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Sample records for factor ii receptors

  1. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  2. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF II) receptor from rat brain is of lower apparent molecular weight than the IGF II receptor from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    McElduff, A.; Poronnik, P.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    The binding subunits of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF I) receptors from rat brain are of lower molecular weight than the corresponding receptor in rat liver, possibly due to variations in sialic acid content. We have compared the IGF II receptor from rat brain and rat liver. The brain receptor is of smaller apparent mol wt (about 10 K) on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This size difference is independent of ligand binding as it persists in iodinated and specifically immunoprecipitated receptors. From studies of wheat germ agglutinin binding and the effect of neuraminidase on receptor mobility, we conclude that this difference is not simply due to variations in sialic acid content. Treatment with endoglycosidase F results in reduction in the molecular size of both liver and brain receptors and after this treatment the aglycoreceptors are of similar size. We conclude that in rat brain tissue the IGF II receptor like the binding subunits of the insulin and IGF I receptors is of lower molecular size than the corresponding receptors in rat liver. This difference is due to differences in N-linked glycosylation.

  3. Direct demonstration of rapid insulin-like growth factor II receptor internalization and recycling in rat adipocytes. Insulin stimulates SVI-insulin-like growth factor II degradation by modulating the IGF-II receptor recycling process

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Rozek, L.M.; Czech, M.P.

    1985-08-05

    The photoactive insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II analogue 4-azidobenzoyl- SVI-IGF-II was synthesized and used to label specifically and covalently the Mr = 250,000 Type II IGF receptor. When rat adipocytes are irradiated after a 10-min incubation with 4-azidobenzoyl- SVI-IGF-II at 10 degrees C and immediately homogenized, most of the labeled IGF-II receptors are associated with the plasma membrane fraction, indicating that receptors accessible to the labeling reagent at low temperature are on the cell surface. However, when the photolabeled cells are incubated at 37 degrees C for various times before homogenization, labeled IGF-II receptors are rapidly internalized with a half-time of 3.5 min as evidenced by a loss from the plasma membrane fraction and a concomitant appearance in the low density microsome fraction. The steady state level of cell surface IGF-II receptors in the presence or absence of IGF-II remains constant under these conditions, demonstrating that IGF-II receptors rapidly recycle back to the cell surface at the same rate as receptor internalization. Using the above methodology, it is shown that acute insulin action: 1) increases the steady state number of cell surface IGF-II receptors; 2) increases the number of ligand-bound IGF-II receptors that are internalized per unit of time; and 3) increases the rate of cellular SVI-IGF-II degradation by a process that is blocked by anti-IGF-II receptor antibody.

  4. CrkII signals from epidermal growth factor receptor to Ras.

    PubMed Central

    Kizaka-Kondoh, S; Matsuda, M; Okayama, H

    1996-01-01

    A rat fibroblast mutant defective in oncogenic transformation and signaling from epidermal growth factor receptor to Ras has been isolated. The mutant contains dominant negative-type point mutations in the C-terminal SH3 domain of one crkII gene. Among the adapters tested, the mutant is complemented only by crkII cDNA. Expression of the mutated crkII in parent cells generates the phenotype indistinguishable from the mutant cell. Yet overexpression or reduced expression of Grb2 in the mutant before and after complementation with crkII have little effect on its phenotype. We conclude that adapter molecules are highly specific and that the oncogenic growth signal from epidermal growth factor receptor to Ras is predominantly mediated by CrkII in rat fibroblast. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8901553

  5. Receptors for insulin-like growth factors I and II in rat gastrointestinal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Laburthe, M.; Rouyer-Ressard, C.; Gammeltoft, S. Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen )

    1988-03-01

    Distinct receptors for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been characterized in rat intestinal epithelium using {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-I and {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-II. In jejunal epithelial plasma membranes, IGF-I receptors were observed with a dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 7.2 nM and a binding capacity of 0.56 pmol/mg protein. Distinct IGF-II receptors were also found with a K{sub d} of 9.5 nM and a binding capacity of 2.61 pmol/mg protein. For IGF-I receptors the following order of affinity was observed: IGF-I > IGF-II > insulin > proinsulin. IGF-II receptors recognize IGF-II with a 20-fold higher affinity than IGF-I and display no cross-reactivity with insulin and proinsulin. Affinity labeling of intestinal membranes also discriminates between the two types of receptors, revealing a radioligand-receptor complex of relative molecular weight (M{sub r}) 130,000 using {sup 125}I-IGF-I and 250,000 for {sup 125}I-IGF-II under reducing conditions. Separation of proliferative crypt cells from mature villus cells in the small intestine makes it possible to show that a gradient of IGF receptors is present along the crypt-villus axis. {sup 125}I-IGF-I and {sup 125}I-IGF-II binding is 4.0- and 1.8-fold higher in crypt cells than in villus cells, respectively. Specific {sup 125}I-IGF binding is detectable throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The level of IGF binding is similar in stomach, small intestine, and cecum, but higher values are observed in colon.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor II receptor is phosphorylated by a tyrosine kinase in adipocyte plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Corvera, S.; Whitehead, R.E.; Mottola, C.; Czech, M.P.

    1986-06-15

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P from (gamma-32P)ATP into tyrosine residues of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II receptor was observed in a Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of rat adipocyte plasma membranes. IGF-II receptor phosphorylation proceeded to a stoichiometry of approximately 0.5 mol of phosphate/IGF-II binding site after 10 min of incubation at 4 degrees C. A Km for ATP of 6 microM was calculated for this phosphorylation reaction. Addition of IGF-II caused an approximately 2-fold increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of the IGF-II receptor in this preparation. In contrast, phosphorylation of angiotensin II by the Triton X-100 washed membranes was not stimulated by IGF-II. Incubation of purified receptor immobilized on IGF-II agarose or of receptor-enriched low density microsomal membranes with (gamma-32P)ATP did not result in appreciable incorporation of (/sup 32/P)phosphate into the IGF-II receptor nor into exogenous substrates. These data suggest that the IGF-II receptor is not a tyrosine protein kinase capable of autophosphorylation but that it is a substrate for a tyrosine protein kinase endogenous to the adipocyte plasma membrane. The stimulatory effect of IGF-II on the tyrosine phosphorylation of its receptor may be due to a conformational change which converts the receptor to a better substrate for this tyrosine kinase.

  7. Mapping of the insulin-like growth factor II binding site of the Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Heidi; Whittaker, Linda; Hinrichsen, Jane; Groth, Andreas; Whittaker, Jonathan

    2004-05-07

    The Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor is a physiological receptor for insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). To characterize the molecular basis of the receptor's ligand binding properties, we have examined the effects of alanine mutations of residues in the ligand binding site of the receptor on its affinity for IGF-II. The functional epitope for IGF-II comprises residues in the N-terminal L1 domain and residues at the C-terminus of the alpha subunit. Cysteine rich domain residues do not appear to be critical for IGF-II binding.

  8. Proteinuria, a modifiable risk factor: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).

    PubMed

    Dykeman-Sharpe, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Microalbuminuria and proteinuria have been determined to be modifiable risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease as well as risk factors for cardiovascular events. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers have been demonstrated to decrease proteinuria at all stages and slow the progression of renal disease. Proteinuria can be used as a marker of successful treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease in combination with other established targets. This article discusses the various diagnostic tests used for the detection of microalbuminuria and proteinuria and appropriate pharmaceutical treatment.

  9. Understanding the Mechanism of Insulin and Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF) Receptor Activation by IGF-II

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; Ong, Shee Chee; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Forbes, Briony E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) promotes cell proliferation and survival and plays an important role in normal fetal development and placental function. IGF-II binds both the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) and insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) with high affinity. Interestingly both IGF-II and the IR-A are often upregulated in cancer and IGF-II acts via both receptors to promote cancer proliferation. There is relatively little known about the mechanism of ligand induced activation of the insulin (IR) and IGF-1R. The recently solved IR structure reveals a folded over dimer with two potential ligand binding pockets arising from residues on each receptor half. Site-directed mutagenesis has mapped receptor residues important for ligand binding to two separate sites within the ligand binding pocket and we have recently shown that the IGFs have two separate binding surfaces which interact with the receptor sites 1 and 2. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we describe a series of partial IGF-1R and IR agonists generated by mutating Glu12 of IGF-II. By comparing receptor binding affinities, abilities to induce negative cooperativity and potencies in receptor activation, we provide evidence that residue Glu12 bridges the two receptor halves leading to receptor activation. Conclusions/Significance This study provides novel insight into the mechanism of receptor binding and activation by IGF-II, which may be important for the future development of inhibitors of its action for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22140443

  10. Truncated forms of the insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)/mannose 6-phosphate receptor encompassing the IGF-II binding site: characterization of a point mutation that abolishes IGF-II binding.

    PubMed

    Garmroudi, F; Devi, G; Slentz, D H; Schaffer, B S; MacDonald, R G

    1996-06-01

    Complete understanding of the functional significance of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) binding by the IGF-II/mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P) receptor requires mapping and ultimately mutational analysis of the receptor's IGF-II binding domain. Recent advances have localized the IGF-II binding site to extracytoplasmic repeats 10-11. To improve resolution of the binding site map, a nested set of epitope-tagged, truncated forms of the human IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. The IGF-II binding properties of truncated receptors immunoprecipitated from cell lysates and conditioned media were determined by affinity cross-linking. From the largest truncated receptor, encompassing extracytoplasmic repeats 8-11 (M(r) 68 K), through the smallest, comprised primarily of repeat 11 (M(r) 23 K), all were able to bind and cross-link to IGF-II. As a group, the truncated receptors had similar affinities for IGF-II, but with relative binding affinities 5-to 10-fold lower than those of full-length receptors. A point mutation substituting threonine for isoleucine at residue 1572, located in the NH2-terminal half of repeat 11, completely abolished IGF-II binding. We conclude that repeat 11 of the IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor's extracytoplasmic domain contains the minimal elements required for binding and cross-linking to IGF-II, and that lle1572 and other residues within the NH2-terminal half of repeat 11 are particularly important for IGF-II interaction.

  11. [Gene expression of transforming growth factor beta receptor II in the epidermis of pathological scar].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Rui; An, Gang; Liu, Shun-Li; Wei, Feng-Cai

    2012-08-01

    To study the gene expression of transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TbetaR II) in pathological scar. Twenty samples of pathological scar were collected from 20 burn or trauma patients hospitalized in the General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Command from 2007 to 2009. Twenty specimens of epidermal layer were obtained from the middle portion and the edge of pathological scars. Twenty normal skin specimens which were located more than 10 cm away from the lesion sites of 20 patients were collected as self-controls. Serum from 1-2 mL whole blood were obtained from each of the 20 patients for second self-control. Eight normal skin specimens from 8 patients without pathological scar, discarded from un-related operations, were also collected as negative-control. Positive expressions of TbetaR II in three different skin specimens were determined with biotin-streptavidin-peroxidase staining. Gene expressions of TbetaR II in all specimens were compared with PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and gene sequencing. Data were processed with Fisher's exact test. Positive expression of TbetaR II in pathological scar epidermis was lower than that in normal skin specimen of patients with pathological scar or normal skin specimen of patients without pathological scar, and TbetaR II was mainly located in the basal layer of epidermis. Positive expressions of TbetaR II were seldom found in acanthocytes, granular cells, and cuticle or even non-existing. No abnormality of TbetaR II was found in normal skin epidermis or serum samples of pathological scar patients or normal skin epidermis of patients without pathological scar. TbetaR II expressing in 8 specimens of epidermis of pathological scar showed abnormal electrophoresis pattern at poly A fragments hand and loss of one A base in DNA fragment (P = 0.044). There may he abnormal gene expression of TbetaR II in pathological scar epidermis. Replantation of epidermis of scar may increase the risk of scar recurrence

  12. The mouse insulin-like growth factor II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (IGF-II/MPR) receptor gene: Molecular cloning and genomic organization

    SciTech Connect

    Szebenyi, G.; Rotwein, P. )

    1994-01-01

    The mammalian insulin-like growth factor III/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (IGF-II/MPR) is a multifunctional protein that binds both IGF-II and ligands containing a mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker through distinct high-affinity sites. This receptor plays an integral part in lysosomal enzyme transport, has a potential role in growth factor maturation and clearance, and may mediate IGF-II-activated signal transduction through a G-protein-coupled mechanism. Recent studies have shown that production of IGF-II/MPR mRNA and protein begins in the mouse embryo soon after fertilization and have demonstrated that the receptor gene is on mouse chromosome 17 and is maternally imprinted. In this paper, the authors report the cloning and characterization of the mouse IGF-II/MPR gene. The gene is 93 kb long, is composed of 48 exons, and codes for a predicted protein of 2482 amino acids. The extracellular part of the receptor is encoded by exons 1-46, with each of 15 related repeating motifs being determined by parts of 3-5 exons. A single fibronectin type II-like element is found in exon 39. The transmembrane portion of the receptor also is encoded by exon 46, and the cytoplasmic region by exons 46-48. The positions of exon-intron splice junctions are conserved between several of the repeats in the IGF-II/MPR and the homologous extracellular region of the gene for the other known lysosomal sorting receptor, the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. The gene duplications that gave rise to the modern IGF-II/MPR probably occurred before the divergence of mammals, since there is more extensive protein sequence conservation between receptors from different species than between any pair of repeating motifs within a single receptor. 55 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Functional cross-talk between angiotensin II and epidermal growth factor receptors in NIH3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    De Paolis, Paola; Porcellini, Antonio; Savoia, Carmine; Lombardi, Alessia; Gigante, Bruna; Frati, Giacomo; Rubattu, Speranza; Musumeci, Beatrice; Volpe, Massimo

    2002-04-01

    The main angiotensin (Ang) II subtype receptors (AT1R and AT2R) are involved in cellular growth processes and exert functionally antagonistic effects. To characterize the mechanisms by which Ang II receptors influence growth, by investigating the interactions between Ang II subtype receptors and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation. The experiments were performed using a mouse fibroblast cell line, NIH3T3, by transient co-transfection with rat AT1R or AT2R expression vectors, or both. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation was analysed by western blot and the ERK activity was evaluated using PathDetect, an in-vivo signal transduction pathway trans-reporting system. Selective Ang II receptor antagonists (losartan for AT1R and PD123319 for AT2R) were used to investigate the contributions of each receptor to the response observed. Our data show that, in this cellular model, both Ang II receptors phosphorylate ERK1/2. However, in the cells expressing AT1R, the EGF-induced MAPK pathway was enhanced in the presence of Ang II in a synergistic fashion. In contrast, a reduction of EGF-induced MAPK activation was observed in the cells expressing AT2R. In cells expressing both Ang II subtype receptors, Ang II promoted an enhancement of EGF-induced MAPK activation. However, in the presence of the AT1R antagonist, losartan, the effect of EGF was reduced. These data indicate the existence of an opposite cross-talk of AT1R and AT2R with EGF receptors, and suggest a complex functional interaction between these pathways in the regulation of cellular growth processes.

  14. Signaling activity of transforming growth factor beta type II receptors lacking specific domains in the cytoplasmic region.

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, R; Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Massagué, J

    1993-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) type II receptor (T beta R-II) is a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase that contains two inserts in the kinase region and a serine/threonine-rich C-terminal extension. T beta R-II is required for TGF-beta binding to the type I receptor, with which it forms a heteromeric receptor complex, and its kinase activity is required for signaling by this complex. We investigated the role of various cytoplasmic regions in T beta R-II by altering or deleting these regions and determining the signaling activity of the resulting products in cell lines made resistant to TGF-beta by inactivation of the endogenous T beta R-II. TGF-beta binding to receptor I and responsiveness to TGF-beta in these cells can be restored by transfection of wild-type T beta R-II. Using this system, we show that the kinase insert 1 and the C-terminal tail of T beta R-II, in contrast to the corresponding regions in most tyrosine kinase receptors, are not essential to specify ligand-induced responses. Insert 2 is necessary to support the catalytic activity of the receptor kinase, and its deletion yields a receptor that is unable to mediate any of the responses tested. However, substitution of this insert with insert 2 from the activin receptor, ActR-IIB, does not diminish the ability of T beta R-II to elicit these responses. A truncated T beta R-II lacking the cytoplasmic domain still binds TGF-beta, supports ligand binding to receptor I, and forms a complex with this receptor. However, TGF-beta binding to receptor I facilitated by this truncated T beta R-II fails to inhibit cell proliferation, activate extracellular matrix protein production, or activate transcription from a promoter containing TGF-beta-responsive elements. We conclude that the transcriptional and antiproliferative responses to TGF-beta require both components of a heteromeric receptor complex that differs from tyrosine kinase receptors in its mode of signaling. Images PMID:8246946

  15. Dysfunctional Transforming Growth FactorReceptor II Accelerates Prostate Tumorigenesis in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Hong; Collazo, Joanne; Jones, Elisabeth; Gayheart, Dustin; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Vogt, Adam; Mitchell, Bonnie; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of a dysfunctional TGF-β type II receptor (TGFβRII) to prostate cancer initiation and progression was investigated in an in vivo mouse model. Transgenic mice harboring the dominant-negative mutant TGF-β type II receptor (DNTGFβRII) in mouse epithelial cell were crossed with the TRAMP prostate cancer transgenic mouse to characterize the in vivo consequences of inactivated TGF-β signaling on prostate tumor initiation and progression. Histopathological diagnosis of prostate specimens from the TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII double transgenic mice, revealed the appearance of early malignant changes and subsequently highly aggressive prostate tumors at a younger age, compared to littermates TRAMP+/Wt TGFβRII mice. Immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis revealed significantly increased proliferative and apoptotic activities, as well as vascularity and macrophage infiltration that correlated with an elevated VEGF and MCP-1 protein levels in prostates from TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII+ mice. An epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-effect was also detected in prostates of TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice, as documented by the loss of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and β-catenin) and upregulation of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin) and EMT-transcription factor Snail. A significant increase in the androgen receptor (AR) mRNA and protein levels was associated with the early onset of prostate tumorigenesis in TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice. Our results indicate that in vivo disruption of TGF-β signaling accelerates the pathological malignant changes in the prostate by altering the kinetics of prostate growth and inducing EMT. The study also suggests that a dysfunctional TGFβRII augments AR expression and promotes inflammation in early stage tumor growth thus conferring a significant contribution by TGF-β to prostate cancer progression. PMID:19738062

  16. Receptors for insulin-like growth factors I and II: autoradiographic localization in rat brain and comparison to receptors for insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Lesniak, M.A.; Hill, J.M.; Kiess, W.; Rojeski, M.; Pert, C.B.; Roth, J.

    1988-10-01

    Receptors for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in rat brain were visualized using autoradiography with (125I)IGF-I. The binding of the labeled peptide was competed for fully by high concentrations of unlabeled IGF-I. At intermediate concentrations of unlabeled peptide the binding of (125I)IGF-I was competed for by unlabeled IGF-I more effectively than by IGF-II or insulin, which is typical of receptors for IGF-I. Essentially every brain section shows specific binding of IGF-I, and the pattern of binding of IGF-I to its receptors correlated well with the cytoarchitectonic structures. In parallel studies we showed that (125I)IGF-II was bound to tissue sections of rat brain and that the binding was competed for by an excess of unlabeled IGF-II. However, intermediate concentrations of unlabeled peptides gave inconclusive results. To confirm that the binding of (125I)IGF-II was to IGF-II receptors, we showed that antibodies specific for the IGF-II receptor inhibited the binding of labeled IGF-II. Furthermore, the binding of the antibody to regions of the brain section, visualized by the application of (125I)protein-A, gave patterns indistinguishable from those obtained with (125I)IGF-II alone. Again, the binding was very widely distributed throughout the central nervous system, and the patterns of distribution corresponded well to the underlying neural structures. Densitometric analysis of the receptors enabled us to compare the distribution of IGF-I receptors with that of IGF-II receptors as well as retrospectively with that of insulin receptors.

  17. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor II; recognition sites for receptors and binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Terasawa, H; Kohda, D; Hatanaka, H; Nagata, K; Higashihashi, N; Fujiwara, H; Sakano, K; Inagaki, F

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human insulin-like growth factor II was determined at high resolution in aqueous solution by NMR and simulated annealing based calculations. The structure is quite similar to those of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I, which consists of an alpha-helix followed by a turn and a strand in the B-region and two antiparallel alpha-helices in the A-region. However, the regions of Ala1-Glu6, Pro31-Arg40 and Thr62-Glu67 are not well-defined for lack of distance constraints, possibly due to motional flexibility. Based on the resultant structure and the results of structure-activity relationships, we propose the interaction sites of insulin-like growth factor II with the type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptor and the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. These sites partially overlap with each other at the opposite side of the putative binding surface to the insulin receptor and the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor. We also discuss the interaction modes of insulin-like growth factor II with the insulin receptor and the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor. Images PMID:7527339

  18. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... side effects include: Dizziness Elevated blood potassium level (hyperkalemia) Localized swelling of tissues (angioedema) There have been ... 31, 2016. Townsend RR. Major side effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers. http://www.uptodate. ...

  19. Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Decreases Transforming Growth Factor-β Type II Receptor Expression and Function in Human Renal Proximal Tubule Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-Lin; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), via its receptors, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and plays an important role in the development of renal tubulointersitial fibrosis. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R), which mediates beneficial renal physiological functions, has received attention as a prospective therapeutic target for renoprotection. In this study, we investigated the effect and underlying mechanism of AT2R on the TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) expression and function in human proximal tubular cells (HK-2). Here, we show that the AT2R agonist CGP42112A decreased TGF-βRII protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in HK-2 cells. The inhibitory effect of the AT2R on TGF-βRII expression was blocked by the AT2R antagonists PD123319 or PD123177. Stimulation with TGF-β1 enhanced EMT in HK-2 cells, which was prevented by pre-treatment with CGP42112A. One of mechanisms in this regulation is associated with the increased TGF-βRII degradation after activation of AT2R. Furthermore, laser confocal immunofluorescence microscopy showed that AT2R and TGF-βRII colocalized in HK-2 cells. AT2R and TGF-βRII coimmunoprecipitated and this interaction was increased after AT2R agonist stimulation for 30 min. The inhibitory effect of the AT2R on TGF-βRII expression was also blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, indicating that nitric oxide is involved in the signaling pathway. Taken together, our study indicates that the renal AT2R regulates TGF-βRII expression and function via the nitric oxide pathway, which may be important in the control of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

  20. Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Mimicking as Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor II Mutation.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Rana O; Dhillon, Baltej Singh; Sandhu, Harleen K; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Estrera, Anthony L; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We report successful endovascular repair of a left vertebral artery aneurysm in a patient with transforming growth factor beta receptor II mutation. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left subclavian artery aneurysm on computed tomography angiography. The patient consented to publication of this report.

  1. Autoradiographic visualization of insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kerchner, G.A.; Clemens, J.A.; Smith, M.C.

    1986-03-01

    The documented presence of IGF-II in brain and CSF prompted us to investigate the distribution of receptors for IGF-II in rat brain slices. Human /sup 125/-I-IGF-II (10 pM) was incubated for 16 hrs at 4/sup 0/C with slide-mounted rat brain slices in the absence and presence of unlabeled human IGF-II (67 nM) or human insulin (86 nM). Slides were washed, dried, and exposed to X-ray film for 4-7 days. The results showed dense labeling in the granular layers of the olfactory bulbs, deep layers of the cerebral cortex, pineal gland, anterior pituitary, hippocampus (pyramidal cells CA/sub 1/-CA/sub 2/ and dentate gyrus), and the granule cell layers of the cerebellum. Unlabeled IGF-II eliminated most of the binding of these brain regions while insulin produced only a minimal reduction in the amount of /sup 125/I-IGF-II bound. These results indicate that a specific neural receptor for IGS-II is uniquely distributed in rat brain tissue and supports the notion that this peptide might play an important role in normal neuronal functioning.

  2. Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor II Differentially Regulate Endocytic Sorting and Stability of Insulin Receptor Isoform A*

    PubMed Central

    Morcavallo, Alaide; Genua, Marco; Palummo, Angela; Kletvikova, Emilia; Jiracek, Jiri; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Belfiore, Antonino; Morrione, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) binds both insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II, although the affinity for IGF-II is 3–10-fold lower than insulin depending on a cell and tissue context. Notably, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the IGF-IR and expressing solely the IR-A (R−/IR-A), IGF-II is a more potent mitogen than insulin. As receptor endocytosis and degradation provide spatial and temporal regulation of signaling events, we hypothesized that insulin and IGF-II could affect IR-A biological responses by differentially regulating IR-A trafficking. Using R−/IR-A cells, we discovered that insulin evoked significant IR-A internalization, a process modestly affected by IGF-II. However, the differential internalization was not due to IR-A ubiquitination. Notably, prolonged stimulation of R−/IR-A cells with insulin, but not with IGF-II, targeted the receptor to a degradative pathway. Similarly, the docking protein insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) was down-regulated after prolonged insulin but not IGF-II exposure. Similar results were also obtained in experiments using [NMeTyrB26]-insulin, an insulin analog with IR-A binding affinity similar to IGF-II. Finally, we discovered that IR-A was internalized through clathrin-dependent and -independent pathways, which differentially regulated the activation of downstream effectors. Collectively, our results suggest that a lower affinity of IGF-II for the IR-A promotes lower IR-A phosphorylation and activation of early downstream effectors vis à vis insulin but may protect IR-A and IRS-1 from down-regulation thereby evoking sustained and robust mitogenic stimuli. PMID:22318726

  3. Probing Receptor Specificity by Sampling the Conformational Space of the Insulin-like Growth Factor II C-domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hexnerová, Rozálie; Křížková, Květoslava; Fábry, Milan; Sieglová, Irena; Kedrová, Kateřina; Collinsová, Michaela; Ullrichová, Pavlína; Srb, Pavel; Williams, Christopher; Crump, Matthew P.; Tošner, Zdeněk; Jiráček, Jiří; Veverka, Václav; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II are closely related protein hormones. Their distinct evolution has resulted in different yet overlapping biological functions with insulin becoming a key regulator of metabolism, whereas insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I/II are major growth factors. Insulin and IGFs cross-bind with different affinities to closely related insulin receptor isoforms A and B (IR-A and IR-B) and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-1R). Identification of structural determinants in IGFs and insulin that trigger their specific signaling pathways is of increasing importance in designing receptor-specific analogs with potential therapeutic applications. Here, we developed a straightforward protocol for production of recombinant IGF-II and prepared six IGF-II analogs with IGF-I-like mutations. All modified molecules exhibit significantly reduced affinity toward IR-A, particularly the analogs with a Pro-Gln insertion in the C-domain. Moreover, one of the analogs has enhanced binding affinity for IGF-1R due to a synergistic effect of the Pro-Gln insertion and S29N point mutation. Consequently, this analog has almost a 10-fold higher IGF-1R/IR-A binding specificity in comparison with native IGF-II. The established IGF-II purification protocol allowed for cost-effective isotope labeling required for a detailed NMR structural characterization of IGF-II analogs that revealed a link between the altered binding behavior of selected analogs and conformational rearrangement of their C-domains. PMID:27510031

  4. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor II receptors by growth hormone and insulin in rat adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Loennroth, P.; Assmundsson, K.; Eden, S.; Enberg, G.; Gause, I.; Hall, K.; Smith, U.

    1987-06-01

    The acute and long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) on the binding of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) were evaluated in adipose cells from hypophysectomized rats given replacement therapy with thyroxine and hydrocortisone and in cells from their sham-operated littermates. After the cells were incubated with insulin and/or GH, the recycling of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-II receptors was metabolically inhibited by treating the cells with KCN. IGF-II binding was 100 +/- 20% higher in cells from GH-deficient animals when compared with sham-operated controls. These GH-deficient cells also showed an increased sensitivity for insulin as compared with control cells (the EC/sub 50/ for insulin was 0.06 ng/ml in GH-deficient cells and 0.3 ng/ml in control cells.). However, the maximal incremental effect of insulin on IGH-II binding was reduced approx. = 27% by hypophysectomy. GH added to the incubation medium increased the number of IGF-II binding sites by 100 +/- 18% in cells from hypophysectomized animals. This increase was rapidly induced, but the time course was slower than that for the stimulatory effect of insulin. Half-maximal effect of GH on IGF-II binding was obtained at approx. = 30 ng/ml. Thus, GH added in vitro exerted a rapid insulin-like effect on the number of IGH-II receptors. GH also appears to play a regulating role for maintaining the cellular number of IGH-II receptors and, in addition, modulates the stimulatory effect of insulin on IGF-II binding.

  5. The kangaroo cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor binds insulin-like growth factor II with low affinity.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Dunbar, A J; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-09-17

    The mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) binds mannose 6-phosphate-bearing glycoproteins and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II. However, the CI-MPR from the opossum has been reported to bind bovine IGF-II with low affinity (Dahms, N. M., Brzycki-Wessell, M. A., Ramanujam, K. S., and Seetharam, B. (1993) Endocrinology 133, 440-446). This may reflect the use of a heterologous ligand, or it may represent the intrinsic binding affinity of this receptor. To examine the binding of IGF-II to a marsupial CI-MPR in a homologous system, we have previously purified kangaroo IGF-II (Yandell, C. A., Francis, G. L., Wheldrake, J. F., and Upton, Z. (1998) J. Endocrinol. 156, 195-204), and we now report the purification and characterization of the CI-MPR from kangaroo liver. The interaction of the kangaroo CI-MPR with IGF-II has been examined by ligand blotting, radioreceptor assay, and real-time biomolecular interaction analysis. Using both a heterologous and homologous approach, we have demonstrated that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a lower binding affinity for IGF-II than its eutherian (placental mammal) counterparts. Furthermore, real-time biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a higher affinity for kangaroo IGF-II than for human IGF-II. The cDNA sequence of the kangaroo CI-MPR indicates that there is considerable divergence in the area corresponding to the IGF-II binding site of the eutherian receptor. Thus, the acquisition of a high-affinity binding site for regulating IGF-II appears to be a recent event specific to the eutherian lineage.

  6. Experimental diabetes increases insulin-like growth factor I and II receptor concentration and gene expression in kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, H.; Shen-Orr, Z.; Stannard, B.; Burguera, B.; Roberts, C.T. Jr.; LeRoith, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) is a mitogenic hormone with important regulatory roles in growth and development. One of the target organs for IGF-I action is the kidney, which synthesizes abundant IGF-I receptors and IGF-I itself. To study the involvement of IGF-I and the IGF-I receptor in the development of nephropathy, one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus, we measured the expression of these genes in the kidney and in other tissues of the streptozocin-induced diabetic rat. The binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I to crude membranes was measured in the same tissues. We observed a 2.5-fold increase in the steady-state level of IGF-I-receptor mRNA in the diabetic kidney, which was accompanied by a 2.3-fold increase in IGF-I binding. In addition to this increase in IGF-I binding to the IGF-I receptor, there was also binding to a lower-molecular-weight material that may represent an IGF-binding protein. No change was detected in the level of IGF-I-peptide mRNA. Similarly, IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-II binding were significantly increased in the diabetic kidney. IGF-I- and IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-I and IGF-II binding returned to control values after insulin treatment. Because the IGF-I receptor is able to transduce mitogenic signals on activation of its tyrosine kinase domain, we hypothesize that, among other factors, high levels of receptor in the diabetic kidney may also be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Increased IGF-II-receptor expression in the diabetic kidney may be important for the intracellular transport and packaging of lysosomal enzymes, although a role for this receptor in signal transduction cannot be excluded. Finally, the possible role of IGF-binding proteins requires further study.

  7. The Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter-Transcription Factor II Negatively Regulates the Transactivation of Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chin-Hee; Lee, Hyun Joo; Park, Eunsook; Lee, Keesook

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is involved in the development and progression of prostate cancers. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs remain incompletely understood. In previous reports, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TF II) has been suggested to play a role in the development of cancers. In the present study, we explored a putative role of COUP-TF II in prostate cancers by investigating its effect on cell proliferation and a cross-talk between COUP-TF II and AR. Overexpression of COUP-TF II results in the inhibition of androgen-dependent proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Further studies show that COUP-TF II functions as a corepressor of AR. It represses AR transactivation on target promoters containing the androgen response element (ARE) in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, COUP-TF II interacts physically with AR in vitro and in vivo. It binds to both the DNA binding domain (DBD) and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR and disrupts the N/C terminal interaction of AR. Furthermore, COUP-TF II competes with coactivators such as ARA70, SRC-1, and GRIP1 to modulate AR transactivation as well as inhibiting the recruitment of AR to its ARE-containing target promoter. Taken together, our findings suggest that COUP-TF II is a novel corepressor of AR, and provide an insight into the role of COUP-TF II in prostate cancers. PMID:23145053

  8. Polymorphism in the tumour necrosis factor receptor II gene is associated with circulating levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Glossop, John R; Dawes, Peter T; Nixon, Nicola B; Mattey, Derek L

    2005-01-01

    Levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors (sTNFRs) are elevated in the circulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although these receptors can act as natural inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor-α, levels of sTNFRs in RA appear to be insufficient to prevent tumour necrosis factor-α induced inflammation. The factors that regulate circulating levels of sTNFRs are unclear, but polymorphisms in the tumour necrosis factor receptor genes may play a role. We investigated the relationship between polymorphisms in the tumour necrosis factor receptor I (TNF-RI) and II (TNF-RII) genes and levels of sTNFRs in two groups of Caucasian RA patients: one with early (disease duration ≤2 years; n = 103) and one with established disease (disease duration ≥5 years; n = 151). PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to genotype patients for the A36G polymorphism in the TNF-RI gene and the T676G polymorphism in TNF-RII. Levels of sTNFRs were measured using ELISA. We also isolated T cells from peripheral blood of 58 patients with established RA with known TNF-R genotypes, and release of sTNFRs into the culture medium was measured in cells incubated with or without phytohaemagglutinin. Serum levels of the two sTNFRs (sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII) were positively correlated in both populations, and the level of each sTNFR was significantly higher in the patients with established disease (P < 0.0001). Multiple regression analyses corrected for age, sex and disease duration revealed a significant trend toward decreasing sTNF-RI and sTNF-RII levels across the TNF-RII genotypes (TT > TG > GG) of patients with established disease (P for trend = 0.01 and P for trend = 0.03, respectively). A similar nonsignificant trend was seen for early disease. No relationship with the TNF-RI A36G polymorphism was observed. sTNFRs released by isolated T cells exhibited a similar trend toward decreasing levels according to TNF-RII genotype, although only the association

  9. Add-on angiotensin II receptor blockade lowers urinary transforming growth factor-beta levels.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Siva, Senthuran; Dunn, Stephen R; Sharma, Kumar

    2002-03-01

    Progression of renal failure, despite renoprotection with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in patients with proteinuric nephropathies, may be caused by persistent renal production of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) through the angiotensin II subtype 1 (AT1) receptors. We tested the hypothesis that AT1-receptor blocker therapy added to a background of chronic maximal ACE inhibitor therapy will result in a reduction in urinary TGF-beta1 levels in such patients. Sixteen patients completed a two-period, crossover, randomized, controlled trial, details of which have been previously reported. All patients were administered lisinopril, 40 mg/d, with either losartan, 50 mg/d, or placebo. Blood pressure (BP) was measured using a 24-hour ambulatory BP monitor. Overnight specimens of urine were analyzed for urine TGF-beta1, protein, and creatinine concentrations. Mean age of the study population was 53 +/- 9 (SD) years; body mass index, 38 +/- 5.7 kg/m2; seated BP, 156 +/- 18/88 +/- 12 mm Hg; and urine protein excretion, 3.6 +/- 0.71 g/g of creatinine. Twelve patients had diabetic nephropathy, and the remainder had chronic glomerulonephritis. At baseline, urinary TGF-beta1 levels were significantly increased in the study population compared with healthy controls (13.2 +/- 1.2 versus 1.7 +/- 1.1 ng/g creatinine; P < 0.001). There was a strong correlation between baseline urine protein excretion and urinary TGF-beta1 level (r2 = 0.53; P = 0.001), as well as systolic BP and urinary TGF-beta1 level (r2 = 0.57; P < 0.001). After 4 weeks of add-on losartan therapy, there was a 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16% to 55%) decline in urinary TGF-beta1 levels (13.3 [95% CI, 11.4 to 15.5] to 8.2 pg/mg creatinine [95% CI, 6.2 to 10.7]). The reduction in urinary TGF-beta1 levels occurred independent of changes in mean urinary protein excretion or BP. Thus, proteinuric patients with renal failure, despite maximal ACE inhibition, had increased urinary levels of

  10. A Novel Approach to Identify Two Distinct Receptor Binding Surfaces of Insulin-like Growth Factor II*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Ong, Shee Chee; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Forbes, Briony E.

    2009-01-01

    Very little is known about the residues important for the interaction of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) with the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) and the insulin receptor (IR). Insulin, to which IGF-II is homologous, is proposed to cross-link opposite halves of the IR dimer through two receptor binding surfaces, site 1 and site 2. In the present study we have analyzed the contribution of IGF-II residues equivalent to insulin's two binding surfaces toward the interaction of IGF-II with the IGF-1R and IR. Four “site 1” and six “site 2” analogues were produced and analyzed in terms of IGF-1R and IR binding and activation. The results show that Val43, Phe28, and Val14 (equivalent to site 1) are critical to IGF-1R and IR binding, whereas mutation to alanine of Gln18 affects only IGF-1R and not IR binding. Alanine substitutions at Glu12, Asp15, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 analogues resulted in significant (>2-fold) decreases in affinity for both the IGF-1R and IR. Furthermore, taking a novel approach using a monomeric, single-chain minimized IGF-1R we have defined a distinct second binding surface formed by Glu12, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 that potentially engages the IGF-1R at one or more of the FnIII domains. PMID:19139090

  11. Insulin-like Growth Factor-II (IGF-II) and IGF-II Analogs with Enhanced Insulin Receptor-a Binding Affinity Promote Neural Stem Cell Expansion*

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amber N.; Chidambaram, Shravanthi; Forbes, Briony E.; Wood, Teresa L.; Levison, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to employ genetically engineered IGF-II analogs to establish which receptor(s) mediate the stemness promoting actions of IGF-II on mouse subventricular zone neural precursors. Neural precursors from the subventricular zone were propagated in vitro in culture medium supplemented with IGF-II analogs. Cell growth and identity were analyzed using sphere generation and further analyzed by flow cytometry. F19A, an analog of IGF-II that does not bind the IGF-2R, stimulated an increase in the proportion of neural stem cells (NSCs) while decreasing the proportion of the later stage progenitors at a lower concentration than IGF-II. V43M, which binds to the IGF-2R with high affinity but which has low binding affinity to the IGF-1R and to the A isoform of the insulin receptor (IR-A) failed to promote NSC growth. The positive effects of F19A on NSC growth were unaltered by the addition of a functional blocking antibody to the IGF-1R. Altogether, these data lead to the conclusion that IGF-II promotes stemness of NSCs via the IR-A and not through activation of either the IGF-1R or the IGF-2R. PMID:24398690

  12. The genomic structure of the gene encoding the human transforming growth factor {beta} type II receptor (TGF-{beta} RII)

    SciTech Connect

    Takenoshita, Seiichi; Hagiwara, Koichi; Nagashima, Makoto; Gemma, Akihiko

    1996-09-01

    The genomic structure of the human transforming growth factor-{beta} type II receptor gene (TGF-{beta} RII) was determined by two PCR-based methods, the {open_quotes}long distance sequencer{close_quotes} method and the {open_quotes}promoter finder{close_quotes} method. Genomic fragments containing exons and adjacent introns were amplified by PCR, and the nucleotide sequences were determined by direct sequencing and subcloning sequencing. The TGF-{beta} RII protein is encoded by 567 codons in 7 exons. This is the first report about the genomic structure of a gene that belongs to the serine/threonine kinase type II receptor subfamily. Knowledge of the genomic structure of the TGF-{beta} RII gene will facilitate investigation of the TGF-{beta} RII gene will facilitate investigation of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in normal human cells and of the aberrations occurring during carcinogenesis. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Role of epidermal growth factor receptor and endoplasmic reticulum stress in vascular remodeling induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Takehiko; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Yamato; Elliott, Katherine J; Tilley, Douglas G; Davisson, Robin L; Park, Joon-Young; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms by which angiotensin II (AngII) elevates blood pressure and enhances end-organ damage seem to be distinct. However, the signal transduction cascade by which AngII specifically mediates vascular remodeling such as medial hypertrophy and perivascular fibrosis remains incomplete. We have previously shown that AngII-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation is mediated by disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 17 (ADAM17), and that this signaling is required for vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy but not for contractile signaling in response to AngII. Recent studies have implicated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in hypertension. Interestingly, EGFR is capable of inducing ER stress. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that activation of EGFR and ER stress are critical components required for vascular remodeling but not hypertension induced by AngII. Mice were infused with AngII for 2 weeks with or without treatment of EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib, or ER chaperone, 4-phenylbutyrate. AngII infusion induced vascular medial hypertrophy in the heart, kidney and aorta, and perivascular fibrosis in heart and kidney, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension. Treatment with erlotinib as well as 4-phenylbutyrate attenuated vascular remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy but not hypertension. In addition, AngII infusion enhanced ADAM17 expression, EGFR activation, and ER/oxidative stress in the vasculature, which were diminished in both erlotinib-treated and 4-phenylbutyrate-treated mice. ADAM17 induction and EGFR activation by AngII in vascular cells were also prevented by inhibition of EGFR or ER stress. In conclusion, AngII induces vascular remodeling by EGFR activation and ER stress via a signaling mechanism involving ADAM17 induction independent of hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 improves hypoxia-impaired energy production in cardiomyocytes through increasing activity of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Fei; Ma, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In the present study, we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches to explore the effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II on energy production in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. Hypoxia repressed ATP production in cultured cardiomyocytes, whereas overexpression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 significantly improved ATP production. Conversely, knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 facilitated the hypoxia-induced decrease in ATP synthesis. Further investigation revealed that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 induced the expression and activity of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, a component of cytochrome c oxidase that is important in mitochondrial respiratory chain function. Moreover, lentiviral-mediated overexpression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II antagonized the decrease in ATP synthesis caused by knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1, whereas knockdown of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II attenuated the increase in ATP synthesis caused by overexpression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1. In addition, inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II by a specific inhibitor sodium azide suppressed the ATP sy nthesis induced by overexpressed tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1. Hence, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 protects cardiomyocytes from hypoxia at least partly via potentiation of energy generation, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II is one of the downstream effectors that mediates the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1-mediated energy generation program.

  15. Endothelial thrombomodulin induces Ca2+ signals and nitric oxide synthesis through epidermal growth factor receptor kinase and calmodulin kinase II.

    PubMed

    David-Dufilho, Monique; Millanvoye-Van Brussel, Elisabeth; Topal, Gokce; Walch, Laurence; Brunet, Annie; Rendu, Francine

    2005-10-28

    Endothelial membrane-bound thrombomodulin is a high affinity receptor for thrombin to inhibit coagulation. We previously demonstrated that the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex restrains cell proliferation mediated through protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1. We have now tested the hypothesis that thrombomodulin transduces a signal to activate the endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (NOS3) and to modulate G protein-coupled receptor signaling. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with thrombin or a mutant of thrombin that binds to thrombomodulin and has no catalytic activity on PAR-1. Thrombin and its mutant dose dependently activated NO release at cell surface. Pretreatment with anti-thrombomodulin antibody suppressed NO response to the mutant and to low thrombin concentration and reduced by half response to high concentration. Thrombin receptor-activating peptide that only activates PAR-1 and high thrombin concentration induced marked biphasic Ca2+ signals with rapid phosphorylation of PLC(beta3) and NOS3 at both serine 1177 and threonine 495. The mutant thrombin evoked a Ca2+ spark and progressive phosphorylation of Src family kinases at tyrosine 416 and NOS3 only at threonine 495. It activated rapid phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-dependent NO synthesis and phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and calmodulin kinase II. Complete epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition only partly reduced the activation of phospholipase Cgamma1 and NOS3. Prestimulation of thrombomodulin did not affect NO release but reduced Ca2+ responses to thrombin and histamine, suggesting cross-talks between thrombomodulin and G protein-coupled receptors. This is the first demonstration of an outside-in signal mediated by the cell surface thrombomodulin receptor to activate NOS3 through tyrosine kinase-dependent pathway. This signaling may contribute to thrombomodulin function in thrombosis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

  16. Transforming Growth Factor-β Family Ligands Can Function as Antagonists by Competing for Type II Receptor Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Aykul, Senem; Martinez-Hackert, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family ligands are pleiotropic cytokines. Their physiological activities are not determined by a simple coupling of stimulus and response, but depend critically on context, i.e. the interplay of receptors, ligands, and regulators that form the TGF-β signal transduction system of a cell or tissue. How these different components combine to regulate signaling activities remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a ligand-mediated mechanism of signaling regulation. Based on the observation that the type II TGF-β family receptors ActRIIA, ActRIIB, and BMPRII interact with a large group of overlapping ligands at overlapping epitopes, we hypothesized high affinity ligands compete with low affinity ligands for receptor binding and signaling. We show activin A and other high affinity ligands directly inhibited signaling by the low affinity ligands BMP-2, BMP-7, and BMP-9. We demonstrate activin A functions as a competitive inhibitor that blocks the ligand binding epitope on type II receptors. We propose binding competition and signaling antagonism are integral functions of the TGF-β signal transduction system. These functions could help explain how activin A modulates physiological signaling during extraordinary cellular responses, such as injury and wound healing, and how activin A could elicit disease phenotypes such as cancer-related muscle wasting and fibrosis. PMID:26961869

  17. Transforming Growth Factor-β Family Ligands Can Function as Antagonists by Competing for Type II Receptor Binding.

    PubMed

    Aykul, Senem; Martinez-Hackert, Erik

    2016-05-13

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family ligands are pleiotropic cytokines. Their physiological activities are not determined by a simple coupling of stimulus and response, but depend critically on context, i.e. the interplay of receptors, ligands, and regulators that form the TGF-β signal transduction system of a cell or tissue. How these different components combine to regulate signaling activities remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a ligand-mediated mechanism of signaling regulation. Based on the observation that the type II TGF-β family receptors ActRIIA, ActRIIB, and BMPRII interact with a large group of overlapping ligands at overlapping epitopes, we hypothesized high affinity ligands compete with low affinity ligands for receptor binding and signaling. We show activin A and other high affinity ligands directly inhibited signaling by the low affinity ligands BMP-2, BMP-7, and BMP-9. We demonstrate activin A functions as a competitive inhibitor that blocks the ligand binding epitope on type II receptors. We propose binding competition and signaling antagonism are integral functions of the TGF-β signal transduction system. These functions could help explain how activin A modulates physiological signaling during extraordinary cellular responses, such as injury and wound healing, and how activin A could elicit disease phenotypes such as cancer-related muscle wasting and fibrosis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Angiotensin II receptor blocker inhibits tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced cell damage in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Toru; Takao, Toshihiro; Horino, Taro; Matsumoto, Reiko; Inoue, Kousuke; Morita, Tatsuhito; Hashimoto, Kozo

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the effect of angiotensin II (AII) type 1 (AT1) and angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor blockers on tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced cell damage in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC). The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG) release into the medium after TNF-alpha treatment in RPTEC were determined using modified commercial procedures. In addition, the levels of caspase 3/7 activity in RPTEC were measured after TNF-alpha treatment with AlphaTau1 or AT2 receptor blockers. Finally we investigated the change of p22phox protein levels after TNF-alpha with AlphaTau1 or AT2 receptor blockers in RPTEC. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (10(-8) mol/L) significantly increased LDH and NAG release into the medium from RPTEC. AlphaTau1 receptor blockers, olmesartan and valsartan (10(-9)-10(-6) mol/L) showed a significant reduction on TNF-alpha-induced LDH and NAG release in RPTEC. AT2 receptor blocker, PD123319 (10(-7)-10(-5) mol/L) also decreased TNF-alpha-induced LDH and NAG release in RPTEC. Blockade of both AlphaTau1 and AT2 receptor indicated additional reduction on TNF-alpha-induced LDH and NAG release. TNF-alpha (10(-8) mol/L) treatment showed small but significant increases of caspase 3/7 activity in RPTEC, and AT1 and AT2 receptor blockers (10(-8) mol/L) comparably decreased TNF-alpha-induced caspase 3/7 activity. Significant increases of p22phox protein levels were observed in TNF-alpha-treated group in RPTEC. However, only AlphaTau1 (10(-8) mol/L) but not AT2 (10(-5) mol/L) receptor blocker significantly decreased TNF-alpha-induced p22phox protein levels. The present study demonstrates that TNF-alpha induces renal tubular cell damage in RPTEC and AT1/AT2 receptor blockers showed cytoprotective effects probably via at least partly different mechanism.

  19. High-Affinity Ligand Binding by Wild-Type:Mutant Heteromeric Complexes of the Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin-like Growth Factor II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Michelle A.; Kreiling, Jodi L.; Byrd, James C.; MacDonald, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) has diverse ligand-binding properties contributing to its roles in lysosome biogenesis and growth suppression. Optimal receptor binding and internalization of mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P)-bearing ligands requires a dimeric structure leading to bivalent high-affinity binding, presumably mediated by cooperation between sites on both subunits. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) binds to a single site on each monomer. It is hypothesized that IGF-II binding to cognate sites on each monomer occurs independently, but bivalent Man-6-P ligand binding requires cooperative contributions from sites on both monomers. To test this hypothesis, we co-immunoprecipitated differentially epitope-tagged soluble mini-receptors and assessed ligand binding. Pairing of wild-type and point-mutated IGF-II binding sites between two dimerized mini-receptors had no effect on the function of the contralateral binding site, indicating IGF-II binding to each side of the dimer is independent and manifests no intersubunit effects. As expected, heterodimeric receptors composed of a wild-type monomer and a mutant bearing two Man-6-P-binding knockout mutations form functional IGF-II binding sites. In contrast to prediction, such heterodimeric receptors also bind Man-6-P–based ligands with high affinity, and the amount of binding can be attributed entirely to the immunoprecipitated wild-type receptors. Anchoring of both C-terminal ends of the heterodimer produces optimal binding of both IGF-II and Man-6-P ligands. Thus, IGF-II binds independently to both subunits of the dimeric M6P/IGF2R. Although wild-type/mutant heterooligomers from readily when mixed, it appears that multivalent Man-6-P ligands bind preferentially to wild-type sites, possibly by cross-bridging receptors within clusters of immobilized receptors. PMID:19236480

  20. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor II. Relationship to receptor and binding protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Torres, A M; Forbes, B E; Aplin, S E; Wallace, J C; Francis, G L; Norton, R S

    1995-04-28

    The three-dimensional structure of human insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II in aqueous solution at pH 3.1 and 300 K has been determined from nuclear magnetic resonance data and restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Structural constraints consisting of 502 NOE-derived distance constraints, 11 dihedral angle restraints, and three disulfide bridges were used as input for distance geometry calculations in DIANA and X-PLOR, followed by simulated annealing refinement and energy minimization in X-PLOR. The resulting family of 20 structures was well defined in the regions of residues 5 to 28 and 41 to 62, with an average pairwise root-mean-square deviation of 1.24 A for the backbone heavy-atoms (N, C2, C) and 1.90 A for all heavy atoms. The poorly defined regions consist of the N and C termini, part of the B-domain, and the C-domain loop. Resonances from these regions of the protein gave stronger cross peaks in two dimensional NMR spectra, consistent with significant motional averaging. The main secondary structure elements in IGF-II are alpha-helices encompassing residues 11 to 21, 42 to 49 and 53 to 59. A small anti-parallel beta-sheet is formed by residues 59 to 61 and 25 to 27, while residues 26 to 28 appear to participate in intermolecular beta-sheet formation. The structure of IGF-II in the well-defined regions is very similar to those of the corresponding regions of insulin and IGF-I. Significant differences between IGF-II and IGF-I occur near the start of the third helix, in a region known to modulate affinity for the type 2 IGF receptor, and at the C terminus. The IGF II structure is discussed in relation to its binding sites for the insulin and IGF receptors and the IGF binding proteins.

  1. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  2. Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)-dependent cell growth by multidentate pentamannosyl 6-phosphate-based ligands targeting the mannose 6-phosphate/IGF-II receptor

    PubMed Central

    Grosely, Rosslyn; MacDonald, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) binds M6P-capped ligands and IGF-II at different binding sites within the ectodomain and mediates ligand internalization and trafficking to the lysosome. Multivalent M6P-based ligands can cross-bridge the M6P/IGF2R, which increases the rate of receptor internalization, permitting IGF-II binding as a passenger ligand and subsequent trafficking to the lysosome, where the IGF-II is degraded. This unique feature of the receptor may be exploited to design novel therapeutic agents against IGF-II-dependent cancers that will lead to decreased bioavailable IGF-II within the tumor microenvironment. We have designed a panel of M6P-based ligands that bind to the M6P/IGF2R with high affinity in a bivalent manner and cause decreased cell viability. We present evidence that our ligands bind through the M6P-binding sites of the receptor and facilitate internalization and degradation of IGF-II from conditioned medium to mediate this cellular response. To our knowledge, this is the first panel of synthetic bivalent ligands for the M6P/IGF2R that can take advantage of the ligand-receptor interactions of the M6P/IGF2R to provide proof-of-principle evidence for the feasibility of novel chemotherapeutic agents that decrease IGF-II-dependent growth of cancer cells. PMID:27694692

  3. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits angiotensin II receptor type 1 expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons via β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Wu, H; Yan, J-Q; Song, Z-B; Guo, Q-L

    2013-09-17

    Both tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) axis play important roles in neuropathic pain and nociception. In the present study, we explored the interaction between the two systems by examining the mutual effects between TNF-α and the Ang II/AT1 receptor axis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Rat DRG neurons were treated with TNF-α in different concentrations for different lengths of time in the presence or absence of transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) inhibitor SPD304, β-catenin signaling inhibitor CCT031374, or different kinase inhibitors. TNF-α decreased the AT1 receptor mRNA level as well as the AT1a receptor promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner within 30 h, which led to dose-dependent inhibition of Ang II-binding AT1 receptor level on the cell membrane. Actinomycin D (1 mg/ml), SPD304 (50 μM), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD169316 (25 μM), and CCT031374 (50 μM) completely abolished the inhibitory effect of TNF-α on AT1 receptor expression. TNF-α dose-dependently increased soluble β-catenin and phosphorylated GSK-3β levels, which was blocked by SPD304 and PD169316. In DRG neurons treated with AT2 receptor agonist CGP421140, or Ang II with or without AT1 receptor antagonist losartan or AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319 for 30 h, we found that Ang II and Ang II+PD123319 significantly decreased TNF-α expression, whereas CPG421140 and Ang II+losartan increased TNF-α expression. In conclusion, we demonstrate that TNF-α inhibits AT1 receptor expression at the transcription level via TNFR1 in rat DRG neurons by increasing the soluble β-catenin level through the p38 MAPK/GSK-3β pathway. In addition, Ang II appears to inhibit and induce TNF-α expression via the AT1 receptor and the AT2 receptor in DRG neurons, respectively. This is the first evidence of crosstalk between TNF-α and the Ang II/AT receptor axis in DRG neurons.

  5. Serum factors alter the extent of dephosphorylation of ligands endocytosed via the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Mouse L-cells that contain the cation-independent (CI) mannose 6- phosphate (Man 6-P)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II receptor endocytose acid hydrolases and deliver these enzymes to lysosomes. The postendocytic loss of the Man 6-P recognition marker from the cell- associated acid hydrolases was assessed by CI-Man 6-P receptor affinity chromatography. 125I-labeled acid hydrolases internalized by L-cells grown at high density were delivered to lysosomes but were not dephosphorylated. In contrast, the same 125I-labeled hydrolases internalized by L-cells maintained at low density were delivered to lysosomes and were extensively dephosphorylated. The dephosphorylation at low density required 5 h for completion suggesting that the phosphatase responsible for the dephosphorylation is located within the lysosomal compartment. Transition from the high to low density state was rapid and was not inhibited by cycloheximide. Medium substitution experiments indicated that serum factors were necessary to maintain the L-cells in the dephosphorylation-competent (low density) state, and that serum-free conditions led to a dephosphorylation-incompetent (high density) state. Addition of IGF II to cells in serum-free medium allowed acid hydrolases subsequently introduced by endocytosis to be dephosphorylated. The results indicate that the removal of the Man 6-P recognition marker from endocytosed acid hydrolases is regulated by serum factors in the growth medium, including IGF II. PMID:2549075

  6. A highly phosphorylated subpopulation of insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptors is concentrated in a clathrin-enriched plasma membrane fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Corvera, S.; Folander, K.; Clairmont, K.B.; Czech, M.P. )

    1988-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)/mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) receptors immunoprecipitated from purified plasma membranes of {sup 32}P-labeled rat adipocytes are markedly heterogenous in their phosphorylation state. Approximately 80% of the plasma membrane receptors are solubilized in 1% (vol/vol) Triton X-100 and are phosphorylated on serine residues at a stoichiometry of {approx} 0.1-0.2 mol of phosphate per mol of receptor. In contrast, 15-20% of the receptors are Triton X-100-insoluble and are phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues at {approx} 4 or 5 mol of phosphate per mol of receptor. This Triton X-100-insoluble membrane subfraction contains only 5% of the total plasma membrane protein and yet contains all of the clathrin heavy chain associated with plasma membrane. Based on the relative yields of protein in the detergent-insoluble material, IGF-II/Man-6-P receptors are concentrated {approx} 3-fold in this clathrin-enriched subfraction. Taken together, these results indicate that insulin decreases the phosphorylation state of a highly phosphorylated subpopulation of IGF-II/Man-6-P receptors on the plasma membrane. In addition, insulin action may prevent the concentration of these receptors in a clathrin-enriched membrane subfraction.

  7. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist decreases plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 and soluble adhesion molecules in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tsutamoto, T; Wada, A; Maeda, K; Mabuchi, N; Hayashi, M; Tsutsui, T; Ohnishi, M; Sawaki, M; Fujii, M; Matsumoto, T; Kinoshita, M

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of an angiotensin (Ang II) type 1 receptor antagonist on immune markers in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Ang II stimulates production of immune factors via the Ang II type 1 receptor in vitro, and the long-term effects of Ang II type 1 receptor antagonists on plasma markers of immune activation are unknown in patients with CHF. Twenty-three patients with mild to moderate CHF with left ventricular dysfunction were randomly divided into two groups: treatment with Ang II type 1 receptor (candesartan cilexetil) (n = 14) or placebo (n = 9). We measured plasma levels of immune factors such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1). We also measured plasma levels of the neurohumoral factors such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a biological marker of ANP and BNP. Plasma levels of TNFalpha, IL-6, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were increased in the 23 CHF patients compared with normal subjects and significantly decreased after 14 weeks of candesartan cilexetil treatment, but did not change in the placebo group. Plasma levels of BNP, which is a marker of ventricular injury, significantly decreased, and the molar ratio of plasma cGMP to cardiac natriuretic peptides (ANP + BNP) was significantly increased after candesartan cilexetil treatment, but did not change in the placebo group. These findings suggest that 14 weeks of treatment with an Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist (candesartan cilexetil) decreased plasma levels of the immune markers such as TNFalpha, IL-6, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 and that it improved the biological compensatory action of endogenous cardiac natriuretic peptides in patients with mild to moderate CHF.

  8. Endocytosis of receptor-bound insulin-like growth factor II is enhanced by mannose-6-phosphate in IM9 cells.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R

    1988-10-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and glycoproteins containing mannose 6-phosphate (M6P), bind to two different sites of the same receptor molecule (Morgan et al, Nature 329:301, 1987). To study the interactions between the two ligands on their common receptor in intact cells, we examined the effect of free M6P on IGF-II binding and endocytosis in the IM9 human lymphoblastoid cell line. M6P, up to a 3 mM concentration, had no effect on the binding of IGF-II to the cell surface receptor of intact IM9 cells at 4 degrees C. By contrast, when IM9 cells were incubated with 125I-IGF-II at 37 degrees C, 1mM M6P increased cell-associated radioactivity by twofold. The increase was resistant to acid wash at 4 degrees C, and therefore assumed to represent endocytosed IGF-II. Acid-washable radioactivity was no different, confirming that, in intact cells, M6P does not affect IGF-II surface binding. In addition, preincubation of cells with M6P at 37 degrees C for up to 3 hours did not change the abundance of receptor on the cell surface, as measured by a subsequent 4 degrees C binding assay. We conclude that M6P causes a shift of IGF-II-occupied receptors form the cell surface to intracellular locations without affecting surface binding of this ligand in IM9 cells. The effect could be produced by the binding of M6P itself, or by the displacement of endogenous phosphomannosylated ligands.

  9. Endocytosis of receptor-bound insulin-like growth factor II is enhanced by mannose-6-phosphate in IM9 cells.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R

    1988-12-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and glycoproteins containing mannose 6-phosphate (M6P), bind to two different sites of the same receptor molecule (Morgan et al, Nature 329:301, 1987). To study the interactions between the two ligands on their common receptor in intact cells, we examined the effect of free M6P on IGF-II binding and endocytosis in the IM9 human lymphoblastoid cell line. M6P, up to a 3 mM concentration, had no effect on the binding of IGF-II to the cell surface receptor of intact IM9 cells at 4 degrees C. By contrast, when IM9 cells were incubated with 125I-IGF-II at 37 degrees C, 1 mM M6P increased cell-associated radioactivity by twofold. The increase was resistant to acid wash at 4 degrees C, and therefore assumed to represent endocytosed IGF-II. Acid-washable radioactivity was no different, confirming that, in intact cells, M6P does not affect IGF-II surface binding. In addition, preincubation of cells with M6P at 37 degrees C for up to 3 hours did not change the abundance of receptor on the cell surface, as measured by a subsequent 4 degrees C binding assay. We conclude that M6P causes a shift of IGF-II-occupied receptors form the cell surface to intracellular locations without affecting surface binding of this ligand in IM9 cells. The effect could be produced by the binding of M6P itself, or by the displacement of endogenous phosphomannosylated ligands.

  10. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II regulates nuclear receptor, myogenic, and metabolic gene expression in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Lisa M; Wang, Shu-Ching Mary; Eriksson, Natalie A; Myers, Stephen A; Murray, Lauren A; Muscat, George E O

    2011-02-24

    We demonstrate that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) mRNA is more abundantly expressed (than COUP-TFI mRNA) in skeletal muscle C2C12 cells and in (type I and II) skeletal muscle tissue from C57BL/10 mice. Consequently, we have utilized the ABI TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) platform to analyze gene expression changes specifically attributable to ectopic COUP-TFII (relative to vector only) expression in muscle cells. Utilizing a TLDA-based platform and 5 internal controls, we analyze the entire NR superfamily, 96 critical metabolic genes, and 48 important myogenic regulatory genes on the TLDA platform utilizing 5 internal controls. The low density arrays were analyzed by rigorous statistical analysis (with Genorm normalization, Bioconductor R, and the Empirical Bayes statistic) using the (integromics) statminer software. In addition, we validated the differentially expressed patho-physiologically relevant gene (identified on the TLDA platform) glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4). We demonstrated that COUP-TFII expression increased the steady state levels of Glut4 mRNA and protein, while ectopic expression of truncated COUP-TFII lacking helix 12 (COUP-TFΔH12) reduced Glut4 mRNA expression in C2C12 cells. Moreover, COUP-TFII expression trans-activated the Glut4 promoter (-997/+3), and ChIP analysis identified selective recruitment of COUP-TFII to a region encompassing a highly conserved SP1 binding site (in mouse, rat, and human) at nt positions -131/-118. Mutation of the SpI site ablated COUP-TFII mediated trans-activation of the Glut4 promoter. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that in skeletal muscle cells, COUP-TFII regulates several nuclear hormone receptors, and critical metabolic and muscle specific genes.

