dendrites in layer-III pyramidal neurons are relatively homogeneous according to these morphometric parameters irrespective of their locations in this portion of the retinotopic map. The homogeneity of dendritic morphology in these neurons suggests that the emphasis of central visual field representation is not attributable to changes in the basal dendritic arbors of pyramidal neurons in layer III, but is likely the result of successive processes earlier in the retino

  8. Basal internal anal sphincter tone, inhibitory neurotransmission, and other factors contributing to the maintenance of high pressures in the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Rattan, S; Singh, J

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of the basal tone in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) is critical for rectoanal continence. Effective evacuation requires a fully functional rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR)-mediated relaxation of the IAS via inhibitory neurotransmission (INT). Systematic studies examining the nature of the INT in different species have identified nitric oxide (NO) as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. However, other mediators such as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), ATP, and carbon monoxide (CO) may also play species-specific role under certain experimental conditions. Measurements of the intraluminal pressures in the IAS along with the force of the isolated IAS tissues are the mainstay in the basic studies for the molecular mechanisms underlying the basal tone and in the nature of the INT. The identification of NO as the inhibitory neurotransmitter has led to major advances in the diagnosis and treatment of a number of rectoanal motility disorders associated with the IAS dysfunction. Besides the IAS, the high pressures in the anal canal are affected by the external anal sphincter (EAS) function, and its malfunction may also lead to rectoanal incontinence. Different approaches including biofeedback have been attempted to improve the EAS function, with variable outcomes. There is a dire need for the innovative ways to improve the week high pressures zone in the anal canal. This viewpoint focuses on two studies that extend the above concept of multiplicity of inhibitory neurotransmitters (Neurogastroenterol Motil 2011 23 e11–25), and that high pressures in the anal canal can be improved by the EAS plication (Neurogastroenterol Motil 2011 23 70–5). © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Hemoglobin enhances tissue factor expression on human malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, F A; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Meyer, T; Biggerstaff, J; Desai, H; Francis, J L

    2001-04-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that complexes with factor VII/activated factor VII to initiate blood coagulation. TF may be expressed on the surface of various cells including monocytes and endothelial cells. Over-expression of TF in human tumor cell lines promotes metastasis. We recently showed that hemoglobin (Hb) forms a specific complex with TF purified from human malignant melanoma cells and enhances its procoagulant activity (PCA). To further study this interaction, we examined the effect of Hb on the expression of TF on human malignant (TF+) cells and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells. Human melanoma A375 and J82 bladder carcinoma cells, which express TF at moderate and relatively high levels, respectively, were incubated with varying concentrations (0-1.5 mg/ml) of Hb. After washing, cells were analyzed for Hb binding and TF expression using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Hb bound to the cells in a concentration-dependent manner, and increased both TF expression and PCA. The human A375 malignant melanoma cells incubated with Hb (1 mg/ml) expressed up to six times more TF antigen than cells without Hb. This increase in TF expression and PCA of intact cells incubated with Hb was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide at a concentration of 10 microg/ml (P < 0.01). An increase in total cellular TF antigen content was demonstrated by specific immunoassay. In contrast, Hb (5 mg/ml) did not induce TF expression and PCA on KG1 cells as determined by flow cytometry and TF (FXAA) activity. We conclude that Hb specifically binds to TF-bearing malignant cells and increases their PCA. This effect seems to be at least partly due to de novo synthesis of TF and increased surface expression. However, the exact mechanism by which Hb binds and upregulates TF expression remains to be determined.

  10. Closure and Sensitivity Study of Scattering Enhancement Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.

    2016-12-01

    Scattering of solar radiation by aerosol particles is highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) as hygroscopic particles take up water with increasing RH. To achieve a better understanding of the effect of aerosol hygroscopic growth on light scattering properties and analyze the possible influence factors, the aerosol scattering coefficients at RH in the range of <40 to 90% were measured using a humidified nephelometer system in the Yangtze River Delta of China in March 2013. In addition, the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition were measured. During the observation period, the mean and standard deviation (SD) of enhancement factors at RH=85% for the scattering coefficient (f(85%)), backscattering coefficient (fb(85%)) and hemispheric backscatter fraction (fp(85%)) were 1.58±0.12, 1.25±0.07 and 0.79±0.04, respectively. The implementation of ISORROPIA II to predict f(RH) was achived. A log-normal distribution has been assumed to analyze the influence of particle number size distribution (PNSD) to f(RH). The result shows that number concentrations do not affect f(RH), f(RH) decreases with the increase of geometric mean diameter (Dp) and standard deviation (σ). Usually, the influence of pnsd on f(RH) mainly depend on the shape of the accumulation mode. Chemical compositions influences f(RH) by two ways: refractive index (n) and growth factor (g). f(RH) decreases with the increase of n. Thus, for organics, its influence on f(RH) has dual sides: increasing f(RH) by decreasing n and decreasing f(RH) by decreasing g. For BC, as a hydrophobic composition with large n, the effect is completely decrease.

  11. Sarcolipin Is a Key Determinant of the Basal Metabolic Rate, and Its Overexpression Enhances Energy Expenditure and Resistance against Diet-induced Obesity*

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Santosh K.; Bal, Naresh C.; Sopariwala, Danesh H.; Pant, Meghna; Rowland, Leslie A.; Shaikh, Sana A.; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-01-01

    Sarcolipin (SLN) is a novel regulator of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) in muscle. SLN binding to SERCA uncouples Ca2+ transport from ATP hydrolysis. By this mechanism, SLN promotes the futile cycling of SERCA, contributing to muscle heat production. We recently showed that SLN plays an important role in cold- and diet-induced thermogenesis. However, the detailed mechanism of how SLN regulates muscle metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we used both SLN knockout (Sln−/−) and skeletal muscle-specific SLN overexpression (SlnOE) mice to explore energy metabolism by pair feeding (fixed calories) and high-fat diet feeding (ad libitum). Our results show that, upon pair feeding, SlnOE mice lost weight compared with the WT, but Sln−/− mice gained weight. Interestingly, when fed with a high-fat diet, SlnOE mice consumed more calories but gained less weight and maintained a normal metabolic profile in comparison with WT and Sln−/− mice. We found that oxygen consumption and fatty acid oxidation were increased markedly in SlnOE mice. There was also an increase in both mitochondrial number and size in SlnOE muscle, together with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) and PPAR γ coactivator 1 α (PGC1α), key transcriptional activators of mitochondrial biogenesis and enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism. These results, taken together, establish an important role for SLN in muscle metabolism and energy expenditure. On the basis of these data we propose that SLN is a novel target for enhancing whole-body energy expenditure. PMID:25713078

  12. Sarcolipin Is a Key Determinant of the Basal Metabolic Rate, and Its Overexpression Enhances Energy Expenditure and Resistance against Diet-induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Santosh K; Bal, Naresh C; Sopariwala, Danesh H; Pant, Meghna; Rowland, Leslie A; Shaikh, Sana A; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-04-24

    Sarcolipin (SLN) is a novel regulator of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) in muscle. SLN binding to SERCA uncouples Ca(2+) transport from ATP hydrolysis. By this mechanism, SLN promotes the futile cycling of SERCA, contributing to muscle heat production. We recently showed that SLN plays an important role in cold- and diet-induced thermogenesis. However, the detailed mechanism of how SLN regulates muscle metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we used both SLN knockout (Sln(-/-)) and skeletal muscle-specific SLN overexpression (Sln(OE)) mice to explore energy metabolism by pair feeding (fixed calories) and high-fat diet feeding (ad libitum). Our results show that, upon pair feeding, Sln(OE) mice lost weight compared with the WT, but Sln(-/-) mice gained weight. Interestingly, when fed with a high-fat diet, Sln(OE) mice consumed more calories but gained less weight and maintained a normal metabolic profile in comparison with WT and Sln(-/-) mice. We found that oxygen consumption and fatty acid oxidation were increased markedly in Sln(OE) mice. There was also an increase in both mitochondrial number and size in Sln(OE) muscle, together with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) and PPAR γ coactivator 1 α (PGC1α), key transcriptional activators of mitochondrial biogenesis and enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism. These results, taken together, establish an important role for SLN in muscle metabolism and energy expenditure. On the basis of these data we propose that SLN is a novel target for enhancing whole-body energy expenditure. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Longitudinal polarizability and enhancement factor of a tapered optical gold nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazizov, A. R.; Kharintsev, S. S.; Salakhov, M. Kh

    2016-05-01

    This work focuses on the mechanism of electric field enhancement near a tapered optical antenna and the calculation of a complex field enhancement factor as a function of tip material, its curvature radius and cone angle. In this paper, an analytical model of longitudinal polarizability, taking into account retardation and dynamic polarization effects, is developed for evaluating the field enhancement factor.

  14. Critical assessment of enhancement factor measurements in surface-enhanced Raman scattering on different substrates.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Daniel C; de Souza, Michele L; Souza, Klester S; dos Santos, Diego P; Andrade, Gustavo F S; Temperini, Marcia L A

    2015-09-07

    The SERS enhancement factor (SERS-EF) is one of the most important parameters that characterizes the ability of a given substrate to enhance the Raman signal for SERS applications. The comparison of SERS intensities and SERS-EF values across different substrates is a common practice to unravel the performance of a given substrate. In this study, it is shown that such a comparison may lack significance if we compare substrates of very distinct nature and optical properties. It is specifically shown that the SERS-EF values for static substrates (e.g. immobilized metallic nanostructures) cannot be compared to those of dynamic ones (e.g. colloidal metal nanoparticle solutions), and that the optical properties for the latter show strong dependence on the metal-molecule interaction dynamics. The most representative experimental results concerning the dynamic substrates have been supported by generalized Mie theory simulations, which are tools used to describe the substrate complexity and the microscopic information not usually taken into account.

  15. Linewidth enhancement factor and chirp in quantum dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka

    2003-08-01

    We have made a comparative study of the linewidth enhancement factor (LEF) and chirp in quantum dot (QDL's) and quantum well lasers (QWL's). The simulations are based on the quasiequilibrium approximation and on semiempirical transition energies and amplitudes of InGaAs quantum pyramid structures. We have accounted for the carriers confined in the active material as well as for the carriers in all the other material layers. It is found that in the quasiequilibrium approximation inhomogeneous broadening leads to asymmetric population of the quantum dot ground state. If the QDL is operated at the gain maximum, the asymmetry leads to nonzero chirp even for a single bound resonance state located at a large distance from other resonances. Our calculations show that, by detuning the laser emission to ˜15 nm shorter wavelengths with a frequency selective cavity and by tailoring the resonance energies and inhomogeneous broadening, the LEF and chirp of a QDL can be made very small. This detuning does not add a substantial penalty to the efficiency of the laser. For QWL's, a similar reduction of chirp is generally not feasible due to the fundamentally different density of states. Therefore QDL's have an important advantage over QWL's as directly modulated light sources in applications where the stability of the emission wavelength is critical.

  16. Amyloid enhancing factor activity is associated with ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh-Khiavi, K; Normand, J; Chronopoulos, S; Ali, A; Ali-Khan, Z

    1992-01-01

    Crude amyloid enhancing factor (AEF) drastically reduces the pre-amyloid phase on passive transfer and induces amyloid deposition in the recipient mice in 48-120 h. We attempted to purify AEF from murine amyloidotic liver and spleen extracts by using gel filtration, preparative sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and ion exchange chromatography and isolated a 5.5 kDa peptide. In the mouse bioassay, this peptide induced accelerated splenic AA deposition in a dose-dependent manner. Based on structural, electrophoretic and immunochemical criteria the peptide was identified as ubiquitin. A polyclonal rabbit anti-bovine ubiquitin IgG antibody (RABU) abolished the in vivo AEF activity of crude murine AEF in a dose-dependent manner. Monomeric ubiquitin and its large molecular weight adducts were isolated from crude AEF using cyanogen bromide-activated sepharose conjugated to RABU and size exclusion chromatography methods. These were assayed and were found to possess AEF activity. Furthermore, increased levels of ubiquitin, a phenomenon similar to that of AEF, were detected by immunocytochemistry in mouse peritoneal leucocytes prior to and during amyloid deposition. Since AEF shares a number of biological and functional properties with ubiquitin, we suggest a possible role of ubiquitin as an AEF, and that serum amyloid protein A and ubiquitin, the two reactants generated during inflammatory stress conditions, may converge to induce AA amyloid deposition.

  17. Basal cell carcinoma: pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Chatterjee, Kingshuk; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer in humans, which typically appears over the sun-exposed skin as a slow-growing, locally invasive lesion that rarely metastasizes. Although the exact etiology of BCC is unknown, there exists a well-established relationship between BCC and the pilo-sebaceous unit, and it is currently thought to originate from pluri-potential cells in the basal layer of the epidermis or the follicle. The patched/hedgehog intracellular signaling pathway plays a central role in both sporadic BCCs and nevoid BCC syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). This pathway is vital for the regulation of cell growth, and differentiation and loss of inhibition of this pathway is associated with development of BCC. The sonic hedgehog protein is the most relevant to BCC; nevertheless, the Patched (PTCH) protein is the ligand-binding component of the hedgehog receptor complex in the cell membrane. The other protein member of the receptor complex, smoothened (SMO), is responsible for transducing hedgehog signaling to downstream genes, leading to abnormal cell proliferation. The importance of this pathway is highlighted by the successful use in advanced forms of BCC of vismodegib, a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, that selectively inhibits SMO. The UV-specific nucleotide changes in the tumor suppressor genes, TP53 and PTCH, have also been implicated in the development of BCC.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates lipid oxidation, reduces protein oxidation, and enhances insulin sensitivity in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M A; Schmitz, O; Mengel, A; Keller, A; Christiansen, J S; Zapf, J; Froesch, E R

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on fuel oxidation and insulin sensitivity, eight healthy subjects were treated with saline and recombinant human (IGF-I (10 micrograms/kg.h) during 5 d in a crossover, randomized fashion, while receiving an isocaloric diet (30 kcal/kg.d) throughout the study period. On the third and fourth treatment days, respectively, an L-arginine stimulation test and an intravenous glucose tolerance test were performed. A euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with indirect calorimetry and a glucose tracer infusion were performed on the fifth treatment day. IGF-I treatment led to reduced fasting and stimulated (glucose and/or L-arginine) insulin and growth hormone secretion. Basal and stimulated glucagon secretion remained unchanged. Intravenous glucose tolerance was unaltered despite reduced insulin secretion. Resting energy expenditure and lipid oxidation were both elevated, while protein oxidation was reduced, and glucose turnover rates were unaltered on the fifth treatment day with IGF-I as compared to the control period. Enhanced lipolysis was reflected by elevated circulating free fatty acids. Moreover, insulin-stimulated oxidative and nonoxidative glucose disposal (i.e., insulin sensitivity) were enhanced during IGF-I treatment. Thus, IGF-I treatment leads to marked changes in lipid and protein oxidation, whereas, at the dose used, carbohydrate metabolism remains unaltered in the face of reduced insulin levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Images PMID:8227340

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Regulates Genes Involved in Insulin/Insulin-like Growth Factor Signaling and Lipid Metabolism during Adipogenesis through Functionally Distinct Enhancer Classes*

    PubMed Central

    Oger, Frédérik; Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Gheeraert, Céline; Avner, Stéphane; Durand, Emmanuelle; Froguel, Philippe; Salbert, Gilles; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ is a transcription factor whose expression is induced during adipogenesis and that is required for the acquisition and control of mature adipocyte functions. Indeed, PPARγ induces the expression of genes involved in lipid synthesis and storage through enhancers activated during adipocyte differentiation. Here, we show that PPARγ also binds to enhancers already active in preadipocytes as evidenced by an active chromatin state including lower DNA methylation levels despite higher CpG content. These constitutive enhancers are linked to genes involved in the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling pathway that are transcriptionally induced during adipogenesis but to a lower extent than lipid metabolism genes, because of stronger basal expression levels in preadipocytes. This is consistent with the sequential involvement of hormonal sensitivity and lipid handling during adipocyte maturation and correlates with the chromatin structure dynamics at constitutive and activated enhancers. Interestingly, constitutive enhancers are evolutionary conserved and can be activated in other tissues, in contrast to enhancers controlling lipid handling genes whose activation is more restricted to adipocytes. Thus, PPARγ utilizes both broadly active and cell type-specific enhancers to modulate the dynamic range of activation of genes involved in the adipogenic process. PMID:24288131

  20. Human basal body basics.

    PubMed

    Vertii, Anastassiia; Hung, Hui-Fang; Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In human cells, the basal body (BB) core comprises a ninefold microtubule-triplet cylindrical structure. Distal and subdistal appendages are located at the distal end of BB, where they play indispensable roles in cilium formation and function. Most cells that arrest in the G0 stage of the cell cycle initiate BB docking at the plasma membrane followed by BB-mediated growth of a solitary primary cilium, a structure required for sensing the extracellular environment and cell signaling. In addition to the primary cilium, motile cilia are present in specialized cells, such as sperm and airway epithelium. Mutations that affect BB function result in cilia dysfunction. This can generate syndromic disorders, collectively called ciliopathies, for which there are no effective treatments. In this review, we focus on the features and functions of BBs and centrosomes in Homo sapiens.

  1. Protein kinase Cmu downregulation of tumor-necrosis-factor-induced apoptosis correlates with enhanced expression of nuclear-factor-kappaB-dependent protective genes.

    PubMed

    Johannes, F J; Horn, J; Link, G; Haas, E; Siemienski, K; Wajant, H; Pfizenmaier, K

    1998-10-01

    Protein kinase Cmu (PKCmu) represents a new subtype of the PKC family characterized by the presence of a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and an amino-terminal hydrophobic region. In order to analyse the potential role of PKCmu in signal-transduction pathways, stable PKCmu transfectants were established with human and murine cell lines. All transfectants showed a reduced sensitivity to tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-induced apoptosis, which correlated with the amount of transgene expressed and with an enhanced basal transcription rate of NF-kappaB-driven genes including the inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 (cIAP2) and TNF-receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAF1). Sensitivity to apoptosis induced by the lipid mediator ceramide was unchanged in PKCmu transfectants. In support of a PKCmu action on NF-kappaB, we show enhancement and downregulation of TNF-induced expression of a NF-kappaB-dependent reporter gene by transient overexpression of wild-type and kinase-negative mutants of PKCmu, respectively. Interestingly, no significant changes were found in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, indicative of PKCmu action downstream of IkappaB degradation, probably by modulation of the transactivation capacity of NF-kappaB. The dominant negative action of the kinase-negative mutant further suggest a regulatory role of PKCmu for NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression.

  2. Rice SAPs are responsive to multiple biotic stresses and overexpression of OsSAP1, an A20/AN1 zinc-finger protein, enhances the basal resistance against pathogen infection in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Himani; Jha, Shweta; Sharma, Meenakshi; Giri, Jitender; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2014-08-01

    Eukaryotic A20/AN1 zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs) play an important role in the regulation of immune and stress response. After elucidation of the role of first such protein, OsSAP1, in abiotic stress tolerance, 18 rice stress associated protein (SAP) genes have been shown to be regulated by multiple abiotic stresses. In the present study, expression pattern of all the 18 OsSAP genes have been analysed in response to different biotic stress simulators, in order to get insights into their possible involvement in biotic stress tolerance. Our results showed the upregulation of OsSAP1 and OsSAP11 by all biotic stress simulator treatments. Furthermore, the functional role of OsSAP1 in plant defence responses has been explored through overexpression in transgenic plants. Constitutive expression of OsSAP1 in transgenic tobacco resulted into enhanced disease resistance against virulent bacterial pathogen, together with the upregulation of known defence-related genes. Present investigation suggests that rice SAPs are responsive to multiple biotic stresses and OsSAP1 plays a key role in basal resistance against pathogen infection. This strongly supports the involvement of rice SAPs in cross-talk between biotic and abiotic stress signalling pathways, which makes them ideal candidate to design strategies for protecting crop plants against multiple stresses.

  3. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein transcription factors in cultured human sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, WenChieh; Yang, Chao-Chun; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2003-09-01

    Lipid synthesis and accumulation represent a major step in sebocyte differentiation and it may be of importance for sebocytes to express two families of transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (c/EBPs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which were found to play a crucial role in the differentiation of adipocytes. Using the immortalized human sebaceous gland cell line SZ95 we examined the expression of the molecules before and after treatment with testosterone, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, dexamethasone, 17beta-estradiol and genistein, at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h, respectively. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors -alpha, -delta, -gamma1, -gamma2 and CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha, -beta, -gamma-delta in native SZ95 sebocytes. In western blot studies, high levels of CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha and -beta, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma were expressed at 6, 24, and 12 h, respectively. Immunostaining of the cultured sebocytes showed the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha and -beta mainly localized within nuclei, whereas peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma in the cytoplasm. Strong staining of sebocytes was immunohistochemically revealed in the basal layer of sebaceous glands in human scalp and sebaceous nevus. Genistein down-regulated the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha and -beta, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma on the protein level. Treatment with linoleic acid for 48 h induced further differentiation of sebocytes leading to abundant lipid synthesis.

  4. Ethanol produces corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-dependent enhancement of spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the mouse central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Fetterly, Tracy L; Awad, Elias K; Milano, Elana J; Usdin, Ted B; Winder, Danny G

    2015-11-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) modulation of central amygdala (CeA) neurocircuitry plays a key role in the development of alcoholism via activation of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor (CRFR) system. Previous work has predominantly focused on EtOH × CRF interactions on the CeA GABA circuitry; however, our laboratory recently showed that CRF enhances CeA glutamatergic transmission. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether EtOH modulates CeA glutamate transmission via activation of CRF signaling. The effects of EtOH on spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and basal resting membrane potentials were examined via standard electrophysiology methods in adult male C57BL/6J mice. Local ablation of CeA CRF neurons (CRF(CeAhDTR) ) was achieved by targeting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (hDTR) to CeA CRF neurons with an adeno-associated virus. Ablation was quantified post hoc with confocal microscopy. Genetic targeting of the diphtheria toxin active subunit to CRF neurons (CRF(DTA) mice) ablated CRF neurons throughout the central nervous system, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction quantification of CRF mRNA. Acute bath application of EtOH significantly increased sEPSC frequency in a concentration-dependent manner in CeA neurons, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment of co-applied CRFR1 and CRFR2 antagonists. In experiments utilizing a CRF-tomato reporter mouse, EtOH did not significantly alter the basal membrane potential of CeA CRF neurons. The ability of EtOH to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was not altered in CRF(CeAhDTR) mice despite a ~78% reduction in CeA CRF cell counts. The ability of EtOH to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was also not altered in the CRF(DTA) mice despite a 3-fold reduction in CRF mRNA levels. These findings demonstrate that EtOH enhances spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the CeA via a CRFR-dependent mechanism. Surprisingly, our data suggest that this action may not

  5. Ethanol produces corticotropin releasing factor receptor-dependent enhancement of spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the mouse central amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Yuval; Fetterly, Tracy L.; Awad, Elias K.; Milano, Elana J.; Usdin, Ted B.; Winder, Danny G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol modulation of Central Amygdala (CeA) neurocircuitry plays a key role in the development of alcoholism via activation of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor system. Previous work has predominantly focused on ethanol/CRF interactions on the CeA GABA circuitry; however our lab recently showed that CRF enhances CeA glutamatergic transmission. Therefore, this study sought to determine if ethanol modulates CeA glutamate transmission via activation of CRF signaling. Methods The effects of ethanol on spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and basal resting membrane potentials were examined via standard electrophysiology methods in adult male C57BL/6J mice. Local ablation of CeA CRF neurons (CRFCeAhDTR) was achieved by targeting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (hDTR) to CeA CRF neurons with an adeno-associated virus. Ablation was quantified post-hoc with confocal microscopy. Genetic targeting of the diphtheria toxin active subunit to CRF neurons (CRFDTA mice) ablated CRF neurons throughout the CNS, as assessed by qRT-PCR quantification of CRF mRNA. Results Acute bath application of ethanol significantly increased sEPSC frequency in a concentration dependent manner in CeA neurons, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment of co-applied CRF receptor 1 and CRF receptor 2 antagonists. In experiments utilizing a CRF-tomato reporter mouse, ethanol did not significantly alter the basal membrane potential of CeA CRF neurons. The ability of ethanol to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was not altered in CRFCeAhDTR mice despite a ~78% reduction in CeA CRF cell counts. The ability of ethanol to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was also not altered in the CRFDTA mice despite a three-fold reduction in CRF mRNA levels. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that ethanol enhances spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the CeA via a CRF receptor dependent mechanism. Surprisingly, our data suggest that this action may not require endogenous CRF

  6. A Prognostic Dilemma of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Intravascular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Niumsawatt, Vachara; Castley, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy; however, it very rarely metastasizes. Despite the low mortality caused by this cancer, once it spreads, it has dim prognosis. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma with rare intravascular invasion and review the literature for risk factors and management of metastasis. PMID:27757356

  7. Vismodegib in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amaria, R N; Bowles, D W; Lewis, K D; Jimeno, A

    2012-07-01

    Vismodegib is a novel, small-molecule inhibitor of smoothened, a key component of the hedgehog signaling pathway. Increased hedgehog pathway signaling is critical in the development of hereditary and spontaneous basal cell carcinomas of the skin, and has been implicated in the development of a number of other tumors. In preclinical models, vismodegib demonstrated potent antitumor activity in hedgehog-dependent tumors, particularly basal cell carcinomas. Clinically, phase I and II studies showed dramatic anticancer activity in patients with advanced basal cell carcinomas. In January 2012, vismodegib was approved by the FDA for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic basal cell carcinomas of the skin.

  8. Quantitatively predictable control of Drosophila transcriptional enhancers in vivo with engineered transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Justin; Ilsley, Garth R; Stern, David L

    2016-03-01

    Genes are regulated by transcription factors that bind to regions of genomic DNA called enhancers. Considerable effort is focused on identifying transcription factor binding sites, with the goal of predicting gene expression from DNA sequence. Despite this effort, general, predictive models of enhancer function are currently lacking. Here we combine quantitative models of enhancer function with manipulations using engineered transcription factors to examine the extent to which enhancer function can be controlled in a quantitatively predictable manner. Our models, which incorporate few free parameters, can accurately predict the contributions of ectopic transcription factor inputs. These models allow the predictable 'tuning' of enhancers, providing a framework for the quantitative control of enhancers with engineered transcription factors.

  9. A Randomized Study of the Effects of Additional Fruit and Nuts Consumption on Hepatic Fat Content, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Basal Metabolic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Romu, Thobias; Dahlqvist-Leinhard, Olof; Borga, Magnus; Leandersson, Per; Nystrom, Fredrik H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Fruit has since long been advocated as a healthy source of many nutrients, however, the high content of sugars in fruit might be a concern. Objectives To study effects of an increased fruit intake compared with similar amount of extra calories from nuts in humans. Methods Thirty healthy non-obese participants were randomized to either supplement the diet with fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg bodyweight/day for two months. Major endpoints were change of hepatic fat content (HFC, by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), basal metabolic rate (BMR, with indirect calorimetry) and cardiovascular risk markers. Results Weight gain was numerically similar in both groups although only statistically significant in the group randomized to nuts (fruit: from 22.15±1.61 kg/m2 to 22.30±1.7 kg/m2, p = 0.24 nuts: from 22.54±2.26 kg/m2 to 22.73±2.28 kg/m2, p = 0.045). On the other hand BMR increased in the nut group only (p = 0.028). Only the nut group reported a net increase of calories (from 2519±721 kcal/day to 2763±595 kcal/day, p = 0.035) according to 3-day food registrations. Despite an almost three-fold reported increased fructose-intake in the fruit group (from 9.1±6.0 gram/day to 25.6±9.6 gram/day, p<0.0001, nuts: from 12.4±5.7 gram/day to 6.5±5.3 gram/day, p = 0.007) there was no change of HFC. The numerical increase in fasting insulin was statistical significant only in the fruit group (from 7.73±3.1 pmol/l to 8.81±2.9 pmol/l, p = 0.018, nuts: from 7.29±2.9 pmol/l to 8.62±3.0 pmol/l, p = 0.14). Levels of vitamin C increased in both groups while α-tocopherol/cholesterol-ratio increased only in the fruit group. Conclusions Although BMR increased in the nut-group only this was not linked with differences in weight gain between groups which potentially could be explained by the lack of reported net caloric increase in the fruit group. In healthy non-obese individuals an increased fruit intake seems safe from cardiovascular risk perspective, including

  10. Enhanced adult neurogenesis and angiogenesis and altered affective behaviors in mice overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor 120.

    PubMed

    Udo, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Yuka; Kino, Takako; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Mizunoya, Wataru; Mukuda, Takao; Sugiyama, Hiroyuki

    2008-12-31

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is implicated as a molecular mediator for adult neurogenesis and behavioral effects of antidepressant drugs. However, these potential roles of VEGF in the CNS have not been clarified in model animals. Here we have created transgenic mice overexpressing a short active variant of VEGF-A (VEGF120) in forebrain. Expression of VEGF120 significantly enhanced cell proliferation and angiogenesis, as exemplified by the formation of an enlarged reddish brain. Adult neurogenesis in hippocampus was markedly stimulated without affecting cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells. Hippocampal neurogenesis was particularly robust in young adult animals, but it declined with age and reduced to control levels by 20 weeks under continuous expression of VEGF120. Thus, VEGF alone is not sufficient to support the long-term enhancement of adult neurogenesis, and VEGF-induced vascularization per se does not necessarily predict increased neurogenesis. In transgenic mice, we observed significant changes in affective behaviors. VEGF was found to have not only antidepressant effects but also anxiolytic effects. In addition, we found that VEGF significantly reduced fear and aggression. In contrast, basal activities under natural conditions were not affected much. Unexpectedly, these characteristic behaviors were maintained in older transgenic mice undergoing a reduced level of cell proliferation in hippocampus, suggesting that there is potential dissociation between adult neurogenesis and mood regulation. Our data indicate that VEGF exerts strong neurogenic and angiogenic effects in postnatal brain and influences different forms of affective behaviors.

  11. Effect of Interval and Continuous Aerobic Training on Basal Serum and Plasma Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Values in Seniors: A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies.

    PubMed

    Enette, Lievyn; Vogel, Thomas; Fanon, Jean Luc; Lang, Pierre Olivier

    2017-06-28

    The purpose of this systematic review was to provide a comprehensive analysis of the available clinical trials analyzing, in seniors, the effect of interval aerobic training (IAT) and continuous aerobic training (CAT) on peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration. We identified 14 randomized or not-randomized intervention studies published up to January 2017 through a computer-assisted search (PUBMED, Pedro, and Science direct data bases). The five trials considering IAT and the nine considering CAT totalized 988 individuals (age range: 58.1-77 years). The parameters of aerobic training (AT) protocol in terms of frequency and intensity are the primary determinants of the BDNF response to AT. The interpretation of the relationship between AT and BDNF signaling pathway was very challenging when specific health conditions were taken into consideration. This was more particularly true with mild cognitive impairment or depressive symptoms. These findings argue in favor of a generalization of the practice of AT and show that the type of training is not the main determining factor of the increase in BDNF level, which results more from the combination of several factors such as intensity and frequency of sessions, duration of programs, and also some genetic determinant coding for BDNF protein. All these factors have to be carefully addressed in future researches in that field. Thus, further researches are still necessary to better the signaling pathway by which AT contributes to better health outcomes.

  12. High enhancement factor of Au nano triangular prism structure for surface enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zuyin; Song, Guofeng

    2017-02-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS) is a well-known detecting tool in biosensing and nonlinear spectroscopy. It can provide a non-invasive alternative without the need for exogenous labels, while the enhancement factor for surface plasmon resonances (SPR) are extensively used to increase the local field close to the oscillators and which can obtain high enhancement. In this work, we investigate the enhancement factor of our structure for surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The absorption spectrum of the structure has been studied, a wide range of absorption has been realized. The enhancement can be as high as 10{16} over standard CARS. Our design is very useful for improving the enhancement factor of surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. Project supported by the National Key Research Program of China (No. 2011ZX01015-001) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Nos. 2011CBA00608, 2012CB619203, 2015CB351902, 2015CB932402).

  13. Assessing Input Enhancement as Positive Factor and Its Impact on L2 Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motlagh, Seyyed Fariborz Pishdadi; Nasab, Mahdiyeh Seyed Beheshti

    2015-01-01

    Input enhancement's role to promote learners' awareness in L2 contexts has caused a tremendous amount of research. Conspicuously, by regarding all aspects of input enhancement, the study aimed to find out how differently many kinds of input enhancement factors such as bolding, underlining, and capitalizing impact on L2 learners' vocabulary…

  14. Moral Judgments and Basal Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantz, Richard K.

    1976-01-01

    Contains a brief review of the research on moral themes in basal reading series and their influence on children and summarizes an investigation which explored the frequency of moral decisions in stories in basal readers and identified those characters who posed the moral questions and those who solved moral dilemmas. (Author/RB)

  15. Modulation of UVB-induced and basal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression by apigenin in mouse keratinocytes: role of USF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Van Dross, Rukiyah T; Hong, Xiaoman; Essengue, Suzanne; Fischer, Susan M; Pelling, Jill C

    2007-04-01

    Apigenin is a bioflavonoid with chemopreventive activity against UV- or chemically-induced mouse skin tumors. To further explore the mechanism of apigenin's chemopreventive activity, we determined whether apigenin inhibited UVB-mediated induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in mouse and human keratinocytes. Apigenin suppressed the UVB-induced increase in COX-2 protein and mRNA in mouse and human keratinocyte cell lines. UVB radiation of keratinocytes transfected with a mouse COX-2 promoter/luciferase reporter plasmid resulted in a threefold increase in transcription from the promoter, and apigenin inhibited the UV-induced promoter activity at doses of 5-50 microM. Transient transfections with COX-2 promoter deletion constructs and COX-2 promoter constructs containing mutations in specific enhancer elements indicated that the effects of UVB required intact Ebox and ATF/CRE response elements. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with supershifting antibodies were used to identify USF-1, USF-2, and CREB as proteins binding to the ATF/CRE-Ebox responsive element of the COX-2 promoter. Keratinocytes co-transfected with the COX-2 luciferase reporter and a USF-2 expression vector, alone or in combination with a USF-1 expression vector, exhibited enhanced promoter activity in both UVB-irradiated and nonirradiated cultures. However, COX-2 promoter activity was inhibited in keratinocytes co-transfected with USF-1 alone. Finally, we present data showing that the suppressive effect of apigenin on COX-2 expression could be reversed by co-expression of USF-1 and USF-2. These results suggest that one pathway by which apigenin inhibits COX-2 expression is through modulation of USF transcriptional activity.

  16. Basal cell nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    High, Alec; Zedan, Walid

    2005-03-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS), is a hereditary condition transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait exhibiting high penetrance and variable expressivity. Inherited or spontaneous mutations in the human homologue of the Drosophila patched gene underlie the disorder and in addition to tumor predisposition, are associated with a range of 'patterning' defects. Recent advances, with glimpses of possible therapies are emerging, but because of the wide-ranging nature of phenotypic expression and overlap with other syndromes, there is difficulty. Finally, because of the importance of PTCH and paralogous genes in many species other than humans, reports appear in a correspondingly wide range of journals, which makes 'keeping abreast' difficult. Progress has been achieved in understanding the role of Gli-1, 2, & 3 in development of 'sporadic' BCCs and BCNS. Expression of PTCH1 is now known to be regulated by alternative promoters and a single functional Gli-binding site. Expression of FOXE1 as a new transcriptional target of Gli2 has been demonstrated in human epidermis and BCCs. Finally, the discovery of Shh pathway inhibitors such as cyclopamine, a naturally occurring alkaloid and ornithine decarboxylase inhibition suggest possible interventional therapies. In BCNS, phenotype does not correlate with position of mutations within Patched, suggesting genetic makeup and environment modulate effects of premature protein truncation induced by PTCH mutation. These developmental abnormalities occur as a result of haplo-insufficiency in heterozygotes for the mutated gene, whereas neoplastic complications arise from a classical two-hit tumor suppressor gene model. Attention is therefore turning toward TP53 and PTCH associations.