  11. Corticotropin-releasing factor type II (CRF-sub-2) receptors in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis modulate conditioned defeat in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Cooper, Matthew A; Huhman, Kim L

    2005-08-01

    In Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), social defeat produces a subsequent increase in submissive and defensive behavior and a loss of normal territorial aggression, which the authors have called conditioned defeat. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of blocking corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) Type I and Type II receptors on conditioned defeat. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the CRF-sub-2 receptor antagonist antisauvagine-30 prior to testing significantly reduced conditioned defeat compared with vehicle controls, whereas the CRF-sub-1 receptor antagonist CP-154,526 had no effect. Also, infusion of antisauvagine-30 into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) 15 min, but not immediately, prior to testing reduced conditioned defeat in a dose-dependent manner. The authors' results provide evidence that CRF-sub-2 receptors in the BNST, but not CRF-sub-1 receptors, are an important component in the neural circuitry regulating conditioned defeat.

  12. Transforming growth factor type beta 1 increases the expression of angiotensin II receptor type 2 by a SMAD- and p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Painemal, Paula; Acuña, María José; Riquelme, Cecilia; Brandan, Enrique; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, a condition known as fibrosis, is a hallmark of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Among the factors that trigger muscle fibrosis are transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and angiotensin II (Ang-II). Ang-II belongs to the renin-angiotensin system, and its biological effects are exerted by Ang-II receptors type 1 and type 2 (AT-1 and AT-2, respectively). This study aims to determine the effect of TGF-β1 on the expression of AT-1 and AT-2 receptor in skeletal muscle. C2 C12 myoblasts exposed to TGF-β1 showed a dose-dependent increase in AT-2 expression but with no effect on AT-1 levels. Injection of TGF-β1 in the skeletal muscle of mice increased the levels of AT-2 and ECM protein but unchanged AT-1 levels. We also detected higher expression levels of AT-2 receptor in dystrophic skeletal muscle of mdx mice than in normal mice. The induction of AT-2 was mediated by the canonical TGF-β pathway because under the inhibitory conditions of the kinase activity of TGFβ receptor I or the knockdown of Smad2/3 levels, TGF-β-induced AT-2 receptor increase was strongly inhibited. Furthermore, we demonstrated that p38MAPK activity in response to TGF-β is also required for AT-2 increase as evaluated by a p38MAPK inhibitor. Our results show that the levels of AT-2 but not AT-1 receptor are modulated by the pro-fibrotic factor TGF-β1 in myoblasts and mouse skeletal muscle. This finding suggests that AT-2 might be involved in the physiopathology of fibrosis in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in vascular smooth muscle regulates blood pressure homeostasis through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-angiotensin II receptor type 1 axis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Jiang, Weidong; Cantalupo, Anna; Sessa, William C; Giordano, Frank J

    2013-09-01

    Hypertension is a major worldwide health issue for which only a small proportion of cases have a known mechanistic pathogenesis. Of the defined causes, none have been directly linked to heightened vasoconstrictor responsiveness, despite the fact that vasomotor tone in resistance vessels is a fundamental determinant of blood pressure. Here, we reported a previously undescribed role for smooth muscle hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in controlling blood pressure homeostasis. The lack of HIF-1α in smooth muscle caused hypertension in vivo and hyperresponsiveness of resistance vessels to angiotensin II stimulation ex vivo. These data correlated with an increased expression of angiotensin II receptor type I in the vasculature. Specifically, we show that HIF-1α, through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, reciprocally defined angiotensin II receptor type I levels in the vessel wall. Indeed, pharmacological blockade of angiotensin II receptor type I by telmisartan abolished the hypertensive phenotype in smooth muscle cell-HIF-1α-KO mice. These data revealed a determinant role of a smooth muscle HIF-1α/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ/angiotensin II receptor type I axis in controlling vasomotor responsiveness and highlighted an important pathway, the alterations of which may be critical in a variety of hypertensive-based clinical settings.

  14. Possible roles of tumor necrosis factor-α and angiotensin II type 1 receptor on high glucose-induced damage in renal proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Takao, Toshihiro; Horino, Taro; Matsumoto, Reiko; Shimamura, Yoshiko; Ogata, Koji; Inoue, Kousuke; Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Taguchi, Takafumi; Terada, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have identified that high glucose-induced renal tubular cell damage. We previously demonstrated that high glucose treatment induced oxidative stress in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs), and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers reduce high glucose-induced oxidative stress in RPTEC possibly via blockade of intracellular as well as extracellular AT1 receptor. However, exact roles of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and AT1 receptor on high glucose-induced renal tubular function remain unclear. N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG), concentrations of TNF-α/angiotensin II and p22(phox) protein levels after high glucose treatment with or without AT1 receptor blocker or thalidomide, an inhibitor of TNF-α protein synthesis, were measured in immortalized human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK2 cells). AT1 receptor knockdown was performed with AT1 receptor small interfering RNA (siRNA). High glucose treatment (30 mM) significantly increased NAG release, TNF-α/angiotensin II concentrations in cell media and p22(phox) protein levels compared with those in regular glucose medium (5.6 mM). Candesartan, an AT1R blocker, showed a significant reduction on high glucose-induced NAG release, TNF-α concentrations and p22(phox) protein levels in HK2 cells. In addition, significant decreases of NAG release, TNF-α concentrations and p22(phox) protein levels in HK2 cells were observed in high glucose-treated group with thalidomide. AT1R knockdown with siRNA markedly reversed high glucose, angiotensin II or TNF-α-induced p22(phox) protein levels in HK2 cells. TNF-α may be involved in high glucose-induced renal tubular damage in HK2 cells possibly via AT1 receptor signaling.

  15. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  16. Heat shock protein 90 inhibitor attenuates renal fibrosis through degradation of transforming growth factor-β type II receptor.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyun J; Yu, Mi R; Kim, Wan-Young; Kim, Jin; Ryu, Jung H; Kwon, Soon H; Jeon, Jin S; Han, Dong C; Ziyadeh, Fuad

    2012-11-01

    The accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the interstitial area is the final common feature of chronic kidney diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 promotes the development of renal fibrosis. Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 inhibitors have been shown to repress TGF-β1 signaling, but whether they inhibit renal fibrosis is unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the therapeutic efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitor on renal fibrosis. In TGF-β1-treated HK2 cells and unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) kidneys, we found that 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG), an Hsp90 inhibitor, decreased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and collagen I and largely restored the expression of E-cadherin. 17AAG inhibited TGF-β1-mediated phosphorylation of Smad2, Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in HK2 cells. Inhibition of Hsp90 also blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of snail1. This 17AAG-induced reduction was completely restored by simultaneous treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132. Furthermore, 17AAG blocked the interaction between Hsp90 and TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) and promoted ubiquitination of TβRII, leading to the decreased availability of TβRII. Smurf2-specific siRNA reversed the ability of 17AAG to inhibit TGF-β1 signaling. The effect of 17AAG on TβRII expression and renal fibrosis was confirmed in UUO kidneys. These findings suggest that Hsp90 inhibitor prevents the development of renal fibrosis via a mechanism dependent on Smurf2-mediated degradation of TβRII.

  17. The bovine mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor. The role of arginine residues in mannose 6-phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Dahms, N M; Rose, P A; Molkentin, J D; Zhang, Y; Brzycki, M A

    1993-03-15

    The extracytoplasmic region of the bovine cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF-II receptor) consists of 15 homologous repeating domains, each of which is approximately 147 residues in length. The receptor contains two high affinity mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) binding sites and our recent studies (Westlund, B., Dahms, N. M., and Kornfeld, S. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 23233-23239) have localized these two binding sites to domains 1-3 and 7-11. To further define the location of the Man-6-P binding sites and to determine the role of specific arginine residues in Man-6-P binding, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create truncated soluble forms of the M6P/IGF-II receptor in conjunction with either conservative (Lys) or nonconservative (Ala) replacement of arginine residues. These mutants were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells and assayed for their ability to bind phosphomannosyl residues by affinity chromatography. Analysis of the ligand binding activity of carboxyl-terminal truncated forms of the receptor's extracytoplasmic region demonstrated that the second Man-6-P binding site is contained within domains 7-9. Substitution of Arg435 in domain 3 of the amino-terminal binding site and Arg1334 in domain 9 of the second binding site results in a dramatic loss of ligand binding activity. However, substitutions at positions 435 and/or 1334 did not affect the secretion, glycosylation, or immunoreactivity of these truncated proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that Arg435 and Arg1334 are essential components of the M6P/IGF-II receptor's high affinity Man-6-P binding sites.

  18. Characterization of the growth of murine fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. II. Interaction of insulin with other growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, P.A.; Jarett, L. )

    1990-09-01

    The effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and insulin on DNA synthesis were studied in murine fibroblasts transfected with an expression vector containing human insulin receptor cDNA (NIH 3T3/HIR) and the parental NIH 3T3 cells. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, individual growth factors in serum-free medium stimulated DNA synthesis with the following relative efficacies: insulin greater than or equal to 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than IGF-1 much greater than EGF. In comparison, the relative efficacies of these factors in stimulating DNA synthesis by NIH 3T3 cells were 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than EGF much greater than IGF-1 = insulin. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, EGF was synergistic with 1-10 ng/ml insulin but not with 100 ng/ml insulin or more. Synergy of PDGF or IGF-1 with insulin was not detected. In the parental NIH 3T3 cells, insulin and IGF-1 were found to be synergistic with EGF (1 ng/ml), PDGF (100 ng/ml), and PDGF plus EGF. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, the lack of interaction of insulin with other growth factors was also observed when the percentage of cells synthesizing DNA was examined. Despite insulin's inducing only 60% of NIH 3T3/HIR cells to incorporate thymidine, addition of PDGF, EGF, or PDGF plus EGF had no further effect. In contrast, combinations of growth factors resulted in 95% of the parental NIH 3T3 cells synthesizing DNA. The independence of insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis from other mitogens in the NIH 3T3/HIR cells is atypical for progression factor-stimulated DNA synthesis and is thought to be partly the result of insulin receptor expression in an inappropriate context or quantity.

  19. Characterization of functional urotensin II receptors in human skeletal muscle myoblasts: comparison with angiotensin II receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jian-shen; Minor, Lisa K; Smith, Charles; Hu, Bing; Yang, Jing; Andrade-Gordon, Patricia; Damiano, Bruce

    2005-04-01

    The properties of urotensin II (U-II) receptor (UT receptor) and angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor (AT receptor) in primary human skeletal myoblasts (HSMM) and differentiated skeletal myotubes (HSMMT) were characterized. Radiolabeled U-II and ANG II bound specifically to HSMM with Kd's of 0.31 nM (2311 receptors/cell) and 0.61 nM (18,257 receptors/cell), respectively. The cyclic segment of U-II peptide, CFWKYC, was the minimal sequence required for binding, with the WKY residues essential. Inhibitor studies suggested AT1 is the predominant ANG II receptor. After radioligand binding, under conditions designed to minimize receptor internalization, half the bound U-II was resistant to acid washing suggesting that U-II binds tightly to its receptor in a quasi-irreversible fashion. The AT1 receptor-bound radioligand was completely removed under the same conditions. RT-PCR detected the expression of mRNAs for UT and AT1 receptors. Western blotting showed that U-II and ANG II signaled via ERK1/2 kinase. UT receptor was not lost upon differentiation into myotubes since both mRNA for UT receptor and U-II binding were still present. ANG II receptors were also present as shown by ANG II-induced calcium mobilization.

  20. Angiotensin II-induced Akt activation through the epidermal growth factor receptor in vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by phospholipid metabolites derived by activation of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Malik, Kafait U

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates cytosolic Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)), phospholipase D (PLD), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Akt in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between Akt activation by Ang II and other signaling molecules in rat VSMC. Ang II-induced Akt phosphorylation was significantly reduced by the PLD inhibitor 1-butanol, but not by its inactive analog 2-butanol, and by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of the PLD cofactor ADP-ribosylation factor, and in cells infected with retrovirus containing PLD(2) siRNA or transfected with PLD(2) antisense but not control LacZ or sense oligonucleotide. Diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor II diminished Ang II-induced and diC8-phosphatidic acid (PA)-increased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that PLD-dependent Akt activation is mediated by PA. Ang II-induced EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by 1-butanol and PLD(2) siRNA and also by cPLA(2) siRNA. In addition, the inhibitor of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) reduced both Ang II- and AA-induced EGFR transactivation. Furthermore, ETYA, cPLA(2) antisense, and cPLA(2) siRNA attenuated Ang II-elicited PLD activation. p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 [4-(4-flurophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole] reduced PLD activity and EGFR and Akt phosphorylation elicited by Ang II. Pyrrolidine-1, a cPLA(2) inhibitor, and cPLA(2) siRNA decreased p38 MAPK activity. These data indicate that Ang II-stimulated Akt activity is mediated by cPLA(2)-dependent, p38 MAPK regulated PLD(2) activation and EGFR transactivation. We propose the following scheme of the sequence of events leading to activation of Akt in VSMC by Ang II: Ang II-->cPLA(2)-->AA-->p38 MAPK-->PLD(2)-->PA-->EGFR-->Akt.

  1. Androgen Receptor and MicroRNA-21 axis down-regulates transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2) expression in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sweta; Deng, Janice J.; Gowda, Pramod S.; Rao, Manjeet K.; Lin, Chun-Lin; Chen, Chun Liang; Huang, Tim; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells escape growth inhibition from TGFβ by down-regulating TGFβ receptors. However, the mechanism by which cancer cells down-regulate TGFβ receptors in prostate is not clear. Here, we showed that coordinated action of miR-21 and androgen receptor (AR) signaling played a critical role in inhibiting TGFβ receptor II (TGFBR2) expression in prostate cancer cells. Our results revealed that miR-21 suppresses TGFBR2 levels by binding to its 3'UTR and AR signaling further potentiates this effect in both untransformed and transformed human prostate epithelial cells as well as in human prostate cancers. Analysis of primary prostate cancers showed that increased miR-21/AR expression parallel a significantly reduced expression of TGFBR2. Manipulation of androgen signaling or the expression levels of AR or miR-21 negatively altered TGFBR2 expression in untransformed and transformed human prostate epithelial cells, human prostate cancer xenografts, and mouse prostate glands. Importantly, we demonstrated that miR-21 and AR regulated each other's expression resulting in a positive feedback loop. Our results indicated that miR-21/AR mediate its tumor promoting function by attenuating TGFβ-mediated Smad2/3 activation, cell growth inhibition, cell migration, and apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that the AR and miR-21 axis exerts its oncogenic effects in prostate tumors by down-regulating TGFBR2, hence inhibiting the tumor suppressive activity of TGFβ pathway. Targeting miR-21 alone or in combination with AR may restore the tumor inhibitory activity of TGFβ in prostate cancer. PMID:24037531

  2. Dexamethasone decreases insulin-like growth factor-I and -II via a glucocorticoid receptor dependent mechanism in developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yangzheng; Famuyide, Mobolaji; Bhatt, Abhay J

    2013-01-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex) causes neurodegeneration in developing brain. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and -II (IGF-II) are potent neurotrophic and differentiation factors and play key roles in the regulation of growth and development of CNS. Current project evaluated the effects of Dex on IGF-I and -II in developing rat brains. Sprague-Dawley rat pups in each litter were divided into vehicle (n=230) or Dex-treated (n=234) groups. Rat pups in the Dex group received one of the 3 different regimens of i.p. Dex: tapering doses (DexTD) on postnatal days (PD) 3 to PD 6 or repeated doses on PD 4 to PD 6 or single dose on PD 6. To quantify the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) blockade effect, rat pups in the DexTD group on PD 3 and 5 received vehicle or RU486 (GR blocker, 60 mg/kg) s.c., twenty minutes prior to Dex treatment. Dex decreased the gain of body and brain weight while RU486 inhibited these effects. RU486 also prevented the DexTD-induced increase in caspase-3 activity and reduction in IGF-I and -II proteins. Compared to the vehicle, the expression of mRNA of IGF-I and -II decreased at 24 h after DexTD treatment, while RU486 prevented this decrease on IGF-II but not IGF-I. Our findings indicate that Dex via GR decreases IGF-I and -II and causes neurodegeneration in the neonatal rat brain.

  3. Krüppel-like factor KLF10 regulates transforming growth factor receptor II expression and TGF-β signaling in CD8+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Konstantinos A; Krempski, James; Reiter, Jesse; Svingen, Phyllis; Xiong, Yuning; Sarmento, Olga F; Huseby, April; Johnson, Aaron J; Lomberk, Gwen A; Urrutia, Raul A; Faubion, William A

    2015-03-01

    KLF10 has recently elicited significant attention as a transcriptional regulator of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling in CD4(+) T cells. In the current study, we demonstrate a novel role for KLF10 in the regulation of TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) expression with functional relevance in antiviral immune response. Specifically, we show that KLF10-deficient mice have an increased number of effector/memory CD8(+) T cells, display higher levels of the T helper type 1 cell-associated transcription factor T-bet, and produce more IFN-γ following in vitro stimulation. In addition, KLF10(-/-) CD8(+) T cells show enhanced proliferation in vitro and homeostatic proliferation in vivo. Freshly isolated CD8(+) T cells from the spleen of adult mice express lower levels of surface TGF-βRII (TβRII). Congruently, in vitro activation of KLF10-deficient CD8(+) T cells upregulate TGF-βRII to a lesser extent compared with wild-type (WT) CD8(+) T cells, which results in attenuated Smad2 phosphorylation following TGF-β1 stimulation compared with WT CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that KLF10 directly binds to the TGF-βRII promoter in T cells, leading to enhanced gene expression. In vivo viral infection with Daniel's strain Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) also led to lower expression of TGF-βRII among viral-specific KLF10(-/-) CD8(+) T cells and a higher percentage of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells in the spleen. Collectively, our data reveal a critical role for KLF10 in the transcriptional activation of TGF-βRII in CD8(+) T cells. Thus, KLF10 regulation of TGF-βRII in this cell subset may likely play a critical role in viral and tumor immune responses for which the integrity of the TGF-β1/TGF-βRII signaling pathway is crucial.

  4. Krüppel-like factor KLF10 regulates transforming growth factor receptor II expression and TGF-β signaling in CD8+ T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, Konstantinos A.; Krempski, James; Reiter, Jesse; Svingen, Phyllis; Xiong, Yuning; Sarmento, Olga F.; Huseby, April; Johnson, Aaron J.; Lomberk, Gwen A.; Urrutia, Raul A.

    2014-01-01

    KLF10 has recently elicited significant attention as a transcriptional regulator of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling in CD4+ T cells. In the current study, we demonstrate a novel role for KLF10 in the regulation of TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) expression with functional relevance in antiviral immune response. Specifically, we show that KLF10-deficient mice have an increased number of effector/memory CD8+ T cells, display higher levels of the T helper type 1 cell-associated transcription factor T-bet, and produce more IFN-γ following in vitro stimulation. In addition, KLF10−/− CD8+ T cells show enhanced proliferation in vitro and homeostatic proliferation in vivo. Freshly isolated CD8+ T cells from the spleen of adult mice express lower levels of surface TGF-βRII (TβRII). Congruently, in vitro activation of KLF10-deficient CD8+ T cells upregulate TGF-βRII to a lesser extent compared with wild-type (WT) CD8+ T cells, which results in attenuated Smad2 phosphorylation following TGF-β1 stimulation compared with WT CD8+ T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that KLF10 directly binds to the TGF-βRII promoter in T cells, leading to enhanced gene expression. In vivo viral infection with Daniel's strain Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) also led to lower expression of TGF-βRII among viral-specific KLF10−/− CD8+ T cells and a higher percentage of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells in the spleen. Collectively, our data reveal a critical role for KLF10 in the transcriptional activation of TGF-βRII in CD8+ T cells. Thus, KLF10 regulation of TGF-βRII in this cell subset may likely play a critical role in viral and tumor immune responses for which the integrity of the TGF-β1/TGF-βRII signaling pathway is crucial. PMID:25472963

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta, transforming growth factor-beta receptor II, and p27Kip1 expression in nontumorous and neoplastic human pituitaries.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Qian, X.; Kulig, E.; Sanno, N.; Scheithauer, B. W.; Kovacs, K.; Young, W. F.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been implicated in the regulation of normal and neoplastic anterior pituitary cell function. TGF-beta regulates the expression of various proteins, including p27Kip1 (p27), a cell cycle inhibitory protein. We examined TGF-beta, TGF-beta type II receptor (TGF-beta-RII), and p27 expression in normal pituitaries, pituitary adenomas, and carcinomas to analyze the possible roles of these proteins in pituitary tumorigenesis. Normal pituitary, pituitary adenomas, and pituitary carcinomas all expressed TGF-beta and TGF-beta-RII immunoreactivity. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed TGF-beta 1, -beta 2, and -beta 3 isoforms and TGF-beta-RII in normal pituitaries and pituitary adenomas. Pituitary adenomas cells cultured for 7 days in defined media showed a biphasic response to TGF-beta with significant inhibition of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at higher concentrations (10(-9) mol/L) and stimulation of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at lower concentrations (10(-13) mol/L) of TGF-beta 1 in gonadotroph adenomas. Immunohistochemical analysis for p27 protein expression showed the highest levels in nontumorous pituitaries with decreased immunoreactivity in adenomas and carcinomas. When nontumorous pituitaries and various adenomas were analyzed for p27 and specific hormone production, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, and thyroid-stimulating hormone cells and tumors had the highest percentages of cells expressing p27, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone cells and tumors had the lowest percentages. Immunoblotting analysis showed that adrenocorticotrophic hormone adenomas also had the lowest levels of p27 protein. Semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern hybridization analysis did not show significant differences in p27 mRNA expression in the various types of adenomas or in nontumorous pituitaries. In situ hybridization for p27 mRNA showed similar

  6. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José L; Sealfon, Stuart C; González-Maeso, Javier

    2009-12-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most common mental illnesses, with hereditary and environmental factors important for its etiology. All antipsychotics have in common a high affinity for monoaminergic receptors. Whereas hallucinations and delusions usually respond to typical (haloperidol-like) and atypical (clozapine-like) monoaminergic antipsychotics, their efficacy in improving negative symptoms and cognitive deficits remains inadequate. In addition, devastating side effects are a common characteristic of monoaminergic antipsychotics. Recent biochemical, preclinical and clinical findings support group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2 and mGluR3) as a new approach to treat schizophrenia. This paper reviews the status of general knowledge of mGluR2 and mGluR3 in the psychopharmacology, genetics and neuropathology of schizophrenia.

  7. Enhanced cortisol increase upon awakening is associated with greater pain ratings but not salivary cortisol or soluble tumor necrosis factorreceptor II responses to acute pain.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Burel R; Quinn, Noel B; King, Christopher D; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert R; Stapleton, Laura M; McGuire, Lynanne

    2012-05-01

    The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is related to psychosocial factors and health in potentially significant ways, suggesting that it may be a distinctive marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and dysfunction. This study sought to expand upon previous work that examined the association between CAR and ratings of laboratory-evoked acute pain stimulation. In addition to evoked pain ratings, this study also tested whether CAR was prospectively related with salivary cortisol and soluble tumor necrosis factorreceptor II responses to acute pain stimulation. This study included 36 healthy, pain-free volunteers of both sexes recruited through posted study flyers. Prior to completion of laboratory pain testing, salivary cortisol samples were obtained at home over the course of a single morning according to the following time frame: upon awakening, and 15, 30, and 60 minute after awakening. After collection of saliva, study participants brought their home saliva samples to the laboratory for assay and subsequently completed acute experimental pain testing procedures. Cluster analysis of CAR revealed two distinct groups with similar patterns of cortisol response to awakening; increased and flattened. Relative to flattened CAR, increased CAR was associated with greater ratings of pain intensity and unpleasantness. Salivary cortisol was significantly increased and soluble tumor necrosis factorreceptor II significantly decreased after pain testing, but neither of these responses differed as a function of increased versus flattened CAR. CAR may be a marker for stress sensitivity and/or the anticipation of impending stress, which could explain why the increased CAR cohort reported greater acute pain ratings.

  8. IGF-II receptors and IGF-II-stimulated glucose transport in human fat cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, M.K.; Buchanan, C.; Raineri-Maldonado, C.; Khazanie, P.; Atkinson, S.; DiMarchi, R.; Caro, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) receptors have been described in rat but not in human adipocytes. In both species, IGF-II has been reported to stimulate glucose transport by interacting with the insulin receptor. In this study, we have unequivocally demonstrated the presence of IGF-II receptors in human adipocytes. 125I-labeled IGF-II specifically binds to intact adipocytes, membranes, and lectin-purified detergent solubilized extracts. Through the use of 0.5 mM disuccinimidyl suberate, 125I-IGF-II is cross-linked to a 260-kDa protein that is identified as the IGF-II receptor by displacement experiments with unlabeled IGF-II, IGF-I, and insulin and either by immunoprecipitation or by Western blot analysis with mannose 6-phosphate receptor antibodies. The concentrations of IGF-II required for half-maximal and maximal stimulation of glucose transport in human adipocytes are 35 and 100 times more than that of insulin. The possibility of IGF-II stimulating glucose transport by interacting predominantly with the insulin receptor is suggested by the following: (1) the concentration of IGF-II that inhibits half of insulin binding is only 20 times more than that of insulin; (2) the lack of an additive effect of IGF-II and insulin for maximal stimulation of glucose transport; (3) the ability of monoclonal insulin receptor antibodies to decrease glucose transport stimulated by submaximal concentrations of both IGF-II and insulin; and (4) the ability of IGF-II to stimulate insulin receptor autophosphorylation albeit at a reduced potency when compared with insulin.

  9. Bud detachment in hydra requires activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor and a Rho–ROCK–myosin II signaling pathway to ensure formation of a basal constriction

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Oliver; Apel, David; Steinmetz, Patrick; Lange, Ellen; Hopfenmüller, Simon; Ohler, Kerstin; Sudhop, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hydra propagates asexually by exporting tissue into a bud, which detaches 4 days later as a fully differentiated young polyp. Prerequisite for detachment is activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling. The mechanism which enables constriction and tissue separation within the monolayered ecto‐ and endodermal epithelia is unknown. Results: Histological sections and staining of F‐actin by phalloidin revealed conspicuous cell shape changes at the bud detachment site indicating a localized generation of mechanical forces and the potential enhancement of secretory functions in ectodermal cells. By gene expression analysis and pharmacological inhibition, we identified a candidate signaling pathway through Rho, ROCK, and myosin II, which controls bud base constriction and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Specific regional myosin phosphorylation suggests a crucial role of ectodermal cells at the detachment site. Inhibition of FGFR, Rho, ROCK, or myosin II kinase activity is permissive for budding, but represses myosin phosphorylation, rearrangement of F‐actin and constriction. The young polyp remains permanently connected to the parent by a broad tissue bridge. Conclusions: Our data suggest an essential role of FGFR and a Rho‐ROCK‐myosin II pathway in the control of cell shape changes required for bud detachment. Developmental Dynamics 246:502–516, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:28411398

  10. Clinical significance of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β gene expression in stage II/III gastric cancer with S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Akio; Oshima, Takashi; Yoshihara, Kazue; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Aoyama, Toru; Suganuma, Nobuyasu; Yamamoto, Naoto; Sato, Tsutomu; Cho, Haruhiko; Shiozawa, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Rino, Yasushi; Kunisaki, Chikara; Imada, Toshio; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    Overall survival remains unsatisfactory in stage II/III gastric cancer, even after curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) is associated with the proliferation of cancer cells. The present study therefore investigated the association of PDGFR-β gene expression with patient outcome in 134 stage II/III gastric cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. Relative PDGFR-β gene expression was measured in surgical cancer tissue and adjacent normal mucosa specimens by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The PDGFR-β gene expression levels were found to be significantly higher in the cancer tissues compared with the adjacent normal mucosa. A high level of PDGFR-β gene expression was associated with a significantly poorer 5-year overall survival rate compared with a low level of PDGFR-β expression. Upon multivariate analysis, PDGFR-β gene expression was found to be an independent predictor of survival. Overall, the study indicates that PDGFR-β overexpression in gastric cancer tissues is a useful independent predictor of outcome in patients with stage II/III gastric cancer who receive adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1.

  11. Mouse Genome-Wide Association Study of Preclinical Group II Pulmonary Hypertension Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Neil J; Radder, Josiah E; Baust, Jeffrey J; Burton, Christine L; Lai, Yen-Chun; Potoka, Karin C; Agostini, Brittani A; Wood, John P; Bachman, Timothy N; Vanderpool, Rebecca R; Dandachi, Nadine; Leme, Adriana S; Gregory, Alyssa D; Morris, Alison; Mora, Ana L; Gladwin, Mark T; Shapiro, Steven D

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with features of obesity and metabolic syndrome that translate to the induction of PH by chronic high-fat diet (HFD) in some inbred mouse strains. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify candidate genes associated with susceptibility to HFD-induced PH. Mice from 36 inbred and wild-derived strains were fed with regular diet or HFD for 20 weeks beginning at 6-12 weeks of age, after which right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) end-systolic pressure (ESP) and maximum pressure (MaxP) were measured by cardiac catheterization. We tested for association of RV MaxP and RV ESP and identified genomic regions enriched with nominal associations to both of these phenotypes. We excluded genomic regions if they were also associated with LV MaxP, LV ESP, or body weight. Genes within significant regions were scored based on the shortest-path betweenness centrality, a measure of network connectivity, of their human orthologs in a gene interaction network of human PH-related genes. WSB/EiJ, NON/ShiLtJ, and AKR/J mice had the largest increases in RV MaxP after high-fat feeding. Network-based scoring of GWAS candidates identified epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) as having the highest shortest-path betweenness centrality of GWAS candidates. Expression studies of lung homogenate showed that EGFR expression is increased in the AKR/J strain, which developed a significant increase in RV MaxP after high-fat feeding as compared with C57BL/6J, which did not. Our combined GWAS and network-based approach adds evidence for a role for Egfr in murine PH.

  12. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factors (TRAFs) 2 and 3 Form a Transcriptional Complex with Phosho-RNA Polymerase II and p65 in CD40 Ligand Activated Neuro2a Cells.

    PubMed

    El Hokayem, Jimmy; Brittain, George C; Nawaz, Zafar; Bethea, John R

    2017-03-01

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) have been classically described as adaptor proteins that function as solely cytosolic signaling intermediates for the TNF receptor superfamily, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD, like receptors (NLRs), cytokine receptors, and others. In this study, we show for the first time that TRAFs are present within the cytoplasm and nucleus of Neuro2a cells and primary cortical neurons, and that TRAF2 and TRAF3 translocate into the nucleus within minutes of CD40L stimulation. Analysis of the transcriptional regulatory potential of TRAFs by luciferase assay revealed that each of the TRAFs differentially functions as a transcriptional activator or repressor in a cell-specific manner. Interestingly, ChIP-qPCR data demonstrate that TRAFs 2/3, p65, and pRNAPol II form part of a transcriptional complex on the Icam-1 gene promoter upon CD40L stimulation. We further determined that TRAF2 recruitment to the nucleus is critical for the ubiquitination of H2b, a transcription permissive epigenetic modification. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that TRAFs 2/3 participate in the formation of a CD40L-induced transcriptional complex in neuronal cells.

  13. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and its type II receptor in giant cell tumors of bone. Possible involvement in osteoclast-like cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, M. H.; Fan, Y.; Wysocki, S. J.; Lau, A. T.; Robertson, T.; Beilharz, M.; Wood, D. J.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a relatively rare skeletal neoplasm characterized by multinuclear giant cells (osteoclast-like cells) scattered in a mass of mononuclear cells. The currently favored hypothesis for the origin of cells within GCT is that the multinuclear giant cells are reactive osteoclasts, whereas the truly neoplastic cells are the major component of the mononuclear population. However, the pathological significance and the precise relationship of tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells in GCT have not been fully established. In this study, we evaluated two GCTs for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcripts and attempted to establish a possible role for TGF-beta 1 in the interaction between tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells. By using in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis, we have demonstrated that TGF-beta 1 mRNA transcript is consistently detected in both tumor mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like cells, whereas TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcript is only present in osteoclast-like cells. Moreover, isolated rat osteoclasts were tested for their ability to migrate in response to GCT-conditioned medium (GCTCM) in an in vitro chemotactic assay. Our results showed that GCTCM stimulates the migration of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, only osteoclasts containing less than three nuclei can migrate through 12-mu pore filters. Addition of monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta significantly reduced but did not abolish the chemotactic activity of GCTCM. Moreover, TGF-beta type II receptor mRNA has been demonstrated in the normal rat osteoclasts and may be involved in the chemotactic action of TGF-beta 1. We concluded that TGF-beta 1, possibly in concert with other cytokines, is involved in the recruitment of osteoclast-like cells in GCT by acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

  14. Release of Nonmuscle Myosin II from the Cytosolic Domain of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 Is Required for Target Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Unni M.; Dechert, Lisa; Davidson, Uchechukwu I.; Waitkus, Matthew; Mavrakis, Lori; Lyons, Katherine; Beach, Jordan R.; Li, Xiaoxia; Egelhoff, Thomas T.; Fox, Paul L.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) elicits its biological activities through activation of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1, also known as p55) and TNFR2 (also known as p75). The activities of both receptors are required for the TNF-α–induced proinflammatory response. The adaptor protein TNFR-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is critical for either p55- or p75-mediated activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, as well as for target gene expression. Here, we identified nonmuscle myosin II (myosin) as a binding partner of p75. TNF-α–dependent signaling by p75 and induction of target gene expression persisted for substantially longer in cells deficient in myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC, a component of myosin) than in cells replete in myosin. In resting endothelial cells, myosin was bound constitutively to the intracellular region of p75, a region that overlaps with the TRAF2-binding domain, and TNF-α caused the rapid dissociation of myosin from p75. At early time points after exposure to TNF-α, p75 activated Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1). Inhibition of ROCK1 activity blocked TNF-α–dependent phosphorylation of MRLC and the dissociation of myosin from p75. ROCK1-dependent release of myosin was necessary for the TNF-α–dependent recruitment of TRAF2 to p75 and for p75-specific activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Thus, our findings have revealed a previously uncharacterized, noncanonical regulatory function of myosin in cytokine signaling. PMID:23861542

  15. Type III Transforming Growth FactorReceptor Drives Cardiac Hypertrophy Through β-Arrestin2-Dependent Activation of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Song, Shu-Ying; Li, Yan-Chao; Sun, Fei; Ding, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Jiang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Mei-Tong; Dong, Chang-Jiang; Ji, Yong; Li, Hongliang; Chu, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-09-01

    The role of type III transforming growth factorreceptor (TβRIII) in the pathogenesis of heart diseases remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated the functional role and molecular mechanisms of TβRIII in the development of myocardial hypertrophy. Western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the expression of TβRIII was significantly elevated in human cardiac hypertrophic samples. Consistently, TβRIII expression was substantially increased in transverse aortic constriction (TAC)- and isoproterenol-induced mouse cardiac hypertrophy in vivo and in isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Overexpression of TβRIII resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was greatly attenuated by knockdown of TβRIII in vitro. Cardiac-specific transgenic expression of TβRIII independently led to cardiac hypertrophy in mice, which was further aggravated by isoproterenol and TAC treatment. Cardiac contractile function of the mice was not altered in TβRIII transgenic mice; however, TAC led to significantly decreased cardiac contractile function in TβRIII transgenic mice compared with control mice. Conversely, isoproterenol- and TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and TAC-induced cardiac contractile function impairment were partially reversed by suppression of TβRIII in vivo. Our data suggest that TβRIII mediates stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy through activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which requires a physical interaction of β-arrestin2 with both TβRIII and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our findings indicate that stress-induced increase in TβRIII expression results in cardiac hypertrophy through β-arrestin2-dependent activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and that transforming growth factor-β and β-adrenergic receptor signaling are not involved in spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy in cardiac

  16. Messenger RNA stockpile of cyclin B, insulin-like growth factor I, insulin-like growth factor II, insulin-like growth factor receptor Ib, and p53 in the rainbow trout oocyte in relation with developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Aegerter, Sandrine; Jalabert, Bernard; Bobe, Julien

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, correlations between the oocyte messenger RNA (mRNA) stockpile of Cyclin B, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-II), insulin-like growth factor receptor Ib (IGFR Ib), and p53 transcripts and the developmental competence of the oocyte were studied. For this purpose, post-ovulatory ageing was used as a tool to generate oocytes of varying developmental competence. Mature female rainbow trout were held at 12 degrees C and periodically checked for ovulation. Oocytes were collected from each female at ovulation and 5, 14, 21 days later. For each collected egg batch, the abundance of several mRNAs in the oocyte was analyzed by real-time PCR and embryo development was monitored after fertilization. Egg quality was estimated not only through embryonic survival but also by studying the occurrence of specific morphological abnormalities. The present study showed that oocyte post-ovulatory ageing was associated with variations of the relative abundance of several studied transcripts within the oocyte. In addition, the abundance of specific mRNAs could be correlated with either the embryonic survival or the occurrence of malformations. Thus, the abundance of IGFR Ib and Cyclin B transcripts in the oocyte was correlated with the occurrence of morphological abnormalities observed at yolk-sac resorption (negatively for IGFR Ib and positively for Cyclin B), while the maternal stockpile of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFR Ib mRNAs was positively correlated with embryonic survival. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor-II up-regulation during wound healing in previously irradiated graft beds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Wehrhan, Falk; Rödel, Franz; Amann, Kerstin; Radespiel-Tröger, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G

    2003-01-01

    Wound healing disorders may often present in patients with head and neck cancer after surgical interventions, particularly in preirradiated tissue. Inflammatory changes and the expression of cytokines can lead to induction of fibrosis. The isoforms of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta1-3) play a key role for this process. It has been shown that radiation treatment associated fibrosis is induced by TGFbeta1 and TGFbeta2, although the influence of radiation on the expression of the TGFbeta receptor-II (TGFbetaR-II) involved in the signal transduction of TGFbeta remains elusive. The objective of this in vivo study was to analyze the expression profile of TGFbetaR-II in the graft bed and in the transition area between graft and graft bed after surgery with and without prior radiation treatment to compare with the expression profiles of activated TGFbeta1 and latency-associated peptide. A total of 48 Wistar rats (male, weight 300-500 g) were used in the study. Eighteen rats were irradiated in the neck region (3 x 10 Gy) without transplantation. A free myocutaneous gracilis flap was transplanted in 30 rats, of which 16 animals were preirradiated in the neck region (3 x 10 Gy) and 14 animals were not irradiated at all. Tissue samples were taken postoperatively from the transition area between the graft and the graft bed and from the graft bed itself after 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. Tissue samples were taken from the irradiated neck region and the non-irradiated groin region 0, 4, 7, 11, 14, and 28 days after the end of the exposure. The expression of TGFbetaR-II, activated TGFbeta1 and latency-associated peptide was analyzed immunohistochemically both qualitatively and quantitatively (labeling index). The success rate for graft healing was 75% in the previously irradiated group with 30 Gy, and 86% in the non-irradiated group. Following radiation alone a significantly (p = 0.04) increased TGFbetaR-II expression in the neck was revealed 2-4 weeks following

  18. Differential Regulation of Smad3 and of the Type II Transforming Growth FactorReceptor in Mitosis: Implications for Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hirschhorn, Tal; Barizilay, Lior; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) depends on cellular context. This context is changed in mitosis through selective inhibition of vesicle trafficking, reduction in cell volume and the activation of mitotic kinases. We hypothesized that these alterations in cell context may induce a differential regulation of Smads and TGF-β receptors. We tested this hypothesis in mesenchymal-like ovarian cancer cells, arrested (or not) in mitosis with 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2). In mitosis, without TGF-β stimulation, Smad3 was phosphorylated at the C-terminus and linker regions and localized to the mitotic spindle. Phosphorylated Smad3 interacted with the negative regulators of Smad signaling, Smurf2 and Ski, and failed to induce a transcriptional response. Moreover, in cells arrested in mitosis, Smad3 levels were progressively reduced. These phosphorylations and reduction in the levels of Smad3 depended on ERK activation and Mps1 kinase activity, and were abrogated by increasing the volume of cells arrested in mitosis with hypotonic medium. Furthermore, an Mps1-dependent phosphorylation of GFP-Smad3 was also observed upon its over-expression in interphase cells, suggesting a mechanism of negative regulation which counters increases in Smad3 concentration. Arrest in mitosis also induced a block in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβRII). Moreover, following the stimulation of mitotic cells with TGF-β, the proteasome-mediated attenuation of TGF-β receptor activity, the degradation and clearance of TβRII from the plasma membrane, and the clearance of the TGF-β ligand from the medium were compromised, and the C-terminus phosphorylation of Smad3 was prolonged. We propose that the reduction in Smad3 levels, its linker phosphorylation, and its association with negative regulators (observed in mitosis prior to ligand stimulation) represent a signal attenuating mechanism. This mechanism is balanced by the retention of active TGF

  19. Differential regulation of Smad3 and of the type II transforming growth factorreceptor in mitosis: implications for signaling.

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, Tal; Barizilay, Lior; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) depends on cellular context. This context is changed in mitosis through selective inhibition of vesicle trafficking, reduction in cell volume and the activation of mitotic kinases. We hypothesized that these alterations in cell context may induce a differential regulation of Smads and TGF-β receptors. We tested this hypothesis in mesenchymal-like ovarian cancer cells, arrested (or not) in mitosis with 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2). In mitosis, without TGF-β stimulation, Smad3 was phosphorylated at the C-terminus and linker regions and localized to the mitotic spindle. Phosphorylated Smad3 interacted with the negative regulators of Smad signaling, Smurf2 and Ski, and failed to induce a transcriptional response. Moreover, in cells arrested in mitosis, Smad3 levels were progressively reduced. These phosphorylations and reduction in the levels of Smad3 depended on ERK activation and Mps1 kinase activity, and were abrogated by increasing the volume of cells arrested in mitosis with hypotonic medium. Furthermore, an Mps1-dependent phosphorylation of GFP-Smad3 was also observed upon its over-expression in interphase cells, suggesting a mechanism of negative regulation which counters increases in Smad3 concentration. Arrest in mitosis also induced a block in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβRII). Moreover, following the stimulation of mitotic cells with TGF-β, the proteasome-mediated attenuation of TGF-β receptor activity, the degradation and clearance of TβRII from the plasma membrane, and the clearance of the TGF-β ligand from the medium were compromised, and the C-terminus phosphorylation of Smad3 was prolonged. We propose that the reduction in Smad3 levels, its linker phosphorylation, and its association with negative regulators (observed in mitosis prior to ligand stimulation) represent a signal attenuating mechanism. This mechanism is balanced by the retention of active TGF

  20. Experimental pain ratings and reactivity of cortisol and soluble tumor necrosis factorreceptor II following a trial of hypnosis: results of a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Burel R; Quinn, Noel B; Kronfli, Tarek; King, Christopher D; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert R; Stapleton, Laura M; McGuire, Lynanne

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence supports the efficacy of hypnosis for reducing the pain associated with experimental stimulation and various acute and chronic conditions; however, the mechanisms explaining how hypnosis exerts its effects remain less clear. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines represent potential targets for investigation given their purported roles in the perpetuation of painful conditions; yet, no clinical trials have thus far examined the influence of hypnosis on these mechanisms. Healthy participants, highly susceptible to the effects of hypnosis, were randomized to either a hypnosis intervention or a no-intervention control. Using a cold pressor task, assessments of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were collected prior to the intervention (Pre) and following the intervention (Post) along with pain-provoked changes in salivary cortisol and the soluble tumor necrosis factorreceptor II (sTNFαRII). Compared with the no-intervention control, data analyses revealed that hypnosis significantly reduced pain intensity and pain unpleasantness. Hypnosis was not significantly associated with suppression of cortisol or sTNFαRII reactivity to acute pain from Pre to Post; however, the effect sizes for these associations were medium-sized. Overall, the findings from this randomized controlled pilot study support the importance of a future large-scale study on the effects of hypnosis for modulating pain-related changes of the HPA axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Comparison of drug and cell-based delivery: engineered adult mesenchymal stem cells expressing soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II prevent arthritis in mouse and rat animal models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linda N; Wang, Gang; Hendricks, Kyle; Lee, Keunmyoung; Bohnlein, Ernst; Junker, Uwe; Mosca, Joseph D

    2013-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with unknown etiology where tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) plays a critical role. Etanercept, a recombinant fusion protein of human soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II (hsTNFR) linked to the Fc portion of human IgG1, is used to treat RA based on the rationale that sTNFR binds TNFα and blocks TNFα-mediated inflammation. We compared hsTNFR protein delivery from genetically engineered human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with etanercept. Blocking TNFα-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on transduced hMSCs and inhibition of nitric oxide production from TNFα-treated bovine chondrocytes by conditioned culture media from transduced hMSCs demonstrated the functionality of the hsTNFR construction. Implanted hsTNFR-transduced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduced mouse serum circulating TNFα generated from either implanted TNFα-expressing cells or lipopolysaccharide induction more effectively than etanercept (TNFα, 100%; interleukin [IL]-1α, 90%; and IL-6, 60% within 6 hours), suggesting faster clearance of the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR)-TNFα complex from the animals. In vivo efficacy of sTNFR-transduced MSCs was illustrated in two (immune-deficient and immune-competent) arthritic rodent models. In the antibody-induced arthritis BalbC/SCID mouse model, intramuscular injection of hsTNFR-transduced hMSCs reduced joint inflammation by 90% compared with untransduced hMSCs; in the collagen-induced arthritis Fischer rat model, both sTNFR-transduced rat MSCs and etanercept inhibited joint inflammation by 30%. In vitro chondrogenesis assays showed the ability of TNFα and IL1α, but not interferon γ, to inhibit hMSC differentiation to chondrocytes, illustrating an additional negative role for inflammatory cytokines in joint repair. The data support the utility of hMSCs as therapeutic gene delivery vehicles and their potential to be used in alleviating inflammation

  2. De-ubiquitinating enzyme, USP11, promotes transforming growth factor β-1 signaling through stabilization of transforming growth factor β receptor II

    PubMed Central

    Jacko, A M; Nan, L; Li, S; Tan, J; Zhao, J; Kass, D J; Zhao, Y

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) signaling pathway plays a central role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Two TGFβ-1 receptors, TβRI and TβRII, mediate this pathway. TβRI protein stability, as mediated by the ubiquitin/de-ubiquitination system, has been well studied; however, the molecular regulation of TβRII still remains unclear. Here we reveal that a de-ubiquitinating enzyme, USP11, promotes TGFβ-1 signaling through de-ubiquitination and stabilization of TβRII. We elucidate the role that mitoxantrone (MTX), an USP11 inhibitor, has in the attenuation of TGFβ-1 signaling. Inhibition or downregulation of USP11 results in increases in TβRII ubiquitination and reduction of TβRII stability. Subsequently, TGFβ-1 signaling is greatly attenuated, as shown by the decreases in phosphorylation of SMAD2/3 levels as well as that of fibronectin (FN) and smooth muscle actin (SMA). Overexpression of USP11 reduces TβRII ubiquitination and increases TβRII stabilization, thereby elevating phosphorylation of SMAD2/3 and the ultimate expression of FN and SMA. Further, elevated expression of USP11 and TβRII were detected in lung tissues from bleomycin-challenged mice and IPF patients. Therefore, USP11 may contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis by stabilization of TβRII and promotion of TGFβ-1 signaling. This study provides mechanistic evidence for development of USP11 inhibitors as potential antifibrotic drugs for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27853171

  3. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  4. Solar Ultraviolet Irradiation Reduces Collagen in Photoaged Human Skin by Blocking Transforming Growth Factor-β Type II Receptor/Smad Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Taihao; He, Tianyuan; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J.; Fisher, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation from the sun reduces production of type I procollagen (COLI), the major structural protein in human skin. This reduction is a key feature of the pathophysiology of premature skin aging (photoaging). Photoaging is the most common form of skin damage and is associated with skin carcinoma. TGF-β/Smad pathway is the major regulator of type I procollagen synthesis in human skin. We have previously reported that UV irradiation impairs transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling in mink lung epithelial cells. We have investigated the mechanism of UV irradiation impairment of the TGF-β/Smad pathway and the impact of this impairment on type I procollagen production in human skin fibroblasts, the major collagen-producing cells in skin. We report here that UV irradiation impairs TGF-β/Smad pathway in human skin by down-regulation of TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII). This loss of TβRII occurs within 8 hours after UV irradiation and precedes down-regulation of type I procollagen expression in human skin in vivo. In human skin fibroblasts, UV-induced TβRII down-regulation is mediated by transcriptional repression and results in 90% reduction of specific, cell-surface binding of TGF-β. This loss of TβRII prevents downstream activation of Smad2/3 by TGF-β, thereby reducing expression of type I procollagen. Preventing loss of TβRII by overexpression protects against UV inhibition of type I procollagen gene expression in human skin fibroblasts. UV-induced down-regulation of TβRII, with attendant reduction of type I procollagen production, is a critical molecular mechanism in the pathophysiology of photoaging. PMID:15331399

  5. Endogenous interleukin-22 protects against inflammatory bowel disease but not autoimmune cholangitis in dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, G-X; Sun, Y; Tsuneyama, K; Zhang, W; Leung, P S C; He, X-S; Ansari, A A; Bowlus, C; Ridgway, W M; Gershwin, M E

    2016-08-01

    During chronic inflammation, interleukin (IL)-22 expression is up-regulated in both CD4 and CD8 T cells, exerting a protective role in infections. However, in autoimmunity, IL-22 appears to have either a protective or a pathogenic role in a variety of murine models of autoimmunity and, by extrapolation, in humans. It is not clear whether IL-22 itself mediates inflammation or is a by-product of inflammation. We have taken advantage of the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice that develop both inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune cholangitis and studied the role and the biological function of IL-22 by generating IL-22(-/-) dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data suggest that the influence of IL-22 on autoimmunity is determined in part by the local microenvironment. In particular, IL-22 deficiency exacerbates tissue injury in inflammatory bowel disease, but has no influence on either the hepatocytes or cholangiocytes in the same model. These data take on particular significance in the previously defined effects of IL-17A, IL-12p40 and IL-23p19 deficiency and emphasize that, in colitis, there is a dominant role of IL-23/T helper type 17 (Th17) signalling. Furthermore, the levels of IL-22 are IL-23-dependent. The use of cytokine therapy in patients with autoimmune disease has significant potential, but must take into account the overlapping and often promiscuous effects that can theoretically exacerbate inflammation. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  6. Cyclin D-1, interleukin-6, HER-2/neu, transforming growth factor receptor-II and prediction of relapse in women with early stage, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer treated with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Muss, Hyman B; Bunn, Janice Yanushka; Crocker, Abigail; Plaut, Karen; Koh, James; Heintz, Nick; Rincon, Mercedes; Weaver, Donald L; Tam, Diane; Beatty, Barbara; Kaufman, Peter; Donovan, Michael; Verbel, David; Weiss, Linda

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that amplification or overexpression of HER-2 (c-erbB-2), the Ki-67 antigen (Mib1), cyclin D-1 (CD1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), or the transforming growth factor beta II receptor, (TGFbetaRII), would predict relapse in women with early stage, estrogen (ER) and/or progesterone receptor (PR) positive breast cancer treated with tamoxifen. Conditional logistic regression models and a new novel analytic method - support vector machines (SVM) were used to assess the effect of multiple variables on treatment outcome. All patients had stage I-IIIa breast cancer (AJCC version 5). We paired 63 patients who were disease-free on or after tamoxifen with 63 patients who had relapsed (total 126); both disease-free and relapsed patients were matched by duration of tamoxifen therapy and time to recurrence. These 126 patients also served as the training set for SVM analysis and 18 other patients used as a validation set for SVM. In a multivariate analysis, larger tumor size, increasing extent of lymph node involvement, and poorer tumor grade were significant predictors of relapse. When HER-2 or CD1 were added to the model both were borderline significant predictors of relapse. The SVM model, after including all of the clinical and marker variables in the 126 patients as a training set, correctly predicted relapse in 78% of the 18 patient validation samples. In this trial, HER-2 and CD1 proved of borderline significance as predictive factors for recurrence on tamoxifen. An SVM model that included all clinical and biologic variables correctly predicted relapse in >75% of patients.

  7. Pretransplant angiotensin II type 1-receptor antibodies are a risk factor for earlier detection of de novo HLA donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Eric; Arreola-Guerra, José M; Hernández-Méndez, Erick A; Salcedo, Isaac; Castelán, Natalia; Uribe-Uribe, Norma O; Vilatobá, Mario; Contreras-Saldívar, Alan G; Sánchez-Cedillo, Aczel I; Ramírez, Julia B; de Rungs, David; Granados, Julio; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E; Alberú, Josefina

    2016-10-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antibodies (AT1Rabs) have been associated with significantly reduced graft survival. Earlier graft loss has been observed in patients who had pretransplant AT1Rabs and posttransplant donor-specific antibodies (DSA). The main goal of this retrospective cohort study was to examine the association between AT1Rabs and the time period to detection of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DSA) posttransplantation in living donor kidney transplant recipients (KTR). The analysis included 141 KTRs. Pretransplant frozen serum samples were tested for AT1Rabs by ELISA and HLA-DSA by SAB (Luminex) at both the pre- and post-KT time points. The median AT1Rab level was 9.13 U (interquartile range 5.22-14.33). After a mean follow-up period of 3.55 years, 48 patients were found to harbour de novo HLA-DSAs. The presence of AT1Rabs [hazard ratio (HR) 1.009, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.002-1.01, P = 0.010], male-to-male transplantation (HR 2.57, 95% CI 1.42-4.67, P = 0.002) and antecedent borderline changes or acute cellular rejection (ACR) (HR 2.47, 95% CI 1.29-4.75, P = 0.006) were significantly associated with de novo DSA detection. A dose-dependent association between AT1Rab levels (<10 U, 10.1-16.9 U, 17-29.9 U and >30 U) and de novo DSA detection was observed (log-rank P = 0.0031). After multivariate analysis of AT1Rab levels (continuous variable), AT1Rabs >30 U, male-to-male transplantation, donor age, higher class I percentage of Panel Reactive Antibody and antecedent borderline changes or ACR remained as independent significant risk factors for the detection of de novo DSAs. The findings suggest that higher levels of pretransplant circulating antibodies against AT1R (>30 U) in kidney graft recipients constitute an independent risk factor for earlier de novo HLA-DSA detection during the posttransplant period. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of the Igf-II Binding Site of the IGF-II/MAN-6-P Receptor Extracellular Domain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmroudi, Farideh

    1995-01-01

    In mammals, insulin-like growth factor II (IGF -II) and glycoproteins bearing the mannose 6-phosphate (Man -6-P) recognition marker bind with high affinity to the same receptor. The functional consequences of IGF-II binding to the receptor at the cell surface are not clear. In these studies, we sought to broaden our understanding of the functional regions of the receptor regarding its IGF -II binding site. The IGF-II binding/cross-linking domain of the IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor was mapped by sequencing receptor fragments covalently attached to IGF-II. Purified rat placental or bovine liver receptors were affinity-labeled, with ^{125}I-IGF-II and digested with endoproteinase Glu-C. Analysis of digests by gel electrophoresis revealed a major radiolabeled band of 18 kDa, which was purified by gel filtration chromatography followed by reverse-phase HPLC and electroblotting. Sequence analysis revealed that, the peptide S(H)VNSXPMF, located within extracellular repeat 10 and beginning with serine 1488 of the bovine receptor, was the best candidate for the IGF-II cross-linked peptide. These data indicated that residues within repeats 10-11 were important for IGF -II binding. To define the location of the IGF-II binding site further, a nested set of six human receptor cDNA constructs was designed to produce epitope-tagged fusion proteins encompassing the region between repeats 8 and 11 of the human IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor extracellular domain. These truncated receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, immunoprecipitated and analyzed for their abilities to bind and cross-link to IGF-II. All of the constructs were capable of binding/cross-linking to IGF-II, except for the 9.0-11 construct. Displacement curve analysis indicated that the truncated receptors were approximately equivalent in IGF-II binding affinity, but were of 5- to 10-fold lower affinity than full-length receptors. Sequencing of the 9.0-11 construct indicated the presence of a point mutation

  9. Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) 022: A Phase II Trial of Neratinib for Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Rachel A; Gelman, Rebecca S; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Melisko, Michelle E; Hess, Kenneth R; Connolly, Roisin M; Van Poznak, Catherine H; Niravath, Polly A; Puhalla, Shannon L; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Moy, Beverly; Herold, Christina; Liu, Minetta C; Lowe, Alarice; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Ryabin, Nicole; Farooq, Sarah; Lawler, Elizabeth; Rimawi, Mothaffar F; Krop, Ian E; Wolff, Antonio C; Winer, Eric P; Lin, Nancy U

    2016-03-20

    Evidence-based treatments for metastatic, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer in the CNS are limited. Neratinib is an irreversible inhibitor of erbB1, HER2, and erbB4, with promising activity in HER2-positive breast cancer; however, its activity in the CNS is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of treatment with neratinib in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases in a multicenter, phase II open-label trial. Eligible patients were those with HER2-positive brain metastases (≥ 1 cm in longest dimension) who experienced progression in the CNS after one or more line of CNS-directed therapy, such as whole-brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and/or surgical resection. Patients received neratinib 240 mg orally once per day, and tumors were assessed every two cycles. The primary endpoint was composite CNS objective response rate (ORR), requiring all of the following: ≥ 50% reduction in volumetric sum of target CNS lesions and no progression of non-target lesions, new lesions, escalating corticosteroids, progressive neurologic signs/symptoms, or non-CNS progression--the threshold for success was five of 40 responders. Forty patients were enrolled between February 2012 and June 2013; 78% of patients had previous whole-brain radiotherapy. Three women achieved a partial response (CNS objective response rate, 8%; 95% CI, 2% to 22%). The median number of cycles received was two (range, one to seven cycles), with a median progression-free survival of 1.9 months. Five women received six or more cycles. The most common grade ≥ 3 event was diarrhea (occurring in 21% of patients taking prespecified loperamide prophylaxis and 28% of those without prophylaxis). Patients in the study experienced a decreased quality of life over time. Although neratinib had low activity and did not meet our threshold for success, 12.5% of patients received six or more cycles. Studies combining neratinib with chemotherapy in patients

  10. Effect of iron deficiency on the expression of insulin-like growth factor-II and its receptor in neuronal and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Morales González, E; Contreras, I; Estrada, J A

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that iron deficiency modifies the normal function of the central nervous system and alters cognitive abilities. When cellular damage occurs in the central nervous system, neuroprotective mechanisms, such as the production of neurotrophic factors, are essential in order for nervous tissue to function correctly. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF- II) is a neurotrophic factor that was recently shown to be involved in the normal functioning of cognitive processes in animal models. However, the impact of iron deficiency on the expression and function of this molecule has not yet been clarified. Mixed primary cell cultures from the central nervous system were collected to simulate iron deficiency using deferoxamine. The expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-IIR was determined with the western blot test. We observed increased expression of IGF-II, along with a corresponding decrease in the expression of IGF-IIR, in iron-deficient mixed primary cell cultures. We did not observe alterations in the expression of these proteins in isolated microglia or neuronal cultures under the same conditions. We did not detect differences in the expression of IGF-I and IGF-IR in iron-deficient cultures. In vitro iron deficiency increases the expression of IGF-II in mixed glial cell cultures, which may have a beneficial effect on brain tissue homeostasis in a situation in which iron availability is decreased. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. [Angiotensin II receptor antagonists: different or equivalent?].

    PubMed

    Mounier-Vehier, C; Devos, P

    ARA-II: Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA-II) belong to a recent class of antihypertensive drugs whose mechanism of action is similar to converting enzyme inhibitors (CEI). ARA-II are particularly interesting due to the excellent clinical and biological tolerance, similar to placebo, and their antihypertensive efficacy, comparable with classical drug classes. PUBLISHED TRIALS: A meta-analysis, published by Conlin in the American Journal of Hypertension, suggests that ARA-II, specifically losartan, valsartan, irbesartan and candesartan, have an equipotent blood pressure lowering effect. The careful lecture of this meta-analysis however discloses a faulty methodology from which no valid conclusion can be drawn. Since this early publication, several other comparative studies have been published. These multicentric, randomized double-blind studies enrolled a sufficient number of patients and demonstrated a clinical difference between certain ARA-II at usual dosages. CLINICAL PRACTICE: These studies do have an impact on everyday practice. For the practitioner, the goal is to obtain and then maintain a long-term and optimal reduction in the blood pressure level (reduction or prevention of target-organ disorders and cardiovascular complications of high blood pressure). This reduction in the cardiovascular risk will also depend directly on tolerance and compliance to the antihypertensive treatment. This element must also be considered in assessing treatment efficacy, independent of the blood pressure lowering effect. The results of several other studies will be published in 2001-2003. These large-scale studies on ARA-II related morbidity and mortality will be most useful in determining the role of these drugs in different therapeutic strategies compared with other drug classes.

  12. Sex differences in NMDA GluN1 plasticity in rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons containing corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor following slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, T A; Dodos, M; Woods, C; Marques-Lopes, J; Justice, N J; Iadecola, C; Pickel, V M; Glass, M J; Milner, T A

    2015-10-29

    There are profound, yet incompletely understood, sex differences in the neurogenic regulation of blood pressure. Both corticotropin signaling and glutamate receptor plasticity, which differ between males and females, are known to play important roles in the neural regulation of blood pressure. However, the relationship between hypertension and glutamate plasticity in corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-receptive neurons in brain cardiovascular regulatory areas, including the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), is not understood. In the present study, we used dual-label immuno-electron microscopy to analyze sex differences in slow-pressor angiotensin II (AngII) hypertension with respect to the subcellular distribution of the obligatory NMDA glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in the RVLM and PVN. Studies were conducted in mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) under the control of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF1) promoter (i.e., CRF1-EGFP reporter mice). By light microscopy, GluN1-immunoreactivity (ir) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons of the RVLM and PVN. Moreover, in both regions tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons. In response to AngII, male mice showed an elevation in blood pressure that was associated with an increase in the proportion of GluN1 on presumably functional areas of the plasma membrane (PM) in CRF1-EGFP dendritic profiles in the RVLM. In female mice, AngII was neither associated with an increase in blood pressure nor an increase in PM GluN1 in the RVLM. Unlike the RVLM, AngII-mediated hypertension had no effect on GluN1 localization in CRF1-EGFP dendrites in the PVN of either male or female mice. These studies provide an anatomical mechanism for sex-differences in the convergent modulation of RVLM catecholaminergic neurons by CRF and glutamate. Moreover, these results suggest that sexual dimorphism in

  13. A dominant inhibitory mutant of the type II transforming growth factor beta receptor in the malignant progression of a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, P I; Lindemann, D; DeCoteau, J F; Perlman, R; Yankelev, H; Hille, M; Kadin, M E; Lodish, H F

    1996-01-01

    In many cancers, inactivating mutations in both alleles of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) type 11 receptor (TbetaRII) gene occur and correlate with loss of sensitivity to TGF-beta. Here we describe a novel mechanism for loss of sensitivity to growth inhibition by TGF-beta in tumor development. Mac-1 cells, isolated from the blood of a patient with an indolent form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, express wild-type TbetaRII and are sensitive to TGF-beta. Mac-2A cells, clonally related to Mac-1 and isolated from a skin nodule of the same patient at a later, clinically aggressive stage of lymphoma, are resistant to TGF-beta. They express both the wild-type TbetaRII and a receptor with a single point mutation (Asp-404-Gly [D404G]) in the kinase domain (D404G-->TbetaRII); no TbetaRI or TbetaRII is found on the plasma membrane, suggesting that D404G-TbetaRII dominantly inhibits the function of the wild-type receptor by inhibiting its appearance on the plasma membrane. Indeed, inducible expression, under control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter, of D404G-TbetaRII in TGF-beta- sensitive Mac-1 cells as well as in Hep3B hepatoma cells results in resistance to TGF-beta and disappearance of cell surface TbetaRI and TbetaRII. Overexpression of wild-type TbetaRII in Mac-2A cells restores cell surface TbetaRI and TbetaRH and sensitivity to TGF-beta. The ability of the D404G-TbetaRH to dominantly inhibit function of wild-type TGF-beta receptors represents a new mechanism for loss of sensitivity to the growth-inhibitory functions of TGF-beta in tumor development. PMID:8668164

  14. Localization of gene and protein expressions of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and tumor necrosis factor receptor types I and II in the bovine corpus luteum during the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Sakumoto, R; Vermehren, M; Kenngott, R A; Okuda, K; Sinowatz, F

    2011-10-01

    One of the many roles of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is to control mammalian corpus luteum (CL) PG synthesis and apoptotic cell death. Here, the cellular localization of TNF-α and its type I (TNF-RI) and type II (TNF-RII) receptors in bovine luteal tissue were analyzed using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Transcripts for TNF-α were expressed in bovine CL throughout the estrous cycle, but were significantly more abundant (P < 0.01) at the regressed luteal stage than at the other stages. Localization of TNF-α transcripts and protein were observed in large and small bovine luteal cells, as well as in immune cells. Moreover, transcripts for TNF-RI and TNF-RII were expressed in bovine CL throughout the estrous cycle. The abundance of TNF-RII transcripts was greater (P < 0.01) at the regressed luteal stage than at the other stages, whereas TNF-RI transcript abundance did not significantly change. Expression of TNF-RI and TNF-RII transcripts and proteins were observed in both the large and small luteal cells, and the proteins were also expressed in the immune cells and vascular endothelial cells. These results suggest that TNF-α sources include immune cells, as well as large and small luteal cells, and that TNF-RI and TNF-RII are present in the luteal cells of the bovine CL.

  15. GDP-mannose-4,6-dehydratase (GMDS) deficiency renders colon cancer cells resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor- and CD95-mediated apoptosis by inhibiting complex II formation.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Kenta; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2011-12-16

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through binding to TRAIL receptors, death receptor 4 (DR4), and DR5. TRAIL has potential therapeutic value against cancer because of its selective cytotoxic effects on several transformed cell types. Fucosylation of proteins and lipids on the cell surface is a very important posttranslational modification that is involved in many cellular events. Recently, we found that a deficiency in GDP-mannose-4,6-dehydratase (GMDS) rendered colon cancer cells resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, resulting in tumor development and metastasis by escape from tumor immune surveillance. GMDS is an indispensable regulator of cellular fucosylation. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of inhibition of TRAIL signaling by GMDS deficiency. DR4, but not DR5, was found to be fucosylated; however, GMDS deficiency inhibited both DR4- and DR5-mediated apoptosis despite the absence of fucosylation on DR5. In addition, GMDS deficiency also inhibited CD95-mediated apoptosis but not the intrinsic apoptosis pathway induced by anti-cancer drugs. Binding of TRAIL and CD95 ligand to their cognate receptors primarily leads to formation of a complex comprising the receptor, FADD, and caspase-8, referred to as the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). GMDS deficiency did not affect formation of the primary DISC or recruitment to and activation of caspase-8 on the DISC. However, formation of secondary FADD-dependent complex II, comprising caspase-8 and cFLIP, was significantly inhibited by GMDS deficiency. These results indicate that GMDS regulates the formation of secondary complex II from the primary DISC independent of direct fucosylation of death receptors.

  16. Evidence for selective expression of angiotensin II receptors on atretic follicles in the rat ovary: an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Daud, A.I.; Bumpus, F.M.; Husain, A.

    1988-06-01

    Ovarian angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors display a cyclical pattern of variation during the rat estrous cycle. Ang II receptors, estimated by the specific binding of the Ang II receptor antagonist (/sup 125/I)iodo-(Sar1,Ile8) Ang II to ovarian membranes, were lowest at estrus (binding site density (Bmax) = 35 +/- 2 fmol/mg; binding site affinity (KD) = 2.0 +/- 0.2 nM) and highest at diestrus I (Bmax = 59 +/- 3 fmol/mg; KD = 1.6 +/- 0.1 nM). We have previously shown that Ang II receptors in the rat ovary predominantly exist on the granulosa cell layer of a subpopulation of follicles. Our present studies show that the Ang II receptor-containing follicles in the rat ovary are mainly atretic (approximately 80%) or show signs of early atresia (approximately 15%) during all stages of the estrous cycle. A small number of Ang II receptor-containing follicles were healthy (approximately 5%). In contrast to the Ang II receptor-containing follicles, the FSH receptor-containing follicles were predominantly healthy (greater than 90%). Follicles which contained both Ang II receptors and FSH receptors were mainly early atretic. Since Ang II receptor-containing follicles in the rat ovary were mainly atretic these studies suggest that in the rat Ang II may be a major factor in regulating the function of atretic ovarian follicles.

  17. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  18. Unexpected binding of an octapeptide to the angiotensin II receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, R.L.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Rosenberg, E.; Hoeprich, P.; Teitelbaum, A.; Brunck, T.; Colby, C.B.; Gloff, C.

    1987-12-01

    An octapeptide, TBI-22 (Lys-Gly-Val-Tyr-Ile, His-Ala-Leu), inhibited binding of angiotensin II by a solubilized angiotensin receptor partially purified from rabbit liver. This inhibition appears to result from competition for binding to the same receptor. Radioiodinated TBI-22, like angiotensin II, bound to the solubilized receptor with an affinity such that the binding was inhibited 50% by unlabeled TBI-22 or angiotensin II at nanomolar concentrations. The binding reaction, like that for angiotensin II, required p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. TBI-22 and angiotensin II share the sequence Val-Tyr-Ile-His; this tetrapeptide alone, however, did not inhibit binding of angiotensin II. Replacement of the tyrosine residue by aspartic acid in TBI-22 greatly reduced the ability of the peptide to compete with angiotensin II for binding, suggesting an important contribution of this residue to the configuration required for recognition by the receptor.

  19. An angiotensin II receptor antagonist suppresses running-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis in rat.

    PubMed

    Mukuda, Takao; Sugiyama, Hiroyuki

    2007-06-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is enhanced by voluntary running exercise in adult mammals. To elucidate the factors involved in this enhancement, we examined the effects of losartan, an antagonist of angiotensin II type 1 receptors, on the running-enhanced neurogenesis in the adult rat hippocampus. When losartan was administered orally via the drinking water, the running-enhanced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone was almost completely suppressed, indicating that this enhancement may be mediated by angiotensin II and its receptors.

  20. Experimental pain ratings and reactivity of cortisol and soluble tumor necrosis factorreceptor II following a trial of hypnosis: Results of a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Burel R.; Quinn, Noel B.; Kronfli, Tarek; King, Christopher D.; Page, Gayle G.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert R.; Stapleton, Laura M.; McGuire, Lynanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective Current evidence supports the efficacy of hypnosis for reducing the pain associated with experimental stimulation and various acute and chronic conditions; however, the mechanisms explaining how hypnosis exerts its effects remain less clear. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines represent potential targets for investigation given their purported roles in the perpetuation of painful conditions; yet, no clinical trials have thus far examined the influence of hypnosis on these mechanisms. Design Healthy participants, highly susceptible to the effects of hypnosis, were randomized to either a hypnosis intervention or a no-intervention control. Using a cold pressor task, assessments of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were collected prior to the intervention (Pre) and following the intervention (Post) along with pain-provoked changes in salivary cortisol and the soluble receptor of tumor necrosis factor-α (sTNFαRII). Results Compared to the no-intervention control, data analyses revealed that hypnosis significantly reduced pain intensity and pain unpleasantness. Hypnosis was not significantly associated with suppression of cortisol or sTNFαRII reactivity to acute pain from Pre to Post; however, the effect sizes for these associations were medium-sized. Conclusions Overall, the findings from this randomized controlled pilot study support the importance of a future large-scale study on the effects of hypnosis for modulating pain-related changes of the HPA axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:22233394

  1. Decorin inhibits the proliferation of HepG2 cells by elevating the expression of transforming growth factorreceptor II.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfeng; Wang, Xuesong; Wang, Zhaohui; Ju, Wenbo; Wang, Dawei

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of decorin (DCN) on the proliferation of human hepatoma HepG2 cells and the involvement of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway. A vector containing DCN was transfected into HepG2 cells with the use of Lipofectamine 2000. Cell proliferation was assessed with an MTT assay, and western blot analysis was used to detect the protein expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-βRI), phosphorylated TGF-βRI, p15 and TGF-βRII. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing was performed to knock down the target gene. The results indicated that, compared with the control group, cell proliferation was significantly decreased in HepG2 cells transfected with DCN. In addition, DCN transfection significantly increased the phosphorylation level of TGF-βRI in HepG2 cells. The expression of the downstream factor p15 was also significantly elevated in the DCN-transfected HepG2 cells. Furthermore, DCN transfection significantly elevated the expression level of TGF-βRII in HepG2 cells. By contrast, the silencing of TGF-βRII significantly decreased the phosphorylation of TGF-βRI in DCN-transfected HepG2 cells. In addition, TGF-βRII silencing abolished the effects of DCN on the proliferation of HepG2 cells. In conclusion, DCN elevated the expression level of TGF-βRII, increased the phosphorylation level of TGF-βRI, enhanced the expression of p15, and finally inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 cells. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the role of DCN in the pathogenesis of hepatic carcinoma and assist in the disease treatment.

  2. Attenuation of corneal myofibroblast development through nanoparticle-mediated soluble transforming growth factor-β type II receptor (sTGFβRII) gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajay; Rodier, Jason T.; Tandon, Ashish; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To explore (i) the potential of polyethylenimine (PEI)-DNA nanoparticles as a vector for delivering genes into human corneal fibroblasts, and (ii) whether the nanoparticle-mediated soluble extracellular domain of the transforming growth factor–β type II receptor (sTGFβRII) gene therapy could be used to reduce myofibroblasts and fibrosis in the cornea using an in vitro model. Methods PEI-DNA nanoparticles were prepared at a nitrogen-to-phosphate ratio of 30 by mixing linear PEI and a plasmid encoding sTGFβRII conjugated to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) portion of human immunoglobulin. The PEI-DNA polyplex formation was confirmed through gel retardation assay. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) were generated from donor corneas; myofibroblasts and fibrosis were induced with TGFβ1 (1 ng/ml) stimulation employing serum-free conditions. The sTGFβRII conjugated to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin gene was introduced into HCF using either PEI-DNA nanoparticles or Lipofectamine. Suitable negative and positive controls to compare selected nanoparticle and therapeutic gene efficiency were included. Delivered gene copies and mRNA (mRNA) expression were quantified with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and protein with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The changes in fibrosis parameters were quantified by measuring fibrosis marker α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) mRNA and protein levels with qPCR, immunostaining, and immunoblotting. Cytotoxicity was determined using cellular viability, proliferation, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results PEI readily bound to plasmids to form nanoparticular polyplexes and exhibited much greater transfection efficiency (p<0.01) than the commercial reagent Lipofectamine. The PEI-DNA-treated cultures showed 4.5×104 plasmid copies/µg DNA in real-time qPCR and 7,030±87 pg/ml sTGFβRII protein in ELISA analyses, whereas Lipofectamine-transfected cultures demonstrated 1.9

  3. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  4. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  5. Customized chemotherapy based on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status for elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shiro; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Masago, Katsuhiro; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Tomii, Keisuke; Kaneda, Toshihiko; Hirabayashi, Masataka; Kunimasa, Kei; Morizane, Toshio; Mio, Tadashi

    2012-05-21

    Elderly patients are more vulnerable to toxicity from chemotherapy. Activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are associated with enhanced response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. We studied patients with advanced NSCLC for whom treatment was customized based on EGFR mutation status. We screened 57 chemotherapy-naïve patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed NSCLC, stage IIIB or IV, aged 70 years or older, and with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1, for EGFR exon 19 codon 746-750 deletion and exon 21 L858R mutation. Twenty-two patients with EGFR mutations received gefitinib; 32 patients without mutations received vinorelbine or gemcitabine. The primary endpoint was the response rate. The response rate was 45.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 24.4%, 67.8%) in patients with EGFR mutations and 18.8% (95% CI: 7.2%, 36.4%) in patients without EGFR mutations. The median overall survival was 27.9 months (95%CI: 24.4 months, undeterminable months) in patients with EGFR mutations and 14.9 months (95%CI: 11.0 months, 22.4 months) in patients without EGFR mutations. In the gefitinib group, grade 3/4 hepatic dysfunction and dermatitis occurred in 23% and 5% of patients, respectively. In patients treated with vinorelbine or gemcitabine, the most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (47%; four had febrile neutropenia), anemia (13%), and anorexia (9%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. Treatment customization based on EGFR mutation status deserves consideration, particularly for elderly patients who often cannot receive second-line chemotherapy due to poor organ function or comorbidities. This trial is registered at University hospital Medical Information Network-clinical trial registration (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index/htm) with the registration identification number C000000436.

  6. Cardiac angiotensin II type I and type II receptors are increased in rats submitted to experimental hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro-Ramos, M S; Diniz, G P; Almeida, J; Vieira, R L P; Pinheiro, S V B; Santos, R A; Barreto-Chaves, M L M

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the behaviour of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors in an experimental hypothyroidism model in male Wistar rats. Animals were subjected to thyroidectomy and resting for 14 days. The alteration of cardiac mass was evaluated by total heart weight (HW), right ventricle weight (RVW), left ventricle weight (LVW), ratio of HW, RVW and LVW to body weight (BW) and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) expression. Cardiac and plasma Ang II levels and serum T3 and T4 were determined. The mRNA and protein levels of Ang II receptors were investigated by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Functional analyses were performed using binding assays. T3 and T4 levels and the haemodynamic parameters confirmed the hypothyroid state. HW/BW, RVW/BW and LVW/BW ratios and the ANF expression were lower than those of control animals. No change was observed in cardiac or plasma Ang II levels. Both AT1/AT2 mRNA and protein levels were increased in the heart of hypothyroid animals due to a significant increase of these receptors in the RV. Experiments performed in cardiomyocytes showed a direct effect promoted by low thyroid hormone levels upon AT1 and AT2 receptors, discarding possible influence of haemodynamic parameters. Functional assays showed that both receptors are able to bind Ang II. Herein, we have identified, for the first time, a close and direct relation of elevated Ang II receptor levels in hypothyroidism. Whether the increase in these receptors in hypothyroidism is an alternative mechanism to compensate the atrophic state of heart or whether it may represent a potential means to the progression of heart failure remains unknown. PMID:17540701

  7. Interaction of the glucocorticoid receptor and the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII): implications for the actions of glucocorticoids on glucose, lipoprotein, and xenobiotic metabolism.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Massimo U; Alesci, Salvatore; Chrousos, George P; Kino, Tomoshige

    2004-06-01

    Glucocorticoids exert their extremely diverse effects on numerous biologic activities of humans via only one protein module, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The GR binds to the glucocorticoid response elements located in the promoter region of target genes and regulates their transcriptional activity. In addition, GR associates with other transcription factors through direct protein-protein interactions and mutually represses or stimulates each other's transcriptional activities. The latter activity of GR may be more important than the former one, granted that mice harboring a mutant GR, which is active in terms of protein-protein interactions but inactive in terms of transactivation via DNA, survive and procreate, in contrast to mice with a deletion of the entire GR gene that die immediately after birth. We recently found that GR physically interacts with the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII), which plays a critical role in the metabolism of glucose, cholesterol, and xenobiotics, as well as in the development of the central nervous system in fetus. GR stimulates COUP-TFII-induced transactivation by attracting cofactors via its activation function-1, while COUP-TFII represses the GR-governed transcriptional activity by tethering corepressors, such as the silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) and the nuclear receptor corepressors (NCoRs) via its C-terminal domain. Their mutual interaction may play an important role in gluconeogenesis, lipoprotein metabolism, and enzymatic clearance of clinically important compounds and bioactive chemicals, by regulating their rate-limiting enzymes and molecules, including the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the cytochrome P450 CYP3A and CYP7A, and several apolipoproteins. It appears that glucocorticoids exert their intermediary effects partly via physical interaction with COUP-TFII.

  8. Customized chemotherapy based on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status for elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elderly patients are more vulnerable to toxicity from chemotherapy. Activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are associated with enhanced response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. We studied patients with advanced NSCLC for whom treatment was customized based on EGFR mutation status. Methods We screened 57 chemotherapy-naïve patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed NSCLC, stage IIIB or IV, aged 70 years or older, and with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1, for EGFR exon 19 codon 746–750 deletion and exon 21 L858R mutation. Twenty-two patients with EGFR mutations received gefitinib; 32 patients without mutations received vinorelbine or gemcitabine. The primary endpoint was the response rate. Results The response rate was 45.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 24.4%, 67.8%) in patients with EGFR mutations and 18.8% (95% CI: 7.2%, 36.4%) in patients without EGFR mutations. The median overall survival was 27.9 months (95%CI: 24.4 months, undeterminable months) in patients with EGFR mutations and 14.9 months (95%CI: 11.0 months, 22.4 months) in patients without EGFR mutations. In the gefitinib group, grade 3/4 hepatic dysfunction and dermatitis occurred in 23% and 5% of patients, respectively. In patients treated with vinorelbine or gemcitabine, the most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (47%; four had febrile neutropenia), anemia (13%), and anorexia (9%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. Conclusions Treatment customization based on EGFR mutation status deserves consideration, particularly for elderly patients who often cannot receive second-line chemotherapy due to poor organ function or comorbidities. Trial registration This trial is registered at University hospital Medical Information Network-clinical trial registration (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index/htm) with the registration identification number C000000436

  9. The role of angiotensin II receptors in stroke protection.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2012-06-01

    The hypothesis that angiotensin II (Ang II) might have a stroke-protective role was first proposed by Brown and Brown about 25 years ago. Their hypothesis was generated from the results of the first Medical Research Council trial in patients with mild to moderate hypertension, which showed that patients treated with the diuretic bendrofluazide had a 70% decrease in strokes compared with those treated with the β-blocker propranolol for similar blood pressure reduction. This hypothesis, which remained dormant for many years, was recently resurrected by several experimental studies that showed that the brain possesses its own renin-angiotensin system (RAS) similar to the one existing in the systemic circulation. These studies also showed that the brain RAS plays an important role in stroke prevention and neuronal protection through its active peptide Ang II. In addition, these studies demonstrated that the beneficial effects of Ang II are mediated through stimulation of its subtype 2 receptors, and possibly through stimulation of the subtype 4 receptors by Ang IV, a metabolite of Ang II. Drugs that selectively block the Ang II subtype 1 receptors, such as the angiotensin receptor blockers, have shown superior protection against strokes and neuronal damage than drugs that decrease the generation of Ang II, such as the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and β-blockers. In this review, the role of the Ang II receptors and their mechanism of action regarding stroke prevention are discussed in view of the evidence from experimental and clinical studies.

  10. Myometrial angiotensin II receptor subtypes change during ovine pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, B E; Ipson, M A; Shaul, P W; Kamm, K E; Rosenfeld, C R

    1993-01-01

    Although regulation of angiotensin II receptor (AT) binding in vascular and uterine smooth muscle is similar in nonpregnant animals, studies suggest it may differ during pregnancy. We, therefore, examined binding characteristics of myometrial AT receptors in nulliparous (n = 7), pregnant (n = 24, 110-139 d of gestation), and postpartum (n = 21, 5 to > or = 130 d) sheep and compared this to vascular receptor binding. We also determined if changes in myometrial binding reflect alterations in receptor subtype. By using plasma membrane preparations from myometrium and medial layer of abdominal aorta, we determined receptor density and affinity employing radioligand binding; myometrial AT receptor subtypes were assessed by inhibiting [125I]-ANG II binding with subtype-specific antagonists. Compared to nulliparous ewes, myometrial AT receptor density fell approximately 90% during pregnancy (1,486 +/- 167 vs. 130 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein) and returned to nulliparous values > or = 4 wk postpartum; vascular binding was unchanged. Nulliparous myometrium expressed predominantly AT2 receptors (AT1/AT2 congruent to 15%/85%), whereas AT1 receptors predominated during pregnancy (AT1/AT2 congruent to 80%/20%). By 5 d postpartum AT1/AT2 congruent to 40%/60%, and > 4 wk postpartum AT2 receptors again predominated (AT1/AT2 congruent to 15%/85%). In studies of ANG II-induced force generation, myometrium from pregnant ewes (n = 10) demonstrated dose-dependent increases in force (P < 0.001), which were inhibited with an AT1 receptor antagonist. Postpartum myometrial responses were less at doses > or = 10(-9) M (P < 0.05) and unaffected by AT2 receptor antagonists. Vascular and myometrial AT receptor binding are differentially regulated during ovine pregnancy, the latter primarily reflecting decreases in AT2 receptor expression. This is the first description of reversible changes in AT receptor subtype in adult mammals. PMID:8227339

  11. Type I (RI) and type II (RII) receptors for transforming growth factor-beta isoforms are expressed subsequent to transforming growth factor-beta ligands during excisional wound repair.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, L. I.; Sung, J. J.; Siebert, J. W.; Longaker, M. T.

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta isoforms (TGF-beta 1, -beta 2, and -beta 3) regulate cell growth and differentiation and have critical regulatory roles in the process of tissue repair and remodeling. Signal transduction for TGF-beta function is transmitted by a heteromeric complex of receptors consisting of two serine/threonine kinase transmembrane proteins (RI and RII). We have previously shown that each TGF-beta isoform is widely expressed in a distinct spatial and temporal pattern throughout the processes of excisional and incisional wound repair. As the presence of TGF-beta receptors determines cellular responsiveness, we have currently examined, by immunohistochemistry, the localization of RI (ALK-1, ALK-5) and RII throughout repair of full-thickness excisional wounds up to 21 days after wounding. The expression of RI (ALK-5) and RII co-localized in both the unwounded and wounded skin and was present in the same cell types as TGF-beta ligands. However, immunoreactivity for TGF-beta receptors, throughout repair, occurred 1 to 5 days later than TGF-beta isoform immunostaining. This implies that the presence of TGF-beta ligands may up-regulate TGF-beta receptors for function and/or may reflect a lag due to local processing of latent TGF-beta. As observed for the immunohistochemical localization of TGF-beta isoforms in unwounded skin, RI and RII were expressed throughout the four layers of the epidermis, showing a wavy pattern of slight to moderate immunostaining, and hair follicles, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands were moderately immunoreactive. The extracellular matrix, fibroblasts, and blood vessels in the dermis were not immunoreactive. After injury, as observed for TGF-beta ligands, RI and RII expression was increased in the epidermis adjacent to the wound and the epithelium migrating over the wound was completely devoid of TGF-beta receptor immunoreactivity until re-epithelialization was completed by day 7 after wounding. The dermis was only

  12. Angiotensin II AT2 Receptors Contribute to Regulate the Sympathoadrenal and Hormonal Reaction to Stress Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, J M; Armando, I

    2017-09-07

    Angiotensin II, through AT1 receptor stimulation, mediates multiple cardiovascular, metabolic, and behavioral functions including the response to stressors. Conversely, the function of Angiotensin II AT2 receptors has not been totally clarified. In adult rodents, AT2 receptor distribution is very limited but it is particularly high in the adrenal medulla. Recent results strongly indicate that AT2 receptors contribute to the regulation of the response to stress stimuli. This occurs in association with AT1 receptors, both receptor types reciprocally influencing their expression and therefore their function. AT2 receptors appear to influence the response to many types of stressors and in all components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The molecular mechanisms involved in AT2 receptor activation, the complex interactions with AT1 receptors, and additional factors participating in the control of AT2 receptor regulation and activity in response to stressors are only partially understood. Further research is necessary to close this knowledge gap and to clarify whether AT2 receptor activation may carry the potential of a major translational advance.

  13. TAF4, a subunit of transcription factor II D, directs promoter occupancy of nuclear receptor HNF4A during post-natal hepatocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Alpern, Daniil; Langer, Diana; Ballester, Benoit; Le Gras, Stephanie; Romier, Christophe; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2014-09-10

    The functions of the TAF subunits of mammalian TFIID in physiological processes remain poorly characterised. In this study, we describe a novel function of TAFs in directing genomic occupancy of a transcriptional activator. Using liver-specific inactivation in mice, we show that the TAF4 subunit of TFIID is required for post-natal hepatocyte maturation. TAF4 promotes pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation at post-natal expressed liver function genes and down-regulates a subset of embryonic expressed genes by increased RNA polymerase II pausing. The TAF4-TAF12 heterodimer interacts directly with HNF4A and in vivo TAF4 is necessary to maintain HNF4A-directed embryonic gene expression at post-natal stages and promotes HNF4A occupancy of functional cis-regulatory elements adjacent to the transcription start sites of post-natal expressed genes. Stable HNF4A occupancy of these regulatory elements requires TAF4-dependent PIC formation highlighting that these are mutually dependent events. Local promoter-proximal HNF4A-TFIID interactions therefore act as instructive signals for post-natal hepatocyte differentiation.

  14. Hypomethylation of the Angiotensin II Type I Receptor (AGTR1) Gene Along with Environmental Factors Increases the Risk for Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiabing; Lin, Shaowei; Wu, Yihai; Wang, Xiaoxia; Wu, Siying; Li, Huangyuan

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the hypertension status of community residents, analyze environmental and epigenetic factors, and propose prevention measures for hypertension. In our study, different methylation levels were distinguished utilizing melting temperature (Tm) values in both the case and the control group. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the risk of having essential hypertension (EH) between hypertensive and nonhypertensive participants. A receiver-operating characteristic curve was used to analyze Tm cutoff levels of methylation. The average DNA Tm was 71.784 with a standard deviation of 0.210. The Tm value of community residents (Fujian, China) was inversely correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Student t test analysis showed a clear separation in Tm expression levels between the hypertensive and the control group (p < 0.05). The Tm value was lower in the hypertension group than in the normotensive group. Multivariate regression analysis showed that high levels of DNA methylation were a protective factor in hypertension with adjustment of demographic and environmental factors, whereas when the Tm value increased by 0.1 units, the risk of hypertension was reduced by 0.652 times. Patients that smoked and consumed an irregular diet demonstrated a lower degree of methylation in the presence of hypertension. DNA methylation affects the risk for the development of hypertension; therefore, epigenetic markers could be used to measure hypertension levels to help elucidate the pathogenesis of EH. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. [Dynamics of local expression of connexin-43 and basic fibroblast growth factor receptors in patients with skin and soft-tissue infections against the background of diabetes mellitus type II].

    PubMed

    Vinnik, Iu S; Salmina, A B; Tepliakova, O V; Drobushevskaia, A I; Malinovskaia, N A; Pozhilenkova, E A; Morgun, A V; Gitlina, A G

    2014-01-01

    Clinical results of wound healing dynamics were studied in 60 patients with soft-tissue infection against the background of diabetes mellitus type II. At the same time the study considered indices of intercellular contacts protein tissue expression such as connexin 43 (Cx43) and basic fibroblast growth factor receptors (bFGFR). The basic therapy of biopsy material of wound borders was applied. The reduction of bFGFR expression and the minor growth of Cx43 expression were observed. The pain syndrome proceeded for a long time and there were signs of perifocal inflammation, retard wound healing with granulation tissue. The application of combined method of ozone therapy which included autohemotherapy with ozone and an external management of wound by ozone-oxygen mixture facilitated to considerable shortening of inflammatory phase and regeneration. It was associated with increased Cx43 expression (in 1.9 times) in comparison with initial level and bFGFR was enlarged in 1.7 times to eighth day of postoperative period.

  16. Angiotensin II receptors in amphibian kidney. [Calyptocephalella caudiverbera

    SciTech Connect

    Tchernitchin, S.M.; Galli, S.M.; Raizada, M.

    1986-03-05

    The localization of Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors in the Amphibia kidney was investigated by radioautography and binding studies. /sup 125/I-Ang II was injected into the dorsal aorta of anesthetized toads, Calyptocephalella caudiverbera. The kidney excised 2 and 10 min after injection show intense labeling in the glomeruli and a lesser amount in the tubules. Ang II labeling was found in the proximal, distal and collecting tubules. The thin connecting segment (diluting segment) also shows a distinct labeling. Afferent and efferent arterioles and interstitial connective tissue do not show radioautographic granules above the background level. Ang II binding studies of glomerular and tubular membranes show that the binding of /sup 125/I-Ang II is higher in the glomerular than in the tubular membranes with a Kd of 1.9 x 10/sup -9/M and 1.0 x 10/sup -9/M respectively. Their results show that angiotensin II receptors in the amphibian nephron are present in the glomeruli and tubular segments, supporting the hypothesis of the intrarenal action of Ang II in this group of vertebrates.

  17. Gasdermin C Is Upregulated by Inactivation of Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor Type II in the Presence of Mutated Apc, Promoting Colorectal Cancer Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Miguchi, Masashi; Hinoi, Takao; Shimomura, Manabu; Adachi, Tomohiro; Saito, Yasufumi; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Kochi, Masatoshi; Sada, Haruki; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Shigeyasu, Kunitoshi; Tanakaya, Kohji; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in TGFBR2, a component of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway, occur in high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) colorectal cancer (CRC). In mouse models, Tgfbr2 inactivation in the intestinal epithelium accelerates the development of malignant intestinal tumors in combination with disruption of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. However, no studies have further identified the genes influenced by TGFBR2 inactivation following disruption of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. We previously described CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox mice, which is stochastically null for Apc in the colon epithelium. In this study, we generated CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice, with simultaneous loss of Apc and Tgfbr2. These mice developed tumors, including adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon. We compared gene expression profiles between tumors of the two types of mice using microarray analysis. Our results showed that the expression of the murine homolog of GSDMC was significantly upregulated by 9.25-fold in tumors of CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice compared with those of CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox mice. We then investigated the role of GSDMC in regulating CRC tumorigenesis. The silencing of GSDMC led to a significant reduction in the proliferation and tumorigenesis of CRC cell lines, whereas the overexpression of GSDMC enhanced cell proliferation. These results suggested that GSDMC functioned as an oncogene, promoting cell proliferation in colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, combined inactivation of both Apc and Tgfbr2 in the colon epithelium of a CRC mouse model promoted development of adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon. Moreover, GSDMC was upregulated by TGFBR2 mutation in CRC and promoted tumor cell proliferation in CRC carcinogenesis, suggesting that GSDMC may be a promising therapeutic target.

  18. Gasdermin C Is Upregulated by Inactivation of Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor Type II in the Presence of Mutated Apc, Promoting Colorectal Cancer Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Miguchi, Masashi; Hinoi, Takao; Shimomura, Manabu; Adachi, Tomohiro; Saito, Yasufumi; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Kochi, Masatoshi; Sada, Haruki; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Shigeyasu, Kunitoshi; Tanakaya, Kohji; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in TGFBR2, a component of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway, occur in high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) colorectal cancer (CRC). In mouse models, Tgfbr2 inactivation in the intestinal epithelium accelerates the development of malignant intestinal tumors in combination with disruption of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. However, no studies have further identified the genes influenced by TGFBR2 inactivation following disruption of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. We previously described CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox mice, which is stochastically null for Apc in the colon epithelium. In this study, we generated CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice, with simultaneous loss of Apc and Tgfbr2. These mice developed tumors, including adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon. We compared gene expression profiles between tumors of the two types of mice using microarray analysis. Our results showed that the expression of the murine homolog of GSDMC was significantly upregulated by 9.25-fold in tumors of CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice compared with those of CDX2P-G19Cre;Apcflox/flox mice. We then investigated the role of GSDMC in regulating CRC tumorigenesis. The silencing of GSDMC led to a significant reduction in the proliferation and tumorigenesis of CRC cell lines, whereas the overexpression of GSDMC enhanced cell proliferation. These results suggested that GSDMC functioned as an oncogene, promoting cell proliferation in colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, combined inactivation of both Apc and Tgfbr2 in the colon epithelium of a CRC mouse model promoted development of adenocarcinoma in the proximal colon. Moreover, GSDMC was upregulated by TGFBR2 mutation in CRC and promoted tumor cell proliferation in CRC carcinogenesis, suggesting that GSDMC may be a promising therapeutic target. PMID:27835699

  19. Constitutively Active ALK2 Receptor Mutants Require Type II Receptor Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Bagarova, Jana; Vonner, Ashley J.; Armstrong, Kelli A.; Börgermann, Jan; Lai, Carol S. C.; Deng, Donna Y.; Beppu, Hideyuki; Alfano, Ivan; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Bullock, Alex N.; Knaus, Petra; Mishina, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Constitutively activating mutations in receptor kinases recruit downstream effector pathways independently of upstream signaling, with consequences ranging from developmental syndromes to cancer. Classic fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a congenital syndrome resulting from highly conserved activating mutations of the glycine-serine-rich (GS) regulatory domain of ACVR1, encoding bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptor ALK2, which lead to inappropriate signaling and heterotopic ossification of soft tissues. It is unclear if constitutively active mutant ALK2 receptors (caALK2) can function independently of signaling complexes with type II receptors and ligands. We found that ablation of BmpRII and ActRIIa abrogated BMP ligand-mediated and caALK2-mediated signaling and transcription in cells and disrupted caALK2-induced heterotopic ossification in mice. Signaling via GS domain ALK2 mutants could be restored by the expression of either BMP type II receptor. The contribution of BMP type II receptors was independent of their ligand-binding or kinase function but was dependent upon an intact cytoplasmic domain. These data demonstrate that GS domain ALK2 mutants act independently of upstream signaling but may require a nonenzymatic scaffolding function provided by type II receptors to form functional, apparently ligand-independent signaling complexes. These findings define the minimal requirements for signaling of GS domain ALK2 mutants, with implications for the therapeutic targeting of their activity in disease. PMID:23572558

  20. Clinical effects of prior trastuzumab on combination eribulin mesylate plus trastuzumab as first-line treatment for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: results from a Phase II, single-arm, multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Puhalla, Shannon; Wilks, Sharon; Brufsky, Adam M; O’Shaughnessy, Joyce; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Berrak, Erhan; Song, James; Vahdat, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate, a novel nontaxane microtubule dynamics inhibitor in the halichondrin class of antineoplastic drugs, is indicated for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who previously received ≥2 chemotherapy regimens in the metastatic setting. Primary data from a Phase II trial for the first-line combination of eribulin plus trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients showed a 71% objective response rate and tolerability consistent with the known profile of these agents. Here, we present prespecified analyses of efficacy of this combination based on prior trastuzumab use. Patients received eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 (equivalent to 1.23 mg/m2 eribulin [expressed as free base]) intravenously on days 1 and 8 plus trastuzumab (8 mg/kg intravenously/cycle 1, then 6 mg/kg) on day 1 of each 21-day cycle. Objective response rates, progression-free survival, and tolerability were assessed in patients who had and had not received prior adjuvant or neoadjuvant (neo/adjuvant) trastuzumab treatment. Fifty-two patients (median age: 59.5 years) received eribulin/trastuzumab for a median treatment duration of ~31 weeks; 40.4% (n=21) had been previously treated with neo/adjuvant trastuzumab prior to treatment with eribulin plus trastuzumab for metastatic disease (median time between neo/adjuvant and study treatment: 23 months). In trastuzumab-naïve patients (n=31) compared with those who had received prior trastuzumab, objective response rate was 77.4% versus 61.9%, respectively; duration of response was 11.8 versus 9.5 months, respectively; clinical benefit rate was 87.1% versus 81.0%, respectively; and median progression-free survival was 12.2 versus 11.5 months, respectively. The most common grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events (occuring in ≥5% of patients) in patients who received prior trastuzumab versus trastuzumab naïve patients, respectively, were neutropenia (47.6% vs 32.3%), peripheral neuropathy (14

  1. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated augmentation of renal interstitial fluid angiotensin II in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Akira; Seth, Dale M; Navar, L Gabriel

    2003-10-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent hypertension is associated with augmented intrarenal concentrations of Ang II; however, the distribution of the increased intrarenal Ang II has not been fully established. To determine the changes in renal interstitial fluid Ang II concentrations in Ang II-induced hypertension and the consequences of treatment with an angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker. Rats were selected to receive vehicle (5% acetic acid subcutaneously; n = 6), Ang II (80 ng/min subcutaneously, via osmotic minipump; n = 7) or Ang II plus an AT1 receptor antagonist, candesartan cilexetil (10 mg/kg per day, in drinking water; n = 6) for 13-14 days, at which time, experiments were performed on anesthetized rats. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the renal cortex and were perfused at 2 microl/min. The effluent dialysate concentrations of Ang I and Ang II were measured by radioimmunoassay and reported values were corrected for the equilibrium rates at this perfusion rate. Ang II-infused rats developed greater mean arterial pressures (155 +/- 7 mmHg) than vehicle-infused rats (108 +/- 3 mmHg). Ang II-infused rats showed greater plasma (181 +/- 30 fmol/ml) and kidney (330 +/- 38 fmol/g) Ang II concentrations than vehicle-infused rats (98 +/- 14 fmol/ml and 157 +/- 22 fmol/g, respectively). Renal interstitial fluid Ang II concentrations were much greater than plasma concentrations, averaging 5.74 +/- 0.26 pmol/ml in Ang II-infused rats - significantly greater than those in vehicle-infused rats (2.86 +/- 0.23 pmol/ml). Candesartan treatment prevented the hypertension (87 +/- 3 mmHg) and led to increased plasma Ang II concentrations (441 +/- 27 fmol/ml), but prevented increases in kidney (120 +/- 15 fmol/g) and renal interstitial fluid (2.15 +/- 0.12 pmol/ml) Ang II concentrations. These data indicate that Ang II-infused rats develop increased renal interstitial fluid concentrations of Ang II, which may contribute to the increased vascular resistance and

  2. Left ventricular hypertrophy and angiotensin II receptor blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Maeda, K; Nakamura, M; Watanabe, T; Yoshikawa, J; Hirohashi, K

    2005-01-01

    Angiotensin II plays a significant role in cell growth and proliferation in model systems and in humans. Numerous studies have shown that left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) increases the risk of coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, stroke or transient ischemic attack; all-cause deaths, and sudden death. The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) has provided beneficial effects on LVH regression and on cardiac remodeling in the presence of hypertension and heart failure. The new class of ARBs appears to provide cardioprotective effects that are similar to those of the ACE inhibitors. Most of the beneficial effects provided by these agents appear to be related to a more complete blockade of the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor. However, costimulation of the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor appears to increase nitric oxide and thus causes some bradykinin-like effects. Evidence for the role of angiotensin II in promoting LVH as well as abnormal regulation of the angiotensin II signal transduction pathways in model systems and in humans has been reviewed. Secondly, the mechanisms for the beneficial effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers studied in model systems and in humans, including possible involvement in the formation of reactive oxygen species by mononuclear cells, are presented. Finally, results from large-scale interventions such as the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction (LIFE) study, as well as an overview of the Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial involving the use of ARB in high-risk patients, are presented.

  3. Azilsartan: a newly approved angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sum

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a common chronic disease that leads to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Blood pressure control is essential to prevent end-organ complications, such as stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, or kidney disease. Azilsartan is the eighth angiotensin II receptor blocker approved for the management of hypertension, alone or in combination with other agents. At the approved dosage, it reduces systolic blood pressure by 12 to 15 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 7 to 8 mm Hg. A higher dose of azilsartan (80 mg) was superior to valsartan 320 mg or olmesartan 40 mg in lowering systolic blood pressure in short-term studies. Additional blood pressure reduction is expected when azilsartan is used adjunctively with a diuretic. However, the effects of azilsartan on cardiovascular morbidity or mortality are still lacking. Azilsartan is well tolerated; the most common side effects are headache and diarrhea. No cases of hyperkalemia have been reported in 6-week clinical trials. Worsening of renal function and hypotension should be monitored, particularly in those with baseline risk factors. It is unknown whether azilsartan would join angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and other angiotensin receptor blockers as the preferred hypertensive agents for end-organ protection. At this time, azilsartan should be considered as an alternative agent for mild-to-moderate hypertension, or as an adjunctive therapy when preferred agents fail to maintain optimal blood pressure control. It is also an option for those patients who have contraindications or cannot tolerate other antihypertensive agents, including dry cough induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

  4. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-CXCR4 Receptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Deepa; Gröning, Sabine; Schmitz, Corinna; Zierow, Swen; Drucker, Natalie; Bakou, Maria; Kohl, Kristian; Mertens, André; Lue, Hongqi; Weber, Christian; Xiao, Annie; Luker, Gary; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite; Lolis, Elias; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    An emerging number of non-chemokine mediators are found to bind to classical chemokine receptors and to elicit critical biological responses. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine that exhibits chemokine-like activities through non-cognate interactions with the chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, in addition to activating the type II receptor CD74. Activation of the MIF-CXCR2 and -CXCR4 axes promotes leukocyte recruitment, mediating the exacerbating role of MIF in atherosclerosis and contributing to the wealth of other MIF biological activities. Although the structural basis of the MIF-CXCR2 interaction has been well studied and was found to engage a pseudo-ELR and an N-like loop motif, nothing is known about the regions of CXCR4 and MIF that are involved in binding to each other. Using a genetic strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that expresses a functional CXCR4 receptor, site-specific mutagenesis, hybrid CXCR3/CXCR4 receptors, pharmacological reagents, peptide array analysis, chemotaxis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism, we provide novel molecular information about the structural elements that govern the interaction between MIF and CXCR4. The data identify similarities with classical chemokine-receptor interactions but also provide evidence for a partial allosteric agonist compared with CXCL12 that is possible due to the two binding sites of CXCR4. PMID:27226569

  5. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: heat shock protein 90 overexpression, Ki67 proliferative index, and topoisomerase II-α co-amplification as predictors of pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy with trastuzumab and docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Bria, Emilio; Furlanetto, Jenny; Carbognin, Luisa; Brunelli, Matteo; Caliolo, Chiara; Nortilli, Rolando; Massari, Francesco; Pedron, Serena; Manfrin, Erminia; Pellini, Francesca; Bonetti, Franco; Sperduti, Isabella; Pollini, Giovanni Paolo; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-02-01

    The combination of trastuzumab and chemotherapy is currently considered the standard of care for patients with locally advanced/operable human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. The potential correlation between the pathologic complete response (pCR) and the overexpression of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), Ki67, and the amplification of topoisomerase II-α (TOPO2A) was investigated in a series of patients who received neoadjuvant treatment. HER2-amplified patients who received neoadjuvant trastuzumab-docetaxel were gathered. Baseline and postsurgical Hsp90 immunoscore, Ki67 proliferation index, and TOPO2A amplification were determined together with classic clinical-pathologic predictors and correlated with pCR and imaging data. A total of 24 patients were evaluated for response; pCR, clinical, and radiologic response were found in 4 patients (16.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-31.5), 9 patients (37.5%; 95% CI, 18.1-56.8), and 6 patients (25.0%; 95% CI, 7.6-42.3) patients, respectively. pCR was significantly higher in premenopausal (60.0% vs. 5.3%, P = .02) and negative hormonal receptor patients (50.0% vs. 5.6%, P = .03). A trend for patients with high Ki67 and TOPO2A/HER2 co-amplification was found (21.1% vs. none, P = .54; 50.0% vs. 12%, P = .16). pCR was significantly higher in patients with Hsp90 score 3+, in comparison with score 2+ and score 1+ (50.0% vs. 14.3% vs. none, P = .05). After treatment, a statistically significant lower Ki67 staining (30.0% vs. 17.5%, P = .005) and a trend for the decreased expression of high (score 3+) and moderate (score 2+) Hsp90 immunostaining (McNemar P = .25, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney P = .08) were found. Although underpowered, our data suggest that patients with HER2-positive breast cancer overexpressing Hsp90 should be investigated as a "newer" molecular subtype with a significantly higher chance of pCR when receiving anti-Her2 agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. A phase II study of trastuzumab emtansine in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive metastatic breast cancer who were previously treated with trastuzumab, lapatinib, an anthracycline, a taxane, and capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Krop, Ian E; LoRusso, Patricia; Miller, Kathy D; Modi, Shanu; Yardley, Denise; Rodriguez, Gladys; Guardino, Ellie; Lu, Michael; Zheng, Maoxia; Girish, Sandhya; Amler, Lukas; Winer, Eric P; Rugo, Hope S

    2012-09-10

    To determine whether the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), which combines human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -targeted delivery of the potent antimicrotubule agent DM1 with the antitumor activity of trastuzumab, is effective in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who have previously received all standard HER2-directed therapies. In this single-arm phase II study, T-DM1 3.6 mg/kg was administered intravenously every 3 weeks to patients with HER2-positive MBC who had prior treatment with trastuzumab, lapatinib, an anthracycline, a taxane, and capecitabine. The primary objectives were overall response rate (ORR) by independent review and safety. Among 110 pretreated patients (median, seven prior agents for MBC; median follow-up, 17.4 months), the ORR was 34.5% (95% CI, 26.1% to 43.9%), clinical benefit rate was 48.2% (95% CI, 38.8% to 57.9%), median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.9 months (95% CI, 4.2 to 8.4 months), and median duration of response was 7.2 months (95% CI, 4.6 months to not estimable). In patients with confirmed HER2-positive tumors (n = 80 by retrospective central testing), the response rate was 41.3% (95% CI, 30.4% to 52.8%), and median PFS was 7.3 months (95% CI, 4.6 to 12.3 months). Most adverse events were grades 1 to 2; the most frequent grade ≥ 3 events were thrombocytopenia (9.1%), fatigue (4.5%), and cellulitis (3.6%). T-DM1 is well tolerated and has single-agent activity in patients with HER2-positive MBC who have previously received both approved HER2-directed therapies and multiple chemotherapy agents. T-DM1 may be an effective new treatment for this patient population.

  7. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  8. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, F A; Quirion, R; Saavedra, J M; Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1984-01-01

    The 125I-labeled agonist analog [1-sarcosine]-angiotensin II ( [Sar1]AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (Ka = 2 X 10(9) M-1) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6324205

  9. In the grey zone between epilepsy and schizophrenia: alterations in group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; Boets, Stephanie; Janssens, Pieter; Lavreysen, Hilde; Steckler, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. The glutamate system plays an important role in the formation of synapses during brain development and synaptic plasticity. Dysfunctions in glutamate regulation may lead to hyperexcitatory neuronal networks and neurotoxicity. Glutamate excess is possibly of great importance in the pathophysiology of several neurological and psychiatric disorders such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. Interestingly, cross talk between these disorders has been well documented: psychiatric comorbidities are frequent in epilepsy and temporal lobe epilepsy is one of the highest risk factors for developing psychosis. Therefore, dysfunctions in glutamatergic neurotransmission might constitute a common pathological mechanism. A major negative feedback system is regulated by the presynaptic group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors including mGlu2/3 receptors. These receptors are predominantly localised extrasynaptically in basal ganglia and limbic structures. Hence, mGlu2/3 receptors are an interesting target for the treatment of disorders like epilepsy and schizophrenia. A dysfunction in the glutamate system may be associated with alterations in mGlu2/3 receptor expression. In this review, we describe the localization of mGlu2/3 receptors in the healthy brain of mice, rats and humans. Secondly, changes in mGlu2/3 receptor density of the brain regions affected in epilepsy and schizophrenia are summarised. Increased mGlu2/3 receptor density might represent a compensatory mechanism of the brain to regulate elevated glutamate levels, while reduced mGlu2/3 receptor density in some brain regions may further contribute to the aberrant hyperexcitability. Further research considering the mGlu2/3 receptor can contribute significantly to the understanding of the etiological and therapeutic role of group II mGlu receptor in epilepsy, epilepsy with psychosis and schizophrenia.

  10. TNF receptor 1 signaling is critically involved in mediating angiotensin-II-induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Crawford, Jeffrey R; Reineke, Erin; Taffet, George E; Trial, Joann; Entman, Mark L; Haudek, Sandra B

    2013-04-01

    Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is associated with many conditions involving heart failure and pathologic hypertrophy. Ang-II induces the synthesis of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 that mediates the uptake of CD34(+)CD45(+) monocytic cells into the heart. These precursor cells differentiate into collagen-producing fibroblasts and are responsible for the Ang-II-induced development of non-adaptive cardiac fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that in vitro, using a human monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation model, Ang-II required the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) to induce fibroblast maturation from monocytes. In vivo, mice deficient in both TNF receptors did not develop cardiac fibrosis in response to 1week Ang-II infusion. We then subjected mice deficient in either TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1-KO) or TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2-KO) to continuous Ang-II infusion. Compared to wild-type, in TNFR1-KO, but not in TNFR2-KO hearts, collagen deposition was greatly attenuated, and markedly fewer CD34(+)CD45(+) cells were present. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated a striking reduction of key fibrosis-related, as well as inflammation-related mRNA expression in Ang-II-treated TNFR1-KO hearts. TNFR1-KO animals also developed less cardiac remodeling, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension compared to wild-type and TNFR2-KO in response to Ang-II. Our data suggest that TNF induced Ang-II-dependent cardiac fibrosis by signaling through TNFR1, which enhances the generation of monocytic fibroblast precursors in the heart.

  11. Angiotensin II binding to cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: identification of angiotensin II receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.; Printz, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    Physiological experiments have provided evidence that angiotensin II stimulates catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland. Their laboratory and others have now shown by receptor autoradiography the presence of angiotensin II receptors (AIIR) in bovine and rat adrenal medulla. In order to extend these studies they have undertaken to define AIIR on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were isolated using the method of Levitt including cell enrichment with Percoll gradient centrifugation. Primary cultures of bovine adrenal medullary cells were maintained in DME/F12 medium containing 10% FCS. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, PNMT, DBH and Chromagranin A. Cultured cells bind with high affinity and specificity (/sup 125/I)-ANG II yielding a K/sub D/ of 0.74 nM and B/sub max/ of 24,350 sites/cell. After Percoll treatment values of .77 nm and 34,500 sites/cell are obtained. K/sub D/ values are in close agreement with that obtained in adrenal slices by Healy. Competition studies identify a rank order of binding by this receptor similar to that of other tissues. They conclude that cultured chromaffin cells provide a suitable model system for the investigation and characterization of the ANG II receptor and for cellular studies of its functional significance.

  12. Cripto forms a complex with activin and type II activin receptors and can block activin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter C.; Harrison, Craig A.; Vale, Wylie

    2003-01-01

    Activin, nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 are members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and signal via the activin type II (ActRII/IIB) and type I (ALK4) serine/threonine kinase receptors. Unlike activins, however, signaling by nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 requires a coreceptor from the epidermal growth factor-Cripto-FRL1-Cryptic protein family such as Cripto. Cripto has important roles during development and oncogenesis and binds nodal or related ligands and ALK4 to facilitate assembly of type I and type II receptor signaling complexes. Because Cripto mediates signaling via activin receptors and binds directly to ALK4, we tested whether transfection with Cripto would affect the ability of activin to signal and/or interact with its receptors. Here we show that Cripto can form a complex with activin and ActRII/IIB. We were unable to detect activin binding to Cripto in the absence of ActRII/IIB, indicating that unlike nodal, activin requires type II receptors to bind Cripto. If cotransfected with ActRII/IIB and ALK4, Cripto inhibited crosslinking of activin to ALK4 and the association of ALK4 with ActRII/IIB. In addition, Cripto blocked activin signaling when transfected into either HepG2 cells or 293T cells. We have also shown that under conditions in which Cripto facilitates nodal signaling, it antagonizes activin. Inhibition of activin signaling provides an additional example of a Cripto effect on the regulation of signaling by transforming growth factor-β superfamily members. Because activin is a potent inhibitor of cell growth in multiple cell types, these results provide a mechanism that may partially explain the oncogenic action of Cripto. PMID:12682303

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsman, Stanislav; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2004-08-01

    Abstract: A peptide purified from the salivary gland of a mouse was shown few years ago to accelerate incisor eruption and eyelid opening in newborn mice, and was named epidermal growth factor (EGF). The members of this family of peptide growth factors had been identified in numerous physiological and pathological contexts. EGF binds to a cell surface EGF receptor, which induces a biochemical modification (phosphorylation) of the receptor's cytoplasmic tail. There is a growing consensus in the research community that, in addition to cellular and molecular studies, the dynamics of the EGFR network and its operation must be examined in tissues. A key challenge is to integrate the existing molecular and cellular information into a system-level description of the EGFR network at the tissue and organism level. In this paper, the two examples of EGFR signaling in tissues are described, and the recent efforts to model EGFR autocrine loops, which is a predominant mode of EGFR activation in vivo, are summarized.

  14. Testicular gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown constitutively impairs diurnal testosterone secretion in the boar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II) and its specific receptor (GnRHR-II) are highly expressed in the testis, suggesting an important role in testis biology. Gene coding errors prevent the production of GnRH-II and GnRHR-II in many species, but both genes are functional in swine. We have demo...

  15. Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) 022: A Phase II Trial of Neratinib for Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Rebecca S.; Wefel, Jeffrey S.; Melisko, Michelle E.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Connolly, Roisin M.; Van Poznak, Catherine H.; Niravath, Polly A.; Puhalla, Shannon L.; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Moy, Beverly; Herold, Christina; Liu, Minetta C.; Lowe, Alarice; Agar, Nathalie Y.R.; Ryabin, Nicole; Farooq, Sarah; Lawler, Elizabeth; Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Krop, Ian E.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Winer, Eric P.; Lin, Nancy U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evidence-based treatments for metastatic, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–positive breast cancer in the CNS are limited. Neratinib is an irreversible inhibitor of erbB1, HER2, and erbB4, with promising activity in HER2-positive breast cancer; however, its activity in the CNS is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of treatment with neratinib in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases in a multicenter, phase II open-label trial. Patients and Methods Eligible patients were those with HER2-positive brain metastases (≥ 1 cm in longest dimension) who experienced progression in the CNS after one or more line of CNS-directed therapy, such as whole-brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and/or surgical resection. Patients received neratinib 240 mg orally once per day, and tumors were assessed every two cycles. The primary endpoint was composite CNS objective response rate (ORR), requiring all of the following: ≥50% reduction in volumetric sum of target CNS lesions and no progression of non-target lesions, new lesions, escalating corticosteroids, progressive neurologic signs/symptoms, or non-CNS progression—the threshold for success was five of 40 responders. Results Forty patients were enrolled between February 2012 and June 2013; 78% of patients had previous whole-brain radiotherapy. Three women achieved a partial response (CNS objective response rate, 8%; 95% CI, 2% to 22%). The median number of cycles received was two (range, one to seven cycles), with a median progression-free survival of 1.9 months. Five women received six or more cycles. The most common grade ≥ 3 event was diarrhea (occurring in 21% of patients taking prespecified loperamide prophylaxis and 28% of those without prophylaxis). Patients in the study experienced a decreased quality of life over time. Conclusion Although neratinib had low activity and did not meet our threshold for success, 12.5% of patients received six or more cycles. Studies

  16. Limiting angiotensin II signaling with a cell penetrating peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of the angiotensin II type I receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Mierke, Dale; Berg, Eric; Shia, Michael; Fishman, Jordan; Sallum, Christine; Polgar, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A cell-penetrating peptide consisting of the second intracellular loop (IC2) of the Angiotensin II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1) linked to the HIV transactivating regulatory protein (TAT) domain was used to identify the role of this motif for intracellular signal transduction. HEK-293 cells stably transfected with AT1R cDNA and primary cultures of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressing endogenous AT1 receptor were exposed to the cell-penetrating peptide construct and the effect on angiotensin II signaling determined. The AT1 IC2 peptide effectively inhibited AngII stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover and calcium influx. It also limited the activation of Akt/PKB as determined by an inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 and completely abolished the AngII dependent activation of the transcriptional factor NFκB. In contrast, the AT1 IC2 peptide had no effect on AngII/AT1 receptor activation of ERK. These results illustrate the potential of using cell penetrating peptides to both delineate receptor-mediated signal transduction as well as to selectively regulate G protein coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20492449

  17. Nuclear transportation of exogenous epidermal growth factor receptor and androgen receptor via extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Read, Jolene; Ingram, Alistair; Al Saleh, Hassan A; Platko, Khrystyna; Gabriel, Kathleen; Kapoor, Anil; Pinthus, Jehonathan; Majeed, Fadwa; Qureshi, Talha; Al-Nedawi, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a central role in the progression of several human malignancies. Although EGFR is a membrane receptor, it undergoes nuclear translocation, where it has a distinct signalling pathway. Herein, we report a novel mechanism by which cancer cells can directly transport EGFR to the nucleus of other cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). The transported receptor is active and stimulates the nuclear EGFR pathways. Interestingly, the translocation of EGFR via EVs occurs independently of the nuclear localisation sequence that is required for nuclear translocation of endogenous EGFR. Also, we found that the mutant receptor EGFRvIII could be transported to the nucleus of other cells via EVs. To assess the role of EVs in the regulation of an actual nuclear receptor, we studied the regulation of androgen receptor (AR). We found that full-length AR and mutant variant ARv7 are secreted in EVs derived from prostate cancer cell lines and could be transported to the nucleus of AR-null cells. The EV-derived AR was able to bind the androgen-responsive promoter region of prostate specific antigen, and recruit RNA Pol II, an indication of active transcription. The nuclear-translocated AR via EVs enhanced the proliferation of acceptor cells in the absence of androgen. Finally, we provide evidence that nuclear localisation of AR could occur in vivo via orthotopically-injected EVs in male SCID mice prostate glands. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the nuclear translocation of nuclear receptors via EVs, which significantly extends the role of EVs as paracrine transcriptional regulators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Estrogen reduces aldosterone, upregulates adrenal angiotensin II AT2 receptors and normalizes adrenomedullary Fra-2 in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Macova, Miroslava; Armando, Ines; Zhou, Jin; Baiardi, Gustavo; Tyurmin, Dmitri; Larrayoz-Roldan, Ignacio M; Saavedra, Juan M

    2008-01-01

    We studied the effect of ovariectomy and estrogen replacement on expression of adrenal angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, aldosterone content, catecholamine synthesis, and the transcription factor Fos-related antigen 2 (Fra-2). Ovariectomy increased AT1 receptor expression in the adrenal zona glomerulosa and medulla, and decreased adrenomedullary catecholamine content and Fra-2 expression when compared to intact female rats. In the zona glomerulosa, estrogen replacement normalized AT1 receptor expression, decreased AT1B receptor mRNA, and increased AT2 receptor expression and mRNA. Estrogen treatment decreased adrenal aldosterone content. In the adrenal medulla, the effects of estrogen replacement were: normalized AT1 receptor expression, increased AT2 receptor expression, AT2 receptor mRNA, and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA, and normalized Fra-2 expression and catecholamine content. We demonstrate that the constitutive adrenal expression of AT1 receptors, catecholamine synthesis and Fra-2 expression are partially under the control of reproductive hormones. Our results suggest that estrogen treatment decreases aldosterone production through AT1 receptor downregulation and AT2 receptor upregulation. AT2 receptor upregulation and modulation of Fra-2 expression may participate in the estrogen-dependent normalization of adrenomedullary catecholamine synthesis in ovariectomized rats. The AT2 receptor upregulation and the decrease in AT1 receptor function and in the production of the fluid-retentive, pro-inflammatory hormone aldosterone partially explain the protective effects of estrogen therapy. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. 40 CFR Table II-1 to Subpart II of... - Emission Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission Factors II Table II-1 to Subpart II of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt. 98, Subpt. II, Table II-1...

  20. 40 CFR Table II-1 to Subpart II of... - Emission Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission Factors II Table II-1 to Subpart II of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt. 98, Subpt. II, Table II-1...

  1. Oxidative DNA Damage in Kidneys and Heart of Hypertensive Mice Is Prevented by Blocking Angiotensin II and Aldosterone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Susanne; Amann, Kerstin; Mandel, Philipp; Zimnol, Anna; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recently, we could show that angiotensin II, the reactive peptide of the blood pressure-regulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system, causes the formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in kidneys and hearts of hypertensive mice. To further investigate on the one hand the mechanism of DNA damage caused by angiotensin II, and on the other hand possible intervention strategies against end-organ damage, the effects of substances interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system on angiotensin II-induced genomic damage were studied. Methods In C57BL/6-mice, hypertension was induced by infusion of 600 ng/kg • min angiotensin II. The animals were additionally treated with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan, the mineralocorticoid receptor blocker eplerenone and the antioxidant tempol. DNA damage and the activation of transcription factors were studied by immunohistochemistry and protein expression analysis. Results Administration of angiotensin II led to a significant increase of blood pressure, decreased only by candesartan. In kidneys and hearts of angiotensin II-treated animals, significant oxidative stress could be detected (1.5-fold over control). The redox-sensitive transcription factors Nrf2 and NF-κB were activated in the kidney by angiotensin II-treatment (4- and 3-fold over control, respectively) and reduced by all interventions. In kidneys and hearts an increase of DNA damage (3- and 2-fold over control, respectively) and of DNA repair (3-fold over control) was found. These effects were ameliorated by all interventions in both organs. Consistently, candesartan and tempol were more effective than eplerenone. Conclusion Angiotensin II-induced DNA damage is caused by angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated formation of oxidative stress in vivo. The angiotensin II-mediated physiological increase of aldosterone adds to the DNA-damaging effects. Blocking angiotensin II and mineralocorticoid receptors therefore

  2. Structural basis for selectivity and diversity in angiotensin II receptors

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haitao; Han, Gye Won; Batyuk, Alexander; ...