  17. New basal temperature and basal melt rate maps of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martos, Yasmina M.; Martin, Carlos; Vaughan, David G.

    2017-04-01

    Ice sheet basal conditions are key to initialize ice flow models and be able to estimate the future of the cryosphere. The thermal conditions are of importance because of the widespread presence of water beneath the Antarctic continent that affects both the ice-dynamics and the mass budget. The melting or freezing at the base of the ice sheet is consequence of several contributions to the heat balance. This includes the geothermal heat flux, the heat conducted or advected through the ice sheet, the latent heat and the friction heat at the interface. Here we present a new basal temperature and a total basal melting rate distributions of Antarctica. For this we use the most recent heat flux map (Martos et al., 2016) and an advanced ice flow model to incorporate the effect of advection and estimate frictional heat. We assume steady state conditions to estimate the basal properties. We found higher basal melting rates in West Antarctica than in East Antarctica as well as in the coastal regions of the continent and ice shelves. The spatial variation of our new basal temperature and basal melting rate distributions are greater than previously proposed which will help to unveil the Antarctic subglacial hydrology.

  18. REPLY: Reply to comment on 'Model calculation of the scanned field enhancement factor of CNTs'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Amir; Tripathi, V. K.

    2010-09-01

    In the paper (Ahmad and Tripathi 2006 Nanotechnology 17 3798), we derived an expression to compute the field enhancement factor of CNTs under any positional distribution of CNTs by using the model of a floating sphere between parallel anode and cathode plates. Using this expression we can compute the field enhancement factor of a CNT in a cluster (non-uniformly distributed CNTs). This expression was used to compute the field enhancement factor of a CNT in an array (uniformly distributed CNTs). We used an approximation to calculate the field enhancement factor. Hence, our expressions are correct in that assumption only. Zhbanov et al (2010 Nanotechnology 21 358001) suggest a correction that can calculate the field enhancement factor without using the approximation. Hence, this correction can improve the applicability of this model.

  19. Cold tolerance of UCP1-ablated mice: a skeletal muscle mitochondria switch toward lipid oxidation with marked UCP3 up-regulation not associated with increased basal, fatty acid- or ROS-induced uncoupling or enhanced GDP effects.

    PubMed

    Shabalina, Irina G; Hoeks, Joris; Kramarova, Tatiana V; Schrauwen, Patrick; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Mice lacking the thermogenic mitochondrial membrane protein UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1)--and thus all heat production from brown adipose tissue--can still adapt to a cold environment (4 degrees C) if successively transferred to the cold. The mechanism behind this adaptation has not been clarified. To examine possible adaptive processes in the skeletal muscle, we isolated mitochondria from the hind limb muscles of cold-acclimated wild-type and UCP1(-/-) mice and examined their bioenergetic chracteristics. We observed a switch in metabolism, from carbohydrate towards lipid catabolism, and an increased total mitochondrial complement, with an increased total ATP production capacity. The UCP1(-/-) muscle mitochondria did not display a changed state-4 respiration rate (no uncoupling) and were less sensitive to the uncoupling effect of fatty acids than the wild-type mitochondria. The content of UCP3 was increased 3-4 fold, but despite this, endogenous superoxide could not invoke a higher proton leak, and the small inhibitory effect of GDP was unaltered, indicating that it was not mediated by UCP3. Double mutant mice (UCP1(-/-) plus superoxide dismutase 2-overexpression) were not more cold sensitive than UCP1(-/-), bringing into question an involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in activation of any alternative thermogenic mechanism. We conclude that there is no evidence for an involvement of UCP3 in basal, fatty-acid- or superoxide-stimulated oxygen consumption or in GDP sensitivity. The adaptations observed did not imply any direct alternative process for nonshivering thermogenesis but the adaptations observed would be congruent with adaptation to chronically enhanced muscle activity caused by incessant shivering in these mice.

  20. [Enhancement of epidermal regeneration by recombinant vaccinia virus growth factor].

    PubMed

    Petrov, V S; Cheshenko, I O; Omigov, V V; Azaev, M Sh; Krendel'shchikov, A V; Ovechkina, L G; Cheshenko, N V; Malygin, E G

    1998-01-01

    Examining the specific activity has showed that recombinant vaccinia virus growth factor binds to appropriate receptors on the A-431 cell surface and prompts the healing acceleration of degree III burns in rats. This recombinant factor did not demonstrate pyrogenicity or toxicogenicity in tests on rabbits, guinea-pits, noninbred albino mice.

  1. An Investigation of Institutional Enhancement Factors on Student College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwaokoro, Amaechi Nkemakolem

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the importance of students' hard work and institutional factors--technology, advising, mentoring, and tutoring on student's academic performance. It is important for institutions to emphasize both students' hard work and effective institutional factors that will have positive impact on student success.

  2. Great enhancements in the thermoelectric power factor of BiSbTe nanostructured films with well-ordered interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiu-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Hua; Kuo, Yung-Kang

    2013-07-01

    An innovative concept of twin-enhanced thermoelectricity was proposed to fundamentally resolve the high electrical resistance while not degrading the phonon scattering of the thermoelectric nanoassemblies. Under this frame, a variety of highly oriented and twinned bismuth antimony telluride (BixSb2-xTe3) nanocrystals were successfully fabricated by a large-area pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) technique on insulated silicon substrates at various deposition temperatures. The significant presence of the nonbasal- and basal-plane twins across the hexagonal BiSbTe nanocrystals, which were experimentally and systematically observed for the first time, evidently contributes to the unusually high electrical conductivity of ~2700 S cm-1 and the power factor of ~25 μW cm-1 K-2 as well as the relatively low thermal conductivity of ~1.1 W m-1 K-1 found in these nanostructured films.An innovative concept of twin-enhanced thermoelectricity was proposed to fundamentally resolve the high electrical resistance while not degrading the phonon scattering of the thermoelectric nanoassemblies. Under this frame, a variety of highly oriented and twinned bismuth antimony telluride (BixSb2-xTe3) nanocrystals were successfully fabricated by a large-area pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) technique on insulated silicon substrates at various deposition temperatures. The significant presence of the nonbasal- and basal-plane twins across the hexagonal BiSbTe nanocrystals, which were experimentally and systematically observed for the first time, evidently contributes to the unusually high electrical conductivity of ~2700 S cm-1 and the power factor of ~25 μW cm-1 K-2 as well as the relatively low thermal conductivity of ~1.1 W m-1 K-1 found in these nanostructured films. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Morphologies, XRD patterns, SEM compositions and room-temperature thermoelectric properties of the series of (015) oriented Bi0.4Sb1.6Te3 nanocolumns (Fig. S1-S3), (00l) oriented

  3. Factors Affecting Quality Enhancement Procedures for E-Learning Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jara, Magdalena; Mellar, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports on an empirical study exploring the way in which campus-based higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK apply their internal quality assurance and enhancement (QA/QE) procedures to their e-learning courses. The purpose of this paper is to identify those characteristics of e-learning courses which affected the…

  4. The Fatal Five? Five Factors That Enhance Effectiveness of Stability Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited THE FATAL FIVE? FIVE FACTORS THAT ENHANCE EFFECTIVENESS OF STABILITY OPERATIONS A...2014 2. REPORT TYPE SAMS Monograph 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2013 – May 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Fatal Five? Five Factors That...Z39.18 ii MONOGRAPH APPROVAL Name of Candidate: Major Ralph D. Heaton Monograph Title: The Fatal Five? Five Factors That Enhance Effectiveness of

  5. [Molecular mechanism of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Xu, Xuan; Li, Lulu; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Min; Shen, Lu; Tang, Beisha; Liu, Jingyu

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC), also known as Fahr’s disease, is an inheritable neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by mineral deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain regions. Patients with IBGC are often accompanied with movement disorders, cognitive impairment as well as psychiatric abnormalities. So far, no therapeutic drug has been developed for the treatment of IBGC. Recently, genetic studies have identified several genes associated with IBGC, including SLC20A2, PDGFRB, PDGFB, ISG15 and XPR1. Loss-of-function mutations in these genes have been associated with disturbance in phosphate homeostasis in brain regions, the dysfunction of blood-brain barrier as well as enhanced IFN-α/β immunity. In this review, we summarize the latest research progress in the studies on molecular genetics of IBGC, and discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of mutations of different genes.

  6. Fat-induced satiety factor oleoylethanolamide enhances memory consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Campolongo, Patrizia; Roozendaal, Benno; Trezza, Viviana; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Astarita, Giuseppe; Fu, Jin; McGaugh, James L.; Piomelli, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    The ability to remember contexts associated with aversive and rewarding experiences provides a clear adaptive advantage to animals foraging in the wild. The present experiments investigated whether hormonal signals released during feeding might enhance memory of recently experienced contextual information. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an endogenous lipid mediator that is released when dietary fat enters the small intestine. OEA mediates fat-induced satiety by engaging type-α peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR-α) in the gut and recruiting local afferents of the vagus nerve. Here we show that post-training administration of OEA in rats improves retention in the inhibitory avoidance and Morris water maze tasks. These effects are blocked by infusions of lidocaine into the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and by propranolol infused into the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA). These findings suggest that the memory-enhancing signal generated by OEA activates the brain via afferent autonomic fibers and stimulates noradrenergic transmission in the BLA. The actions of OEA are mimicked by PPAR-α agonists and abolished in mutant mice lacking PPAR-α. The results indicate that OEA, acting as a PPAR-α agonist, facilitates memory consolidation through noradrenergic activation of the BLA, a mechanism that is also critically involved in memory enhancement induced by emotional arousal. PMID:19416833

  7. Basal and therapy-driven hypoxia-inducible factor-1α confers resistance to endocrine therapy in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoqing; Hong, Qi; Lei, Li; Li, Daqiang; Li, Jianwei; Mo, Miao; Wang, Yujie; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Zhenzhou; Cheng, Jingyi; Liu, Guangyu

    2015-04-20

    Resistance is an obstacle to endocrine therapy for breast cancer. We measured levels of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in 52 primary breast cancer patients before and after receiving neoadjuvant endocrine therapy with letrozole for at least 3 months. Pre-treatment levels of HIF-1α were associated with negative clinical outcome. Furthermore, levels of HIF-1α were increased in post-treatment residual tumors compared with those in pre-treatment biopsy samples. In animal studies, xenografts stably expressing HIF-1α were resistant to endocrine therapy with fulvestrant compared with the effects in control xenografts. Additionally, HIF-1α transcription was inhibited by zoledronic acid, a conventional drug for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, and was accompanied by a marked inhibition of the RAS/MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway. HIF-1α is a determinant of resistance to endocrine therapy and should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for overcoming endocrine resistance in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. In addition, zoledronic acid may overcome endocrine resistance in ER-positive human breast cancer by targeting HIF-1α transcription through inhibition of the RAS/MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway. Clinical studies on the administration of zoledronic acid as a second line treatment in patients who failed endocrine therapy should be considered to improve therapeutic outcomes in breast cancer patients.

  8. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  9. Sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet evolution and flow on basal conditions - a parameter study with the PISM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, L. T.; Hvidberg, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The basal boundary conditions of the Greenland ice sheet have an important control on the ice flow pattern and dynamical evolution of the ice sheet. Basal melting and sliding conditions cannot be observed directly, but observables such as ice thickness, surface velocity and the internal radar layer structure contain indirect information of the basal conditions. The northeast ice stream extend to the interior parts indicating that basal conditions are also important in the interior parts. The purpose of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of the large-scale evolution of the Greenland Ice Sheet on millennial to glacial/interglacial time scales to parameters controlling basal sliding and ice flow. In the study, we use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) to examine the response of the ice sheet evolution to the choices of dynamic parameters. The investigated parameters relates to the parameterization of the basal processes and ice viscosity, these includes the enhancement factor, the exponent in the basal sliding relation employed in the model and the parameterization of the basal material. We run the PISM model through the last glacial/interglacial cycle for an ensemble of model parameters sets to obtain the evolution of the ice sheet using the same climate reconstruction as surface boundary conditions in all experiments in order to estimate the sensitivity of the ice sheet evolution to the choices of dynamic parameters alone. The paleo-climatic spinup of the seaRISE experiment is used as surface boundary conditions. The results of the ensemble experiments are compared using time series of global variables and by comparing snapshots of the ice sheet at predefined times. We discuss the regional differences and sensitivity to the model parameters, and further discuss the evaluation of the parameter combinations by comparing the modelled ice flow pattern to observed present day velocities.

  10. Enhance placebo, avoid nocebo: How contextual factors affect physiotherapy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Testa, Marco; Rossettini, Giacomo

    2016-08-01

    Placebo and nocebo represent complex and distinct psychoneurobiological phenomena in which behavioural and neurophysiological modifications occur together with the application of a treatment. Despite a better understanding of this topic in the medical field, little is known about their role in physiotherapy. The aim of this review is: a) to elucidate the neurobiology behind placebo and nocebo effects, b) to describe the role of the contextual factors as modulators of the clinical outcomes in rehabilitation and c) to provide clinical and research guidelines on their uses. The physiotherapist's features, the patient's features, the patient-physiotherapist relationship, the characteristics of the treatment and the overall healthcare setting are all contextual factors influencing clinical outcomes. Since every physiotherapy treatment determines a specific and a contextual effect, physiotherapists should manage the contextual factors as a boosting element of any manual therapy to improve placebo effects and avoid detrimental nocebo effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Basal Cell Carcinoma. Part 1: Basal Cell Carcinoma Has Come of Age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Min; Marsch, Amanda F; Petronic-Rosic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Almost 2 centuries after its recognition, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) remains the most common cancer worldwide, with a 30% overall lifetime risk in the United States and an incidence that continues to increase annually. The increasing incidence of BCC is multifactorial and likely correlates to multiple risk factors, including exposure to both ionizing and UV radiation. Despite its relatively indolent growth, what was once referred to as a rodent ulcer or basal cell epithelioma is now identified as a full-fledged malignancy. The authors describe the societal burden of this disease and characterize its malignant potential, emphasizing associated clinical and histopathologic prognostic features.

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering enhancement factor distribution for nanoparticles of arbitrary shapes using surface integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying Huang, Shao; Wu, Bae-Ian; Foong, Shaohui

    2013-01-01

    Poggio-Miller-Chang-Harrington-Wu-Tsai (PMCHWT) surface integral equation method is applied for the first time to accurately estimate the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factor distribution for arbitrary nanoparticles and nano-aggregates. It is the first time in literature that the distributions of SERS enhancement factors of nanoparticles of a large variety are reported. It is shown that not every SERS substrate exhibits a long-tail distribution as a dimer consisting of two spheres in close proximity. Generic methods are proposed to evaluate the performance of nanoparticles on SERS substrates. A cumulative distribution is proposed to examine the contributions of hot and warm spots around the nanoparticles. It is used to identify the importance of warm spots on a SERS substrate. A parameter q is proposed to describe the likelihood of a randomly positioned molecule that can be activated. This study provides guidance and insights for the optimization of SERS substrate fabrication techniques.

  13. Ultrasound-enhanced bioscouring of greige cotton: regression analysis of process factors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Process factors of enzyme concentration, time, power and frequency were investigated for ultrasound-enhanced bioscouring of greige cotton. A fractional factorial experimental design and subsequent regression analysis of the process factors were employed to determine the significance of each factor a...

  14. Functional characterization of Vitellogenin_N domain, domain of unknown function 1943, and von Willebrand factor type D domain in vitellogenin of the non-bilaterian coral Euphyllia ancora: Implications for emergence of immune activity of vitellogenin in basal metazoan.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Xia; Wang, Su; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Shicui

    2017-02-01

    Our understanding of the function of vitellogenin (Vg) in reproduction has undergone a transformation over the past decade in parallel with new insights into the role of Vg in immunity. However, the time when Vg was endowed with immunological activities during animal evolution remains elusive. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the recombinant proteins rVitellogenin_N, rDUF1943, and rVWD from Vg of the basal metazoan coral Euphyllia ancora not only interact with Gram-positive and negative bacteria as well as their conserved surface components LTA and LPS but also enhance phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages. Moreover, challenge with LPS results in a marked up-regulation of vg in the coral E. ancora. These data suggest that E. ancora Vg, like that described in the bilaterian oviparous animals fish and amphioxus, is a molecule related to antibacterial defense, indicating that the timing of the emergence of immune role of Vg predates the divergence of the cnidarian (non-bilaterian) and bilaterian lineages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced factoring with a bose-einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Sadgrove, Mark; Kumar, Sanjay; Nakagawa, Ken'ichi

    2008-10-31

    We present a novel method to realize analog sum computation with a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice potential subject to controlled phase jumps. We use the method to implement the Gauss sum algorithm for factoring numbers. By exploiting higher order quantum momentum states, we are able to improve the algorithm's accuracy beyond the limits of the usual classical implementation.

  16. Scale-model charge-transfer technique for measuring enhancement factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kositsky, J.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Determination of aircraft electric field enhancement factors is crucial when using airborne field mill (ABFM) systems to accurately measure electric fields aloft. SRI used the scale model charge transfer technique to determine enhancement factors of several canonical shapes and a scale model Learjet 36A. The measured values for the canonical shapes agreed with known analytic solutions within about 6 percent. The laboratory determined enhancement factors for the aircraft were compared with those derived from in-flight data gathered by a Learjet 36A outfitted with eight field mills. The values agreed to within experimental error (approx. 15 percent).

  17. Master transcription factors and mediator establish super-enhancers at key cell identity genes.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Warren A; Orlando, David A; Hnisz, Denes; Abraham, Brian J; Lin, Charles Y; Kagey, Michael H; Rahl, Peter B; Lee, Tong Ihn; Young, Richard A

    2013-04-11

    Master transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog bind enhancer elements and recruit Mediator to activate much of the gene expression program of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We report here that the ESC master transcription factors form unusual enhancer domains at most genes that control the pluripotent state. These domains, which we call super-enhancers, consist of clusters of enhancers that are densely occupied by the master regulators and Mediator. Super-enhancers differ from typical enhancers in size, transcription factor density and content, ability to activate transcription, and sensitivity to perturbation. Reduced levels of Oct4 or Mediator cause preferential loss of expression of super-enhancer-associated genes relative to other genes, suggesting how changes in gene expression programs might be accomplished during development. In other more differentiated cells, super-enhancers containing cell-type-specific master transcription factors are also found at genes that define cell identity. Super-enhancers thus play key roles in the control of mammalian cell identity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative embryology of basal angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Friedman, W E

    2001-02-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses of basal angiosperms have identified those lineages central to the study of the origin and early diversification of flowering plants. As we begin to understand the early evolution of endosperm developmental patterns in flowering plants, it is apparent that we know little about the other basic embryological features of basal angiosperms, such as the nature of the female gametophyte and even whether a process of double fertilization occurs.

  19. Numerical investigation of the enhancement factor of Raman scattering using plasmonic properties of gold nanorhomb arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrvar, L.; Dizaji, Z. V.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2017-03-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures with sharp tips like nanorhomb array provide strong electric field enhancement and consequently meaningful Raman signal enhancement. In this study, the near-field electromagnetic enhancement of the gold nanorhomb array formed by a new proposed approach has been investigated using the finite element method (FEM). Feasibility and ease of fabrication, which are very important in practical applications, are intended in this approach. This nanorhomb array is achieved by arranging holes tangentially together in a square lattice. In other words, nanorhombs are formed by transition from nanohole to nanoparticle array. Optimization of this structure for a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate is performed by sweeping through the geometric parameters. The most privileged nanorhomb array substrate with highest hot spot density and EM field enhancement is obtained by calculating the enhancement factor (EF) and normalized EF (EFN) for Raman lines of pyridine. Our simulations indicate that the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) mode of such nanorhomb array leads to high electromagnetic enhancement factor (EMEF) and average surface integral of field enhancement factor (\\overlineEF), which are hundreds of times greater than the nanohole arrays. It is found that this LSPR mode is thickness-dependent besides being periodicity-dependent. Finally, accurate EF is calculated by considering local incident field enhancement in terms of the excitation process and local density of states (LDOS) enhancements on emission process and then the best structure with highest EF is obtained.

  20. Factors enhancing career satisfaction among female emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Clem, Kathleen J; Promes, Susan B; Glickman, Seth W; Shah, Anand; Finkel, Michelle A; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Cairns, Charles B

    2008-06-01

    Attrition rates in emergency medicine have been reported as high as 25% in 10 years. The number of women entering emergency medicine has been increasing, as has the number of female medical school graduates. No studies have identified factors that increase female emergency physician career satisfaction. We assess career satisfaction in women emergency physicians in the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and identify factors associated with career satisfaction. The survey questionnaire was developed by querying 3 groups: (1) ACEP women in the American Association of Women Emergency Physicians, the (2) Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Mentoring Women Interest Group, and (3) nonaffiliated female emergency physicians. Their responses were categorized into 6 main areas: schedule, relationships with colleagues, administrative support and mentoring, patient/work-related issues, career advancement opportunities, and financial. The study cohort for the survey included all female members of ACEP with a known e-mail address. All contact with survey recipients was exclusively through the e-mail that contained a uniform resource locator link to the survey itself. Two thousand five hundred two ACEP female members were sent the uniform resource locator link. The Web survey was accessed a total of 1,851 times, with a total of 1,380 surveys completed, an overall response rate of 56%. Most women were satisfied with their career as an emergency physician, 492 (35.5%) very satisfied, 610 (44.0%) satisfied, 154 (11.1%) neutral, 99 (7.1%) not satisfied, and 31 (2.3%) very unsatisfied. Significant factors for career satisfaction included amount of recognition at work, career advancement, schedule flexibility, and the fairness of financial compensation. Workplace factors associated with high satisfaction included academic practice setting and sex-equal opportunity for advancement and sex-equal financial compensation. Most of the ACEP female physicians surveyed were

  1. Elastic liposomes containing benzophenone-3 for sun protection factor enhancement.

    PubMed

    Severino, Patrícia; Moraes, Lívia Faria; Zanchetta, Beatriz; Souto, Eliana B; Santana, Maria H A

    2012-01-01

    This work was focused on the loading of benzophenone-3 in elastic liposomes composed of egg phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, prepared by the Bangham method. Samples were characterized in terms of particle size, polydispersity index (PI), zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro photoprotection properties. The extrusion of liposomes loading benzophenone-3 produced reduced-size (100 nm) elastic liposomes with a PI of 0.2. The active was loaded with a concentration of 20.34% (m/m) revealing changes in the ultraviolet properties after loading. On the basis of these results, it can be anticipated that liposomes are able to improve sun protector factor in vitro compared the free active.

  2. Ultrasound-enhanced bioscouring of greige cotton: regression analysis of process factors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ultrasound-enhanced bioscouring process factors for greige cotton fabric are examined using custom experimental design utilizing statistical principles. An equation is presented which predicts bioscouring performance based upon percent reflectance values obtained from UV-Vis measurements of rutheniu...

  3. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Induction of Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Enhances Vascular Phenotype While Preserving Myogenic Potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Howard D; Guo, Qiongyu; Quan, Amy; Lopez, Joseph; Alonso-Escalante, Jose C; Lough, Denver M; Lee, W P Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Kumar, Anand R

    2017-10-01

    Previous work by our group and other laboratories have revealed that muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) may contain both myogenic and endothelial progenitors, making MDSCs a promising option for skeletal muscle regeneration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induction on the vascular and myogenic potential of MDSCs. Muscle-derived stem cells were isolated from 4- to 8-week-old C57BL/6J mice using a preplate technique and recombinant human VEGFa was used as the induction agent. Cellular proliferation and migration were assessed using serial imaging and wound healing assays, respectively. Myosin heavy chain staining was performed to assess MDSC myotube formation. Vascular potential of MDSCs was measured by expression of CD31 and in vitro capillary tube formation. Vascular endothelial growth factor stimulation led to a dose-dependent increase in MDSC proliferation (P < 0.05) and migration kinetics (P < 0.01). Control MDSCs had low levels of baseline expression of CD31, which was significantly upregulated by VEGF stimulation. Similarly, MDSCs demonstrated a basal capability for capillary tube formation, which was significantly increased after VEGF induction as evidenced by increased branches (5.91 ± 0.58 vs 9.23 ± 0.67, P < 0.01) and total tube length (11.73 ± 0.97 vs 18.62 ± 1.57 mm, P < 0.01). Additionally, the myogenic potential of MDSCs as measured by fusion index remained unchanged with increasing concentration of VEGF up to 250 ng/mL (P = 0.77). Vascular endothelial growth factor induction enhances MDSC proliferation, migration, and endothelial phenotypes without negatively impacting myogenic potential. These results suggest that VEGF stimulation may improve vascularization of MDSC-based strategies for skeletal muscle regeneration.

  4. Enhanced/Synthetic Vision Systems - Human factors research and implications for future systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foyle, David C.; Ahumada, Albert J.; Larimer, James; Sweet, Barbara T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews recent human factors research studies conducted in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division at NASA Ames Research Center related to the development and usage of Enhanced or Synthetic Vision Systems. Research discussed includes studies of field of view (FOV), representational differences of infrared (IR) imagery, head-up display (HUD) symbology, HUD advanced concept designs, sensor fusion, and sensor/database fusion and evaluation. Implications for the design and usage of Enhanced or Synthetic Vision Systems are discussed.

  5. Clamping of the Linewidth Enhancement Factor in Narrow Quantum-Well GRINSCH Semiconductor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, D.; Chow, W.W.; Hader, J.; Koch, S.W.; Moloney, J.V.; Stohls, J.

    1999-01-20

    The linewidth enhancement factor in single quantum-well GRINSCH semiconductor lasers is investigated theoretically and experimentally. For thin wells a small linewidth enhancement factor is obtained which clamps with increasing carrier density, in contrast to the monotonous increase observed for thicker wells. Microscopic many-body calculations reproduce the experimental observations attributing the clamping to a subtle interplay between excitation dependent gain shifts and carrier population distributions.

  6. Ethanol induces cytostasis of cortical basal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Riar, Amanjot Kaur; Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Rathinam, Mary Latha; Henderson, George I; Mahimainathan, Lenin

    2016-01-19

    Developing brain is a major target for alcohol's actions and neurological/functional abnormalities include microencephaly, reduced frontal cortex, mental retardation and attention-deficits. Previous studies have shown that ethanol altered the lateral ventricular neuroepithelial cell proliferation. However, the effect of ethanol on subventricular basal progenitors which generate majority of the cortical layers is not known. We utilized spontaneously immortalized rat brain neuroblasts obtained from cultures of 18-day-old fetal rat cerebral cortices using in vitro ethanol exposures and an in utero binge model. In the in vitro acute model, cells were exposed to 86 mM ethanol for 8, 12 and 24 h. The second in vitro model comprised of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure which consisted of 14 h of ethanol treatment followed by 10 h of withdrawal with three repetitions. E18 neuroblasts expressing Tbr2 representing immature basal progenitors displayed significant reduction of proliferation in response to ethanol in both the models. The decreased proliferation was accompanied by absence of apoptosis or autophagy as illustrated by FACS analysis and expression of apoptotic and autophagic markers. The BrdU incorporation assay indicated that ethanol enhanced the accumulation of cells at G1 with reduced cell number in S phase. In addition, the ethanol-inhibited basal neuroblasts proliferation was connected to decrease in cyclin D1 and Rb phosphorylation indicating cell cycle arrest. Further, in utero ethanol exposure in pregnant rats during E15-E18 significantly decreased Tbr2 and cyclin D1 positive cell number in cerebral cortex of embryos as assessed by cell sorting analysis by flow cytometry. Altogether, the current findings demonstrate that ethanol impacts the expansion of basal progenitors by inducing cytostasis that might explain the anomalies of cortico-cerebral development associated with fetal alcohol syndrome.

  7. Identification of a new hybrid serum response factor and myocyte enhancer factor 2-binding element in MyoD enhancer required for MyoD expression during myogenesis.

    PubMed

    L'honore, Aurore; Rana, Vanessa; Arsic, Nikola; Franckhauser, Celine; Lamb, Ned J; Fernandez, Anne

    2007-06-01

    MyoD is a critical myogenic factor induced rapidly upon activation of quiescent satellite cells, and required for their differentiation during muscle regeneration. One of the two enhancers of MyoD, the distal regulatory region, is essential for MyoD expression in postnatal muscle. This enhancer contains a functional divergent serum response factor (SRF)-binding CArG element required for MyoD expression during myoblast growth and muscle regeneration in vivo. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and microinjection analyses show this element is a hybrid SRF- and MEF2 Binding (SMB) sequence where myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) complexes can compete out binding of SRF at the onset of differentiation. As cells differentiate into postmitotic myotubes, MyoD expression no longer requires SRF but instead MEF2 binding to this dual-specificity element. As such, the MyoD enhancer SMB element is the site for a molecular relay where MyoD expression is first initiated in activated satellite cells in an SRF-dependent manner and then increased and maintained by MEF2 binding in differentiated myotubes. Therefore, SMB is a DNA element with dual and stage-specific binding activity, which modulates the effects of regulatory proteins critical in controlling the balance between proliferation and differentiation.

  8. [Regulation of myostatin promoter activity by myocyte enhancer factor 2].

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Deng, Jie; Zhang, Junlin; Cheng, De; Wang, Huayan

    2012-08-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily that functions as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation in mammals. The transcriptional regulation of Mstn is controlled by multiple genes including MEF2, which raise the importance of identifying the binding sites of MEF2 on myostatin promoter region and mechanisms underlying. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of MEF2 on porcine Mstn promoter activity in C2C12 cells. Sequence analysis of the 1 969 bp porcine Mstn promoter region revealed that it contained three potential MEF2 motifs. Using a serial deletion strategy, we tested the activity of several promoter fragments by luciferase assay. Overexpression of MEF2C, but not MEF2A increased Mstn promoter activity in all the promoter fragments with MEF2 motifs by two to six folds, in both C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes. When we transfected exogenous MEF2C, Mstn mRNA level was also upregulated in C2C12 cells, but the protein level was only significantly increased in myotubes. Thus, we propose that MEF2C could modulate and restrain myogenesis by Mstn activation and Mstn-dependent gene processing in porcine. Our research also provided potential targets and an effective molecule to regulate Mstn expression and gave a new way to explore the functional performance of Mstn.

  9. The Related Transcriptional Enhancer Factor-1 Isoform, TEAD4216, Can Repress Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Appukuttan, Binoy; McFarland, Trevor J.; Stempel, Andrew; Kassem, Jean B.; Hartzell, Matthew; Zhang, Yi; Bond, Derek; West, Kelsey; Wilson, Reid; Stout, Andrew; Pan, Yuzhen; Ilias, Hoda; Robertson, Kathryn; Klein, Michael L.; Wilson, David; Smith, Justine R.; Stout, J. Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Increased cellular production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is responsible for the development and progression of multiple cancers and other neovascular conditions, and therapies targeting post-translational VEGF products are used in the treatment of these diseases. Development of methods to control and modify the transcription of the VEGF gene is an alternative approach that may have therapeutic potential. We have previously shown that isoforms of the transcriptional enhancer factor 1-related (TEAD4) protein can enhance the production of VEGF. In this study we describe a new TEAD4 isoform, TEAD4216, which represses VEGF promoter activity. The TEAD4216 isoform inhibits human VEGF promoter activity and does not require the presence of the hypoxia responsive element (HRE), which is the sequence critical to hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-mediated effects. The TEAD4216 protein is localized to the cytoplasm, whereas the enhancer isoforms are found within the nucleus. The TEAD4216 isoform can competitively repress the stimulatory activity of the TEAD4434 and TEAD4148 enhancers. Synthesis of the native VEGF165 protein and cellular proliferation is suppressed by the TEAD4216 isoform. Mutational analysis indicates that nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of any isoform determines whether it acts as an enhancer or repressor, respectively. The TEAD4216 isoform appears to inhibit VEGF production independently of the HRE required activity by HIF, suggesting that this alternatively spliced isoform of TEAD4 may provide a novel approach to treat VEGF-dependent diseases. PMID:22761647

  10. Adipocyte secreted factors enhance aggressiveness of prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade.

  11. Adipocyte Secreted Factors Enhance Aggressiveness of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S.; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade. PMID:25928422

  12. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography Features of Breast Malignancies with Different Sizes: Correlation with Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Xia; Liu, Hui; Wei, Qing; Xu, Guang; Wu, Jian; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Wu, Rong; Pu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the correlation between contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) characteristics with prognostic factors in breast cancers with different sizes. A retrospective analysis of CEUS characteristics of 104 pathologically proven malignant lesions from 104 women was conducted. Lesions were divided into two groups according to their size measured by US (Group 1: maximum diameter ≤20 mm; Group 2: maximum diameter >20 mm). Features including enhancement degree, order and pattern, enlargement of the enhancement area, and penetrating vessels on CEUS were evaluated. Pathologic prognostic factors, including estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and the expression of c-erb-B2, p53, Ki-67, and VEGF were assessed. Comparison of enhancement pattern parameters between Group 1 and Group 2 showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.0001). A significant correlation was found between enlargement of the enhancement area and ER positivity in Group 1 (P = 0.032). In Group 2 the absence of penetrating vessels was significantly associated with VEGF negativity (P = 0.022) and ER negativity (P = 0.022). Centripetal enhancement reflected VEGF negativity (P = 0.033) in lesions with diameter >20 mm. Thus, breast cancers with different sizes show different CEUS features; small breast cancers show homogeneous enhancement pattern while cancers with diameter >20 mm show homogeneous enhancement pattern. Some CEUS characteristics of differently sized breast cancers could be correlated with prognostic factors, which may be useful in prognosis assessment. PMID:26881202

  13. Regulatory Enhancer-Core-Promoter Communication via Transcription Factors and Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Zabidi, Muhammad A; Stark, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Gene expression is regulated by genomic enhancers that recruit transcription factors and cofactors to activate transcription from target core promoters. Over the past years, thousands of enhancers and core promoters in animal genomes have been annotated, and we have learned much about the domain structure in which regulatory genomes are organized in animals. Enhancer-core-promoter targeting occurs at several levels, including regulatory domains, DNA accessibility, and sequence-encoded core-promoter specificities that are likely mediated by different regulatory proteins. We review here current knowledge about enhancer-core-promoter targeting, regulatory communication between enhancers and core promoters, and the protein factors involved. We conclude with an outlook on open questions that we find particularly interesting and that will likely lead to additional insights in the upcoming years.

  14. Evolution and diversification of the basal transcription machinery.

    PubMed

    Duttke, Sascha H C

    2015-03-01

    Transcription initiation was once thought to be regulated primarily by sequence-specific transcription factors with the basal transcription machinery being largely invariant. Gradually it became apparent that the basal transcription machinery greatly diversified during evolution and new studies now demonstrate that diversification of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) family yielded specialized and largely independent transcription systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors Enhancing the Teaching of Information Literacy to Adirondack Community College Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joyce

    This study examines the status of information literacy skills among the faculty of Adirondack Community College (ACC) in New York, and describes factors that enhance these skills. Three primary questions posed by the study are: (1) what information literacy skills do faculty have now?; (2) what factors strengthen the teaching of information…

  16. Analysis of Factors Enhancing Pitfall in Research and Teaching of the Nigerian University System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Tafida; Umar, Kasim; Paul, Chima

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses factors enhancing pitfall in research and teaching in the Nigerian university system. Using data generated from secondary sources, it was found that so many factors are responsible for the constant decay in teaching and research in the Nigerian universities. The paper however found from literature that the high rate of pitfalls…

  17. Basal Organelles of Bacterial Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Bazire, Germaine; London, Jack

    1967-01-01

    Liberated by enzymatic lysis of the cells, the flagella of Rhodospirillum rubrum, R. molischianum, and R. fulvum all have a similar structure. The hook at the base of the flagellum is connected by a short, narrow collar to a paired disc in the basal organelle. This paired disc is in turn connected to a second paired disc. The disposition of flagella to which fragments of the cell membrane still adhere suggests that the narrow collar at the base of the hook traverses both the wall and the membrane, and that the upper pair of discs in the basal organelle lies just beneath the surface of the membrane. Images PMID:6039362

  18. Determination and applications of enhancement factors for positron and ortho-positronium annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.

    2005-12-15

    Electron-positron annihilation rates calculated directly from the electron and positron densities are known to underestimate the true annihilation rate. A correction factor, known as the enhancement factor, allows for the local increase of the electron density around the positron caused by the attractive electron-positron interaction. Enhancement factors are given for positrons annihilating with the 1s electron in H, He{sup +}, He, Li{sup 2+}, and Li{sup +}. The enhancement factor for a free positron annihilating with He{sup +} and He is found to be close to that of ortho-positronium (i.e., Ps in its triplet state) annihilating with these atoms. The enhancement factor for Ps-He scattering is used in conjunction with the known annihilation rate for pickoff annihilation to derive a scattering length of 1.47a{sub 0} for Ps-He scattering. Further, enhancement factors for e{sup +}-Ne and e{sup +}-Ar annihilation are used in conjunction with the pickoff annihilation rate to estimate scattering lengths of 1.46a{sub 0} for Ps-Ne scattering and 1.75a{sub 0} for Ps-Ar scattering.

  19. Sliding of temperate basal ice on a rough, hard bed: creep mechanisms, pressure melting, and implications for ice streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbendam, Maarten

    2016-09-01

    Basal ice motion is crucial to ice dynamics of ice sheets. The classic Weertman model for basal sliding over bedrock obstacles proposes that sliding velocity is controlled by pressure melting and/or ductile flow, whichever is the fastest; it further assumes that pressure melting is limited by heat flow through the obstacle and ductile flow is controlled by standard power-law creep. These last two assumptions, however, are not applicable if a substantial basal layer of temperate (T ˜ Tmelt) ice is present. In that case, frictional melting can produce excess basal meltwater and efficient water flow, leading to near-thermal equilibrium. High-temperature ice creep experiments have shown a sharp weakening of a factor 5-10 close to Tmelt, suggesting standard power-law creep does not operate due to a switch to melt-assisted creep with a possible component of grain boundary melting. Pressure melting is controlled by meltwater production, heat advection by flowing meltwater to the next obstacle and heat conduction through ice/rock over half the obstacle height. No heat flow through the obstacle is required. Ice streaming over a rough, hard bed, as possibly in the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream, may be explained by enhanced basal motion in a thick temperate ice layer.

  20. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S.; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2016-04-12

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets.

  1. [Basal cell carcinoma and rare form variants].

    PubMed

    Liersch, J; Schaller, J

    2014-09-01

    Basal cell carcinomas are the most common primary cutaneous malignant neoplasms. The diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma represents a common and routine task for pathologists and dermatopathologists. The aim of this review is the clinical and histopathological presentation of the most common subtypes of basal cell carcinoma. Furthermore, the rare variants of basal cell carcinoma and their differential diagnoses are also discussed.

  2. Frequency-dependent linewidth enhancement factor of optical injection-locked quantum dot/dash lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Chaibi, Mohamed E; Huang, Heming; Erasme, Didier; Poole, Philip; Even, Jacky; Grillot, Frédéric

    2015-08-24

    Combining theoretical and experimental studies show that optical injection strongly changes the behavior of the linewidth enhancement factor (α(H)-factor) and the FM-to-AM indices ratio (FAIR) in quantum dash/dot semiconductor lasers. In contrast to solitary lasers, both the α(H)-factor and the FAIR at low-frequency modulation are reduced by optical injection. At high modulation frequency, however, the phase-amplitude coupling characteristics are little influenced by optical injection.

  3. Spectral dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor in quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zubov, F. I.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Maximov, M. V.; Zhukov, A. E.; Livshits, D. A.; Payusov, A. S.; Nadtochiy, A. M.; Savelyev, A. V.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Gordeev, N. Yu.

    2013-12-15

    The spectral analysis of amplified spontaneous emission is used to determine the linewidth enhancement factor (α-factor) in lasers based on InAs/InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) in a wide spectral range near the ground-state optical transition energy. The effect of the pump current and number of QDs on the spectral dependences of the α-factor is examined. The temperature dependence of the spectra of the α-factor is experimentally determined for the first time for lasers with InAs/InGaAs QDs. An explanation is suggested for the observed anomalous decrease in the α-factor with increasing temperature.

  4. Identification of an algal carbon fixation-enhancing factor extracted from Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yutaka; Imamura, Nobutaka

    2011-01-01

    The green ciliate Paramecium bursaria contains several hundred symbiotic Chlorella species. We previously reported that symbiotic algal carbon fixation is enhanced by P. bursaria extracts and that the enhancing factor is a heat-stable, low-molecular-weight, water-soluble compound. To identify the factor, further experiments were carried out. The enhancing activity remained even when organic compounds in the extract were completely combusted at 700 degrees C, suggesting that the factor is an inorganic substance. Measurement of the major cations, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, by an electrode and titration of the extract resulted in concentrations of 0.90 mM, 0.55 mM, and 0.21 mM, respectively. To evaluate the effect of these cations, a mixture of the cations at the measured concentrations was prepared, and symbiotic algal carbon fixation was measured in the solution. The results demonstrated that the fixation was enhanced to the same extent as with the P. bursaria extract, and thus this mixture of K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ was concluded to be the carbon fixation-enhancing factor. There was no effect of the cation mixture on free-living C. vulgaris. Comparison of the cation concentrations of nonsymbiotic and symbiotic Paramecium extracts revealed that the concentrations of K+ and Mg2+ in nonsymbiotic Paramecium extracts were too low to enhance symbiotic algal carbon fixation, suggesting that symbiotic P. bursaria provide suitable cation conditions for photosynthesis to its symbiotic Chlorella.

  5. Children's Literature in the Basals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Maureen A.

    Three basal reading series, levels kindergarten through grade three, were studied to categorize the types of literature each contained. The following series were analyzed: "The Headway Program" (Open Court Publishing Company), "Series r Macmillan Reading," and "Basics in Reading" (Scott, Foresman and Company). It was…

  6. Teachers Reflect Standards in Basals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Dozens of teachers and literacy specialists from across the country hunkered down in Baltimore at round tables, with laptops, pens, and paper, intent on rewriting the collections that wield tremendous influence over the way millions of U.S. children learn literacy skills: the big-name basal readers. Hailing from 18 school districts in 11 states,…

  7. Children's Literature in the Basals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Maureen A.

    Three basal reading series, levels kindergarten through grade three, were studied to categorize the types of literature each contained. The following series were analyzed: "The Headway Program" (Open Court Publishing Company), "Series r Macmillan Reading," and "Basics in Reading" (Scott, Foresman and Company). It was…

  8. Teachers Reflect Standards in Basals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Dozens of teachers and literacy specialists from across the country hunkered down in Baltimore at round tables, with laptops, pens, and paper, intent on rewriting the collections that wield tremendous influence over the way millions of U.S. children learn literacy skills: the big-name basal readers. Hailing from 18 school districts in 11 states,…

  9. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... other skin problems a person has experienced. Early treatment of basal cell skin cancer reduces the amount of surgery and scarring. Regular ... sun . People with NBCCS should not receive radiation therapy, as this will ... cell skin cancers. Screening recommendations may change over time as new ...

  10. Demonstration of the enhanced Purcell factor in all-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnok, Alexander; Glybovski, Stanislav; Petrov, Mihail; Makarov, Sergey; Savelev, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Simovski, Constantin; Kivshar, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    The Purcell effect is usually described as a modification of the spontaneous decay rate in the presence of a resonator. In plasmonics, this effect is commonly associated with a large local-field enhancement in "hot spots" due to the excitation of surface plasmons. However, high-index dielectric nanostructures, which become the basis of all-dielectric nanophotonics, cannot provide high values of the local-field enhancement due to larger radiation losses. Here, we demonstrate how to achieve a strong Purcell effect in all-dielectric nanostructures, and show theoretically that the Purcell factor can be increased by two orders of magnitude in a finite chain of silicon nanoparticles. Using the eigenmode analysis for an infinite chain, we demonstrate that the high Purcell factor regime is associated with a Van Hove singularity. We perform a proof-of-concept experiment for microwave frequencies and observe the 65-fold enhancement of the Purcell factor in a chain of 10 dielectric particles.

  11. Tead proteins activate the Foxa2 enhancer in the node in cooperation with a second factor.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Atsushi; Nishizaki, Yuriko; Sato, Hiroko; Yada, Yukari; Nakayama, Rika; Yamamoto, Shinji; Nishioka, Noriyuki; Kondoh, Hisato; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2005-11-01

    The cell population and the activity of the organizer change during the course of development. We addressed the mechanism of mouse node development via an analysis of the node/notochord enhancer (NE) of Foxa2. We first identified the core element (CE) of the enhancer, which in multimeric form drives gene expression in the node. The CE was activated in Wnt/beta-catenin-treated P19 cells with a time lag, and this activation was dependent on two separate sequence motifs within the CE. These same motifs were also required for enhancer activity in transgenic embryos. We identified the Tead family of transcription factors as binding proteins for the 3' motif. Teads and their co-factor YAP65 activated the CE in P19 cells, and binding of Tead to CE was essential for enhancer activity. Inhibition of Tead activity by repressor-modified Tead compromised NE enhancer activation and notochord development in transgenic mouse embryos. Furthermore, manipulation of Tead activity in zebrafish embryos led to altered expression of foxa2 in the embryonic shield. These results suggest that Tead activates the Foxa2 enhancer core element in the mouse node in cooperation with a second factor that binds to the 5' element, and that a similar mechanism also operates in the zebrafish shield.

  12. Theoretical study on enhanced differential gain and extremely reduced linewidth enhancement factor in quantum-well lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Takayuki; Yoshikuni, Yuzo; Yokoyama, Kiyoyuki; Lui, Wayne; Seki, Shunji

    1993-06-01

    Low-chirped lasing operation in semiconductor lasers is desirable for high-speed high-bit-rate optical transmission. This paper addresses this issue with a theoretical investigation of possibility of extreme reductions in the linewidth enhancement factor (alpha factor) in quantum-well (QW) lasers to a value of zero. We show that in reducing the alpha factor it is essential that lasing oscillation be around the peak of the differential gain spectrum, not in the vicinity of the gain peak. The condition for such lasing oscillation is analytically derived. The wavelength dependence of the material gain, the differential gain, and the alpha factor are calculated in detail taking into account the effects of compressive-strain and band mixing on the valence subband structure. Along with the derived condition, we also discuss the effect of p-type modulation doping in compressive-strained QW's. It is shown that alpha-factor, the anomalous dispersion part in the spectrum, crosses zero in the region of positive material gain, which makes it possible to attain virtual chirpless operation by detuning.

  13. On the nature of the linewidth enhancement factor in p-doped quantum dash based lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Siddharth Chimot, Nicolas; Lelarge, François; Ramdane, Abderrahim

    2014-12-15

    P-doped quantum dash based lasers have shown superior dynamic performance as compared to their un-doped counterparts. This improvement in performance is strongly observed in line-width enhancement factor. These devices show a dramatic reduction in the α{sub H} parameter, resulting in very low chirp. This letter discusses the nature line-width enhancement factor of p-doped quantum dash lasers as opposed to un-doped counterparts. Owing to the p-doping a low and bias-stable alpha parameter is demonstrated.

  14. A global study of the unmet need for glycemic control and predictor factors among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have achieved optimal fasting plasma glucose control on basal insulin.

    PubMed

    Raccah, Denis; Chou, Engels; Colagiuri, Stephen; Gaàl, Zsolt; Lavalle, Fernando; Mkrtumyan, Ashot; Nikonova, Elena; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Vidal, Josep; Davies, Melanie

    2017-03-01

    This study used data from different sources to identify the extent of the unmet need for postprandial glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after the initiation of basal insulin therapy in Europe, Asia Pacific, the United States, and Latin America. Different levels of evidence were used as available for each country/region, with data extracted from seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs), three clinical trial registries (CTRs), and three electronic medical record (EMR) databases. Glycemic status was categorized as "well controlled" (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c ] at target [<7%]), "residual hyperglycemia" (fasting plasma glucose [FPG] but not HbA1c at target [FPG <7.2/7.8 mmol/L, <130/140 mg/dL, depending on country-specific recommendations]), or "uncontrolled" (both FPG and HbA1c above target). Predictor factors were identified from the RCT data set using logistic regression analysis. RCT data showed that 16.9% to 28.0%, 42.7% to 54.4%, and 16.9% to 38.1% of patients with T2DM had well-controlled glycemia, residual hyperglycemia, and uncontrolled hyperglycemia, respectively. In CTRs, respective ranges were 21.8% to 33.6%, 31.5% to 35.6%, and 30.7% to 46.8%, and in EMR databases were 4.4% to 21.0%, 23.9% to 31.8%, and 53.6% to 63.8%. Significant predictor factors of residual hyperglycemia identified from RCT data included high baseline HbA1c (all countries/regions except Brazil), high baseline FPG (United Kingdom/Japan), longer duration of diabetes (Brazil), and female sex (Europe/Latin America). Irrespective of intrinsic differences between data sources, 24% to 54% of patients with T2DM globally had residual hyperglycemia with HbA1c not at target, despite achieving FPG control, indicating a significant unmet need for postprandial glycemic control. © 2016 The Authors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A global study of the unmet need for glycemic control and predictor factors among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have achieved optimal fasting plasma glucose control on basal insulin

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Engels; Colagiuri, Stephen; Gaàl, Zsolt; Lavalle, Fernando; Mkrtumyan, Ashot; Nikonova, Elena; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Vidal, Josep; Davies, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background This study used data from different sources to identify the extent of the unmet need for postprandial glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after the initiation of basal insulin therapy in Europe, Asia Pacific, the United States, and Latin America. Methods Different levels of evidence were used as available for each country/region, with data extracted from seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs), three clinical trial registries (CTRs), and three electronic medical record (EMR) databases. Glycemic status was categorized as “well controlled” (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] at target [<7%]), “residual hyperglycemia” (fasting plasma glucose [FPG] but not HbA1c at target [FPG <7.2/7.8 mmol/L, <130/140 mg/dL, depending on country‐specific recommendations]), or “uncontrolled” (both FPG and HbA1c above target). Predictor factors were identified from the RCT data set using logistic regression analysis. Results RCT data showed that 16.9% to 28.0%, 42.7% to 54.4%, and 16.9% to 38.1% of patients with T2DM had well‐controlled glycemia, residual hyperglycemia, and uncontrolled hyperglycemia, respectively. In CTRs, respective ranges were 21.8% to 33.6%, 31.5% to 35.6%, and 30.7% to 46.8%, and in EMR databases were 4.4% to 21.0%, 23.9% to 31.8%, and 53.6% to 63.8%. Significant predictor factors of residual hyperglycemia identified from RCT data included high baseline HbA1c (all countries/regions except Brazil), high baseline FPG (United Kingdom/Japan), longer duration of diabetes (Brazil), and female sex (Europe/Latin America). Conclusions Irrespective of intrinsic differences between data sources, 24% to 54% of patients with T2DM globally had residual hyperglycemia with HbA1c not at target, despite achieving FPG control, indicating a significant unmet need for postprandial glycemic control. PMID:27606888

  16. Genome-wide methylome and chromatin interactome identify abnormal enhancer to be risk factor of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Hao, Da-Peng; Li, Jing-Jing; Wang, Li; Di, Li-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Enhancer is critical cis regulatory elements in gene expression. To understand whether and how the aberrant enhancer activation may contribute to cancer risk, the differentially methylated enhancers (eDMRs) in normal and malignant breast tissues were identified and analyzed. By incorporating genome-wide chromatin interaction, integrated analysis of eDMRs and target gene expression identified 1,272 enhancer-promoter pairs. Surprisingly, two functionally distinct groups of genes were identified in these pairs, one showing better correlation to enhancer methylation (eRGs) and the other showing better correlation to promoter methylation (pRGs), and the former group is functionally enriched with cancer related genes. Moreover, enhancer methylation based clustering of breast cancer samples is capable of discriminating basal breast cancer from other subtypes. By correlating enhancer methylation status to patient survival, 345 enhancers show the impact on the disease outcome and the majority of their target genes are important regulators of cell survival pathways including known cancer related genes. Together, these results suggest reactivation of enhancers in cancer cells has the add-on effect and contributes to cancer risk in combination. PMID:28621677

  17. Plasmon-enhanced Kerr nonlinearity via subwavelength-confined anisotropic Purcell factors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juanjuan; Chen, Hongyi; Gu, Ying; Zhao, Dongxing; Zhou, Haitao; Zhang, Junxiang; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-10-21

    We theoretically investigate the enhancement of Kerr nonlinearity through anisotropic Purcell factors provided by plasmon nanostructures. In a three-level atomic system with crossing damping, larger anisotropism of Purcell factors leads to more enhanced Kerr nonlinearity in electromagnetically induced transparency windows. While for fixed anisotropic Purcell factors, Kerr nonlinearity with orthogonal dipole moments increases with the decrease of its crossing damping, and Kerr nonlinearity with nonorthogonal dipole moments is very sensitive to both the value of crossing damping and the orientation of the dipole moments. We design the non-resonant gold nanorods array, which only provides subwavelength-confined anisotropic Purcell factors, and demonstrate that the Kerr nonlinearity of cesium atoms close to the nanorods array can be modulated at the nanoscale. These findings should have potential application in ultracompact quantum logic devices.

  18. Plasmon-enhanced Kerr nonlinearity via subwavelength-confined anisotropic Purcell factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Juanjuan; Chen, Hongyi; Gu, Ying; Zhao, Dongxing; Zhou, Haitao; Zhang, Junxiang; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically investigate the enhancement of Kerr nonlinearity through anisotropic Purcell factors provided by plasmon nanostructures. In a three-level atomic system with crossing damping, larger anisotropism of Purcell factors leads to more enhanced Kerr nonlinearity in electromagnetically induced transparency windows. While for fixed anisotropic Purcell factors, Kerr nonlinearity with orthogonal dipole moments increases with the decrease of its crossing damping, and Kerr nonlinearity with nonorthogonal dipole moments is very sensitive to both the value of crossing damping and the orientation of the dipole moments. We design the non-resonant gold nanorods array, which only provides subwavelength-confined anisotropic Purcell factors, and demonstrate that the Kerr nonlinearity of cesium atoms close to the nanorods array can be modulated at the nanoscale. These findings should have potential application in ultracompact quantum logic devices.

  19. Pioneer factors govern super-enhancer dynamics in stem cell plasticity and lineage choice

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Rene C.; Yang, Hanseul; Rockowitz, Shira; Larsen, Samantha B.; Nikolova, Maria; Oristian, Daniel S.; Polak, Lisa; Kadaja, Meelis; Asare, Amma; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells (SCs) reside in niches which balance self-renewal with lineage selection and progression during tissue homeostasis. Following injury, culture or transplantation, SCs outside their niche often display fate flexibility1-4. Here we show that super-enhancers5 underlie the identity, lineage commitment and plasticity of adult SCs in vivo. Using hair follicle (HF) as model, we map the global chromatin domains of HFSCs and their committed progenitors in their native microenvironments. We show that super-enhancers and their dense clusters (‘epicenters’) of transcription factor (TF) binding sites change upon lineage progression. New fate is acquired by decommissioning old and establishing new super-enhancers and/or epicenters, an auto-regulatory process that abates one master regulator subset while enhancing another. We further show that when outside their niche, either in vitro or in wound-repair, HFSCs dynamically remodel super-enhancers in response to changes in their microenvironment. Intriguingly, some key super-enhancers shift epicenters, enabling them to remain active and maintain a transitional state in an ever-changing transcriptional landscape. Finally, we identify SOX9 as a crucial chromatin rheostat of HFSC super-enhancers, and provide functional evidence that super-enhancers are dynamic, dense TF-binding platforms which are acutely sensitive to pioneer master regulators whose levels define not only spatial and temporal features of lineage-status, but also stemness, plasticity in transitional states and differentiation. PMID:25799994

  20. Uncoupling evolutionary changes in DNA sequence, transcription factor occupancy and enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Khoueiry, Pierre; Girardot, Charles; Ciglar, Lucia; Peng, Pei-Chen; Gustafson, E Hilary; Sinha, Saurabh; Furlong, Eileen EM

    2017-01-01

    Sequence variation within enhancers plays a major role in both evolution and disease, yet its functional impact on transcription factor (TF) occupancy and enhancer activity remains poorly understood. Here, we assayed the binding of five essential TFs over multiple stages of embryogenesis in two distant Drosophila species (with 1.4 substitutions per neutral site), identifying thousands of orthologous enhancers with conserved or diverged combinatorial occupancy. We used these binding signatures to dissect two properties of developmental enhancers: (1) potential TF cooperativity, using signatures of co-associations and co-divergence in TF occupancy. This revealed conserved combinatorial binding despite sequence divergence, suggesting protein-protein interactions sustain conserved collective occupancy. (2) Enhancer in-vivo activity, revealing orthologous enhancers with conserved activity despite divergence in TF occupancy. Taken together, we identify enhancers with diverged motifs yet conserved occupancy and others with diverged occupancy yet conserved activity, emphasising the need to functionally measure the effect of divergence on enhancer activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.28440.001 PMID:28792889

  1. Chicken stem cell factor enhances primordial germ cell proliferation cooperatively with fibroblast growth factor 2

    PubMed Central

    MIYAHARA, Daichi; OISHI, Isao; MAKINO, Ryuichi; KURUMISAWA, Nozomi; NAKAYA, Ryuma; ONO, Tamao; KAGAMI, Hiroshi; TAGAMI, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    An in vitro culture system of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has been recently developed, but the growth factor involved in the proliferation of PGCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the growth effects of chicken stem cell factor (chSCF) on the in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. We established two feeder cell lines (buffalo rat liver cells; BRL cells) that stably express the putative secreted form of chSCF (chSCF1-BRL) and membrane bound form of chSCF (chSCF2-BRL). Cultured PGC lines were incubated on chSCF1 or chSCF2-BRL feeder cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and growth effects of each chSCF isoform were investigated. The in vitro proliferation rate of the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL at 20 days of culture was more than threefold higher than those cultured on chSCF1-BRL cells and more than fivefold higher than those cultured on normal BRL cells. Thus, use of chSCF2-BRL feeder layer was effective for in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. However, the acceleration of PGC proliferation on chSCF2-BRL was not observed without FGF2, suggesting that chSCF2 would act as a proliferation co-factor of FGF2. We transferred the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL cells to recipient embryos, generated germline chimeric chickens and assessed the germline competency of cultured PGCs by progeny test. Donor-derived progenies were obtained, and the frequency of germline transmission was 3.39%. The results of this study demonstrate that chSCF2 induces hyperproliferation of chicken PGCs retaining germline competency in vitro in cooperation with FGF2. PMID:26727404

  2. Enhancement of rabbit jugular vein thrombolysis by neutralization of factor XI. In vivo evidence for a role of factor XI as an anti-fibrinolytic factor.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; Friederich, P W; Levi, M; von dem Borne, P A; Mosnier, L O; Meijers, J C; Biemond, B J; Hack, C E; Bouma, B N; ten Cate, H

    1998-01-01

    Recent in vitro studies have shown that fibrinolytic activity may be attenuated by a thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), which is activated by thrombin, generated via the intrinsic pathway of coagulation in a factor XI-dependent way. Thus factor XI may play a role in the regulation of endogenous fibrinolysis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in vivo inhibition of factor XI and TAFI in an experimental thrombosis model in rabbits. Incorporation of anti-factor XI antibodies in jugular vein thrombi resulted in an almost twofold increase in endogenous thrombolysis compared with a control antibody. A similar effect was observed when the anti-factor XI antibody was administered systemically. Inhibition of TAFI activity also resulted in a twofold increase in clot lysis whereas inhibition of both factor XI and TAFI activity had no additional effect. Thus, we provide the first in vivo evidence for enhanced thrombolysis through inhibition of clotting factor XI, demonstrating a novel role for the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. Furthermore we demonstrate that inhibition of TAFI had a similar effect on thrombolysis. We postulate that inhibition of factor XI activity enhances thrombolysis because of diminished indirect activation of TAFI.

  3. Theory of g-factor enhancement in narrow-gap quantum well heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtopenko, S. S.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Goiran, M.

    2011-09-01

    We report on the study of the exchange enhancement of the g-factor in the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas in n-type narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures. Our approach is based on the eight-band kṡp Hamiltonian and takes into account the band nonparabolicity, the lattice deformation, the spin-orbit coupling and the Landau level broadening in the δ-correlated random potential model. Using the ‘screened’ Hartree-Fock approximation we demonstrate that the exchange g-factor enhancement not only shows maxima at odd values of Landau level filling factors but, due to the conduction band nonparabolicity, persists at even filling factor values as well. The magnitude of the exchange enhancement, the amplitude and the shape of the g-factor oscillations are determined by both the screening of the electron-electron interaction and the Landau level width. The ‘enhanced’ g-factor values calculated for the 2D electron gas in InAs/AlSb quantum well heterostructures are compared with our earlier experimental data and with those obtained by Mendez et al (1993 Phys. Rev. B 47 13937) in magnetic fields up to 30 T.

  4. Tcra enhancer activation by inducible transcription factors downstream of pre-TCR signaling.

    PubMed

    del Blanco, Beatriz; García-Mariscal, Alberto; Wiest, David L; Hernández-Munain, Cristina

    2012-04-01

    The Tcra enhancer (Eα) is essential for pre-TCR-mediated activation of germline transcription and V(D)J recombination. Eα is considered an archetypical enhanceosome that acts through the functional synergy and cooperative binding of multiple transcription factors. Based on dimethylsulfate genomic footprinting experiments, there has been a long-standing paradox regarding Eα activation in the absence of differences in enhancer occupancy. Our data provide the molecular mechanism of Eα activation and an explanation of this paradox. We found that germline transcriptional activation of Tcra is dependent on constant phospholipase Cγ, as well as calcineurin- and MAPK/ERK-mediated signaling, indicating that inducible transcription factors are crucially involved. NFAT, AP-1, and early growth response factor 1, together with CREB-binding protein/p300 coactivators, bind to Eα as part of an active enhanceosome assembled during pre-TCR signaling. We favor a scenario in which the binding of lymphoid-restricted and constitutive transcription factors to Eα prior to its activation forms a regulatory scaffold to recruit factors induced by pre-TCR signaling. Thus, the combinatorial assembly of tissue- and signal-specific transcription factors dictates the Eα function. This mechanism for enhancer activation may represent a general paradigm in tissue-restricted and stimulus-responsive gene regulation.

  5. The Use of Growth Factors and Other Humoral Agents to Accelerate and Enhance Burn Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Yiu-Hei; Sutton, Thomas L.; Pierpont, Yvonne N.; Robson, Martin C.; Payne, Wyatt G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Certain cytokines, especially those known as growth factors, have been demonstrated to mediate or modulate burn wound healing. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that there are therapeutic advantages to the wound healing process when these agents are utilized. Positive effects have been reported for 4 types of wounds seen in the burn patient: partial-thickness wounds, full-thickness wounds, interstices of meshed skin grafts, and skin graft donor sites. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using the MEDLINE, Ovid, and Web of Science databases to identify pertinent articles regarding growth factors and other cytokines in burns and wound healing. Results: The current knowledge about cytokine growth factors and their potential therapeutic applications in burn wound healing are discussed and reviewed. Conclusions: Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factors, epidermal growth factors, transforming growth factor alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, insulin-like growth factor I, nerve growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and amnion-derived cellular cytokine solution have all been suggested to enhance the rate and quality of healing in 1 or more of these wounds encountered in burn care. PMID:22084646

  6. Five factor model personality factors moderated the effects of an intervention to enhance chronic disease management self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Franks, Peter; Chapman, Benjamin; Duberstein, Paul; Jerant, Anthony

    2009-09-01

    Peer led interventions can enhance patient self-efficacy for managing chronic illnesses, but little is known regarding the moderators or duration of their effects. We hypothesized Homing in on Health (HIOH), a variant of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, would be most effective in patients high in neuroticism and low in extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and/or conscientiousness. Analysis of data from subjects (N=415) enrolled in an ongoing randomized controlled trial. Regression analyses were conducted to explore whether Five Factor Model (FFM) personality factors moderated the effects of HIOH, delivered in subjects' homes or via telephone, on disease management self-efficacy. Data were collected at 6 time points over the course of 1 year. Compared with control and telephone HIOH, home HIOH significantly increased self-efficacy, an effect peaking at 6 weeks and fully attenuating by 1 year. Moderation analyses revealed the benefit was confined to patients higher in neuroticism and/or lower in conscientiousness, agreeableness, and extraversion. A peer led intervention to enhance disease management self-efficacy had only short-term effects, and FFM personality factors moderated those effects. Measuring personality factors in chronically ill individuals may facilitate targeting of self-management interventions to those most likely to respond.

  7. Five factor model personality factors moderated the effects of an intervention to enhance chronic disease management self-efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Peter; Chapman, Benjamin; Duberstein, Paul; Jerant, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Peer led interventions can enhance patient self-efficacy for managing chronic illnesses, but little is known regarding the moderators or duration of their effects. We hypothesized Homing in on Health (HIOH), a variant of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, would be most effective in patients high in neuroticism and low in extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and/or conscientiousness. Design Analysis of data from subjects (N = 415) enrolled in an ongoing randomized controlled trial Methods Regression analyses were conducted to explore whether Five Factor Model (FFM) personality factors moderated the effects of HIOH, delivered in subjects’ homes or via telephone, on disease management self-efficacy. Data were collected at 6 time points over the course of 1 year. Results Compared with control and telephone HIOH, home HIOH significantly increased self-efficacy, an effect peaking at 6 weeks and fully attenuating by 1 year. Moderation analyses revealed the benefit was confined to patients higher in neuroticism and/or lower in conscientiousness, agreeableness, and extraversion. Conclusions A peer led intervention to enhance disease management self-efficacy had only short-term effects, and FFM personality factors moderated those effects. Measuring personality factors in chronically ill individuals may facilitate targeting of self-management interventions to those most likely to respond. PMID:18808733

  8. Transcription factor p63 bookmarks and regulates dynamic enhancers during epidermal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kouwenhoven, Evelyn N; Oti, Martin; Niehues, Hanna; van Heeringen, Simon J; Schalkwijk, Joost; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; van Bokhoven, Hans; Zhou, Huiqing

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 plays a pivotal role in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in the epidermis. However, how p63 regulates epidermal genes during differentiation is not yet clear. Using epigenome profiling of differentiating human primary epidermal keratinocytes, we characterized a catalog of dynamically regulated genes and p63-bound regulatory elements that are relevant for epithelial development and related diseases. p63-bound regulatory elements occur as single or clustered enhancers, and remarkably, only a subset is active as defined by the co-presence of the active enhancer mark histone modification H3K27ac in epidermal keratinocytes. We show that the dynamics of gene expression correlates with the activity of p63-bound enhancers rather than with p63 binding itself. The activity of p63-bound enhancers is likely determined by other transcription factors that cooperate with p63. Our data show that inactive p63-bound enhancers in epidermal keratinocytes may be active during the development of other epithelial-related structures such as limbs and suggest that p63 bookmarks genomic loci during the commitment of the epithelial lineage and regulates genes through temporal- and spatial-specific active enhancers. PMID:26034101

  9. Focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal brain delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Georgiana Zong Xin; Getachew, Hoheteberhan; Acosta, Camilo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2016-06-27

    The objective of this study was to unveil the potential mechanism of focused ultrasound (FUS)-enhanced intranasal (IN) brain drug delivery and assess its feasibility in the delivery of therapeutic molecules. Delivery outcomes of fluorescently-labeled dextrans to mouse brains by IN administration either before or after FUS sonication were compared to evaluate whether FUS enhances IN delivery by active pumping or passive diffusion. Fluorescence imaging of brain slices found that IN administration followed by FUS sonication achieved significantly higher delivery than IN administration only, while pre-treatment by FUS sonication followed by IN administration was not significantly different from IN administration only. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a promising neurotrophic factor for the treatment of many central nervous system diseases, was delivered by IN followed by FUS to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and compared with the established FUS technique where drugs are injected intravenously. Immunohistochemistry staining of BDNF revealed that FUS-enhanced IN delivery achieved similar locally enhanced delivery as the established FUS technique. This study suggested that FUS enhances IN brain drug delivery by FUS-induced active pumping of the drug and demonstrated that FUS-enhanced IN delivery is a promising technique for noninvasive and localized delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain.

  10. Focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal brain delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Georgiana Zong Xin; Getachew, Hoheteberhan; Acosta, Camilo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to unveil the potential mechanism of focused ultrasound (FUS)-enhanced intranasal (IN) brain drug delivery and assess its feasibility in the delivery of therapeutic molecules. Delivery outcomes of fluorescently-labeled dextrans to mouse brains by IN administration either before or after FUS sonication were compared to evaluate whether FUS enhances IN delivery by active pumping or passive diffusion. Fluorescence imaging of brain slices found that IN administration followed by FUS sonication achieved significantly higher delivery than IN administration only, while pre-treatment by FUS sonication followed by IN administration was not significantly different from IN administration only. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a promising neurotrophic factor for the treatment of many central nervous system diseases, was delivered by IN followed by FUS to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and compared with the established FUS technique where drugs are injected intravenously. Immunohistochemistry staining of BDNF revealed that FUS-enhanced IN delivery achieved similar locally enhanced delivery as the established FUS technique. This study suggested that FUS enhances IN brain drug delivery by FUS-induced active pumping of the drug and demonstrated that FUS-enhanced IN delivery is a promising technique for noninvasive and localized delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain.

  11. EFFECT OF MORTALITY-ENHANCING FACTOR FROM LISTERIA ON EXPERIMENTAL HISTOPLASMOSIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    bacteria has been previously reported. This preparation was labeled mortality - enhancing factor (MEF). This report describes investigations to determine...the effect of MEF on experimental histoplasmosis , principally in Syrian hamsters. In a preliminary study, yeast cells of Histoplasma capsulatum...however, the rate of death and total numbers of dead animals were approximately the same as those for control animals receiving spores alone.

  12. Enhancing Coping and Supporting Protective Factors after a Disaster: Findings From a Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Tara; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This article presents the Journey of Hope (JoH), a school-based intervention for children who have experienced a collective trauma such as a natural disaster. Through the use of group work, the JoH focuses on building coping skills and enhancing protective factors to help children recover. Method: This quasi-experimental research…

  13. Evaluation of a Resilience Intervention to Enhance Coping Strategies and Protective Factors and Decrease Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhardt, Mary; Dolbier, Christyn

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In this pilot study, the authors examined the effectiveness of a 4-week resilience intervention to enhance resilience, coping strategies, and protective factors, as well as decrease symptomatology during a period of increased academic stress. Participants and Methods: College students were randomly assigned to experimental (n = 30) and…

  14. Emotional Enhancement Effect of Memory: Removing the Influence of Cognitive Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Tobias; Glascher, Jan; Moritz, Steffen; Buchel, Christian

    2008-01-01

    According to the modulation hypothesis, arousal is the crucial factor in the emotional enhancement of memory (EEM). However, the multifactor theory of the EEM recently proposed that cognitive characteristics of emotional stimuli, e.g., relatedness and distinctiveness, also play an important role. The current study aimed to investigate the…

  15. Factors Contributing to Employment and Enhancement in Quality of Life of Adult Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Jane

    A statistical analysis of an adult high school was conducted to determine factors for achievement and enhancement of quality of life of adult learners. Participants were 206 adult students studying English as a Second Language or enrolled in upgrading and business courses at a metropolitan Toronto (Ontario, Canada) secondary school. Variables…

  16. COMMENT: Comment on 'Model calculation of the scanned field enhancement factor of CNTs'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhbanov, A. I.; Lee, Yong-Gu; Pogorelov, E. G.; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2010-09-01

    The model proposed by Ahmad and Tripathi (2006 Nanotechnology 17 3798) demonstrates that the field enhancement factor of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reaches a maximum at a certain length. Here, we show that this behavior should not occur and suggest our correction to this model.