    2017-04-20

    The angiotensin II receptors AT1R and AT2R serve as key components of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system. AT1R has a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, but the function of AT2R is unclear and it has a variety of reported effects. To identify the mechanisms that underlie the differences in function and ligand selectivity between these receptors, here we report crystal structures of human AT2R bound to an AT2R-selective ligand and to an AT1R/AT2R dual ligand, capturing the receptor in an active-like conformation. Unexpectedly, helix VIII was found in a non-canonical position, stabilizing the active-like state, but at the samemore » time preventing the recruitment of G proteins or β-arrestins, in agreement with the lack of signalling responses in standard cellular assays. Structure–activity relationship, docking and mutagenesis studies revealed the crucial interactions for ligand binding and selectivity. Finally, our results thus provide insights into the structural basis of the distinct functions of the angiotensin receptors, and may guide the design of new selective ligands.« less

  3. Structural Basis for Selectivity and Diversity in Angiotensin II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Han, Gye Won; Batyuk, Alexander; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Kate L.; Patel, Nilkanth; Sadybekov, Anastasiia; Zamlynny, Beata; Rudd, Michael T.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Tolstikova, Alexandra; White, Thomas A.; Hunter, Mark S.; Weierstall, Uwe; Liu, Wei; Babaoglu, Kerim; Moore, Eric L.; Katz, Ryan D.; Shipman, Jennifer M.; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Sharma, Sujata; Sheth, Payal; Soisson, Stephen M.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Cherezov, Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptors, AT1R and AT2R, serve as key components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. While AT1R plays a central role in the regulation of blood pressure, the function of AT2R is enigmatic with a variety of reported effects. To elucidate the mechanisms for the functional diversity and ligand selectivity between these receptors, we report crystal structures of the human AT2R bound to an AT2R-selective and an AT1R/AT2R-dual ligand, respectively, capturing the receptor in an active-like conformation. Unexpectedly, helix VIII was found in a non-canonical position, stabilizing the active-like state, but at the same time preventing the recruitment of G proteins/β-arrestins, in agreement with the lack of signaling responses in standard cellular assays. Structure-activity relationship, docking and mutagenesis studies revealed the interactions critical for ligand binding and selectivity. Our results thus provide insights into the structural basis for distinct functions of the angiotensin receptors, and may guide the design of novel selective ligands. PMID:28379944

  4. Gene expression profiles of some cytokines, growth factors, receptors, and enzymes (GM-CSF, IFNγ, MMP-2, IGF-II, EGF, TGF-β, IGF-IIR) during pregnancy in the cat uterus.

    PubMed

    Agaoglu, Ozgecan Korkmaz; Agaoglu, Ali Reha; Guzeloglu, Aydin; Aslan, Selim; Kurar, Ercan; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Schäfer-Somi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Early pregnancy is one of the most critical periods of pregnancy, and many factors such as cytokines, enzymes, and members of the immune system have to cooperate in a balanced way. In the present study, the gene expression profiles of factors associated with pregnancy such as EGF, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon gamma, insulin-like growth factor 2, insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 were analyzed in uterine tissues of female cats. The cats were assigned to five groups: G1 (embryo positive, n = 7; 7th day after mating), G2 (after implantation, n = 7; 20th day after mating), G3 (midgestation, n = 7; 24-25th day after mating), G4 (late gestation, n = 7; 30-45th day after mating), G5 (oocyte group, n = 7; 7th day after estrus). Tissue samples from the uterus and placenta were collected after ovariohysterectomy. Relative messenger RNA levels were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All the factors examined were detected in all tissue samples. In the course of pregnancy, significantly higher expression of EGF and matrix metalloproteinase 2 in G2 than in G1 was observed (P < 0.05). Insulin-like growth factor 2 expression was higher in all groups than in G1 (P < 0.05). Upregulation of EGF during implantation was detected. The expression of interferon gamma was significantly higher in G3 than in G1 (P < 0.05). Transforming growth factor beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were constantly expressed in all groups. In conclusion, the expressions of these factors in feline uterine tissue at different stages of pregnancy might indicate that these factors play roles in the development of pregnancy such as trophoblast invasion, vascularization, implantation, and placentation.

  5. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers as treatments for inflammatory brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    SAAVEDRA, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of brain AngII (angiotensin II) depend on AT1 receptor (AngII type 1 receptor) stimulation and include regulation of cerebrovascular flow, autonomic and hormonal systems, stress, innate immune response and behaviour. Excessive brain AT1 receptor activity associates with hypertension and heart failure, brain ischaemia, abnormal stress responses, blood–brain barrier breakdown and inflammation. These are risk factors leading to neuronal injury, the incidence and progression of neurodegerative, mood and traumatic brain disorders, and cognitive decline. In rodents, ARBs (AT1 receptor blockers) ameliorate stress-induced disorders, anxiety and depression, protect cerebral blood flow during stroke, decrease brain inflammation and amyloid-β neurotoxicity and reduce traumatic brain injury. Direct anti-inflammatory protective effects, demonstrated in cultured microglia, cerebrovascular endothelial cells, neurons and human circulating monocytes, may result not only in AT1 receptor blockade, but also from PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ) stimulation. Controlled clinical studies indicate that ARBs protect cognition after stroke and during aging, and cohort analyses reveal that these compounds significantly reduce the incidence and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. ARBs are commonly used for the therapy of hypertension, diabetes and stroke, but have not been studied in the context of neurodegenerative, mood or traumatic brain disorders, conditions lacking effective therapy. These compounds are well-tolerated pleiotropic neuroprotective agents with additional beneficial cardiovascular and metabolic profiles, and their use in central nervous system disorders offers a novel therapeutic approach of immediate translational value. ARBs should be tested for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer’s disease, affective disorders, such as co-morbid cardiovascular disease and depression, and traumatic

  6. Angiotensin II AT(1) receptor blockers as treatments for inflammatory brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Juan M

    2012-11-01

    The effects of brain AngII (angiotensin II) depend on AT(1) receptor (AngII type 1 receptor) stimulation and include regulation of cerebrovascular flow, autonomic and hormonal systems, stress, innate immune response and behaviour. Excessive brain AT(1) receptor activity associates with hypertension and heart failure, brain ischaemia, abnormal stress responses, blood-brain barrier breakdown and inflammation. These are risk factors leading to neuronal injury, the incidence and progression of neurodegerative, mood and traumatic brain disorders, and cognitive decline. In rodents, ARBs (AT(1) receptor blockers) ameliorate stress-induced disorders, anxiety and depression, protect cerebral blood flow during stroke, decrease brain inflammation and amyloid-β neurotoxicity and reduce traumatic brain injury. Direct anti-inflammatory protective effects, demonstrated in cultured microglia, cerebrovascular endothelial cells, neurons and human circulating monocytes, may result not only in AT(1) receptor blockade, but also from PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ) stimulation. Controlled clinical studies indicate that ARBs protect cognition after stroke and during aging, and cohort analyses reveal that these compounds significantly reduce the incidence and progression of Alzheimer's disease. ARBs are commonly used for the therapy of hypertension, diabetes and stroke, but have not been studied in the context of neurodegenerative, mood or traumatic brain disorders, conditions lacking effective therapy. These compounds are well-tolerated pleiotropic neuroprotective agents with additional beneficial cardiovascular and metabolic profiles, and their use in central nervous system disorders offers a novel therapeutic approach of immediate translational value. ARBs should be tested for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease, affective disorders, such as co-morbid cardiovascular disease and depression, and traumatic

  7. Down-Modulation of Lung Immune Responses by Interleukin-10 and Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) and Analysis of TGF-β Receptors I and II in Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bonecini-Almeida, M. Glória; Ho, John L.; Boéchat, Neio; Huard, Richard C.; Chitale, Sadhana; Doo, Howard; Geng, Jiayuan; Rego, Lorena; Lazzarini, Luiz Claudio Oliveira; Kritski, AfrÂnio L.; Johnson, Warren D.; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Silva, José R. Lapa e

    2004-01-01

    Immune factors influencing progression to active tuberculosis (TB) remain poorly defined. In this study, we investigated the expression of immunoregulatory cytokines and receptors by using lung bronchoalveolar lavage cells obtained from patients with pulmonary TB, patients with other lung diseases (OLD patients), and healthy volunteers (VOL) by using reverse transcriptase PCR, a transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) bioactivity assay, and an enzyme immunoassay. TB patients were significantly more likely than OLD patients to coexpress TGF-β receptor I (RI) and RII mRNA, as well as interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA (thereby indicating the state of active gene transcription in the alveolar cells at harvest). In contrast, gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and IL-2 mRNA was seen in both TB and OLD patients. Likewise, significantly elevated pulmonary steady-state protein levels of IL-10, IFN-γ, and bioactive TGF-β were found in TB patients versus those in OLD patients and VOL. These data suggest that the combined production of the immunosuppressants IL-10 and TGF-β, as well as coexpression of TGF-β RI and RII (required for cellular response to TGF-β), may act to down-modulate host anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunity and thereby allow uncontrolled bacterial replication and overt disease. Delineating the underlying mechanisms of M. tuberculosis-triggered expression of these immune elements may provide a molecular-level understanding of TB immunopathogenesis. PMID:15102771

  8. Purification and characterization of an insulin-like growth factor II variant from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Hampton, B; Burgess, W H; Marshak, D R; Cullen, K J; Perdue, J F

    1989-11-15

    An insulin-like growth factor II variant (IGF-II variant) was purified from Cohn fraction IV1 of human plasma by ion exchange, gel filtration, and reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. The amino-terminal sequence of the first 35 amino acid residues showed a replacement of Ser-29 of IGF-II with the tetrapeptide Arg-Leu-Pro-Gly of IGF-II variant. Peptides isolated and sequenced after digestion with endoproteinase Asp-N and endoproteinase Glu-C disclosed no differences with the sequence predicted from an IGF-II variant cDNA clone isolated by Jansen, M., van Shaik, F. M. A., van Tol, H., Van den Brande, J. L., and Sussenbach, J. S. (1985) FEBS Lett., 179, 243-246. The molecular ion of intact IGF-II variant was 7809.4 mass units, as measured by plasma desorption mass spectrometry. This is in close agreement with the molecular ion of 7812.8 mass units calculated from the determined sequence and indicates the entire amino acid sequence had been accounted for. Binding of IGF-II variant to purified insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors demonstrated a 2-3-fold lower affinity for this receptor compared with IGF-I or IGF-II. The dissociation constants for IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-II variant are 0.23, 0.38, and 0.80 nM, respectively. In a growth assay, the concentration of IGF-II and IGF-II variant required to stimulate the half-maximal growth of MCF-7 cells was 4 and 13 nM, respectively. Finally, the amount of IGF-II variant that can be purified by this method constitutes approximately 25% of the total IGF-II isolated from Cohn fraction IV1 of human plasma.

  9. Progesterone receptor induces bcl-x expression through intragenic binding sites favoring RNA polymerase II elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, Paola Y.; Nacht, A. Silvina; Alló, Mariano; Rocha-Viegas, Luciana; Ballaré, Cecilia; Soronellas, Daniel; Castellano, Giancarlo; Zaurin, Roser; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.; Beato, Miguel; Vicent, Guillermo P.; Pecci, Adali

    2013-01-01

    Steroid receptors were classically described for regulating transcription by binding to target gene promoters. However, genome-wide studies reveal that steroid receptors-binding sites are mainly located at intragenic regions. To determine the role of these sites, we examined the effect of progestins on the transcription of the bcl-x gene, where only intragenic progesterone receptor-binding sites (PRbs) were identified. We found that in response to hormone treatment, the PR is recruited to these sites along with two histone acetyltransferases CREB-binding protein (CBP) and GCN5, leading to an increase in histone H3 and H4 acetylation and to the binding of the SWI/SNF complex. Concomitant, a more relaxed chromatin was detected along bcl-x gene mainly in the regions surrounding the intragenic PRbs. PR also mediated the recruitment of the positive elongation factor pTEFb, favoring RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation activity. Together these events promoted the re-distribution of the active Pol II toward the 3′-end of the gene and a decrease in the ratio between proximal and distal transcription. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which PR regulates gene expression by facilitating the proper passage of the polymerase along hormone-dependent genes. PMID:23640331

  10. Macrocyclic receptor showing extremely high Sr(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Ca(II) selectivities with potential application in chelation treatment of metal intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; Esteban-Gómez, David; Tóth, Éva; de Blas, Andrés; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa

    2011-04-18

    Herein we report a detailed investigation of the complexation properties of the macrocyclic decadentate receptor N,N'-Bis[(6-carboxy-2-pyridil)methyl]-4,13-diaza-18-crown-6 (H(2)bp18c6) toward different divalent metal ions [Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Sr(II), and Ca(II)] in aqueous solution. We have found that this ligand is especially suited for the complexation of large metal ions such as Sr(II) and Pb(II), which results in very high Pb(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) selectivities (in fact, higher than those found for ligands widely used for the treatment of lead poisoning such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (edta)), as well as in the highest Sr(II)/Ca(II) selectivity reported so far. These results have been rationalized on the basis of the structure of the complexes. X-ray crystal diffraction, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as theoretical calculations at the density functional theory (B3LYP) level have been performed. Our results indicate that for large metal ions such as Pb(II) and Sr(II) the most stable conformation is Δ(δλδ)(δλδ), while for Ca(II) our calculations predict the Δ(λδλ)(λδλ) form being the most stable one. The selectivity that bp18c6(2-) shows for Sr(II) over Ca(II) can be attributed to a better fit between the large Sr(II) ions and the relatively large crown fragment of the ligand. The X-ray crystal structure of the Pb(II) complex shows that the Δ(δλδ)(δλδ) conformation observed in solution is also maintained in the solid state. The Pb(II) ion is endocyclically coordinated, being directly bound to the 10 donor atoms of the ligand. The bond distances to the donor atoms of the pendant arms (2.55-2.60 Å) are substantially shorter than those between the metal ion and the donor atoms of the crown moiety (2.92-3.04 Å). This is a typical situation observed for the so-called hemidirected compounds, in which the Pb(II) lone pair is stereochemically active. The X-ray structures of the Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes show that

  11. Inactivation of Smad-Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling by Ca2+-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, Stephen J.; Lui, Stephen; Abdel-Wahab, Nadia; Mason, Roger M.; Chantry, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family transduce signals through Smad proteins. Smad signaling can be regulated by the Ras/Erk/mitogen-activated protein pathway in response to receptor tyrosine kinase activation and the gamma interferon pathway and also by the functional interaction of Smad2 with Ca2+-calmodulin. Here we report that Smad–TGF-β-dependent transcriptional responses are prevented by expression of a constitutively activated Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Cam kinase II). Smad2 is a target substrate for Cam kinase II in vitro at serine-110, -240, and -260. Cam kinase II induces in vivo phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad4 and, to a lesser extent, Smad3. A phosphopeptide antiserum raised against Smad2 phosphoserine-240 reacted with Smad2 in vivo when coexpressed with Cam kinase II and by activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor, HER2 (c-erbB2), and the TGF-β receptor. Furthermore, Cam kinase II blocked nuclear accumulation of a Smad2 and induced Smad2-Smad4 hetero-oligomerization independently of TGF-β receptor activation, while preventing TGF-β-dependent Smad2-Smad3 interactions. These findings provide a novel cross-talk mechanism by which Ca2+-dependent kinases activated downstream of multiple growth factor receptors antagonize cell responses to TGF-β. PMID:11027280

  12. Effect of C-reactive protein on Fcgamma receptor II in cultured bovine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Escribano-Burgos, Marta; López-Farré, Antonio; del Mar González, María; Macaya, Carlos; García-Méndez, Antonio; Mateos-Cáceres, Petra J; Alonso-Orgaz, Sergio; Carrasco, Carolina; Rico, Luis A; Porres Cubero, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The major CRP (C-reactive protein) receptor on leucocytes has been identified as the low-affinity IgG receptor Fcgamma receptor II (CD32). Our aim was to assess whether inflammation may modify the presence of the CD32 receptor in BAEC (bovine aortic endothelial cells). Confocal microscopy experiments showed a weak expression of the CD32 receptor in control BAEC that was slightly increased by 10 microg/ml CRP. Incubation of BAEC with TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) did not modify the fluorescence signal of CD32. Addition of CRP to TNF-alpha-incubated BAEC enhanced the fluorescence signal of the CD32 receptors. The CD32 receptors showed a perinuclear cytoplasmic localization in BAEC. An alteration of the NO (nitric oxide)-dependent vasorelaxation has been defined as endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with the presence of superoxide anion and with a reduction in the expression of the eNOS (endothelial NO synthase). A concentration of CRP similar to that detected in patients with cardiovascular risk (10 microg/ml) failed to modify the generation of superoxide anion stimulated by TNF-alpha. Western blot experiments showed that TNF-alpha decreased the expression of the eNOS protein, which was partially protected by treatment with 10 microg/ml CRP. The protective effect of 10 microg/ml CRP on eNOS expression in TNF-alpha-incubated BAEC was prevented by an antibody against CD32 receptors. In conclusion, the present results suggest that, although CRP has been associated with inflammation, CRP may protect the expression of eNOS protein against pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-alpha.

  13. Use of Enterally Delivered Angiotensin II Type Ia Receptor Antagonists to Reduce the Severity of Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Koga, Hiroyuki; Larsen, Scott D.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Turbiak, Anjanette J.; Jin, Xiaohong; Lucas, Peter C.; Lipka, Elke; Hillfinger, John; Kim, Jae Seung

    2011-01-01

    Background Renin-angiotensin system blockade reduces inflammation in several organ systems. Having found a fourfold increase in angiotensin II type Ia receptor expression in a dextran sodium sulfate colitis model, we targeted blockade with angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists to prevent colitis development. Because hypotension is a major complication of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists use, we hypothesized that use of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists compounds which lack cell membrane permeability, and thus enteric absorption, would allow for direct enteral delivery at far higher concentrations than would be tolerated systemically, yet retain efficacy. Methods Based on the structure of the angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist losartan, deschloro-losartan was synthesized, which has extremely poor cell membrane permeability. Angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy was evaluated by determining the ability to block NF-κB activation in vitro. Dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in mice and angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy delivered transanally was assessed. Results In vitro, deschloro-losartan demonstrated near equal angiotensin II type Ia receptor blockade compared to losartan as well as another angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist, candesartan. In the dextran sodium sulfate model, each compound significantly improved clinical and histologic scores and epithelial cell apoptosis. Abundance of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL6 mRNA were significantly decreased with each compound. In vitro and in vivo intestinal drug absorption, as well as measures of blood pressure and mucosal and colonic blood flow, showed significantly lower uptake of deschloro-losartan compared to losartan and candesartan. Conclusions This study demonstrated efficacy of high-dose angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists in this colitis model. We postulate that a specially designed angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist with

  14. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, Philip; Kane, Emilie; Giaid, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) binds to its receptor, UT, playing an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland, and central nervous system. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, however, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) activity leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII), as well as inflammation, high blood pressure, and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  15. Clinical Profile of Eprosartan: A Different Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Blankestijn, P. J; Rupp, H

    2008-01-01

    Rationale. The goal of antihypertensive treatment is to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Apart from blood pressure lowering per se, also reducing the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system appears to be important. Angiotensin II receptor blocker drugs (ARBs) have provided a useful class of anti-hypertensive drugs. Eprosartan is a relatively new ARB which is chemically distinct (non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole) from all other ARBs (biphenyl tetrazoles). An analysis has been made on available experimental and clinical data on eprosartan which not only is an effective and well tolerated antihypertensive agent, but also lowers the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system. Experimental and pharmacokinetic studies on eprosartan have shown differences with the other ARBs. The distinct properties of this non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole ARB might be relevant in the effort to reduce cardiovascular risk, also beyond its blood pressure lowering capacity. PMID:18855637

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-II stimulates steroidogenesis in cultured bovine thecal cells.

    PubMed

    Spicer, L J; Voge, J L; Allen, D T

    2004-11-30

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) on luteinizing hormone (LH)-induced progesterone and androstenedione production by bovine thecal cells and compare it to that of insulin and IGF-I. Cells from large (>7.9 mm) bovine follicles were collected and cultured for 2 days in the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. Then cells were cultured for an additional 1 or 2 days in serum-free medium with various doses of recombinant human IGF-II, bovine LH (30 ng/ml), IGF-I, and(or) insulin. Cell numbers were determined at the end of treatments via Coulter counting and used to correct steroid production data. In the presence of LH, 1-day treatment with 3-300 ng/ml of IGF-II had no significant effect on progesterone or androstenedione production, whereas 2-day treatment with 30, 100 and 300 ng/ml of IGF-II increased (P < 0.05) both progesterone and androstenedione production by 2-3-fold. The estimated effective dose of IGF-II stimulating 50% of the maximal steroidogenic response was calculated to be 25 ng/ml. In the absence of LH, 2-day treatment of IGF-I or -II had no effect on thecal androstenedione production but increased (P < 0.05) thecal progesterone production. In the presence of LH, 100 ng/ml of IGF-I increased progesterone and androstenedione production to a greater degree than did 100 ng/ml of IGF-II. Maximal effects of IGF-I and insulin on thecal steroidogenesis were similar and were not additive. Anti-IGF type I receptor antibodies attenuated (P < 0.05) the stimulatory effect of both IGF-I and IGF-II on thecal cell steroidogenesis. Use of radioligand assays demonstrated that specific receptors for (125)I-IGF-II existed in thecal cells with a 25 ng/well of IGF-II causing 50% inhibition of binding. IGF-I cross-reactivity with (125)I-IGF-II receptors averaged 3% whereas cross-reactivity of IGF-II with (125)I-IGF-I receptors averaged 114%. These results indicate that the stimulatory effects of IGF-II on

  17. Properties of angiotensin II receptors in glial cells from the adult corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Matute, C; Pulakat, L; Río, C; Valcárcel, C; Miledi, R

    1994-01-01

    The existence and the properties of angiotensin II receptors in the adult bovine and human corpus callosum (CC) were investigated by using Xenopus oocytes and primary glial cell cultures. In oocytes injected with CC mRNA, angiotensin II elicited oscillatory Cl- currents due to activation of the inositol phosphate/Ca(2+)-receptor-channel coupling system. The receptors expressed in oocytes and in CC cultures were pharmacologically similar to the AT1 receptor type as assayed by binding. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization studies in sections from CC and in glial cultures revealed that the receptors were molecularly related to the AT1 receptor and that they were present in astrocytes. In these cells, activation of the receptors with angiotensin II increased de novo DNA synthesis, promoted the release of aldosterone, and induced c-Fos expression. These findings indicate that CC astrocytes possess functional AT1 receptors that participate in various physiological processes. Images PMID:8170986

  18. pK(a) determination of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA II) by spectrofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, E; González, L; Alonso, R M; Jiménez, R M

    2001-10-01

    The acid-base equilibrium constants of a new family of antihypertensive drugs, the angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA II), Losartan, Irbesartan, Valsartan, Candesartan cilexetil, its metabolite Candesartan M1 and Telmisartan were determined by spectrofluorimetry. Relative fluorescent intensity (I(F,rel))-pH data were treated by graphical (derivatives and curve-fitting) and numerical methods (LETAGROP SPEFO). The resultant pK(a) values at an ionic strength of 0.5 M were (3.15+/-0.07) for Losartan, (4.70+/-0.06) for Irbesartan, (4.90+/-0.09) for Valsartan, (6.0+/-0.1) for Candesartan cilexetil, (3.9+/-0.1) for Candesartan M1, and (4.45+/-0.09) for Telmisartan.

  19. High resolution structures of the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor in two crystal forms: Implications for ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Peter D.; Cutfield, John F.; Cutfield, Sue M. . E-mail: sue.cutfield@otago.ac.nz

    2006-12-29

    BMPRII is a type II TGF-{beta} serine threonine kinase receptor which is integral to the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling pathway. It is known to bind BMP and growth differentiation factor (GDF) ligands, and has overlapping ligand specificity with the activin type II receptor, ActRII. In contrast to activin and TGF-{beta} type ligands, BMPs bind to type II receptors with lower affinity than type I receptors. Crystals of the BMPRII ectodomain were grown in two different forms, both of which diffracted to high resolution. The tetragonal form exhibited some disorder, whereas the entire polypeptide was seen in the orthorhombic form. The two structures retain the basic three-finger toxin fold of other TGF-{beta} receptor ectodomains, and share the main hydrophobic patch used by ActRII to bind various ligands. However, they present different conformations of the A-loop at the periphery of the proposed ligand-binding interface, in conjunction with rearrangement of a disulfide bridge within the loop. This particular disulfide (Cys94-Cys117) is only present in BMPRII and activin receptors, suggesting that it is important for their likely shared mode of binding. Evidence is presented that the two crystal forms represent ligand-bound and free conformations of BMPRII. Comparison with the solved structure of ActRII bound to BMP2 suggests that His87, unique amongst TGF-{beta} receptors, may play a key role in ligand recognition.

  20. Epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Henry Q; Abbruzzese, James L

    2002-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in tumor development and maintenance. It is a cell surface molecule that mediates signal transduction from the cell surface to cytoplasm. Elevated expression of EGFR or its ligand correlates with worse prognosis in a variety of human cancers. Therefore, blockade of EGFR activity would provide a novel strategy for the treatment of cancer. Two classes of EGFR inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have been described. The preclinical activity of these EGFR inhibitors and phase I clinical data are summarized in this article. A phase II trial of the EGFR inhibitor IMC-C225 in combination with gemcitabine for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer is discussed. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  1. Generation of monoclonal antibody targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Olena; Ovcharenko, Galyna; Klymenko, Tetyana; Zhyvoloup, Olexandr; Gaman, Nadia; Volkova, Darija; Gout, Ivan; Filonenko, Valeriy

    2009-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a member of the FGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, whose function has been implicated in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and tumorigenesis. Deregulation of FGFR3 signaling has been implicated with human pathologies, including cancer. Activating mutations in FGFR3 gene are frequently detected in bladder cancer, multiple myeloma, and noninvasive papillary urothelial cell carcinomas, while the overexpression of the receptor is observed in thyroid lymphoma and bladder cancer. The main aim of this study was to generate hybridoma clones producing antibody that could specifically recognize FGFR3/S249C mutant, but not the wild-type FGFR. To achieve this, we used for immunization bacterially expressed fragment of FGFR3 corresponding to loops II-III of the extracellular domain (GST-His/FGFR3/S249C-LII-III), which possesses oncogenic mutation at Ser249 detected in at least 50% of bladder cancers. Primary ELISA screening allowed us to isolate several hybridoma clones that showed specificity towards FGFR3/S249C, but not FGFR3wt protein. Unfortunately, these clones were not stable during single-cell cloning and expansion and lost the ability to recognize specifically FGFR3/S249C. However, this study allowed us to generate several monoclonal antibodies specific towards both FGFR3wt and FGFR3/S249C recombinant proteins. Produced hybridomas secreted MAbs that were specific in Western blotting towards bacterially expressed FGFR3wt and FGFR3/S249C, as well as the full-length receptors ectopically expressed in Sf21 and HEK293 cells. Moreover, transiently expressed wild-type and oncogenic forms of FGFR were efficiently immunoprecipitated with selected antibodies from the lysates of infected Sf21 and transiently transfected HEK293. In summary, generated antibodies should be useful as tools for examining the expression pattern and biological functions of FGFR3 in normal and

  2. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ciardiello, F

    2000-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-driven autocrine growth pathway has been implicated in the development and progression of the majority of the most common human epithelial cancers, making the blockade of this growth pathway a promising anticancer therapeutic strategy. Different approaches have been developed to block EGFR activation and/or function in cancer cells. In the past 15 years, various anti-EGFR blocking monoclonal antibodies (MAb), recombinant proteins containing transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) or EGF fused to toxins, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been generated and their biological and potentially therapeutic properties characterised. One of these agents, MAb IMC-C225, a chimeric human-mouse IgG1 MAb, is the first anti-EGFR agent to enter phase II to III clinical trials in patients with cancer. Several small compounds that block the ligand-induced activation of the EGFR tyrosine kinase have been developed. Among these EGFR-TKIs, various quinazoline-derived agents have been synthesised and have shown promising activity as anticancer agents in preclinical models. ZD1839 ('Iressa'), an anilinoquinazoline, is an orally active, selective EGFR-TKI which is currently under clinical evaluation in phase II to III clinical trials in patients with cancer. Preclinical data for ZD1839 strongly support the possibility of potentiating the antitumour activity of conventional chemotherapy with agents that selectively block the EGFR.

  4. Mechanism of kinase activation in the receptor for colony-stimulating factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A W; Nienhuis, A W

    1990-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases remain dormant until activated by ligand binding to the extracellular domain. Two mechanisms have been proposed for kinase activation: (i) ligand binding to the external domain of a receptor monomer may induce a conformational change that is transmitted across the cell membrane (intramolecular model) or (ii) the ligand may facilitate oligomerization, thereby allowing interactions between the juxtaposed kinase domains (intermolecular model). The receptor for colony-stimulating factor 1 was used to test these models. Large insertions at the junction between the external and transmembrane domains of the receptor, introduced by site-directed mutagenesis of the cDNA, were positioned to isolate the external domain and prevent transmembrane conformational propagation while allowing for receptor oligomerization. Such mutant receptors were expressed on the cell surface, bound ligand with high affinity, exhibited ligand-stimulated autophosphorylation, and signaled mitogenesis and cellular proliferation in the presence of ligand. A second experimental strategy directly tested the intermolecular model of ligand activation. A hybrid receptor composed of the external domain of human glycophorin A and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor exhibited anti-glycophorin antibody-induced kinase activity that supported mitogenesis. Our data strongly support a mechanism of receptor activation based on ligand-induced receptor oligomerization. Images PMID:2169623

  5. Evidence that the modulator of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex is the endogenous molybdate factor.

    PubMed Central

    Bodine, P V; Litwack, G

    1988-01-01

    We have recently purified the modulator of the glucocorticoid-receptor complex from rat liver. Purified modulator inhibits glucocorticoid-receptor complex activation and stabilizes the steroid-binding ability of the unoccupied glucocorticoid receptor. Since these activities are shared by exogenous sodium molybdate, modulator appears to be the endogenous factor that sodium molybdate mimics. In this report, we present additional evidence for the mechanism of action of purified modulator. (i) Molybdate and modulator inhibit receptor activation as measured by DNA-cellulose binding, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and Sepharose 4B gel filtration. (ii) The ability of molybdate and modulator to inhibit receptor activation and stabilize the unoccupied receptor appears to be additive. (iii) Scatchard analysis of heat-destabilized unoccupied receptors indicates that the number of steroid-binding sites is reduced during destabilization, whereas the steroid dissociation constant remains unchanged. Molybdate and modulator stabilize the receptor by maintaining the number of steroid-binding sites. (iv) Molybdate and modulator do not inhibit alkaline phosphatase-induced destabilization of the unoccupied receptor. However, alkaline phosphatase-induced destabilization is reversed by the addition of dithiothreitol in the presence, but not in the absence, of molybdate or modulator. These results suggest that the mechanism of action for modulator is identical to that of sodium molybdate, and we propose that modulator is the endogenous molybdate factor for the glucocorticoid receptor. PMID:3422744

  6. Randomized Phase II Study of Erlotinib in Combination With Placebo or R1507, a Monoclonal Antibody to Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor, for Advanced-Stage Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Spigel, David R.; Chen, David; Steins, Martin B.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Schneider, Claus-Peter; Novello, Silvia; Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E.; Crino, Lucio; Habben, Kai; Liu, Lian; Jänne, Pasi A.; Brownstein, Carrie M.; Reck, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose R1507 is a selective, fully human, recombinant monoclonal antibody (immunoglobulin G1 subclass) against insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R). The strong preclinical evidence supporting coinhibition of IGF-1R and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as anticancer therapy prompted this study. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced-stage non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with progression following one or two prior regimens, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0 to 2, and measurable disease were eligible. Patients were randomly assigned to receive erlotinib (150 mg orally once a day) in combination with either placebo, R1507 9 mg/kg weekly, or R1507 16 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks. Treatment cycles were repeated every 3 weeks. The primary end point was comparison of the 12-week progression-free survival (PFS) rate. Results In all, 172 patients were enrolled: median age, 61 years; female, 33%; never-smokers, 12%; and performance status 0 or 1, 88%. The median number of R1507 doses was six for the weekly arm and 3.5 for the every-3-weeks arm. Grades 3 to 4 adverse events occurred in 37%, 44%, and 48% of patients with placebo, R1507 weekly, and R1507 every 3 weeks, respectively. The 12-week PFS rates were 39%, 37%, and 44%, and the median overall survival was 8.1, 8.1, and 12.1 months for the three groups, respectively, with statistically nonsignificant hazard ratios. The 12-week PFS rate in patients with KRAS mutation was 36% with R1507 compared with 0% with placebo. Conclusion The combination of R1507 with erlotinib did not provide PFS or survival advantage over erlotinib alone in an unselected group of patients with advanced NSCLC. Predictive biomarkers are essential for further development of combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR. PMID:22025157

  7. Angiotensin II enhances endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction through upregulating endothelin type A receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan-Jie; Kwok, Ching-Fai; Juan, Chi-Chang; Hsu, Yung-Pei; Shih, Kuang-Chung; Chen, Chin-Chang; Ho, Low-Tone

    2014-08-22

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is the most potent vasoconstrictor by binding to endothelin receptors (ETAR) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The complex of angiotensin II (Ang II) and Ang II type one receptor (AT1R) acts as a transient constrictor of VSMCs. The synergistic effect of ET-1 and Ang II on blood pressure has been observed in rats; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesize that Ang II leads to enhancing ET-1-mediated vasoconstriction through the activation of endothelin receptor in VSMCs. The ET-1-induced vasoconstriction, ET-1 binding, and endothelin receptor expression were explored in the isolated endothelium-denuded aortae and A-10 VSMCs. Ang II pretreatment enhanced ET-1-induced vasoconstriction and ET-1 binding to the aorta. Ang II enhanced ETAR expression, but not ETBR, in aorta and increased ET-1 binding, mainly to ETAR in A-10 VSMCs. Moreover, Ang II-enhanced ETAR expression was blunted and ET-1 binding was reduced by AT1R antagonism or by inhibitors of PKC or ERK individually. In conclusion, Ang II enhances ET-1-induced vasoconstriction by upregulating ETAR expression and ET-1/ETAR binding, which may be because of the AngII/Ang II receptor pathways and the activation of PKC or ERK. These findings suggest the synergistic effect of Ang II and ET-1 on the pathogenic development of hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Angiotensin-(1-7) Suppresses Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth and Angiogenesis via Complex Interactions of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor, Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor and Mas Receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Li, Bin; Wang, Ximing; Li, Guishuang; Shang, Rui; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Yuguo; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng; Hao, Panpan

    2015-07-27

    We recently confirmed that angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R) was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue using a murine hepatoma model. Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7) has been found beneficial in ameliorating lung cancer and prostate cancer. Which receptor of Ang-(1-7) is activated to mediate its effects is much speculated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Ang-(1-7) on hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as the probable mechanisms. H22 hepatoma-bearing mice were randomly divided into five groups for treatment: mock group, low-dose Ang-(1-7), high-dose Ang-(1-7), high-dose Ang-(1-7) + A779 and high-dose Ang-(1-7) + PD123319. Ang-(1-7) treatment inhibited tumor growth time- and dose-dependently by arresting tumor proliferation and promoting tumor apoptosis as well as inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. The effects of Ang-(1-7) on tumor proliferation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration with A779 or PD123319, whereas the effects on tumor angiogenesis were completely reversed by A779 but not by PD123319. Moreover, Ang-(1-7) downregulated AT1R mRNA, upregulated mRNA levels of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R) and Mas receptor (MasR) and p38-MAPK phosphorylation and suppressed H22 cell-endothelial cell communication. Thus, Ang-(1-7) administration suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via complex interactions of AT1R, AT2R and MasR and may provide a novel and promising approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Angiotensin-(1–7) Suppresses Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth and Angiogenesis via Complex Interactions of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor, Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor and Mas Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanping; Li, Bin; Wang, Ximing; Li, Guishuang; Shang, Rui; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Yuguo; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng; Hao, Panpan

    2015-01-01

    We recently confirmed that angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R) was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue using a murine hepatoma model. Angiotensin(Ang)-(1–7) has been found beneficial in ameliorating lung cancer and prostate cancer. Which receptor of Ang-(1–7) is activated to mediate its effects is much speculated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Ang-(1–7) on hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as the probable mechanisms. H22 hepatoma-bearing mice were randomly divided into five groups for treatment: mock group, low-dose Ang-(1–7), high-dose Ang-(1–7), high-dose Ang-(1–7) + A779 and high-dose Ang-(1–7) + PD123319. Ang-(1–7) treatment inhibited tumor growth time- and dose-dependently by arresting tumor proliferation and promoting tumor apoptosis as well as inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. The effects of Ang-(1–7) on tumor proliferation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration with A779 or PD123319, whereas the effects on tumor angiogenesis were completely reversed by A779 but not by PD123319. Moreover, Ang-(1–7) downregulated AT1R mRNA, upregulated mRNA levels of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R) and Mas receptor (MasR) and p38-MAPK phosphorylation and suppressed H22 cell–endothelial cell communication. Thus, Ang-(1–7) administration suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via complex interactions of AT1R, AT2R and MasR and may provide a novel and promising approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26225830

  10. Angiotensin II receptor blocker-based therapy in Japanese elderly, high-risk, hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Matsui, Kunihiko; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2012-10-01

    It is unknown whether high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy or angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker combination therapy is better in elderly hypertensive patients with high cardiovascular risk. The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of these treatments in elderly, high-risk Japanese hypertensive patients. The OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-end point study of 1164 hypertensive patients aged 65 to 84 years with type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension during treatment with olmesartan 20 mg/d were randomly assigned to receive 40 mg/d olmesartan (high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker) or a calcium channel blocker + 20 mg/d olmesartan (angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker). The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular events and noncardiovascular death. During a 3-year follow-up, blood pressure was significantly lower in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group than in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group. Mean blood pressure at 36 months was 135.0/74.3 mm Hg in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group and 132.6/72.6 mm Hg in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group. More primary end points occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group than in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group (58 vs 48 events, hazard ratio [HR], 1.31, 95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.92; P=.17). In patients with cardiovascular disease at baseline, more primary events occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group (HR, 1.63, P=.03); in contrast, fewer events were observed in the subgroup without cardiovascular disease (HR, 0.52, P=.14). This treatment-by-subgroup interaction was significant (P=.02). The angiotensin II receptor blocker and

  11. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown on testosterone secretion in the boar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Unlike the classical gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-I), the second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II; His5, Trp7, Tyr8) is a poor stimulator of gonadotropin secretion. In addition, GnRH-II is ubiquitously expressed, with transcript levels highest in tissues outside of the brain. A receptor speci...

  12. Acute Systemic Infection with Dengue Virus Leads to Vascular Leakage and Death through Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Tie2/Angiopoietin Signaling in Mice Lacking Type I and II Interferon Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Limkittikul, Kriengsak; Sakai, Yusuke; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Severe dengue is caused by host responses to viral infection, but the pathogenesis remains unknown. This is, in part, due to the lack of suitable animal models. Here, we report a non-mouse-adapted low-passage DENV-3 clinical isolate, DV3P12/08, derived from recently infected patients. DV3P12/08 caused a lethal systemic infection in type I and II IFN receptor KO mice (IFN-α/β/γR KO mice), which have the C57/BL6 background. Infection with DV3P12/08 induced a cytokine storm, resulting in severe vascular leakage (mainly in the liver, kidney and intestine) and organ damage, leading to extensive hemorrhage and rapid death. DV3P12/08 infection triggered the release of large amounts of TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1. Treatment with a neutralizing anti-TNF-α antibody (Ab) extended survival and reduced liver damage without affecting virus production. Anti-IL-6 neutralizing Ab partly prolonged mouse survival. The anti-TNF-α Ab suppressed IL-6, MCP-1, and IFN-γ levels, suggesting that the severe response to infection was triggered by TNF-α. High levels of TNF-α mRNA were expressed in the liver and kidneys, but not in the small intestine, of infected mice. Conversely, high levels of IL-6 mRNA were expressed in the intestine. Importantly, treatment with Angiopoietin-1, which is known to stabilize blood vessels, prolonged the survival of DV3P12/08-infected mice. Taken together, the results suggest that an increased level of TNF-α together with concomitant upregulation of Tie2/Angiopoietin signaling have critical roles in severe dengue infection. PMID:26844767

  13. Angiotensin II induces apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through the AT2 receptor, GATA-6 and the Bax pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lihua; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Yang, Yang; Yang, Hua

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ang II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cell through AT2 receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apoptosis process involves in the Bax/Bcl-2 intrinsic pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GATA-6 short hairpin RNA reduced Bax expression, but not Bcl-2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GATA-6 may play a critical role in apoptosis in response to the Ang II challenge. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been shown to play an important role in cell apoptosis. However, the mechanisms of Ang-II-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells are not fully understood. GATA-6 is a zinc finger transcription factor expressed in the colorectal epithelium, which directs cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In the present study we investigated the underlying mechanism of which GATA-6 affects Ang-II induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells. The in vitro intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis model was established by co-culturing Caco-2 cells with Ang II. Pretreatment with Angiotensin type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist, PD123319, significantly reduced the expression of Bax and prevented the Caco-2 cells apoptosis induced by Ang II. In addition, Ang II up-regulated the expression of GATA-6. Interestingly, GATA-6 short hairpin RNA prevented Ang II-induced intestinal epithelial cells apoptosis and reduced the expression of Bax, but not Bcl-2. Taken together, the present study suggests that Angiotensin II promotes apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through GATA-6 and the Bax pathway in an AT2 receptor-dependent manner.

  14. The Pseudo Signal Peptide of the Corticotropin-releasing Factor Receptor Type 2A Prevents Receptor Oligomerization*

    PubMed Central

    Teichmann, Anke; Rutz, Claudia; Kreuchwig, Annika; Krause, Gerd; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal signal peptides mediate the interaction of native proteins with the translocon complex of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and are cleaved off during early protein biogenesis. The corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2a (CRF2(a)R) possesses an N-terminal pseudo signal peptide, which represents a so far unique domain within the large protein family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In contrast to a conventional signal peptide, the pseudo signal peptide remains uncleaved and consequently forms a hydrophobic extension at the N terminus of the receptor. The functional consequence of the presence of the pseudo signal peptide is not understood. Here, we have analyzed the significance of this domain for receptor dimerization/oligomerization in detail. To this end, we took the CRF2(a)R and the homologous corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRF1R) possessing a conventional cleaved signal peptide and conducted signal peptide exchange experiments. Using single cell and single molecule imaging methods (fluorescence resonance energy transfer and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy, respectively) as well as biochemical experiments, we obtained two novel findings; we could show that (i) the CRF2(a)R is expressed exclusively as a monomer, and (ii) the presence of the pseudo signal peptide prevents its oligomerization. Thus, we have identified a novel functional domain within the GPCR protein family, which plays a role in receptor oligomerization and which may be useful to study the functional significance of this process in general. PMID:22689579

  15. High-affinity prorenin binding to cardiac man-6-P/IGF-II receptors precedes proteolytic activation to renin.

    PubMed

    Saris, J J; Derkx, F H; De Bruin, R J; Dekkers, D H; Lamers, J M; Saxena, P R; Schalekamp, M A; Jan Danser, A H

    2001-04-01

    Mannose-6-phosphate (man-6-P)/insulin-like growth factor-II (man-6-P/IgF-II) receptors are involved in the activation of recombinant human prorenin by cardiomyocytes. To investigate the kinetics of this process, the nature of activation, the existence of other prorenin receptors, and binding of native prorenin, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were incubated with recombinant, renal, or amniotic fluid prorenin with or without man-6-P. Intact and activated prorenin were measured in cell lysates with prosegment- and renin-specific antibodies, respectively. The dissociation constant (K(d)) and maximum number of binding sites (B(max)) for prorenin binding to man-6-P/IGF-II receptors were 0.6 +/- 0.1 nM and 3,840 +/- 510 receptors/myocyte, respectively. The capacity for prorenin internalization was greater than 10 times B(max). Levels of internalized intact prorenin decreased rapidly (half-life = 5 +/- 3 min) indicating proteolytic prosegment removal. Prorenin subdivision into man-6-P-free and man-6-P-containing fractions revealed that only the latter was bound. Cells also bound and activated renal but not amniotic fluid prorenin. We concluded that cardiomyocytes display high-affinity binding of renal but not extrarenal prorenin exclusively via man-6-P/IGF-II receptors. Binding precedes internalization and proteolytic activation to renin thereby supporting the concept of cardiac angiotensin formation by renal prorenin.

  16. Glucocorticoids and atrial natriuretic factor receptors on vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Takeda, T

    1990-11-01

    The effect of glucocorticoids on the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)-mediated formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by intact vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) was studied in rats. Cultured VSMC were obtained from the renal arteries of 14-week-old Wistar rats by the explant method. Micromolar concentrations of dexamethasone, given as pretreatment for 48 hours, suppressed the ANF-mediated response. The dexamethasone-induced suppression was detectable at 6 hours and reached a maximum 24 hours after administration in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of protein synthesis blocked this effect of the glucocorticoid. The basal activity of guanylate cyclase in the dexamethasone-treated cells was lower than in the control cells. Other steroids having glucocorticoid action mimicked this suppression of the ANF-mediated response. This suppression was blocked by a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. The results suggest that glucocorticoids suppress ANF-mediated cGMP formation by VSMC through glucocorticoid type II receptors and the induction of protein synthesis. Suppression of the ANF-mediated response may play a role in glucocorticoid-induced hypertension.

  17. Tissue Factor, Protease Activated Receptors and Pathologic Heart Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Tissue factor is the primary initiator of coagulation cascade and plays an essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis. In addition, tissue factor and coagulation proteases contribute to the many cellular responses via activation of protease activated receptors. Heart is the organ demonstrating high levels of constitutive tissue factor expression. This review focuses on the role of tissue factor, coagulation proteases and protease activated receptors in heart hemostasis and the pathological heart remodeling associated with myocardial infarction, viral myocarditis and hypertension. PMID:25104210

  18. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors modify N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors via Src kinase

    PubMed Central

    Trepanier, Catherine; Lei, Gang; Xie, Yu-Feng; MacDonald, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) have emerged as important targets for the treatment of schizophrenia. Since hypofunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) has also been implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia, we examined whether postsynaptic mGluR2/3 regulate NMDAR function. Activation of mGluR2/3 significantly decreased the ratio of AMPA-to-NMDA excitatory postsynaptic currents at Schaffer Collateral-CA1 synapses and enhanced the peak of NMDA-evoked currents in acutely isolated CA1 neurons. The mGluR2/3-mediated potentiation of NMDAR currents was selective for GluN2A-containing NMDARs and was mediated by the Src family kinase Src. Activation of mGluR2/3 inhibited the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-PKA pathway and thereby activated Src by inhibiting its regulatory C-terminal Src kinase (Csk). We suggest a novel model of regulation of NMDARs by Gi/o-coupled receptors whereby inhibition of the cAMP-PKA pathway via mGluR2/3 activates Src kinase and potentiates GluN2A-containing NMDAR currents. This represents a potentially novel mechanism to correct the hypoglutamatergic state found in schizophrenia. PMID:23378895

  19. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage.

    PubMed

    Villapol, Sonia; Balarezo, María G; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2015-11-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article.Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan's blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking and

  20. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage

    PubMed Central

    Balarezo, María G.; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M.; Symes, Aviva J.

    2015-01-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article. Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan’s blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking

  1. BLOCKADE OF BRAIN ANGIOTENSIN II AT1 RECEPTORS AMELIORATES STRESS, ANXIETY, BRAIN INFLAMMATION AND ISCHEMIA: THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    SAAVEDRA, Juan M.; SÁNCHEZ-LEMUS, Enrique; BENICKY, Julius

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Poor adaptation to stress, alterations in cerebrovascular function and excessive brain inflammation play critical roles in the pathophysiology of many psychiatric and neurological disorders such as major depression, schizophrenia, post traumatic stress disorder, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and traumatic brain injury. Treatment for these highly prevalent and devastating conditions is at present very limited and many times inefficient, and the search for novel therapeutic options is of major importance. Recently, attention has been focused on the role of a brain regulatory peptide, Angiotensin II, and in the translational value of the blockade of its physiological AT1 receptors. In addition to its well-known cardiovascular effects, Angiotensin II, through AT1 receptor stimulation, is a pleiotropic brain modulatory factor involved in the control of the reaction to stress, in the regulation of cerebrovascular flow and the response to inflammation. Excessive brain AT1 receptor activity is associated with exaggerated sympathetic and hormonal response to stress, vulnerability to cerebrovascular ischemia and brain inflammation, processes leading to neuronal injury. In animal models, inhibition of brain AT1 receptor activity with systemically administered Angiotensin II receptor blockers is neuroprotective; it reduces exaggerated stress responses and anxiety, prevents stress-induced gastric ulcerations, decreases vulnerability to ischemia and stroke, reverses chronic cerebrovascular inflammation, and reduces acute inflammatory responses produced by bacterial endotoxin. These effects protect neurons from injury and contribute to increase the lifespan. Angiotensin II receptor blockers are compounds with a good margin of safety widely used in the treatment of hypertension and their anti-inflammatory and vascular protective effects contribute to reduce renal and cardiovascular failure. Inhibition of brain AT1 receptors in humans is also neuroprotective

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation by the Cannabinoid Receptor (CB1) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Induces Differential Responses in Corneal Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by the cannabinoid receptor (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) induces...Available online 7 July 2010 Keywords: cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR...release of endogenous metabolites that are cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) agonists. We determined

  3. Fc receptor triggering induces expression of surface activation antigens and release of platelet-activating factor in large granular lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Malavasi, F; Tetta, C; Funaro, A; Bellone, G; Ferrero, E; Franzone, A C; Dellabona, P; Rusci, R; Matera, L; Camussi, G

    1986-01-01

    Triggering of large granular lymphocyte (LGL) Fc receptor with a specific monoclonal antibody (AB8.28) linked to an insoluble matrix induces cell activation, as witnessed by expression of HLA class II (DR and DQ) molecules and interleukin 2 receptor. Moreover, this event is accompanied by a concomitant release of platelet-activating factor by LGL. We conclude that the Fc receptor molecule identified by mAb AB8.28 represents a trigger for LGL activation. PMID:3085094

  4. Targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ann-Lii; Shen, Ying-Chun; Zhu, Andrew X

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the primary type of liver cancer, and both the age-adjusted incidence and mortality of HCC have steadily increased in recent years. Advanced HCC is associated with a very poor survival rate. Despite accumulating data regarding the risk factors for HCC, the mechanisms that contribute to HCC tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. Signaling through the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family is involved in fibrosis and its progression to cirrhosis of the liver, which is a risk factor for the development of HCC. Furthermore, several alterations in FGF/FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling correlate with the outcomes of HCC patients, suggesting that signaling through this family of proteins contributes to the development or progression of HCC tumors. Currently, there are no established systemic treatments for patients with advanced HCC in whom sorafenib treatment has failed or who were unable to tolerate it. Recently, several multikinase inhibitors that target FGFRs have demonstrated some early evidence of antitumor activity in phase I/II trials. Therefore, this review discusses the molecular implications of FGFR-mediated signaling in HCC and summarizes the clinical evidence for novel FGFR-targeted therapies for HCC currently being studied in clinical trials.

  5. Testis composition and steroidogenic protein abundance in GnRH-II receptor knockdown boars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Testosterone, secreted from Leydig cells, is classically stimulated by luteinizing hormone (LH) from the anterior pituitary gland, but an LH-independent mechanism of testosterone production has also been identified in the boar. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone II (GnRH-II) and its receptor (GnRHR-II) ...

  6. Inclusion of Strep-Tag II in design of antigen receptors for T cell immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingfeng; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Cabanov, Alexandra; Kosasih, Paula; Hill, Tyler; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-01-01

    The tactical introduction of Strep-tag II into synthetic antigen receptors provides engineered T cells with a marker for identification and rapid purification, and a functional element for selective antibody coated microbead-driven large-scale expansion. Such receptor designs can be applied to chimeric antigen receptors of different ligand specificities and costimulatory domains, and to T cell receptors to facilitate cGMP manufacturing of adoptive T cell therapies to treat cancer and other diseases. PMID:26900664

  7. Combination of ruthenium(II)-arene complex [Ru(η6-p-cymene)Cl2(pta)] (RAPTA-C) and the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib results in efficient angiostatic and antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Berndsen, Robert H.; Weiss, Andrea; Abdul, U. Kulsoom; Wong, Tse J.; Meraldi, Patrick; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Dyson, Paul J.; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja

    2017-01-01

    Ruthenium-based compounds show strong potential as anti-cancer drugs and are being investigated as alternatives to other well-established metal-based chemotherapeutics. The organometallic compound [Ru(η6-p-cymene)Cl2(pta)], where pta = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (RAPTA-C) exhibits broad acting anti-tumor efficacy with intrinsic angiostatic activity. In the search for an optimal anti-angiogenesis drug combination, we identified synergistic potential between RAPTA-C and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, erlotinib. This drug combination results in strong synergistic inhibition of cell viability in human endothelial (ECRF24 and HUVEC) and human ovarian carcinoma (A2780 and A2780cisR) cells. Additionally, erlotinib significantly enhances the cellular uptake of RAPTA-C relative to treatment with RAPTA-C alone in human ovarian carcinoma cells, but not endothelial cells. Drug combinations induce the formation of chromosome bridges that persist after mitotic exit and delay abscission in A2780 and A2780cisR, therefore suggesting initiation of cellular senescence. The therapeutic potential of these compounds and their combination is further validated in vivo on A2780 tumors grown on the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model, and in a preclinical model in nude mice. Immunohistochemical analysis confirms effective anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative activity in vivo, based on a significant reduction of microvascular density and a decrease in proliferating cells. PMID:28223694

  8. Angiotensin II receptor blockers in the treatment of the cardiovascular disease continuum.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2008-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease (CVD) continuum is a chain of events that begins with a host of risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, visceral obesity, and smoking. If left untreated, it might progress to atherosclerosis, left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, left ventricular remodeling, left ventricular enlargement, and eventually endstage heart disease and death. Initiation of treatment, at any stage in its course, might prevent or delay its further progression. This review discusses data from doubleblind, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have investigated the effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) on various stages of the CVD continuum. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for relevant English-language double-blind RCTs using the years 1995 to 2008 and the terms angiotensin type II receptor blocker, renin-angiotensin system, hypertension, heart failure, left ventricular hypertropby, renal disease, stroke, and cerebrovascular disease. A total of 13 studies were included in this review. The results suggest that ARB-based therapy has cardioprotective, cerebroprotective, and renoprotective effects, including regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, reduction in the risk of stroke, and slowing of the progression of renal disease. Treatment of CVD risk factors, including hypertension, is increasingly recognized as a way to interrupt the CVD continuum. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to the development and progression of CVD, and RAS blockade has been reported to be beneficial at all stages of the CVD continuum.

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by intracellular prostaglandin E2-activated prostaglandin E2 receptors. Role in retinoic acid receptor-β up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Lucio Cazaña, Francisco J

    2013-09-01

    The pharmacological modulation of renoprotective factor vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in the proximal tubule has therapeutic interest. In human proximal tubular HK-2 cells, treatment with all-trans retinoic acid or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) triggers the production of VEGF-A. The pathway involves an initial increase in intracellular PGE2, followed by activation of EP receptors (PGE2 receptors, most likely an intracellular subset) and increase in retinoic acid receptor-β (RARβ) expression. RARβ then up-regulates transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which increases the transcription and production of VEGF-A. Here we studied the role in this pathway of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation by EP receptors. We found that EGFR inhibitor AG1478 prevented the increase in VEGF-A production induced by PGE2- and all-trans retinoic acid. This effect was due to the inhibition of the transcriptional up-regulation of RARβ, which resulted in loss of the RARβ-dependent transcriptional up-regulation of HIF-1α. PGE2 and all-trans retinoic acid also increased EGFR phosphorylation and this effect was sensitive to antagonists of EP receptors. The role of intracellular PGE2 was indicated by two facts; i) PGE2-induced EGFR phosphorylation was substantially prevented by inhibitor of prostaglandin uptake transporter bromocresol green and ii) all-trans retinoic acid treatment, which enhanced intracellular but not extracellular PGE2, had lower effect on EGFR phosphorylation upon pre-treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitor diclofenac. Thus, EGFR transactivation by intracellular PGE2-activated EP receptors results in the sequential activation of RARβ and HIF-1α leading to increased production of VEGF-A and it may be a target for the therapeutic modulation of HIF-1α/VEGF-A. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Blockade of Urotensin II Receptor Prevents Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Ae; Lee, Dong Gil; Yi, Kyu Yang; Lee, Byung Ho; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a potent vasoactive peptide and mitogenic agent to induce proliferation of various cells including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we examined the effects of a novel UII receptor (UT) antagonist, KR-36676, on vasoconstriction of aorta and proliferation of aortic SMCs. In rat aorta, UII-induced vasoconstriction was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In primary human aortic SMCs (hAoSMCs), UII-induced cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, KR-36676 decreased UII-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and UII-induced cell proliferation was also significantly inhibited by a known ERK inhibitor U0126. In mouse carotid ligation model, intimal thickening of carotid artery was dramatically suppressed by oral treatment with KR-36676 (30 mg/ kg/day) for 4 weeks compared to vehicle-treated group. From these results, it is indicated that KR-36676 suppress UII-induced proliferation of VSMCs at least partially through inhibition of ERK activation, and that it also attenuates UII-induced vasoconstriction and vascular neointima formation. Our study suggest that KR-36676 may be an attractive candidate for the pharmacological management of vascular dysfunction. PMID:27582556

  11. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, Philip; Kane, Émilie; Giaid, Adel

    2011-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) binds to its receptor, UT, playing an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland, and central nervous system. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, however, this constriction–dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) activity leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII), as well as inflammation, high blood pressure, and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases. PMID:21811463

  12. Modulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor levels on microvascular endothelial cells during in vitro angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, S; Mahooti-Brooks, N; Bensen, L; McCarthy, T L; Centrella, M; Madri, J A

    1996-01-01

    Microvascular endothelial cells (RFCs) cultured in two-dimensional (2D) cultures proliferate rapidly and exhibit an undifferentiated phenotype. Addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1) increases fibronectin expression and inhibits proliferation. RFCs cultured in three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen gels proliferate slowly and are refractory to the anti-proliferative effects of TGF beta1. TGF beta1 promotes tube formation in 3D cultures. TGF beta1 increases fibronectin expression and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) activity and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels in 3D cultures. Since the TGF beta type I and II receptors have been reported to regulate different activities induced by TGF beta1, we compared the TGF beta receptor profiles on cells in 2D and 3D cultures. RFCs in 3D cultures exhibited a significant loss of cell surface type II receptor compared with cells in 2D cultures. The inhibitory effect of TGF beta1 on proliferation is suppressed in transfected 2D cultures expressing a truncated form of the type II receptor, while its stimulatory effect on fibronectin production is reduced in both 2D and 3D transfected cultures expressing a truncated form of the type I receptor. These data suggest that the type II receptor mediates the antiproliferative effect of TGF beta1 while the type I receptor mediates the matrix response of RFCs to TGF beta1 and demonstrate that changes in the matrix environment can modulate the surface expression of TGF beta receptors, altering the responsiveness of RFCs to TGF beta1. PMID:8617876

  13. The angiotensin II receptor 2 is expressed and mediates angiotensin II signaling in lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Königshoff, Melanie; Wilhelm, Anke; Jahn, Andreas; Sedding, Daniel; Amarie, Oana Veronica; Eul, Bastian; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Günther, Andreas; Eickelberg, Oliver; Rose, Frank

    2007-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a severe interstitial lung disease unresponsive to currently available therapies. In IPF, initial alveolar epithelial cell damage leads to activation of fibroblast-(myo)fibroblasts, which deposit an increased amount of a collagen-rich extracellular matrix. Angiotensin II (ANGII) signaling, mediated via angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1) or type 2 (AGTR2), controls tissue remodeling in fibrosis, but the relevance of AGTR2 remains elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated increased expression of AGTR1 und AGTR2 in human and rodent lung tissues from patients with IPF and mice subjected to bleomycin-induced fibrosis, respectively. Both AGTR1 und AGTR2 localized to interstitial fibroblasts. Quantitative analysis of cell surface expression in primary mouse fibroblasts revealed a significant increase of AGTR2 surface expression in fibrotic fibroblasts, whereas AGTR1 surface expression levels remained similar. ANGII treatment of normal fibroblasts led to enhanced migration and proliferation, which was abrogated after pretreatment with losartan (LOS), an AGTR1 inhibitor. In contrast, in fibrotic fibroblasts, migration and proliferation was modified only by AGTR2, but not AGTR1 inhibition (using PD123319). ANGII-induced effects were mediated via phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and p42/44, which was blocked via LOS and PD123319, respectively. Similar effects of AGTR1 and AGTR2 inhibition were observed using conditioned media of alveolar epithelial cells, a prominent source of ANGII in the lung in vivo. In summary, we conclude that ANGII signaling occurs primarily via AGTR1 in normal fibroblasts, while AGTR2-mediated effects are dominant on activated (myo)-fibroblasts, a receptor switch that may perturb epithelial-mesenchymal interaction, thereby further perpetuating fibrogenesis.

  14. Purkinje cells express Angiotensin II AT(2) receptors at different developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Arce, María E; Sánchez, Susana I; Aguilera, Francisco López; Seguin, Leonardo R; Seltzer, Alicia M; Ciuffo, Gladys M

    2011-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) binds and activates two major receptors subtypes, namely AT(1) and AT(2). In the fetus, AT(2) receptors predominate in all tissues and decline shortly after birth, being restricted to a few organs including brain. Interpretation of the function of Ang II in the cerebellum requires a thorough understanding of the localization of Ang II receptors. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the localization of Ang II AT(2) receptors in the Purkinje cell (PC) layer during development. By binding autoradiography, a clear complementary pattern of AT(1) and AT(2) binding labeled by [(125)I] Ang II was observed in young rats within the cerebellar cortex. This pattern was present at the stages P8 and P15, but not at P30 and P60, where AT(2) binding appears low and superimposed with AT(1) binding. We demonstrate that AT(2) antibodies recognized postmitotic Purkinje cells, labeling the somata of these cells at all the stages studied, from P8 to P60, suggesting that PCs express these receptors from early stages of development until adulthood. In P8 and P15 animals, we observed a clear correspondence between immunolabeling and the well-defined layer observed by binding autoradiography. Confocal analysis allowed us to discard the co-localization of AT(2) receptors with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a glial marker. Double immunolabeling allowed us to demonstrate the co-localization of Ang II AT(2) receptors with zebrin II, a specific PC marker. Since PCs are the sole output signal from the cerebellar cortex and considering the role of cerebellum in movement control, the specific receptor localization suggests a potential role for Ang II AT(2) receptors in the cerebellar function.