  17. Comment on 'Model calculation of the scanned field enhancement factor of CNTs'.

    PubMed

    Zhbanov, A I; Lee, Yong-Gu; Pogorelov, E G; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2010-09-03

    The model proposed by Ahmad and Tripathi (2006 Nanotechnology 17 3798) demonstrates that the field enhancement factor of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reaches a maximum at a certain length. Here, we show that this behavior should not occur and suggest our correction to this model.

  18. Enhancing Coping and Supporting Protective Factors after a Disaster: Findings From a Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Tara; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This article presents the Journey of Hope (JoH), a school-based intervention for children who have experienced a collective trauma such as a natural disaster. Through the use of group work, the JoH focuses on building coping skills and enhancing protective factors to help children recover. Method: This quasi-experimental research…

  19. Emotional Enhancement Effect of Memory: Removing the Influence of Cognitive Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Tobias; Glascher, Jan; Moritz, Steffen; Buchel, Christian

    2008-01-01

    According to the modulation hypothesis, arousal is the crucial factor in the emotional enhancement of memory (EEM). However, the multifactor theory of the EEM recently proposed that cognitive characteristics of emotional stimuli, e.g., relatedness and distinctiveness, also play an important role. The current study aimed to investigate the…

  20. Intestinal smooth muscle cells locally enhance stem cell factor (SCF) production against gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells can produce stem cell factor (SCF) in the normal state for the preservation of mast cells, but it is still unknown whether smooth muscle cells can enhance SCF production in response to the pathological stimuli. The present study showed that smooth muscle cells in mast cell-increased regions around worm cysts of intestinal nematodes significantly enhanced SCF gene expression compared with mast cell non-increased regions in same sample. SCF gene expression in mast cell non-increased regions in nematode-infected mice showed almost the same level as in non-infected control groups. These results indicate that smooth muscle cells can locally enhance SCF gene expression, and may have a role in local immunological reactions as growth factor-producing cells.

  1. Computational identification of developmental enhancers:conservation and function of transcription factor binding-site clustersin drosophila melanogaster and drosophila psedoobscura

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Benjamin P.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Laverty, Todd R.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, SusanE.

    2004-08-06

    Background The identification of sequences that control transcription in metazoans is a major goal of genome analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that searching for clusters of predicted transcription factor binding sites could discover active regulatory sequences, and identified 37 regions of the Drosophila melanogaster genome with high densities of predicted binding sites for five transcription factors involved in anterior-posterior embryonic patterning. Nine of these clusters overlapped known enhancers. Here, we report the results of in vivo functional analysis of 27 remaining clusters. Results We generated transgenic flies carrying each cluster attached to a basal promoter and reporter gene, and assayed embryos for reporter gene expression. Six clusters are enhancers of adjacent genes: giant, fushi tarazu, odd-skipped, nubbin, squeeze and pdm2; three drive expression in patterns unrelated to those of neighboring genes; the remaining 18 do not appear to have enhancer activity. We used the Drosophila pseudoobscura genome to compare patterns of evolution in and around the 15 positive and 18 false-positive predictions. Although conservation of primary sequence cannot distinguish true from false positives, conservation of binding-site clustering accurately discriminates functional binding-site clusters from those with no function. We incorporated conservation of binding-site clustering into a new genome-wide enhancer screen, and predict several hundred new regulatory sequences, including 85 adjacent to genes with embryonic patterns. Conclusions Measuring conservation of sequence features closely linked to function - such as binding-site clustering - makes better use of comparative sequence data than commonly used methods that examine only sequence identity.

  2. Computational identification of developmental enhancers:conservation and function of transcription factor binding-site clustersin drosophila melanogaster and drosophila psedoobscura

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Benjamin P.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Laverty, Todd R.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, SusanE.

    2004-08-06

    The identification of sequences that control transcription in metazoans is a major goal of genome analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that searching for clusters of predicted transcription factor binding sites could discover active regulatory sequences, and identified 37 regions of the Drosophila melanogaster genome with high densities of predicted binding sites for five transcription factors involved in anterior-posterior embryonic patterning. Nine of these clusters overlapped known enhancers. Here, we report the results of in vivo functional analysis of 27 remaining clusters. We generated transgenic flies carrying each cluster attached to a basal promoter and reporter gene, and assayed embryos for reporter gene expression. Six clusters are enhancers of adjacent genes: giant, fushi tarazu, odd-skipped, nubbin, squeeze and pdm2; three drive expression in patterns unrelated to those of neighboring genes; the remaining 18 do not appear to have enhancer activity. We used the Drosophila pseudoobscura genome to compare patterns of evolution in and around the 15 positive and 18 false-positive predictions. Although conservation of primary sequence cannot distinguish true from false positives, conservation of binding-site clustering accurately discriminates functional binding-site clusters from those with no function. We incorporated conservation of binding-site clustering into a new genome-wide enhancer screen, and predict several hundred new regulatory sequences, including 85 adjacent to genes with embryonic patterns. Measuring conservation of sequence features closely linked to function--such as binding-site clustering--makes better use of comparative sequence data than commonly used methods that examine only sequence identity.

  3. Dopamine release in the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Margaret E.; Patel, Jyoti C.; Cragg, Stephanie J.

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key transmitter in the basal ganglia, yet DA transmission does not conform to several aspects of the classic synaptic doctrine. Axonal DA release occurs through vesicular exocytosis and is action-potential and Ca2+ dependent. However, in addition to axonal release, DA neurons in midbrain exhibit somatodendritic release, by an incompletely understood, but apparently exocytotic mechanism. Even in striatum, axonal release sites are controversial, with evidence for DA varicosities that lack postsynaptic specialization, and largely extrasynaptic DA receptors and transporters. Moreover, DA release is often assumed to reflect a global response to a population of activities in midbrain DA neurons, whether tonic or phasic, with precise timing and specificity of action governed by other basal ganglia circuits. This view has been reinforced by anatomical evidence showing dense axonal DA arbors throughout striatum, and a lattice network formed by DA axons and glutamatergic input from cortex and thalamus. Nonetheless, localized DA transients are seen in vivo using voltammetric methods with high spatial and temporal resolution. Mechanistic studies using similar methods in vitro have revealed local regulation of DA release by other transmitters and modulators, as well as by proteins known to be disrupted in Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. Notably, the actions of most other striatal transmitters on DA release also do not conform to the synaptic doctrine, with the absence of direct synaptic contacts for glutamate, GABA and aceylcholie (ACh) on striatal DA axons. Overall, the findings reviewed here indicate that DA signaling in the basal ganglia is sculpted by cooperation between the timing and pattern of DA input and those of local regulatory factors. PMID:21939738

  4. Enhancement of Memories by Systemic Administration of Insulin-Like Growth Factor II

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Sarah A; Kohtz, Amy S; Pollonini, Gabriella; Alberini, Cristina M

    2014-01-01

    To treat cognitive disorders in humans, new effective therapies that can be easily delivered systemically are needed. Previous studies showed that a bilateral injection of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) into the dorsal hippocampus of rats or mice enhances fear memories and facilitates fear extinction. Here, we report that, in mice, systemic treatments with IGF-II given before training significantly enhance the retention and persistence of several types of working, short-term and long-term memories, including fear conditioning, object recognition, object placement, social recognition, and spatial reference memory. IGF-II-mediated memory enhancement does not alter memory flexibility or the ability for new learning and also occurs when IGF-II treatment is given in concert with memory retrieval. Thus IGF-II may represent a potentially important and effective treatment for enhancing human cognitive and executive functions. PMID:24642597

  5. Basal cell nevus syndrome - plantar pits (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pits in the palms and soles, and numerous basal cell carcinomas (skin cancers). This picture is a close-up of the pits found on the sole of the foot of an individual with basal cell nevus syndrome.

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation enhances expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lin, Paul-Yann; Lung, Jr-Hau; Li, Ya-Chin; Lin, Yu-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been demonstrated to have a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In the present study, the correlation between EGFR mutations and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was investigated in lung cancer cell lines and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor tissues. VEGF levels were significantly increased in culture medium of lung cancer cells and NSCLC tissues with EGFR mutations (H1650 vs. A549, P=0.0399; H1975 vs. A549, P<0.0001). Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion, E746-A750; exon 21 missense mutation, L858R) and wild-type EGFR genes were established. Significantly increased expression of VEGF and stronger inhibitory effects of gefitinib to VEGF expression were observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells (exon 19 deletion vs. wild-type EGFR, P=0.0005). The results of the present study may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and VEGF expression in lung cancer, and may assist with further development of targeted therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  7. The dermatoscopic universe of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lallas, Aimilios; Apalla, Zoe; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina; Moscarella, Elvira; Specchio, Francesca; Raucci, Margaritha; Zalaudek, Iris

    2014-07-01

    Following the first descriptions of the dermatoscopic pattern of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that go back to the very early years of dermatoscopy, the list of dermatoscopic criteria associated with BCC has been several times updated and renewed. Up to date, dermatoscopy has been shown to enhance BCC detection, by facilitating its discrimination from other skin tumors and inflammatory skin diseases. Furthermore, upcoming evidence suggests that the method is also useful for the management of the tumor, since it provides valuable information about the histopathologic subtype, the presence of clinically undetectable pigmentation, the expansion of the tumor beyond clinically visible margins and the response to non-ablative treatments. In the current article, we provide a summary of the traditional and latest knowledge on the value of dermatoscopy for the diagnosis and management of BCC.

  8. Basal Ganglia Beta Oscillations Accompany Cue Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Daniel K.; Gage, Gregory J.; Schmidt, Robert; Pettibone, Jeffrey R.; Case, Alaina C.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Beta oscillations in cortical-basal ganglia (BG) circuits have been implicated in normal movement suppression and motor impairment in Parkinson’s disease. To dissect the functional correlates of these rhythms we compared neural activity during four distinct variants of a cued choice task in rats. Brief beta (~20 Hz) oscillations occurred simultaneously throughout the cortical-BG network, both spontaneously and at precise moments of task performance. Beta phase was rapidly reset in response to salient cues, yet increases in beta power were not rigidly linked to cues, movements, or movement suppression. Rather, beta power was enhanced after cues were used to determine motor output. We suggest that beta oscillations reflect a postdecision stabilized state of cortical-BG networks, which normally reduces interference from alternative potential actions. The abnormally strong beta seen in Parkinson’s Disease may reflect overstabilization of these networks, producing pathological persistence of the current motor state. PMID:22325204

  9. The dermatoscopic universe of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lallas, Aimilios; Apalla, Zoe; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina; Moscarella, Elvira; Specchio, Francesca; Raucci, Margaritha; Zalaudek, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Following the first descriptions of the dermatoscopic pattern of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that go back to the very early years of dermatoscopy, the list of dermatoscopic criteria associated with BCC has been several times updated and renewed. Up to date, dermatoscopy has been shown to enhance BCC detection, by facilitating its discrimination from other skin tumors and inflammatory skin diseases. Furthermore, upcoming evidence suggests that the method is also useful for the management of the tumor, since it provides valuable information about the histopathologic subtype, the presence of clinically undetectable pigmentation, the expansion of the tumor beyond clinically visible margins and the response to non-ablative treatments. In the current article, we provide a summary of the traditional and latest knowledge on the value of dermatoscopy for the diagnosis and management of BCC. PMID:25126452

  10. Heterogeneity of luminal breast cancer characterised by immunohistochemical expression of basal markers

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hyuna; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Blows, Fiona M; Ali, H Raza; Figueroa, Jonine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Fagerholm, Rainer; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; McLean, Catriona; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Sironen, Reijo; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Olswold, Curtis; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Kraft, Peter; Tamimi, Rulla M; Eliassen, A Heather; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Easton, Douglas; Howat, William J; Coulson, Penny; Pharoah, Paul DP; Sherman, Mark E; Yang, Xiaohong R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Luminal A breast cancer defined as hormone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative is known to be heterogeneous. Previous study showed that luminal A tumours with the expression of basal markers ((cytokeratin (CK) 5 or CK5/6) or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)) were associated with poorer prognosis compared with those that stained negative for basal markers. Prompted by this study, we assessed whether tumour characteristics and risk factors differed by basal marker status within luminal A tumours. Methods: We pooled 5040 luminal A cases defined by immunohistochemistry (4490 basal-negative ((CK5 (or CK5/6))− and EGFR−) and 550 basal-positive ((CK5 (or CK5/6+)) or EGFR+)) from eight studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Case–case comparison was performed using unconditional logistic regression. Results: Tumour characteristics and risk factors did not vary significantly by the expression of basal markers, although results suggested that basal-positive luminal tumours tended to be smaller and node negative, and were more common in women with a positive family history and lower body mass index. Conclusions: Most established breast cancer risk factors were similar in basal-positive and basal-negative luminal A tumours. The non-significant but suggestive differences in tumour features and family history warrant further investigations. PMID:26679376

  11. Characterization of protein factor(s) in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid that enhance insulin transport via transcytosis across primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Bahhady, Rana; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Borok, Zea; Crandall, Edward D.; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize factor(s) in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) that enhance(s) insulin transport across primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECM) in primary culture. BALF was concentrated 7.5-fold using the Centricon device and the retentate was used to characterize the factor(s) involved in enhancing apical-to-basolateral transport of intact 125I-insulin across various epithelial cell monolayers. These factor(s) enhanced transport of intact insulin across type II cell-like RAECM (3-fold increase) and type I cell-like RAECM (2-fold increase), but not across Caco-2 or MDCK cell monolayers. The insulin transport-enhancing factor(s) were temperature- and trypsin-sensitive. The mechanism of enhancement did not seem to involve paracellular transport or fluid-phase endocytosis, since fluxes of sodium fluorescein and FITC-dextran (70 kDa) were not affected by the factor(s) in the apical bathing fluid. BALF enhancement of intact 125I-insulin transport was abolished at 4°C and in the presence of monensin, suggesting involvement of transcellular pathways. Sephacryl S-200 purification of BALF retentate, followed by LC-MS/MS, indicated that the high molecular weight (>100 kDa) fractions (which show some homology to alpha-1-inhibitor III, murinoglobulin gamma 2, and pregnancy-zone protein) appear to facilitate transcellular transport of insulin across RAECM. PMID:18406118

  12. Basal inflammation and innate immune response in chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Generaal, Ellen; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Macfarlane, Gary J; Geenen, Rinie; Smit, Johannes H; Dekker, Joost; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2014-08-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in chronic pain, although study findings are inconsistent. This cross-sectional study examined whether basal inflammatory markers and the innate immune response are associated with the presence and severity of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain. Data were used on 1632 subjects of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. The Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire was used to determine the presence and severity of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain. Subjects were categorized in a chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain group (n=754) and a control group (n=878). Blood levels of the basal inflammatory markers C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were determined. To obtain a measure of the innate immune response, 13 inflammatory markers were assessed after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in a subsample (n=707). Subjects with chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain showed elevated levels of basal inflammatory markers compared with controls, but statistical significance was lost after adjustment for lifestyle and disease variables. For some LPS-stimulated inflammatory markers, we did find elevated levels in subjects with chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain both before and after adjustment for covariates. Pain severity was not associated with inflammation within chronic pain subjects. An enhanced innate immune response in chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain may be examined as a potential biomarker for the onset or perpetuation of chronic pain.

  13. Examining Dictionary Instruction in Basal Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Peter J. L.; And Others

    This study explored the nature of dictionary instruction in several basal reading series. Three basal reading series from major academic publishers (Scott Foresman, Ginn, and Holt) with 1989 copyrights, were selected for detailed analysis. Results indicated that even where the professed aim of the basal reading series was to incorporate dictionary…

  14. Multiorgan autoimmune inflammation, enhanced lymphoproliferation, and impaired homeostasis of reactive oxygen species in mice lacking the antioxidant-activated transcription factor Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiang; Battelli, Lori; Hubbs, Ann F

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an antioxidant-activated cap "n" collar basic leucine zipper transcription factor. To assess the function of Nrf2 in the antioxidant response, we examined mice with targeted disruption of the Nrf2 gene. Nrf2-null mice developed complex disease manifestations, with a majority exhibiting a lupus-like autoimmune syndrome characterized by multiorgan inflammatory lesions with a marked female predominance, appearance of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies in young adulthood, intravascular deposition of immunoglobulin complexes in blood vessels, and premature death due to rapidly progressing membranoproliferative glomerular nephritis. Mechanistic analyses revealed that the null mice showed enhanced proliferative response of CD4+ T cells, altered ratios of CD4+ and CD8+ cells, and increased oxidative lesions in tissues. Analyses of antioxidant-induced gene expression showed that the knockout mice were devoid of the basal and inducible expression of certain phase 2 detoxification enzymes and antioxidant genes in hepatic and lymphoid cells in vivo. Our findings suggest that Nrf2 mediates important antioxidant functions involved in the control of peripheral lymphocyte homeostasis and autoimmune surveillance.

  15. The basal ganglia and apraxia.

    PubMed

    Pramstaller, P P; Marsden, C D

    1996-02-01

    Ever since Liepmann's original descriptions at the beginning of the century apraxia has usually been attributed to damage confined to the cerebral cortex and/or cortico-cortical connecting pathways. However, there have been suggestions that apraxia can be due to deep subcortical lesions, which raises the question as to whether damage to the basal ganglia or thalamus can cause apraxia. We therefore analysed 82 cases of such 'deep' apraxias reported in the literature. These reports consisted of a small number (n=9) of cases studied neuropathologically, and a much larger group (n=73) in which CT or MRI was used to identify the size and extent of the lesion. The reports were subdivided into (i) those with small isolated lesions which involved nuclei of the basal ganglia or thalamus only, and not extending to involve periventricular or peristriatal white matter; (ii) those with large lesions which involved two or more of the nuclei, or one or more of these deep structures plus damage to closely adjacent areas including the internal capsule, periventricular or peristriatal white matter; and (iii) lesions sparing basal ganglia and thalamus but involving adjacent white matter. The main conclusions to be drawn from this meta-analysis are that lesions confined to the basal ganglia (putamen, caudate nucleus and globus pallidus) rarely, if ever, cause apraxia. Lesions affecting the lenticular nucleus or putamen nearly always intruded into the adjacent lateral white matter to involve association fibres, in particular those of the superior longitudinal fasciculus and frontostriatal connections. Apraxia occurred with deep lesions of the basal ganglia apparently sparing white matter in only eight out of the 82 cases. Apraxia was most commonly seen when there were lesions in the lenticular nucleus or putamen (58 out of 72 cases) with additional involvement of capsular, and particularly of periventricular or peristriatal, white matter. Lesions of the globus pallidus (no cases) or

  16. Oscillations and the basal ganglia: Motor control and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, John-Stuart; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations form a ubiquitous feature of the central nervous system. Evidence is accruing from cortical and sub-cortical recordings that these rhythms may be functionally important, although the precise details of their roles remain unclear. The basal ganglia share this predilection for rhythmic activity which, as we see in Parkinson’s disease, becomes further enhanced in the dopamine depleted state. While certain cortical rhythms appear to penetrate the basal ganglia, others are transformed or blocked. Here, we discuss the functional association of oscillations in the basal ganglia and their relationship with cortical activity. We further explore the neural underpinnings of such oscillatory activity, including the important balance to be struck between facilitating information transmission and limiting information coding capacity. Finally, we introduce the notion that synchronised oscillatory activity can be broadly categorised as immutability promoting rhythms that reinforce incumbent processes, and mutability promoting rhythms that favour novel processing. PMID:23711535

  17. Transcription factor assisted loading and enhancer dynamics dictate the hepatic fasting response

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ido; Baek, Songjoon; Presman, Diego M.; Paakinaho, Ville; Swinstead, Erin E.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2017-01-01

    Fasting elicits transcriptional programs in hepatocytes leading to glucose and ketone production. This transcriptional program is regulated by many transcription factors (TFs). To understand how this complex network regulates the metabolic response to fasting, we aimed at isolating the enhancers and TFs dictating it. Measuring chromatin accessibility revealed that fasting massively reorganizes liver chromatin, exposing numerous fasting-induced enhancers. By utilizing computational methods in combination with dissecting enhancer features and TF cistromes, we implicated four key TFs regulating the fasting response: glucocorticoid receptor (GR), cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARA), and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (CEBPB). These TFs regulate fuel production by two distinctly operating modules, each controlling a separate metabolic pathway. The gluconeogenic module operates through assisted loading, whereby GR doubles the number of sites occupied by CREB1 as well as enhances CREB1 binding intensity and increases accessibility of CREB1 binding sites. Importantly, this GR-assisted CREB1 binding was enhancer-selective and did not affect all CREB1-bound enhancers. Single-molecule tracking revealed that GR increases the number and DNA residence time of a portion of chromatin-bound CREB1 molecules. These events collectively result in rapid synergistic gene expression and higher hepatic glucose production. Conversely, the ketogenic module operates via a GR-induced TF cascade, whereby PPARA levels are increased following GR activation, facilitating gradual enhancer maturation next to PPARA target genes and delayed ketogenic gene expression. Our findings reveal a complex network of enhancers and TFs that dynamically cooperate to restore homeostasis upon fasting. PMID:28031249

  18. Quantitative investigation of physical factors contributing to gold nanoparticle-mediated proton dose enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Manohar, Nivedh; Kerr, Matthew; Krishnan, Sunil; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Some investigators have shown tumor cell killing enhancement in vitro and tumor regression in mice associated with the loading of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) before proton treatments. Several Monte Carlo (MC) investigations have also demonstrated GNP-mediated proton dose enhancement. However, further studies need to be done to quantify the individual physical factors that contribute to the dose enhancement or cell-kill enhancement (or radiosensitization). Thus, the current study investigated the contributions of particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), Auger and secondary electrons, and activation products towards the total dose enhancement. Specifically, GNP-mediated dose enhancement was measured using strips of radiochromic film that were inserted into vials of cylindrical GNPs, i.e. gold nanorods (GNRs), dispersed in a saline solution (0.3 mg of GNRs/g or 0.03% of GNRs by weight), as well as vials containing water only, before proton irradiation. MC simulations were also performed with the tool for particle simulation code using the film measurement setup. Additionally, a high-purity germanium detector system was used to measure the photon spectrum originating from activation products created from the interaction of protons and spherical GNPs present in a saline solution (20 mg of GNPs/g or 2% of GNPs by weight). The dose enhancement due to PIXE/PIGE recorded on the films in the GNR-loaded saline solution was less than the experimental uncertainty of the film dosimetry (<2%). MC simulations showed highly localized dose enhancement (up to a factor 17) in the immediate vicinity (<100 nm) of GNRs, compared with hypothetical water nanorods (WNRs), mostly due to GNR-originated Auger/secondary electrons; however, the average dose enhancement over the entire GNR-loaded vial was found to be minimal (0.1%). The dose enhancement due to the activation products from GNPs was minimal (<0.1%) as well. In conclusion, under the

  19. Quantitative investigation of physical factors contributing to gold nanoparticle-mediated proton dose enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jongmin; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Manohar, Nivedh; Kerr, Matthew; Krishnan, Sunil; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-03-21

    Some investigators have shown tumor cell killing enhancement in vitro and tumor regression in mice associated with the loading of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) before proton treatments. Several Monte Carlo (MC) investigations have also demonstrated GNP-mediated proton dose enhancement. However, further studies need to be done to quantify the individual physical factors that contribute to the dose enhancement or cell-kill enhancement (or radiosensitization). Thus, the current study investigated the contributions of particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), Auger and secondary electrons, and activation products towards the total dose enhancement. Specifically, GNP-mediated dose enhancement was measured using strips of radiochromic film that were inserted into vials of cylindrical GNPs, i.e. gold nanorods (GNRs), dispersed in a saline solution (0.3 mg of GNRs/g or 0.03% of GNRs by weight), as well as vials containing water only, before proton irradiation. MC simulations were also performed with the tool for particle simulation code using the film measurement setup. Additionally, a high-purity germanium detector system was used to measure the photon spectrum originating from activation products created from the interaction of protons and spherical GNPs present in a saline solution (20 mg of GNPs/g or 2% of GNPs by weight). The dose enhancement due to PIXE/PIGE recorded on the films in the GNR-loaded saline solution was less than the experimental uncertainty of the film dosimetry (<2%). MC simulations showed highly localized dose enhancement (up to a factor 17) in the immediate vicinity (<100 nm) of GNRs, compared with hypothetical water nanorods (WNRs), mostly due to GNR-originated Auger/secondary electrons; however, the average dose enhancement over the entire GNR-loaded vial was found to be minimal (0.1%). The dose enhancement due to the activation products from GNPs was minimal (<0.1%) as well. In conclusion, under the currently

  20. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  1. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  2. Enhanced vascularization of cultured skin substitutes genetically modified to overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Supp, D M; Supp, A P; Bell, S M; Boyce, S T

    2000-01-01

    Cultured skin substitutes have been used as adjunctive therapies in the treatment of burns and chronic wounds, but they are limited by lack of a vascular plexus. This deficiency leads to greater time for vascularization compared with native skin autografts and contributes to graft failure. Genetic modification of cultured skin substitutes to enhance vascularization could hypothetically lead to improved wound healing. To address this hypothesis, human keratinocytes were genetically modified by transduction with a replication incompetent retrovirus to overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor, a specific and potent mitogen for endothelial cells. Cultured skin substitutes consisting of collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates inoculated with human fibroblasts and either vascular endothelial growth factor-modified or control keratinocytes were prepared, and were cultured in vitro for 21 d. Northern blot analysis demonstrated enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA in genetically modified keratinocytes and in cultured skin substitutes prepared with modified cells. Furthermore, the vascular endothelial growth factor-modified cultured skin substitutes secreted greatly elevated levels of vascular endothelial growth factor protein throughout the entire culture period. The bioactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor protein secreted by the genetically modified cultured skin substitutes was demonstrated using a microvascular endothelial cell growth assay. Vascular endothelial growth factor-modified and control cultured skin substitutes were grafted to full-thickness wounds on athymic mice, and elevated vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression was detected in the modified grafts for at least 2 wk after surgery. Vascular endothelial growth factor-modified grafts exhibited increased numbers of dermal blood vessels and decreased time to vascularization compared with controls. These results indicate that genetic modification of

  3. Perturbation of transcription factor Nur77 expression mediated by myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) regulates dopaminergic neuron loss in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP).

    PubMed

    Mount, Matthew P; Zhang, Yi; Amini, Mandana; Callaghan, Steve; Kulczycki, Jerzy; Mao, Zixu; Slack, Ruth S; Anisman, Hymie; Park, David S

    2013-05-17

    We have earlier reported the critical nature of calpain-CDK5-MEF2 signaling in governing dopaminergic neuronal loss in vivo. CDK5 mediates phosphorylation of the neuronal survival factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) leading to its inactivation and loss. However, the downstream factors that mediate MEF2-regulated survival are unknown. Presently, we define Nur77 as one such critical downstream survival effector. Following 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in vivo, Nur77 expression in the nigrostriatal region is dramatically reduced. This loss is attenuated by expression of MEF2. Importantly, MEF2 constitutively binds to the Nur77 promoter in neurons under basal conditions. This binding is lost following 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium treatment. Nur77 deficiency results in significant sensitization to dopaminergic loss following 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium/MPTP treatment, in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, Nur77-deficient MPTP-treated mice displayed significantly reduced levels of dopamine and 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the striatum as well as elevated post synaptic FosB activity, indicative of increased nigrostriatal damage when compared with WT MPTP-treated controls. Importantly, this sensitization in Nur77-deficient mice was rescued with ectopic Nur77 expression in the nigrostriatal system. These results indicate that the inactivation of Nur77, induced by loss of MEF2 activity, plays a critical role in nigrostriatal degeneration in vivo.

  4. Impact of Contextual Factors and Substance Characteristics on Perspectives toward Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Sebastian; Forlini, Cynthia; Racine, Éric; Sauer, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing cognitive performance with substances–especially prescription drugs–is a fiercely debated topic among scholars and in the media. The empirical basis for these discussions is limited, given that the actual nature of factors that influence the acceptability of and willingness to use cognitive enhancement substances remains unclear. In an online factorial survey, contextual and substance-specific characteristics of substances that improve academic performance were varied experimentally and presented to respondents. Students in four German universities rated their willingness to use and moral acceptance of different substances for cognitive enhancement. We found that the overall willingness to use performance enhancing substances is low. Most respondents considered the use of these substances as morally unacceptable. Situational influences such as peer pressure, policies concerning substance use, relative performance level of peers, but also characteristics of the substance, such as perceptions of substance safety, shape the willingness and acceptability of using a substance to enhance academic performance. Among the findings is evidence of a contagion effect meaning that the willingness was higher when the respondents have more CE drug users in their social network. We also found deterrence effects from strong side effects of using the substance, as well as from policy regulations and sanctions. Regulations might activate social norms against usage and sanctions can be seen as costly to users. Moreover, enhancement substances seem to be most tempting to low performers to catch up with others compared to high performers. By identifying contextual factors and substance characteristics influencing the willingness and acceptability of cognitive enhancers, policy approaches could consider these insights to better manage the use of such substances. PMID:23940757

  5. Impact of contextual factors and substance characteristics on perspectives toward cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Sebastian; Forlini, Cynthia; Racine, Eric; Sauer, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing cognitive performance with substances--especially prescription drugs--is a fiercely debated topic among scholars and in the media. The empirical basis for these discussions is limited, given that the actual nature of factors that influence the acceptability of and willingness to use cognitive enhancement substances remains unclear. In an online factorial survey, contextual and substance-specific characteristics of substances that improve academic performance were varied experimentally and presented to respondents. Students in four German universities rated their willingness to use and moral acceptance of different substances for cognitive enhancement. We found that the overall willingness to use performance enhancing substances is low. Most respondents considered the use of these substances as morally unacceptable. Situational influences such as peer pressure, policies concerning substance use, relative performance level of peers, but also characteristics of the substance, such as perceptions of substance safety, shape the willingness and acceptability of using a substance to enhance academic performance. Among the findings is evidence of a contagion effect meaning that the willingness was higher when the respondents have more CE drug users in their social network. We also found deterrence effects from strong side effects of using the substance, as well as from policy regulations and sanctions. Regulations might activate social norms against usage and sanctions can be seen as costly to users. Moreover, enhancement substances seem to be most tempting to low performers to catch up with others compared to high performers. By identifying contextual factors and substance characteristics influencing the willingness and acceptability of cognitive enhancers, policy approaches could consider these insights to better manage the use of such substances.

  6. Controlling the electric field enhancement factor of photonic nanojets by using the magneto-optical effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleque, Abdul; Li, Ziyuan; Hattori, Haroldo T.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied photonic nanojets. These nanojets are created when an incident plane wave is focused into a narrow and high intensity emerging optical beam leaving a micro-object (e.g. microcylinder). These narrow beams may find applications in particle imaging and detection, optical sensors, enhanced Raman scattering, and particle manipulation. They also allow the projection of a particle to the far-field where it can be easily visualized. In this paper, it is shown that the electric field enhancement factor can be dynamically controlled by the application of an external intense magnetic flux density.

  7. Squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma of the skin in relation to radiation therapy and potential modification of risk by sun exposure.

    PubMed

    Karagas, Margaret R; Nelson, Heather H; Zens, Michael S; Linet, Martha; Stukel, Therese A; Spencer, Steve; Applebaum, Katie M; Mott, Leila; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2007-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies consistently find enhanced risk of basal cell carcinoma of the skin among individuals exposed to ionizing radiation, but it is unclear whether the radiation effect occurs for squamous cell carcinoma. It is also not known whether subgroups of individuals are at greater risk, eg, those with radiation sensitivity or high ultraviolet radiation exposure. We analyzed data from a case-control study of keratinocyte cancers in New Hampshire. Incident cases diagnosed in 1993-1995 and 1997-2000 were identified through a state-wide skin cancer surveillance system, and controls were identified through the Department of Transportation and Center for Medicare and Medicaid Service Files (n = 1121 basal cell carcinoma cases, 854 squamous cell carcinoma cases, and 1049 controls). We found an association between history of radiation treatment and basal cell carcinoma. The association was especially strong for basal cell carcinomas arising within the radiation treatment field (odds ratio = 2.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.5-4.3), and among those treated with radiation therapy before age 20 (3.4; 1.8-6.4), those whose basal cell carcinomas occurred 40 or more years after radiation treatment (3.2; 1.8-5.8), and those treated with radiation for acne (11; 2.7-49). Similar age and time patterns of risk were observed for squamous cell carcinoma, although generally with smaller odds ratios. For basal cell carcinoma, early exposure to radiation treatment was a risk factor largely among those without a history of severe sunburns, whereas for squamous cell carcinoma, radiation treatment was a risk factor primarily among those with a sun-sensitive skin type (ie, a tendency to sunburn). Radiation treatment, particularly if experienced before age 20, seems to increase the long-term risk of both basal and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin. These risks may differ by sun exposure or host response to sunlight exposure.

  8. Contributions of radiative factors to enhanced dryland warming over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanting; Guan, Xiaodan; Yu, Haipeng; Xie, Yongkun; Jin, Hongchun

    2017-08-01

    Enhanced near-surface atmospheric warming has occurred over East Asia in recent decades, especially in drylands. Although local factors have been confirmed to provide considerable contributions to this warming, such factors have not been sufficiently analyzed. In this study, we extracted the radiatively forced temperature (RFT) associated with the built-up greenhouse gases, aerosol emission, and various other radiative forcing over East Asia and found a close relationship between RFT and CO2. In addition, using climate model experiments, we explored the responses of temperature changes to black carbon (BC), CO2, and SO4 and found that the enhanced dryland warming induced by CO2 had the largest magnitude and was strengthened by the warming effect of BC. Moreover, the sensitivity of daily maximum and minimum temperature changes to BC, CO2, and SO4 was examined. It showed asymmetric responses of daily maximum and minimum temperature to radiative factors, which led to an obvious change of diurnal temperature range (DTR), especially in drylands. The DTR's response to CO2 is the most significant. Therefore, CO2 not only plays a dominant role in enhanced warming but also greatly affects the decrease of DTR in drylands. However, the mechanisms of these radiative factors' effects in the process of DTR change are not clear and require more investigation.

  9. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month). The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human) brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF) to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication) group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF). Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine. PMID:21936901

  10. Basal lamina development in chicken muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Maier, A; Mayne, R

    1995-03-01

    The development of basal laminas was examined in immunohistochemical sections of chicken leg muscle spindles from embryonic day (E) 13 to 8 weeks postnatal. Fragments of basal laminas as seen with immunostaining for isoforms of laminin were already observed in E6 muscles. When clusters of intrafusal myotubes were first recognized at E13-14, they were surrounded by basal laminas which were incomplete both in terms of coverage and molecular composition. More mature basal lamina tubes individually enclosed young myofibers at E18. After afferents made contact with myotubes, synaptic portions of basal laminas at myosensory junctions reacted strongly with antibodies against s-laminin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, while extrasynaptic portions were negative or reacted only weakly. At synaptic basal laminas of neuromuscular junctions heparin sulfate proteoglycan and s-laminin became prominent after E16. Contrary to the early presence of basal lamina proteins around intrafusal fibers, initial deposition of basal lamina proteins in the outer spindle capsule was not recognized until E17-18, and significant amounts were not detected until postnatal week 1. Unlike intrafusal basal laminas, capsular basal laminas developed no distinct specialized regions; however, molecular compositions of intrafusal and capsular basal laminas were similar.