  15. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the urotensin II receptor antagonist palosuran in macroalbuminuric, diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Sidharta, Patricia N; Wagner, Frank D; Bohnemeier, Holger; Jungnik, Arvid; Halabi, Atef; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Chadha-Boreham, Harbajan; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2006-09-01

    In patients with renal disease increased urotensin II plasma levels have been observed. We have investigated whether palosuran, a potent, selective, and competitive antagonist of the urotensin II receptor, has effects in patients who are prone to the development of renal disease. Macroalbuminuric, diabetic patients, categorized by renal function, were treated with oral doses of 125 mg palosuran twice daily for 13.5 days in addition to treatment with either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker. The 24-hour urinary albumin excretion rate was determined twice at baseline and after 13.5 days of treatment. Plasma concentrations of palosuran were determined for 12 hours after the first and last drug intake. Renal hemodynamics was measured before and after 12.5 days of treatment. Tolerability and safety parameters were monitored. An overall clinically significant reduction of 24.3% (geometric mean) (95% confidence interval, 4.1 to 45.0) in the 24-hour urinary albumin excretion rate was observed (P = .014). No effect was observed on renal hemodynamic parameters. Palosuran was rapidly absorbed with maximum plasma concentrations at 1 hour after drug administration. The accumulation factor was 1.7 (geometric mean) (95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 2.1). Palosuran was well tolerated. The good tolerability profile and the decrease in the 24-hour urinary albumin excretion rate may benefit diabetic patients with renal failure with regard to their disease progression. Larger placebo-controlled trials in this patient population are needed to investigate whether urotensin II receptor antagonists, given as monotherapy or combination therapy, may improve the current treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Direct stimulation of angiotensin II type 2 receptor initiated after stroke ameliorates ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Min, Li-Juan; Mogi, Masaki; Tsukuda, Kana; Jing, Fei; Ohshima, Kousei; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-No, Harumi; Wang, Xiao-Li; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Bai, Hui-Yu; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2014-08-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability; however, meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of blood pressure-lowering drugs in acute stroke has shown no definite evidence of a beneficial effect on functional outcome. Accumulating evidence suggests that angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade with angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor stimulation could contribute to protection against ischemic brain damage. We examined the possibility that direct AT2 receptor stimulation by compound 21 (C21) initiated even after stroke can prevent ischemic brain damage. Stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, and the area of cerebral infarction was measured by magnetic resonant imaging. C21 (10 µg/kg/day) treatment was initiated immediately after MCA occlusion by intraperitoneal injection followed by treatment with C21 once daily. We observed that ischemic area was enlarged in a time dependent fashion and decreased on day 5 after MCA occlusion. Treatment with C21 initiated after MCA occlusion significantly reduced the ischemic area, with improvement of neurological deficit in a time-dependent manner without affecting blood pressure. The decrease of cerebral blood flow after MCA occlusion was also ameliorated by C21 treatment. Moreover, treatment with C21 significantly attenuated superoxide anion production and expression of proinflammatory cytokines, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and tumor necrosis factor α. Interestingly, C21 administration significantly decreased blood-brain barrier permeability and cerebral edema on the ischemic side. These results provide new evidence that direct AT2 receptor stimulation with C21 is a novel therapeutic approach to prevent ischemic brain damage after acute stroke. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Phase II Trial of Trastuzumab in Combination With Cytotoxic Chemotherapy for Treatment of Metastatic Osteosarcoma With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Overexpression: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Ebb, David; Meyers, Paul; Grier, Holcombe; Bernstein, Mark; Gorlick, Richard; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Krailo, Mark; Devidas, Meenakshi; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Siegal, Gene P.; Ferguson, William Shay; Letson, George Douglas; Marcus, Karen; Goorin, Allen; Beardsley, Peter; Marina, Neyssa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite efforts to intensify chemotherapy, survival for patients with metastatic osteosarcoma remains poor. Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in osteosarcoma has been shown to predict poor therapeutic response and decreased survival. This study tests the safety and feasibility of delivering biologically targeted therapy by combining trastuzumab with standard chemotherapy in patients with metastatic osteosarcoma and HER2 overexpression. Patients and Methods Among 96 evaluable patients with newly diagnosed metastatic osteosarcoma, 41 had tumors that were HER2-positive by immunohistochemistry. All patients received chemotherapy with cisplatin, doxorubicin, methotrexate, ifosfamide, and etoposide. Dexrazoxane was administered with doxorubicin to minimize the risk of cardiotoxicity from treatment with trastuzumab and anthracycline. Only patients with HER2 overexpression received concurrent therapy with trastuzumab given for 34 consecutive weeks. Results The 30-month event-free and overall survival rates for patients with HER2 overexpression treated with chemotherapy and trastuzumab were 32% and 59%, respectively. For patients without HER2 overexpression, treated with chemotherapy alone, the 30-month event-free and overall survival rates were 32% and 50%, respectively. There was no clinically significant short-term cardiotoxicity in patients treated with trastuzumab and doxorubicin. Conclusion Despite intensive chemotherapy plus trastuzumab for patients with HER2-positive disease, the outcome for all patients was poor, with no significant difference between the HER2-positive and HER2-negative groups. Although our findings suggest that trastuzumab can be safely delivered in combination with anthracycline-based chemotherapy and dexrazoxane, its therapeutic benefit remains uncertain. Definitive assessment of trastuzumab's potential role in treating osteosarcoma would require a randomized study of patients with HER2-positive disease

  18. Role of angiotensin II receptor subtype activation in cognitive function and ischaemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Mogi, Masaki

    2011-07-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1) ) receptor blockers (ARBs) reduce the onset of stroke, stroke severity and the incidence and progression of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. We can expect that ARBs exert these effects by both AT(1) receptor blockade and angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2) ) receptor stimulation. Moreover, recent experimental results support the notion that AT(2) receptor stimulation with AT(1) receptor blockade could contribute to protection against ischaemic brain damage at least partly due to an increase in cerebral blood flow and decrease in oxidative stress, and prevent cognitive decline. Cellular therapy has been focused on as a new therapeutic approach to restore injured neurons. In this context, it has been reported that AT(2) receptor stimulation enhances neurite outgrowth and decreases neural damage, thereby enhancing neurogenesis. Moreover, additional beneficial effects of ARBs with an AT(1) receptor blocking action with a partial peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonistic effect have been reported, and interaction of AT(2) receptor activation and PPAR-γ might be involved in these ARBs' effects. This article reviews the effects of regulation of activation of angiotensin II receptor subtypes on ischaemic brain damage and cognitive function, focusing on the effects of AT(2) receptor stimulation. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Urocortin II mediates pro‐inflammatory effects in human colonocytes via corticotropin‐releasing hormone receptor

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Alan C; Anton, Pauline; Savidge, Tor; Newman, Paul; Cheifetz, Adam S; Gay, Jerome; Paraschos, Sophia; Winter, Michael Weinstein; Moyer, Mary P; Karalis, Katia; Kokkotou, Efi; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aims Urocortin II (UcnII) is a neuropeptide that binds with high affinity to the corticotropin‐releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) in peripheral tissues. UcnII is synthesised in the intestine, but its role in human intestinal inflammation is largely unknown. Methods Responses of human colonic epithelial cells expressing CRHR2 to stimulation by UcnII were measured using ELISA, western blot analysis, real‐time reverse transcription‐PCR (RT‐PCR) and interleukin (IL)8 promoter activity. Expression levels of CRHR2 and UcnII in human colitis were determined by immunofluorescence and real‐time RT‐PCR in mucosal biopsies from patients with Crohn's and ulcerative colitis, and in human intestinal xenografts after exposure to Clostridium difficile toxin A. Results It is reported here that expression of CRHR2 mRNA and protein in human colonic epithelial cells (HT‐29) are increased by exposure to C difficile toxin A or tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α. Stimulation of non‐transformed NCM460 colonocytes overexpressing CRHR2α receptor with UcnII resulted in a time‐ and concentration‐dependent increase in IL8 production. UcnII stimulation also led to activation of nuclear factor‐κB (NF‐κB) and mitogen‐acivated protein (MAP) kinase in these cells, as evidenced by degradation of IκBα and phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF‐κB and extracellularly regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Furthermore, expression of UcnII and CRHR2 mRNA was increased in mucosal samples of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and after exposure of human intestinal xenografts to C difficile toxin A. Conclusions These results suggest that UcnII has pro‐inflammatory effects in human intestinal cells via the CRHR2α receptor and may play an important role in the pathophysiology of colitis in humans. PMID:17412781

  20. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein downregulates vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hirohide; Ichiki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Jiro; Takeda, Kotaro; Miyazaki, Ryohei; Hashimoto, Toru; Narabayashi, Eriko; Kitamoto, Shiro; Tokunou, Tomotake; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) by hypoxia stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and increases the expression of target genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor. Although the systemic renin-angiotensin system is activated by hypoxia, the role of PHD in the regulation of the renin-angiotensin system remains unknown. We examined the effect of PHD inhibition on the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R). Hypoxia, cobalt chloride, and dimethyloxalylglycine, all known to inhibit PHD, reduced AT(1)R expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. Knockdown of PHD2, a major isoform of PHDs, by RNA interference also reduced AT(1)R expression. Cobalt chloride diminished angiotensin II-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Cobalt chloride decreased AT(1)R mRNA through transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Oral administration of cobalt chloride (14 mg/kg per day) to C57BL/6J mice receiving angiotensin II infusion (490 ng/kg per minute) for 4 weeks significantly attenuated perivascular fibrosis of the coronary arteries without affecting blood pressure level. These data suggest that PHD inhibition may be beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases by inhibiting renin-angiotensin system via AT(1)R downregulation.

  1. Induction of nerve growth factor receptors on cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Yaar, M.; Mansur, C.P.; Chao, M.V.; Gilchrest, B.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human melanocytes involve a complex series of interactions during which both genetic and environmental factors play roles. At present, the regulation of these processes is poorly understood. The authors have induced the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on cultured human melanocytes with phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate and have correlated this event with the appearance of a more differentiated, dendritic morphology. Criteria for NGF receptor expression included protein accumulation and cell-surface immunofluorescent staining with a monoclonal antibody directed against the human receptor and induction of the messenger RNA species as determined by blot-hybridization studies. The presence of the receptor could also be induced by UV irradiation or growth factor deprivation. The NGF receptor is inducible in cultured human melanocytes, and they suggest that NGF may modulate the behavior of this neural crest-derived cell in the skin.

  2. Interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein interacts with the type II interleukin-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Malinowsky, D; Lundkvist, J; Layé, S; Bartfai, T

    1998-06-16

    Stably transfected HEK-293 cells express on their surface the murine type II IL-1 receptor (mIL-1RII) as demonstrated by FACS analysis using the mAb 4E2, however binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta to these cells is nearly absent. Saturable high affinity binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta is observed when the murine IL-1 receptor accessory protein (mIL-1RAcP) is coexpressed with mIL-1RII. Binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta to mIL-1RII-mIL-1RAcP complex can be inhibited either with antibodies to mIL-1RII (mAb 4E2), or by antibodies to mIL-1RAcP (mAb 4C5). The number of high affinity binding sites in cells stably transfected with the cDNA for mIL-1RII is dependent on the dose of cDNA for mIL-1RAcP used to transfect the cells. The high affinity complex between mIL-1RII and mIL-1RAcP is not preformed by interaction between the intracellular domains of these two transmembrane proteins, rather it appears to require the extracellular portions of mIL-1RII and mIL-1RAcP and the presence of a ligand. We suggest that in addition to its earlier described decoy receptor role, IL-1RII may modulate the responsiveness of cells to IL-1 by binding the IL-1RAcP in unproductive/non-signalling complexes and thus reducing the number of signalling IL-1RI-IL-1RAcP-agonist complexes when IL-1 is bound.

  3. Calix receptor edifice; scrupulous turn off fluorescent sensor for Fe(III), Co(II) and Cu(II).

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Keyur D; Gupte, Hrishikesh S; Makwana, Bharat A; Vyas, Disha J; Maity, Debdeep; Jain, Vinod K

    2012-11-01

    Novel Supramolecular fluorescence receptor derived from calix-system i.e. calix[4]resorcinarene bearing dansylchloride as fluorophore was designed and synthesized. The compound was purified by column chromatography and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR and Mass spectroscopy. Tetradansylated calix[4] resorcinarene (TDCR) shows a boat conformation with C(2)v symmetry. The complexation behaviour of metal cations [Ag(I), Cd(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Hg(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), U(VI) (1 × 10(-4) M)] with tetra dansylated calix[4]resorcinarene (1 × 10(-6) M) was studied by spectophotometry and spectrofluorometry. Red shift in the absorption spectra led us to conclude that there is strong complexation Fe(III), Co(II) and Cu(II) with TDCR. These metal cations also produce quenching with red shifts in the emission spectra. The maximum quenching in emission intensity was observed in the case of Fe(III) and its binding constant was also found to be significantly higher than that of Co(II) and Cu(II). Quantum yield of metal complexes of Fe(III) was found to be lower in comparison with Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes. Stern Volmer analysis indicates that the mechanism of fluorescence quenching is either purely dynamic, or purely static.

  4. Angiotensin II AT2 receptor subtype: an uprising frontier in cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Volpe, Massimo; Musumeci, Beatrice; De Paolis, Paola; Savoia, Carmine; Morganti, Alberto

    2003-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of fluid, electrolyte balance and blood pressure, and is a modulator of cellular growth and proliferation. Biological actions of RAS are linked to the binding of the effector molecule, angiotensin II (AngII), to specific membrane receptors, mostly the AT1 subtype and, to a lesser extent, other subtypes. Following the identification and characterization of the AT2 subtype receptor, it has been proposed that a complex interaction between AngII and its receptors may play an important role in the effects of RAS. In this paper current information on AngII subtype receptors--their structure, regulation and intracellular signalling--are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on the potential relevance for cardiovascular pathophysiology. In addition, we discuss modulation of expression of the AT2 receptor and its interaction with the AT1 receptor subtype, as well as the potential effects of this receptor on blood pressure regulation. A better understanding of the integrated effects of the AngII subtype receptors may help to elucidate the function of the RAS, as well as their participation in the mechanisms of cardiovascular disease and attendant therapeutic implications.

  5. Angiotensin II activates endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase via AT1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Hirata, Y; Emori, T; Imai, T; Marumo, F

    1996-09-01

    To determine whether angiotensin (ANG) II, a vasoconstrictor hormone, activates constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) in endothelial cells (ECs), we investigated the cellular mechanism by which ANG II induces nitric oxide (NO) formation in cultured bovine ECs. ANG II rapidly (within 1 min) and dose-dependently (10(-9)-10(-6) M) increased nitrate/nitrite (NOx) production. This effect of ANG II was abolished by a NOS inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. An ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist (DuP 753), but not an ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist (PD 123177), dose-dependently inhibited ANG II-induced NOx production. A Ca(2+)-channel blocker (barnidipine) failed to affect ANG II-induced NOx production, whereas an intracellular Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA) and a calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) abolished NOx production induced by ANG II. A protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (H-7) and down-regulation of endogenous PKC after pretreatment with phorbol ester decreased NOx production stimulated by ANG II. ANG II transiently stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) formation, and increased cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations; these effects were blocked by DuP 753. Our data demonstrate that ANG II stimulates NO release by activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent cNOS via AT1 receptors in bovine ECs.

  6. Biochemical Characterization of Individual Human Glycosylated pro-Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-II and big-IGF-II Isoforms Associated with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenall, Sameer A.; Bentley, John D.; Pearce, Lesley A.; Scoble, Judith A.; Sparrow, Lindsay G.; Bartone, Nicola A.; Xiao, Xiaowen; Baxter, Robert C.; Cosgrove, Leah J.; Adams, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major embryonic growth factor belonging to the insulin-like growth factor family, which includes insulin and IGF-I. Its expression in humans is tightly controlled by maternal imprinting, a genetic restraint that is lost in many cancers, resulting in up-regulation of both mature IGF-II mRNA and protein expression. Additionally, increased expression of several longer isoforms of IGF-II, termed “pro” and “big” IGF-II, has been observed. To date, it is ambiguous as to what role these IGF-II isoforms have in initiating and sustaining tumorigenesis and whether they are bioavailable. We have expressed each individual IGF-II isoform in their proper O-glycosylated format and established that all bind to the IGF-I receptor and both insulin receptors A and B, resulting in their activation and subsequent stimulation of fibroblast proliferation. We also confirmed that all isoforms are able to be sequestered into binary complexes with several IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-5). In contrast to this, ternary complex formation with IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5 and the auxillary protein, acid labile subunit, was severely diminished. Furthermore, big-IGF-II isoforms bound much more weakly to purified ectodomain of the natural IGF-II scavenging receptor, IGF-IIR. IGF-II isoforms thus possess unique biological properties that may enable them to escape normal sequestration avenues and remain bioavailable in vivo to sustain oncogenic signaling. PMID:23166326

  7. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  8. Design of angiotensin II derivatives suitable for indirect affinity techniques: potential applications to receptor studies.

    PubMed

    Bonnafous, J C; Seyer, R; Tence, M; Marie, J; Kabbaj, M; Aumelas, A

    1988-01-01

    The design of angiotensin II (A II)-derived probes suitable for indirect affinity techniques is presented. Biotin or dinitrophenyl moieties have been added at the N-terminus of A II, through aminohexanoic acid as spacer arm, to generate (6-biotinylamido)-hexanoyl-AII (Bio-Ahx-AII) and dinitrophenyl- aminohexanoyl-AII (Dnp-Ahx-AII). Monoiodinated and highly labeled radioiodinated forms of these probes have been prepared. The two bifunctional ligands displayed high affinities for rat liver A II receptors (Kd values in the nanomolar range) and their secondary acceptors: streptavidin and monoclonal anti-Dnp antibodies respectively. Bio-Ahx-AII and Dnp-Ahx-AII behaved as agonists on several AII-sensitive systems. Based on these structural assessments, the parent photoactivable azido probe: Bio-Ahx-(Ala1,Phe(4N3)8)A II. A II was synthesized and proved to possess similar biological properties than the non-azido compound. The hepatic A II receptor could be covalently labeled by the radioiodinated probe, with a particularly high yield (15-20%); SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of solubilized complexes revealed specific labeling of a 65 Kdaltons binding unit, in agreement with previous data obtained with other azido AII-derived compounds. The potential applications of these probes are: i) receptor purification by combination of its photoaffinity labeling and adsorption of biotin-tagged solubilized hormone-receptor complexes on avidin gels. ii) cell labeling and sorting. iii) histochemical receptor visualization.

  9. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor A1166C gene polymorphism and essential hypertension in San Luis.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Alicia Viviana; Arce, Maria Elena; Lopez, José Raul; Ciuffo, Gladys María

    2006-12-01

    Essential hypertension is considered a multifactorial trait resulting from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor mediates the vasoconstrictor and growth-promoting effects of Ang II. The A1166C polymorphism of the AT1 receptor gene may be associated with cardiovascular phenotypes, such as high arterial blood pressure, aortic stiffness, and increased cardiovascular risk. We investigated the association between this A1166C polymorphism and hypertension in hypertense and normotense subjects from San Luis (Argentina) by mismatch PCR-RFLP analysis. Hypertense patients exhibited significant increases in lipid related values and body mass index. The frequency of occurrence of the C1166 allele was higher among patients with hypertension (0.19) than in the control group (0.06). No significant association was found between this polymorphism and essential hypertension in the study population, although the AC genotype prevalence was higher in patients with hypertension and positive family history of hypertension (32%) than in control subjects (12%). Patients with the A1166C polymorphism exhibited higher levels of serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and BMI than in control subjects. Taken together the genotype and biochemical parameters and considering the restrictive selection criteria used, the present results suggest a correlation between AT1 A1166C gene polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease.

  10. Self-assembly of dinuclear Pd(ii)/Pt(ii) metallacyclic receptors incorporating N-heterocyclic carbene complexes as corners.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ismael; Domarco, Olaya; Peinador, Carlos; Fenández, Alberto; Fernández, Jesús J; Vázquez-García, Digna; García, Marcos D

    2017-03-07

    We report herein the self-assembly of a series of new square and rectangular-shaped dinuclear M2L2 metallacycles (M = Pd(ii)/Pt(ii)), receptors self-assembled in water from four different N-monoalkyl-4,4'-bipyridinium derivatives as ligands and square-planar Pd(ii) and Pt(ii) metal centers having the chelating N-heterocyclic carbene 1,1'-di(methyl)-3,3'-methylene-4-diimidazolin-2,2'-diylidene. The concentration-dependent Pd2L2 metallacycles were successfully obtained and characterized by means of NMR experiments in aqueous media. Due to the strong trans effect exerted by the carbene ligands, the synthesis of the Pt2L2 receptors was achieved as well by self-assembly of the components at room temperature in a few hours, in clear contraposition to the harsh reaction conditions usually required for the labilization of other kinetically inert Pt(ii)-N(pyridine) bonds. X-ray diffraction studies of suitable single crystals of two of the obtained receptors offered additional information on the structure of the obtained supramolecules, whose ability as receptors has been explored by the preparation and study of the corresponding inclusion complexes in water with 1,5-dihydroxynaphthalene as the model substrate.

  11. Brain-Targeted (Pro)Renin Receptor Knockdown attenuates Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wencheng; Peng, Hua; Cao, Theresa; Sato, Ryosuke; McDaniels, Sarah. J.; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel; Feng, Yumei

    2012-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor is a newly discovered member of the brain renin-angiotensin system. To investigate the role of brain (pro)renin receptor in hypertension, adeno-associated virus-mediated (pro)renin receptor shRNA was used to knockdown (pro)renin receptor expression in the brain of non-transgenic normotensive and human renin-angiotensinogen double transgenic hypertensive mice. Blood pressure was monitored using implanted telemetric probes in conscious animals. Real-time PCR and immunostaining were performed to determine (pro)renin receptor, angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin mRNA levels. Plasma vasopressin levels were determined by Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay. Double transgenic mice exhibited higher blood pressure, elevated cardiac and vascular sympathetic tone, and impaired spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. Intracerebroventricular delivery of (pro)renin receptor shRNA significantly reduced blood pressure, cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic tone, and improved baroreflex sensitivity compared to the control virus treatment in double transgenic mice. (Pro)renin receptor knockdown significantly reduced angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin levels in double transgenic mice. These data indicate that (pro)renin receptor knockdown in the brain attenuates angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and is associated with a decrease insympathetic tone and an improvement of the baroreflex sensitivity. In addition, brain-targeted (pro)renin receptor knockdown is associated with down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin levels. We conclude that central (pro)renin receptor contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension in human renin-angiotensinogen transgenic mice. PMID:22526255

  12. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and PKC-{alpha} are involved in the inhibitory effects of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngiotensinII subtype AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, on AngiotensinII-induced vascular contraction in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Wang Wei; Wang Qiujuan Wu Jinhui; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming

    2007-12-07

    The vasoactive peptide AngiotensinII (AngII) is an important factor in the cardiovascular system, exerting most of its effects through AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}). Ib, a new nonpeptide AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, has been observed to play a positive role in the treatment of hypertension in preclinical tests. In this study, the inhibitory effects of Ib on AngII-induced vascular contraction in vitro were investigated, and its molecular mechanisms were further explored. In endothelium-denuded aortic rings from rabbits, Ib produced a rightward shift in the concentration-response curve for AngII with a decrease in the maximal contractile response and the pD{sub 2}{sup '} was 7.29. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was inhibited by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. Ib could inhibit both AngII-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization from internal stores and Ca{sup 2+} influx. Moreover, the translocation of PKC-{alpha} stimulated by AngII was inhibited by Ib. Thus, the inhibitory effects of Ib might be related with the depression on AngII-induced increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and translocation of PKC-{alpha} through blocking AT{sub 1} receptors.

  13. Endoglin forms a heteromeric complex with the signaling receptors for transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, H; Ichijo, H; Grimsby, S; Morén, A; ten Dijke, P; Miyazono, K

    1994-01-21

    Human endoglin is a dimeric protein that binds transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). A porcine cDNA clone for endoglin was obtained from a porcine uterus cDNA library. The deduced sequence of the primary translated product of endoglin consists of 643 amino acids with a high sequence identity (96%) to human endoglin in the transmembrane and intracellular domains, but with a lower sequence similarity (66%) in the extracellular domain. In contrast to human endoglin, porcine endoglin has no Arg-Gly-Asp tripeptide in its sequence. Antibodies, raised against a peptide corresponding to the intracellular domain of porcine endoglin, immunoprecipitated an 84-kDa protein under reducing condition and a 130-kDa protein under nonreducing condition in porcine aortic endothelial cells. Porcine endoglin bound TGF-beta 1 and -beta 3 efficiently, but TGF-beta 2 less efficiently. Endoglin was found to be coimmunoprecipitated with TGF-beta receptors type I and/or II by the endoglin antibodies or by TGF-beta receptor II antibodies in the presence of ligand. Thus, endoglin and TGF-beta receptors I and/or II most likely formed a heteromeric receptor complex. Endoglin was phosphorylated on serine residue(s), which did not change after stimulation by TGF-beta 1. These results revealed that endoglin is a phosphorylated protein which forms a heteromeric complex with signaling receptors for TGF-beta.

  14. Differential expression of anti-Müllerian hormone (amh) and anti-Müllerian hormone receptor type II (amhrII) in the teleost medaka.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Nils; Pfennig, Frank; Pala, Irene; Storch, Katja; Schlieder, Marlen; Froschauer, Alexander; Gutzeit, Herwig O; Schartl, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, the anti-Müllerian hormone (Amh) is responsible for the regression of the Müllerian ducts; therefore, Amh is an important factor of male sex differentiation. The amh gene has been cloned in various vertebrates, as well as in several teleost species. To date, all described species show a sexually dimorphic expression of amh during sex differentiation or at least in differentiated juvenile gonads. We have identified the medaka amh ortholog and examined its expression pattern. Medaka amh shows no sexually dimorphic expression pattern. It is expressed in both developing XY male and XX female gonads. In adult testes, amh is expressed in the Sertoli cells and in adult ovaries in granulosa cells surrounding the oocytes, like in mammals. To better understand the function of amh, we cloned the anti-Müllerian hormone receptor type II (amhrII) ortholog and compared its expression pattern with amh, aromatase (cyp19a1), and scp3. During gonad development, amhrII is coexpressed with medaka amh in somatic cells of the gonads and shows no sexually dimorphic expression. Only the expression level of the Amh type II receptor gene was decreased noticeably in adult female gonads. These results suggest that medaka Amh and AmhrII are involved in gonad formation and maintenance in both sexes.

  15. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit platelet adhesion and aggregation by nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Leszek; Matys, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Buczko, Włodzimierz; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the process of nitric oxide (NO) release from platelets after stimulation with different angiotensin II type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonists and its effect on platelet adhesion and aggregation. Angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets was compared with that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by using a highly sensitive porphyrinic microsensor. In vitro and ex vivo effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on platelet adhesion to collagen and thromboxane A2 analog U46619-induced aggregation were evaluated. Losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan alone caused NO release from platelets and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.01 to 100 micro mol/L, which was attenuated by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists had more than 70% greater potency in NO release in platelets than in endothelial cells. The degree of inhibition of platelet adhesion (collagen-stimulated) and aggregation (U46619-stimulated) elicited by losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan, either in vitro or ex vivo, closely correlated with the NO levels produced by each of these drugs alone. The inhibiting effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on collagen-stimulated adhesion and U46619-stimulated aggregation of platelets were significantly reduced by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Neither the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319, the cyclooxygenase synthase inhibitor indomethacin, nor the selective thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist SQ29,548 had any effect on angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets and endothelial cells. The presented studies clearly indicate a crucial role of NO in the arterial antithrombotic effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists.

  16. Randomized Phase II Study of Dacomitinib (PF-00299804), an Irreversible Pan–Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor, Versus Erlotinib in Patients With Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Blackhall, Fiona; Krzakowski, Maciej; Barrios, Carlos H.; Park, Keunchil; Bover, Isabel; Seog Heo, Dae; Rosell, Rafael; Talbot, Denis C.; Frank, Richard; Letrent, Stephen P.; Ruiz-Garcia, Ana; Taylor, Ian; Liang, Jane Q.; Campbell, Alicyn K.; O'Connell, Joseph; Boyer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This randomized, open-label trial compared dacomitinib (PF-00299804), an irreversible inhibitor of human epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR)/HER1, HER2, and HER4, with erlotinib, a reversible EGFR inhibitor, in patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Patients with NSCLC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 to 2, no prior HER-directed therapy, and one/two prior chemotherapy regimens received dacomitinib 45 mg or erlotinib 150 mg once daily. Results One hundred eighty-eight patients were randomly assigned. Treatment arms were balanced for most clinical and molecular characteristics. Median progression-free survival (PFS; primary end point) was 2.86 months for patients treated with dacomitinib and 1.91 months for patients treated with erlotinib (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.66; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.91; two-sided P = .012); in patients with KRAS wild-type tumors, median PFS was 3.71 months for patients treated with dacomitinib and 1.91 months for patients treated with erlotinib (HR = 0.55; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.85; two-sided P = .006); and in patients with KRAS wild-type/EGFR wild-type tumors, median PFS was 2.21 months for patients treated with dacomitinib and 1.84 months for patients treated with erlotinib (HR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.99; two-sided P = .043). Median overall survival was 9.53 months for patients treated with dacomitinib and 7.44 months for patients treated with erlotinib (HR = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.13; two-sided P = .205). Adverse event-related discontinuations were uncommon in both arms. Common treatment-related adverse events were dermatologic and gastrointestinal, predominantly grade 1 to 2, and more frequent with dacomitinib. Conclusion Dacomitinib demonstrated significantly improved PFS versus erlotinib, with acceptable toxicity. PFS benefit was observed in most clinical and molecular subsets, notably KRAS wild-type/EGFR any status, KRAS wild-type/EGFR wild-type, and EGFR mutants

  17. Facilitated diffusion of angiotensin II from perivascular interstitium to AT1 receptors of the arteriole. A regulating step in vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Schalekamp, Maarten A D H; Danser, A H Jan

    2011-05-01

    A kinetic model for the binding of angiotensin (Ang) II to AT1 receptors (AT1R) in arterioles in vivo did suggest a novel mechanism of stimulus amplification. To further clarify the role of this mechanism in the functioning of the local renin-angiotensin systems, as opposed to circulating Ang II. The model was refined in order to account for geometric characteristics of the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells in arterioles with a single VSM cell layer. Results show that, unlike experiments in vitro, the graph of AT1R occupancy, that is, [Rec(occ)]/[Rec(total)] where [Rec(total)]=[Rec(occ)]+[Rec(free)], as a function of log [Ang II], is shifted to the left at higher [Rec(total)]. This leads to the concept of association rate amplification (ASRA) and facilitated Ang II diffusion. Considering that abluminal Ang II has to cross a diffusion fluid-barrier 1-10 times the glycocalyx to reach VSM AT1R, it appears that the ASRA factor is 1500 to 150 respectively, whereas more than 90% of Ang II is captured, at 10% occupancy, and with [Ang II] as low as 10(-15)-10(-14) mol/ml. Due to the presence of endothelium, intraluminal [Ang II] needs to be 20-30 times higher. ASRA favors a low [Ang II] threshold for AT1R stimulation, but it also favors a flat stimulus/response curve by promoting receptor-mediated endocytosis and receptor downregulation. The model predicts that, in small resistance vessels, abluminal rather than intraluminal Ang II is important for maintaining vasoconstrictor tone. ASRA minimizes the overflow of de-novo generated tissue Ang II into the circulation. It explains why Ang II acts at levels far below K(D), why AT1R blockers are effective in hypertension even when [Ang II] is low, and why the constrictor action of Ang II appears so much suppressed by sodium depletion. © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  18. CD95 death receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in liver cell apoptosis and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reinehr, Roland; Häussinger, Dieter

    2012-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that signaling pathways towards cell proliferation and cell death are much more interconnected than previously thought. Whereas not only death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1) can couple to both, cell death and proliferation, also growth factor receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are involved in these opposing kinds of cell fate. EGFR is briefly discussed as a growth factor receptor involved in liver cell proliferation during liver regeneration. Then the role of EGFR in activating CD95 death receptor in liver parenchymal cells (PC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which represent a liver stem/progenitor cell compartment, is described summarizing different ways of CD95- and EGFR-dependent signaling in the liver. Here, depending on the hepatic cell type (PC vs. HSC) and the respective signaling context (sustained vs. transient JNK activation) CD95-/EGFR-mediated signaling ends up in either liver cell apoptosis or cell proliferation.

  19. The Relationship between Urotensin II and its Receptor and the Clinicopathological Parameters of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balakan, Ozan; Kalender, Mehmet Emin; Suner, Ali; Cengiz, Beyhan; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Bayraktar, Recep; Borazan, Ersin; Babacan, Taner; Camci, Celaletdin

    2014-01-01

    Background Urotensin II is a vasoactive polypeptide. It is known that some vasoactive polypeptides are produced and secreted by tumor cells, and act as a paracrine growth stimulant. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between urotensin II and its receptor’s messenger RNA expression in breast cancer. Material/Methods Fifty-nine women with breast cancer were included in this study. The median age was 48 years. The relationships between urotensin II and urotensin II receptor mRNA expressions, which were derived from fresh breast cancer tissues and adjacent normal breast tissues, and clinical and pathological parameters, were assessed. Results We found expressions of urotensin II mRNA and its receptor in 55 of 59 breast cancer tissues and in 55 of 59 normal breast tissues. We found a positive significant correlation between urotensin II and its receptor (p=0.001, r=0.632), and found a negative, but insignificant, correlation between urotensin II and age (p=0.038, r=−0.281). Urotensin II levels were higher in the premenopausal group compared to the postmenopausal group (p<0.05). The mean urotensin II receptor expression was higher in the premenopausal group (p<0.05) compared to the postmenopausal group, and its expression was also higher in the group without extra-nodal invasion compared to that of the group with extra-nodal invasion (p=0.001). Urotensin II levels were higher in the group without lymphatic invasion compared to the group with lymphatic invasion (p=0.048). Conclusions This study is the first in the English medical literature to determine the urotensin II and its receptor mRNA expressions in breast cancer tissues. Consequently, urotensin II seems be associated with menopausal status, and extra-nodal and lymphatic invasion. PMID:25112588

  20. Development of the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor OSI-774.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Viktor; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2003-06-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor involved in the regulation of a complex array of essential biological processes such as cell proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of the EGFR signaling network has been frequently reported in multiple human cancers and has been associated with the processes of tumor development, growth, proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Inhibition of the EGFR was associated with antitumor effects in preclinical models. On the basis of these data, therapeutics targeting the EGFR were explored in clinical trials. OSI-774 is a small-molecule selective inhibitor of the EGFR tyrosine kinase. In preclinical studies, OSI-774 inhibited the phosphorylation of the EGFR in a dose-dependent and concentration-dependent manner resulting in cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. In in vivo studies, this agent caused tumor growth inhibition and showed synergistic effects when combined with conventional chemotherapy. Subsequent single-agent phase I studies and phase I studies in combination with chemotherapy showed that the agent has a good safety profile and induced tumor growth inhibition in a substantial number of patients with a variety of different solid tumors. Preliminary reports from phase II studies confirmed the excellent tolerability of OSI-774 and showed encouraging preliminary activity. Phase III studies have either been completed or are ongoing in several tumor types such as lung cancer and pancreatic cancer. In summary, OSI-774 is a novel inhibitor of the EGFR tyrosine kinase that has shown promising activity in initial studies and is currently undergoing full development as an anticancer drug.

  1. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in brain and kidney: focus on cardiovascular implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative techniques of receptor autoradiography have been applied to localize (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in brain and kidney. High densities of autoradiographic grains, indicating the presence of angiotensin II receptors, have been localized to several rat brain nuclei including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, anterior pituitary, locus coeruleus and several hypothalamic nuclei. Cat thoracic spinal cord exhibited a high density of sites over the intermedio-lateral cell column. In sections of rat kidney, angiotensin II receptors were detected in the glomerulus, vasa recta and ureter. The cardiovascular implications of these results are apparent and relate angiotensin II to hypertensive mechanisms. Thus, angiotensin II represents an endocoid which is involved in control of blood pressure through its effects on peripheral organs as well as the central nervous system.

  2. How does the angiotensin II type 1 receptor 'trump' the type 2 receptor in blood pressure control?

    PubMed

    Schalekamp, Maarten A D H; Danser, A H Jan

    2013-04-01

    A kinetic model for the binding of angiotensin II (Ang II) to AT1 receptors (AT1Rs) in arterioles did suggest a novel mechanism of association rate amplification and facilitated Ang II diffusion in vivo. To examine how this mechanism, acting on AT1R, will affect the stimulation of AT2R. The model distinguishes between the diffusion of plasma Ang II across the endothelium layer (thickness 10(-4) - 5 × 10(-4) cm) into the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) layer (5 × 10(-4) cm), and the diffusion of tissue Ang II from perivascular interstitium (thickness of micromilieu fluid layer at abluminal VSM surface 10(-6) - 10(-5) cm, i.e. 1 to 10 times the glycocalyx). Thus, Ang II concentration [Ang II] is taken to be 0 at the abluminal and adluminal VSM cell surfaces, respectively. Tissue Ang II is defined as originating from local generation and/or from the capillary circulation. [Ang II]/AT1R and [Ang II]/AT2R occupancy curves for the two directions of diffusion are constructed from the model-based calculations. Ang II, at 10(-15)-10(-13) mol/ml (~1-100 pg/ml), is much less likely to react with vascular AT2R than AT1R, though it has similar affinity for the receptor types. With plasma [Ang II] = 10(-15)-10(-13) mol/ml, AT2R occupancy is less than 10% of maximum on endothelium, and virtually 0 on VSM, whereas AT1R occupancy on VSM is virtually 0 at plasma [Ang II] < 10(-14) mol/ml, and between 0 and 30% at plasma [Ang II] = 10(-13) mol/ml. With tissue [Ang II] = 10(-15)-10(-13) mol/ml, VSM AT2R occupancy is close to 0, whereas VSM AT1R occupancy is 40-60% in the absence of endocytotic AT1R down-regulation, and up to 70-90% in its presence. The threshold concentration of Ang II needed for response is much higher for AT2R than for AT1R. Plasma Ang II rather than tissue Ang II is the agonist of AT2R, and the reverse applies to AT1R. Thus, AT2R stimulation may come into play only at unusually high circulating levels of Ang II.

  3. The BDI-II factor structure in pregnancy and postpartum: Two or three factors?

    PubMed

    Carvalho Bos, Sandra; Pereira, Ana Telma; Marques, Mariana; Maia, Berta; Soares, Maria João; Valente, José; Gomes, Ana; Macedo, António; Azevedo, Maria Helena

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) in pregnancy and postpartum. Women were asked to fill in the BDI-II in their last trimester of pregnancy and at 3 months after delivery. A total of 331 pregnant women, with a mean age of 29.7 years (SD=4.6), and 354 mothers, aged 30.6 years (SD=4.6 years), answered the BDI-II. The first group was mainly nulliparas (65.6%) and the second group was mostly primiparas (57.4%). Factor analyses with principal components solution and varimax rotation were performed. Based on the scree test of Cattell a 2-factor solution and a 3-factor solution were explored. The 2-factor solution was identical in pregnancy and postpartum. Items loading in the Cognitive-Affective factor and in the Somatic-Anxiety factor were almost the same, though the Cognitive-Affective factor explained more of the BDI-II total variance in pregnancy, whereas in postpartum both factors explained similar total variances. The 3-factor solution of the BDI-II in pregnancy and postpartum slightly diverged. Besides the Cognitive-Affective and the Somatic-Anxiety factors, a third factor, Fatigue, was obtained in pregnancy while Guilt was the third factor identified in postpartum. This study reveals that the BDI-II 3-factor solution might be more appropriate to assess depressive symptoms in pregnancy and postpartum.

  4. Differential trafficking of transforming growth factor-beta receptors and ligand in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S J; Doré, J J E; Edens, M; Coffey, R J; Barnard, J A; Mitchell, H; Wilkes, M; Leof, E B

    2004-06-01

    Epithelial cells in vivo form tight cell-cell associations that spatially separate distinct apical and basolateral domains. These domains provide discrete cellular processes essential for proper tissue and organ development. Using confocal imaging and selective plasma membrane domain activation, the type I and type II transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptors were found to be localized specifically at the basolateral surfaces of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Receptors concentrated predominantly at the lateral sites of cell-cell contact, adjacent to the gap junctional complex. Cytoplasmic domain truncations for each receptor resulted in the loss of specific lateral domain targeting and dispersion to both the apical and basal domains. Whereas receptors concentrate basolaterally in regions of direct cell-cell contact in nonpolarized MDCK cell monolayers, receptor staining was absent from areas of noncell contact. In contrast to the defined basolateral polarity observed for the TGFbeta receptor complex, TGFbeta ligand secretion was found to be from the apical surfaces. Confocal imaging of MDCK cells with an antibody to TGFbeta1 confirmed a predominant apical localization, with a stark absence at the basal membrane. These findings indicate that cell adhesion regulates the localization of TGFbeta receptors in polarized epithelial cultures and that the response to TGFbeta is dependent upon the spatial distribution and secretion of TGFbeta receptors and ligand, respectively.

  5. The role of the M6P/IGF-II receptor in cancer: tumor suppression or garbage disposal?

    PubMed

    Scott, C D; Firth, S M

    2004-05-01

    The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor-II receptor (M6P/IGF-IIR) is an intriguing protein with multiple ligands and multiple functions. Approximately 90 - 95 % of the receptor is located intracellularly, with 5 - 10 % being on the cell surface. It has long been known to play an essential intracellular role in the transport of newly-synthesized lysosomal enzymes from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the lysosomes. More recently, however, the loss of this receptor has been described in some tumour types, suggesting that it may play a role in tumour suppression. The focus has therefore shifted to elucidating the role played by the cell surface receptor and its interaction with its diverse ligands in tumour growth and progression. The list of ligands is continuously increasing and includes growth factors such as IGF-II and transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta). This review will address the question of whether the M6P/IGF-IIR plays a direct role in tumour suppression or merely plays an indirect role as a transporter for ligands designated for degradation in the lysosomes.

  6. The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor in cancer: old focus, new future.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Hermien; Wesseling, Jelle; Boezen, H Marike; van der Graaf, Winette T A

    2007-09-01

    The importance of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) signalling in malignant behaviour of tumour cells is well established. Currently, development of drugs targeting the IGF-1R as anticancer treatment is emerging. Several IGF-1R targeting strategies are being investigated in phases I and II clinical trials. Interactions of IGF-1R with insulin receptor, however, might complicate efficiency and tolerability of such drugs. This review describes mechanisms, recent developments and potential limitations of IGF-1R antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  7. The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the main active product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), mediating its action via two major receptors, namely, the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and the type 2 (AT2) receptor. Recent results also implicate several other members of the renin-angiotensin system in various aspects of brain functions. The first aim of this paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the properties and signaling of the AT2 receptor, its expression in the brain, and its well-established effects. Secondly, we will highlight the potential role of the AT2 receptor in cognitive function, neurological disorders and in the regulation of appetite and the possible link with development of metabolic disorders. The potential utility of novel nonpeptide selective AT2 receptor ligands in clarifying potential roles of this receptor in physiology will also be discussed. If confirmed, these new pharmacological tools should help to improve impaired cognitive performance, not only through its action on brain microcirculation and inflammation, but also through more specific effects on neurons. However, the overall physiological relevance of the AT2 receptor in the brain must also consider the Ang IV/AT4 receptor. PMID:23320146

  8. Nature and regulation of the receptors for insulin-like growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rechler, M.M.; Nissley, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Two subtypes of IGF receptors have been identified. Type I IGF receptors have a Mr greater than 300,000 and are composed of disulfide-linked 130,000-dalton (alpha) and approximately 90,000-dalton (beta) subunits. Type I receptors preferentially bind IGF-I but also bind IGF-II and, more weakly, insulin. Type II IGF receptors consist of a 250,000-dalton protein that contains internal disulfide bonds but is not linked to other membrane components. Type II receptors bind IGF-II with higher affinity than IGF-I. They do not interact with even very high concentrations of insulin. Type I IGF receptors and insulin receptors are homologous structures. Type II IGF receptors do not appear to be homologous to type I receptors. Type II receptors do not appear to be downregulated. Insulin acutely upregulates type II IGF receptors in intact rat adipose cells by effecting a redistribution of receptors cycling between a large intracellular pool and the plasma membrane. Insulin and the IGFs elicit the same biological responses, either by cross-reacting with one of the receptors for the heterologous ligand or by concurrent activation of convergent effector pathways by binding to the homologous receptor. Which mechanism is utilized appears to depend more on the tissue than on the biological response. Insulin desensitizes rat hepatoma cells to the actions of insulin and IGFs, mediated by both insulin and IGF receptors, by mechanisms distal to hormone binding and possibly common to IGF and insulin effector pathways.

  9. Factoring handedness data: II. Geschwind's multidimensional hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Messinger, H B; Messinger, M I

    1996-06-01

    The challenge in this journal by Peters and Murphy to the validity of two published factor analyses of handedness data because of bimodality was dealt with in Part I by identifying measures to normalize the handedness item distributions. A new survey using Oldfield's questionnaire format had 38 bell-shaped (unimodal) handedness-item distributions and 11 that were only marginally bimodal out of the 55 items used in Geschwind's 1986 study. Yet they were still non-normal and the factor analysis was unsatisfactory; bimodality is not the only problem. By choosing a transformation for each item that was optimal as assessed by D'Agostino's K2 statistic, all but two items could be normalized. Seven factors were derived that showed high congruence between maximum likelihood and principal components extractions before and after varimax rotation. Geschwind's assertion that handedness is not unidimensional is therefore supported.

  10. Mechanism of adrenal angiotensin II receptor changes after nephrectomy in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J G

    1981-01-01

    At 48 h after bilateral nephrectomy in rats there is a two- to threefold increase in the number of adrenal angiotensin II receptors and a decrease in Kd of smooth muscle angiotensin II receptors. These changes have been attributed to the absence of circulating angiotensin II. Serum K+, which increases after nephrectomy may be an important and overlooked modulator. Therefore, the present experiments were designed to assess the role of K+ as a regulator of angiotensin II receptors after nephrectomy. Serum K+ was controlled with Na polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate), a resin designed to exchange Na+ for K+ in the gastrointestinal tract. Acutely nephrectomized rats were divided into two groups: experimental animals received Kayexalate resin every 12 h for four doses, and controls received Kayexalate exchanged with KCl in vitro before gavage. There was a significant positive correlation serum K+ and aldosterone (r = 0.78, P less than 0.001). Kayexalate maintained a normal serum K+ of 5.9 +/- 0.2 meq/liter (n = 27), aldosterone 25 +/- 3 ng/dl (n = 27) and adrenal receptor concentration of 934 +/- 156 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). Control animals had significantly higher serum K+ of 10.5 +/- 0.4 meq/liter (n = 23), aldosterone 435 +/- 32 (n = 23), and adrenal receptors of 2726 +/- 235 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). There was a linear relationship between serum K+ and number of adrenal receptors (r = 0.87). No such relationship was present in uterine smooth muscle. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that K+ modulates the number of adrenal but not smooth muscle angiotensin II receptors after nephrectomy. This is the first evidence that potassium modulates angiotensin II receptors independently of changes in angiotensin II blood levels. PMID:6259213

  11. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors increases neuronal platelet-derived growth factor β receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2012-03-09

    Several antipsychotics have a high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors yet despite intense interest in the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential drug target to treat psychosis, the function and signaling properties of 5-HT7 receptors in neurons remain largely uncharacterized. In primary mouse hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as in the SH-SY5Y cell line, incubation with 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), or 5-HT7 receptor-selective agonists increases the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)β receptors. The increased PDGFβ receptor expression is cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptors couple to Gα(s) in primary neurons. Interestingly, up-regulated PDGFβ receptors display an increased basal phosphorylation state at the phospholipase Cγ-activating tyrosine 1021. This novel linkage between the 5-HT7 receptor and the PDGF system may be an important GPCR-neurotrophic factor signaling pathway in neurons.

  12. Radioligand binding assays: application of [(125)I]angiotensin II receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Leifert, Wayne R; Bucco, Olgatina; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Patten, Glen S

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is an octapeptide hormone with a key role in blood pressure regulation. AngII increases blood pressure by stimulating G protein-coupled receptors in vascular smooth muscle. AngII receptors are therefore an important target in patients with high blood pressure. Strategies to lower high blood pressure (hypertension) include the use of drugs that compete for AngII at the angiotensin II Type 1 receptors (ATR) using ATR antagonists (e.g., irbesartan, valsartan, and losartan). This chapter will demonstrate the subtype specificity of ATR binding and we discuss some of the key experiments that are necessary in optimizing some of the parameters for GPCR screening. The latter protocols include saturation binding to determine K (d) and B (max), as well as competition/inhibition experiments to determine the IC(50) of binding. For these experiments we have used rat liver membranes which express ATR (type 1a) in relatively abundant amounts. Additionally, rat liver membrane preparations can be easily prepared in "bulk," frozen away for extended periods (up to 1 year) and used when necessary with no loss of receptor binding activity using the radiolabeled angiotensin II analogue, [(125)I][Sar(1),I le(8)]AngII.

  13. Hypotensive effect of angiotensin II after AT1-receptor blockade with losartan.

    PubMed

    Matys, T; Pawlak, R; Kucharewicz, I; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W

    2000-03-01

    Recent data suggest that hypotensive effect of losartan may not be attributed solely to AT1-receptor blockade, but also to excessive AT2 or other receptors stimulation by elevated angiotensin II and its derivative peptides. Therefore in the present study we examined the effect of angiotensin II on mean blood pressure after AT -receptor blockade with losartan. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetised and received injection of either losartan (30 mg/kg, 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or saline (the same volume and route) followed by bolus injection of angiotensin II (100, 300 or 1,000 ng/kg; 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or 1-hour infusion of angiotensin II (200 ng/kg/min; 2.5 ml/kg/h, i.v.). Control animals received saline instead. Angiotensin II, given either as the injection or the infusion, caused an evident increase in mean blood pressure (p ranged from 0.05 to 0.001 depending on the experimental group). Losartan caused a rapid drop in mean blood pressure and blunted the hypertensive effect of angiotensin II (p < 0.01). Moreover, in the losartan-pretreated animals the hypotensive phase was enhanced by the infusion, but not single injection of angiotensin II, which was most evident from the 30 th minute of observation (p < 0.05 vs control). In conclusion, hypotensive effect of losartan may be amplified by simultaneous increase in angiotensin II level, the situation observed during chronic AT1-receptor blockade.

  14. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xue-Fen; Zhang, Li-Hui; Bai, Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Garner, Ron E; McKallip, Robert J; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min) using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day) was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02%) vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05). These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited, and tissue fibrosis was attenuated, as demonstrated by less extensive collagen-rich fibrosis. Furthermore, curcumin increased protein level of ACE2 and enhanced its expression in the intermyocardium relative to the Ang II group. These results suggest that curcumin could be considered as an add-on therapeutic agent in the treatment of fibrosis-derived heart failure patient who is intolerant of ACE inhibitor therapy. PMID:26648693

  15. Production of angiotensin II receptors type one (AT1) and type two (AT2) during the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mallow, H; Trindl, A; Löffler, G

    2000-01-01

    During their development from progenitor cells, adipocytes not only express enzymatic activities necessary for the storage of triglycerides, but also achieve the capability to produce a number of endocrine factors such as leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), complement factors, adiponectin/adipoQ, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), angiotensin II and others. Angiotensin II is produced from angiotensinogen by the proteolytic action of renin and angiotensin-converting enzyme; and several data point to the existence of a complete local renin-angiotensin system in adipose tissue, including angiotensin II receptors. In this study, we directly monitored the production of angiotensin II type one receptor (AT1) and angiotensin II type two receptor (AT2) proteins during the adipose conversion of murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by immunodetection with specific antibodies. AT1 receptors could be detected throughout the whole differentiation period. The strong AT2 signal in preadipocytes however was completely lost during the course of differentiation, which suggests that expression of AT2 receptors is inversely correlated to the adipose conversion program.

  16. Neuroprotective effect of angiotensin II type 2 receptor during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chun-ye; Yin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) activation has been shown to protect against stroke, but its precise mechanism remains poorly understood. We investigated whether the protective effect of AT2R against ischemia/reperfusion injury is mediated by the suppression of immune and inflammatory responses. Rat models of middle cerebral artery occlusion were intraperitoneally injected with physiological saline, the AT2R agonist CGP42112 (1 mg/kg per day) or antagonist PD123319 (1 mg/kg per day). In the CGP42112 group, AT2R expression increased, the infarct area decreased, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α expression decreased, and interleukin-10 expression increased compared with the saline group. Antagonisin AT2R using PD123319 produced the opposite effects. These results indicate that AT2R activation suppresses immune and inflammatory responses, and protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27630693

  17. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  18. Angiotensin II, hypertension, and angiotensin II receptor antagonism: Roles in the behavioural and brain pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Roelofs, Monica; van der Lugt, Robert; Heerschap, Arend; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen Ahr

    2016-01-01

    Elevated angiotensin II causes hypertension and contributes to Alzheimer's disease by affecting cerebral blood flow. Angiotensin II receptor blockers may provide candidates to reduce (vascular) risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. We studied effects of two months of angiotensin II-induced hypertension on systolic blood pressure, and treatment with the angiotensin II receptor blockers, eprosartan mesylate, after one month of induced hypertension in wild-type C57bl/6j and AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 (AβPP/PS1/Alzheimer's disease) mice. AβPP/PS1 showed higher systolic blood pressure than wild-type. Subsequent eprosartan mesylate treatment restored this elevated systolic blood pressure in all mice. Functional connectivity was decreased in angiotensin II-infused Alzheimer's disease and wild-type mice, and only 12 months of Alzheimer's disease mice showed impaired cerebral blood flow. Only angiotensin II-infused Alzheimer's disease mice exhibited decreased spatial learning in the Morris water maze. Altogether, angiotensin II-induced hypertension not only exacerbated Alzheimer's disease-like pathological changes such as impairment of cerebral blood flow, functional connectivity, and cognition only in Alzheimer's disease model mice, but it also induced decreased functional connectivity in wild-type mice. However, we could not detect hypertension-induced overexpression of Aβ nor increased neuroinflammation. Our findings suggest a link between midlife hypertension, decreased cerebral hemodynamics and connectivity in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Eprosartan mesylate treatment restored and beneficially affected cerebral blood flow and connectivity. This model could be used to investigate prevention/treatment strategies in early Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Localization of the ANG II type 2 receptor in the microcirculation of skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nora, E. H.; Munzenmaier, D. H.; Hansen-Smith, F. M.; Lombard, J. H.; Greene, A. S.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Only functional studies have suggested the presence of the ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor in the microcirculation. To determine the distribution of this receptor in the rat skeletal muscle microcirculation, a polyclonal rabbit anti-rat antiserum was developed and used for immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The antiserum was prepared against a highly specific and antigenic AT2-receptor synthetic peptide and was validated by competition and sensitivity assays. Western blot analysis demonstrated a prominent, single band at approximately 40 kDa in cremaster and soleus muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a wide distribution of AT2 receptors throughout the skeletal muscle microcirculation in large and small microvessels. Microanatomic studies displayed an endothelial localization of the AT2 receptor, whereas dual labeling with smooth muscle alpha-actin also showed colocalization of the AT2 receptor with vascular smooth muscle cells. Other cells associated with the microvessels also stained positive for AT2 receptors. Briefly, this study confirms previous functional data and localizes the AT2 receptor to the microcirculation. These studies demonstrate that the AT2 receptor is present on a variety of vascular cell types and that it is situated in a fashion that would allow it to directly oppose ANG II type 1 receptor actions.

  20. Localization of the ANG II type 2 receptor in the microcirculation of skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nora, E. H.; Munzenmaier, D. H.; Hansen-Smith, F. M.; Lombard, J. H.; Greene, A. S.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Only functional studies have suggested the presence of the ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor in the microcirculation. To determine the distribution of this receptor in the rat skeletal muscle microcirculation, a polyclonal rabbit anti-rat antiserum was developed and used for immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The antiserum was prepared against a highly specific and antigenic AT2-receptor synthetic peptide and was validated by competition and sensitivity assays. Western blot analysis demonstrated a prominent, single band at approximately 40 kDa in cremaster and soleus muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a wide distribution of AT2 receptors throughout the skeletal muscle microcirculation in large and small microvessels. Microanatomic studies displayed an endothelial localization of the AT2 receptor, whereas dual labeling with smooth muscle alpha-actin also showed colocalization of the AT2 receptor with vascular smooth muscle cells. Other cells associated with the microvessels also stained positive for AT2 receptors. Briefly, this study confirms previous functional data and localizes the AT2 receptor to the microcirculation. These studies demonstrate that the AT2 receptor is present on a variety of vascular cell types and that it is situated in a fashion that would allow it to directly oppose ANG II type 1 receptor actions.

  1. Hypercholesterolemia blunts the oxidative stress elicited by hypertension in venules through angiotensin II type-2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Alper; Senchenkova, Elena; Granger, D. Neil

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hypertension and hypercholesterolemia elicit inflammatory and thrombogenic responses in the microvasculature. However, little is known about whether and how risk factor combinations alter microvascular function. We examined how the actions of HTN+HCh on the microvasculature differ from the responses elicited by either risk factor alone. METHODS Intravital microscopy was used to monitor the adhesion and emigration of leukocytes and dihydrorhodamine oxidation in cremaster muscle venules of wild type mice that were infused with angiotensin II for 2 wks (HTN), placed on a high cholesterol diet (HCD), or both. RESULTS Either HTN or HCh alone enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species and promoted the recruitment of leukocytes in venules. However, the combination of HTN and HCh produced changes in ROS production and leukocyte recruitment that were greatly attenuated compared to HTN alone. The inhibitory effects of HCh on the AngII mediated responses were also observed in genetically-induced HCh (ApoE-deficient mice). Treating HCh + HTN mice with an antagonist to AT2r reversed the HCh-dependent protection against oxidative stress and inflammation during HTN. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicate that HCh blunts the oxidative stress and inflammatory cell recruitment elicited by hypertension in venules through a mechanism that involves AT2 receptor activation. PMID:26775070

  2. Topical administration of adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics and nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Steinle, Jena J

    2010-01-01

    Topical application of nerve growth factor (NGF) and adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics are currently in use for corneal ulcers and glaucoma. A recent interest in the neuroprotective abilities of NGF has led to a renewed interest in NGF as a therapeutic for retinal and choroidal diseases. NGF can promote cell proliferation through actions of the TrkA receptor or promote apoptosis through receptor p75NTR. This understanding has led to novel interest in the role of NGF for diseases of the posterior eye. The role of β-adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists for treatments of glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and their potential mechanisms of action, are still under investigation. This review discusses the current knowledge and applications of topical NGF and adrenergic receptor drugs for ocular disease. PMID:20668722

  3. The epidermal growth factor receptor family: Biology driving targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wieduwilt, M. J.; Moasser, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbBs) plays essential roles in regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and migration. The ErbB receptors carry out both redundant and restricted functions in mammalian development and in the maintenance of tissues in the adult mammal. Loss of regulation of the ErbB receptors underlies many human diseases, most notably cancer. Our understanding of the function and complex regulation of these receptors has fueled the development of targeted therapeutic agents for human malignancies in the last 15 years. Here we review the biology of ErbB receptors, including their structure, signaling, regulation, and roles in development and disease, then briefly touch on their increasing roles as targets for cancer therapy. PMID:18259690

  4. Rhamnogalacturonan II is a Toll-like receptor 4 agonist that inhibits tumor growth by activating dendritic cell-mediated CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Nam; Noh, Kyung Tae; Jeong, Young-Il; Jung, In Duk; Kang, Hyun Kyu; Cha, Gil Sun; Lee, Su Jung; Seo, Jong Keun; Kang, Dae Hwan; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kwon, Byungsuk; Park, Yeong-Min

    2013-02-08

    We evaluated the effectiveness of rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II)-stimulated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) vaccination on the induction of antitumor immunity in a mouse lymphoma model using EG7-lymphoma cells expressing ovalbumin (OVA). BMDCs treated with RG-II had an activated phenotype. RG-II induced interleukin (IL)-12, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production during dendritic cell (DC) maturation. BMDCs stimulated with RG-II facilitate the proliferation of CD8+ T cells. Using BMDCs from the mice deficient in Toll-like receptors (TLRs), we revealed that RG-II activity is dependent on TLR4. RG-II showed a preventive effect of immunization with OVA-pulsed BMDCs against EG7 lymphoma. These results suggested that RG-II expedites the DC-based immune response through the TLR4 signaling pathway.

  5. Expression of growth factor and receptor mRNAs in skin epithelial cells following acute cutaneous injury.

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, H. N.; Galanopoulos, T.; Neville-Golden, J.; Kiritsy, C. P.; Lynch, S. E.

    1993-01-01

    We report that acute injury induces the expression of selective growth factor and growth factor receptors in the epithelial cells of the wounded tissue. In situ hybridization analysis of skin biopsy specimens obtained after cutaneous injury in swine demonstrated the induction of the expression of transforming growth factor-alpha, its receptor, epidermal growth factor-R, acidic fibroblast growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor messenger RNAs in the skin epithelial cells of the wounded tissue. There was no significant expression in the epithelial cells of control, uninjured tissues. The expression levels were maximal during the period of active tissue repair (1 to 5 days after injury) and were totally suppressed upon the healing of the wounded tissues. In contrast, insulinlike growth factor-I, (IGF-I), IGF-I receptor, and IGF-II receptor messenger RNAs were expressed in the epithelial cells of both the control, uninjured tissues and in tissue specimens obtained after injury. There was no significant expression of IGF-II messenger RNA in the epithelial cells before or after injury. It seems that injury induces the coordinated expression of selective growth factor and growth factor receptor genes whose products contribute to the regulation of the complex processes involved in tissue repair and remodeling. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8386442

  6. Properly timed exposure to central ANG II prevents behavioral sensitization and changes in angiotensin receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Santollo, Jessica; Whalen, Philip E.; Speth, Robert C.; Clark, Stewart D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) is susceptible to rapid desensitization, but that more chronic treatments that stimulate ANG II lead to sensitization of several responses. It is unclear, however, if the processes of desensitization and sensitization interact. To test for differences in AT1R expression associated with single or repeated injections of ANG II, we measured AT1R mRNA in nuclei that control fluid intake of rats given ANG II either in a single injection or divided into three injections spaced 20 min apart. Rats given a single injection of ANG II had more AT1R mRNA in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the periventricular tissue surrounding the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) than did controls. The effect was not observed, however, when the same cumulative dose of ANG II was divided into multiple injections. Behavioral tests found that single daily injections of ANG II sensitized the dipsogenic response to ANG II, but a daily regimen of four injections did not cause sensitization. Analysis of 125I-Sar1-ANG II binding revealed a paradoxical decrease in binding in the caudal AV3V and dorsal median preoptic nucleus after 5 days of single daily injections of ANG II; however, this effect was absent in rats treated for 5 days with four daily ANG II injections. Taken together, these data suggest that a desensitizing treatment regimen prevents behavior- and receptor-level effects of repeated daily ANG II. PMID:25354729

  7. Contribution of renal purinergic receptors to renal vasoconstriction in angiotensin II-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Franco, Martha; Bautista, Rocio; Tapia, Edilia; Soto, Virgilia; Santamaría, José; Osorio, Horacio; Pacheco, Ursino; Sánchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the participation of purinergic P2 receptors in the regulation of renal function in ANG II-dependent hypertension, renal and glomerular hemodynamics were evaluated in chronic ANG II-infused (14 days) and Sham rats during acute blockade of P2 receptors with PPADS. In addition, P2X1 and P2Y1 protein and mRNA expression were compared in ANG II-infused and Sham rats. Chronic ANG II-infused rats exhibited increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances and reductions in glomerular blood flow, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), single-nephron GFR (SNGFR), and glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient. PPADS restored afferent and efferent resistances as well as glomerular blood flow and SNGFR, but did not ameliorate the elevated arterial blood pressure. In Sham rats, PPADS increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances and reduced GFR and SNGFR. Since purinergic blockade may influence nitric oxide (NO) release, we evaluated the role of NO in the response to PPADS. Acute blockade with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) reversed the vasodilatory effects of PPADS and reduced urinary nitrate excretion (NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-)) in ANG II-infused rats, indicating a NO-mediated vasodilation during PPADS treatment. In Sham rats, PPADS induced renal vasoconstriction which was not modified by l-NAME, suggesting blockade of a P2X receptor subtype linked to the NO pathway; the response was similar to that obtained with l-NAME alone. P2X1 receptor expression in the renal cortex was increased by chronic ANG II infusion, but there were no changes in P2Y1 receptor abundance. These findings indicate that there is an enhanced P2 receptor-mediated vasoconstriction of afferent and efferent arterioles in chronic ANG II-infused rats, which contributes to the increased renal vascular resistance observed in ANG II-dependent hypertension.