  11. Phytolatex synthesized gold nanoparticles as novel agent to enhance sun protection factor of commercial sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Borase, H P; Patil, C D; Salunkhe, R B; Suryawanshi, R K; Salunke, B K; Patil, S V

    2014-12-01

    To study the potential of phytolatex (latex of Jatropha gossypifolia) fabricated gold nanoparticles as promising candidate in sunscreen formulations for enhancement in sun protection factor. In this study, plant latex was used as reducing and capping agent to synthesize gold nanoparticles. Latex fabricated gold nanoparticles were characterized by different analytical techniques such as UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Potential of sunscreen preparations containing gold nanoparticles to protect skin from UV radiation was investigated by in vitro sun protection factor analysis. Transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques were used to get insight into mechanism by which AuNPs enhance sun protection factor of sunscreen. Monodisperse gold nanoparticles were synthesized using plant latex without need of hazardous chemical reducing and capping agents. Gold nanoparticles showed surface plasmon resonance peak at 550 nm in UV-Vis spectroscopic study. Gold nanoparticles were spherical and triangular in shape with size range of 30-50 nm. The zeta potential of gold nanoparticles was found to be -9.39 ± 0.19 mV. XRD analysis confirmed face-centred cubic (fcc) structure of gold nanoparticles. Incorporation of latex synthesized gold nanoparticles (2 and 4 [% w/w]) into commercial sunscreens increased the sun protection factor from 2.43 ± 0.74 to 24.11 ± 0.46% than sunscreen devoid of gold nanoparticles. From UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and TEM analysis, it was observed that gold nanoparticles enhance the sun protection factor of commercial sunscreens due to reflection and scattering of UV radiation. Phytolatex synthesized gold nanoparticle is novel agent to enhance sun protection factor of commercial sunscreens. Gold nanoparticles aggregation in commercial sunscreen was the main factor behind SPF enhancement. This

  12. Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor enhances the invasion of mesothelioma cell lines and the expression of matrix metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, P; Clark, I M; Jaurand, M-C; Warn, R M; Edwards, D R

    2000-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) is a multifunctional factor involved both in development and tissue repair, as well as pathological processes such as cancer and metastasis. It has been identified in vivo in many types of tumours together with its tyrosine kinase receptor, Met. We show here that exogenous HGF/SF acts as a strong chemoattractant for human mesothelioma cell lines. The factor also enhanced cell adhesion to and invasion into Matrigel. The mesothelioma cell lines synthesized a panel of matrix metalloproteinases critical for tumour progression such as MMP-1, 2, 3, 9 and membrane-bound MT1-MMP. HGF/SF stimulated the expression of MMP-1, 9 and MT1-MMP and had a slight effect on expression of the MMP inhibitor TIMP-1 but not TIMP-2. However, there was no simple correlation between the levels of MMPs and TIMPs of the cell lines and their different invasion properties or between HGF/SF stimulatory effects on MMP expression and invasion. In addition, effects of protease inhibitors on invasion suggested that serine proteases were also expressed in human mesothelioma cell lines and were involved in HGF/SF-induced invasion. The results show a predominant role for HGF/SF in mesothelioma cell invasion, stimulating simultaneously adhesion, motility, invasion and regulation of MMP and TIMP levels. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027427

  13. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, So Yeon; Grisan, Valentina; Jang, Boyun; Herbert, John; Badenhorst, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx)) has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions. PMID:27046080

  14. Molecular Basis of Enhanced Activity in Factor VIIa-Trypsin Variants Conveys Insights into Tissue Factor-mediated Allosteric Regulation of Factor VIIa Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, Anders B.; Madsen, Jesper J.; Svensson, L. Anders; Pedersen, Anette A.; Østergaard, Henrik; Overgaard, Michael T.; Olsen, Ole H.; Gandhi, Prafull S.

    2016-01-01

    The complex of coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa), a trypsin-like serine protease, and membrane-bound tissue factor (TF) initiates blood coagulation upon vascular injury. Binding of TF to FVIIa promotes allosteric conformational changes in the FVIIa protease domain and improves its catalytic properties. Extensive studies have revealed two putative pathways for this allosteric communication. Here we provide further details of this allosteric communication by investigating FVIIa loop swap variants containing the 170 loop of trypsin that display TF-independent enhanced activity. Using x-ray crystallography, we show that the introduced 170 loop from trypsin directly interacts with the FVIIa active site, stabilizing segment 215–217 and activation loop 3, leading to enhanced activity. Molecular dynamics simulations and novel fluorescence quenching studies support that segment 215–217 conformation is pivotal to the enhanced activity of the FVIIa variants. We speculate that the allosteric regulation of FVIIa activity by TF binding follows a similar path in conjunction with protease domain N terminus insertion, suggesting a more complete molecular basis of TF-mediated allosteric enhancement of FVIIa activity. PMID:26694616

  15. Nuclear transcription factors: a new approach to enhancing cellular responses to ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Sato, Nobuyuki; Moore, Brian; Mack, Judith; Gasbarre, Christopher; Keevey, Samantha; Ortel, Bernhard; Sinha, Alok; Khachemoune, Amor

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using aminolevulinic acid (ALA) relies upon the uptake of ALA into cancer cells, where it is converted into a porphyrin intermediate, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) that is highly photosensitizing. For large or resistant tumors, however, ALA/PDT is often not completely effective due to inadequate PpIX levels. Therefore, new approaches to enhance the intracellular production of PpIX are sought. Here, we describe a general approach to improve intracellular PpIX accumulation via manipulations that increase the expression of an enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO), that is rate-determining for PpIX production. We show that nuclear hormones that promote terminal differentiation, e.g. vitamin D or androgens, can also increase the accumulation of PpIX and the amount of killing of the target cells upon exposure to light. These hormones bind to intracellular hormone receptors that translocate to the nucleus, where they act as transcription factors to increase the expression of target genes. We have found that several other transcription factors associated with terminal differentiation, including members of the CCAAT enhancer binding (C/EBP) family, and a homeobox protein named Hoxb13, are also capable of enhancing PpIX accumulation. These latter transcription factors appear to interact directly with the CPO gene promoter, resulting in enhanced CPO transcriptional activity. Our data in several different cell systems, including epithelial cells of the skin and prostate cancer cells, indicate that enhancement of CPO expression and PpIX accumulation represents a viable new approach toward improving the efficacy of ALA/PDT.

  16. Four-wave mixing analysis of quantum dot semiconductor lasers for linewidth enhancement factor extraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hao; Lin, Hung-Hsin; Lin, Fan-Yi

    2012-01-02

    We apply a four-wave mixing analysis on a quantum dot laser to simultaneously obtain the linewidth enhancement factor α and other intrinsic laser parameters. By fitting the experimentally obtained regenerative signals and power spectra at different detuning frequencies with the respective curves analytically calculated from the rate equations, parameters including the linewidth enhancement factor, the carrier decay rate in the dots, the differential gain, and the photon decay rate can be determined all at once under the same operating conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model for the four-wave mixing analysis of the QD lasers is derived and verified. The sensitivity and accuracy of the parameter extraction using the four-wave mixing method are presented. Moreover, how each each parameters alter the shapes of the regenerative signals and the power spectra are also discussed.

  17. Nanoscale determination of the mass enhancement factor in the lightly doped bulk insulator lead selenide

    PubMed Central

    Zeljkovic, Ilija; Scipioni, Kane L.; Walkup, Daniel; Okada, Yoshinori; Zhou, Wenwen; Sankar, R; Chang, Guoqing; Wang, Yung Jui; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Chou, Fangcheng; Wang, Ziqiang; Madhavan, Vidya

    2015-01-01

    Bismuth chalcogenides and lead telluride/selenide alloys exhibit exceptional thermoelectric properties that could be harnessed for power generation and device applications. Since phonons play a significant role in achieving these desired properties, quantifying the interaction between phonons and electrons, which is encoded in the Eliashberg function of a material, is of immense importance. However, its precise extraction has in part been limited due to the lack of local experimental probes. Here we construct a method to directly extract the Eliashberg function using Landau level spectroscopy, and demonstrate its applicability to lightly doped thermoelectric bulk insulator PbSe. In addition to its high energy resolution only limited by thermal broadening, this novel experimental method could be used to detect variations in mass enhancement factor at the nanoscale level. This opens up a new pathway for investigating the local effects of doping and strain on the mass enhancement factor. PMID:25814140

  18. Dehydrocostus lactone enhances tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced apoptosis of human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, G S; Pae, H O; Chung, H T; Kwon, J W; Lee, J H; Kwon, T O; Kwon, S Y; Chon, B H; Yun, Young Gab

    2004-05-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones have raised considerable interest because of their ability to block the activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). NF-kappaB plays an important role in the resistance of cancer cells to the induction of apoptosis by anticancer drugs and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Pharmacological inhibition of NF-kappaB offers the promise of enhancing the efficacy of anticancer therapies. Here, we demonstrate that dehydrocostus lactone (DL), the major sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the roots of Saussurea lappa, inhibits NF-kappaB activation by preventing TNF-alpha-induced degradation and phosphorylation of its inhibitory protein I-kappaB alpha in human leukemia HL-60 cells and that DL renders HL-60 cells susceptible to TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis by enhancing caspase-8 and caspase-3 activities.

  19. Estimating electric field enhancement factors on an aircraft utilizing a small scale model: A method evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterbrook, Calvin C.; Rudolph, Terence; Easterbrook, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    A method for obtaining field enhancement factors at specific points on an aircraft utilizing a small scale model was evaluated by measuring several canonical shapes. Comparison of the form factors obtained by analytical means with measurements indicate that the experimental method has serious flaws. Errors of 200 to 300 percent were found between analytical values and measured values. As a result of the study, the analytical method is not recommended for calibration of field meters located on aircraft, and should not be relied upon in any application where the local spatial derivatives of the electric field on the model are large over the dimensions of the sensing probe.

  20. Factors enhancing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egnin, M.; Mora, A.; Prakash, C. S.; Mortley, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Parameters enhancing Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of foreign genes to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cells were investigated. An intron-containing beta-glucuronidase uidA (gusA) gene under the transcriptional control of CaMV 35S promoter served as a reporter. Transformation frequency was evaluated by scoring the number of sectors expressing GUS activity on leaf and epicotyl explants. The 'Valencia Select' market type cv. New Mexico was more amenable to Agrobacterium transformation than the 'runner' market type cultivars tested (Florunner, Georgia Runner, Sunrunner, or South Runner). The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was superior in facilitating the transfer of uidA gene to peanut cells compared to the disarmed strain C58. Rinsing of explants in half-strength Murashige-Skoog (MS) media prior to infection by Agrobacterium significantly increased the transformation efficiency. The use of cocultivation media containing high auxin [1.0 or 2.5 mg/l (4.53 micromolar or 11.31 micromolar) 2,4-D] and low cytokinin [0.25 or 0.5 mg/l (1.0 micromolar or 2.0 micromolar) BA] promoted higher transformation than either hormone-free or thidiazuron-containing medium. The polarity of the epicotyl during cocultivation was important; explants incubated in an inverted (vertically) manner followed by a vertically upright position resulted in improved transformation and shoot regeneration frequencies. Preculture of explants in MS basal medium or with 2.5 mg thidiazuron per l prior to infection drastically decreased the number of transformed zones. The optimized protocol was used to obtain transient transformation frequencies ranging from 12% to 36% for leaf explants, 15% to 42% for epicotyls. Initial evidence of transformation was obtained by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by Southern analysis of regenerated plants.

  1. Factors enhancing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egnin, M.; Mora, A.; Prakash, C. S.; Mortley, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Parameters enhancing Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of foreign genes to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cells were investigated. An intron-containing beta-glucuronidase uidA (gusA) gene under the transcriptional control of CaMV 35S promoter served as a reporter. Transformation frequency was evaluated by scoring the number of sectors expressing GUS activity on leaf and epicotyl explants. The 'Valencia Select' market type cv. New Mexico was more amenable to Agrobacterium transformation than the 'runner' market type cultivars tested (Florunner, Georgia Runner, Sunrunner, or South Runner). The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was superior in facilitating the transfer of uidA gene to peanut cells compared to the disarmed strain C58. Rinsing of explants in half-strength Murashige-Skoog (MS) media prior to infection by Agrobacterium significantly increased the transformation efficiency. The use of cocultivation media containing high auxin [1.0 or 2.5 mg/l (4.53 micromolar or 11.31 micromolar) 2,4-D] and low cytokinin [0.25 or 0.5 mg/l (1.0 micromolar or 2.0 micromolar) BA] promoted higher transformation than either hormone-free or thidiazuron-containing medium. The polarity of the epicotyl during cocultivation was important; explants incubated in an inverted (vertically) manner followed by a vertically upright position resulted in improved transformation and shoot regeneration frequencies. Preculture of explants in MS basal medium or with 2.5 mg thidiazuron per l prior to infection drastically decreased the number of transformed zones. The optimized protocol was used to obtain transient transformation frequencies ranging from 12% to 36% for leaf explants, 15% to 42% for epicotyls. Initial evidence of transformation was obtained by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by Southern analysis of regenerated plants.

  2. Linearity enhancement of scale factor in an optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Feng, Lishuang; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A method to reduce the residual stress of support arms in an optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer is proposed in order to enhance the linearity of the scale factor of the accelerometer. First, the behavior of residual stress in support arms is analyzed in detail, and the simulation of shape curvature caused by residual stress in aluminum-made support arms is completed using finite element analysis. Then, by comparing two different materials of support arms (aluminum-made and silicon-made support arms), a modified fabrication is introduced in order to reduce the unexpected residual stress in support arms. Finally, based on contrast experiments, the linearity of the scale factor of accelerometers with aluminum-made and silicon-made support arms is measured using the force feedback test system, respectively. Results show that the linearity of the scale factor of the accelerometer with silicon-made support arms is 0.85%, which is reduced about an order of magnitude compared to that of the accelerometer with aluminum-made support arms with the linearity of scale factor of 7.48%; linearity enhancement of the scale factor is validated. This allows accuracy improvement of the optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer in the application of inertial navigation and positioning.

  3. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture.

  4. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A

    2015-05-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity.

  5. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  6. HTLV-1 bZIP factor enhances TGF-β signaling through p300 coactivator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiejun; Satou, Yorifumi; Sugata, Kenji; Miyazato, Paola; Green, Patrick L; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2011-08-18

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that is etiologically associated with adult T-cell leukemia. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by the minus strand of the provirus, is involved in both regulation of viral gene transcription and T-cell proliferation. We showed in this report that HBZ interacted with Smad2/3, and enhanced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad transcriptional responses in a p300-dependent manner. The N-terminal LXXLL motif of HBZ was responsible for HBZ-mediated TGF-β signaling activation. In a serial immunoprecipitation assay, HBZ, Smad3, and p300 formed a ternary complex, and the association between Smad3 and p300 was markedly enhanced in the presence of HBZ. In addition, HBZ could overcome the repression of the TGF-β response by Tax. Finally, HBZ expression resulted in enhanced transcription of Pdgfb, Sox4, Ctgf, Foxp3, Runx1, and Tsc22d1 genes and suppression of the Id2 gene; such effects were similar to those by TGF-β. In particular, HBZ induced Foxp3 expression in naive T cells through Smad3-dependent TGF-β signaling. Our results suggest that HBZ, by enhancing TGF-β signaling and Foxp3 expression, enables HTLV-1 to convert infected T cells into regulatory T cells, which is thought to be a critical strategy for virus persistence.

  7. Enhancing healthcare process design with human factors engineering and reliability science, part 1: setting the context.

    PubMed

    Boston-Fleischhauer, Carol

    2008-01-01

    The design and implementation of efficient, effective, and safe processes are never-ending challenges in healthcare. Less than optimal performance levels and rising concerns about patient safety suggest that traditional process design methods are insufficient to meet design requirements. In this 2-part series, the author presents human factors engineering and reliability science as important knowledge to enhance existing operational and clinical process design methods in healthcare. An examination of these theories, application approaches, and examples are presented.

  8. Power factor enhancement in solution-processed organic n-type thermoelectrics through molecular design.

    PubMed

    Russ, Boris; Robb, Maxwell J; Brunetti, Fulvio G; Miller, P Levi; Perry, Erin E; Patel, Shrayesh N; Ho, Victor; Chang, William B; Urban, Jeffrey J; Chabinyc, Michael L; Hawker, Craig J; Segalman, Rachel A

    2014-06-04

    A new class of high-performance n-type organic thermoelectric materials, self-doping perylene diimide derivatives with modified side chains, is reported. These materials achieve the highest n-type thermoelectric performance of solution-processed organic materials reported to date, with power factors as high as 1.4 μW/mK(2). These results demonstrate that molecular design is a promising strategy for enhancing organic thermoelectric performance.

  9. Removal of PAHs with surfactant-enhanced soil washing: influencing factors and removal effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sheng; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jiajun

    2011-02-01

    PAH removal with surfactant enhanced washing was investigated through a series of laboratory tests to examine the effect of stirring speed, washing time, surfactant concentration, liquid/solid ratio, temperature, and on-and-off mode. The first four factors show significant influence on the PAH removal while the latter two do not. Total removal ratio and a new proposed parameter, solubilization percentage, are used to evaluate the effectiveness quantitatively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HIV-Enhancing Factors Are Secreted by Reproductive Epithelia upon Inoculation with Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eade, Colleen R; Diaz, Camila; Chen, Sixue; Cole, Amy L; Cole, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common reproductive infection in which commensal vaginal lactobacilli are displaced by a mixed population of pathogenic bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis increases susceptibility to HIV, and it has been suggested that host innate immune responses to pathogenic bacteria contribute to enhanced infection, yet the cellular mechanisms mediating the increased HIV susceptibility remain uncharacterized. We evaluated the HIV-enhancing effects of bacterial vaginosis by inoculating endocervical epithelia with Atopobium vaginae, a bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria, and assaying secreted factors for HIV-enhancing activity. When epithelia and A. vaginae were cocultured, we observed increased HIV-enhancing activity mediated by secreted low molecular weight factors. From this complex mixture we identified several upregulated host proteins, which functioned in combination to enhance HIV infection. These studies suggest that the host immune response to bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria results in the release of HIV-enhancing factors. The combined activity of bacterial vaginosis-induced proteins likely mediates HIV enhancement.

  11. College Experiences and Student Inputs: Factors That Promote the Development of Skills and Attributes that Enhance Learning among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemosit, Caroline Chepkurui

    2012-01-01

    The study involved an exploration of factors that promoted the development of skills and attributes that enhanced learning among college students. The factors explored in this study were, active learning, student-teacher interaction, time on tasks, institutional expectations, student inputs, and skills and attributes that enhance learning. This…

  12. Preferential Enhancement of Sensory and Motor Axon Regeneration by Combining Extracellular Matrix Components with Neurotrophic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Daniel; González-Pérez, Francisco; Giudetti, Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Udina, Esther; Del Valle, Jaume; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, motor and sensory axons are able to regenerate but inaccuracy of target reinnervation leads to poor functional recovery. Extracellular matrix (ECM) components and neurotrophic factors (NTFs) exert their effect on different neuronal populations creating a suitable environment to promote axonal growth. Here, we assessed in vitro and in vivo the selective effects of combining different ECM components with NTFs on motor and sensory axons regeneration and target reinnervation. Organotypic cultures with collagen, laminin and nerve growth factor (NGF)/neurotrophin-3 (NT3) or collagen, fibronectin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) selectively enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons and motor neurite outgrowth from spinal cord slices respectively. For in vivo studies, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone tube filled with a collagen and laminin matrix with NGF/NT3 encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (MP) (LM + MP.NGF/NT3), or a collagen and fibronectin matrix with BDNF in PLGA MPs (FN + MP.BDNF). Retrograde labeling and functional tests showed that LM + MP.NGF/NT3 increased the number of regenerated sensory neurons and improved sensory functional recovery, whereas FN + MP.BDNF preferentially increased regenerated motoneurons and enhanced motor functional recovery. Therefore, combination of ECM molecules with NTFs may be a good approach to selectively enhance motor and sensory axons regeneration and promote appropriate target reinnervation. PMID:28036084

  13. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor enhances angiogenesis by promoting proliferation and migration of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Qiangsong; Zheng Liduan; Li Bo; Wang Danming; Huang Chuanshu; Matuschak, George M.; Li Dechun . E-mail: dli2@slu.edu

    2006-11-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF) has angiogenic properties in an in vivo matrigel plug model and HIMF upregulates expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse lungs and cultured lung epithelial cells. However, whether HIMF exerts angiogenic effects through modulating endothelial cell function remains unknown. In this study, mouse aortic rings cultured with recombinant HIMF protein resulted in enhanced vascular sprouting and increased endothelial cell spreading as confirmed by Dil-Ac-LDL uptake, von Willebrand factor and CD31 staining. In cultured mouse endothelial cell line SVEC 4-10, HIMF dose-dependently enhanced cell proliferation, in vitro migration and tubulogenesis, which was not attenuated by SU1498, a VEGFR2/Flk-1 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Moreover, HIMF stimulation resulted in phosphorylation of Akt, p38 and ERK1/2 kinases in SVEC 4-10 cells. Treatment of mouse aortic rings and SVEC 4-10 cells with LY294002, but not SB203580, PD098059 or U0126, abolished HIMF-induced vascular sprouting and angiogenic responses. In addition, transfection of a dominant-negative mutant of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K), {delta}p85, blocked HIMF-induced phosphorylation of Akt, endothelial activation and tubulogenesis. These results indicate that HIMF enhances angiogenesis by promoting proliferation and migration of endothelial cells via activation of the PI-3K/Akt pathways.

  14. Demonstration of the enhanced Purcell factor in all-dielectric structures

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnok, Alexander; Glybovski, Stanislav; Petrov, Mihail; Makarov, Sergey; Savelev, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Simovski, Constantin; Kivshar, Yuri

    2016-05-23

    The Purcell effect is usually described as a modification of the spontaneous decay rate in the presence of a resonator. In plasmonics, this effect is commonly associated with a large local-field enhancement in “hot spots” due to the excitation of surface plasmons. However, high-index dielectric nanostructures, which become the basis of all-dielectric nanophotonics, cannot provide high values of the local-field enhancement due to larger radiation losses. Here, we demonstrate how to achieve a strong Purcell effect in all-dielectric nanostructures, and show theoretically that the Purcell factor can be increased by two orders of magnitude in a finite chain of silicon nanoparticles. Using the eigenmode analysis for an infinite chain, we demonstrate that the high Purcell factor regime is associated with a Van Hove singularity. We perform a proof-of-concept experiment for microwave frequencies and observe the 65-fold enhancement of the Purcell factor in a chain of 10 dielectric particles.

  15. Numerical and experimental studies of the elastic enhancement factor of 2D open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirko, Leszek; Białous, Małgorzata; Yunko, Vitalii; Bauch, Szymon; Ławniczak, Michał

    We present the results of numerical and experimental studies of the elastic enhancement factor W for microwave rough and rectangular cavities simulating two-dimensional chaotic and partially chaotic quantum billiards in the presence of moderate absorption strength. We show that for the frequency range ν = 15 . 0 - 18 . 5 GHz, in which the coupling between antennas and the system is strong enough, the values of W for the microwave rough cavity lie below the predictions of random matrix theory and on average they are above the theoretical results of V. Sokolov and O. Zhirov, Phys. Rev. E, 91, 052917 (2015). We also show that the enhancement factor W of a microwave rectangular cavity coupled to the external channels via microwave antennas, simulating a partially chaotic quantum billiard, calculated by applying the Potter-Rosenzweig model with κ = 2 . 8 +/- 0 . 5 is close to the experimental one. Our numerical and experimental results suggest that the enhancement factor can be used as a measure of internal chaos which can be especially useful for systems with significant openness or absorption. This work was partially supported by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education Grants N N202 130239 and UMO-2013/09/D/ST2/03727.

  16. Preferential Enhancement of Sensory and Motor Axon Regeneration by Combining Extracellular Matrix Components with Neurotrophic Factors.

    PubMed

    Santos, Daniel; González-Pérez, Francisco; Giudetti, Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Udina, Esther; Del Valle, Jaume; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-12-29

    After peripheral nerve injury, motor and sensory axons are able to regenerate but inaccuracy of target reinnervation leads to poor functional recovery. Extracellular matrix (ECM) components and neurotrophic factors (NTFs) exert their effect on different neuronal populations creating a suitable environment to promote axonal growth. Here, we assessed in vitro and in vivo the selective effects of combining different ECM components with NTFs on motor and sensory axons regeneration and target reinnervation. Organotypic cultures with collagen, laminin and nerve growth factor (NGF)/neurotrophin-3 (NT3) or collagen, fibronectin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) selectively enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons and motor neurite outgrowth from spinal cord slices respectively. For in vivo studies, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone tube filled with a collagen and laminin matrix with NGF/NT3 encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (MP) (LM + MP.NGF/NT3), or a collagen and fibronectin matrix with BDNF in PLGA MPs (FN + MP.BDNF). Retrograde labeling and functional tests showed that LM + MP.NGF/NT3 increased the number of regenerated sensory neurons and improved sensory functional recovery, whereas FN + MP.BDNF preferentially increased regenerated motoneurons and enhanced motor functional recovery. Therefore, combination of ECM molecules with NTFs may be a good approach to selectively enhance motor and sensory axons regeneration and promote appropriate target reinnervation.

  17. Systematic dissection of genomic features determining transcription factor binding and enhancer function

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Sharon R.; Zhang, Xiaolan; Wang, Li; Engreitz, Jesse; Melnikov, Alexandre; Rogov, Peter; Tewhey, Ryan; Isakova, Alina; Deplancke, Bart; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    Enhancers regulate gene expression through the binding of sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) to cognate motifs. Various features influence TF binding and enhancer function—including the chromatin state of the genomic locus, the affinities of the binding site, the activity of the bound TFs, and interactions among TFs. However, the precise nature and relative contributions of these features remain unclear. Here, we used massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) involving 32,115 natural and synthetic enhancers, together with high-throughput in vivo binding assays, to systematically dissect the contribution of each of these features to the binding and activity of genomic regulatory elements that contain motifs for PPARγ, a TF that serves as a key regulator of adipogenesis. We show that distinct sets of features govern PPARγ binding vs. enhancer activity. PPARγ binding is largely governed by the affinity of the specific motif site and higher-order features of the larger genomic locus, such as chromatin accessibility. In contrast, the enhancer activity of PPARγ binding sites depends on varying contributions from dozens of TFs in the immediate vicinity, including interactions between combinations of these TFs. Different pairs of motifs follow different interaction rules, including subadditive, additive, and superadditive interactions among specific classes of TFs, with both spatially constrained and flexible grammars. Our results provide a paradigm for the systematic characterization of the genomic features underlying regulatory elements, applicable to the design of synthetic regulatory elements or the interpretation of human genetic variation. PMID:28137873

  18. Systematic dissection of genomic features determining transcription factor binding and enhancer function.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Sharon R; Zhang, Xiaolan; Wang, Li; Engreitz, Jesse; Melnikov, Alexandre; Rogov, Peter; Tewhey, Ryan; Isakova, Alina; Deplancke, Bart; Bernstein, Bradley E; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Lander, Eric S

    2017-02-14

    Enhancers regulate gene expression through the binding of sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) to cognate motifs. Various features influence TF binding and enhancer function-including the chromatin state of the genomic locus, the affinities of the binding site, the activity of the bound TFs, and interactions among TFs. However, the precise nature and relative contributions of these features remain unclear. Here, we used massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) involving 32,115 natural and synthetic enhancers, together with high-throughput in vivo binding assays, to systematically dissect the contribution of each of these features to the binding and activity of genomic regulatory elements that contain motifs for PPARγ, a TF that serves as a key regulator of adipogenesis. We show that distinct sets of features govern PPARγ binding vs. enhancer activity. PPARγ binding is largely governed by the affinity of the specific motif site and higher-order features of the larger genomic locus, such as chromatin accessibility. In contrast, the enhancer activity of PPARγ binding sites depends on varying contributions from dozens of TFs in the immediate vicinity, including interactions between combinations of these TFs. Different pairs of motifs follow different interaction rules, including subadditive, additive, and superadditive interactions among specific classes of TFs, with both spatially constrained and flexible grammars. Our results provide a paradigm for the systematic characterization of the genomic features underlying regulatory elements, applicable to the design of synthetic regulatory elements or the interpretation of human genetic variation.

  19. [Therapy of basal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, L; Dirschka, T

    2016-06-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represents the most common malignant skin tumour in fair-skinned people. Despite low metastatic potential, BCC can cause decisive tissue destruction and disfigurement by invasive growth. In addition to clinical and histologic diagnosis modern imaging techniques as optical coherence tomography and confocal laser microscopy have been introduced. BCCs with aggressive growth pattern and/or increased risk of relapse are preferentially treated surgically. For superficial BCCs various topical treatments and photodynamic therapy are available. Inhibitors of the sonic hedgehog pathway have been approved for symptomatic treatment of metastatic BCC and locally advanced BCC inappropriate for surgery or radiotherapy. Detailed knowledge of the clinical spectrum of BCC and an appropriate choice of therapy are mandatory for the successful treatment of BCC.

  20. Matrix immobilization enhances the tissue repair activity of growth factor gene therapy vectors.

    PubMed

    Doukas, J; Chandler, L A; Gonzalez, A M; Gu, D; Hoganson, D K; Ma, C; Nguyen, T; Printz, M A; Nesbit, M; Herlyn, M; Crombleholme, T M; Aukerman, S L; Sosnowski, B A; Pierce, G F

    2001-05-01

    Although growth factor proteins display potent tissue repair activities, difficulty in sustaining localized therapeutic concentrations limits their therapeutic activity. We reasoned that enhanced histogenesis might be achieved by combining growth factor genes with biocompatible matrices capable of immobilizing vectors at delivery sites. When delivered to subcutaneously implanted sponges, a platelet-derived growth factor B-encoding adenovirus (AdPDGF-B) formulated in a collagen matrix enhanced granulation tissue deposition 3- to 4-fold (p < or = 0.0002), whereas vectors encoding fibroblast growth factor 2 or vascular endothelial growth factor promoted primarily angiogenic responses. By day 8 posttreatment of ischemic excisional wounds, collagen-formulated AdPDGF-B enhanced granulation tissue and epithelial areas up to 13- and 6-fold (p < 0.009), respectively, and wound closure up to 2-fold (p < 0.05). At longer times, complete healing without excessive scar formation was achieved. Collagen matrices were shown to retain both vector and transgene products within delivery sites, enabling the transduction and stimulation of infiltrating repair cells. Quantitative PCR and RT-PCR demonstrated both vector DNA and transgene mRNA within wound beds as late as 28 days posttreatment. By contrast, aqueous formulations allowed vector seepage from application sites, leading to PDGF-induced hyperplasia in surrounding tissues but not wound beds. Finally, repeated applications of PDGF-BB protein were required for neotissue induction approaching equivalence to a single application of collagen-immobilized AdPDGF-B, confirming the utility of this gene transfer approach. Overall, these studies demonstrate that immobilizing matrices enable the controlled delivery and activity of tissue promoting genes for the effective regeneration of injured tissues.

  1. Basal terraces on melting ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrieux, Pierre; Stewart, Craig; Jenkins, Adrian; Nicholls, Keith W.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Rignot, Eric; Steffen, Konrad

    2014-08-01

    Ocean waters melt the margins of Antarctic and Greenland glaciers, and individual glaciers' responses and the integrity of their ice shelves are expected to depend on the spatial distribution of melt. The bases of the ice shelves associated with Pine Island Glacier (West Antarctica) and Petermann Glacier (Greenland) have similar geometries, including kilometer-wide, hundreds-of-meter high channels oriented along and across the direction of ice flow. The channels are enhanced by, and constrain, oceanic melt. New meter-scale observations of basal topography reveal peculiar glaciated landscapes. Channel flanks are not smooth, but are instead stepped, with hundreds-of-meters-wide flat terraces separated by 5-50 m high walls. Melting is shown to be modulated by the geometry: constant across each terrace, changing from one terrace to the next, and greatly enhanced on the ~45° inclined walls. Melting is therefore fundamentally heterogeneous and likely associated with stratification in the ice-ocean boundary layer, challenging current models of ice shelf-ocean interactions.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhances IL-15-induced natural killer cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiwon; Lee, Suk Hyung; Shin, Nara; Jeong, Mira; Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Mi Jeong; Yoon, Suk Ran; Chung, Jin Woong; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2009-09-04

    The differentiation of natural killer (NK) cells is regulated by various factors including soluble growth factors and transcription factors. Here, we have demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) is a positive regulator of NK cell differentiation. TNF-{alpha} augmented the IL-15-induced expression of NK1.1 and CD122 in mature NK cells, and TNF-{alpha} alone also induced NK cell maturation as well as IL-15. TNF-{alpha} also increased IFN-{gamma} production in NK cells in the presence of IL-15. Meanwhile, mRNA expression of several transcription factors, including T-bet and GATA-3, was increased by the addition of TNF-{alpha} and IL-15. In addition, TNF-{alpha} increased nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in NK cells and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B impeded TNF-{alpha}-enhanced NK cell maturation. Overall, these data suggest that TNF-{alpha} significantly increased IL-15-driven NK cell differentiation by increasing the expression of transcription factors that play crucial roles in NK cell maturation and inducing the NF-{kappa}B activity.

  3. SPOCK1 Is a Novel Transforming Growth Factor-β–Induced Myoepithelial Marker That Enhances Invasion and Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Ching; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Lu, Yueh-Tong; Lien, Huang-Chun

    2016-01-01

    In addition to contraction, myoepithelia have diverse paracrine effects, including a tumor suppression effect. However, certain myoepithelial markers have been shown to contribute to tumor progression. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is involved in the transdifferentiation of fibroblasts to contractile myofibroblasts. We investigated whether TGF-β can upregulate potential myoepithelial markers, which may have functional and clinicopathological significance in breast cancer. We found that TGF-β induced SPOCK1 expression in MCF10A, MCF12A, and M10 breast cells and demonstrated SPOCK1 as a novel myoepithelial marker that was immunolocalized within or beneath myoepithelia lining ductolobular units. A functional study showed that overexpression of SPOCK1 enhanced invasiveness in mammary immortalized and cancer cells. To further determine the biological significance of SPOCK1 in breast cancer, we investigated the expression of SPOCK1 in 478 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases through immunohistochemistry and correlated the expression with clinicopathological characteristics. SPOCK1 expression was significantly correlated with high pathological tumor size (P = 0.012), high histological grade (P = 0.013), the triple-negative phenotype (P = 0.022), and the basal-like phenotype (P = 0.026) and was correlated with a significantly poorer overall survival on univariate analysis (P = 0.001, log-rank test). Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that SPOCK1 expression maintained an independent poor prognostic factor of overall survival. Analysis of SPOCK1 expression on various non-IDC carcinoma subtypes showed an enrichment of SPOCK1 expression in metaplastic carcinoma, which is pathogenetically closely related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In conclusion, we identified SPOCK1 as a novel TGF-β–induced myoepithelial marker and further demonstrated that SPOCK1 enhanced invasion in breast cancer cells and correlated with poor prognosis in breast

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2 delivery from spinal cord bridges to enhance angiogenesis following injury.

    PubMed

    De Laporte, Laura; des Rieux, Anne; Tuinstra, Hannah M; Zelivyanskaya, Marina L; De Clerck, Nora M; Postnov, Andrei A; Préat, Véronique; Shea, Lonnie D

    2011-09-01

    The host response to spinal cord injury can lead to an ischemic environment that can induce cell death and limits cell transplantation approaches to promote spinal cord regeneration. Spinal cord bridges that provide a localized and sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) were investigated for their ability to promote angiogenesis and nerve growth within the injury. Bridges were fabricated by fusion of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres using a gas foaming/particulate leaching technique, and proteins were incorporated by encapsulation into the microspheres and/or mixing with the microspheres before foaming. Compared to the mixing method, encapsulation reduced the losses during leaching and had a slower protein release, while VEGF was released more rapidly than FGF-2. In vivo implantation of bridges loaded with VEGF enhanced the levels of VEGF within the injury at 1 week, and bridges releasing VEGF and FGF-2 increased the infiltration of endothelial cells and the formation of blood vessel at 6 weeks postimplantation. Additionally, substantial neurofilament staining was observed within the bridge; however, no significant difference was observed between bridges with or without protein. Bridges releasing angiogenic factors may provide an approach to overcome an ischemic environment that limits regeneration and cell transplantation-based approaches. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The pioneer transcription factor FoxA maintains an accessible nucleosome configuration at enhancers for tissue-specific gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Iwafuchi-Doi, Makiko; Donahue, Greg; Kakumanu, Akshay; Watts, Jason A.; Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin; Lee, Dolim; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Nuclear DNA wraps around core histones to form nucleosomes, which restricts the binding of transcription factors to gene regulatory sequences. Pioneer transcription factors can bind DNA sites on nucleosomes and initiate gene regulatory events, often leading to the local opening of chromatin. However, the nucleosomal configuration of open chromatin and the basis for its regulation is unclear. We combined low and high levels of MNase digestion along with core histone mapping to assess the nucleosomal configuration at enhancers and promoters in mouse liver. We find that MNase-accessible nucleosomes, bound by transcription factors, are retained more at liver-specific enhancers than at promoters and ubiquitous enhancers. The pioneer factor FoxA displaces linker histone H1, thereby keeping enhancer nucleosomes accessible in chromatin and allowing other liver-specific transcription factors to bind and stimulate transcription. Thus, nucleosomes are not exclusively repressive to gene regulation when they are retained with, and exposed by, pioneer factors. PMID:27058788

  6. Secreted Endothelial Cell Factors Immobilized on Collagen Scaffolds Enhance the Recipient Endothelial Cell Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Callanan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Strategies to design novel vascular scaffolds are a continuing aim in tissue engineering and often such designs encompass the use of recombinant factors to enhance the performance of the scaffold. The established use of cell secretion utilized in feeder systems and conditioned media offer a source of paracrine factors, which has potential to be used in tissue-engineered (TE) scaffolds. Here we utilize this principle from endothelial cells (ECs), to create a novel TE scaffold by harnessing secreted factors and immobilizing these to collagen scaffolds. This research revealed increased cellular attachment and positive angiogenic gene upregulation responses in recipient ECs grown on these conditioned scaffolds. Also, the conditioning method did not affect the mechanical structural integrity of the scaffolds. These results may advocate the potential use of this system to improve vascular scaffolds' in vivo performance. In addition, this process may be a future method utilized to improve other tissue engineering scaffold therapies. PMID:27057474

  7. Basal ganglia lesions following carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ramona O; Fearing, Michael A; Weaver, Lindell K; Foley, John F

    2006-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the most common cause of poisoning and may result in basal ganglia lesions. This study reviewed the literature of carbon monoxide poisoning and basal ganglia lesions and prospectively assessed the prevalence of basal ganglia lesions in a cohort of patients with CO poisoning. Literature review and prospective cohort study. This study conducted a comprehensive review of the literature and assessed 73 CO-poisoned patients for basal ganglia lesions on sequential MR scans. Magnetic resonance scans were obtained on day 1, 2 weeks and 6 months post-CO poisoning. The literature review found basal ganglia lesions occur in 4-88% of subjects. Only one patient was found with globus pallidus lesions at 2 weeks and 6 months following CO poisoning, that were not present on the initial day 1 MR scan. Basal ganglia lesions, including lesions of the globus pallidus, may be less common than previously reported.

  8. Cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to enhance neural circuit reconstruction following transplantation in Parkinsonian mice

    PubMed Central

    Kauhausen, Jessica; Thompson, Lachlan H; Parish, Clare L

    2013-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease has predominantly focused on ectopic transplantation of fetal dopamine (DA) neurons into the striatum as a means to restore neurotransmission, rather than homotopic grafts into the site of cell loss, which would require extensive axonal growth. However, ectopic grafts fail to restore important aspects of DA circuitry necessary for controlled basal ganglia output, and this may underlie the suboptimal and variable functional outcomes in patients. We recently showed that DA neurons in homotopic allografts of embryonic ventral mesencephalon (VM) can send long axonal projections along the nigrostriatal pathway in order to innervate forebrain targets, although the extent of striatal reinnervation remains substantially less than can be achieved with ectopic placement directly into the striatal target. Here, we examined the possible benefits of using younger VM donor tissue and over-expression of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in the striatal target to improve the degree of striatal innervation from homotopic grafts. Younger donor tissue, collected on embryonic day (E)10, generated 4-fold larger grafts with greater striatal targeting, compared to grafts generated from more conventional E12 donor VM. Over-expression of GDNF in the host brain also significantly increased DA axonal growth and striatal innervation. Furthermore, a notable increase in the number and proportion of A9 DA neurons, essential for functional recovery, was observed in younger donor grafts treated with GDNF. Behavioural testing confirmed functional integration of younger donor tissue and demonstrated that improved motor function could be attributed to both local midbrain and striatal innervation. Together, these findings suggest there is significant scope for further development of intra-nigral grafting as a restorative approach for Parkinson's disease. PMID:23045338

  9. Paracrine Overexpression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Enhances Mammary Tumorigenesis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Ostrovich, Krisztina Kovács; Lambertz, Isabel; Colby, Jennifer K. L.; Tian, Jie; Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Johnston, Dennis; Conti, Claudio J.; DiGiovanni, John; Fuchs-Young, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulates proliferation, regulates tissue development, protects against apoptosis, and promotes the malignant phenotype in the breast and other organs. Some epidemiological studies have linked high circulating levels of IGF-1 with an increased risk of breast cancer. To study the role of IGF-1 in mammary tumorigenesis in vivo, we used transgenic mice in which overexpression of IGF-1 is under the control of the bovine keratin 5 (BK5) promoter and is directed to either the myoepithelial or basal cells in a variety of organs, including the mammary gland. This model closely recapitulates the paracrine exposure of breast epithelium to stromal IGF-1 seen in women. Histologically, mammary glands from transgenic mice were hyperplastic and highly vascularized. Mammary glands from prepubertal transgenic mice had significantly increased ductal proliferation compared with wild-type tissues, although this difference was not maintained after puberty. Transgenic mice also had increased susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis, and 74% of the BK5.IGF-1 mice treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (20 μg/day) developed mammary tumors compared with 29% of the wild-type mice. Interestingly, 31% of the vehicle-treated BK5.IGF-1 animals, but none of the wild-type animals, spontaneously developed mammary cancer. The mammary tumors were moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas that expressed functional, nuclear estrogen receptor at both the protein and mRNA levels. These data support the hypothesis that tissue overexpression of IGF-1 stimulates mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:18688034

  10. Enhanced somatic embryogenesis in Theobroma cacao using the homologous BABY BOOM transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Florez, Sergio L; Erwin, Rachel L; Maximova, Siela N; Guiltinan, Mark J; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-05-16

    Theobroma cacao, the chocolate tree, is an important economic crop in East Africa, South East Asia, and South and Central America. Propagation of elite varieties has been achieved through somatic embryogenesis (SE) but low efficiencies and genotype dependence still presents a significant limitation for its propagation at commercial scales. Manipulation of transcription factors has been used to enhance the formation of SEs in several other plant species. This work describes the use of the transcription factor Baby Boom (BBM) to promote the transition of somatic cacao cells from the vegetative to embryonic state. An ortholog of the Arabidopsis thaliana BBM gene (AtBBM) was characterized in T. cacao (TcBBM). TcBBM expression was observed throughout embryo development and was expressed at higher levels during SE as compared to zygotic embryogenesis (ZE). TcBBM overexpression in A. thaliana and T. cacao led to phenotypes associated with SE that did not require exogenous hormones. While transient ectopic expression of TcBBM provided only moderate enhancements in embryogenic potential, constitutive overexpression dramatically increased SE proliferation but also appeared to inhibit subsequent development. Our work provides validation that TcBBM is an ortholog to AtBBM and has a specific role in both somatic and zygotic embryogenesis. Furthermore, our studies revealed that TcBBM transcript levels could serve as a biomarker for embryogenesis in cacao tissue. Results from transient expression of TcBBM provide confirmation that transcription factors can be used to enhance SE without compromising plant development and avoiding GMO plant production. This strategy could compliment a hormone-based method of reprogramming somatic cells and lead to more precise manipulation of SE at the regulatory level of transcription factors. The technology would benefit the propagation of elite varieties with low regeneration potential as well as the production of transgenic plants, which

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Saito, Fumiaki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  12. The cerebellum communicates with the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Eiji; Tremblay, Léon; Féger, Jean; Carras, Peter L; Strick, Peter L

    2005-11-01

    The cerebral cortex is interconnected with two major subcortical structures: the basal ganglia and the cerebellum. How and where cerebellar circuits interact with basal ganglia circuits has been a longstanding question. Using transneuronal transport of rabies virus in macaques, we found that a disynaptic pathway links an output stage of cerebellar processing, the dentate nucleus, with an input stage of basal ganglia processing, the striatum.

  13. BASAL BODIES, BUT NOT CENTRIOLES, IN NAEGLERIA

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Chandler; Dingle, Allan D.

    1971-01-01

    Amebae of Naegleria gruberi transform into flagellates whose basal bodies have the typical centriole-like structure. The amebae appear to lack any homologous structure, even during mitosis. Basal bodies are constructed during transformation and, in cells transforming synchronously at 25°C, they are first seen about 10 min before flagella are seen. No structural precursor for these basal bodies has been found. These observations are discussed in the light of hypotheses about the continuity of centrioles. PMID:4942778

  14. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Peris, Ketty

    2015-11-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an effective and safe noninvasive treatment for low-risk basal cell carcinoma, with the advantage of an excellent cosmetic outcome. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy in basal cell carcinoma is supported by substantial research and clinical trials. In this article, we review the procedure, indications and clinical evidences for the use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  15. Priming of human monocytes for enhanced lipopolysaccharide responses: expression of alpha interferon, interferon regulatory factors, and tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, M P; Zoon, K C

    1993-01-01

    Culture of human monocytes with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) results in a primed state, during which these cells express heightened responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The production of IFN-alpha in response to LPS by human monocytes has an absolute requirement for priming. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expression is also greatly enhanced in primed monocytes after LPS stimulation, but unlike IFN-alpha, TNF is readily expressed in unprimed monocytes as well. In an effort to determine the molecular events associated with IFN-alpha induction in this system, freshly isolated human monocytes were primed by culture with either IFN-gamma or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with LPS; expression of IFN-alpha subtype 2 (IFN-alpha 2), IFN regulatory factors (IRFs), and TNF was assessed by Northern (RNA blot) analysis. IRF-1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in monocytes and is regulated by both LPS and priming cytokines, but its expression alone does not correlate with the induction of IFN-alpha 2 expression. IRF-2 mRNA is expressed in a more gradual manner following LPS stimulation, implying a possible feedback mechanism for inhibiting IFN-alpha expression. However, nuclear run-on analysis indicates that IFN-alpha 2 is not transcriptionally modulated in this system, in striking contrast to TNF, which is clearly regulated at the transcriptional level. In addition, IFN-alpha 2 mRNA accumulation is superinduced when primed monocytes are treated with LPS plus cycloheximide, while TNF mRNA is relatively unaffected. The results demonstrate that priming can affect subsequent LPS-induced gene expression at different levels in human monocytes. Images PMID:8335353

  16. Intracellular reactive oxygen species as apparent modulators of heat-shock protein 27 (hsp27) structural organization and phosphorylation in basal and tumour necrosis factor alpha-treated T47D human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mehlen, P; Kretz-Remy, C; Briolay, J; Fostan, P; Mirault, M E; Arrigo, A P

    1995-01-01

    The small stress protein heat-shock protein 27 (hsp27) is an oligomeric phosphoprotein, constitutively expressed in most human cells, which enhances cellular resistance to tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). This phenomenon correlates with dramatic changes in hsp27 cellular location, structural organization and phosphorylation. To gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating these properties of hsp27, we investigated whether they were a consequence of the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by TNF alpha. Here, we report that, in T47D carcinoma cell lines, the rapid burst of intracellular ROS production and changes in hsp27 locale, structural organization and phosphoisoform composition induced by TNF alpha were abolished by the overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme seleno-glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx). These effects were greatly diminished when GSHPx-expressing cells were grown in the absence of selenium, a cofactor that is essential for seleno-GSHPx activity, indicating that they are directly linked to the increased GSHPx activity. Moreover, in growing T47D cells, GSHPx expression induced intracellular redistribution of hsp27 and decreased the phosphorylation of this protein without altering its pattern of oligomerization. In contrast, the heat-mediated phosphorylation of hsp27 was not altered by decreased intracellular ROS levels. Hence, in growing and TNF-treated cells, several hsp27 properties appear to be modulated by fluctuations in intracellular ROS levels. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8526844

  17. Immune suppressor factor confers stromal cell line with enhanced supporting activity for hematopoietic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Hideaki . E-mail: hnakajim@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Ito, Miyuki; Urano, Atsushi; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Toshio

    2006-02-03

    Immune suppressor factor (ISF) is a subunit of the vacuolar ATPase proton pump. We earlier identified a short form of ISF (ShIF) as a stroma-derived factor that supports cytokine-independent growth of mutant Ba/F3 cells. Here, we report that ISF/ShIF supports self-renewal and expansion of primary hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Co-culture of murine bone marrow cells with a stromal cell line overexpressing ISF or ShIF (MS10/ISF or MS10/ShIF) not only enhanced their colony-forming activity and the numbers of long-term culture initiating cells, but also maintained the competitive repopulating activity of HSC. This stem cell supporting activity depended on the proton-transfer function of ISF/ShIF. Gene expression analysis of ISF/ShIF-transfected cell lines revealed down-regulation of secreted frizzled-related protein-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3, and the restoration of their expressions in MS10/ISF cells partially reversed its enhanced LTC-IC supporting activity to a normal level. These results suggest that ISF/ShIF confers stromal cells with enhanced supporting activities for HSCs by modulating Wnt-activity and the extracellular matrix.

  18. A mechanistic hypothesis of the factors that enhance vulnerability to nicotine use in females

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Laura E.; Torres, Oscar V.

    2013-01-01

    Women are particularly more vulnerable to tobacco use than men. This review proposes a unifying hypothesis that females experience greater rewarding effects of nicotine and more intense stress produced by withdrawal than males. We also provide a neural framework whereby estrogen promotes greater rewarding effects of nicotine in females via enhanced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). During withdrawal, we suggest that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) stress systems are sensitized and promote a greater suppression of dopamine release in the NAcc of females versus males. Taken together, females display enhanced nicotine reward via estrogen and amplified effects of withdrawal via stress systems. Although this framework focuses on sex differences in adult rats, it is also applied to adolescent females who display enhanced rewarding effects of nicotine, but reduced effects of withdrawal from this drug. Since females experience strong rewarding effects of nicotine, a clinical implication of our hypothesis is that specific strategies to prevent smoking initiation among females are critical. Also, anxiolytic medications may be more effective in females that experience intense stress during withdrawal. Furthermore, medications that target withdrawal should not be applied in a unilateral manner across age and sex, given that nicotine withdrawal is lower during adolescence. This review highlights key factors that promote nicotine use in females, and future studies on sex-dependent interactions of stress and reward systems are needed to test our mechanistic hypotheses. Future studies in this area will have important translational value toward reducing health disparities produced by nicotine use in females. PMID:23684991

  19. Memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus via induction of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Oh, Myung Sook

    2013-07-14

    Fruits rich in phytochemicals have been shown to improve memory by protecting or enhancing neuronal functions mediated by neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), in the hippocampus. Mori Fructus (Morus alba L., Moraceae), also called mulberry, is used as a food, dietary supplement and an anti-ageing agent in traditional Oriental medicine. It is also known to contain abundant flavonoid compounds and to exhibit various pharmacological effects. The present study was performed to evaluate the memory-enhancing effect of Mori Fructus extract (ME) in mice, with a focus on NGF regulation. ME (20, 100 and 500 mg/kg per d for 7 d, per os) dose-dependently promoted NGF release in the mouse hippocampus, leading to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. ME significantly increased pre- and post-synapse formation, acetylcholine synthesisation, neuronal cell differentiation, neurite outgrowth and neuronal cell proliferation in the mouse hippocampus. Furthermore, ME significantly increased latency time in the passive avoidance task (P< 0·001) and recognition time of novel objects in the object recognition test (P< 0·05), indicating improvements in learning and memory. Taken together, these data suggest that ME exhibits a memory-enhancing effect via up-regulation of NGF.

  20. Modified harvest system for enhancing Factor VIII yield in alternating tangential flow perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Chul; An, Sora; Kim, Hyun-Ki; Park, Beom-Soo; Na, Kyu-Heum; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2016-05-01

    This study describes the development and experimental verification of a modified harvest system to enhance Factor VIII (FVIII) yield in an alternating tangential flow (ATF) perfusion culture. The main innovation of the modified harvest system is the use of check and pinch valves, eliminating the need of a peristaltic pump for harvest. The system was applied to perfusion cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, which co-express both recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII) and von Willebrand factor (vWF). The modified harvest system showed comparable cell growth with the conventional harvest system using a peristaltic pump. The perfusion rate was successfully controlled using the system. In addition, the modified harvest system achieved an approximately 13.6-fold increase in the final concentration yield of FVIII activity and a 1.47-fold increase in the production yield of FVIII activity compared with a peristaltic pump. Enhancement of the yield of FVIII activity resulted from the reduction of FVIII antigen ( Ag) retention. As a result of transmembrane pressure (TMP) measurement, the reduction of the retained Ag was due to the increased TMP, which was caused by the characteristic function of a check valve, compared with a peristaltic harvest system. The modified harvest system developed in this study could be useful to enhance the production yield of other recombinant proteins in ATF perfusion culture. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Functional Neuroanatomy of the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lanciego, José L.; Luquin, Natasha; Obeso, José A.

    2012-01-01

    The “basal ganglia” refers to a group of subcortical nuclei responsible primarily for motor control, as well as other roles such as motor learning, executive functions and behaviors, and emotions. Proposed more than two decades ago, the classical basal ganglia model shows how information flows through the basal ganglia back to the cortex through two pathways with opposing effects for the proper execution of movement. Although much of the model has remained, the model has been modified and amplified with the emergence of new data. Furthermore, parallel circuits subserve the other functions of the basal ganglia engaging associative and limbic territories. Disruption of the basal ganglia network forms the basis for several movement disorders. This article provides a comprehensive account of basal ganglia functional anatomy and chemistry and the major pathophysiological changes underlying disorders of movement. We try to answer three key questions related to the basal ganglia, as follows: What are the basal ganglia? What are they made of? How do they work? Some insight on the canonical basal ganglia model is provided, together with a selection of paradoxes and some views over the horizon in the field. PMID:23071379

  2. Serotonin enhances platelet procoagulant properties and their activation induced during platelet tissue factor uptake.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; White, James G; Escolar, Gines; Galan, Ana M

    2009-11-01

    Circulating tissue factor (TF) has been linked to thrombus propagation. Our group demonstrated that platelets possess mechanisms to capture TF-rich microvesicles (TF-MVs). Serotonin facilitates the development of platelets with increased procoagulant activity. An enhanced platelet serotonin uptake has been identified with increased cardiovascular risk. We have investigated the involvement of serotonergic mechanisms facilitating the interaction of human platelets with TF-MVs. Inhibitory strategies aimed at blocking serotonin and coagulation mechanisms were also studied. Standard aggregometry, flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and thrombin generation assays were performed. TF-MVs induced platelet aggregation in heparinized platelet-rich plasma (PRP) samples; this aggregation was further accelerated by serotonin. In washed platelets, serotonin enhanced platelet aggregation to TF-MVs with a maximum peak of 55.9 +/- 1.8 vs. 48.7 +/- 2.1% (P < 0.05). Inhibitory strategies with a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor and with lepirudin decreased these aggregations. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that serotonin induced platelet pseudopodia formation, thus facilitating the engulfment of TF-MVs. In general, serotonin significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) thrombin generation and the expression of activation markers and procoagulant activity in platelets measured for TF-MVs alone. Serotonin enhances the interaction of platelets with TF-MVs, increases platelet activation, and potentiates their overall procoagulant activity. The present results could have significant implications in thrombus formation and in the thrombogenic profile of pathological situations with increased cardiovascular risk.

  3. Inverted polymer solar cells with enhanced fill factor by inserting the potassium stearate interfacial modification layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiangsheng; Jiu, Tonggang E-mail: fangjf@nimte.ac.cn; Li, Bairu; Kuang, Chaoyang; Chen, Qiushan; Ma, Sushuang; Fang, Junfeng E-mail: fangjf@nimte.ac.cn; Shu, Jie

    2016-05-02

    A thin potassium stearate (KSt) film combined with an optimized ZnO film was introduced to improve the fill factor (FF) of highly efficient inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs). Atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements were used to show that the introduction of KSt did not change the morphology of interlayer. On the contrary, it is beneficial for the spread of the active layer on the interlayer. The origin of enhanced FF was systematically studied by the ideal current-voltage model for a single heterojunction solar cell and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. On the basis of the data analysis, the reduced charge recombination loss was responsible for this improved FF. At last, when KSt was replaced by sodium stearate (NaSt), the similar experiment phenomenon was observed. This indicates that inserting a metallic stearate modified layer is a promising strategy to enhance inverted PSCs performance.

  4. Band structure engineering through orbital interaction for enhanced thermoelectric power factor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hong; Sun, Wenhao; Ceder, Gerbrand; Armiento, Rickard; Lazic, Predrag

    2014-02-24

    Band structure engineering for specific electronic or optical properties is essential for the further development of many important technologies including thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and microelectronics. In this work, we report orbital interaction as a powerful tool to finetune the band structure and the transport properties of charge carriers in bulk crystalline semiconductors. The proposed mechanism of orbital interaction on band structure is demonstrated for IV-VI thermoelectric semiconductors. For IV-VI materials, we find that the convergence of multiple carrier pockets not only displays a strong correlation with the s-p and spin-orbit coupling but also coincides with the enhancement of power factor. Our results suggest a useful path to engineer the band structure and an enticing solid-solution design principle to enhance thermoelectric performance.

  5. Inverted polymer solar cells with enhanced fill factor by inserting the potassium stearate interfacial modification layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangsheng; Jiu, Tonggang; Li, Bairu; Kuang, Chaoyang; Chen, Qiushan; Ma, Sushuang; Shu, Jie; Fang, Junfeng

    2016-05-01

    A thin potassium stearate (KSt) film combined with an optimized ZnO film was introduced to improve the fill factor (FF) of highly efficient inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs). Atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements were used to show that the introduction of KSt did not change the morphology of interlayer. On the contrary, it is beneficial for the spread of the active layer on the interlayer. The origin of enhanced FF was systematically studied by the ideal current-voltage model for a single heterojunction solar cell and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. On the basis of the data analysis, the reduced charge recombination loss was responsible for this improved FF. At last, when KSt was replaced by sodium stearate (NaSt), the similar experiment phenomenon was observed. This indicates that inserting a metallic stearate modified layer is a promising strategy to enhance inverted PSCs performance.

  6. Dislocation loops as a mechanism for thermoelectric power factor enhancement in silicon nano-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Nick S.; Byrne, Daragh; Cowley, Aidan; Neophytou, Neophytos

    2016-10-01

    A more than 70% enhancement in the thermoelectric power factor of single-crystal silicon is demonstrated in silicon nano-films, a consequence of the introduction of networks of dislocation loops and extended crystallographic defects. Despite these defects causing reductions in electrical conductivity, carrier concentration, and carrier mobility, large corresponding increases in the Seebeck coefficient and reductions in thermal conductivity lead to a significant net enhancement in thermoelectric performance. Crystal damage is deliberately introduced in a sub-surface nano-layer within a silicon substrate, demonstrating the possibility to tune the thermoelectric properties at the nano-scale within such wafers in a repeatable, large-scale, and cost-effective way.

  7. Feature enhancement of reverberant speech by distribution matching and non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keronen, Sami; Kallasjoki, Heikki; Palomäki, Kalle J.; Brown, Guy J.; Gemmeke, Jort F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a novel two-stage dereverberation feature enhancement method for noise-robust automatic speech recognition. In the first stage, an estimate of the dereverberated speech is generated by matching the distribution of the observed reverberant speech to that of clean speech, in a decorrelated transformation domain that has a long temporal context in order to address the effects of reverberation. The second stage uses this dereverberated signal as an initial estimate within a non-negative matrix factorization framework, which jointly estimates a sparse representation of the clean speech signal and an estimate of the convolutional distortion. The proposed feature enhancement method, when used in conjunction with automatic speech recognizer back-end processing, is shown to improve the recognition performance compared to three other state-of-the-art techniques.

  8. Transcription enhancer factor 1 interacts with a basic helix-loop-helix zipper protein, Max, for positive regulation of cardiac alpha-myosin heavy-chain gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, M P; Amin, C S; Gupta, M; Hay, N; Zak, R

    1997-01-01

    The M-CAT binding factor transcription enhancer factor 1 (TEF-1) has been implicated in the regulation of several cardiac and skeletal muscle genes. Previously, we identified an E-box-M-CAT hybrid (EM) motif that is responsible for the basal and cyclic AMP-inducible expression of the rat cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MHC) gene in cardiac myocytes. In this study, we report that two factors, TEF-1 and a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper protein, Max, bind to the alpha-MHC EM motif. We also found that Max was a part of the cardiac troponin T M-CAT-TEF-1 complex even when the DNA template did not contain an apparent E-box binding site. In the protein-protein interaction assay, a stable association of Max with TEF-1 was observed when glutathione S-transferase (GST)-TEF-1 or GST-Max was used to pull down in vitro-translated Max or TEF-1, respectively. In addition, Max was coimmunoprecipitated with TEF-1, thus documenting an in vivo TEF-1-Max interaction. In the transient transcription assay, overexpression of either Max or TEF-1 resulted a mild activation of the alpha-MHC-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene at lower concentrations and repression of this gene at higher concentrations. However, when Max and TEF-1 expression plasmids were transfected together, the repression mediated by a single expression plasmid was alleviated and a three- to fourfold transactivation of the alpha-MHC-CAT reporter gene was observed. This effect was abolished once the EM motif in the promoter-reporter construct was mutated, thus suggesting that the synergistic transactivation function of the TEF-1-Max heterotypic complex is mediated through binding of the complex to the EM motif. These results demonstrate a novel association between Max and TEF-1 and indicate a positive cooperation between these two factors in alpha-MHC gene regulation. PMID:9199327

  9. Cloning and sequence analysis of candidate human natural killer-enhancing factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shau, H.; Butterfield, L.H.; Chiu, R.; Kim, A.

    1994-12-31

    A cytosol factor from human red blood cells enhances natural killer (NK) activity. This factor, termed NK-enhancing factor (NKEF), is a protein of 44000 M{sub r} consisting of two subunits of equal size linked by disulfide bonds. NKEF is expressed in the NK-sensitive erythroleukemic cell line K562. Using an antibody specific for NKEF as a probe for immunoblot screening, we isolated several clones from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library of K562. Additional subcloning and sequencing revealed that the candidate NKEF cDNAs fell into one of two categories of closely related but non-identical genes, referred to as NKEF A and B. They are 88% identical in amino acid sequence and 71% identical in nucleotide sequence. Southern blot analysis suggests that there are two to three NKEF family members in the genome. Analysis of predicted amino acid sequences indicates that both NKEF A and B are cytosol proteins with several phosphorylation sites each, but that they have no glycosylation sites. They are significantly homologous to several other proteins from a wide variety of organisms ranging from prokaryotes to mammals, especially with regard to several well-conserved motifs within the amino acid sequences. The biological functions of these proteins in other species are mostly unknown, but some of them were reported to be induced by oxidative stress. Therefore, as well as for immunoregulation of NK activity, NKEF may be important for cells in coping with oxidative insults. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Static Magnetic Field Stimulation Enhances Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Secretion of Neurotrophic Factors.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ankshita; Teh, Daniel B Loong; Blasiak, Agata; Chai, Chou; Wu, Yang; Gharibani, Payam M; Yang, In Hong; Phan, Thang T; Lim, Kah Leong; Yang, Hyunsoo; Liu, Xiaogang; All, Angelo H

    2017-07-27

    The cellular-level effects of low/high frequency oscillating magnetic field on excitable cells such as neurons are well established. In contrast, the effects of a homogeneous, static magnetic field (SMF) on Central Nervous System (CNS) glial cells are less investigated. Here, we have developed an in vitro SMF stimulation set-up to investigate the genomic effects of SMF exposure on oligodendrocyte differentiation and neurotrophic factors secretion. Human oligodendrocytes precursor cells (OPCs) were stimulated with moderate intensity SMF (0.3 T) for a period of two weeks (two hours/day). The differential gene expression of cell activity marker (c-fos), early OPC (Olig1, Olig2. Sox10), and mature oligodendrocyte markers (CNP, MBP) were quantified. The enhanced myelination capacity of the SMF stimulated oligodendrocytes was validated in a dorsal root ganglion microfluidics chamber platform. Additionally, the effects of SMF on the gene expression and secretion of neurotrophic factors- BDNF and NT3 was quantified. We also report that SMF stimulation increases the intracellular calcium influx in OPCs as well as the gene expression of L-type channel subunits-CaV1.2 and CaV1.3. Our findings emphasize the ability of glial cells such as OPCs to positively respond to moderate intensity SMF stimulation by exhibiting enhanced differentiation, functionality as well as neurotrophic factor release.

  11. Compressive strain induced enhancement in thermoelectric-power-factor in monolayer MoS2 nanosheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimple; Jena, Nityasagar; De Sarkar, Abir

    2017-06-01

    Strain and temperature induced tunability in the thermoelectric properties in monolayer MoS2 (ML-MoS2) has been demonstrated using density functional theory coupled to semi-classical Boltzmann transport theory. Compressive strain, in general and uniaxial compressive strain (along the zig-zag direction), in particular, is found to be most effective in enhancing the thermoelectric power factor, owing to the higher electronic mobility and its sensitivity to lattice compression along this direction. Variation in the Seebeck coefficient and electronic band gap with strain is found to follow the Goldsmid-Sharp relation. n-type doping is found to raise the relaxation time-scaled thermoelectric power factor higher than p-type doping and this divide widens with increasing temperature. The relaxation time-scaled thermoelectric power factor in optimally n-doped ML-MoS2 is found to undergo maximal enhancement under the application of 3% uniaxial compressive strain along the zig-zag direction, when both the (direct) electronic band gap and the Seebeck coefficient reach their maximum, while the electron mobility drops down drastically from 73.08 to 44.15 cm2 V-1 s-1. Such strain sensitive thermoelectric responses in ML-MoS2 could open doorways for a variety of applications in emerging areas in 2D-thermoelectrics, such as on-chip thermoelectric power generation and waste thermal energy harvesting.

  12. Stable co-occupancy of transcription factors and histones at the HIV-1 enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Steger, D J; Workman, J L

    1997-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms yielding DNase I-hypersensitive sites (DHSs) at gene regulatory regions, we have initiated a biochemical analysis of transcription factor binding and nucleosome remodeling with a region of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) that harbors constitutive DHSs in vivo. In vitro reconstitution of an HIV-1 5' LTR fragment into nucleosome core particles demonstrates that Sp1, NF-kappaB1, LEF-1, ETS-1 and USF can gain access to their binding sites in HIV-1 nucleosomal DNA. The factor-bound mononucleosomes resist histone displacement from the DNA by the chromatin remodeling activity, SW1-SNF, or the histone chaperone, nucleoplasmin, suggesting that the binding of these factors to nucleosomal HIV-1 sequences forms a stable complex that includes the underlying histones. However, when the HIV-1 5' LTR fragment is incorporated into a nucleosomal array, Sp1 and NF-kappaB1 binding produce regions of enhanced DNase I sensitivity specifically at the HIV-1 nucleosome. These regions resemble the observed in vivo DHSs, yet the HIV-1 nucleosome remains intact even in the presence of nucleoplasmin. Thus, the constitutive DHSs identified at the HIV-1 enhancer in native chromatin may reflect the presence of a ternary complex composed of transcriptional activators, histones and DNA. PMID:9171359

  13. Factors associated with a purine-rich exonic splicing enhancer sequence in Xenopus oocyte nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Masuyama, Kaoru; Taniguchi, Ichiro; Okawa, Katsuya; Ohno, Mutsuhito . E-mail: hitoohno@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-03

    Purine-rich exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) stimulate splicing of the adjacent introns with suboptimal splice sites. To elucidate the mechanism regarding ESEs, factors specifically associated with ESEs in HeLa cell nuclear extracts were previously investigated, and shown to include SR (serine/arginine-rich) proteins. However, factors associated with ESEs in vivo have not yet been explored. Here we show that a GAA repeat RNA sequence, a typical ESE, is associated in Xenopus oocyte nuclei with at least one SR protein, SF2/ASF, as was expected. Moreover, components of SF3a/b complexes, U2 snRNA, and U2AF{sup 65} were also found to be associated with the ESE in the nucleus. Since SF3a/b complexes are the constituents of the 17S U2 snRNP, these results suggest that the 17S U2 snRNP is associated with the ESE in the nucleus, probably through bridging interactions of U2AF and SR proteins. The identified factors may represent a functional splicing enhancer complex in vivo.

  14. Discovery of osmosensitive transcriptional regulation of human cytochrome P450 3As by the tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (nuclear factor of activated T cells 5).

    PubMed

    Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Chuang, Andrew I; Uematsu, Satoko; Tan, Kah Poh; Ohashi, Kyoichi; Ko, Ben C B; Ito, Shinya

    2007-10-01

    We report the discovery of an osmosensitive transcriptional control of human CYP3A4, CYP3A7, and CYP3A5. Ambient hypertonicity (350-450 mOsmol/kg) increased mRNA expressions of the CYP3A by approximately 10- to 20-fold in human-intestinal C(2)bbe1 cells, followed by an increase of CYP3A protein. Hypotonicity, on the other hand, suppressed CYP3A mRNA levels, indicating that physiological isotonic conditions may regulate the basal expression of CYP3A. Similar responses to ambient tonicity were observed in other human-derived cell lines (intestinal LS180 and hepatic HepG2) and human primary colonic cells. The 11-base pair tonicity-responsive enhancer (TonE) is an osmosensitive regulator that is activated by the transcription factor, the nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5). Luciferase-based reporter assays of 13 consensus TonE motifs within +/-10 kilobases (kb) from the transcription start sites of CYP3A showed that only the CYP3A7 intron 2 region ( approximately 5 kb downstream from the transcription start site), which contains two TonE motifs (+5076/+5086 and + 5417/+5427), was responsive to hypertonicity stimuli. This observation was confirmed upon cotransfection with an NFAT5 expression vector, small interfering RNA, or dominant-negative NFAT5. Deletion and mutation analyses suggested that the TonE (+5417/+5427) is indispensable for the enhancer activity. NFAT5 binding to the CYP3A7 intron 2 TonE motif was demonstrated with electrophoretic mobility shift assay and in a native cell context by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We conclude that transcription of human CYP3A is influenced by ambient tonicity. The physiological significance of the tonic regulation of CYP3A enzymes remains to be determined.

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases vascular endothelial growth factor expression and enhances angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Shih-Ya; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-10-15

    Chondrosarcomas are a type of primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity for local invasion and distant metastasis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is commonly upregulated during neurogenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanism involved in BDNF-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells. Here, we knocked down BDNF expression in chondrosarcoma cells and assessed their capacity to control VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We found knockdown of BDNF decreased VEGF expression and abolished chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis effects in vivo in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel plug nude mouse models. In addition, in the xenograft tumor angiogenesis model, the knockdown of BDNF significantly reduced tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. BDNF increased VEGF expression and angiogenesis through the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α signaling pathway. Finally, we analyzed samples from chondrosarcoma patients by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of BDNF and VEGF protein in 56 chondrosarcoma patients was significantly higher than in normal cartilage. In addition, the high level of BDNF expression correlated strongly with VEGF expression and tumor stage. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF increases VEGF expression and enhances angiogenesis through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α. Therefore, BDNF may represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy for human chondrosarcoma.