  8. Activation Induces Structural Changes in the Liganded Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Martin; Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian J.; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2009-01-01

    The octapeptide hormone angiotensin II (AngII) binds to and activates the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (hAT1) of the G protein-coupled receptor class A family. Several activation mechanisms have been proposed for this family, but they have not yet been experimentally validated. We previously used the methionine proximity assay to show that 11 residues in transmembrane domain (TMD) III, VI, and VII of the hAT1 receptor reside in close proximity to the C-terminal residue of AngII. With the exception of a single change in TMD VI, the same contacts are present on N111G-hAT1, a constitutively active mutant; this N111G-hAT1 is a model for the active form of the receptor. In this study, two series of 53 individual methionine mutations were constructed in TMD I, II, IV, and V on both receptor forms. The mutants were photolabeled with a neutral antagonist, 125I-[Sar1,p-benzoyl-l-Phe8]AngII, and the resulting complexes were digested with cyanogen bromide. Although no new contacts were found for the hAT1 mutants, two were found in the constitutively active mutants, Phe-77 in TMD II and Asn-200 in TMD V. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a direct ligand contact with TMD II and TMD V has been reported. These contact point differences were used to identify the structural changes between the WT-hAT1 and N111G-hAT1 complexes through homology-based modeling and restrained molecular dynamics. The model generated revealed an important structural rearrangement of several TMDs from the basal to the activated form in the WT-hAT1 receptor. PMID:19635801

  9. BMP type I receptor ALK2 is required for angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolli, Ester; Ernande, Laura; Thoonen, Robrecht; Kolodziej, Starsha A.; Leyton, Patricio A.; Cheng, Juan; Tainsh, Robert E. T.; Mayeur, Claire; Rhee, David K.; Wu, Mei. X.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Zapol, Warren M.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Bloch, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling contributes to the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the identity of the BMP type I receptor involved in cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. By using quantitative PCR and immunoblotting, we demonstrated that BMP signaling increased during phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs), as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of Smads 1 and 5 and induction of Id1 gene expression. Inhibition of BMP signaling with LDN193189 or noggin, and silencing of Smad 1 or 4 using small interfering RNA diminished the ability of phenylephrine to induce hypertrophy in NRCs. Conversely, activation of BMP signaling with BMP2 or BMP4 induced hypertrophy in NRCs. Luciferase reporter assay further showed that BMP2 or BMP4 treatment of NRCs repressed atrogin-1 gene expression concomitant with an increase in calcineurin protein levels and enhanced activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, providing a mechanism by which BMP signaling contributes to cardiac hypertrophy. In a model of cardiac hypertrophy, C57BL/6 mice treated with angiotensin II (A2) had increased BMP signaling in the left ventricle. Treatment with LDN193189 attenuated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition in left ventricles. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of BMP type I receptor ALK2 (activin-like kinase 2), but not ALK1 or ALK3, inhibited BMP signaling and mitigated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular fibrosis in mice. The results suggest that BMP signaling upregulates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cell pathway via BMP type I receptor ALK2, contributing to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. PMID:26873969

  10. BMP type I receptor ALK2 is required for angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Mohd; Spagnolli, Ester; Ernande, Laura; Thoonen, Robrecht; Kolodziej, Starsha A; Leyton, Patricio A; Cheng, Juan; Tainsh, Robert E T; Mayeur, Claire; Rhee, David K; Wu, Mei X; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Buys, Emmanuel S; Zapol, Warren M; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B

    2016-04-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling contributes to the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the identity of the BMP type I receptor involved in cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. By using quantitative PCR and immunoblotting, we demonstrated that BMP signaling increased during phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs), as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of Smads 1 and 5 and induction of Id1 gene expression. Inhibition of BMP signaling with LDN193189 or noggin, and silencing of Smad 1 or 4 using small interfering RNA diminished the ability of phenylephrine to induce hypertrophy in NRCs. Conversely, activation of BMP signaling with BMP2 or BMP4 induced hypertrophy in NRCs. Luciferase reporter assay further showed that BMP2 or BMP4 treatment of NRCs repressed atrogin-1 gene expression concomitant with an increase in calcineurin protein levels and enhanced activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, providing a mechanism by which BMP signaling contributes to cardiac hypertrophy. In a model of cardiac hypertrophy, C57BL/6 mice treated with angiotensin II (A2) had increased BMP signaling in the left ventricle. Treatment with LDN193189 attenuated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition in left ventricles. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of BMP type I receptor ALK2 (activin-like kinase 2), but not ALK1 or ALK3, inhibited BMP signaling and mitigated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular fibrosis in mice. The results suggest that BMP signaling upregulates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cell pathway via BMP type I receptor ALK2, contributing to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Endoglin structure and function: Determinants of endoglin phosphorylation by transforming growth factor-beta receptors.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Rositsa I; Conley, Barbara A; Romero, Diana; Riley, Kristin S; Marto, Jarrod A; Lux, Andreas; Vary, Calvin P H

    2006-09-01

    Determination of the functional relationship between the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor proteins endoglin and ALK1 is essential to the understanding of the human vascular disease, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. TGFbeta1 caused recruitment of ALK1 into a complex with endoglin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Therefore, we examined TGFbeta receptor-dependent phosphorylation of endoglin by the constitutively active forms of the TGFbeta type I receptors ALK1, ALK5, and the TGFbeta type II receptor, TbetaRII. Of these receptors, TbetaRII preferentially phosphorylated endoglin on cytosolic domain serine residues Ser(634) and Ser(635). Removal of the carboxyl-terminal tripeptide of endoglin, which comprises a putative PDZ-liganding motif, dramatically increased endoglin serine phosphorylation by all three receptors, suggesting that the PDZ-liganding motif is important for the regulation of endoglin phosphorylation. Constitutively active (ca)ALK1, but not caALK5, phosphorylated endoglin on cytosolic domain threonine residues. caALK1-mediated threonine phosphorylation required prior serine phosphorylation, suggesting a sequential mechanism of endoglin phosphorylation. Wild-type, but not a threonine phosphorylation-defective endoglin mutant blocked cell detachment and the antiproliferative effects of caALK1 expressed in HUVECs. These results suggest that ALK1 is a preferred TGFbeta receptor kinase for endoglin threonine phosphorylation in HUVECs and indicate a role for endoglin phosphorylation in the regulation of endothelial cell adhesion and growth by ALK1.

  12. Transforming Growth Factor β Can Stimulate Smad1 Phosphorylation Independently of Bone Morphogenic Protein Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wrighton, Katharine H.; Lin, Xia; Yu, Paul B.; Feng, Xin-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) superfamily ligands control a diverse set of cellular processes by activating type I and type II serine-threonine receptor kinases. Canonical TGFβ signaling is mediated via the TβRI/ALK5 type I receptor that phosphorylates Smad2 and Smad3 in their SXS motif to facilitate their activation and subsequent role in transcriptional regulation. Canonical bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling is mediated via the ALK1/2/3/6 type I receptors that phosphorylate Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 in their SXS motif. However, studies in endothelial cells have shown that TGFβ can also lead to the phosphorylation of Smad1, dependent on ALK1 receptor activity. Here we present data showing that TGFβ can significantly induce Smad1 phosphorylation in several non-endothelial cell lineages. Additionally, by using chemical inhibitors specific for the TGFβ/activin/nodal (ALK4/5/7) and BMP (ALK1/2/3/6) type I receptors, we show that in some cell types TGFβ induces Smad1 phosphorylation independently of the BMP type I receptors. Thus, TGFβ-mediated Smad1 phosphorylation appears to occur via different receptor complexes in a cell type-specific manner. PMID:19224917

  13. Transforming Growth Factor {beta} Can Stimulate Smad1 Phosphorylation Independently of Bone Morphogenic Protein Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, Katharine H; Lin, Xia; Yu, Paul B; Feng, Xin-Hua

    2009-04-10

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily ligands control a diverse set of cellular processes by activating type I and type II serine-threonine receptor kinases. Canonical TGFbeta signaling is mediated via the TbetaRI/ALK5 type I receptor that phosphorylates Smad2 and Smad3 in their SXS motif to facilitate their activation and subsequent role in transcriptional regulation. Canonical bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling is mediated via the ALK1/2/3/6 type I receptors that phosphorylate Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 in their SXS motif. However, studies in endothelial cells have shown that TGFbeta can also lead to the phosphorylation of Smad1, dependent on ALK1 receptor activity. Here we present data showing that TGFbeta can significantly induce Smad1 phosphorylation in several non-endothelial cell lineages. Additionally, by using chemical inhibitors specific for the TGFbeta/activin/nodal (ALK4/5/7) and BMP (ALK1/2/3/6) type I receptors, we show that in some cell types TGFbeta induces Smad1 phosphorylation independently of the BMP type I receptors. Thus, TGFbeta-mediated Smad1 phosphorylation appears to occur via different receptor complexes in a cell type-specific manner.

  14. Enhancement of Adipocyte Browning by Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Tsukuda, Kana; Mogi, Masaki; Iwanami, Jun; Kanno, Harumi; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Higaki, Akinori; Yamauchi, Toshifumi; Min, Li-Juan; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has been highlighted as a new possible therapeutic target for obesity, diabetes and lipid metabolic disorders, because WAT browning could increase energy expenditure and reduce adiposity. The new clusters of adipocytes that emerge with WAT browning have been named ‘beige’ or ‘brite’ adipocytes. Recent reports have indicated that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a role in various aspects of adipose tissue physiology and dysfunction. The biological effects of angiotensin II, a major component of RAS, are mediated by two receptor subtypes, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and type 2 receptor (AT2R). However, the functional roles of angiotensin II receptor subtypes in WAT browning have not been defined. Therefore, we examined whether deletion of angiotensin II receptor subtypes (AT1aR and AT2R) may affect white-to-beige fat conversion in vivo. AT1a receptor knockout (AT1aKO) mice exhibited increased appearance of multilocular lipid droplets and upregulation of thermogenic gene expression in inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) compared to wild-type (WT) mice. AT2 receptor-deleted mice did not show miniaturization of lipid droplets or alteration of thermogenic gene expression levels in iWAT. An in vitro experiment using adipose tissue-derived stem cells showed that deletion of the AT1a receptor resulted in suppression of adipocyte differentiation, with reduction in expression of thermogenic genes. These results indicate that deletion of the AT1a receptor might have some effects on the process of browning of WAT and that blockade of the AT1 receptor could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:27992452

  15. Understanding Cytokine and Growth Factor Receptor Activation Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Mariya; Whitty, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the detailed mechanism of action of cytokine and growth factor receptors – and particularly our quantitative understanding of the link between structure, mechanism and function – lags significantly behind our knowledge of comparable functional protein classes such as enzymes, G protein-coupled receptors, and ion channels. In particular, it remains controversial whether such receptors are activated by a mechanism of ligand-induced oligomerization, versus a mechanism in which the ligand binds to a pre-associated receptor dimer or oligomer that becomes activated through subsequent conformational rearrangement. A major limitation to progress has been the relative paucity of methods for performing quantitative mechanistic experiments on unmodified receptors expressed at endogenous levels on live cells. In this article we review the current state of knowledge on the activation mechanisms of cytokine and growth factor receptors, critically evaluate the evidence for and against the different proposed mechanisms, and highlight other key questions that remain unanswered. New approaches and techniques have led to rapid recent progress in this area, and the field is poised for major advances in the coming years, which promises to revolutionize our understanding of this large and biologically and medically important class of receptors. PMID:23046381

  16. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 is a positive regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi; Deng, Ke-Qiong; Luo, Yuxuan; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Gao, Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Guang-Nian; Zhu, Xueyong; Li, Hongliang

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a common early symptom of heart failure, is regulated by numerous signaling pathways. Here, we identified tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3), an adaptor protein in tumor necrosis factor-related signaling cascades, as a key regulator of cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 expression was upregulated in hypertrophied mice hearts and failing human hearts. Four weeks after aortic banding, cardiac-specific conditional TRAF3-knockout mice exhibited significantly reduced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction. Conversely, transgenic mice overexpressing TRAF3 in the heart developed exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 also promoted an angiotensin II- or phenylephrine-induced hypertrophic response in isolated cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, TRAF3 directly bound to TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), causing increased TBK1 phosphorylation in response to hypertrophic stimuli. This interaction between TRAF3 and TBK1 further activated AKT signaling, which ultimately promoted the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Our findings not only reveal a key role of TRAF3 in regulating the hypertrophic response but also uncover TRAF3-TBK1-AKT as a novel signaling pathway in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This pathway may represent a potential therapeutic target for this pathological process.

  17. Astrocyte Mitogen Inhibitor Related to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel

    1988-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a well-characterized polypeptide hormone with diverse biological activities, including stimulation of astrocyte division. A soluble astrocyte mitogen inhibitor, immunologically related to the EGF receptor, is present in rat brain. Injury to the brain causes a time-dependent reduction in the levels of this inhibitor and the concomitant appearance of EGF receptor on the astrocyte surface. Intracerebral injection of antibody capable of binding the inhibitor caused the appearance of numerous reactive astrocytes. EGF receptor-related inhibitors may play a key role in the control of glial cell division in both normal and injured brain.

  18. Violence against radiologists. II: Psychosocial factors.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, N; Fileni, A

    2012-09-01

    Violence against radiologists is a growing problem. This study evaluated the psychosocial factors associated with this phenomenon. A questionnaire was administered to 992 Italian radiologists. Physical violence experienced in the previous 12-month period was associated with the radiologist's poor mental health [odds ratio (OR) 1.11] and overcommitment to work (OR 1.06), whereas radiologists in good physical health (OR 0.64), with job satisfaction (OR 0.96) and with overall happiness (OR 0.67) were less exposed. Nonphysical abuse was equally associated with the radiologist's poor mental health (OR 1.10) and overcommitment (OR 1.14) and negatively associated with physical health (OR 0.54), job satisfaction (OR 0.96), happiness (OR 0.81), organisational justice (OR 0.94) and social support (OR 0.80). Preventive intervention against violence in the workplace should improve workplace organisation and relationships between workers.

  19. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of ACE2 enzymatic activity. Examination of the subcellular localization of ACE2 revealed that Ang-II treatment leads to ACE2 internalization and degradation into lysosomes. These effects were prevented by both the Ang-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan and the lysosomal inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, in HEK293T cells, which lack endogenous AT1R, Ang-II failed to promote ACE2 internalization. Moreover, this effect could be induced after AT1R transfection. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AT1R and ACE2 form complexes and these interactions were decreased by Ang-II treatment, which also enhanced ACE2 ubiquitination. In contrast, ACE2 activity was not changed by transfection of AT2 or Mas receptors. In vivo, Ang-II-mediated hypertension was blunted by chronic infusion of leupeptin in wildtype C57Bl/6, but not in ACE2 knockout mice. Overall, this is the first demonstration that elevated Ang-II levels reduce ACE2 expression and activity by stimulation of lysosomal degradation through an AT1R-dependent mechanism. PMID:25225202

  20. Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor-Mediated Janus Kinase 2 Activation Induces Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Granzow, Michaela; Schierwagen, Robert; Klein, Sabine; Kowallick, Benita; Huss, Sebastian; Linhart, Markus; Reza Mazar, Irela G.; Görtzen, Jan; Vogt, Annabelle; Schildberg, Frank A.; Gonzalez-Carmona, Maria A.; Wojtalla, Alexandra; Krämer, Benjamin; Nattermann, Jacob; Siegmund, Sören V.; Werner, Nikos; Fürst, Dieter O.; Laleman, Wim; Knolle, Percy; Shah, Vijay H.; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Trebicka, Jonel

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the renin angiotensin system resulting in stimulation of angiotensin-II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1R) is an important factor in the development of liver fibrosis. Here, we investigated the role of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) as a newly described intra-cellular effector of AT1R in mediating liver fibrosis. Fibrotic liver samples from rodents and humans were compared to respective controls. Transcription, protein expression, activation, and localization of JAK2 and downstream effectors were analyzed by realtime polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy. Experimental fibrosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL), CCl4 intoxication, thioacetamide intoxication or continuous AngII infusion. JAK2 was inhibited by AG490. In vitro experiments were performed with primary rodent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (KCs), and hepatocytes as well as primary human and human-derived LX2 cells. JAK2 expression and activity were increased in experimental rodent and human liver fibrosis, specifically in myofibroblastic HSCs. AT1R stimulation in wild-type animals led to activation of HSCs and fibrosis in vivo through phosphorylation of JAK2 and subsequent RhoA/Rho-kinase activation. These effects were prevented in AT1R–/– mice. Pharmacological inhibition of JAK2 attenuated liver fibrosis in rodent fibrosis models. In vitro, JAK2 and downstream effectors showed increased expression and activation in activated HSCs, when compared to quiescent HSCs, KCs, and hepatocytes isolated from rodents. In primary human and LX2 cells, AG490 blocked AngII-induced profibrotic gene expression. Overexpression of JAK2 led to increased profibrotic gene expression in LX2 cells, which was blocked by AG490. Conclusion Our study substantiates the important cell-intrinsic role of JAK2 in HSCs for development of liver fibrosis. Inhibition of JAK2 might therefore offer a promising therapy for liver fibrosis. PMID:24619965

  1. EFFECT OF GROWTH FACTOR-FIBRONECTIN MATRIX INTERACTION ON RAT TYPE II CELL ADHESION AND DNA SYTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Type II cells attach, migrate and proliferate on a provisional fibronectin-rich matrix during alveolar wall repair after lung injury. The combination of cell-substratum interactions via integrin receptors and exposure to local growth factors are likely to initiat...

  2. EFFECT OF GROWTH FACTOR-FIBRONECTIN MATRIX INTERACTION ON RAT TYPE II CELL ADHESION AND DNA SYTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Type II cells attach, migrate and proliferate on a provisional fibronectin-rich matrix during alveolar wall repair after lung injury. The combination of cell-substratum interactions via integrin receptors and exposure to local growth factors are likely to initiat...

  3. Identification and characterization of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was demonstrated by radioligand binding. A single class of finding sites with a K/sub D/ of 0.7 nM was characterized. The use of radioligands also allows the localization of receptors by autoradiography. Autoradiography demonstrated that approximately 50% of the isolated cells bound angiotensin II. It was of interest to see if angiotensin II bound to a cell that possessed a certain phenotype. In order to evaluate this possibility a technique was developed that combined autoradiography and immunocytochemistry. Results indicated that angiotensin II binding sites were not localized preferentially to either norepinephrine or epinephrine cells. Binding of angiotensin II was associated with the release of intracellular catecholamine stores. Cells were pre-loaded with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and secretion was monitored by following radioactivity released into the supernatant. Alternatively, release of endogenous catecholamines was determined by fluorometric assay.

  4. Nonpeptidic urotensin-II receptor antagonists I: in vitro pharmacological characterization of SB-706375

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Stephen A; Behm, David J; Aiyar, Nambi V; Naselsky, Diane; Disa, Jyoti; Brooks, David P; Ohlstein, Eliot H; Gleason, John G; Sarau, Henry M; Foley, James J; Buckley, Peter T; Schmidt, Dulcie B; Wixted, William E; Widdowson, Katherine; Riley, Graham; Jin, Jian; Gallagher, Timothy F; Schmidt, Stanley J; Ridgers, Lance; Christmann, Lisa T; Keenan, Richard M; Knight, Steven D; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2005-01-01

    SB-706375 potently inhibited [125I]hU-II binding to both mammalian recombinant and ‘native' UT receptors (Ki 4.7±1.5 to 20.7±3.6 nM at rodent, feline and primate recombinant UT receptors and Ki 5.4±0.4 nM at the endogenous UT receptor in SJRH30 cells). Prior exposure to SB-706375 (1 μM, 30 min) did not alter [125I]hU-II binding affinity or density in recombinant cells (KD 3.1±0.4 vs 5.8±0.9 nM and Bmax 3.1±1.0 vs 2.8±0.8 pmol mg−1) consistent with a reversible mode of action. The novel, nonpeptidic radioligand [3H]SB-657510, a close analogue of SB-706375, bound to the monkey UT receptor (KD 2.6±0.4 nM, Bmax 0.86±0.12 pmol mg−1) in a manner that was inhibited by both U-II isopeptides and SB-706375 (Ki 4.6±1.4 to 17.6±5.4 nM) consistent with the sulphonamides and native U-II ligands sharing a common UT receptor binding domain. SB-706375 was a potent, competitive hU-II antagonist across species with pKb 7.29–8.00 in HEK293-UT receptor cells (inhibition of [Ca2+]i-mobilization) and pKb 7.47 in rat isolated aorta (inhibition of contraction). SB-706375 also reversed tone established in the rat aorta by prior exposure to hU-II (Kapp∼20 nM). SB-706375 was a selective U-II antagonist with ⩾100-fold selectivity for the human UT receptor compared to 86 distinct receptors, ion channels, enzymes, transporters and nuclear hormones (Ki/IC50>1 μM). Accordingly, the contractile responses induced in isolated aortae by KCl, phenylephrine, angiotensin II and endothelin-1 were unaltered by SB-706375 (1 μM). In summary, SB-706375 is a high-affinity, surmountable, reversible and selective nonpeptide UT receptor antagonist with cross-species activity that will assist in delineating the pathophysiological actions of U-II in mammals. PMID:15852036

  5. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor-Dependent GLP-1 and PYY Secretion in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Rievaj, Juraj; Larraufie, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the key hormone mediator of the renin angiotensin system, which regulates blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. Here we report that in the colonic epithelium, the Ang II type 1 receptor is highly and exclusively expressed in enteroendocrine L cells, which produce the gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Ang II stimulated glucagon-like peptide-1 and PYY release from primary cultures of mouse and human colon, which was antagonized by the specific Ang II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan. Ang II raised intracellular calcium levels in L cells in primary cultures, recorded by live-cell imaging of L cells specifically expressing the fluorescent calcium sensor GCaMP3. In Ussing chamber recordings, Ang II reduced short circuit currents in mouse distal colon preparations, which was antagonized by candesartan or a specific neuropeptide Y1 receptor inhibitor but insensitive to amiloride. We conclude that Ang II stimulates PYY secretion, in turn inhibiting epithelial anion fluxes, thereby reducing net fluid secretion into the colonic lumen. Our findings highlight an important role of colonic L cells in whole-body fluid homeostasis by controlling water loss through the intestine. PMID:27447725

  6. Modulation of the NMDA Receptor Through Secreted Soluble Factors.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Waldo; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic activity is a critical determinant in the formation and development of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). The excitatory current is produced and regulated by several ionotropic receptors, including those that respond to glutamate. These channels are in turn regulated through several secreted factors that function as synaptic organizers. Specifically, Wnt, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) particularly regulate the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glutamatergic channel. These factors likely regulate early embryonic development and directly control key proteins in the function of important glutamatergic channels. Here, we review the secreted molecules that participate in synaptic organization and discuss the cell signaling behind of this fine regulation. Additionally, we discuss how these factors are dysregulated in some neuropathologies associated with glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the CNS.

  7. Angiotensin II regulates brain (pro)renin receptor expression through activation of cAMP response element-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Wencheng; Liu, Jiao; Hammond, Sean L; Tjalkens, Ronald B; Saifudeen, Zubaida; Feng, Yumei

    2015-07-15

    We reported that brain (pro)renin receptor (PRR) expression levels are elevated in DOCA-salt-induced hypertension; however, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. To address whether ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling is involved in this regulation, we implanted a DOCA pellet and supplied 0.9% saline as the drinking solution to C57BL/6J mice. Sham pellet-implanted mice that were provided regular drinking water served as controls. Concurrently, mice were intracerebroventricularly infused with the AT1R blocker losartan, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor captopril, or artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 3 wk. Intracerebroventricular infusion of losartan or captopril attenuated DOCA-salt-induced PRR mRNA elevation in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, suggesting a role for ANG II/AT1R signaling in regulating PRR expression during DOCA-salt hypertension. To test which ANG II/AT1R downstream transcription factors were involved in PRR regulation, we treated Neuro-2A cells with ANG II with or without CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) or AP-1 (activator protein-1) inhibitors, or CREB siRNA. CREB and AP-1 inhibitors, as well as CREB knockdown abolished ANG II-induced increases in PRR levels. ANG II also induced PRR upregulation in primary cultured neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ANG II treatment increased CREB binding to the endogenous PRR promoter in both cultured neurons and hypothalamic tissues of DOCA-salt hypertensive mice. This increase in CREB activity was reversed by AT1R blockade. Collectively, these findings indicate that ANG II acts via AT1R to upregulate PRR expression both in cultured cells and in DOCA-salt hypertensive mice by increasing CREB binding to the PRR promoter.

  8. Angiotensin II regulates brain (pro)renin receptor expression through activation of cAMP response element-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wencheng; Liu, Jiao; Hammond, Sean L.; Tjalkens, Ronald B.; Saifudeen, Zubaida

    2015-01-01

    We reported that brain (pro)renin receptor (PRR) expression levels are elevated in DOCA-salt-induced hypertension; however, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. To address whether ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling is involved in this regulation, we implanted a DOCA pellet and supplied 0.9% saline as the drinking solution to C57BL/6J mice. Sham pellet-implanted mice that were provided regular drinking water served as controls. Concurrently, mice were intracerebroventricularly infused with the AT1R blocker losartan, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor captopril, or artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 3 wk. Intracerebroventricular infusion of losartan or captopril attenuated DOCA-salt-induced PRR mRNA elevation in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, suggesting a role for ANG II/AT1R signaling in regulating PRR expression during DOCA-salt hypertension. To test which ANG II/AT1R downstream transcription factors were involved in PRR regulation, we treated Neuro-2A cells with ANG II with or without CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) or AP-1 (activator protein-1) inhibitors, or CREB siRNA. CREB and AP-1 inhibitors, as well as CREB knockdown abolished ANG II-induced increases in PRR levels. ANG II also induced PRR upregulation in primary cultured neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ANG II treatment increased CREB binding to the endogenous PRR promoter in both cultured neurons and hypothalamic tissues of DOCA-salt hypertensive mice. This increase in CREB activity was reversed by AT1R blockade. Collectively, these findings indicate that ANG II acts via AT1R to upregulate PRR expression both in cultured cells and in DOCA-salt hypertensive mice by increasing CREB binding to the PRR promoter. PMID:25994957

  9. [Inhibitory effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonist on the contraction and growth of hepatic stellate cells].

    PubMed

    Baik, Soon Koo; Jo, Ho Sung; Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Jung Min; Lee, Byong Jun; Choi, Yeun Jong; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Dong Ki; Kwon, Sang Ok; Lee, Keon Il; Cha, Seung Kyu; Park, Kyu Sang; Kong, In Deok

    2003-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) and its receptor antagonist (losartan) on the contraction and growth of HSCs. HSCs were isolated from Sprague Dawley rat and cultured at various conditions as follows: control, pretreatment of 10(-5) M ANG II, pretreatment of 10(-5) M endothelin, and pretreatment of 10(-5) M ANG II and 10(-6) M losartan. We conducted morphologic analysis with cellular area and length by image analysis system to estimate cell growth in each group. In addition, we measured the change of intracellular calcium currents via electrophysiological methods to evaluate the contractile effect of ANG II and losartan on HSCs. At the fifth day of incubation, the mean cellular area of ANG II-pretreated group and ANG II with losartan-pretreated group were 704.68+/-22.6 micro m2 and 332.90+/-32.6 micro m2, respectively. This difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). ANG II induced an increase in the intracellular calcium current by 22.0+/-3.0% compared with basal current level (p<0.05). However, when losartan was pretreated, ANG II did not cause a significant increase in calcium current (3.1+/-0.8%, p>0.05). ANG II accelerates the contraction and growth of HSCs, while its receptor blocker, losartan, inhibits the contraction and growth of HSCs.

  10. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation: Mechanisms, Pathophysiology, and Potential Therapies in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Steven J; Kawai, Tatsuo; O'Brien, Shannon; Thomas, Walter; Harris, Raymond C; Eguchi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation impacts the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, and inhibition of EGFR activity is emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat diseases including hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, renal fibrosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm. The capacity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, such as angiotensin II (AngII), to promote EGFR signaling is called transactivation and is well described, yet delineating the molecular processes and functional relevance of this crosstalk has been challenging. Moreover, these critical findings are dispersed among many different fields. The aim of our review is to highlight recent advancements in defining the signaling cascades and downstream consequences of EGFR transactivation in the cardiovascular renal system. We also focus on studies that link EGFR transactivation to animal models of the disease, and we discuss potential therapeutic applications.

  11. Isolation and characterization of two alternatively spliced complementary DNAs encoding a Xenopus laevis angiotensin II receptor.

    PubMed

    Nishimatsu, S; Koyasu, N; Sugaya, T; Ohnishi, J; Yamagishi, T; Murakami, K; Miyazaki, H

    1994-08-02

    We have isolated two cDNAs of 1.7 and 3.0 kb, produced by alternative splicing, that encode a angiotensin II (AII) receptor from a Xenopus laevis heart cDNA library. The two clones had identical coding regions with each other and were found to belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily like the mammalian type 1 AII receptors (AT1); their amino acid sequence was 68.7% homologous with the human AT1 receptor sequence. However, there was a 1.3 kb insertion at the 3'-untranslated region of the longer clone. The insertion contained 9 repeats of an ATTTA motif, suggesting that the two mRNAs undergo distinct post-transcriptional regulation by virtue of a difference in their stability. Although the Xenopus receptor exhibited distinct specificities for AII receptor antagonists compared with mammalian AII receptors, several common characteristics, including the effect of dithiothreitol and guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), demonstrated that the cloned receptor is a counterpart of the mammalian AT1 receptor. Moreover, the cloned receptor was expressed most abundantly in the Xenopus heart, which is inconsistent with the tissue distribution of mammalian AII receptors. This indicated that the Xenopus heart, unlike that of mammals, plays a major role in the AII-dependent regulation of blood pressure and extracellular fluid volume.

  12. TNFα drives pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing the BMP type-II receptor and altering NOTCH signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Liam A.; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; Long, Lu; Crosby, Alexi; Al-Lamki, Rafia; Deighton, John; Southwood, Mark; Yang, Xudong; Nikolic, Marko Z.; Herrera, Blanca; Inman, Gareth J.; Bradley, John R.; Rana, Amer A.; Upton, Paul D.; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2017-01-01

    Heterozygous germ-line mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein type-II receptor (BMPR-II) gene underlie heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH). Although inflammation promotes PAH, the mechanisms by which inflammation and BMPR-II dysfunction conspire to cause disease remain unknown. Here we identify that tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) selectively reduces BMPR-II transcription and mediates post-translational BMPR-II cleavage via the sheddases, ADAM10 and ADAM17 in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). TNFα-mediated suppression of BMPR-II subverts BMP signalling, leading to BMP6-mediated PASMC proliferation via preferential activation of an ALK2/ACTR-IIA signalling axis. Furthermore, TNFα, via SRC family kinases, increases pro-proliferative NOTCH2 signalling in HPAH PASMCs with reduced BMPR-II expression. We confirm this signalling switch in rodent models of PAH and demonstrate that anti-TNFα immunotherapy reverses disease progression, restoring normal BMP/NOTCH signalling. Collectively, these findings identify mechanisms by which BMP and TNFα signalling contribute to disease, and suggest a tractable approach for therapeutic intervention in PAH. PMID:28084316

  13. TNFα drives pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing the BMP type-II receptor and altering NOTCH signalling.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Liam A; Dunmore, Benjamin J; Long, Lu; Crosby, Alexi; Al-Lamki, Rafia; Deighton, John; Southwood, Mark; Yang, Xudong; Nikolic, Marko Z; Herrera, Blanca; Inman, Gareth J; Bradley, John R; Rana, Amer A; Upton, Paul D; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2017-01-13

    Heterozygous germ-line mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein type-II receptor (BMPR-II) gene underlie heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH). Although inflammation promotes PAH, the mechanisms by which inflammation and BMPR-II dysfunction conspire to cause disease remain unknown. Here we identify that tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) selectively reduces BMPR-II transcription and mediates post-translational BMPR-II cleavage via the sheddases, ADAM10 and ADAM17 in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). TNFα-mediated suppression of BMPR-II subverts BMP signalling, leading to BMP6-mediated PASMC proliferation via preferential activation of an ALK2/ACTR-IIA signalling axis. Furthermore, TNFα, via SRC family kinases, increases pro-proliferative NOTCH2 signalling in HPAH PASMCs with reduced BMPR-II expression. We confirm this signalling switch in rodent models of PAH and demonstrate that anti-TNFα immunotherapy reverses disease progression, restoring normal BMP/NOTCH signalling. Collectively, these findings identify mechanisms by which BMP and TNFα signalling contribute to disease, and suggest a tractable approach for therapeutic intervention in PAH.

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-II and heparin are anti-apoptotic survival factors in human villous cytotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Hills, Frank A; Mehmet, Huseyin; Sullivan, Mark H

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II), heparin, aspirin and vitamin C on the proliferation and apoptosis of human villous cytotrophoblast from first trimester and term placentae. Villous cytotrophoblast cells were isolated from uncomplicated first trimester (n=12) and term placental tissues (n=12) using negative immunoselection with an antibody to HLA class I antigens. Cells were incubated with IGF-I, IGF-II, heparin, aspirin and vitamin C either alone, or in combination with either TNF-α/IFN-γ or staurosporine. Proliferation was determined by measurement of Ki67 expression using immunocytochemistry. Trophoblast apoptosis was determined by TUNEL staining. Finally RT-PCR was carried out to identify IGF-binding insulin receptor isoforms. Data were expressed as means±SEM. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction was used to determine if differences between groups were statistically significant. Following negative immunoselection >98% of cells were positively stained for cytokeratin 7, a marker for cytotrophoblasts, and <1% were vimentin positive. First trimester and term trophoblasts underwent spontaneous apoptosis which was inhibited by approximately 50% in the presence of IGF-II or heparin. Apoptosis was significantly increased following incubation with a combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ or staurosporine. Apoptosis was decreased to basal levels following coincubation with IGF-II or heparin. Incubation with IGFs or heparin resulted in a small, but significant increase in Ki67 expression. Insulin receptor isoform A, which binds IGF-II with high affinity, was present in all trophoblast samples tested. These results suggest that heparin and IGF-II, but not IGF-I are important regulators of villous cytotrophoblast survival in early and late pregnancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Platelet-activating factor: receptors and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1993-06-15

    During the past two decades, studies describing the chemistry and biology of PAF have been extensive. This potent phosphoacylglycerol exhibits a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological effects in various cells and tissues. PAF acts, through specific receptors and a variety of signal transduction systems, to elicit diverse biochemical responses. Several important future directions can be enumerated for the characterization of PAF receptors and their attendant signalling mechanisms. The recent cloning and sequence analysis of the gene for the PAF receptor will allow a number of important experimental approaches for characterizing the structure and analysing the function of the various domains of the receptor. Using molecular genetic and immunological technologies, questions relating to whether there is receptor heterogeneity, the precise mechanism(s) for the regulation of the PAF receptor, and the molecular details of the signalling mechanisms in which the PAF receptor is involved can be explored. Another area of major significance is the examination of the relationship between the signalling response(s) evoked by PAF binding to its receptor and signalling mechanisms activated by a myriad of other mediators, cytokines and growth factors. A very exciting recent development in which PAF receptors undoubtedly play a role is in the regulation of the function of various cellular adhesion molecules. Finally, there remain many incompletely characterized physiological and pathophysiological situations in which PAF and its receptor play a crucial signalling role. Our laboratory has been active in the elucidation of several tissue responses in which PAF exhibits major autocoid signalling responses, e.g. hepatic injury and inflammation, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and cerebral stimulation and/or trauma. As new experimental strategies are developed for characterizing the fine structure of the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue injury and inflammation, the

  16. The structure of the follistatin:activin complex reveals antagonism of both type I and type II receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.B.; Lerch, T.F.; Cook, R.W.; Woodruff, T.K.; Jardetzky, T.S.

    2010-03-08

    TGF-{beta} ligands stimulate diverse cellular differentiation and growth responses by signaling through type I and II receptors. Ligand antagonists, such as follistatin, block signaling and are essential regulators of physiological responses. Here we report the structure of activin A, a TGF-{beta} ligand, bound to the high-affinity antagonist follistatin. Two follistatin molecules encircle activin, neutralizing the ligand by burying one-third of its residues and its receptor binding sites. Previous studies have suggested that type I receptor binding would not be blocked by follistatin, but the crystal structure reveals that the follistatin N-terminal domain has an unexpected fold that mimics a universal type I receptor motif and occupies this receptor binding site. The formation of follistatin:BMP:type I receptor complexes can be explained by the stoichiometric and geometric arrangement of the activin:follistatin complex. The mode of ligand binding by follistatin has important implications for its ability to neutralize homo- and heterodimeric ligands of this growth factor family.

  17. Positive and negative regulation of type II TGF-beta receptor signal transduction by autophosphorylation on multiple serine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, K; Lodish, H F

    1997-01-01

    The type II transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptor Ser/Thr kinase (TbetaRII) is responsible for the initiation of multiple TGF-beta signaling pathways, and loss of its function is associated with many types of human cancer. Here we show that TbetaRII kinase is regulated intricately by autophosphorylation on at least three serine residues. Ser213, in the membrane-proximal segment outside the kinase domain, undergoes intra-molecular autophosphorylation which is essential for the activation of TbetaRII kinase activity, activation of TbetaRI and TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition. In contrast, phosphorylation of Ser409 and Ser416, located in a segment corresponding to the substrate recognition T-loop region in a three-dimensional structural model of protein kinases, is enhanced by receptor dimerization and can occur via an intermolecular mechanism. Phosphorylation of Ser409 is essential for TbetaRII kinase signaling, while phosphorylation of Ser416 inhibits receptor function. Mutation of Ser416 to alanine results in a hyperactive receptor that is better able than wild-type to induce TbetaRI activation and subsequent cell cycle arrest. Since on a single receptor either Ser409 or Ser416, but not both simultaneously, can become autophosphorylated, our results show that TbetaRII phosphorylation is regulated intricately and affects TGF-beta receptor signal transduction both positively and negatively. PMID:9155023

  18. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor constitutive activation: from molecular mechanisms to pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Petrel, Christophe; Clauser, Eric

    2009-04-29

    Mutations activating the angiotensin II AT(1) receptor are important to identify and characterize because they give access to the activation mechanisms of this G protein coupled receptor and help to characterize the signaling pathways and the potential pathophysiology of this receptor. The different constitutively activated mutations of the AT(1) receptor are mostly localized in transmembrane domains (TM) and their characterization demonstrated that release of intramolecular constraints and movements among these TM are a necessary step for receptor activation. These mutations constitutively activate Gq linked signaling pathways, receptor internalization and maybe the G protein-independent signaling pathways. Expression of such mutations in mice is linked to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, but such natural mutations have not been identified in human pathology.

  19. Simultaneous determination of hydrochlorothiazide and several angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hillaert, S; Van den Bossche, W

    2003-02-26

    We have investigated the capability of the capillary zone electrophoretic (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatographic (MEKC) methods to simultaneously separate hydrochlorothiazide and six angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists (ARA-IIs): candesartan, eprosartan mesylate, irbesartan, losartan potassium, telmisartan, and valsartan. The CZE and MEKC methods are suitable for the qualitative and quantitative determination of combined HCT/ARA-IIs in pharmaceutical formulations. Depending on the ARA-II, at least one of the two methods can be used for each combination. The two methods have been validated in terms of their linearity of response, reproducibility, and accuracy.

  20. Structural determinants for activation or inhibition of ryanodine receptors by basic residues in the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop.

    PubMed Central

    Casarotto, M G; Green, D; Pace, S M; Curtis, S M; Dulhunty, A F

    2001-01-01

    The structures of peptide A, and six other 7-20 amino acid peptides corresponding to sequences in the A region (Thr671- Leu690) of the skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop have been examined, and are correlated with the ability of the peptides to activate or inhibit skeletal ryanodine receptor calcium release channels. The peptides adopted either random coil or nascent helix-like structures, which depended upon the polarity of the terminal residues as well as the presence and ionisation state of two glutamate residues. Enhanced activation of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, and activation of current flow through single ryanodine receptor channels (at -40 mV), was seen with peptides containing the basic residues 681Arg Lys Arg Arg Lys685, and was strongest when the residues were a part of an alpha-helix. Inhibition of channels (at +40 mV) was also seen with peptides containing the five positively charged residues, but was not enhanced in helical peptides. These results confirm the hypothesis that activation of ryanodine receptor channels by the II-III loop peptides requires both the basic residues and their participation in helical structure, and show for the first time that inhibition requires the basic residues, but is not structure-dependent. These findings imply that activation and inhibition result from peptide binding to separate sites on the ryanodine receptor. PMID:11371447

  1. Angiotensin II-induced angiotensin II type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2009-02-01

    Upon activation, the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1Rs) rapidly undergoes endocytosis. After a series of intracellular processes, the internalized AT1Rs recycle back to the plasma membrane or are trafficked to proteasomes or lysosomes for degradation. We recently reported that AT1Rs degrades in proteasomes upon stimulation of the D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) in human renal proximal tubule and HEK-293 cells. This is in contrast to the degradation of AT1R in lysosomes upon binding Ang II. However, the dynamic regulation of the AT1Rs in lysosomes is not well understood. Here we investigated the AT1Rs lysosomal degradation using FRET-FLIM in HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing the human AT1R tagged with EGFP as the donor fluorophore. Compared to its basal state, the lifetime of AT1Rs decreased after a 5-minute treatment with Ang II treatment and colocalized with Rab5 but not Rab7 and LAMP1. With longer Ang II treatment (30 min), the AT1Rs lifetime decreased and co-localized with Rab5, as well as Rab7 and LAMP1. The FLIM data are corroborated with morphological and biochemical co-immunoprecipitation studies. These data demonstrate that Ang II induces the internalization of AT1Rs into early sorting endosomes prior to trafficking to late endosomes and subsequent degradation in lysosomes.

  2. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade suppresses light-induced neural damage in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Toshio; Ozawa, Yoko; Miyake, Seiji; Nagai, Norihiro; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2014-06-01

    Exposure to light contributes to the development and progression of retinal degenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying light-induced tissue damage are not fully understood. Here, we examined the role of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling, which is part of the renin-angiotensin system, in light-induced retinal damage. Light-exposed Balb/c mice that were treated with the AT1R blockers (angiotensin II receptor blockers; ARBs) valsartan, losartan, and candesartan before and after the light exposure exhibited attenuated visual function impairment, compared to vehicle-treated mice. This effect was dose-dependent and observed across the ARB class of inhibitors. Further evaluation of valsartan showed that it suppressed a number of light-induced retinal effects, including thinning of the photoreceptor cell layer caused by apoptosis, shortening of the photoreceptor cell outer segment, and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The role of ROS in retinal pathogenesis was investigated further using the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Treatment of light-exposed mice with NAC before the light exposure suppressed the visual function impairment and photoreceptor cell histological changes due to apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with valsartan or NAC suppressed the induction of c-fos (a component of the AP-1 transcription factor) and the upregulation of fasl (a proapoptotic molecule whose transcript is regulated downstream of AP-1). Our results suggest that AT1R signaling mediates light-induced apoptosis, by increasing the levels of ROS and proapoptotic molecules in the retina. Thus, AT1R blockade may represent a new therapeutic approach for preventing light-induced retinal neural tissue damage. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Modulation of the transcripts for tumor necrosis factor-alpha and its receptors in vivo.

    PubMed

    de Kossodo, S; Critico, B; Grau, G E

    1994-03-01

    We investigated the effects of a single bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection in vivo on the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and its receptors: TNF receptor type I (TNF-R 55 kDa or TNF-R1) and TNF receptor type II (TNF-R 75 kDa or TNF-R2) in various tissues and white blood cells. While TNF mRNA rapidly accumulated in most tissues, TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 mRNA levels were found to be differentially regulated in lung, spleen, lymph nodes and white blood cells. In most cases, TNF-R mRNA levels did not parallel TNF mRNA levels. These observations indicate that TNF-R of both types of capable of modulating the host response to LPS, not only by shedding of their extracellular domains, but also by strict regulation of their gene expression.

  4. Placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in human lung development.

    PubMed

    Janér, Joakim; Andersson, Sture; Haglund, Caj; Karikoski, Riitta; Lassus, Patrik

    2008-08-01

    We examined the pulmonary expression of 2 proangiogenic factors, namely, placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, during lung development and acute and chronic lung injury in newborn infants. Six groups were included in an immunohistochemical study of placental growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, that is, 9 fetuses, 4 preterm and 8 term infants without lung injury who died soon after birth, 5 preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome of <2 days and 7 with respiratory distress syndrome of >10 days, and 6 with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Placental growth factor concentrations in tracheal aspirate fluid were measured in 70 samples from 20 preterm infants during the first postnatal week. In immunohistochemical analyses, placental growth factor staining was seen in bronchial epithelium and macrophages in all groups. Distal airway epithelium positivity was observed mostly in fetuses and in preterm infants who died soon after birth. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining was seen in vascular endothelium in all groups and also in lymphatic endothelium in fetuses. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining in arterial endothelium was associated with higher and staining in venous endothelium with lower gestational age. In capillaries, less vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining was seen in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The mean placental growth factor protein concentration in tracheal aspirate fluid during the first postnatal week was 0.64 +/- 0.42 pg/mL per IgA-secretory component unit. Concentrations during the first postnatal week were stable. Lower placental growth factor concentrations correlated with chorioamnionitis and lactosyl ceramide positivity. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 staining pattern seems to reflect ongoing differentiation and activity of different endothelia. Lower vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression

  5. Molecular cloning, characterization, and distribution of the gerbil angiotensin II AT2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Armando, Ines; Baiardi, Gustavo; Sreenath, Taduru; Kulkarni, Ashok; Martínez, Alfredo; Saavedra, Juan M

    2003-12-01

    We isolated a cDNA clone encoding the gerbil AT2 receptor (gAT2) gene from a gerbil adrenal gland cDNA library. The full-length cDNA contains a 1,089-bp open reading frame encoding 363 amino acid residues with 90.9, 96.1, and 95.6% identity with the human (hAT2), rat (rAT2), and mouse AT2 (mAT2) receptors, respectively. There are at least seven nonconserved amino acids in the NH2-terminal domain and in positions Val196, Val217, and Met293, important for angiotensin (ANG) II but not for CGP-42112 binding. Displacement studies in adrenal sections revealed that affinity of the gAT2 receptor was 10-20 times lower for ANG II, ANG III, and PD-123319 than was affinity of the rAT2 receptor. The affinity of each receptor remained the same for CGP-42112. When transfected into COS-7 cells, the gAT2 receptor shows affinity for ANG II that is three times lower than that shown by the hAT2 receptor, whereas affinities for ANG III and the AT2 receptor ligands CGP-42112 and PD-123319 were similar. Autoradiography in sections of the gerbil head showed higher binding in muscles, retina, skin, and molars at embryonic day 19 than at 1 wk of age. In situ hybridization and emulsion autoradiography revealed that at embryonic day 19 the gAT2 receptor mRNA was highly localized to the base of the dental papilla of maxillary and mandibular molars. Our results suggest selective growth-related functions in late gestation and early postnatal periods for the gAT2 receptor and provide an essential basis for future mutagenesis studies to further define structural requirements for agonist binding.

  6. Cell and molecular biology of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ceresa, Brian P; Peterson, Joanne L

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been one of the most intensely studied cell surface receptors due to its well-established roles in developmental biology, tissue homeostasis, and cancer biology. The EGFR has been critical for creating paradigms for numerous aspects of cell biology, such as ligand binding, signal transduction, and membrane trafficking. Despite this history of discovery, there is a continual stream of evidence that only the surface has been scratched. New ways of receptor regulation continue to be identified, each of which is a potential molecular target for manipulating EGFR signaling and the resultant changes in cell and tissue biology. This chapter is an update on EGFR-mediated signaling, and describes some recent developments in the regulation of receptor biology.

  7. Economic benefits of treating high-risk hypertension with angiotensin II receptor antagonists (blockers).

    PubMed

    Coca, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the leading risk factors for cardiovascular disease and represents a major health and economic burden. Most patients with high- or very high-risk hypertension have multiple cardiovascular risk factors with or without accompanying subclinical organ damage or established cardiovascular or renal disease. Patients with severe hypertension or with moderate hypertension and one to two additional risk factors have absolute 10-year risks of cardiovascular disease of 21-30% and 15-20%, respectively. Current European treatment guidelines recommend that antihypertensive therapy be initiated rapidly and aggressively in patients with high-risk hypertension. Most patients require two or more antihypertensive agents to achieve the strict blood pressure target of <130/80 mmHg. This article reviews the existing cost-effectiveness data on the use of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (blockers) [ARBs] in patients with high-risk hypertension. Aggressive ARB treatment of patients in the early (microalbuminuric) stages of diabetic nephropathy has a significant renoprotective effect, delaying the onset of overt (proteinuric) nephropathy. By slowing the progression of these patients to end-stage renal disease, substantial cost savings can be made. There is a paucity of cost-effectiveness data regarding the use of fixed-dose ARB plus thiazide diuretic combination therapies. Longitudinal cost-benefit studies of this attractive and efficacious first-line treatment option are needed.

  8. Inhibition of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme, Angiotensin II Receptor Blocking, and Blood Pressure Lowering Bioactivity across Plant Families.

    PubMed

    Patten, Glen S; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, kidney disease, and stroke. Interest in medicinal or nutraceutical plant bioactives to reduce hypertension has increased dramatically. The main biological regulation of mammalian blood pressure is via the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The key enzyme is angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) that converts angiotensin I into the powerful vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II. Angiotensin II binds to its receptors (AT1) on smooth muscle cells of the arteriole vasculature causing vasoconstriction and elevation of blood pressure. This review focuses on the in vitro and in vivo reports of plant-derived extracts that inhibit ACE activity, block angiotensin II receptor binding and demonstrate hypotensive activity in animal or human studies. We describe 74 families of plants that exhibited significant ACE inhibitory activity and 16 plant families with potential AT1 receptor blocking activity, according to in vitro studies. From 43 plant families including some of those with in vitro bioactivity, the extracts from 73 plant species lowered blood pressure in various normotensive or hypertensive in vivo models by the oral route. Of these, 19 species from 15 families lowered human BP when administered orally. Some of the active plant extracts, isolated bioactives and BP-lowering mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Anxiety-like behavior in mice lacking the angiotensin II type-2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, S; Sakagawa, T; Chaki, S; Imagawa, Y; Ichiki, T; Inagami, T

    1999-03-06

    The main biological role of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2) has not been established. We made use of targeted disruption of the mouse AT2 gene to examine the role of the AT2 receptor in the central nervous system (CNS). AT2-deficient mice displayed anxiety-like behavior compared with wild-type mice. However, AT2-deficient mice showed no depressant-like activity and no change in hexobarbital-induced sleeping time as compared with findings in wild-type mice. Both noradrenergic and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuronal systems appear to be involved in this anxiety-like behavior. Diazepam, captopril (angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor), prazosin (alpha1 antagonist) reversed the anxiety-like behavior in these AT2-deficient mice, whereas yohimbine (alpha2 antagonist), phenylephrine (alpha1 agonist), clonidine (alpha2 agonist), isoproterenol (beta1/beta2 agonist), propranolol (beta1/beta2 antagonist) and alpha-helical CRF9-41 (CRF receptor antagonist) has no apparent effects on anxiety-like behavior in AT2-deficient mice. In addition, concentrations of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone in AT2-deficient mice did not differ from these in wild-type mice, hence, there are probably no endocrine abnormalities involving the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). The amygdala appears to play an important role in many of the responses to fear and anxiety. The number of [3H]prazosin but not [125I]CRF binding sites in the amygdala was significantly reduced in AT2-deficient mice. These findings indicate that the noradrenergic system is involved in mediating the anxiety-like behavior in AT2-deficient mice. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. Vascular growth factors and receptors in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Böhling, T.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Persico, M. G.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1996-01-01

    Capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas are highly vascular central nervous system tumors of controversial origin. Of interest in their pathogenesis are mechanisms regulating endothelial cell growth. The endothelial cell mitogen vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis, and together with its two receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-1(FLT1) and VEGFR-2(KDR), is up-regulated during the malignant progression of gliomas. We have analyzed the expression of VEGF and its receptors, the related placental growth factor (PlGF) and the endothelial receptors FLT4 and Tie by in situ hybridization in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in all of the hemangiopericytomas studied and highly expressed in the stromal cells of hemangioblastomas. In addition, some hemangioblastoma tumor cells expressed high levels of PlGF. Significantly elevated levels of Tie mRNA, Tie protein, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 but not FLT4 mRNAs were observed in the endothelia of both tumor types. In hemangioblastomas, however, the receptors were also highly expressed by a subpopulation of stromal cells. Consistent results were obtained for a human hemangioblastoma cell line in culture. Up-regulation of the endothelial growth factors and receptors may result in autocrine or paracrine stimulation of endothelial cells and their precursors involved in the genesis of these two vascular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8774132

  11. Expression of type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor in the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Xiang; Gao, Na; Wang, Xiyu; Fang, Xiucai; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Guo-Du; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D

    2005-01-17

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, electrophysiological recording, and intraneuronal injection of the neuronal tracer biocytin were integrated in a study of the functional expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors in the guinea pig enteric nervous system. RT-PCR revealed expression of CRF1 receptor mRNA, but not CRF2, in both myenteric and submucosal plexuses. Immunoreactivity for the CRF1 receptor was distributed widely in the myenteric plexus of the stomach and small and large intestine and in the submucosal plexus of the small and large intestine. CRF1 receptor immunoreactivity was coexpressed with calbindin, choline acetyltransferase, and substance P in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, CRF1 receptor immunoreactivity was found in neurons that expressed calbindin, substance P, choline acetyltransferase, or neuropeptide Y. Application of CRF evoked slowly activating depolarizing responses associated with elevated excitability in both myenteric and submucosal neurons. Histological analysis of biocytin-filled neurons revealed that both uniaxonal neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology responded to CRF. The CRF-evoked depolarizing responses were suppressed by the CRF1/CRF2 receptor antagonist astressin and the selective CRF1 receptor antagonist NBI27914 and were unaffected by the selective CRF2 receptor antagonist antisauvagine-30. The findings support the hypothesis that the CRF1 receptor mediates the excitatory actions of CRF on neurons in the enteric nervous system. Actions on enteric neurons might underlie the neural mechanisms by which stress-related release of CRF in the periphery alters intestinal propulsive motor function, mucosal secretion, and barrier functions.

  12. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (AT1-blockers, ARBs, sartans): similarities and differences

    PubMed Central

    van Zwieten, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A survey is presented of the registered non-peptidergic angiotensin II receptor antagonists (AT1 blockers, ARBs, sartans) and their general properties and similarities. Accordingly, their receptor profile, pharmacokinetic and therapeutic applications are discussed. In addition, attention is paid to the individual characteristics of the AT1 blockers now available. A few components of this category offer additional potentially beneficial properties, owing to their pharmacological or metabolic characteristics. Such additional properties are critically discussed for eprosartan, losartan, telmisartan and valsartan. PMID:25696573

  13. miR-155 functions downstream of angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 and calcineurin to regulate cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Zhou, Yong; Cao, Zheng; Tong, Xin Zhu; Xie, Hua Qiang; Luo, Tao; Hua, Xian Ping; Wang, Han Qin

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by maladaptive tissue remodeling that may lead to heart failure or sudden death. MicroRNAs (miRs) are negative regulators of angiotensin II and the angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1), which are two components involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the present study, the interaction between angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1) signaling and miR-155 was investigated. Rat H9C2 (2-1) cardiomyocytes were transfected with miR-155 analogues or inhibitors, then stimulated with angiotensin II to induce cardiac hypertrophy. miR-155 expression was revealed to be altered following transfection with chemically-modified miR-155 analogues and inhibitors in rat cardiomyocytes. In cell cardiac hypertrophy models, the cell surface area, AGTR1, atrial natriuretic peptide and myosin heavy chain-β mRNA expression levels were revealed to be lower in cells stimulated with miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin alone (P<0.05), as determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. Furthermore, calcineurin mRNA and protein, intracellular free calcium and nuclear factor of activated T-cells-4 proteins were downregulated in miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II, as compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin II alone (P<0.05). In conclusion, the current study indicates that miR-155 may improve cardiac hypertrophy by downregulating AGTR1 and suppressing the calcium signaling pathways activated by AGTR1.

  14. miR-155 functions downstream of angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 and calcineurin to regulate cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Zhou, Yong; Cao, Zheng; Tong, Xin Zhu; Xie, Hua Qiang; Luo, Tao; Hua, Xian Ping; Wang, Han Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by maladaptive tissue remodeling that may lead to heart failure or sudden death. MicroRNAs (miRs) are negative regulators of angiotensin II and the angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1), which are two components involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the present study, the interaction between angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1) signaling and miR-155 was investigated. Rat H9C2 (2–1) cardiomyocytes were transfected with miR-155 analogues or inhibitors, then stimulated with angiotensin II to induce cardiac hypertrophy. miR-155 expression was revealed to be altered following transfection with chemically-modified miR-155 analogues and inhibitors in rat cardiomyocytes. In cell cardiac hypertrophy models, the cell surface area, AGTR1, atrial natriuretic peptide and myosin heavy chain-β mRNA expression levels were revealed to be lower in cells stimulated with miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin alone (P<0.05), as determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. Furthermore, calcineurin mRNA and protein, intracellular free calcium and nuclear factor of activated T-cells-4 proteins were downregulated in miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II, as compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin II alone (P<0.05). In conclusion, the current study indicates that miR-155 may improve cardiac hypertrophy by downregulating AGTR1 and suppressing the calcium signaling pathways activated by AGTR1. PMID:27588076

  15. Growth factor control of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase activity via an intramolecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Cerione, R A

    1988-02-15

    The mechanism by which the protein kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is activated by binding of growth factor was investigated. Detergent-solubilized receptor in monomeric form was isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and both its kinase and autophosphorylation activities monitored. In a low ionic strength medium and with MnCl2 as an activator, the activity of the monomeric receptor was EGF-independent. However, with 0.25 M ammonium sulfate present, the MnCl2-stimulated kinase activity was strikingly EGF-dependent. In contrast, the kinase activity expressed in the presence of MgCl2 showed growth factor control in the absence of added salt. Under the conditions of these experiments there was apparently little tendency for growth factor to induce aggregation of the receptor, indicating that the allosteric activation of the receptor kinase by EGF occurred via an intramolecular mechanism. Whereas detergent-solubilized receptor was the subject of these studies, the kinase activity of cell surface receptors might also be controlled by an intramolecular mechanism. These results indicate that an individual receptor molecule has the potential to function as a transmembrane signal transducer.

  16. Reassessment of the Unique Mode of Binding between Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Their Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yoshino; Saku, Keijiro; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2013-01-01

    While the molecular structures of angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs) are very similar, they are also slightly different. Although each ARB has been shown to exhibit a unique mode of binding to AT1 receptor, different positions of the AT1 receptor have been analyzed and computational modeling has been performed using different crystal structures for the receptor as a template and different kinds of software. Therefore, we systematically analyzed the critical positions of the AT1 receptor, Tyr113, Tyr184, Lys199, His256 and Gln257 using a mutagenesis study, and subsequently performed computational modeling of the binding of ARBs to AT1 receptor using CXCR4 receptor as a new template and a single version of software. The interactions between Tyr113 in the AT1 receptor and the hydroxyl group of olmesartan, between Lys199 and carboxyl or tetrazole groups, and between His256 or Gln257 and the tetrazole group were studied. The common structure, a tetrazole group, of most ARBs similarly bind to Lys199, His256 and Gln257 of AT1 receptor. Lys199 in the AT1 receptor binds to the carboxyl group of EXP3174, candesartan and azilsartan, whereas oxygen in the amidecarbonyl group of valsartan may bind to Lys199. The benzimidazole portion of telmisartan may bind to a lipophilic pocket that includes Tyr113. On the other hand, the n-butyl group of irbesartan may bind to Tyr113. In conclusion, we confirmed that the slightly different structures of ARBs may be critical for binding to AT1 receptor and for the formation of unique modes of binding. PMID:24260317

  17. Role of Mas receptor antagonist (A779) in renal hemodynamics in condition of blocked angiotensin II receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, A; Oryan, S; Nematbakhsh, M

    2016-03-01

    The vasodilatory effect of angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7) is exerted in the vascular bed via Mas receptor (MasR) gender dependently. However, the crosstalk between MasR and angiotensin II (Ang II) types 1 and 2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R) may change some actions of Ang 1-7 in renal circulation. In this study by blocking AT1R and AT2R, the role of MasR in kidney hemodynamics was described. In anaesthetized male and female Wistar rats, the effects of saline as vehicle and MasR blockade (A779) were tested on mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal perfusion pressure (RPP), renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance (RVR) when both AT1R and AT2R were blocked by losartan and PD123319, respectively. In male rats, when AT1R and AT2R were blocked, there was a tendency for the increase in RBF/wet kidney tissue weight (RBF/KW) to be elevated by A779 as compared with the vehicle (P=0.08), and this was not the case in female rats. The impact of MasR on renal hemodynamics appears not to be sexual dimorphism either when Ang II receptors were blocked. It seems that co-blockade of all AT1R, AT2R, and MasR may alter RBF/ KW in male more than in female rats. These findings support a crosstalk between MasR and Ang II receptors in renal circulation.