  16. Myocyte enhancer factor 2D promotes colorectal cancer angiogenesis downstream of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Junyu; Sun, Hui; Su, Li; Liu, Limei; Shan, Juanjuan; Shen, Junjie; Yang, Zhi; Chen, Jun; Zhong, Xing; Ávila, Matías A; Yan, Xiaochu; Liu, Chungang; Qian, Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) is involved in many aspects of cancer progression, including cell proliferation, invasion, and migration. However, little is known about the role of MEF2D in tumor angiogenesis. Using clinical specimens, colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines and a mouse model in the present study, we found that MEF2D expression was positively correlated with CD31-positive microvascular density in CRC tissues. MEF2D promoted tumor angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo and induced the expression of proangiogenic cytokines in CRC cells. MEF2D was found to be a downstream effector of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the induction of tumor angiogenesis. HIF-1α transactivates MEF2D expression by binding to the MEF2D gene promoter. These results demonstrate that the HIF-1α/MEF2D axis can serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of CRC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Platelet-Derived Short-Chain Polyphosphates Enhance the Inactivation of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor by Activated Coagulation Factor XI

    PubMed Central

    Puy, Cristina; Tucker, Erik I.; Ivanov, Ivan S.; Gailani, David; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Factor (F) XI supports both normal human hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Activated FXI (FXIa) promotes thrombin generation by enzymatic activation of FXI, FIX, FX, and FV, and inactivation of alpha tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPIα), in vitro. Some of these reactions are now known to be enhanced by short-chain polyphosphates (SCP) derived from activated platelets. These SCPs act as a cofactor for the activation of FXI and FV by thrombin and FXIa, respectively. Since SCPs have been shown to inhibit the anticoagulant function of TFPIα, we herein investigated whether SCPs could serve as cofactors for the proteolytic inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa, further promoting the efficiency of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation to generate thrombin. Methods and Results Purified soluble SCP was prepared by size-fractionation of sodium polyphosphate. TFPIα proteolysis was analyzed by western blot. TFPIα activity was measured as inhibition of FX activation and activity in coagulation and chromogenic assays. SCPs significantly accelerated the rate of inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa in both purified systems and in recalcified plasma. Moreover, platelet-derived SCP accelerated the rate of inactivation of platelet-derived TFPIα by FXIa. TFPIα activity was not affected by SCP in recalcified FXI-depleted plasma. Conclusions Our data suggest that SCP is a cofactor for TFPIα inactivation by FXIa, thus, expanding the range of hemostatic FXIa substrates that may be affected by the cofactor functions of platelet-derived SCP. PMID:27764259

  18. Heparin-Binding Epidermal Growth Factor-Like Growth Factor Enhances Aquaporin 3 Expression and Function During Mouse Embryo Implantation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chuan-Xiang; Nong, Ying-Qi; Liu, Feng-Hua; Fan, Lin; Chen, Ye

    2017-03-01

    Aquaporin 3 (AQP3) is highly expressed in peri-implantation blastocyst trophoblastic cells, indicating its role in cytotrophoblast invasion during embryo implantation. However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of AQP3 expression during embryo implantation remains unclear. In this study, an in vitro co-culture system of blastocysts on a monolayer of uterine endometrial cells was used to mimic in vivo process of embryo attachment and invasion to uterine endometrium and treated with different concentrations of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF). The results showed that HB-EGF enhanced AQP3 expression in blastocysts in a dose-dependent manner and promoted the attachment and outgrowth of blastocysts on the monolayer of uterine endometrial cells. When the AQP3 activity was inhibited by copper sulfate, both the attachment and outgrowth of blastocysts were inhibited. Furthermore, HB-EGF induced the phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). PD153035 (EGFR inhibitor) and U0126 (ERK inhibitor) inhibited AQP3 expression and also the attachment and outgrowth of blastocysts. Collectively, our findings provide the first evidence that HB-EGF stimulates EGFR/ERK signaling to promote AQP3 expression in trophoblastic cells, and AQP3 plays a vital role in HB-EGF-induced embryo implantation.

  19. Enhanced hepatic insulin signaling in the livers of high altitude native rats under basal conditions and in the livers of low altitude native rats under insulin stimulation: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Al Dera, Hussain; Eleawa, Samy M; Al-Hashem, Fahaid H; Mahzari, Moeber M; Hoja, Ibrahim; Al Khateeb, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of the liver in lowering fasting blood glucose levels (FBG) in rats native to high (HA) and low altitude (LA) areas. As compared with LA natives, besides the improved insulin and glucose tolerance, HA native rats had lower FBG, at least mediated by inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and activation of glycogen synthesis. An effect that is mediated by the enhancement of hepatic insulin signaling mediated by the decreased phosphorylation of TSC induced inhibition of mTOR function. Such effect was independent of activation of AMPK nor stabilization of HIF1α, but most probably due to oxidative stress induced REDD1 expression. However, under insulin stimulation, and in spite of the less activated mTOR function in HA native rats, LA native rats had higher glycogen content and reduced levels of gluconeogenic enzymes with a more enhanced insulin signaling, mainly due to higher levels of p-IRS1 (tyr612).

  20. [Profiles of factors enhancing teachers' occupational wellbeing and their use in health promoting schools].

    PubMed

    Woynarowska-Sołdan, Magdalena; Weziak-Białowolska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the results of survey on general occupational being and factors contributing to the enhancement of teachers' occupational wellbeing. The authors also address the issue how to work out, analyze, present and use the survey results in health promotion at schools. Teachers of four selected health promoting schools (HPS) were surveyed and the results were analyzed. The Factors Enhancing Teachers's Occupational Wellbeing Scale was used. This instrument consisted of 45 statements on 5 subscales (working conditions, teachers' community, students' and parents' community, organization and workload, professional competences). They were measured from two points of view, the assessment of a current situation and the assessment of needs for the improvement. The scale was preceded by questions concerning the assessment of general occupational being and the assessment of general occupational being of other teachers at school. The self-assessment of the respondents' own and other teachers' occupational being was positive. The current situation related to factors influencing teachers' wellbeing was recognized by teachers as rather good and the need for change was rather low. There were differences between schools in the majority of analyzed factors. An easy method of analyzing data as numerical values and graphic profiles was proposed to be used in HPS. Factors influencing teachers' occupational wellbeing differed between schools. The results of their assessment should be analyzed in each school taking account of its individual context. The proposed instrument and method of data analysis are useful in the planning of teachers' health promotion projects, diagnosis of the initial status ("pre-test") and evaluation of their outcomes ("post-test").

  1. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Umbilicus: A Comprehensive Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) typically occurs in sun-exposed sites. Only 16 individuals with umbilical BCC have been described in the literature, and the characteristics of patients with umbilical BCC are summarized. PubMed was used to search the following terms: abdomen, basal cell carcinoma, basal cell nevus syndrome, and umbilicus. Papers with these terms and references cited within these papers were reviewed. BCC of the umbilicus has been reported in five men and 11 women; one man had two tumors. Two patients had basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS). Other risk factors for BCC were absent. The tumor most commonly demonstrated nodular histology (64%, 9/14); superficial and fibroepithelioma of Pinkus variants were noted in three and two patients, respectively. The tumor was pigmented in eight individuals. Treatment was conventional surgical excision (87%, 13/15) or Mohs micrographic surgery (13%, 2/15); either adjuvant laser ablation or radiotherapy was performed in two patients. The prognosis after treatment was excellent with no recurrence or metastasis (100%, 16/16). In conclusion, BCC of the umbilicus is rare. It usually presents as a tumor with a non-aggressive histologic subtype in an individual with no risk factors for this malignancy. There has been no recurrence or metastasis following excision of the cancer. PMID:27738570

  2. Pseudohypoparathyroidism with basal ganglia calcification

    PubMed Central

    Song, Cheng-Yuan; Zhao, Zhen-Xiang; Li, Wei; Sun, Cong-Cong; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Parkinsonism can be secondary to many internal diseases, in some certain conditions, it seems that the clinical manifestations of parkinsonism presenting reversible. We report a case of patient with parkinsonism secondary to pseudohypoparathyroidism, who improved markedly after the supplement of serum calcium. Patient concerns and diagnoses: A 52-year-old woman with acute parkinsonism was diagnosed as pseudohypoparathyroidism after the conducting of brain computed tomography, laboratory examinations, and gene detection. The son of the patient was also examined and was diagnosed as pseudohypoparathyroidism, who had ever complained of the history of epilepsy. The clinical manifestations of parkinsonism of the patient was reevaluated after the supplement of serum calcium according to the diagnosis. Interventions and outcomes: The brain computed tomography revealed the basal ganglia calcification of the patient, accompanying by serum hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. Loss of function mutation also confirmed the diagnosis. Five days after the therapy targeting at correction of serum hypocalcemia, the patient improved greatly in dyskinesia. Lessons: This study reported a patient presenting as acute reversible parkinsonism, who was finally diagnosed as pseudohypoparathyroidism. It indicated us that secondary parkinsonism should be carefully differentiated for its dramatic treatment effect. And the family history of seizures might be an indicator for the consideration of pseudohypoparathyroidism. PMID:28296742

  3. Basal cell carcinoma and rhinophyma.

    PubMed

    Leyngold, Mark; Leyngold, Ilya; Letourneau, Peter R; Zamboni, William A; Shah, Himansu

    2008-10-01

    Rhinophyma, the end stage in the development of acne rosacea, is characterized by sebaceous hyperplasia, fibrosis, follicular plugging, and telangiectasia. Although it is commonly considered a cosmetic problem, it can result in gross distortion of soft tissue and airway obstruction. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a rare finding in patients with rhinophyma. The objective of this study is to review the literature of BCC in rhinophyma and report on a case. A 70-year-old male presented with long-standing rosacea that resulted in a gross nasal deformity. The patient suffered from chronic drainage and recurrent infections that failed conservative treatment with oral and topical antibiotics. The patient decided to proceed with surgical intervention and underwent tangential excision and dermabrasion in the operating room. Since 1955 there have been 11 cases reported in the literature. In our case, the pathology report noted that the specimen had an incidental finding of a completely resected BCC. The patient did well postoperatively and at follow-up remains tumor-free. Despite the uncommon occurrence of BCC in resection specimens for rhinophyma, we recommend that all specimens be reviewed by a pathologist. If BCC is detected, re-excision may be necessary and careful follow-up is mandatory. Larger studies would be needed to determine the correlation between the 2 conditions.

  4. N-linked glycan truncation causes enhanced clearance of plasma-derived von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, J M; Aguila, S; McRae, E; Ward, S E; Rawley, O; Fallon, P G; Brophy, T M; Preston, R J S; Brady, L; Sheils, O; Chion, A; O'Donnell, J S

    2016-12-01

    Essentials von Willebrands factor (VWF) glycosylation plays a key role in modulating in vivo clearance. VWF glycoforms were used to examine the role of specific glycan moieties in regulating clearance. Reduction in sialylation resulted in enhanced VWF clearance through asialoglycoprotein receptor. Progressive VWF N-linked glycan trimming resulted in increased macrophage-mediated clearance. Click to hear Dr Denis discuss clearance of von Willebrand factor in a free presentation from the ISTH Academy SUMMARY: Background Enhanced von Willebrand factor (VWF) clearance is important in the etiology of both type 1 and type 2 von Willebrand disease (VWD). In addition, previous studies have demonstrated that VWF glycans play a key role in regulating in vivo clearance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying VWF clearance remain poorly understood. Objective To define the molecular mechanisms through which VWF N-linked glycan structures influence in vivo clearance. Methods By use of a series of exoglycosidases, different plasma-derived VWF (pd-VWF) glycoforms were generated. In vivo clearance of these glycoforms was then assessed in VWF(-/-) mice in the presence or absence of inhibitors of asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), or following clodronate-induced macrophage depletion. Results Reduced amounts of N-linked and O-linked sialylation resulted in enhanced pd-VWF clearance modulated via ASGPR. In addition to this role of terminal sialylation, we further observed that progressive N-linked glycan trimming also resulted in markedly enhanced VWF clearance. Furthermore, these additional N-linked glycan effects on clearance were ASGPR-independent, and instead involved enhanced macrophage clearance that was mediated, at least in part, through LDL receptor-related protein 1. Conclusion The carbohydrate determinants expressed on VWF regulate susceptibility to proteolysis by ADAMTS-13. In addition, our findings now further demonstrate that non-sialic acid carbohydrate

  5. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 knockdown enhances glucose uptake and alters glucose metabolism in AML12 hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoyang; Huang, Huijing; Huang, Yi; Wang, Jinli; Yan, Jinhua; Ding, Ling; Zhang, Cuntai; Zhang, Le

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to induce the expression of a variety of antioxidant and detoxification genes. Recently, increasing evidence has revealed roles for Nrf2 in glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism; however, the exact functions of Nrf2 in hepatocyte biology are largely unclear. In the current study, the transient knockdown of Nrf2 via siRNA transfection enhanced the glucose uptake of fasting AML12 hepatocytes to 325.3 ± 11.1% ( P < 0.05) of that of untransfected control cells. The impacts of Nrf2 knockdown (NK) on the antioxidant system, inflammatory response, and glucose metabolism were then examined in AML12 cells under both high-glucose (33 mmol/L) and low-glucose (4.5 mmol/L) conditions. NK lowered the gene and protein expression of the anti-oxidases heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 and increased p-eukaryotic initiation factor-2α(S51), p-nuclear factor-κB p65(S276), and its downstream proinflammatory factors, including interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metalloproteinase 2, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, at the protein level. NK also altered the protein expression of fibroblast growth factor 21, glucose transporter type 4, insulin-like growth factor 1, forkhead box protein O1, p-AKT(S473), and p-GSK3α/β(Y279/Y216), which are involved in glucose uptake, glycogenesis, and gluconeogenesis in AML12 cells. Our results provide a comprehensive understanding of the central role of Nrf2 in the regulation of glucose metabolism in AML12 hepatocytes, in addition to its classical roles in the regulation of redox signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and proinflammatory responses, and support the potential of Nrf2 as a therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and other associated metabolic syndromes. Impact statement Increasing evidence supports the complexity of Nrf2 functions beyond the antioxidant and detoxification response. Previous in

  6. Electromagnetic Enhancement Factor of Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering of Rh6G Molecules on Au Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jaetae; Kim, Wanjoong; Jung, Sungsoo

    2009-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of molecules on nanometals has been intensively studied for technical application of bio-chemical sensing. Among physical origins of SERS enhancement, the electromagnetic effect is the most fundamental contribution of SERS enhancement. Relevant REF of C-C stretching mode of Rh6G near 1511 cm-1 was shown two-order enhancement with 5-nm Au colloidal nanoparticles. The REF was greatly enhanced up to ˜six orders with ˜35 nm Au particles, and was enhanced ˜five orders with 40-nm Au nanoparticles. The reduction of REF with smaller sizes is possibly due to the scattering of conduction electrons on particles surfaces; that with larger sizes is probably due to tips or complex structures. This work at Hampton University was supported by the National Science Foundation (HRD-0734635, HRD-0630372, and ESI-0426328/002) and the U.S. Army Research Office (W911NF-07-1-0608).

  7. Resveratrol Enhances Antitumor Activity of TRAIL in Prostate Cancer Xenografts through Activation of FOXO Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Chen, Qinghe; Singh, Karan P.; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Resveratrol (3, 4′, 5 tri-hydroxystilbene), a naturally occurring polyphenol, exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, cardioprotective and antitumor activities. We have recently shown that resveratrol can enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of TRAIL in prostate cancer cells through multiple mechanisms in vitro. Therefore, the present study was designed to validate whether resveratrol can enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of TRAIL in a xenograft model of prostate cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Resveratrol and TRAIL alone inhibited growth of PC-3 xenografts in nude mice by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation (PCNA and Ki67 staining) and inducing apoptosis (TUNEL staining). The combination of resveratrol and TRAIL was more effective in inhibiting tumor growth than single agent alone. In xenografted tumors, resveratrol upregulated the expressions of TRAIL-R1/DR4, TRAIL-R2/DR5, Bax and p27/K IP1, and inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1. Treatment of mice with resveratrol and TRAIL alone inhibited angiogenesis (as demonstrated by reduced number of blood vessels, and VEGF and VEGFR2 positive cells) and markers of metastasis (MMP-2 and MMP-9). The combination of resveratrol with TRAIL further inhibited number of blood vessels in tumors, and circulating endothelial growth factor receptor 2-positive endothelial cells than single agent alone. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited the cytoplasmic phosphorylation of FKHRL1 resulting in its enhanced activation as demonstrated by increased DNA binding activity. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that resveratrol can enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of TRAIL by activating FKHRL1 and its target genes. The ability of resveratrol to inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis, and enhance the therapeutic potential of TRAIL suggests that resveratrol alone or in combination with TRAIL can be used for the management of prostate cancer. PMID:21209944

  8. Basal level of autophagy is increased in aging human skin fibroblasts in vitro, but not in old skin.

    PubMed

    Demirovic, Dino; Nizard, Carine; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular autophagy (AP) is a stress response that is enhanced under conditions of limitation of amino acids, growth factors and other nutrients, and also when macromolecules become damaged, aggregated and fibrillated. Aging is generally accompanied by an increase in intracellular stress due to all the above factors. Therefore, we have compared the basal levels of AP in serially passaged human facial skin fibroblasts undergoing aging and replicative senescence in vitro, and ex vivo in the skin biopsies from the photo-protected and photo-exposed area of the arms of 20 healthy persons of young and old ages. Immunofluorescence microscopy, employing antibodies against a specific intracellular microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3) as a well established marker of AP, showed a 5-fold increase in the basal level of LC3 in near senescent human skin fibroblasts. However, no such age-related increase in LC3 fluorescence and AP could be detected in full thickness skin sections from the biopsies obtained from 10 healthy young (age 25 to 30 yr) and 10 old (age 60 to 65 yr) donors. Furthermore, there was no difference in the basal level of LC3 in the skin sections from photo-protected and photo-exposed areas of the arm. Thus, in normal conditions, the aging phenotype of the skin cells in culture and in the body appears to be different in the case of AP.

  9. A team training program using human factors to enhance patient safety.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David A; Manus, Danae A

    2007-12-01

    Beginning in 2005, the aorn foundation and Safer Healthcare implemented a human factors program based on Crew Resource Management training in five diverse surgical facilities across the United States. Highly interactive, customized training sessions were designed to help clinicians standardize communication, enhance teamwork, implement preprocedure briefings and postprocedure debriefings, maintain situational awareness, and recognize red flags in the workplace. Pretraining and post-training surveys were used to determine the effectiveness of the program. Brief overviews from the participating facilities detail specific issues encountered in each setting.

  10. A single exposure to cocaine during development elicits regionally-selective changes in basal basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2) gene expression and alters the trophic response to a second injection.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Giuseppe; Caffino, Lucia; Malpighi, Chiara; Melfi, Simona; Racagni, Giorgio; Fumagalli, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    During adolescence, the brain is maturing and more sensitive to drugs of abuse that can influence its developmental trajectory. Recently, attention has been focused on basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) given that its administration early in life enhances the acquisition of cocaine self-administration and sensitization at adulthood (Turner et al. (Pharmacol Biochem Behav 92:100-4, 2009), Clinton et al. (Pharmacol Biochem Behav103:6-17, 2012)). Additionally, we found that abstinence from adolescent cocaine exposure long lastingly dysregulates FGF-2 transcription (Giannotti et al. (Psychopharmacology (Berl) 225:553-60, 2013 ). The objectives of the study are to evaluate if (1) a single injection of cocaine (20 mg/kg) at postnatal day 35 alters FGF-2 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels and (2) the first injection influences the trophic response to a second injection (10 mg/kg) provided 24 h or 7 days later. We found regional differences in the FGF-2 expression pattern as either the first or the second injection of cocaine by themselves upregulated FGF-2 mRNA in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens while downregulating it in the hippocampus. The first injection influences the trophic response of the second. Of note, 24 h after the first injection, accumbal and hippocampal FGF-2 changes produced by cocaine in saline-pretreated rats were prevented in cocaine-pretreated rats. Conversely, in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus 7 days after the first injection, the cocaine-induced FGF-2 changes were modified by the subsequent exposure to the psychostimulant. These findings show that a single cocaine injection is sufficient to produce enduring changes in the adolescent brain and indicate that early cocaine priming alters the mechanisms regulating the trophic response in a brain region-specific fashion.

  11. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience.

    PubMed

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-02

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience.

  12. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience

    PubMed Central

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-01

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience. PMID:25663734

  13. Enhanced power factor in Ho3+ doped ZnO: A new material for TE application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradyumnan, P. P.; Paulson, Anju; Muhammed Sabeer N., A.; Deepthy, N.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we investigate the structural, chemical and thermoelectric property of Ho doped ZnO based material as a function of temperature. The thermoelectric properties were measured in a temperature 100-700 °C and found that Holmium doped samples posses a remarkable effect on transport properties in pure ZnO. Negative thermopower ensured that electrons are the majority charge carriers. Seebeck Coefficient and resistivity are found to be lower for the Holmium doped samples results for the enhancement in power factor. Power factor corresponding to 0.9 wt % doped Ho is found to be 0.57*10 -4 W/mK2, so that it can be considered as a potential candidate for thermoelectric application.

  14. Transgenic songbirds with suppressed or enhanced activity of CREB transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kentaro; Matsui, Sumiko; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Songbirds postnatally develop their skill to utter and to perceive a vocal signal for communication. How genetic and environmental influences act in concert to regulate the development of such skill is not fully understood. Here, we report the phenotype of transgenic songbirds with altered intrinsic activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. By viral vector-mediated modification of genomic DNA, we established germ line-transmitted lines of zebra finches, which exhibited enhanced or suppressed activity of CREB. Although intrinsically acquired vocalizations or their hearing ability were not affected, the transgenic birds showed reduced vocal learning quality of their own songs and impaired audio-memory formation against conspecific songs. These results thus demonstrate that appropriate activity of CREB is necessary for the postnatal acquisition of learned behavior in songbirds, and the CREB transgenic birds offer a unique opportunity to separately manipulate both genetic and environmental factors that impinge on the postnatal song learning. PMID:26048905

  15. Basal Terraces on Melting Ice Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrieux, P.; Stewart, C.; Jenkins, A.; Nicholls, K. W.; Corr, H. F. J.; Rignot, E. J.; Steffen, K.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean waters melt the margins of Antarctic and Greenland glaciers and individualglaciers' responses and the integrity of their ice shelves are expected to depend on thespatial distribution of melt. The bases of the ice shelves associated with Pine IslandGlacier (West Antarctica) and Petermann Glacier (Greenland) have similar geometries,including kilometers-wide, hundreds-of-meter-high channels oriented along and acrossthe direction of ice flow. The channels are enhanced by, and constrain, oceanic melt.New, meter-scale observations of basal topography reveal peculiar glaciated landscapes.Channel flanks are not smooth, but are instead stepped, with hundreds-of-meters-wideflat terraces separated by 5-50 m-high walls. Melting is shown to be modulated by thegeometry: constant across each terrace, changing from one terrace to the next, and greatlyenhanced on the ~45°-inclined walls. Melting is therefore fundamentally heterogeneousand likely associated with stratification in the ice-ocean boundary layer, challengingcurrent models of ice shelf-ocean interactions.

  16. Mussel-inspired immobilization of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for enhanced endothelialization of vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Min; Lee, Yu Bin; Kim, Seok Joo; Kang, Jae Kyeong; Park, Jong-Chul; Jang, Wonhee; Shin, Heungsoo

    2012-07-09

    Most polymeric vascular prosthetic materials have low patency rate for replacement of small diameter vessels (<5 mm), mainly due to failure to generate healthy endothelium. In this study, we present polydopamine-mediated immobilization of growth factors on the surface of polymeric materials as a versatile tool to modify surface characteristics of vascular grafts potentially for accelerated endothelialization. Polydopamine was deposited on the surface of biocompatible poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) elastomer, on which vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was subsequently immobilized by simple dipping. Surface characteristics and composition were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Immobilization of VEGF on the polydopamine-deposited PLCL films was effective (19.8 ± 0.4 and 197.4 ± 19.7 ng/cm(2) for DPv20 and DPv200 films, respectively), and biotin-mediated labeling of immobilized VEGF revealed that the fluorescence intensity increased as a function of the concentration of VEGF solution. The effect of VEGF on adhesion of HUVECs was marginal, which may have been masked by polydopamine layer that also enhanced cell adhesion. However, VEGF-immobilized substrate significantly enhanced proliferation of HUVECs for over 7 days of in vitro culture and also improved their migration. In addition, immobilized VEGF supported robust cell to cell interactions with strong expression of CD 31 marker. The same process was effective for immobilization of basic fibroblast growth factor, demonstrating the robustness of polydopamine layer for secondary ligation of growth factors as a simple and novel surface modification strategy for vascular graft materials.

  17. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  18. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  19. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  20. Effective light absorption and its enhancement factor for silicon nanowire-based solar cell.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhiqiang; Li, Meicheng; Mwenya, Trevor; Fu, Pengfei; Li, Yingfeng; Song, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    Although nanowire (NW) antireflection coating can enhance light trapping capability, which is generally used in crystal silicon (CS) based solar cells, whether it can improve light absorption in the CS body depends on the NW geometrical shape and their geometrical parameters. In order to conveniently compare with the bare silicon, two enhancement factors E(T) and E(A) are defined and introduced to quantitatively evaluate the efficient light trapping capability of NW antireflective layer and the effective light absorption capability of CS body. Five different shapes (cylindrical, truncated conical, convex conical, conical, and concave conical) of silicon NW arrays arranged in a square are studied, and the theoretical results indicate that excellent light trapping does not mean more light can be absorbed in the CS body. The convex conical NW has the best light trapping, but the concave conical NW has the best effective light absorption. Furthermore, if the cross section of silicon NW is changed into a square, both light trapping and effective light absorption are enhanced, and the Eiffel Tower shaped NW arrays have optimal effective light absorption.

  1. Enhancement of drug sensitivity of human malignancies by epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Kröning, R.; Jones, J. A.; Hom, D. K.; Chuang, C. C.; Sanga, R.; Los, G.; Howell, S. B.; Christen, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) enhances the in vitro and in vivo sensitivity of human ovarian carcinoma 2008 cells to cisplatin. EGF was found to enhance selectively the in vivo toxicity of cisplatin to 2008 cell xenografts without altering the toxicity of cisplatin to non-malignant target tissues such as the kidney or bone marrow. We now show that recombinant human EGF (rhEGF) enhances the cisplatin sensitivity of cell lines representative of many other types of malignancies in addition to ovarian carcinoma, including cancers of the head and neck, cervix, colon, pancreas and prostate, as well as non-small-cell carcinoma of the lung. In addition, rhEGF was found to sensitise cells to other platinum-containing drugs and several other classes of chemotherapeutic agents. rhEGF sensitised 2008 cells not only to cisplatin, but also to carboplatin and tetraplatin, as well as taxol, melphalan and 5-fluorouracil. We conclude that modulation of drug sensitivity by rhEGF is observed in cell lines representative of many human malignancies and for multiple classes of chemotherapeutic agents, indicating that it alters one or more components of the cellular damage response that are both common between cell lines and classes of drugs and fundamental to survival. Images Figure 2 PMID:7669570

  2. Long-lasting efficacy of the cognitive enhancer cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Sonia; Musilli, Marco; Martino, Assunta; Diana, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Rho GTPases are key regulators of the activity-dependent changes of neural circuits. Besides being involved in nervous system development and repair, this neural structural plasticity is believed to constitute the cellular basis of learning and memory. Here we report that concurrent modulation of cerebral Rho GTPases, including Rac, Rho and Cdc42 subfamilies, by Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1, 10 fmol/kg intracerebroventricularly) improves object recognition in both C57BL/6J and CD1 mice. The improvement is long lasting, as it is still observed 90 days post treatment. At this time, the treatment is associated with enhancement of neurotransmission and long-term potentiation. The effects depend on changes in Rho GTPase status, since the recombinant molecule CNF1 C866S, in which the enzymatic activity was abolished through substitution of serine to cysteine at position 866, is ineffective. The study confirms the role of Rho GTPases in learning and suggests that a single administration of CNF1 is effective for a long time after administration. In general, the long-lasting cognition enhancing effect of CNF1 might be beneficial for the treatment of CNS disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'.

  3. Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 enhances synthesis of endotoxin-induced tumor necrosis factor in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Henne, E; Campbell, W H; Carlson, E

    1991-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) was tested for its ability to enhance the production of endotoxin-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in C3H/HeN mice. The TNF level in serum was quantified by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It was found that when mice were injected with 20 micrograms of TSST-1 12 h before exposure to 1 micrograms of endotoxin, the serum endotoxin-induced TNF was 20 times as high as that found in mice exposed to endotoxin alone. Although 20 micrograms of TSST-1 did induce a maximum level of near 1 ng of TNF per ml of serum 1.5 h after exposure, the TNF concentration was greatly diminished after 5 to 6 h and was no longer detectable after 12 h. Pretreatment of mice with 20 micrograms of TSST-1 or 1 micrograms of endotoxin did not influence TNF induction by TSST-1 12 h later. Also, pretreatment of mice with 1 micrograms of endotoxin did not enhance TNF induction by endotoxin 12 h later. Enhancement was achieved only when mice were exposed to TSST-1 more than 4 h and less than 24 h before injection of endotoxin. Despite the relatively high serum TNF levels (30 to 50 ng/ml), no mortality was observed in the mice treated with both TSST and endotoxin. PMID:1879919

  4. Effect of enhanced biosecurity and selected on-farm factors on Campylobacter colonization of chicken broilers.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, M; Beauvais, W; Guitian, J

    2017-02-01

    Human campylobacteriosis is the most commonly reported gastrointestinal bacterial infection in the EU; poultry meat has been identified as the main source of infection. We tested the hypothesis that enhanced biosecurity and other factors such as welfare status, breed, the practice of partial depopulation and number of empty days between flocks may prevent Campylobacter spp. caecal colonization of poultry batches at high levels (>123 000 c.f.u./g in pooled caecal samples). We analysed data from 2314 poultry batches sampled at slaughter in the UK in 2011-2013. We employed random-effects logistic regression to account for clustering of batches within farms and adjust for confounding. We estimated population attributable fractions using adjusted risk ratios. Enhanced biosecurity reduced the odds of colonization at partial depopulation [odds ratio (OR) 0·25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·14-0·47] and, to a lesser extent, at final depopulation (OR 0·47, 95% CI 0·25-0·89). An effect of the type of breed was also found. Under our assumptions, approximately 1/3 of highly colonized batches would be avoided if they were all raised under enhanced biosecurity or without partial depopulation. The results of the study indicate that on-farm measures can play an important role in reducing colonization of broiler chickens with Campylobacter spp. and as a result human exposure.

  5. Radiation-induced bystander effects enhanced by elevated sodium chloride through sensitizing cells to bystander factors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingyan; Han, Wei; Chen, Shaopeng; Zhao, Ye; Jiang, Erkang; Bao, Lingzhi; Pei, Bei; Yang, Gen; Zhao, Guoping; Wang, Jun; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun

    2008-09-26

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been demonstrated to occur widely in various cell lines. However, very little data is available on the genotoxic effects of RIBE combined with other factor(s). We reported previously that with a low dose of alpha-particle irradiation, the fraction of gamma-H2AX foci-positive cells in non-irradiated bystander cells was significantly increased under elevated NaCl culture conditions. In this study, we further investigated the functional role of NaCl in the enhancement of RIBE using a specially designed co-culture system and micronucleus (MN) test. It was shown that the MN frequency was not increased significantly by elevated NaCl (9.0 g/L) alone or by medium exposure. However, with 1.0 cGy alpha-particle irradiation, the induced MN frequency increased significantly in both irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions. Additional studies showed that elevated NaCl made the non-irradiated bystander cells more vulnerable to bystander factors. Furthermore, it was found that the induced MN frequency in cells both in irradiated and non-irradiated bystander regions was weakened when the hypertonic medium was changed to normotonic medium for 2h before irradiation. Such observations were quite similar to the co-effect of NaCl and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), indicating that elevated NaCl might sensitize non-irradiated cells to bystander factors-induced oxidative stress.

  6. Control of cardiac-specific transcription by p300 through myocyte enhancer factor-2D.

    PubMed

    Slepak, T I; Webster, K A; Zang, J; Prentice, H; O'Dowd, A; Hicks, M N; Bishopric, N H

    2001-03-09

    The transcriptional integrator p300 regulates gene expression by interaction with sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins and local remodeling of chromatin. p300 is required for cardiac-specific gene transcription, but the molecular basis of this requirement is unknown. Here we report that the MADS (MCM-1, agamous, deficiens, serum response factor) box transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor-2D (MEF-2D) acts as the principal conduit for cardiac transcriptional activation by p300. p300 activation of the native 2130-base pair human skeletal alpha-actin promoter required a single hybrid MEF-2/GATA-4 DNA motif centered at -1256 base pairs. Maximal expression of the promoter in cultured myocytes and in vivo correlated with binding of both MEF-2 and p300, but not GATA-4, to this AT-rich motif. p300 and MEF-2 were coprecipitated from cardiac nuclear extracts by an oligomer containing this element. p300 was found exclusively in a complex with MEF-2D at this and related sites in other cardiac-restricted promoters. MEF-2D, but not other MEFs, significantly potentiated cardiac-specific transcription by p300. No physical or functional interaction was observed between p300 and other factors implicated in skeletal actin transcription, including GATA-4, TEF-1, or SRF. These results show that, in the intact cell, p300 interactions with its protein targets are highly selective and that MEF-2D is the preferred channel for p300-mediated transcriptional control in the heart.

  7. A Combination of Radiosurgery and Soluble Tissue Factor Enhances Vascular Targeting for Experimental Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Radiosurgery for glioblastoma is limited to the development of resistance, allowing tumor cells to survive and initiate tumor recurrence. Based on our previous work that coadministration of tissue factor and lipopolysaccharide following radiosurgery selectively induced thrombosis in cerebral arteriovenous malformations, achieving thrombosis of 69% of the capillaries and 39% of medium sized vessels, we hypothesized that a rapid and selective shutdown of the capillaries in glioblastoma vasculature would decrease the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, reducing tumor growth, preventing intracranial hypertension, and improving life expectancy. Glioblastoma was formed by implantation of GL261 cells into C57Bl/6 mouse brain. Mice were intravenously injected tissue factor, lipopolysaccharide, a combination of both, or placebo 24 hours after radiosurgery. Control mice received both agents after sham irradiation. Coadministration of tissue factor and lipopolysaccharide led to the formation of thrombi in up to 87 ± 8% of the capillaries and 46 ± 4% of medium sized vessels within glioblastoma. The survival rate of mice in this group was 80% versus no survivor in placebo controls 30 days after irradiation. Animal body weight increased with time in this group (r = 0.88, P = 0.0001). Thus, radiosurgery enhanced treatment with tissue factor, and lipopolysaccharide selectively induces thrombosis in glioblastoma vasculature, improving life expectancy. PMID:24307995

  8. Reduced linewidth enhancement factor due to excited state transition of quantum dot lasers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng-Fei; Ji, Hai-Ming; Xiao, Jin-Long; Gu, Yong-Xian; Huang, Yong-Zhen; Yang, Tao

    2012-04-15

    The carrier induced refractive index change and linewidth enhancement factor α due to ground-state (GS) and excited-state (ES) transitions have been compared by measuring the optical gain spectra from an InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) laser structure. It is shown that the ES transition exhibits a reduced α-factor compared to the value due to the GS transition. This result can be explained by the α-factor due to the ES transition having a smaller increase from the non-resonant carriers in the combined state of the wetting layer and InGaAs strain reducing layer than the α-factor increase due to the GS transition, since the relaxation time for carriers from the combined state of the wetting layer and InGaAs strain reducing layer to the ES is shorter than to the GS. The result reported here shows another advantage of using ES QD lasers for optical communication, in addition to their higher modulation speed.