  18. Central angiotensin II stimulates cutaneous water intake behavior via an angiotensin II type-1 receptor pathway in the Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Sho; Konno, Norifumi; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2010-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates oral water intake by causing thirst in all terrestrial vertebrates except anurans. Anuran amphibians do not drink orally but absorb water osmotically through ventral skin. In this study, we examined the role of Ang II on the regulation of water-absorption behavior in the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). In fully hydrated frogs, intracerebroventricular (ICV) and intralymphatic sac (ILS) injection of Ang II significantly extended the residence time of water in a dose-dependent manner. Ang II-dependent water uptake was inhibited by ICV pretreatment with an angiotensin II type-1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonist but not a type-2 (AT(2)) receptor antagonist. These results suggest that Ang II stimulates water-absorption behavior in the tree frog via an AT(1)-like but not AT(2)-like receptor. We then cloned and characterized cDNA of the tree frog AT(1) receptor from the brain. The tree frog AT(1) receptor cDNA encodes a 361 amino acid residue protein, which is 87% identical to the toad (Bufo marinus) AT(1) receptor and exhibits the functional characteristics of an Ang II receptor. AT(1) receptor mRNAs were found to be present in a number of tissues including brain (especially in the diencephalon), lung, large intestine, kidney and ventral pelvic skin. When tree frogs were exposed to dehydrating conditions, AT(1) receptor mRNA significantly increased in the diencephalon and the rhombencephalon. These data suggest that central Ang II may control water intake behavior via an AT(1) receptor on the diencephalon and rhombencephalon in anuran amphibians and may have implications for water consumption in vertebrates.

  19. Type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors: Current therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kalofoutis, Christos; Piperi, Christina; Kalofoutis, Anastasios; Harris, Fred; Phoenix, David; Singh, Jaipaul

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 200 million people currently have type II diabetes mellitus (DM), a prevalence that has been predicted to increase to 366 million by 2030. Rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and morbidity are particularly high in this population, representing a significant cost for health care systems. Type II DM patients generally carry a number of risk factors for CVD, including hyperglycemia, abnormal lipid profiles, alterations in inflammatory mediators and coagulation/thrombolytic parameters, as well as other ‘nontraditional’ risk factors, many of which may be closely associated with insulin resistance. Therefore, successful management of CVD associated with diabetes represents a major challenge to the clinicians. An effective way of tackling this problem is to detect the associated risk factors and to target treatment toward their improvement. Targeting hyperglycemia alone does not reduce the excess risk in diabetes, highlighting the need for aggressive treatment of other risk factors. Although the current use of statin therapy is effective at reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, residual risk remains for other independent lipid and nonlipid factors. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ appears to be closely involved in regulating risk markers at multiple levels. A relatively new class of therapeutic agents that activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, the thiazolidinedione insulin-sensitizing agents, is currently used to manage type II DM. These agents display a number of potential antiatherogenic properties, including effects on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as other beneficial nonlipid effects, such as regulating levels of mediators involved in inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Research data suggest that simple strategies combining thiazolidinediones and statins could have complementary effects on CVD risk-factor profiles in diabetes, alongside the

  20. Angiotensin II type 2-receptor: new clinically validated target in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Rice, A S C; Smith, M T

    2015-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is a large unmet medical need. The angiotensin II type 2 (AT2 ) receptor is a target with promising data in rodent models of peripheral neuropathic pain. The AT2 receptor has attracted attention on the basis of human data from a proof-of-concept clinical trial showing that oral EMA401, a highly selective, peripherally restricted, small molecule AT2 receptor antagonist, at 100 mg twice-daily for 4 weeks, alleviated postherpetic neuralgia, an often intractable type of peripheral neuropathic pain. © 2014 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  1. The ontogeny of epidermal growth factor receptors during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E.D.; Meek, J.

    1984-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the role(s) of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in vivo during murine development, we have examined the /sup 125/I-EGF binding characteristics of EGF-receptors in membrane preparations of tissues from the 12th day of gestation to parturition. Using autoradiography, the earliest time that we could detect EGF-receptors was on trophoblast cells cultured for 3 days as blastocyst outgrowths. Trophoblast eventually forms a large portion of the placenta, where EGF-receptors have long been recognized. We measured the number and affinity of EGF-receptors on tissues dissected from conceptuses from the 12th day of gestation in order to identify a stage when tissues may be most sensitive to EGF. Whereas the number of EGF receptors increases during gestation for all tissues examined, the affinity of the receptors declines for carcass and placenta and remains relatively unchanged for brain and liver. This suggests that EGF may function differently throughout development. Our hypothesis is that EGF (or its embryonic equivalent) initially stimulates proliferation in embryonic cells and then stimulates differentiation as the tissues mature. In the adult, its main role could be to stimulate tissue repair after damage.

  2. Biochemical and biological properties of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have utilized a monoclonal antibody (192-IgG) to study the rat nerve growth factor receptor. After intraocular injection, {sup 125}I-192-IgG was retrogradely transported in sympathetic neuronal axons to the superior cervical ganglion. When the sciatic nerve was ligated to induce the accumulation of axonally transported materials, 192-IgG immunostaining was observed on both sides of the ligature, indicating that NGF receptors are transported in both orthograde and retrograde directions. By using {sup 125}I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG immunoprecipitation, we detected receptor molecules throughout the rat brain, thereby supporting the hypothesis that NGF is active in the central nervous system. We also discovered that sciatic nerve transection leads to a dramatic increase in the amount of NGF receptor found in the distal portion of the nerve. Immunostaining revealed that all Schwann cells in the distal axotomized nerve were expressing NGF receptors. We examined phosphorylation of NGF receptor in cultured sympathetic neurons and PC12 cells. We also examined pharmacological effects of 192-IgG. Systemic injection of 192-IgG into neonatal rats caused a permanent partial sympathectomy in a dose-dependent manner; a maximum of 50% of the cells were killed.

  3. Variations of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene are associated with extreme human longevity.

    PubMed

    Benigni, Ariela; Orisio, Silvia; Noris, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Castaldi, Davide; Kamide, Kei; Rakugi, Hiromi; Arai, Yasumichi; Todeschini, Marta; Ogliari, Giulia; Imai, Enyu; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Mari, Daniela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Longevity phenotype in humans results from the influence of environmental and genetic factors. Few gene polymorphisms have been identified so far with a modest effect on lifespan leaving room for the search of other players in the longevity game. It has been recently demonstrated that targeted disruption of the mouse homolog of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene (AGTR1) translates into marked prolongation of animal lifespan (Benigni et al., J Clin Invest 119(3):524-530, 2009). Based on the above study in mice, here we sought to search for AGTR1 variations associated to reduced AT1 receptor protein levels and to prolonged lifespan in humans. AGTR1 was sequenced in 173 Italian centenarians and 376 younger controls. A novel non-synonymous mutation was detected in a centenarian. Two polymorphisms in AGTR1 promoter, rs422858 and rs275653, in complete linkage disequilibrium, were significantly associated with the ability to attain extreme old age. We then replicated the study of rs275653 in a large independent cohort of Japanese origin (598 centenarians and semi-supercentenarians, 422 younger controls) and indeed confirmed its association with exceptional old age. In combined analyses, rs275653 was associated to extreme longevity either at recessive model (P = 0.007, odds ratio (OR) 3.57) or at genotype level (P = 0.015). Significance was maintained after correcting for confounding factors. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that subjects homozygous for the minor allele of rs275653 had less AT1R-positive peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells. Moreover, rs275653 was associated to lower blood pressure in centenarians. These findings highlight the role of AGTR1 as a possible candidate among longevity-enabling genes.

  4. Glutamate receptors on myelinated spinal cord axons: II)AMPA and GluR5 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ouardouz, M.; Coderre, E.; Zamponi, G. W.; Hameed, S.; Yin, X.; Trapp, B.D.; Stys, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Glutamate receptors, which play a major role in the physiology and pathology of CNS gray matter, are also involved in the pathophysiology of white matter. However the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for excitotoxic damage to white matter elements are not fully understood. We explored the roles of AMPA and GluR5 kainate receptors in axonal Ca2+ deregulation. Methods Dorsal column axons were loaded with a Ca2+ indicator and imaged in vitro using confocal microscopy. Results Both AMPA and a GluR5 kainate receptor agonists increased intra-axonal Ca2+ in myelinated rat dorsal column fibers. These responses were inhibited by selective antagonists of these glutamate receptors. The GluR5-mediated Ca2+ rise was mediated by both canonical (i.e. ionotropic) and non-canonical (metabotropic) signalling, dependent on a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein and a phospholipase C-dependent pathway, promoting Ca2+ release from IP3-dependent stores. Additionally, the GluR5 response was significantly reduced by intra-axonal NO scavengers. In contrast, GluR4 AMPA receptors operated via Ca2+ induced Ca2+ release, dependent on ryanodine receptors, and unaffected by NO scavengers. Neither pathway depended on L-type Ca2+ channels, in contrast to GlurR6 kainate receptor action 1. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of GluR4 and GluR5 clustered at the surface of myelinated axons; GluR5 co-immunoprecipitated with nNOS and often co-localized with nNOS clusters on the internodal axon. Interpretation Central myelinated axons express functional AMPA and GluR5 kainate receptors, and can directly respond to glutamate receptor agonists. These glutamate receptor-dependent signalling pathways promote an increase in intra-axonal Ca2+ levels potentially contributing to axonal degeneration. PMID:19224531

  5. Systems Biological Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization Dynamics for Altered Receptor Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Hannah; Reinz, Eileen; Eils, Roland; Brady, Nathan R.

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) overexpression is a hallmark of many cancers. EGFR endocytosis is a critical step in signal attenuation, raising the question of how receptor expression levels affect the internalization process. Here we combined quantitative experimental and mathematical modeling approaches to investigate the role of the EGFR expression level on the rate of receptor internalization. Using tetramethylrhodamine-labeled EGF, we established assays for quantifying EGF-triggered EGFR internalization by both high resolution confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. We determined that the flow cytometry approach was more sensitive for examining large populations of cells. Mathematical modeling was used to investigate the relationship between EGF internalization kinetics, EGFR expression, and internalization machinery. We predicted that the standard parameter used to assess internalization kinetics, the temporal evolution r(t) of the ratio of internalized versus surface-located ligand·receptor complexes, does not describe a straight line, as proposed previously. Instead, a convex or concave curve occurs depending on whether initial receptor numbers or internalization adaptors are limiting the uptake reaction, respectively. To test model predictions, we measured EGF-EGFR binding and internalization in cells expressing different levels of green fluorescent protein-EGFR. As expected, surface binding of rhodamine-labeled EGF increased with green fluorescent protein-EGFR expression level. Unexpectedly, internalization of ligand· receptor complexes increased linearly with increasing receptor expression level, suggesting that receptors and not internalization adaptors were limiting the uptake in our experimental model. Finally, determining the ratio of internalized versus surface-located ligand·receptor complexes for this cell line confirmed that it follows a convex curve, supporting our model predictions. PMID:19297331

  6. Regulation of rat mesangial cell migration by platelet-derived growth factor, angiotensin II, and adrenomedullin.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Kano, H; Maeda, K; Mandal, A K; Inoki, K; Haneda, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1999-12-01

    This study sought to determine whether platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and angiotensin II (AngII) stimulate migration of cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells. After finding that this was so, the effects of adrenomedullin (ADM) and cAMP-elevating agents on basal and stimulated mesangial cell migration were examined. Two isoforms of PDGF, AB and BB, stimulated migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 1 and 50 ng/ml, while the AA isoform lacked significant effect. AngII modestly but significantly stimulated migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-7) and 10(-6) mol/L. Rat ADM significantly inhibited the PDGF BB- and AngII-stimulated migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-8) and 10(-7) mol/L. Inhibition by rat ADM was accompanied by an increase in cellular cAMP. cAMP agonists or inducers such as 8-bromo cAMP, forskolin, and prostaglandin I2 also significantly reduced the stimulated migration. H 89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, attenuated the inhibitory effect of ADM, and a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, human CGRP (8-37), abolished the inhibitory effects of rat ADM. These results suggest that PDGF AB and BB as well as AngII stimulate rat mesangial cell migration and that ADM can inhibit PDGF BB- and AngII-stimulated migration, at least in part through cAMP-dependent mechanisms likely to involve specific ADM receptors with which CGRP interacts. The adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA system may be involved in the migration-inhibitory effect of ADM in these cells.

  7. Effect of angiotensin II type 2 receptor deletion in hematopoietic cells on brain ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Jun; Mogi, Masaki; Tsukuda, Kana; Min, Li-Juan; Sakata, Akiko; Jing, Fei; Ohshima, Kousei; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2011-09-01

    The angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2)) receptor is expressed in bone marrow cells and may affect cell differentiation. We previously reported a beneficial role of the AT(2) receptor in ischemic brain damage. Here, we investigated the effect of AT(2) receptor stimulation in hematopoietic cells on ischemic brain injury using chimeric mice. Chimeric mice were generated by bone marrow transplantation into wild-type mice after irradiation. Bone marrow cells were prepared from wild-type (Agtr2(+)) or AT(2) receptor-deficient mice (Agtr2(-)). Six weeks after bone marrow transplantation, these chimeric mice were subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury. Both Agtr2(+) and Agtr2(-) chimeric mice did not show a significant change in systolic and diastolic blood pressures, whereas body weight decreased in Agtr2(-) chimera. Twenty-four hours after ischemia/reperfusion injury, ischemic brain damage in Agtr2(-) chimera was exaggerated compared with that in Agtr2(+) chimera. Moreover, cerebral blood flow in the peripheral region before and after ischemia/reperfusion injury was decreased in Agtr2(-) chimera. The inflammatory response in the ipsilateral hemisphere was not significantly different, whereas tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 expressions tended to increase in the Agtr2(-) chimeric brain. Expression of methylmethane sulfonate 2, which has a neuroprotective effect, was lower in the brain of Agtr2(-) chimera. These results indicate that deletion of AT(2) receptor in blood cells has a harmful effect on ischemic brain injury.

  8. Therapeutic Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Yoshitaka; Otsuki, Sho; Sato, Yuya; Nakagawa, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy has become the global standard treatment for patients with metastatic or unresectable gastric cancer (GC), although outcomes remain unfavorable. Many molecular-targeted therapies inhibiting signaling pathways of various tyrosine kinase receptors have been developed, and monoclonal antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have become standard therapy for HER2-positive GC. An inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 or MET has also produced promising results in patients with GC. Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) play key roles in tumor growth via activated signaling pathways in GC. Genomic amplification of FGFR2 leads to the aberrant activation found in GC tumors and is related to survival in patients with GC. This review discusses the clinical relevance of FGFR in GC and examines FGFR as a potential therapeutic target in patients with GC. Preclinical studies in animal models suggest that multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including FGFR inhibitor, suppress tumor cell proliferation and delay tumor progression. Several TKIs are now being evaluated in clinical trials as treatment for metastatic or unresectable GC harboring FGFR2 amplification. PMID:26000013

  9. The role of insulin-like growth factor II in the malignant transformation of rat liver oval cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Siegel, K; Odenthal, M; Becker, R; Oesch, F; Dienes, H P; Schirmacher, P; Steinberg, P

    1997-04-01

    Oval cells are small nonparenchymal epithelial cells that first appear in the periportal areas of the liver and thereafter invade the whole parenchyma when mice or rats are exposed to a variety of chemical carcinogens. In the present study we have analyzed the expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) in the recently established oval cell line OC/CDE 22 and its malignantly transformed counterpart (the M22 cells) and the biological consequences of the constitutive expression of IGF II in oval cells. OC/CDE 22 cells do not express the above-mentioned growth factor, whereas the M22 cells do and addition of a neutralizing anti-IGF II antibody to M22 cells resulted in an almost complete proliferation stop. The presence of type 1 as well as type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptors in OC/CDE 22 and M22 cells was revealed by Northern blotting; however, only neutralizing antibodies directed against the type 1 IGF receptor were able to inhibit the proliferation of the cultured oval cells. Finally, transfection of an IGF II complementary DNA (cDNA) into OC/CDE 22 cells resulted in the release of active IGF II into the extracellular medium but not in the concomitant malignant transformation of the cells. Taken together these results show that: 1) upon transformation oval cells start producing IGF II and 2) IGF II acts on oval cells as a pure mitogen (without being per se oncogenic) via an autocrine loop involving the activation of the type 1 IGF receptor.

  10. Control of gravitropic orientation. II. Dual receptor model for gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMotte, Clifford E.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    2004-01-01

    Gravitropism of vascular plants has been assumed to require a single gravity receptor mechanism. However, based on the evidence in Part I of this study, we propose that maize roots require two. The first mechanism is without a directional effect and, by itself, cannot give rise to tropism. Its role is quantitative facilitation of the second mechanism, which is directional like the gravitational force itself and provides the impetus for tropic curvature. How closely coupled the two mechanisms may be is, as yet, unclear. The evidence for dual receptors supports a general model for roots. When readiness for gravifacilitation, or gravifacilitation itself, is constitutive, orthogravitropic curvature can go to completion. If not constitutively enabled, gravifacilitation can be weak in the absence of light and water deficit or strong in the presence of light and water deficit. In either case, it can decay and permit roots to assume reproducible non-vertical orientations (plagiogravitropic or plagiotropic orientations) without using non-vertical setpoints. In this way roots are deployed in a large volume of soil. Gravitropic behaviours in shoots are more diverse than in roots, utilising oblique and horizontal as well as vertical setpoints. As a guide to future experiments, we assess how constitutive v. non-constitutive modes of gravifacilitation might contribute to behaviours based on each kind of setpoint.

  11. Control of gravitropic orientation. II. Dual receptor model for gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMotte, Clifford E.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    2004-01-01

    Gravitropism of vascular plants has been assumed to require a single gravity receptor mechanism. However, based on the evidence in Part I of this study, we propose that maize roots require two. The first mechanism is without a directional effect and, by itself, cannot give rise to tropism. Its role is quantitative facilitation of the second mechanism, which is directional like the gravitational force itself and provides the impetus for tropic curvature. How closely coupled the two mechanisms may be is, as yet, unclear. The evidence for dual receptors supports a general model for roots. When readiness for gravifacilitation, or gravifacilitation itself, is constitutive, orthogravitropic curvature can go to completion. If not constitutively enabled, gravifacilitation can be weak in the absence of light and water deficit or strong in the presence of light and water deficit. In either case, it can decay and permit roots to assume reproducible non-vertical orientations (plagiogravitropic or plagiotropic orientations) without using non-vertical setpoints. In this way roots are deployed in a large volume of soil. Gravitropic behaviours in shoots are more diverse than in roots, utilising oblique and horizontal as well as vertical setpoints. As a guide to future experiments, we assess how constitutive v. non-constitutive modes of gravifacilitation might contribute to behaviours based on each kind of setpoint.

  12. Identification and pharmacological characterization of native, functional human urotensin-II receptors in rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Stephen A; Naselsky, Diane; Ao, Zhaohui; Disa, Jyoti; Herold, Christopher L; Lynch, Frank; Aiyar, Nambi V

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to identify endogenous, native mammalian urotensin-II (U-II) receptors (UT), a diverse range of human, primate and rodent cell lines (49 in total) were screened for the presence of detectable [125I]hU-II binding sites. UT mRNA (Northern blot, PCR) and protein (immunocytochemistry) were evident in human skeletal muscle tissue and cells. [125I]hU-II bound to a homogenous population of high-affinity, saturable (Kd 67.0±11.8 pM, Bmax 9687±843 sites cell−1) receptors in the skeletal muscle (rhabdomyosarcoma) cell line SJRH30. Radiolabel was characteristically slow to dissociate (⩽15% dissociation 90 min). A lower density of high-affinity U-II binding sites was also evident in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell line TE671 (1667±165 sites cell−1, Kd 74±8 pM). Consistent with the profile recorded in human recombinant UT-HEK293 cells, [125I]hU-II binding to SJRH30 cells was selectively displaced by both mammalian and fish U-II isopeptides (Kis 0.5±0.1–1.2±0.3 nM) and related analogues (hU-II[4-11]>[Cys5,10]Acm hU-II; Kis 0.4±0.1 and 864±193 nM, respectively). U-II receptor activation was functionally coupled to phospholipase C-mediated [Ca2+]i mobilization (EC50 6.9±2.2 nM) in SJRH30 cells. The present study is the first to identify the presence of ‘endogenous' U-II receptors in SJRH30 and TE671 cells. SJRH30 cells, in particular, might prove to be of utility for (a) investigating the pharmacological properties of hU-II and related small molecule antagonists at native human UT and (b) delineating the role of this neuropeptide in the (patho)physiological regulation of mammalian neuromuscular function. PMID:15210573

  13. Identification of type II and type III pyoverdine receptors from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    de Chial, Magaly; Ghysels, Bart; Beatson, Scott A; Geoffroy, Valérie; Meyer, Jean Marie; Pattery, Theresa; Baysse, Christine; Chablain, Patrice; Parsons, Yasmin N; Winstanley, Craig; Cordwell, Stuart J; Cornelis, Pierre

    2003-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces, under conditions of iron limitation, a high-affinity siderophore, pyoverdine (PVD), which is recognized at the level of the outer membrane by a specific TonB-dependent receptor, FpvA. So far, for P. aeruginosa, three different PVDs, differing in their peptide chain, have been described (types I-III), but only the FpvA receptor for type I is known. Two PVD-producing P. aeruginosa strains, one type II and one type III, were mutagenized by a mini-TnphoA3 transposon. In each case, one mutant unable to grow in the presence of the strong iron chelator ethylenediaminedihydroxyphenylacetic acid (EDDHA) and the cognate PVD was selected. The first mutant, which had an insertion in the pvdE gene, upstream of fpvA, was unable to take up type II PVD and showed resistance to pyocin S3, which is known to use type II FpvA as receptor. The second mutant was unable to take up type III PVD and had the transposon insertion in fpvA. Cosmid libraries of the respective type II and type III PVD wild-type strains were constructed and screened for clones restoring the capacity to grow in the presence of PVD. From the respective complementing genomic fragments, type II and type III fpvA sequences were determined. When in trans, type II and type III fpvA restored PVD production, uptake, growth in the presence of EDDHA and, in the case of type II fpvA, pyocin S3 sensitivity. Complementation of fpvA mutants obtained by allelic exchange was achieved by the presence of cognate fpvA in trans. All three receptors posses an N-terminal extension of about 70 amino acids, similar to FecA of Escherichia coli, but only FpvAI has a TAT export sequence at its N-terminal end.

  14. Inhibition of Angiotensin II receptors during pregnancy induces malformations in developing rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Susana I; Seltzer, Alicia M; Fuentes, Lucia B; Forneris, Myriam L; Ciuffo, Gladys M

    2008-06-24

    Evidence suggests that Angiotensin II plays an important role in the complex process of renal organogenesis. Rat kidney organogenesis starts between E13-14 and lasts up to 2 weeks after birth. The present study demonstrates histologic modifications and changes in receptor localisation in animals born from mothers treated with Angiotensin II, Losartan or PD123319 (1.0 mg/kg/day) during late pregnancy. Angiotensin II-treated animals exhibited very well developed tubules in the renal medulla in coincidence with higher AT(1) binding. Control animals exhibited angiotensin AT(2) binding in the outer stripe of the outer medulla, while in the Angiotensin II-treated animals binding was observed to the inner stripe. In Angiotensin II-treated 1-week-old animals, the nephrogenic zone contained fewer immature structures, and more developed collecting tubules than control animals. Treatment with Losartan resulted in severe renal abnormalities. For newborn and 1-week-old animals, glomeruli exhibited altered shape and enlarged Bowman spaces, in concordance with a loss of [(125)I]Angiotensin II binding in the cortex. Blockade with PD123319 led to an enlarged nephrogenic zone with increased number of immature glomeruli, and less glomeruli in the juxtamedullary area. Autoradiography showed a considerable loss of AT(1) binding in the kidney cortex of PD123319-treated animals at both ages. The present results show for the first time histomorphological and receptor localisation alterations following treatment with low doses of Losartan and PD123319 during pregnancy. These observations confirm previous assumptions that in the developing kidney Angiotensin II exerts stimulatory effects through AT(1) receptors that might be counterbalanced by angiotensin AT(2) receptors.

  15. (Pro)renin Receptor Triggers Distinct Angiotensin II-Independent Extracellular Matrix Remodeling and Deterioration of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Moilanen, Anne-Mari; Rysä, Jaana; Serpi, Raisa; Mustonen, Erja; Szabò, Zoltán; Aro, Jani; Näpänkangas, Juha; Tenhunen, Olli; Sutinen, Meeri; Salo, Tuula; Ruskoaho, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) plays a key pathophysiological role in heart failure in patients with hypertension and myocardial infarction. However, the function of (pro)renin receptor ((P)RR) is not yet solved. We determined here the direct functional and structural effects of (P)RR in the heart. Methodology/Principal Findings (P)RR was overexpressed by using adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in normal adult rat hearts up to 2 weeks. (P)RR gene delivery into the anterior wall of the left ventricle decreased ejection fraction (P<0.01), fractional shortening (P<0.01), and intraventricular septum diastolic and systolic thickness, associated with approximately 2–fold increase in left ventricular (P)RR protein levels at 2 weeks. To test whether the worsening of cardiac function and structure by (P)RR gene overexpression was mediated by angiotensin II (Ang II), we infused an AT1 receptor blocker losartan via osmotic minipumps. Remarkably, cardiac function deteriorated in losartan-treated (P)RR overexpressing animals as well. Intramyocardial (P)RR gene delivery also resulted in Ang II-independent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase1/2 phosphorylation and myocardial fibrosis, and the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 and connective tissue growth factor genes. In contrast, activation of heat shock protein 27 phosphorylation and apoptotic cell death by (P)RR gene delivery was Ang II-dependent. Finally, (P)RR overexpression significantly increased direct protein–protein interaction between (P)RR and promyelocytic zinc-finger protein. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate for the first time that (P)RR triggers distinct Ang II-independent myocardial fibrosis and deterioration of cardiac function in normal adult heart and identify (P)RR as a novel therapeutic target to optimize RAS blockade in failing hearts. PMID:22911790

  16. Group II/III metabotropic glutamate receptors exert endogenous activity-dependent modulation of TRPV1 receptors on peripheral nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Susan M.; Zhou, Shengtai; Govea, Rosann; Du, Junhui

    2011-01-01

    There is pharmacological evidence Group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) function as activity-dependent autoreceptors, inhibiting transmission in supraspinal sites. These receptors are expressed by peripheral nociceptors. We investigated whether mGluRs function as activity-dependent autoreceptors inhibiting pain transmission to the rat CNS, particularly TRPV1-induced activity. Blocking peripheral mGluR activity by intraplantar injection of antagonists LY341495 (LY, 20, 100 μM, Group II/III ), APICA (100 μM, Group II) or UBP1112 (30 μM, Group III) increased capsaicin (CAP)-induced nociceptive behaviors and nociceptor activity. In contrast, Group II agonist APDC (0.1 μM) or Group III agonist L-AP4 (10 μM) blocked the LY-induced increase. Ca2+ imaging in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells confirmed LY enhanced CAP-induced Ca2+ mobilization which was blocked by APDC and L-AP4. We hypothesized that excess glutamate (GLU), released by high intensity and/or prolonged stimulation endogenously activated Group II/III, dampening nociceptor activation. In support of this, intraplantar GLU+LY produced heat hyperalgesia and exogenous GLU+LY applied to nociceptors produced enhanced nociceptor activity and thermal sensitization. Intraplantar formalin known to elevate extracellular GLU, enhanced pain behaviors in the presence of LY. LY alone produced no pain behaviors, no change in nociceptor discharge rate or heat-evoked responses and no change in cytosolic Ca2+ in DRG cells, demonstrating a lack of tonic inhibitory control. Group II/III mGluRs maintain an activity-dependent autoinhibition, capable of significantly reducing TRPV1-induced activity. They are endogenously activated following high frequency and/or prolonged nociceptor stimulation, acting as built-in negative modulators of TRPV1 and nociceptor function, reducing pain transmission to the CNS. PMID:21900552

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor protects against abdominal aortic aneurysm in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Fukuda, Yamato; Takayanagi, Takehiko; Taro, Yoshinori; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Elliott, Katherine J; Choi, Eric; Daugherty, Alan; Rizzo, Victor; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been implicated in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), Ang II activates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediating growth promotion. We hypothesized that inhibition of EGFR prevents Ang II-dependent AAA. C57BL/6 mice were co-treated with Ang II and β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) to induce AAA with or without treatment with EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib. Without erlotinib, 64.3% of mice were dead due to aortic rupture. All surviving mice had AAA associated with EGFR activation. Erlotinib-treated mice did not die and developed far fewer AAA. The maximum diameters of abdominal aortas were significantly shorter with erlotinib treatment. In contrast, both erlotinib-treated and non-treated mice developed hypertension. The erlotinib treatment of abdominal aorta was associated with lack of EGFR activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, interleukin-6 induction and matrix deposition. EGFR activation in AAA was also observed in humans. In conclusion, EGFR inhibition appears to protect mice from AAA formation induced by Ang II plus BAPN. The mechanism seems to involve suppression of vascular EGFR and ER stress.

  18. Expression of transforming growth factor alpha, epidermal growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor in precursor lesions to gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Filipe, M. I.; Osborn, M.; Linehan, J.; Sanidas, E.; Brito, M. J.; Jankowski, J.

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), its related peptide transforming growth factor (TGF-alpha) and their common receptor (EGFR) have been implicated in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation in the gastrointestinal epithelium and may play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. We compared the immunohistochemical expression and topographic distribution of these peptides using Western blot analysis in gastric carcinoma precursor lesions and in non-cancer tissue. We observed: (i) increased and extended expression of TGF-alpha in normal mucosa and hyperplasia in carcinoma fields compared with non-cancer controls; (ii) increased expression of EGFR in intestinal metaplasia (IM) from carcinoma fields compared with controls; (iii) EGF expression was not detected in normal mucosa and only weakly in IM; (iv) coexpression of TGF-alpha/EGFR and EGF/EGFR was higher in intestinal metaplasia in carcinoma fields than in non-cancer controls. We conclude that altered expression of TGF-alpha/EGFR is associated with morphological changes during gastric carcinogenesis. In this regard increased expression of TGF-alpha is a very early event which is subsequently followed by up-regulation of EGFR and this has important biological and clinical implications. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7819044

  19. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor and genetically engineered PAF receptor mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Shimizu, T

    2000-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a biologically active phospholipid mediator. Although PAF was initially recognized for its potential to induce platelet aggregation and secretion, intense investigations have elucidated potent biological actions of PAF in a broad range of cell types and tissues, many of which also produce the molecule. PAF acts by binding to a unique G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. PAF receptor is linked to intracellular signal transduction pathways, including turnover of phosphatidylinositol, elevation in intracellular calcium concentration, and activation of kinases, resulting in versatile bioactions. On the basis of numerous pharmacological reports, PAF is thought to have many pathophysiological and physiological functions. Recently advanced molecular technics enable us not only to clone PAF receptor cDNAs and genes, but also generate PAF receptor mutant animals, i.e., PAF receptor-overexpressing mouse and PAF receptor-deficient mouse. These mutant mice gave us a novel and specific approach for identifying the pathophysiological and physiological functions of PAF. This review also describes the phenotypes of these mutant mice and discusses them by referring to previously reported pharmacological and genetical data.

  20. Assignment of transforming growth factor beta1 and beta3 and a third new ligand to the type I receptor ALK-1.

    PubMed

    Lux, A; Attisano, L; Marchuk, D A

    1999-04-09

    Germ line mutations in one of two distinct genes, endoglin or ALK-1, cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), an autosomal dominant disorder of localized angiodysplasia. Both genes encode endothelial cell receptors for the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) ligand superfamily. Endoglin has homology to the type III receptor, betaglycan, although its exact role in TGF-beta signaling is unclear. Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK-1) has homology to the type I receptor family, but its ligand and corresponding type II receptor are unknown. In order to identify the ligand and type II receptor for ALK-1 and to investigate the role of endoglin in ALK-1 signaling, we devised a chimeric receptor signaling assay by exchanging the kinase domain of ALK-1 with either the TGF-beta type I receptor or the activin type IB receptor, both of which can activate an inducible PAI-1 promoter. We show that TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta3, as well as a third unknown ligand present in serum, can activate chimeric ALK-1. HHT-associated missense mutations in the ALK-1 extracellular domain abrogate signaling. The ALK-1/ligand interaction is mediated by the type II TGF-beta receptor for TGF-beta and most likely through the activin type II or type IIB receptors for the serum ligand. Endoglin is a bifunctional receptor partner since it can bind to ALK-1 as well as to type I TGF-beta receptor. These data suggest that HHT pathogenesis involves disruption of a complex network of positive and negative angiogenic factors, involving TGF-beta, a new unknown ligand, and their corresponding receptors.

  1. Identification of the epidermal growth factor receptor as the receptor for Salmonella Rck-dependent invasion.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Agnès; Mijouin, Lily; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Barilleau, Emilie; Canepa, Sylvie; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana Paula; Le Vern, Yves; Rosselin, Manon; Reiter, Eric; Velge, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    The Salmonella Rck outer membrane protein binds to the cell surface, which leads to bacterial internalization via a Zipper mechanism. This invasion process requires induction of cellular signals, including phosphorylation of tyrosine proteins, and activation of c-Src and PI3K, which arises as a result of an interaction with a host cell surface receptor. In this study, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was identified as the cell signaling receptor required for Rck-mediated adhesion and internalization. First, Rck-mediated adhesion and internalization were shown to be altered when EGFR expression and activity were modulated. Then, immunoprecipitations were performed to demonstrate the Rck-EGFR interaction. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance biosensor and homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technologies were used to demonstrate the direct interaction of Rck with the extracellular domain of human EGFR. Finally, our study strongly suggests a noncompetitive binding of Rck and EGF to EGFR. Overall, these results demonstrate that Rck is able to bind to EGFR and thereby establish a tight adherence to provide a signaling cascade, which leads to internalization of Rck-expressing bacteria.-Wiedemann, A., Mijouin, L., Ayoub, M. A., Barilleau, E., Canepa, S., Teixeira-Gomes, A. P., Le Vern, Y., Rosselin, M., Reiter, E., Velge, P. Identification of the epidermal growth factor receptor as the receptor for Salmonella Rck-dependent invasion.

  2. Novel prostaglandin receptor modulators--part II: EP receptor modulators; a patent review (2002 - 2012).

    PubMed

    Flesch, Daniel; Merk, Daniel; Lamers, Christina; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred

    2013-02-01

    Prostaglandins and their G-protein-coupled receptors play numerous physiological and pathophysiological roles, especially in inflammation and its resolution. The variety of effects mediated by prostanoids makes prostanoid receptors valuable drug targets and the research on prostaglandin receptor modulators is intensive. The physiological and pathophysiological effects of prostaglandin E(2) are especially complex and numerous. The four subtypes of EP receptor have gained a lot of industrial and academic interest, in particular EP(2) and EP(4) for various indications. Evaluation of the patent activity over the last decade (2002 - 2012) illustrates several potent compounds targeting the distinct prostaglandin E(2) receptors. Many novel methods for the use of EP receptor modulators have been developed, in addition to the classical indications for agents modulating the arachidonic acid cascade such as pain and inflammation. Several EP targeting agents with good potency and selectivity have been developed but their pharmacological use and utility has not yet been satisfactorily investigated. More research is necessary, and clinical use of these agents might therefore take some more time.

  3. Periluminal expression of a secreted transforming growth factor-β type II receptor inhibits in-stent neointima formation following adenovirus-mediated stent-based intracoronary gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Clare E; Ranjzad, Parisa; Williams, Paul D; Kakar, Salik J; Driessen, Anita; Tijsma, Edze; Fernandes, Brian; Heagerty, Anthony M; Kingston, Paul A

    2014-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) has been shown unequivocally to enhance neointima formation in carotid and ileo-femoral arteries. In our previous studies, however, TGF-β1 expression in coronary arteries actually reduced neointima formation without affecting luminal loss postangioplasty, while expression of a TGF-β1 antagonist (RIIs) in balloon-injured coronary arteries reduced luminal loss without affecting neointima formation. These observed effects may be a consequence of the mode of coronary artery gene transfer employed, but they may also represent differences in the modes of healing of coronary, carotid, and ileo-femoral arteries after endoluminal injury. To help clarify whether a gene therapy strategy to antagonize TGF-β might have application within the coronary vasculature, we have investigated the effect of high-level periluminal expression of RIIs using stent-based adenovirus-mediated intracoronary gene transfer. Porcine coronary arteries were randomized to receive a custom-made CoverStent preloaded with saline only, or with 1×10(9) infectious units of adenovirus expressing RIIs or β-galactosidase (lacZ). Vessels were analyzed 28 days poststenting, at which time angiographic in-stent diameter was significantly greater in RIIs-treated arteries, and in-stent luminal loss significantly reduced. Computerized morphometric minimum in-stent lumen area was ~300% greater in RIIs-exposed vessels than in lacZ or saline-only groups. This was because of significantly reduced neointima formation in the RIIs group. RIIs had no demonstrable effect on cellular proliferation or apoptosis, but greater normalized neointimal/medial collagen content was observed in RIIs-exposed arteries. These data highlight the qualitatively similar effect of TGF-β antagonism on neointima formation in injured coronary and noncoronary arteries, and suggest that since cellular proliferation is unaffected, TGF-β1 antagonism might prevent in-stent restenosis without the delayed

  4. Clathrin-dependent internalization of the angiotensin II AT₁A receptor links receptor internalization to COX-2 protein expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Walker, Linda P; Velez, Juan Carlos Q; Ullian, Michael E

    2015-02-05

    The major effects of Angiotensin II (AngII) in vascular tissue are mediated by AngII AT1A receptor activation. Certain effects initiated by AT1A receptor activation require receptor internalization. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC), AngII stimulates cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. We have previously shown this is mediated by β-arrestin-dependent receptor internalization and NF-κB activation. In this study, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), pitstop-2, was used to test the hypothesis that clathrin-dependent internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates NF-κB activation and subsequent cyclooxygenase 2 expression. Radioligand binding assays, real time qt-PCR and immunoblotting were used to document the effects of pitstop-2 on AngII binding and signaling in RASMC. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to image pitstop-2׳s effects on AT1 receptor/GFP internalization in HEK-293 cells and p65 NF-κB nuclear localization in RASMC. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited internalization of AT1A receptor (44.7% ± 3.1% Control vs. 13.2% ± 8.3% Pitstop-2; n=3) as determined by radioligand binding studies in RASMC. Studies utilizing AT1A receptor/GFP expressed in HEK 293 cells and LSCM confirmed these findings. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited AngII-induced p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear localization, COX-2 message and protein expression in RASMC without altering activation of p42/44 ERK or TNFα signaling. Pitstop-2, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, confirms that internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates AngII activation of cyclooxygenase 2 expression in RASMC. These data provide support for additional intracellular signaling pathways activated through β-arrestin mediated internalization of G protein-coupled receptors, such as AT1A receptors.

  5. Transcobalamin II Receptor Polymorphisms Are Associated with Increased Risk for Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Pangilinan, Faith; Mitchell, Adam; VanderMeer, Julie; Molloy, Anne M.; Troendle, James; Conley, Mary; Kirke, Peadar N.; Sutton, Marie; Sequeira, Jeffrey M.; Quadros, Edward V.; Scott, John M.; Mills, James L.; Brody, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Women who have low cobalamin (vitamin B12) levels are at increased risk for having children with neural tube defects (NTDs). The transcobalamin II receptor (TCblR) mediates uptake of cobalamin into cells. We evaluated inherited variants in the TCblR gene as NTD risk factors. Methods: Case-control and family-based tests of association were used to screen common variation in TCblR as genetic risk factors for NTDs in a large Irish group. A confirmatory group of NTD triads was used to test positive findings. Results: We found two tightly linked variants associated with NTDs in a recessive model: TCblR rs2336573 (G220R) (pcorr=0.0080, corrected for multiple hypothesis testing) and TCblR rs9426 (pcorr =0. 0279). These variants were also associated with NTDs in a family-based test prior to multiple test correction (log-linear analysis of a recessive model: rs2336573 (G220R) (RR=6.59, p=0.0037) and rs9426 (RR=6.71, p=0.0035)). We describe a copy number variant (CNV) distal to TCblR and two previously unreported exonic insertion-deletion polymorphisms. Conclusions: TCblR rs2336573 (G220R) and TCblR rs9426 represent a significant risk factor in NTD cases in the Irish population. The homozygous risk genotype was not detected in nearly one thousand controls, indicating this NTD risk factor may be of low frequency and high penetrance. Nine other variants are in perfect LD with the associated SNPs. Additional work is required to identify the disease-causing variant. Our data suggest that variation in TCblR plays a role in NTD risk and that these variants may modulate cobalamin metabolism. PMID:20577008

  6. Evidence to Consider Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers for the Treatment of Early Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Juan M

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent type of dementia and diagnosed late in the progression of the illness when irreversible brain tissue loss has already occurred. For this reason, treatments have been ineffective. It is imperative to find novel therapies ameliorating modifiable risk factors (hypertension, stroke, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and traumatic brain injury) and effective against early pathogenic mechanisms including alterations in cerebral blood flow leading to poor oxygenation and decreased access to nutrients, impaired glucose metabolism, chronic inflammation, and glutamate excitotoxicity. Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) fulfill these requirements. ARBs are directly neuroprotective against early injury factors in neuronal, astrocyte, microglia, and cerebrovascular endothelial cell cultures. ARBs protect cerebral blood flow and reduce injury to the blood brain barrier and neurological and cognitive loss in animal models of brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and Alzheimer's disease. These compounds are clinically effective against major risk factors for Alzheimer's disease: hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, and ameliorate age-dependent cognitive loss. Controlled studies on hypertensive patients, open trials, case reports, and database meta-analysis indicate significant therapeutic effects of ARBs in Alzheimer's disease. ARBs are safe compounds, widely used to treat cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in humans, and although they reduce hypertension, they do not affect blood pressure in normotensive individuals. Overall, there is sufficient evidence to consider long-term controlled clinical studies with ARBs in patients suffering from established risk factors, in patients with early cognitive loss, or in normal individuals when reliable biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease risk are identified.

  7. Intracrine prostaglandin E(2) signalling regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression through retinoic acid receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Jiménez, María I Arenas; Manzano, Victoria Moreno; Lucio-Cazaña, Francisco J

    2012-12-01

    We have previously found in human renal proximal tubular HK-2 cells that hypoxia- and all-trans retinoic acid-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation is accompanied by retinoic acid receptor-β up-regulation. Here we first investigated whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression is dependent on retinoic acid receptor-β and our results confirmed it since (i) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents hypoxia, hypoxia-mimetic agent desferrioxamine, all-trans retinoic acid and interleukin-1β increased retinoic acid receptor-β expression, (ii) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation was prevented by retinoic acid receptor-β antagonist LE-135 or siRNA retinoic acid receptor-β and (iii) there was direct binding of retinoic acid receptor-β to the retinoic acid response element in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α promoter upon treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2). Since intracellular prostaglandin E(2) mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation in normoxia in HK-2 cells, we next investigated and confirmed, its role in the up-regulation of retinoic acid receptor-β in normoxia by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents all-trans retinoic acid, interleukin-1β and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2) by inhibiting cyclooxygenases, prostaglandin influx transporter or EP receptors. Interestingly, the hypoxia-induced increase in retinoic acid receptor-β expression and accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was also blocked by the inhibitors tested. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that retinoic acid receptor-β signalling is involved in the control of the expression of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in both normoxia and hypoxia and that retinoic acid receptor-β expression is found to be strictly regulated by intracellular prostaglandin E(2). Given the relevance of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in the kidney in terms of tumorigenesis, progressive renal failure, production

  8. Anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic role of BMP receptor II in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simic, Tatjana

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of: Kim CW, Song H, Kumar S et al. Anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic role of BMP receptor II in endothelial cells. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 33, 1350-1359 (2013). Increased expression of BMPs in atherosclerosis suggested that the knockdown of the receptor mediating BMP action would prevent endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. Based on this hypothesis, Kim et al. performed a series of experiments in which the effect of BMP receptor type II (BMPRII) knockout was tested in in vitro and in vivo models of atherogenesis. Unexpectedly, they found that the loss of BMPRII induces endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of BMPRII in endothelial cells induced monocyte adhesion through the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. The loss of BMPRII induced endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice. Besides, BMPRII expression was gradually lost over the course of atherosclerosis progression in human coronary arteries.

  9. Vandetanib (ZD6474), a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Alessandro; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Falasconi, Fabiano; De Feo, Gianfranco; Del Giudice, Antonia; Bryce, Jane; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Normanno, Nicola; Perrone, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Vandetanib is a novel, orally available inhibitor of different intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor growth, progression, and angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and REarranged during Transfection tyrosine kinase activity. Phase I clinical trials have shown that vandetanib is well tolerated as a single agent at daily doses < or =300 mg. In the phase II setting, negative results were observed with vandetanib in small cell lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and multiple myeloma. In contrast, three randomized phase II studies showed that vandetanib prolonged the progression-free survival (PFS) time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a single agent when compared with gefitinib or when added to chemotherapy. Rash, diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, and asymptomatic QTc prolongation were the most common adverse events. Antitumor activity was also observed in medullary thyroid cancer. Four randomized phase III clinical trials in NSCLC are exploring the efficacy of vandetanib in combination with docetaxel, the Zactima in cOmbination with Docetaxel In non-small cell lung Cancer (ZODIAC) trial, or with pemetrexed, the Zactima Efficacy with Alimta in Lung cancer (ZEAL) trial, or as a single agent, the Zactima Efficacy when Studied versus Tarceva (ZEST) and the Zactima Efficacy trial for NSCLC Patients with History of EGFR-TKI chemo-Resistance (ZEPHYR) trials. Based on a press release by the sponsor of these trials, the PFS time was longer with vandetanib in the ZODIAC and ZEAL trials; the ZEST trial was negative for its primary superiority analysis, but was successful according to a preplanned noninferiority analysis of PFS. Ongoing phase II and III clinical trials will better define the appropriate schedule, the optimal setting of evaluation, and the safety of long-term use of vandetanib.

  10. Cubilin, the endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12) complex, mediates high-density lipoprotein holoparticle endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hammad, S M; Stefansson, S; Twal, W O; Drake, C J; Fleming, P; Remaley, A; Brewer, H B; Argraves, W S

    1999-08-31

    Receptors that endocytose high-density lipoproteins (HDL) have been elusive. Here yolk-sac endoderm-like cells were used to identify an endocytic receptor for HDL. The receptor was isolated by HDL affinity chromatography and identified as cubilin, the recently described endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12). Cubilin antibodies inhibit HDL endocytosis by the endoderm-like cells and in mouse embryo yolk-sac endoderm, a prominent site of cubilin expression. Cubilin-mediated HDL endocytosis is inhibitable by HDL(2), HDL(3), apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, apoA-II, apoE, and RAP, but not by low-density lipoprotein (LDL), oxidized LDL, VLDL, apoC-I, apoC-III, or heparin. These findings, coupled with the fact that cubilin is expressed in kidney proximal tubules, suggest a role for this receptor in embryonic acquisition of maternal HDL and renal catabolism of filterable forms of HDL.

  11. Cubilin, the endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex, mediates high-density lipoprotein holoparticle endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Samar M.; Stefansson, Steingrimur; Twal, Waleed O.; Drake, Christopher J.; Fleming, Paul; Remaley, Alan; Brewer, H. Bryan; Argraves, W. Scott

    1999-01-01

    Receptors that endocytose high-density lipoproteins (HDL) have been elusive. Here yolk-sac endoderm-like cells were used to identify an endocytic receptor for HDL. The receptor was isolated by HDL affinity chromatography and identified as cubilin, the recently described endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor-vitamin B12. Cubilin antibodies inhibit HDL endocytosis by the endoderm-like cells and in mouse embryo yolk-sac endoderm, a prominent site of cubilin expression. Cubilin-mediated HDL endocytosis is inhibitable by HDL2, HDL3, apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, apoA-II, apoE, and RAP, but not by low-density lipoprotein (LDL), oxidized LDL, VLDL, apoC-I, apoC-III, or heparin. These findings, coupled with the fact that cubilin is expressed in kidney proximal tubules, suggest a role for this receptor in embryonic acquisition of maternal HDL and renal catabolism of filterable forms of HDL. PMID:10468579

  12. Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

  13. Receptor for detection of a Type II sex pheromone in the winter moth Operophtera brumata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Hong-Lei; Schultze, Anna; Froß, Heidrun; Francke, Wittko; Krieger, Jürgen; Löfstedt, Christer

    2016-01-05

    How signal diversity evolves under stabilizing selection in a pheromone-based mate recognition system is a conundrum. Female moths produce two major types of sex pheromones, i.e., long-chain acetates, alcohols and aldehydes (Type I) and polyenic hydrocarbons and epoxides (Type II), along different biosynthetic pathways. Little is known on how male pheromone receptor (PR) genes evolved to perceive the different pheromones. We report the identification of the first PR tuned to Type II pheromones, namely ObruOR1 from the winter moth, Operophtera brumata (Geometridae). ObruOR1 clusters together with previously ligand-unknown orthologues in the PR subfamily for the ancestral Type I pheromones, suggesting that O. brumata did not evolve a new type of PR to match the novel Type II signal but recruited receptors within an existing PR subfamily. AsegOR3, the ObruOR1 orthologue previously cloned from the noctuid Agrotis segetum that has Type I acetate pheromone components, responded significantly to another Type II hydrocarbon, suggesting that a common ancestor with Type I pheromones had receptors for both types of pheromones, a preadaptation for detection of Type II sex pheromone.

  14. Receptor for detection of a Type II sex pheromone in the winter moth Operophtera brumata

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Hong-Lei; Schultze, Anna; Froß, Heidrun; Francke, Wittko; Krieger, Jürgen; Löfstedt, Christer

    2016-01-01

    How signal diversity evolves under stabilizing selection in a pheromone-based mate recognition system is a conundrum. Female moths produce two major types of sex pheromones, i.e., long-chain acetates, alcohols and aldehydes (Type I) and polyenic hydrocarbons and epoxides (Type II), along different biosynthetic pathways. Little is known on how male pheromone receptor (PR) genes evolved to perceive the different pheromones. We report the identification of the first PR tuned to Type II pheromones, namely ObruOR1 from the winter moth, Operophtera brumata (Geometridae). ObruOR1 clusters together with previously ligand-unknown orthologues in the PR subfamily for the ancestral Type I pheromones, suggesting that O. brumata did not evolve a new type of PR to match the novel Type II signal but recruited receptors within an existing PR subfamily. AsegOR3, the ObruOR1 orthologue previously cloned from the noctuid Agrotis segetum that has Type I acetate pheromone components, responded significantly to another Type II hydrocarbon, suggesting that a common ancestor with Type I pheromones had receptors for both types of pheromones, a preadaptation for detection of Type II sex pheromone. PMID:26729427

  15. Potential effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade in adipose tissue and bone.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dysregulation of adipocytokine functions seen in abdominal obesity may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Angiotensinogen, the precursor of angiotensin (Ang) II, is produced primarily in the liver, and also in adipose tissue, where it is up-regulated during the development of obesity and involved in blood pressure regulation and adipose tissue growth. Blockade of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) attenuates weight gain and adiposity by enhanced energy expenditure, and the favorable metabolic effects of telmisartan have been related to its Ang II receptor blockade and action as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. PPARγ plays an important role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ligands for PPARγ can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce triglyceride levels. Similarly, bone metabolism is closely regulated by hormones and cytokines, which have effects on both bone resorption and deposition. It is known that the receptors of Ang II are expressed in culture osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and Ang II is postulated to be able to act upon the cells involved in bone metabolism. In in vitro system, Ang II induced the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts responsible for bone resorption. Importantly, it was demonstrated by the sub-analysis of a recent clinical study that the fracture risk was significantly reduced by the usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. To treat the subgroups of hypertensive patients with osteoporosis RAS can be considered a novel target.

  16. Computational evaluation of unsaturated carbonitriles as neutral receptor model for beryllium(II) recognition.

    PubMed

    Rosli, Ahmad Nazmi; Ahmad, Mohd Rais; Alias, Yatimah; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Woi, Pei Meng

    2014-12-01

    Design of neutral receptor molecules (ionophores) for beryllium(II) using unsaturated carbonitrile models has been carried out via density functional theory, G3, and G4 calculations. The first part of this work focuses on gas phase binding energies between beryllium(II) and 2-cyano butadiene (2-CN BD), 3-cyano propene (3-CN P), and simpler models with two separate fragments; acrylonitrile and ethylene. Interactions between beryllium(II) and cyano nitrogen and terminal olefin in the models have been examined in terms of geometrical changes, distribution of charge over the entire π-system, and rehybridization of vinyl carbon orbitals. NMR shieldings and vibrational frequencies probed charge centers and strength of interactions. The six-membered cyclic complexes have planar structures with the rehybridized carbon slightly out of plane (16° in 2-CN BD). G3 results show that in 2-CN BD complex participation of vinyl carbon further stabilizes the cyclic adduct by 16.3 kcal mol(-1), whereas, in simpler models, interaction between beryllium(II) and acetonitrile is favorable by 46.4 kcal mol(-1) compared with that of ethylene. The terminal vinyl carbon in 2-CN BD rehybridizes to sp (3) with an increase of 7 % of s character to allow interaction with beryllium(II). G4 calculations show that the Be(II) and 2-CN BD complex is more strongly bound than those with Mg(II) and Ca(II) by 98.5 and 139.2 kcal mol(-1) (-1), respectively. QST2 method shows that the cyclic and acyclic forms of Be(II)-2-CN BD complexes are separated by 12.3 kcal mol(-1) barrier height. Overlap population analysis reveals that Ca(II) can be discriminated based on its tendency to form ionic interaction with the receptor models.

  17. Chemical modification of Class II G-protein coupled receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Chapter, Megan C.; White, Caitlin M.; De Ridder, Angela; Chadwick, Wayne; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Recent research and clinical data have begun to demonstrate the huge potential therapeutic importance of ligands that modulate the activity of the secretin-like, Class II, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Ligands that can modulate the activity of these Class II GPCRs may have important clinical roles in the treatment of a wide variety of conditions such as osteoporosis, diabetes, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and autism spectrum disorders. While these receptors present important new therapeutic targets, the large glycoprotein nature of their cognate ligands poses many problems with respect to therapeutic peptidergic drug design. These native peptides often exhibit poor bioavailability, metabolic instability, poor receptor selectivity and resultant low potencies in vivo. Recently, increased attention has been paid to the structural modification of these peptides to enhance their therapeutic efficacy. Successful modification strategies have included D-amino acid substitutions, selective truncation, and fatty acid acylation of the peptide. Through these and other processes, these novel peptide ligand analogs can demonstrate enhanced receptor subtype selectivity, directed signal transduction pathway activation, resistance to proteolytic degradation, and improved systemic bioavailability. In the future, it is likely, through additional modification strategies such as addition of circulation-stabilizing transferrin moieties, that the therapeutic pharmacopeia of drugs targeted towards Class II secretin-like receptors may rival that of the Class I rhodopsin-like receptors that currently provide the majority of clinically used GPCR-based therapeutics. Currently, Class II-based drugs include synthesized analogues of vasoactive intestinal peptide for type 2 diabetes or parathyroid hormone for osteoporosis. PMID:19686775

  18. A heteromeric transcription factor required for mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, S; Tanaka, Y; Kawaguchi, T; Nagaoka, T; Weissman, S M; Yasukochi, Y

    1990-01-01

    A general transcription factor, FC, essential for specific initiation of in vitro transcription by mammalian RNA polymerase II was identified and a procedure developed to purify it to near homogeneity from HeLa cell nuclei. Purified FC is composed of two polypeptides of apparent molecular masses 80 kDa and 30 kDa, on SDS-PAGE, and has a native size of 280 kDa estimated by gel filtration column. Both polypeptides were shown to be essential for reconstituting in vitro transcription activity. Biochemical analysis showed that the 80 kDa and 30 kDa components were present in a 1:1 molar ratio. FC was also demonstrated to interact directly or indirectly with purified RNA polymerase II. Similarities between FC and transcription factors reported by others from human, rat or Drosophila cells are discussed. Images PMID:2395645

  19. Adenosine-A1 Receptor Agonist Induced Hyperalgesic Priming Type II

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of the transition to chronic pain that we have termed Type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to Type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, Type II hyperalgesic priming differs from Type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced Type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced Type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the Type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. PMID:26588695

  20. Adenosine-A1 receptor agonist induced hyperalgesic priming type II.

    PubMed

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2016-03-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala, N-Me-Phe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of transition to chronic pain that we have termed type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, type II hyperalgesic priming differs from type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that, as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study, we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms, as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor.

  1. Sequence analysis of bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II mRNA from ascitic and nonascitic commercial broilers.

    PubMed

    Cisar, C R; Balog, J M; Anthony, N B; Donoghue, A M

    2003-10-01

    Ascites syndrome, also known as pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), is a common metabolic disorder in rapidly growing meat-type chickens. Environmental factors, such as cold, altitude, and diet, play significant roles in development of the disease, but there is also an important genetic component to PHS susceptibility. The human disease familial primary pulmonary hypertension (FPPH) is similar to PHS in broilers both genetically and physiologically. Several recent studies have shown that mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPR2) gene are a cause of FPPH in humans. To determine whether mutations in the chicken BMPR2 gene play a similar role in PHS susceptibility, BMPR-II mRNA from ascitic and nonascitic commercial broilers were sequenced and compared with the published Leghorn chicken BMPR-II mRNA sequence. Fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified in the commercial broiler BMPR-II mRNA. No mutations unique to ascites-susceptible broilers were present in the coding, 5' untranslated or 3' untranslated regions of BMPR-II mRNA. The twelve SNP present within the coding region of BMPR-II mRNA were synonymous substitutions and did not alter the BMPR-II protein sequence. In addition, analysis of BMPR2 gene expression by reverse transcriptase-PCR indicated that there were no differences in BMPR-II mRNA levels in ascitic and nonascitic birds. Therefore, it appears unlikely that mutations in the BMPR2 gene were responsible for susceptibility to PHS in these commercial broilers.

  2. Angiotensin II modulates tyr-phosphorylation of IRS-4, an insulin receptor substrate, in rat liver membranes.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Rodrigo S; Alvarez, Sergio E; Ayub, Maximiliano Juri; Ciuffo, Gladys M

    2006-12-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), a major regulator of blood pressure, is also involved in the control of cellular proliferation and hypertrophy and might exhibit additional actions in vivo by modulating the signaling of other hormones. As hypertension and Insulin (Ins) resistance often coexist and are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, Ang II and Insulin signaling cross-talk may have an important role in hypertension development. The effect of Ins on protein tyrosine phosphorylation was assayed in rat liver membrane preparations, a rich source of Ins receptors. Following stimulation, Ins (10(-7) M) induced tyr-phosphorylation of different proteins. Insulin consistently induced tyr-phosphorylation of a 160 kDa protein (pp160) with maximum effect between 1 and 3 min. The pp160 protein was identified by anti-IRS-4 but not by anti-IRS-1 antibody. Pre-stimulation with Ang II (10(-7) M) diminishes tyr-phosphorylation level of pp160/IRS-4 in a dose-dependent manner. Okadaic acid, the PP1A and PP2A Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitor, increases pp160 phosphorylation induced by Ins and prevents the inhibitory effect of Ang II pre-stimulation. Genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, diminishes tyr-phosphorylation level of IRS-4. PI3K inhibitors Wortmanin and LY294002, both increase tyr-phosphorylation of IRS-4, either in the presence of Ins alone or combined with Ang II. These results suggest that Ins and Ang II modulate IRS-4 tyr-phosphorylation in a PI3K-dependent manner. In summary, we showed that Ins induces tyr-phosphorylation of IRS-4, an effect modulated by Ang II. Assays performed in the presence of different inhibitors points toward a PI3K involvement in this signaling pathway.

  3. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M

    2007-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) are expressed in the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme of the developing kidney. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that exogenous fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) increase growth and maturation of the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. Deletion of fgf7, fgf10, and fgfr2IIIb (the receptor isoform that binds Fgf7 and Fgf10) in mice lead to smaller kidneys with fewer collecting ducts and nephrons. Overexpression of a dominant negative receptor isoform in transgenic mice has revealed more striking defects including renal aplasia or severe dysplasia. Moreover, deletion of many fgf ligands and receptors in mice results in early embryonic lethality, making it difficult to determine their roles in kidney development. Recently, conditional targeting approaches revealed that deletion of fgf8 from the metanephric mesenchyme interrupts nephron formation. Furthermore, deletion of fgfr2 from the ureteric bud resulted in both ureteric bud branching and stromal mesenchymal patterning defects. Deletion of both fgfr1 and fgfr2 in the metanephric mesenchyme resulted in renal aplasia, characterized by defects in metanephric mesenchyme formation and initial ureteric bud elongation and branching. Thus, Fgfr signaling is critical for growth and patterning of all renal lineages at early and later stages of kidney development.

  4. Brefeldin A-Inhibited Guanine Nucleotide-Exchange Factor 1 (BIG1) Governs the Recruitment of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) to Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) Signaling Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takuya; Tsuchida, Mei; Kogue, Yosuke; Spadini, Christian; Hirata, Yusuke; Matsuzawa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a critical mediator of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) signaling. However, the regulatory mechanisms of TRAF2 are not fully understood. Here we show evidence that TRAF2 requires brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factor 1 (BIG1) to be recruited into TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling complexes. In BIG1 knockdown cells, TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was attenuated and the sensitivity to TNF-α-induced apoptosis was increased. Since these trends correlated well with those of TRAF2 deficient cells as previously demonstrated, we tested whether BIG1 functions as an upstream regulator of TRAF2 in TNFR1 signaling. As expected, we found that knockdown of BIG1 suppressed TNF-α-dependent ubiquitination of TRAF2 that is required for JNK activation, and impaired the recruitment of TRAF2 to the TNFR1 signaling complex (complex I). Moreover, we found that the recruitment of TRAF2 to the death-inducing signaling complex termed complex II was also impaired in BIG1 knockdown cells. These results suggest that BIG1 is a key component of the machinery that drives TRAF2 to the signaling complexes formed after TNFR1 activation. Thus, our data demonstrate a novel and unexpected function of BIG1 that regulates TNFR1 signaling by targeting TRAF2. PMID:27834853

  5. Central mineralocorticoid receptors and the role of angiotensin II and glutamate in the paraventricular nucleus of rats with angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Alexander; Leenen, Frans H H

    2013-05-01

    A chronic increase in circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) activates an aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor-ouabain neuromodulatory pathway in the brain that increases neuronal activation in hypothalamic nuclei, such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and causes progressive hypertension. Several models of chronic sympathetic hyperactivity are associated with an increase in AT1 and glutamate receptor activation in the PVN. The current study evaluated whether increased angiotensin type 1 (AT1) and glutamate receptor-dependent signaling in the PVN contributes to the maintenance of blood pressure (BP) in Ang II-hypertensive Wistar rats, and the role of aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor pathway in this enhanced signaling. After subcutaneous infusion of Ang II for 2 weeks, in conscious rats BP and heart rate were recorded after (1) 10-minute bilateral infusions of candesartan and kynurenate in the PVN; (2) 1 hour intracerebroventricular infusion of eplerenone, and (3) candesartan and kynurenate after eplerenone. Candesartan or kynurenate in the PVN fully reversed the increase in BP from circulating Ang II. Kynurenate after candesartan or candesartan after kynurenate did not further lower BP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of eplerenone at 16 hours after its infusion fully reversed the increase in BP from circulating Ang II. After eplerenone, candesartan and kynurenate in the PVN did not further decrease BP. These findings suggest that increased mineralocorticoid receptor activation in the brain activates a slow neuromodulatory pathway that maintains enhanced AT1 and glutamate receptor-dependent signaling in the PVN, and thereby the hypertension from a chronic increase in circulating Ang II.