  9. First results from light scattering enhancement factor over central Indian Himalayas during GVAX campaign.

    PubMed

    Dumka, U C; Kaskaoutis, D G; Sagar, Ram; Chen, Jianmin; Singh, Narendra; Tiwari, Suresh

    2017-12-15

    The present work examines the influence of relative humidity (RH), physical and optical aerosol properties on the light-scattering enhancement factor [f(RH=85%)] over central Indian Himalayas during the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). The aerosol hygroscopic properties were measured by means of DoE/ARM (US Department of Energy, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) mobile facility focusing on periods with the regular instrumental operation (November-December 2011). The measured optical properties include aerosol light-scattering (σsp) and absorption (σap) coefficients and the intensive parameters i.e., single scattering albedo (SSA), scattering Ångström exponent (SAE), absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) and light scattering enhancement factor (f(RH)=σsp(RH, λ)/σsp(RHdry, λ)). The measurements were separated for sub-micron (<1μm, D1μm) and particles with diameter<10μm (D10μm) in order to examine the influence of particle size on f(RH) and enhancement rate (γ). The particle size affects the aerosol hygroscopicity since mean f(RH=85%) of 1.27±0.12 and 1.32±0.14 are found for D10μm and D1μm, respectively. These f(RH) values are relatively low suggesting the enhanced presence of soot and carbonaceous particles from biomass burning activities, which is verified via backward air-mass trajectories. Similarly, the light-scattering enhancement rates are ~0.20 and 0.17 for the D1μm and D10μm particles, respectively. However, a general tendency for increasing f(RH) and γ is shown for higher σsp and σap values indicating the presence of rather aged smoke plumes, coated with industrial aerosols over northern India, with mean SSA, SAE and AAE values of 0.92, 1.00 and 1.15 respectively. On the other hand, a moderate-to-small dependence of f(RH) and γ on SAE, AAE, and SSA was observed for both particle sizes. Furthermore, f(RH) exhibits an increasing tendency with the number of cloud condensation nuclei (NCCN) indicating larger particle hygroscopicity

  10. Improving Baculovirus Infectivity by Efficiently Embedding Enhancing Factors into Occlusion Bodies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shili; Zhao, Lijuan; Ma, Ruipeng; Fang, Wei; Hu, Jia; Lei, Chengfeng; Sun, Xiulian

    2017-07-15

    The relatively low infectivity of baculoviruses to their host larvae limits their use as insecticidal agents on a larger scale. In the present study, a novel strategy was developed to efficiently embed foreign proteins into Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) occlusion bodies (OBs) to achieve stable expression of foreign proteins and to improve viral infectivity. A recombinant AcMNPV bacmid was constructed by expressing the 150-amino-acid (aa) N-terminal segment of polyhedrin under the control of the p10 promoter and the remaining C-terminal 95-aa segment under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. The recombinant virus formed OBs in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells, in which the occlusion-derived viruses were embedded in a manner similar to that for wild-type AcMNPV. Next, the 95-aa polyhedrin C terminus was fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein, and the recombinant AcMNPV formed fluorescent green OBs and was stably passaged in vitro and in vivo The AcMNPV recombinants were further modified by fusing truncated Agrotis segetum granulovirus enhancin or truncated Cydia pomonella granulovirus ORF13 (GP37) to the C-terminal 95 aa of polyhedrin, and both recombinants were able to form normal OBs. Bioactivity assays indicated that the median lethal concentrations of these two AcMNPV recombinants were 3- to 5-fold lower than that of the control virus. These results suggest that embedding enhancing factors in baculovirus OBs by use of this novel technique may promote efficient and stable foreign protein expression and significantly improve baculovirus infectivity.IMPORTANCE Baculoviruses have been used as bioinsecticides for over 40 years, but their relatively low infectivity to their host larvae limits their use on a larger scale. It has been reported that it is possible to improve baculovirus infectivity by packaging enhancing factors within baculovirus occlusion bodies (OBs); however, so far, the packaging efficiency has been low. In this

  11. Enhancement of sciatic nerve regeneration after vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pereira Lopes, F R; Lisboa, B C G; Frattini, F; Almeida, F M; Tomaz, M A; Matsumoto, P K; Langone, F; Lora, S; Melo, P A; Borojevic, R; Han, S W; Martinez, A M B

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the beneficial effects of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on neurone survival and Schwann cell proliferation. VEGF is a potent angiogenic factor, and angiogenesis has long been recognized as an important and necessary step during tissue repair. Here, we investigated the effects of VEGF on sciatic nerve regeneration. Using light and electron microscopy, we evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after transection and VEGF gene therapy. We examined the survival of the neurones in the dorsal root ganglia and in lumbar 4 segment of spinal cord. We also evaluated the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and gastrocnemius muscle weight. In addition, we evaluated the VEGF expression by immunohistochemistry. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran) fluorescence of nerves and muscles revealed intense staining in the VEGF-treated group. Quantitative analysis showed that the numbers of myelinated fibres and blood vessels were significantly higher in VEGF-treated animals. VEGF also increased the survival of neurone cell bodies in dorsal root ganglia and in spinal cord. The sciatic functional index and gastrocnemius muscle weight reached significantly higher values in VEGF-treated animals. We demonstrate a positive relationship between increased vascularization and enhanced nerve regeneration, indicating that VEGF administration can support and enhance the growth of regenerating nerve fibres, probably through a combination of angiogenic, neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects. © 2011 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2011 British Neuropathological Society.

  12. Student-perceived factors for an enhanced advanced education program in prosthodontics recall system.

    PubMed

    Afshari, Fatemeh S; Knoernschild, Kent L

    2011-07-01

    A qualitative study of Advanced Education Programs in Prosthodontics (AEPPs) students was conducted to identify best practices to effectively promote ongoing health and student learning within the context of a patient-centered recall system. Ten students from seven AEPPs nationwide were invited to participate in a focus group on recall systems within AEPPs. The discussion first identified whether an active recall program existed and then delved into benefits for patients and students, positive and negative features of existing recall systems, and factors that can be improved upon for an enhanced recall system. Participants advocated the highest standard of patient care, including regular ongoing care once restorative therapy is complete. Discussion indicates that not only does regular patient recall lead to health promotion, disease prevention, and monitoring of existing prostheses for the patient, but also provides for an enhanced learning experience for the students. Recognizing this, several students from AEPPs lacking an official recall system have established a "makeshift" system, encompassing a treatment completion letter, final intraoral photographs, patient education, and regular prosthetic evaluations, for their existing patients. Prosthodontic program students perceived their program's recall effectiveness could be improved. Due to the numerous potential benefits of an active recall system for both patients and students, some perceived factors to be improved upon include treatment completion protocol, patient education, and establishment of a patient-centered recall system managed by a team of hygienists, receptionists, attending faculty, and residents. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Extraordinary Off-Stoichiometric Bismuth Telluride for Enhanced n-Type Thermoelectric Power Factor.

    PubMed

    Park, Kunsu; Ahn, Kyunghan; Cha, Joonil; Lee, Sanghwa; Chae, Sue In; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Ryee, Siheon; Im, Jino; Lee, Jaeki; Park, Su-Dong; Han, Myung Joon; Chung, In; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2016-11-02

    Thermoelectrics directly converts waste heat into electricity and is considered a promising means of sustainable energy generation. While most of the recent advances in the enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) resulted from a decrease in lattice thermal conductivity by nanostructuring, there have been very few attempts to enhance electrical transport properties, i.e., the power factor. Here we use nanochemistry to stabilize bulk bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) that violates phase equilibrium, namely, phase-pure n-type K0.06Bi2Te3.18. Incorporated potassium and tellurium in Bi2Te3 far exceed their solubility limit, inducing simultaneous increase in the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient along with decrease in the thermal conductivity. Consequently, a high power factor of ∼43 μW cm(-1) K(-2) and a high ZT > 1.1 at 323 K are achieved. Our current synthetic method can be used to produce a new family of materials with novel physical and chemical characteristics for various applications.

  14. The Glucose Transporter (GLUT4) Enhancer Factor Is Required for Normal Wing Positioning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Umar; Huang, Zhiyu; Terman, Jonathan R.

    2008-01-01

    Many of the transcription factors and target genes that pattern the developing adult remain unknown. In the present study, we find that an ortholog of the poorly understood transcription factor, glucose transporter (GLUT4) enhancer factor (Glut4EF, GEF) [also known as the Huntington's disease gene regulatory region-binding protein (HDBP) 1], plays a critical role in specifying normal wing positioning in adult Drosophila. Glut4EF proteins are zinc-finger transcription factors named for their ability to regulate expression of GLUT4 but nothing is known of Glut4EF's in vivo physiological functions. Here, we identify a family of Glut4EF proteins that are well conserved from Drosophila to humans and find that mutations in Drosophila Glut4EF underlie the wing-positioning defects seen in stretch mutants. In addition, our results indicate that previously uncharacterized mutations in Glut4EF are present in at least 11 publicly available fly lines and on the widely used TM3 balancer chromosome. These results indicate that previous observations utilizing these common stocks may be complicated by the presence of Glut4EF mutations. For example, our results indicate that Glut4EF mutations are also present on the same chromosome as two gain-of-function mutations of the homeobox transcription factor Antennapedia (Antp) and underlie defects previously attributed to Antp. In fact, our results support a role for Glut4EF in the modulation of morphogenetic processes mediated by Antp, further highlighting the importance of Glut4EF transcription factors in patterning and morphogenesis. PMID:18245850

  15. [Correction of enhanced dynamic wedge factor and analysis of monitor unit calculation].

    PubMed

    Huang, Sijuan; Chen, Lixin; Cao, Wufei; Sun, Wenzhao; Chen, Along; Liu, Bojio; Wang, Bin

    2015-02-01

    To study the correction of algorithm for Varian enhanced dynamic wedge(EDW) factors and compare the dose/monitor unit (MU) deviation measured at the central axis of EDW field with that obtained by manual calculation or using the treatment planning system. EDW factors and dose were measured with Thimble ion chamber at 10 cm depth under the water for 6 MV and 10 MV photon on Varian linear accelerator. The corresponding calculations were done with the radiation treatment planning system. An analytic formula, namely the MU Fraction model, was used to calculate the EDW factor, which was corrected with a constant factor. The MU of conventional 2-D planning derived from manual calculating, treatment planning system, and actual measurements were compared. With the measured results as the standard, the corrected manual calculation deviation of EDW factors was significantly reduced. For photon 6 MV, the maximum deviation reduced from 4.2% to 1.3% for 60° symmetry fields was, and from -4.7% to -1.8% for asymmetric fields. For photon 10 MV, the maximum deviation for all EDW fields was reduced from -3.0% to 1.1%. Comparison of the manual calculations with the measured results showed a MU deviation for symmetric fields within 2%, and more than 5% for some asymmetric fields. The deviation between the calculations of the treatment planning and the measured results was less than 1.5%. Constant factor correction can effectively reduce the deviation of manual calculation. For MU calculation of EDW field in conventional 2-D dimensional treatment planning, the corrected results of symmetric fields meet clinical requirements. While the minimum distance between the field edge and the central axis was less than 4 cm in asymmetric fields, the corresponding special method, measurement or the treatment planning system should be used to calculate the dose/MU.

  16. A biomimetic growth factor delivery strategy for enhanced regeneration of iliac crest defects.

    PubMed

    Huri, Pinar Yilgor; Huri, Gazi; Yasar, Umit; Ucar, Yurdanur; Dikmen, Nurten; Hasirci, Nesrin; Hasirci, Vasif

    2013-08-01

    The importance of provision of growth factors in the engineering of tissues has long been shown to control the behavior of the cells within the construct and several approaches were applied toward this end. In nature, more than one type of growth factor is known to be effective during the healing of tissue defects and their peak concentrations are not always simultaneous. One of the most recent strategies includes the delivery of a combination of growth factors with the dose and timing to mimic the natural regeneration cascade. The sequential delivery of bone morphogenetic proteins BMP-2 and BMP-7 which are early and late appearing factors during bone regeneration, respectively, was shown in vitro to enhance osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. In the present study, the aim was to study the effectiveness of this delivery strategy in a rabbit iliac crest model. 3D plotted poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds were loaded with BMP carrying nanoparticles to achieve: (a) single BMP-2 or BMP-7 delivery, and (b) their combined delivery in a simultaneous or (c) sequential (biomimetic) fashion. After eight weeks of implantation, computed tomography and biomechanical tests showed better mineralized matrix formation and bone-implant union strength at the defect site in the case of sequential delivery compared to single or simultaneous delivery modes. Bone mineral density (BMD) and push-out stress were: 33.65±2.25 g cm(-3) and 14.5±2.28 MPa, respectively, and almost 2.5 fold higher in comparison to those without growth factors (BMD: 14.14±1.21 g cm(-3); PS: 6.59±0.65 MPa). This study, therefore, supports those obtained in vitro and emphasizes the importance of mimicking the natural timing of bioavailability of osteogenic factors in improving the regeneration of critical-sized bone defects.

  17. Using the Five-Factor Model of Personality To Enhance Career Development and Organizational Functioning in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Felissa K.; Johnston, Joseph A.; Dougherty, Thomas W.

    2000-01-01

    The Five-Factor Model measures emotional stability, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Key issues in its use in organizations include assessing motivation levels, identifying areas for training and development, and enhancing employee fit with work demands and relationships. (SK)

  18. A mechanistic hypothesis of the factors that enhance vulnerability to nicotine use in females.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Laura E; Torres, Oscar V

    2014-01-01

    Women are particularly more vulnerable to tobacco use than men. This review proposes a unifying hypothesis that females experience greater rewarding effects of nicotine and more intense stress produced by withdrawal than males. We also provide a neural framework whereby estrogen promotes greater rewarding effects of nicotine in females via enhanced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). During withdrawal, we suggest that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) stress systems are sensitized and promote a greater suppression of dopamine release in the NAcc of females versus males. Taken together, females display enhanced nicotine reward via estrogen and amplified effects of withdrawal via stress systems. Although this framework focuses on sex differences in adult rats, it is also applied to adolescent females who display enhanced rewarding effects of nicotine, but reduced effects of withdrawal from this drug. Since females experience strong rewarding effects of nicotine, a clinical implication of our hypothesis is that specific strategies to prevent smoking initiation among females are critical. Also, anxiolytic medications may be more effective in females that experience intense stress during withdrawal. Furthermore, medications that target withdrawal should not be applied in a unilateral manner across age and sex, given that nicotine withdrawal is lower during adolescence. This review highlights key factors that promote nicotine use in females, and future studies on sex-dependent interactions of stress and reward systems are needed to test our mechanistic hypotheses. Future studies in this area will have important translational value toward reducing health disparities produced by nicotine use in females. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  19. Linewidth enhancement factor dependence of the instability in semiconductor lasers with delayed feedback and its influence on the analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kenji; Umeda, Tokuo; Cho, Yoshio

    1994-06-01

    The instability enhancement due to the linewidth enhancement factor (α-parameter) in semiconductor lasers with delayed feedback on the regime IV are explained in terms of the laser emission suppression caused by the feedback field using the phasor representation. The discrepancy of the unstable condition due to the adiabatic-following approximation (AFA) is also examined.

  20. What Impedes or Enhances My Studying? The Interrelation between Approaches to Learning, Factors Influencing Study Progress and Earned Credits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailikari, Telle Katriina; Parpala, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how students' experiences of enhancing and impeding factors and approaches to learning are related to students' study progress. A total of 93 students from the Faculty of Arts and Humanities participated in the study by answering a Learn-questionnaire regarding their experiences of the enhancing and impeding…

  1. What Impedes or Enhances My Studying? The Interrelation between Approaches to Learning, Factors Influencing Study Progress and Earned Credits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailikari, Telle Katriina; Parpala, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how students' experiences of enhancing and impeding factors and approaches to learning are related to students' study progress. A total of 93 students from the Faculty of Arts and Humanities participated in the study by answering a Learn-questionnaire regarding their experiences of the enhancing and impeding…

  2. Enhanced angiogenesis in grafted skins by gene transfer of human hepatocyte growth factor using laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Obara, Minoru

    2007-02-01

    We delivered a therapeutic gene, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), to skin grafts of rats using laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) with the objective of enhancing their adhesion. The density and uniformity of neovascularities were enhanced significantly in the grafted skins that were transfected using LISWs, suggesting the efficacy of this method to improve the outcome of skin transplantation.

  3. Calving fluxes and basal melt rates of Antarctic ice shelves.

    PubMed

    Depoorter, M A; Bamber, J L; Griggs, J A; Lenaerts, J T M; Ligtenberg, S R M; van den Broeke, M R; Moholdt, G

    2013-10-03

    Iceberg calving has been assumed to be the dominant cause of mass loss for the Antarctic ice sheet, with previous estimates of the calving flux exceeding 2,000 gigatonnes per year. More recently, the importance of melting by the ocean has been demonstrated close to the grounding line and near the calving front. So far, however, no study has reliably quantified the calving flux and the basal mass balance (the balance between accretion and ablation at the ice-shelf base) for the whole of Antarctica. The distribution of fresh water in the Southern Ocean and its partitioning between the liquid and solid phases is therefore poorly constrained. Here we estimate the mass balance components for all ice shelves in Antarctica, using satellite measurements of calving flux and grounding-line flux, modelled ice-shelf snow accumulation rates and a regional scaling that accounts for unsurveyed areas. We obtain a total calving flux of 1,321 ± 144 gigatonnes per year and a total basal mass balance of -1,454 ± 174 gigatonnes per year. This means that about half of the ice-sheet surface mass gain is lost through oceanic erosion before reaching the ice front, and the calving flux is about 34 per cent less than previous estimates derived from iceberg tracking. In addition, the fraction of mass loss due to basal processes varies from about 10 to 90 per cent between ice shelves. We find a significant positive correlation between basal mass loss and surface elevation change for ice shelves experiencing surface lowering and enhanced discharge. We suggest that basal mass loss is a valuable metric for predicting future ice-shelf vulnerability to oceanic forcing.

  4. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Clamfication) Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever 𔃼 PERSONAL AjTHOR(S...FELD GROUP SUBGROUP Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever. 19...ABSTRAC7 (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Serum specimens~collected during a prospective study of dengue infections among

  5. Enhanced protective antibody to a mutant meningococcal factor H-binding protein with low-factor H binding

    PubMed Central

    Granoff, Dan M.; Giuntini, Serena; Gowans, Flor A.; Lujan, Eduardo; Sharkey, Kelsey; Beernink, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (FHbp) is an antigen in 2 serogroup B meningococcal vaccines. FHbp specifically binds human and some nonhuman primate complement FH. To investigate the effect of binding of FH to FHbp on protective antibody responses, we immunized infant rhesus macaques with either a control recombinant FHbp antigen that bound macaque FH or a mutant antigen with 2 amino acid substitutions and >250-fold lower affinity for FH. The mutant antigen elicited 3-fold higher serum IgG anti-FHbp titers and up to 15-fold higher serum bactericidal titers than the control FHbp vaccine. When comparing sera with similar IgG anti-FHbp titers, the antibodies elicited by the mutant antigen gave greater deposition of complement component C4b on live meningococci (classical complement pathway) and inhibited binding of FH, while the anti-FHbp antibodies elicited by the control vaccine enhanced FH binding. Thus, the mutant FHbp vaccine elicited an anti-FHbp antibody repertoire directed at FHbp epitopes within the FH binding site, which resulted in greater protective activity than the antibodies elicited by the control vaccine, which targeted FHbp epitopes outside of the FH combining site. Binding of a host protein to a vaccine antigen impairs protective antibody responses, which can be overcome with low-binding mutant antigens. PMID:27668287

  6. The influence of basal drag on ice flow across Antarctica and Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, Douglas; Lea, James

    2017-04-01

    Ice sheet stability is largely controlled by the sub-glacial ice-bed boundary, but this is currently one of Earth's least understood landscapes. Basal drag is the spatially emergent force that resists ice flow at this boundary. It is affected by roughness of the bed topography and interactions between subglacial hydrology and basal sediments. The behaviour of ice sheets depends on spatial patterns in basal drag, and consequently computer simulations of their dynamics are highly sensitive to how basal drag is prescribed or derived. This is a significant problem, since the derivation of basal drag is computationally expensive, often geographically limited, and poorly constrained by observations. Here, we present a novel, computationally-light method to determine the relative contribution of basal drag to ice sheet dynamics from surface velocity and elevation data without prior knowledge of ice thickness or bed conditions. We apply it across both the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets to reveal insights into basal drag at high resolution and over unprecedented spatial extents. We identify where ice sheet beds are conducive to ice flow but also locations which accommodate disproportionately high basal resistance thereby controlling non-local / regional ice dynamics. Results are substantiated by independent investigations in regions where evidence is available, and illuminate previously unidentified basal conditions where it is not. We anticipate that our method will provide improved observation-based estimates of basal friction coefficients that will enhance convergence speed and accuracy of 3D ice flow models and it will be a valuable tool for helping focus and plan future geophysical measurement campaigns within vast remaining regions of ice sheets with poorly constrained basal boundary conditions.

  7. Stem cell factor enhances the survival of murine intestinal stem cells after photon irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, B.R.; Khan, W.; Hancock, S.L.

    1995-04-01

    Recombinant rat stem cell factor (SCF) has been shown to decrease lethality in mice exposed to total-body irradiation (TBI) in the lower range of lethality through radioprotection of hematopoietic stem cells and acceleration of bone marrow repopulation. This study evaluates the effect of SCF on the survival of the intestinal mucosal stem cell after TBI. This non-hematopoietic cell is clinically relevant. Gastrointestinal toxicity is common during and after abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy and limits the radiation dose in these regions. As observed with bone marrow, the administration of SCF to mice prior to TBI enhanced the survival of mouse duodenal crypt stem cells. The maximum enhancement of survival was seen when 100 {mu}/kg of SCF was given intraperitoneally 8 h before irradiation. This regimen increased the survival of duodenal crypt stem cells after 12.0 Gy TBI from 22.5 {+-} 0.7 per duodenal cross section for controls to 30.0 {+-} 1.7 after treatment with SCF (P=0.03). The TBI dose producing 50% mortality of 6 days (LD{sub 50/6}) was increased from 14.9 Gy for control mice to 19.0 Gy for mice treated with SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF (dose modification factor = 1.28). These findings demonstrate that SCF has radioprotective effects on a non-hematopoietic stem cell population and suggest that SCF may be of clinical value in preventing radiation injury to the intestine. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Enhancement of placenta growth factor expression by oncostatin M in human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tu, Huang-Ju; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yung-Cheng; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Yang, Rong-Sen; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2013-05-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) belongs to IL-6 subfamily and is mostly produced by T lymphocytes. High levels of OSM are detected in the pannus of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and it may arouse the inflammation responses in joints and eventually leads to bone erosion. Placenta growth factor (PLGF) is an angiogenic factor and highly homologous with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It has been recently reported that PLGF is highly expressed in synovial tissue and enhances the production of proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-6. Here, we demonstrated that OSM increased mRNA and protein levels of PLGF in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in RA synovial fibroblasts. Inhibitors of JAK3 and PI3K antagonized OSM-induced production of PLGF. OSM enhanced the phosphorylation of Tyr705-STAT3, Ser727-STAT3, Ser473-Akt, and increased the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 time-dependently. Transfection of dominant negative Akt or application of PI3K inhibitorLY294002 significantly inhibited p-Tyr705-STAT3, p-Ser727-STAT3, and PLGF expression, indicating that Akt is involved in JAK3/STAT3/PLGF signaling cascade. To further examine whether STAT3 binds to the promoter region of PLGF, Chip assay was used and it was found that OSM could bind with PLGF promoter, which was inhibited by JAK3 and PI3K inhibitors. Accumulation of PLGF in the pannus may contribute to the inflammation, angiogenesis and joints destruction in RA patients. These findings demonstrated the important role of OSM in the pathology network of RA and provided novel therapeutic drug targets for RA treatment.

  9. Immunohistochemical expression of MYB in salivary gland basal cell adenocarcinoma and basal cell adenoma.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Sydney L; Robinson, Robert A

    2017-07-20

    Basal cell predominant salivary gland neoplasms can be difficult to separate histologically. One of the most aggressive of basaloid salivary gland neoplasms is adenoid cystic carcinoma. MYB expression by immunohistochemistry has been documented in adenoid cystic carcinoma. Some investigators have suggested that using this expression can help in establishing the diagnosis of adenoid cystic carcinoma. Utilizing tissue microarrays, we studied a group of basal cell adenocarcinomas and basal cell adenomas to determine: (i) whether either tumor expressed MYB and (ii) the frequency of any expression in either tumors. Seventeen salivary gland basal cell adenocarcinomas and 30 salivary gland basal cell adenomas were used to construct microarrays. These tissue microarrays were used to assess for immunohistochemical MYB expression. Fifty-three percent (nine of 17) of salivary gland basal cell adenocarcinomas and 57% (17 of 30) of salivary gland basal cell adenomas showed MYB overexpression. For comparison, we studied 11 adenoid cystic carcinomas for MYB expression and found that 64% (seven of 11) overexpressed MYB. We found no relation to clinical course for basal adenomas or basal cell adenocarcinomas that overexpressed MYB vs those that did not. MYB expression does not help separate basal cell adenocarcinomas from basal cell adenomas, and our data suggest it does not differentiate between either of these neoplasms and adenoid cystic carcinoma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The Basal Ganglia-Circa 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehler, William R.

    1981-01-01

    Our review has shown that recent studies with the new anterograde and retrograde axon transport methods have confirmed and extended our knowledge of the projection of the basal ganglia and clarified their sites of origin. They have thrown new light on certain topographic connectional relationships and revealed several new reciprocal connections between constituent nuclei of the basal ganglia. Similarly, attention has been drawn to the fact that there have also been many new histochemical techniques introduced in recent years that are now providing regional biochemical overlays for connectional maps of the central nervous system, especially regions in, or interconnecting with, the basal ganglia. However, although these new morphological biochemical maps are very complex and technically highly advanced, our understanding of the function controlled by the basal ganglia still remains primitive. The reader who is interested in some new ideas of the functional aspects of the basal ganglia is directed to Nauta's proposed conceptual reorganization of the basal ganglia telencephalon and to Marsden's more clinically orientated appraisal of the unsolved mysteries of the basal ganglia participation in the control of movement.

  11. Metastatic Basal cell carcinoma accompanying gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Yeliz; Gokce, Erkan; Ozturk, Banu; Deresoy, Faik Alev; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Yaman, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts), the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  12. The Krüppel-like Factor 15 as a Molecular Link between Myogenic Factors and a Chromosome 4q Transcriptional Enhancer Implicated in Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Petr; Petrov, Andrei; Ansseau, Eugenie; Stankevicins, Luiza; Charron, Sébastien; Kim, Elena; Bos, Tomas Jan; Robert, Thomas; Turki, Ahmed; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra; Lazar, Vladimir; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S.

    2011-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a dominant hereditary disease with a prevalence of 7 per 100,000 individuals, is associated with a partial deletion in the subtelomeric D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q. The D4Z4 repeat contains a strong transcriptional enhancer that activates promoters of several FSHD-related genes. We report here that the enhancer within the D4Z4 repeat binds the Krüppel-like factor KLF15. KLF15 was found to be up-regulated during myogenic differentiation induced by serum starvation or by overexpression of the myogenic differentiation factor MYOD. When overexpressed, KLF15 activated the D4Z4 enhancer and led to overexpression of DUX4c (Double homeobox 4, centromeric) and FRG2 (FSHD region gene 2) genes, whereas its silencing caused inactivation of the D4Z4 enhancer. In immortalized human myoblasts, the D4Z4 enhancer was activated by the myogenic factor MYOD, an effect that was abolished upon KLF15 silencing or when the KLF15-binding sites within the D4Z4 enhancer were mutated, indicating that the myogenesis-related activation of the D4Z4 enhancer was mediated by KLF15. KLF15 and several myogenesis-related factors were found to be expressed at higher levels in myoblasts, myotubes, and muscle biopsies from FSHD patients than in healthy controls. We propose that KLF15 serves as a molecular link between myogenic factors and the activity of the D4Z4 enhancer, and it thus contributes to the overexpression of the DUX4c and FRG2 genes during normal myogenic differentiation and in FSHD. PMID:21937448

  13. Thermoelectric power factor enhancement with gate-all-around silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, Benjamin M.; Bowers, John E.

    2014-04-14

    The thermoelectric properties of gate-all-around silicon nanowires (Si NWs) are calculated to determine the potential for significant power factor enhancement. The Boltzmann transport equation and relaxation time approximation are employed to develop an electron transport model used to determine the field-effect mobility, electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and power factor for Si NWs with cross-sectional areas between 4 nm × 4 nm and 12 nm × 12 nm and a range of gate biases. Electrical conductivity for the gated Si NWs was much higher than that of doped Si due to the lack of ionized impurities and correspondingly greater carrier mobility. A significant increase in electrical conductivity with decreasing Si NW cross-sectional area was also observed due to a large increase in the average carrier density. For all Si NWs, the Seebeck coefficient was lower than that of doped bulk Si due to the different energy dependence between ionized impurity and phonon-mediated scattering processes. This decrease was also confirmed with Seebeck coefficient measurements of multigated Si NWs and n-type Si thin-films. Quantum confinement was also found to increase the Seebeck coefficient for <8 nm × 8 nm Si NWs and also at high charge densities. A maximum power factor of 6.8 × 10{sup −3} W m{sup −1} K{sup −2} was calculated for the 6 nm × 6 nm Si NWs with typical Si/SiO{sub 2} interface roughness, which is 2–3 × those obtained experimentally for bulk Si. The power factor was also found to greatly depend on surface roughness, with a root-mean-square roughness of <0.8 nm necessary for power factor enhancement. An increase in ZT may also be possible if a low thermal conductivity can be obtained with minimal surface roughness.

  14. Enhancement of crop photosynthesis by diffuse light: quantifying the contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Heuvelink, E; Dueck, T A; Janse, J; Gort, G; Marcelis, L F M

    2014-07-01

    Plants use diffuse light more efficiently than direct light. However, experimental comparisons between diffuse and direct light have been obscured by co-occurring differences in environmental conditions (e.g. light intensity). This study aims to analyse the factors that contribute to an increase in crop photosynthesis in diffuse light and to quantify their relative contribution under different levels of diffuseness at similar light intensities. The hypothesis is that the enhancement of crop photosynthesis in diffuse light results not only from the direct effects of more uniform vertical and horizontal light distribution in the crop canopy, but also from crop physiological and morphological acclimation. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) crops were grown in three greenhouse compartments that were covered by glass with different degrees of light diffuseness (0, 45 and 71 % of the direct light being converted into diffuse light) while maintaining similar light transmission. Measurements of horizontal and vertical photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) distribution in the crop, leaf photosynthesis light response curves and leaf area index (LAI) were used to quantify each factor's contribution to an increase in crop photosynthesis in diffuse light. In addition, leaf temperature, photoinhibition, and leaf biochemical and anatomical properties were studied. The highest degree of light diffuseness (71 %) increased the calculated crop photosynthesis by 7·2 %. This effect was mainly attributed to a more uniform horizontal (33 % of the total effect) and vertical PPFD distribution (21 %) in the crop. In addition, plants acclimated to the high level of diffuseness by gaining a higher photosynthetic capacity of leaves in the middle of the crop and a higher LAI, which contributed 23 and 13 %, respectively, to the total increase in crop photosynthesis in diffuse light. Moreover, diffuse light resulted in lower leaf temperatures and less photoinhibition at the top of the canopy when

  15. Enhancement of crop photosynthesis by diffuse light: quantifying the contributing factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, T.; Heuvelink, E.; Dueck, T. A.; Janse, J.; Gort, G.; Marcelis, L. F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants use diffuse light more efficiently than direct light. However, experimental comparisons between diffuse and direct light have been obscured by co-occurring differences in environmental conditions (e.g. light intensity). This study aims to analyse the factors that contribute to an increase in crop photosynthesis in diffuse light and to quantify their relative contribution under different levels of diffuseness at similar light intensities. The hypothesis is that the enhancement of crop photosynthesis in diffuse light results not only from the direct effects of more uniform vertical and horizontal light distribution in the crop canopy, but also from crop physiological and morphological acclimation. Methods Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) crops were grown in three greenhouse compartments that were covered by glass with different degrees of light diffuseness (0, 45 and 71 % of the direct light being converted into diffuse light) while maintaining similar light transmission. Measurements of horizontal and vertical photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) distribution in the crop, leaf photosynthesis light response curves and leaf area index (LAI) were used to quantify each factor's contribution to an increase in crop photosynthesis in diffuse light. In addition, leaf temperature, photoinhibition, and leaf biochemical and anatomical properties were studied. Key Results The highest degree of light diffuseness (71 %) increased the calculated crop photosynthesis by 7·2 %. This effect was mainly attributed to a more uniform horizontal (33 % of the total effect) and vertical PPFD distribution (21 %) in the crop. In addition, plants acclimated to the high level of diffuseness by gaining a higher photosynthetic capacity of leaves in the middle of the crop and a higher LAI, which contributed 23 and 13 %, respectively, to the total increase in crop photosynthesis in diffuse light. Moreover, diffuse light resulted in lower leaf temperatures and less

  16. Basal Cell Carcinoma on the Sole: An Easily Missed Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hone, Natalie L.; Grandhi, Radhika; Ingraffea, Adam A.

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer, and solar ultraviolet ray exposure is the most significant risk factor for its development. The plantar foot is infrequently exposed to the sun, thus the presence of BCC on the sole is rare. We report a case of BCC on the sole of the foot and its treatment in the hope to facilitate its detection. PMID:27920679

  17. A broader consideration of human factor to enhance sustainable building design.

    PubMed

    Attaianese, Erminia

    2012-01-01

    The link between ergonomic/human factor and sustainability seems to be clearly evidenced mainly in relation to social dimension of sustainability, in order to contribute to assure corporate social responsibility and global value creation. But the will to establish an equilibrated connection among used resources in human activities, supported by the sustainability perspective, evidences that the contribution of ergonomics/human factors can be effectively enlarged to other aspects, especially in relation to building design. In fact a sustainable building is meant to be a building that contributes, through its characteristics and attribute, to a sustainable development by assuring, in the same time, a decrease of resources use and environmental impact and an increase of health, safety and comfort of the occupants. The purpose of this paper is to analyze in a broader sense the contribution of ergonomic/human factor to design of sustainable building, focusing how ergonomics principles, methodology and techniques can improve building design, enhancing its sustainability performance during all phases of building lifecycle.

  18. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Geetika S; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-11-30

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics.

  19. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  20. Security enhanced multi-factor biometric authentication scheme using bio-hash function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youngsook; Moon, Jongho

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of personal information and wireless communication technology, user authentication schemes have been crucial to ensure that wireless communications are secure. As such, various authentication schemes with multi-factor authentication have been proposed to improve the security of electronic communications. Multi-factor authentication involves the use of passwords, smart cards, and various biometrics to provide users with the utmost privacy and data protection. Cao and Ge analyzed various authentication schemes and found that Younghwa An’s scheme was susceptible to a replay attack where an adversary masquerades as a legal server and a user masquerading attack where user anonymity is not provided, allowing an adversary to execute a password change process by intercepting the user’s ID during login. Cao and Ge improved upon Younghwa An’s scheme, but various security problems remained. This study demonstrates that Cao and Ge’s scheme is susceptible to a biometric recognition error, slow wrong password detection, off-line password attack, user impersonation attack, ID guessing attack, a DoS attack, and that their scheme cannot provide session key agreement. Then, to address all weaknesses identified in Cao and Ge’s scheme, this study proposes a security enhanced multi-factor biometric authentication scheme and provides a security analysis and formal analysis using Burrows-Abadi-Needham logic. Finally, the efficiency analysis reveals that the proposed scheme can protect against several possible types of attacks with only a slightly high computational cost. PMID:28459867