  6. Antiangiogenic effect of angiotensin II type 2 receptor in ischemia-induced angiogenesis in mice hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Tamarat, Radia; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Icchiki, Toshihiro; Ebrahimian, Teni; Iglarz, Marc; Besnard, Sandrine; Duriez, Micheline; Inagami, Tadashi; Lévy, Bernard I

    2002-05-31

    This study examined the potential role of angiotensin type 2 (AT(2)) receptor on angiogenesis in a model of surgically induced hindlimb ischemia. Ischemia was produced by femoral artery ligature in both wild-type and AT(2) gene-deleted mice (Agtr2(-)/Y). After 28 days, angiogenesis was quantitated by microangiography, capillary density measurement, and laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), Bax, and Bcl-2 were determined by Western blot analysis in hindlimbs. The AT(2) mRNA level (assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR) was increased in the ischemic hindlimb of wild-type mice. Angiographic vessel density and laser Doppler perfusion data showed significant improvement in ischemic/nonischemic leg ratio, 1.9- and 1.7-fold, respectively, in Agtr2(-)/Y mice compared with controls. In ischemic leg of Agtr2(-)/Y mice, revascularization was associated with an increase in the antiapoptotic protein content, Bcl-2 (211% of basal), and a decrease (60% of basal) in the number of cell death, determined by TUNEL method. Angiotensin II treatment (0.3 mg/kg per day) raised angiogenic score, blood perfusion, and both VEGF and eNOS protein content in ischemic leg of wild-type control but did not modulate the enhanced angiogenic response observed in untreated Agtr2(-)/Y mice. Finally, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that VEGF was mainly localized to myocyte, whereas eNOS-positive staining was mainly observed in the capillary of ischemic leg of both wild-type and AT(2)-deficient mice. This study demonstrates for the first time that the AT(2) receptor subtype may negatively modulate ischemia-induced angiogenesis through an activation of the apoptotic process.

  7. Dietary sodium intake regulates angiotensin II type 1, mineralocorticoid receptor, and associated signaling proteins in heart.

    PubMed

    Ricchiuti, Vincent; Lapointe, Nathalie; Pojoga, Luminita; Yao, Tham; Tran, Loc; Williams, Gordon H; Adler, Gail K

    2011-10-01

    Liberal or high-sodium (HS) intake, in conjunction with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increases cardiovascular (CV) damage. We tested the hypothesis that sodium intake regulates the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)R), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and associated signaling pathways in heart tissue from healthy rodents. HS (1.6% Na(+)) and low-sodium (LS; 0.02% Na(+)) rat chow was fed to male healthy Wistar rats (n=7 animals per group). Protein levels were assessed by western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis. Fractionation studies showed that MR, AT(1)R, caveolin-3 (CAV-3), and CAV-1 were located in both cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. In healthy rats, consumption of an LS versus a HS diet led to decreased cardiac levels of AT(1)R and MR. Decreased sodium intake was also associated with decreased cardiac levels of CAV-1 and CAV-3, decreased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R-CAV-3 and MR-CAV-3 complexes, but increased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R/MR complexes. Furthermore, decreased sodium intake was associated with decreased cardiac extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated ERK (pERK), and pERK/ERK ratio; increased cardiac striatin; decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (peNOS), but increased peNOS/eNOS ratio; and decreased cardiac plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Dietary sodium restriction has beneficial effects on the cardiac expression of factors associated with CV injury. These changes may play a role in the cardioprotective effects of dietary sodium restriction.

  8. VOC Source - Receptor Relationships in Houston during TexAQS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchner, M.; Rappenglück, B.

    2009-04-01

    During the TexAQS-II field campaign in August and September 2006, C2 - C10 volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured continuously and online at the urban Moody Tower (MT) site. This data set was compared to corresponding VOC data sets obtained at six sites located in the highly industrialized Houston Ship Channel area (HSC). Receptor modeling was performed by positive matrix factorization (PMF) at all sites. Conditional probability functions were used to determine the origin of the polluted air masses in the Houston area. A subdivision into daytime and nighttime was carried out to discriminate photochemical influences. Eight main source categories of industrial, mobile, and biogenic emissions were identified at the urban receptor site, seven and six, respectively, at the different HSC sites. Amongst these categories, natural gas / crude oil, LPG, and vehicular exhaust contributed most to the total measured VOC mass, followed by fuel evaporation, aromatics, petrochemical sources from ethylene and propylene, and biogenic sources. Based on PMF analyses of different wind sectors, the total VOC mass was estimated to be twofold at MT with wind directions from HSC compared to air from a typical urban sector, for petrochemical compounds more than threefold. Despite the strong impact of air masses influenced by industrial sources at HSC, still a significant fraction of the total mass contributions at MT can be apportioned to other sources, mainly motor vehicles and aromatic solvents. The investigation of diurnal variation in combination with wind directional frequencies revealed the greatest HSC impact at the urban site during the morning, and the least during the evening.

  9. Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II type I receptor gene polymorphisms with extreme obesity in Polish individuals.

    PubMed

    Pacholczyk, Marta; Ferenc, Tomasz; Kowalski, Jan; Adamczyk, Przemysław; Chojnowski, Jacek; Ponikowska, Irena

    2013-08-01

    There is strong evidence for the presence of a functional renin-angiotensin system in human adipose tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of polymorphic variants of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE I/D) and angiotensin II type I receptor gene (AGTR1 A1166C) with extreme obesity and obesity-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to examine their combined effect on extremely obese patients. Overall, no significant associations were detected between ACE and AGTR1 gene polymorphisms and extreme obesity. However, extremely obese patients with T2DM showed an increased frequency of ACE II genotype compared with controls (p<0.05) and with non-diabetic extremely obese patients (p<0.01). The results suggest that II genotype of ACE was a significant contributor to extreme obesity in AA homozygotes of AGTR1 gene, regardless of the presence of T2DM. Moreover, the analysis of genetic polymorphisms demonstrated that ACE II and AGTR1 AC genotypes were most frequently observed in patients with extreme obesity and T2DM. On the basis of our results, we suggest that ACE II homozygosity may be a significant predictor of extreme obesity and T2DM and that the interaction between ACE and AGTR1 genes may be considered a predisposing factor for extreme obesity and extreme obesity-associated T2DM development.

  10. Oral administration of GW788388, an inhibitor of TGF-beta type I and II receptor kinases, decreases renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M; Thorikay, M; Deckers, M; van Dinther, M; Grygielko, E T; Gellibert, F; de Gouville, A C; Huet, S; ten Dijke, P; Laping, N J

    2008-03-01

    Progressive kidney fibrosis precedes end-stage renal failure in up to a third of patients with diabetes mellitus. Elevated intra-renal transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is thought to underlie disease progression by promoting deposition of extracellular matrix and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. GW788388 is a new TGF-beta type I receptor inhibitor with a much improved pharmacokinetic profile compared with SB431542. We studied its effect in vitro and found that it inhibited both the TGF-beta type I and type II receptor kinase activities, but not that of the related bone morphogenic protein type II receptor. Further, it blocked TGF-beta-induced Smad activation and target gene expression, while decreasing epithelial-mesenchymal transitions and fibrogenesis. Using db/db mice, which develop diabetic nephropathy, we found that GW788388 given orally for 5 weeks significantly reduced renal fibrosis and decreased the mRNA levels of key mediators of extracellular matrix deposition in kidneys. Our study shows that GW788388 is a potent and selective inhibitor of TGF-beta signalling in vitro and renal fibrosis in vivo.

  11. G protein-coupled receptor kinase and beta-arrestin-mediated desensitization of the angiotensin II type 1A receptor elucidated by diacylglycerol dynamics.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Dewire, Scott M; Barnes, William G; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2006-11-24

    Receptor desensitization progressively limits responsiveness of cells to chronically applied stimuli. Desensitization in the continuous presence of agonist has been difficult to study with available assay methods. Here, we used a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based live cell assay for the second messenger diacylglycerol to measure desensitization of a model seven-transmembrane receptor, the Gq-coupled angiotensin II type 1(A) receptor, expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In response to angiotensin II, we observed a transient diacylglycerol response reflecting activation and complete desensitization of the receptor within 2-5 min. By utilizing a variety of approaches including graded tetracycline-inducible receptor expression, mutated receptors, and overexpression or short interfering RNA-mediated silencing of putative components of the cellular desensitization machinery, we conclude that the rate and extent of receptor desensitization are critically determined by the following: receptor concentration in the plasma membrane; the presence of phosphorylation sites on the carboxyl terminus of the receptor; kinase activity of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, but not of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 3, 5, or 6; and stoichiometric expression of beta-arrestin. The findings introduce the use of the biosensor diacylglycerol reporter as a powerful means for studying Gq-coupled receptor desensitization and document that, at the levels of receptor overexpression commonly used in such studies, the properties of the desensitization process are markedly perturbed and do not reflect normal cellular physiology.

  12. Expression of the estrogen receptor α, progesterone receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor in papillary thyroid carcinoma tissues

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, DAN; QI, WENJING; ZHANG, PENGXIN; GUAN, HONGWEI; WANG, LIFEN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the protein expression, in addition to the clinical value of the expression, of estrogen receptor α (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The expression of ERα, PR and EGFR was examined immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 64 patients with PTC and 14 patients with nodular thyroid goiter (NTG). The expression level of ERα, PR and EGFR was found to be significantly elevated in the PTC tissues compared with the NTG tissues. In addition, the expression of ERα was found to be correlated with the size of PTC tumors. However, there was no significant difference between the expression levels of ERα, PR and EGFR in males and females with PTC. Thus, immunohistochemical evaluation of ERα, PR and EGFR expression in patients with PTC may aid in the prediction of the prognosis of patients with PTC. PMID:26171022

  13. Imbalance of angiotensin type 1 receptor and angiotensin II type 2 receptor in the rostral ventrolateral medulla: potential mechanism for sympathetic overactivity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lie; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Wang, Wei; Zucker, Irving H

    2008-10-01

    Upregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT(1)R) in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) contributes to the sympathoexcitation in the chronic heart failure (CHF). However, the role of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT(2)R) is not clear. In this study, we measured AT(1)R and AT(2)R protein expression in the RVLM and determined their effects on renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate in anesthetized sham and CHF rats. We found that (1) although AT(1)R expression in the RVLM was upregulated, the AT(2)R was significantly downregulated (CHF: 0.06+/-0.02 versus sham: 0.15+/-0.02, P<0.05); (2) simultaneously stimulating RVLM AT(1)R and AT(2)R by angiotensin II evoked sympathoexcitation, hypertension, and tachycardia in both sham and CHF rats with greater responses in CHF; (3) stimulating RVLM AT1R with angiotensin II plus the specific AT(2)R antagonist PD123319 induced a larger sympathoexcitatory response than simultaneously stimulating AT(1)R and AT(2)R in sham rats, but not in CHF; (4) activating RVLM AT(2)R with CGP42112 induced a sympathoinhibition, hypotension, and bradycardia only in sham rats (renal sympathetic nerve activity: 36.4+/-5.1% of baseline versus 102+/-3.9% of baseline in artificial cerebrospinal fluid, P<0.05); (5) pretreatment with 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, a general inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism, into the RVLM attenuates the CGP42112-induced sympathoinhibition. These results suggest that AT(2)R in the RVLM exhibits an inhibitory effect on sympathetic outflow, which is, at least partially, mediated by an arachidonic acid metabolic pathway. These data implicate a downregulation in the AT(2)R as a contributory factor in the sympathoexcitation in CHF.

  14. The effect of the angiotensin II receptor, type 1 receptor antagonists, losartan and telmisartan, on thioacetamide-induced liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Czechowska, G; Celinski, K; Korolczuk, A; Wojcicka, G; Dudka, J; Bojarska, A; Madro, A; Brzozowski, T

    2016-08-01

    It has been reported previously that the density of angiotensin II receptors is increased in the rat liver in experimentally-induced fibrosis. We hypothesized that pharmacological blockade of angiotensin receptors may produce beneficial effects in models of liver fibrosis. In this study, we used the widely used thioacetamide (TAA)-induced model of liver fibrosis (300 mg/L TAA ad libitum for 12 weeks). Rats received daily injections (i.p), lasting 4 weeks of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists, losartan 30 mg/kg (TAA + L) or telmisartan 10 mg/kg (TAA + T) and were compared to rat that received TAA alone. Chronic treatment with losartan and telmisartan was associated with a significant reduction in the activity of alkaline phosphatase, and decreased concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor beta-1 compared to controls. We also found a significant reduction interleukin-6 in rats receiving telmisartan (P < 0.05) but not losartan. Both treatments increased the concentration of liver glutathione along with a concomitant decrease of GSSG compared to controls. In addition, increased paraoxonase 1 activity was observed in the serum of rats receiving telmisartan group compared to the TAA alone controls. Finally, histological evaluation of liver sections revealed losartan and telmisartan treatment was associated with reduced inflammation and liver fibrosis. Taken together, these results indicate that both telmisartan and losartan have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties in the TAA model of liver fibrosis. These finding add support to a growing body of literature indicating a potentially important role for the angiotensin system in liver fibrosis and indicate angiotensin antagonists may be useful agents for fibrosis treatment.

  15. Indications for and utilization of angiotensin receptor II blockers in patients at high cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Farsang, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    The worldwide burden of cardiovascular disease is growing. In addition to lifestyle changes, pharmacologic agents that can modify cardiovascular disease processes have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Antihypertensive agents are widely used to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events partly beyond that of blood pressure-lowering. In particular, the angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), which antagonize the vasoconstrictive and proinflammatory/pro-proliferative effects of angiotensin II, have been shown to be cardio vascularly protective and well tolerated. Although the eight currently available ARBs are all indicated for the treatment of hypertension, they have partly different pharmacology, and their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties differ. ARB trials for reduction of cardiovascular risk can be broadly categorized into those in patients with/without hypertension and additional risk factors, in patients with evidence of cardiovascular disease, and in patients with severe cardiovascular disease, such as heart failure. These differences have led to their indications in different populations. For hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, losartan was approved to have an indication for stroke prevention, while for most patients at high-risk for cardiovascular events, telmisartan is an appropriate therapy because it has a cardiovascular preventive indication. Other ARBs are indicated for narrowly defined high-risk patients, such as those with hypertension or heart failure. Although in one analysis a possible link between ARBs and increased risks of cancer has surfaced, several meta-analyses, using the most comprehensive data available, have found no link between any ARB, or the class as a whole, and cancer. Most recently, the US Food and Drug Administration completed a review of the potential risk of cancer and concluded that treatment with an ARB medication does not increase the risk of developing cancer. This review

  16. Direct angiotensin II type 2 receptor stimulation in Nω-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester-induced hypertension: the effect on pulse wave velocity and aortic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Paulis, Ludovit; Becker, Sophie T R; Lucht, Kristin; Schwengel, Katja; Slavic, Svetlana; Kaschina, Elena; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Dahlöf, Björn; Baulmann, Johannes; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, U Muscha

    2012-02-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV), a direct marker of arterial stiffness, is an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Although the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade belongs to major antihypertensive and cardioprotective therapies, less is known about the effects of long-term stimulation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor. Previously, compound 21, a selective nonpeptide angiotensin II type 2 receptor agonist improved the outcome of myocardial infarction in rats along with anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated whether compound 21 alone or in combination with angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade by olmesartan medoxomil could prevent PWV increase and aortic remodeling in N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertension. Male adult Wistar rats (n=65) were randomly assigned to control, L-NAME, L-NAME+compound-21, L-NAME+olmesartan, and L-NAME+olmesartan+compound-21 groups and treated for 6 weeks. We observed that L-NAME hypertension was accompanied by enhanced PWV, increased wall thickness, and stiffness of the aorta, along with elevated hydroxyproline concentration. Olmesartan completely prevented hypertension, PWV and wall thickness increase, and the increase of aortic stiffness and partly prevented hydroxyproline accumulation. Compound 21 partly prevented all of these alterations, yet without concomitant prevention of blood pressure rise. Although the combination therapy with olmesartan and compound 21 led to blood pressure levels, PWV, and wall thickness comparable to olmesartan-alone-treated rats, only in the combination group was complete prevention of increased hydroxyproline deposition achieved, resulting in even more pronounced stiffness reduction. We conclude that chronic angiotensin II type 2 receptor stimulation prevented aortic stiffening and collagen accumulation without preventing hypertension in rats with inhibited NO synthase. These effects were additive to angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade, yet without additional

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor requirements for the induction of the endothelin-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Castañares, Cristina; Redondo-Horcajo, Mariano; Magan-Marchal, Noemi; Lamas, Santiago; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2006-06-01

    Expression of the endothelin (ET)-1 gene is subject to complex regulation by numerous factors, among which the cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is one of the most important. TGF-beta action is based on the activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad proteins activate transcription of the gene by cooperation with activator protein-1 (AP-1) at specific sites on the ET-1 promoter. Smad signaling pathway is initiated by binding of the cytokine to a heteromeric complex of type I and type II receptors. Signal is then propagated to the nucleus by specific members of the Smad family. Most cell types contain a type I receptor known as ALK5. However, endothelial cells are unique because they coexpress an additional type I receptor named ALK1. These forms do not constitute redundant receptors with the same function, but they actually activate different Smad-mediated expression programs that lead to specific endothelial phenotypes. TGF-beta/ALK5/Smad3 pathway is associated to a mature endothelium because it leads to inhibition of cell migration/proliferation. Conversely, TGF-beta/ALK1/Smad5 activates both processes and is more related to the angiogenic state. We have analyzed the TGF-beta receptor subtype requirements for the activation of the ET-1 gene. For that purpose, we have overexpressed type I receptor and Smad isoforms in endothelial cells and analyzed the effect on ET-1 expression. Our experiments indicate that TGF-beta induces ET-1 expression preferentially through the activation of the ALK5/Smad3 pathway and, therefore, the expression of the vaso-constrictor may be associated to a quiescent and mature endothelial phenotype.

  18. Expression of androgen receptor in breast cancer & its correlation with other steroid receptors & growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ashwani K.; Agrawal, Usha; Negi, Shivani; Bansal, Anju; Mohil, R.; Chintamani, Chintamani; Bhatnagar, Amar; Bhatnagar, Dinesh; Saxena, Sunita

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Breast cancer is the second most common malignancy in Indian women. Among the members of the steroid receptor superfamily the role of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR) is well established in breast cancer in predicting the prognosis and management of therapy, however, little is known about the clinical significance of androgen receptor (AR) in breast carcinogenesis. The present study was aimed to evaluate the expression of AR in breast cancer and to elucidate its clinical significance by correlating it with clinicopathological parameters, other steroid receptors (ER and PR) and growth factors receptors (EGFR and CD105). Methods: Expression of AR, ER, PR, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and endoglin (CD105) was studied in 100 cases of breast cancer by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Risk ratio (RR) along with 95% confidence interval (CI) was estimated to assess the strength of association between the markers and clinicopathological characteristics. Categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA) was applied to obtain new sets of linearly combined expression, for their further evaluation with clinicopathological characteristics (n=100). Results: In 31 cases presenting with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), the expression of AR, ER, PR, EGFR and CD105 was associated with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). The results indicated the association of AR+ (P=0.001) and AR+/EGFR- (P=0.001) with the therapeutic response to NACT in LABC patients. The AR expression exhibited maximum sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio of positive and negative test. The present results showed the benefit of adding AR, EGFR and CD105 to the existing panel of markers to be able to predict response to therapy. Interpretation & conclusions: More studies on the expression profiles of AR+, AR+/CD105+ and AR+/EGFR- in larger set of breast cancer patients may possibly help in confirming their predictive role for therapeutic response

  19. MicroRNA-150 controls differentiation of intraepithelial lymphocytes via TGF-β receptor II regulation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang-Hwan; Jang, Min Seong; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kim, Seok-Min; Oh, Se-Chan; Jung, Cho-Rok; Park, Yunji; Ha, Sang-Jun; Jung, Haiyoung; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Suk Ran; Choi, Inpyo; Kim, Tae-Don

    2017-08-07

    Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) in the intestines play pivotal roles in maintaining the integrity of the mucosa, regulating the immune cells, and protecting against pathogenic invasion. Although several extrinsic factors such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) have been identified to contribute to IEL generation, intrinsic regulatory factors have not been fully determined. Here, we investigated the regulation of IEL differentiation and the underlying mechanisms in mice. We analyzed IELs and the expression of molecules associated with IEL differentiation in wildtype control and microRNA-150-knockout mice. Methotrexate (MTX) was administered to mice lacking microRNA (miR)-150 and control mice. miR-150 deficiency reduced the IEL population in the small intestine and increased susceptibility to MTX-induced mucositis. Evaluation of expression of IEL differentiation-associated molecules showed that miR-150-deficient IELs exhibited decreased expression of TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII), CD103, CD8αα, and RUNX3 in all the IEL subpopulations. The reduced expression of TGF-βRII in miR-150-deficient IELs was caused by the increased expression of c-Myb/miR-20a. Restoration of miR-150 or inhibition of miR-20a recovered the TGF-βRII expression. miR-150 is an intrinsic regulator of IEL differentiation through TGF-βRII regulation. miR-150-mediated IEL generation is crucial for maintaining intestinal integrity against anticancer drug-induced mucositis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Antigen-B Cell Receptor Complexes Associate with Intracellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II Molecules*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Margarida; Tucker, Heidi; Drake, Lisa; Nichol, Kathleen; Drake, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen processing and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells and B cells allows the activation of naïve CD4+ T cells and cognate interactions between B cells and effector CD4+ T cells, respectively. B cells are unique among class II-restricted antigen-presenting cells in that they have a clonally restricted antigen-specific receptor, the B cell receptor (BCR), which allows the cell to recognize and respond to trace amounts of foreign antigen present in a sea of self-antigens. Moreover, engagement of peptide-class II complexes formed via BCR-mediated processing of cognate antigen has been shown to result in a unique pattern of B cell activation. Using a combined biochemical and imaging/FRET approach, we establish that internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular class II molecules. We demonstrate that the M1-paired MHC class II conformer, shown previously to be critical for CD4 T cell activation, is incorporated selectively into these complexes and loaded selectively with peptide derived from BCR-internalized cognate antigen. These results demonstrate that, in B cells, internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular MHC class II molecules, potentially defining a site of class II peptide acquisition, and reveal a selective role for the M1-paired class II conformer in the presentation of cognate antigen. These findings provide key insights into the molecular mechanisms used by B cells to control the source of peptides charged onto class II molecules, allowing the immune system to mount an antibody response focused on BCR-reactive cognate antigen. PMID:26400081

  1. De-Escalation Strategies in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-Positive Early Breast Cancer (BC): Final Analysis of the West German Study Group Adjuvant Dynamic Marker-Adjusted Personalized Therapy Trial Optimizing Risk Assessment and Therapy Response Prediction in Early BC HER2- and Hormone Receptor-Positive Phase II Randomized Trial-Efficacy, Safety, and Predictive Markers for 12 Weeks of Neoadjuvant Trastuzumab Emtansine With or Without Endocrine Therapy (ET) Versus Trastuzumab Plus ET.

    PubMed

    Harbeck, Nadia; Gluz, Oleg; Christgen, Matthias; Kates, Ronald Ernest; Braun, Michael; Küemmel, Sherko; Schumacher, Claudia; Potenberg, Jochem; Kraemer, Stefan; Kleine-Tebbe, Anke; Augustin, Doris; Aktas, Bahriye; Forstbauer, Helmut; Tio, Joke; von Schumann, Raquel; Liedtke, Cornelia; Grischke, Eva-Maria; Schumacher, Johannes; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Kreipe, Hans Heinrich; Nitz, Ulrike Anneliese

    2017-09-10

    Purpose Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive/hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer is a distinct subgroup associated with lower chemotherapy sensitivity and slightly better outcome than HER2-positive/HR-negative disease. Little is known about the efficacy of the combination of endocrine therapy (ET) with trastuzumab or with the potent antibody-cytotoxic, anti-HER2 compound trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) with or without ET for this subgroup. The West German Study Group trial, ADAPT (Adjuvant Dynamic Marker-Adjusted Personalized Therapy Trial Optimizing Risk Assessment and Therapy Response Prediction in Early Breast Cancer) compares pathologic complete response (pCR) rates of T-DM1 versus trastuzumab with ET in early HER2-positive/HR-positive breast cancer. Patients and Methods In this prospective, neoadjuvant, phase II trial, 375 patients with early breast cancer with HER2-positive and HR-positive status (n = 463 screened) were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of T-DM1 with or without ET or to trastuzumab with ET. The primary end point was pCR (ypT0/is/ypN0). Early response was assessed in 3-week post-therapeutic core biopsies (proliferation decrease ≥ 30% Ki-67 or cellularity response). Secondary end points included safety and predictive impact of early response on pCR. Adjuvant therapy followed national standards. Results Baseline characteristics were well balanced among the arms. More than 90% of patients completed the therapy per protocol. pCR was observed in 41.0% of patients treated with T-DM1, 41.5% of patients treated with T-DM1 and ET, and 15.1% with trastuzumab and ET ( P < .001). Early responders (67% of patients with assessable response) achieved pCR in 35.7% compared with 19.8% in nonresponders (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.24 to 4.19). T-DM1 was associated with a significantly higher prevalence of grade 1 to 2 toxicities, especially thrombocytopenia, nausea, and elevation of liver enzymes. Overall toxicity was low; seventeen

  2. UV activates growth factor receptors via reactive oxygen intermediates

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of mammalian cells to UV irradiation induces rapid and transient expression of early growth response-1 gene (Egr-1) encoding a transcription factor that plays a role in cell survival. These signals from the irradiated cell surface are likely to involve more than one pathway, and we show here that an essential pathway involves activation of several growth factor receptors by reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). UVC irradiation causes the tyrosine phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and HC11 mouse mammary cells. EGFR activation by irradiation of cells is abrogated by suramin, by antioxidants, and by the presence of a dominant negative EGFR. UV induces the formation of complexes between activated EGFR and SOS, Grb2, PLC gamma, and SHC that can be precipitated with antibodies to EGFR. The activation of EGFR by UV is mimicked by H2O2, suggesting that ROI may function upstream of EGFR activation. Our observations support the hypothesis that ROI and growth factor receptors operate in the early steps of the UV signal that lead to the enhanced expression and activity of Egr-1. PMID:8601609

  3. Fibroblast growth factor receptor levels decrease during chick embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Two putative receptors for fibroblast growth factor (FGF) of approximately 150 and 200 kD were identified in membrane preparations from chick embryos. Specific binding (femtomoles/milligram) of 125I- aFGF to whole chick embryonic membranes was relatively constant from day 2 to 7, then decreased fivefold between days 7 and 13. Day-19 chick embryos retained 125I-aFGF binding at low levels to brain, eye, and liver tissues but not to skeletal muscle or cardiac tissues. The 200-kD FGF receptor began to decline between day 4.5 and 7 and was barely detectable by day 9, whereas the 150-kD FGF receptor began to decline by day 7 but was still detectable in day-9 embryonic membranes. It is not known whether the two FGF-binding proteins represent altered forms of one polypeptide, but it is clear that their levels undergo differential changes during development. Because endogenous chick FGF may remain bound to FGF receptor in membrane preparations, membranes were treated with acidic (pH 4.0) buffers to release bound FGF; such treatment did not affect 125I-aFGF binding and moderately increased the number of binding sites in day-7 and -19 embryos. Consequently, the observed loss of high affinity 125I-aFGF binding sites and FGF-binding polypeptides most likely represents a loss of FGF receptor protein. These experiments provide in vivo evidence to support the hypothesis that regulation of FGF receptor levels may function as a mechanism for controlling FGF-dependent processes during embryonic development. PMID:2153684

  4. The angiotensin II receptor antagonist candesartan cilexetil (TCV-116) ameliorates retinal disorders in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagisa, Y; Shintani, A; Nakagawa, S

    2001-07-01

    The results of the EUCLID trial (EURODIAB Controlled Trial of Lisinopril in Insulin-dependent Diabetes Mellitus) highlighted the importance of the renin-angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Candesartan cilexetil (TCV-116), a potent angiotensin II (AII) receptor antagonist, has beneficial effects on hypertension as well as on heart, renal and cerebrovascular disease. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of candesarten cilexetil in ameliorating retinal disorders induced by hyperglycaemia. We compared retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA expression and the latencies of retinal oscillatory potentials in TCV-116-treated and control groups of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats with streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. Retinal VEGF mRNA expression was significantly higher and the latencies of oscillatory potentials were significantly elongated in STZ-treated spontaneously hypertensive rats compared with a non-treated spontaneously hypertensive rat group matched for age. These changes were dependent on hyperglycaemia but independent of hypertension. Treatment with TCV-116 (3 mg/kg) significantly diminished retinal VEGF mRNA expression and the latencies of oscillatory potential peaks, but had no effect on plasma glucose concentrations. These results suggest that TCV-116 is effective in preventing the development of diabetic retinopathy already in the early stages.

  5. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor polymorphisms and susceptibility to hypertension: A HuGE review

    PubMed Central

    Mottl, Amy K.; Shoham, David A.; North, Kari E.

    2016-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) plays an integral role in blood pressure control, and is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Polymorphisms within this gene have been extensively studied in association with hypertension; however, findings are conflicting. To clarify these data, we conducted a systematic review of association studies of AGTR1 polymorphisms and hypertension, and performed a meta-analysis of the rs5186 variant. Results show that the currently available literature is too heterogeneous to draw meaningful conclusions. The definition of hypertension and gender composition of individual studies helps to explain this heterogeneity. Although the structure and splicing pattern of AGTR1 would suggest a likely effect of polymorphisms within the promoter region on gene function, few studies have been conducted thus far. In conclusion, there is insufficient evidence that polymorphisms in the AGTR1 gene are risk factors for hypertension. However, most studies are inadequately powered, and larger well-designed studies of haplotypes are warranted. PMID:18641512

  6. Blockage of angiotensin II type 2 receptor prevents thyroxine-mediated cardiac hypertrophy by blocking Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Carneiro-Ramos, M S; Diniz, G P; Nadu, A P; Almeida, J; Vieira, R L P; Santos, R A S; Barreto-Chaves, M L M

    2010-05-01

    Although most of effects of Angiotensin II (Ang II) related to cardiac remodelling can be attributed to type 1 Ang II receptor (AT(1)R), the type 2 receptor (AT(2)R) has been shown to be involved in the development of some cardiac hypertrophy models. In the present study, we investigated whether the thyroid hormone (TH) action leading to cardiac hypertrophy is also mediated by increased Ang II levels or by change on AT(1)R and AT(2)R expression, which could contribute to this effect. In addition, we also evaluated the possible contribution of AT(2)R in the activation of Akt and in the development of TH-induced cardiac hypertrophy. To address these questions, Wistar rats were treated with thyroxine (T(4), 0.1 mg/kg BW/day, i.p.), with or without AT(2)R blocker (PD123319), for 14 days. Cardiac hypertrophy was identified based on heart/body weight ratio and confirmed by analysis of atrial natriuretic factor mRNA expression. Cardiomyocyte cultures were used to exclude the influence of TH-related hemodynamic effects. Our results demonstrate that the cardiac Ang II levels were significantly increased (80%, P < 0.001) as well as the AT(2)R expression (50%, P < 0.05) in TH-induced cardiac hypertrophy. The critical involvement of AT(2)R to the development of this cardiac hypertrophy in vivo was evidenced after administration of AT(2) blocker, which was able to prevent in 40% (P < 0.01) the cardiac mass gain and the Akt activation induced by TH. The role of AT(2)R to the TH-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was also confirmed after using PD123319 in the in vitro studies. These findings improve understanding of the cardiac hypertrophy observed in hyperthyroidism and provide new insights into the generation of future therapeutic strategies.

  7. Identification of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) residues essential for leukemia inhibitory factor receptor binding and generation of CNTF receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, A; Gloaguen, I; Graziani, R; Paonessa, G; Saggio, I; Hudson, K R; Laufer, R

    1996-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) drives the sequential assembly of a receptor complex containing the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and the signal transducers gp130 and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-beta (LIFR). The D1 structural motif, located at the beginning of the D-helix of human CNTF, contains two amino acid residues, F152 and K155, which are conserved among all cytokines that signal through LIFR. The functional importance of these residues was assessed by alanine mutagenesis. Substitution of either F152 or K155 with alanine was found to specifically inhibit cytokine interaction with LIFR without affecting binding to CNTFR alpha or gp130. The resulting variants behaved as partial agonists with varying degrees of residual bioactivity in different cell-based assays. Simultaneous alanine substitution of both F152 and K155 totally abolished biological activity. Combining these mutations with amino acid substitutions in the D-helix, which enhance binding affinity for the CNTFR alpha, gave rise to a potent competitive CNTF receptor antagonist. This protein constitutes a new tool for studies of CNTF function in normal physiology and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 PMID:8799186

  8. Knockdown of the GnRH-II receptor in the procine testis impairs the biosynthesis of 10 gonadal steroids.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II) and its cognate receptor (GnRHR-II) are poor modulators of gonadotropin secretion in swine. However, both are abundantly produced within the porcine testis suggesting an autocrine/paracrine role. Within the boar testis, GnRHR-II immunolocalizes to the plas...

  9. The type II IL-1 receptor interacts with the IL-1 receptor accessory protein: a novel mechanism of regulation of IL-1 responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Lang, D; Knop, J; Wesche, H; Raffetseder, U; Kurrle, R; Boraschi, D; Martin, M U

    1998-12-15

    IL-1 binds to two types of receptors on the cell membrane, of which only type I (IL-1RI) transduces signals in concert with the coreceptor IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL-1RAcP) while type II (IL-1RII) allegedly functions solely as ligand sink and decoy receptor without participating in IL-1 signaling. To investigate the regulatory role of IL-1RII on IL-1 responsiveness, a chimeric receptor encompassing the extracellular and transmembrane portions of IL-1RII and the cytoplasmic signal-transducing domain of IL-1RI was transfected into two murine EL-4-derived sublines that do or do not express IL-1RAcP, respectively. The chimeric receptor was able to transduce the IL-1 signal and induce IL-2 production only in the cell line which expressed IL-1RAcP, suggesting effective interaction between the extracellular domains of IL-1RII and IL-1RAcP in the presence of IL-1. The physical association of ligated IL-1RII with IL-1RAcP was proven by crosslinking experiments with radio-iodinated IL-1 and subsequent immunoprecipitations in normal human B cells and in EL-4 D6/76 cells transiently cotransfected with IL-1RII and IL-1RAcP, respectively. Based on these findings, it is proposed that upon IL-1 binding IL-1RII can recruit IL-1RAcP into a nonfunctional trimeric complex and thus modulate IL-1 signaling by subtracting the coreceptor molecule from the signaling IL-1RI. In this novel mechanism of coreceptor competition, the ratio between IL-1RII and IL-1RI becomes the central factor in determining the IL-1 responsiveness of a cell and the availability of IL-1RAcP becomes limiting for effective IL-1 signaling.

  10. Angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor-mediated accumulation of angiotensin II in tissues and its intracellular half-life in vivo.

    PubMed

    van Kats, J P; de Lannoy, L M; Jan Danser, A H; van Meegen, J R; Verdouw, P D; Schalekamp, M A

    1997-07-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is internalized by various cell types via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Little is known about the kinetics of this process in the whole animal and about the half-life of intact Ang II after its internalization. We measured the levels of 125I-Ang II and 125I-Ang I that were reached in various tissues and blood plasma during infusions of these peptides into the left cardiac ventricle of pigs. Steady-state concentrations of 125I-Ang II in skeletal muscle, heart, kidney, and adrenal were 8% to 41%, 64% to 150%, 340% to 550%, and 680% to 2100%, respectively, of the 125I-Ang II concentration in arterial blood plasma (ranges of six experiments). The tissue concentrations of 125I-Ang I were less than 5% of the arterial plasma concentrations. 125I-Ang II accumulation seen in heart, kidney, and adrenal was almost completely blocked by a specific Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist. Steady-state concentrations of 125I-Ang II were reached within 30 to 60 minutes in the tissues and within 5 minutes in blood plasma. The in vivo half-life of intact 125I-Ang II in heart, kidney, and adrenal was approximately 15 minutes, compared with 0.5 minute in the circulation. Thus, Ang II, but not Ang I, from the circulation is accumulated by some tissues, and this is mediated by AT1 receptors. The time course of this process and the long half-life of the accumulated Ang II support the contention that this Ang II has been internalized after its binding to the AT1 receptor, so that it is protected from rapid degradation by endothelial peptidases. The results of this study are in agreement with growing evidence of an important physiological role for internalized Ang II.

  11. ESCRT-II controls retinal axon growth by regulating DCC receptor levels and local protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Konopacki, Filip A; Wong, Hovy Ho-Wai; Dwivedy, Asha; Bellon, Anaïs; Blower, Michael D; Holt, Christine E

    2016-04-01

    Endocytosis and local protein synthesis (LPS) act coordinately to mediate the chemotropic responses of axons, but the link between these two processes is poorly understood. The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is a key regulator of cargo sorting in the endocytic pathway, and here we have investigated the role of ESCRT-II, a critical ESCRT component, in Xenopus retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons. We show that ESCRT-II is present in RGC axonal growth cones (GCs) where it co-localizes with endocytic vesicle GTPases and, unexpectedly, with the Netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC). ESCRT-II knockdown (KD) decreases endocytosis and, strikingly, reduces DCC in GCs and leads to axon growth and guidance defects. ESCRT-II-depleted axons fail to turn in response to a Netrin-1 gradient in vitro and many axons fail to exit the eye in vivo These defects, similar to Netrin-1/DCC loss-of-function phenotypes, can be rescued in whole (in vitro) or in part (in vivo) by expressing DCC. In addition, ESCRT-II KD impairs LPS in GCs and live imaging reveals that ESCRT-II transports mRNAs in axons. Collectively, our results show that the ESCRT-II-mediated endocytic pathway regulates both DCC and LPS in the axonal compartment and suggest that ESCRT-II aids gradient sensing in GCs by coupling endocytosis to LPS.

  12. Methods for studying the platelet-derived growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Ross, R.

    1985-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a basic 30,000-dalton protein circulating in normal blood sequestered within the platelet alpha granule. Radioiodinated PDGF shows saturable (e.g., 60,000-120,000 receptors per diploid human fibroblast) high affinity binding to culture PDGF-responsive cells. The apparent dissociation constant reported for this binding interaction has varied widely. This paper focuses on factors which affect (/sup 125/I)PGDF binding and on the development of a radioreceptor assay for PDGF.

  13. Expression and potential role of ErbB receptors in type II endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Androutsopoulos, Georgios; Adonakis, Georgios; Liava, Anna; Ravazoula, Panagiota; Decavalas, Georgios

    2013-06-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. Based on clinical and pathological features, endometrial cancer is classified into two types. The aim of our study was to describe the expression and the potential clinical role of ErbB receptors in Greek patients with type II endometrial cancer. Between 1991 and 2008, 10 women with histologically confirmed type II endometrial cancer were referred to the Department of Gynecologic Oncology of the University of Patras Medical School. Tissue specimens from endometrial lesions were immunostained for EGFR, ErbB-2, ErbB-3 and ErbB-4. For EGFR, 5 cases were positive (50%) and 5 cases were negative. For ErbB-2, 9 cases were positive (90%) and 1 case was negative. For ErbB-3, all cases were positive. For ErbB-4, 7 cases were positive (70%) and 3 cases were negative. Also for all ErbB receptors, 5 cases were positive (50%). During follow up, 3 patients died from their disease. All of them had papillary serous endometrial cancer and 2 of them were positive for all ErbB receptors. Although our study was based on a small number of cases, it is obvious that we had high expression levels of ErbB receptors in patients with type II endometrial cancer. Also the majority of patients with dismal outcome were positive for all ErbB receptors. This is very important, as ErbB-targeted therapies may be clinically active as adjuvant therapy in well-defined subgroups of type II EC patients with EGFR and ErbB-2 overexpression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential regulation of translation and endocytosis of alternatively spliced forms of the type II bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor

    PubMed Central

    Amsalem, Ayelet R.; Marom, Barak; Shapira, Keren E.; Hirschhorn, Tal; Preisler, Livia; Paarmann, Pia; Knaus, Petra; Henis, Yoav I.; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The expression and function of transforming growth factor-β superfamily receptors are regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms. The type II BMP receptor (BMPRII) is expressed as two alternatively spliced forms, a long and a short form (BMPRII-LF and –SF, respectively), which differ by an ∼500 amino acid C-terminal extension, unique among TGF-β superfamily receptors. Whereas this extension was proposed to modulate BMPRII signaling output, its contribution to the regulation of receptor expression was not addressed. To map regulatory determinants of BMPRII expression, we compared synthesis, degradation, distribution, and endocytic trafficking of BMPRII isoforms and mutants. We identified translational regulation of BMPRII expression and the contribution of a 3’ terminal coding sequence to this process. BMPRII-LF and -SF differed also in their steady-state levels, kinetics of degradation, intracellular distribution, and internalization rates. A single dileucine signal in the C-terminal extension of BMPRII-LF accounted for its faster clathrin-mediated endocytosis relative to BMPRII-SF, accompanied by mildly faster degradation. Higher expression of BMPRII-SF at the plasma membrane resulted in enhanced activation of Smad signaling, stressing the potential importance of the multilayered regulation of BMPRII expression at the plasma membrane. PMID:26739752

  15. Expression of growth factor ligand and receptor genes in the preimplantation bovine embryo.

    PubMed

    Watson, A J; Hogan, A; Hahnel, A; Wiemer, K E; Schultz, G A

    1992-02-01

    The sensitive technique of mRNA phenotyping with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was employed to determine the patterns of gene expression for several growth factor ligand and receptor genes during bovine preimplantation development. Several thousand bovine embryos encompassing a developmental series from one-cell zygotes to hatched blastocysts were produced by the application of in vitro maturation, fertilization, and oviductal epithelial cell embryo coculture methods. Transcripts for transforming growth factor (TGF-alpha) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-A) are detectable in all preimplantation bovine stages as observed in the mouse. Transcripts for TGF-beta 2 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-II) and the receptors for PDGF-alpha, insulin, IGF-I, and IGF-II are also detectable throughout bovine preimplantation development, suggesting that these mRNAs are products of both the maternal and the embryonic genomes in the cow, whereas in the mouse they are present only following the activation of the embryonic genome at the two-cell stage. In contrast to the mouse embryo, IGF-I mRNA was detected within preimplantation bovine embryos. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a maternal message in the bovine embryo, since it is only detectable up until the eight-cell embryo stage. Bovine trophoblast protein (bTP) mRNA was detectable within day 8 bovine blastocysts. As was observed in the mouse, the transcripts for insulin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), or nerve growth factor (NGF) were not detectable in any bovine embryo stage. Analyses of this type should aid the development of a completely defined culture medium for the more efficient production of preimplantation bovine embryos.

  16. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  17. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor -2 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanchun; Colbert, Laronna S.; Fuller, Miles; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations over the last decade have established the essential role of growth factors and their receptors during angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) family in mammals contains three members, VEGFR-1 (Flt-1), VEGFR-2 (KDR/Flk-1) and VEGFR-3 (Flt-4), which are transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors that regulate the formation of blood and lymphatic vessels. In the early 1990s, the above VEGFR were structurally characterized by cDNA cloning. Among these three receptors, VEGFR-2 is generally recognized to have a principal role in mediating VEGF-induced responses. VEGFR-2 is considered as the earliest marker for endothelial cell development. Importantly, VEGFR-2 directly regulates tumor angiogenesis. Therefore, several inhibitors of VEGFR-2 have been developed and many of them are now in clinical trials. In addition to targeting endothelial cells, the VEGF/VEGFR-2 system works as an essential autocrine/paracrine process for cancer cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies mark the continuous and increased interest in this related, but distinct, function of VEGF/VEGFR-2 in cancer cells: the autocrine/paracrine loop. Several mechanisms regulate VEGFR-2 levels and modulate its role in tumor angiogenesis and physiologic functions, i.e.: cellular localization/trafficking, regulation of cis-elements of promoter, epigenetic regulation and signaling from Notch, cytokines/growth factors and estrogen, etc. In this review, we will focus on updated information regarding VEGFR-2 research with respect to the molecular mechanisms of VEGFR-2 regulation in human breast cancer. Investigations in the activation, function, and regulation of VEGFR-2 in breast cancer will allow the development of new pharmacological strategies aimed at directly targeting cancer cell proliferation and survival. PMID:20462514

  18. Telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevents the development of diabetes in male Spontaneously Diabetic Torii rats.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Goji; Fukui, Michiaki; Hosoda, Hiroko; Asano, Mai; Harusato, Ichiko; Tanaka, Muhei; Shiraishi, Emi; Senmaru, Takashi; Sakabe, Kazumi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kitawaki, Jo; Fujinami, Aya; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoto

    2009-03-01

    To assess the beneficial effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker telmisartan on a non-obese animal model of reduced function and mass of islet beta-cells prior to the development of diabetes, Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rats were treated with telmisartan at 8 weeks of age. At 24 weeks of age, the treatment with telmisartan dose-dependently ameliorated hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, and high-dose (5 mg/kg/day) treated SDT rats did not developed diabetes. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that treatment with high-dose telmisartan reduced mRNA expression of local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components, components of NAD(P)H oxidase, transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the pancreas of male SDT rats. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses revealed that treatment with telmisartan also reduced expression of p47(phox). These results suggest that treatment with telmisartan reduces oxidative stress by local RAS activation and protects against islet beta-cell damage and dysfunction. These findings provide at least a partial explanation for the reduced incidence of new-onset diabetes that has been observed in several clinical trials involving angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers and ACE inhibitors.

  19. Involvement of cAMP-guanine nucleotide exchange factor II in hippocampal long-term depression and behavioral flexibility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungmin; Kobayashi, Yuki; Seo, Hyunhyo; Kwak, Ji-Hye; Masuda, Akira; Lim, Chae-Seok; Lee, Hye-Ryeon; Kang, SukJae Joshua; Park, Pojeong; Sim, Su-Eon; Kogo, Naomi; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Itohara, Shigeyoshi

    2015-06-24

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate small GTPases that are involved in several cellular functions. cAMP-guanine nucleotide exchange factor II (cAMP-GEF II) acts as a target for cAMP independently of protein kinase A (PKA) and functions as a GEF for Rap1 and Rap2. Although cAMP-GEF II is expressed abundantly in several brain areas including the cortex, striatum, and hippocampus, its specific function and possible role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive processes remain elusive. Here, we investigated how cAMP-GEF II affects synaptic function and animal behavior using cAMP-GEF II knockout mice. We found that deletion of cAMP-GEF II induced moderate decrease in long-term potentiation, although this decrease was not statistically significant. On the other hand, it produced a significant and clear impairment in NMDA receptor-dependent long-term depression at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses of hippocampus, while microscopic morphology, basal synaptic transmission, and depotentiation were normal. Behavioral testing using the Morris water maze and automated IntelliCage system showed that cAMP-GEF II deficient mice had moderately reduced behavioral flexibility in spatial learning and memory. We concluded that cAMP-GEF II plays a key role in hippocampal functions including behavioral flexibility in reversal learning and in mechanisms underlying induction of long-term depression.

  20. The chicken vitellogenin II gene is flanked by a GATA factor-dependent estrogen response unit.

    PubMed

    Davis, D L; Burch, J B

    1996-08-01

    The chicken vitellogenin II (VTGII) gene is flanked by an imperfect estrogen response element (ERE) at -350 and a perfect ERE at -620. In the present study we show that this imperfect ERE lies within an estrogen response unit (ERU) that requires a GATA factor and the estrogen receptor to function as an estrogen-dependent enhancer. We infer that GATA-6 contributes to the estrogen-dependent and liver-specific regulation of the endogenous VTGII gene since this is the predominant GATA factor expressed in adult liver. Our analysis of the VTGII ERU revealed four salient points. First, this ERU is comprised of an ERE and a bank of functionally redundant GATA-binding sites. Second, the GATA-6 transactivation domain is necessary (and sufficient, when tethered near the ERE) to render this ERU functional. Third, ERU enhancer activity is dependent on GATA 6, regardless of whether the resident ERE is imperfect or perfect. Fourth, in contrast to a report that the estrogen receptor antagonizes the activity of another GATA factor (GATA-1), we show that these two factors can function in a synergistic manner within the context of the VTGII ERU.

  1. Type II Turn of Receptor-bound Salmon Calcitonin Revealed by X-ray Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Eva; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Hansen, Ann Maria Kruse; Shaw, Allan Christian; Becker, Peter; Schäffer, Lauge; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-06-24

    Calcitonin is a peptide hormone consisting of 32 amino acid residues and the calcitonin receptor is a Class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The crystal structure of the human calcitonin receptor ectodomain (CTR ECD) in complex with a truncated analogue of salmon calcitonin ([BrPhe(22)]sCT(8-32)) has been determined to 2.1-Å resolution. Parallel analysis of a series of peptide ligands showed that the rank order of binding of the CTR ECD is identical to the rank order of binding of the full-length CTR, confirming the structural integrity and relevance of the isolated CTR ECD. The structure of the CTR ECD is similar to other Class B GPCRs and the ligand binding site is similar to the binding site of the homologous receptors for the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedulin (AM) recently published (Booe, J. M., Walker, C. S., Barwell, J., Kuteyi, G., Simms, J., Jamaluddin, M. A., Warner, M. L., Bill, R. M., Harris, P. W., Brimble, M. A., Poyner, D. R., Hay, D. L., and Pioszak, A. A. (2015) Mol. Cell 58, 1040-1052). Interestingly the receptor-bound structure of the ligand [BrPhe(22)]sCT(8-32) differs from the receptor-bound structure of the homologous ligands CGRP and AM. They all adopt an extended conformation followed by a C-terminal β turn, however, [BrPhe(22)]sCT(8-32) adopts a type II turn (Gly(28)-Thr(31)), whereas CGRP and AM adopt type I turns. Our results suggest that a type II turn is the preferred conformation of calcitonin, whereas a type I turn is the preferred conformation of peptides that require RAMPs; CGRP, AM, and amylin. In addition the structure provides a detailed molecular explanation and hypothesis regarding ligand binding properties of CTR and the amylin receptors.

  2. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M

    2011-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) are expressed throughout the developing kidney. Several early studies have shown that exogenous fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) affect growth and maturation of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) and ureteric bud (UB). Transgenic mice that over-express a dominant negative receptor isoform develop renal aplasia/severe dysplasia, confirming the importance of Fgfrs in renal development. Furthermore, global deletion of Fgf7, Fgf10, and Fgfr2IIIb (isoform that binds Fgf7 and Fgf10) in mice leads to small kidneys with fewer collecting ducts and nephrons. Deletion of Fgfrl1, a receptor lacking intracellular signaling domains, causes severe renal dysgenesis. Conditional targeting of Fgf8 from the MM interrupts nephron formation. Deletion of Fgfr2 from the UB results in severe ureteric branching and stromal mesenchymal defects, although loss of Frs2α (major signaling adapter for Fgfrs) in the UB causes only mild renal hypoplasia. Deletion of both Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 in the MM results in renal aplasia with defects in MM formation and initial UB elongation and branching. Loss of Fgfr2 in the MM leads to many renal and urinary tract anomalies as well as vesicoureteral reflux. Thus, Fgfr signaling is critical for patterning of virtually all renal lineages at early and later stages of development.

  3. Upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor 4 in oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Kenichi; Gotoh, Akito; Eguchi, Takanori; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the expression profile of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, which comprises EGFR/ErbB1, HER2/ErbB2, HER3/ErbB3 and HER4/ErbB4 in oral leukoplakia (LP). The expression of four epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family genes and their ligands were measured in LP tissues from 14 patients and compared with levels in 10 patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and normal oral mucosa (NOM) from 14 healthy donors by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Synchronous mRNA coexpression of ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 was detected in LP lesions. Out of the receptors, only ErbB4 mRNA and protein was more highly expressed in LP compared with NOM tissues. These were strongly expressed by epithelial keratinocytes in LP lesions, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Regarding the ligands, the mRNA of Neuregulin2 and 4 were more highly expressed in OLP compared with NOM tissues. Therefore, enhanced ErbB4 on the keratinocytes and synchronous modulation of EGFR family genes may contribute to the pathogenesis and carcinogenesis of LP. PMID:23492901

  4. Utilizing reversible copper(II) peptide coordination in a sequence-selective luminescent receptor.

    PubMed

    Stadlbauer, Stefan; Riechers, Alexander; Späth, Andreas; König, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    Although vast information about the coordination ability of amino acids and peptides to metal ions is available, little use of this has been made in the rational design of selective peptide receptors. We have combined a copper(II) nitrilotriacetato (NTA) complex with an ammonium-ion-sensitive and luminescent benzocrown ether. This compound revealed micromolar affinities and selectivities for glycine- and histidine-containing sequences, which closely resembles those of copper(II) ion peptide binding: the two free coordination sites of the copper(II) NTA complex bind to imidazole and amido nitrogen atoms, replicating the initial coordination steps of non-complexed copper(II) ions. The benzocrown ether recognizes the N-terminal amino moiety intramolecularly, and the significantly increased emission intensity signals the binding event, because only if prior coordination of the peptide has taken place is the intramolecular ammonium ion-benzocrown ether interaction of sufficient strength in water to trigger an emission signal. Intermolecular ammonium ion-benzocrown ether binding is not observed. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the binding constants derived from emission titrations. Thus, as deduced from peptide coordination studies, the combination of a truncated copper(II) coordination sphere and a luminescent benzocrown ether allows for the more rational design of sequence-selective peptide receptors.

  5. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger ribonucleic acids are synthesized in the choroid plexus of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.A.; Brooks, P.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.; Lund, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrating the presence of immunoreactive insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their receptors in the brain suggest a role of the IGFs in the central nervous system. IGF-II has been implicated as the predominant IGF in brain of mature animals based on studies of immunoreactive peptide and of IGF-II mRNAs. To obtain information about the sites of synthesis of IGF-II in adult rat brain, a /sup 32/P-labeled 31 base long synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide complementary in sequence to trailer peptide coding sequences in rat IGF-II mRNA (IGF-II 31 mer) was hybridized with coronal sections of fixed rat brain. The IGF-II 31 mer showed specific hybridization with the choroid plexus throughout rat brain, whereas in other brain regions, structures or cells, hybridization was not discernibly above background. These findings suggest that the choroid plexus is a primary site of synthesis of IGF-II, a probable source of IGF-II in cerebrospinal fluid, and a potential source of IGF-II for actions on target cells within the adult rat brain.

  6. Concentration-dependent mode of interaction of angiotensin II receptor blockers with uric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Takashi; Sato, Masanobu; Maeda, Tomoji; Ogihara, Toshio; Tamai, Ikumi

    2007-01-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) is currently recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It has been reported that an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), losartan, decreases SUA level, whereas other ARBs, such as candesartan, have no lowering effect. Because the renal uric acid transporter (URAT1) is an important factor controlling the SUA level, we examined the involvement of URAT1 in those differential effects of various ARBs on SUA level at clinically relevant concentrations. This study was done by using URAT1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Losartan, pratosartan, and telmisartan exhibited cis-inhibitory effects on the uptake of uric acid by URAT1, whereas at higher concentrations, only telmisartan did, and these ARBs reduced the uptake in competitive inhibition kinetics. On the other hand, candesartan, EXP3174 [2-n-butyl-4-chloro-1-[(2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yI)methyl]imidazole-5-carboxylic acid] (a major metabolite of losartan), olmesartan, and valsartan were not inhibitory. Preloading of those ARBs in the oocytes enhanced the URAT1-mediated uric acid uptake, showing a trans-stimulatory effect. The present study is a first demonstration of the differential effects of ARBs on URAT1 that some ARBs are both cis-inhibitory and trans-stimulatory, depending on concentration, whereas others exhibit either a trans-stimulatory or cis-inhibitory effect alone, which could explain the clinically observed differential effects of ARBs on SUA level. Furthermore, it was found that such differential effects of ARBs on URAT1 could be predicted from the partial chemical structures of ARBs, which will be useful information for the appropriate use and development of ARBs without an increase of SUA.

  7. Topography of human placental receptors for epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V; Ramani, N; Chegini, N; Stadig, B K; Carman, F R; Woost, P G; Schultz, G S; Cook, C L

    1985-02-10

    These studies were undertaken to determine whether term human placental microvillus plasma membranes, which are exposed to maternal blood, and basolateral plasma membranes, which are in close proximity to fetal blood capillaries, contain receptors for epidermal growth factor (EGF). These two highly purified membranes bound 125I-EGF with similar affinity (apparent dissociation constants, 0.07-0.12 nM, but the total number of available receptors was greater in microvillus (8.2 pmol/mg protein) compared to basolateral (4.9 pmol/mg protein) plasma membranes. Detailed characterization of 125I-EGF binding to these membranes revealed numerous similarities as well as differences. The two membranes contained two major (155 and 140 kDa) and at least three minor (115, 175, and 210 kDa) specific 125I-EGF binding proteins. The 115-kDa protein was only found in basolateral plasma membranes. The 155-kDa protein was predominantly labeled in microvillus, whereas the 140-kDa protein was labeled predominantly in basolateral plasma membranes. The addition of protease inhibitors did not alter the multiple 125I-EGF binding proteins pattern found in these membranes. EGF stimulated phosphorylation of 140- and 155-kDa proteins in both microvillus and basolateral plasma membranes. However, the 155-kDa protein was phosphorylated to a greater extent in microvillus, whereas both 140- and 155-kDa proteins were phosphorylated equally in basolateral plasma membranes. Light and electron microscope autoradiographic studies revealed that 125I-EGF preferentially associated with microvillus plasma membranes. The data demonstrates the presence of EGF receptors in outer cell membranes of syncytiotrophoblasts and suggests that maternal EGF may influence syncytiotrophoblast function by binding to receptors in microvillus plasma membranes, while fetal EGF may also influence syncytiotrophoblast function but via receptors in basolateral plasma membranes.

  8. Inhibiting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a widely distributed cell surface receptor that responds to several extracellular signaling molecules through an intracellular tyrosine kinase, which phosphorylates target enzymes to trigger a downstream molecular cascade. Since the discovery that EGFR mutations and amplifications are critical in a number of cancers, efforts have been under way to develop and use targeted EGFR inhibitors. These efforts have met with some spectacular successes, but many patients have not responded as expected, have subsequently developed drug-resistant tumors, or have suffered serious side effects from the therapies to date. CCR Investigators are studying EGFR from multiple vantage points with the goal of developing even better strategies to defeat EGFR-related cancers.

  9. Signal Transduction by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sina; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are master regulators of vascular development and of blood and lymphatic vessel function during health and disease in the adult. It is therefore important to understand the mechanism of action of this family of five mammalian ligands, which act through three receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In addition, coreceptors like neuropilins (NRPs) and integrins associate with the ligand/receptor signaling complex and modulate the output. Therapeutics to block several of the VEGF signaling components have been developed with the aim to halt blood vessel formation, angiogenesis, in diseases that involve tissue growth and inflammation, such as cancer. In this review, we outline the current information on VEGF signal transduction in relation to blood and lymphatic vessel biology. PMID:22762016

  10. Brassinosteroid signal transduction from receptor kinases to transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Wuk; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are growth-promoting steroid hormones in plants. Genetic studies in Arabidopsis illustrated the essential roles of BRs in a wide range of developmental processes and helped identify many genes involved in BR biosynthesis and signal transduction. Recently, proteomic studies identified missing links. Together, these approaches established the BR signal transduction cascade, which includes BR perception by the BRI1 receptor kinase at the cell surface, activation of BRI1/BAK1 kinase complex by transphosphorylation, subsequent phosphorylation of the BSK kinases, activation of the BSU1 phosphatase, dephosphorylation and inactivation of the BIN2 kinase, and accumulation of unphosphorylated BZR transcription factors in the nucleus. Mass spectrometric analyses are providing detailed information on the phosphorylation events involved in each step of signal relay. Thus, the BR signaling pathway provides a paradigm for understanding receptor kinase-mediated signal transduction as well as tools for the genetic improvement of the productivity of crop plants.

  11. Imbalance of tumor necrosis factor receptors during progression in bovine leukemia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Konnai, Satoru . E-mail: konnai@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp; Usui, Tatsufumi; Ikeda, Manabu; Kohara, Junko; Hirata, Toh-ichi; Okada, Kosuke; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Onuma, Misao

    2005-09-01

    Previously, we found an up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-{alpha} and an imbalance of TNF receptors in sheep experimentally infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV). In order to investigate the different TNF-{alpha}-induced responses, in this study we examined the TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferative response and the expression levels of two distinct TNF receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from BLV-uninfected cattle and BLV-infected cattle that were aleukemic (AL) or had persistent lymphocytosis (PL). The proliferative response of PBMC isolated from those cattle with PL in the presence of recombinant bovine TNF-{alpha} (rTNF-{alpha}) was significantly higher than those from AL cattle and uninfected cattle and the cells from PL cattle expressed significantly higher mRNA levels of TNF receptor type II (TNF-RII) than those from AL and BLV-uninfected cattle. No difference was found in TNF-RI mRNA levels. Most cells expressing TNF-RII in PL cattle were CD5{sup +} or sIgM{sup +} cells and these cells showed resistance to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations between the changes in provirus load and TNF-RII mRNA levels, and TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferation and TNF-RII mRNA levels. These data suggest that imbalance in the expression of TNF receptors could at least in part contribute to the progression of lymphocytosis in BLV infection.

  12. [Functional properties of taste bud cells. Mechanisms of afferent neurotransmission in Type II taste receptor cells].

    PubMed

    Romanov, R A

    2013-01-01

    Taste Bud cells are heterogeneous in their morphology and functionality. These cells are responsible for sensing a wide variety of substances and for associating detected compounds with a different taste: bitter, sweet, salty, sour and umami. Today we know that each of the five basic tastes corresponds to distinct cell populations organized into three basic morpho-functional cell types. In addition, some receptor cells of the taste bud demonstrate glia-related functions. In this article we expand on some properties of these three morphological receptor cell types. Main focus is devoted to the Type II cells and unusual mechanism for afferent neurotransmission in these cells. Taste cells of the Type II consist of three populations detecting bitter, sweet and umami tastes, and, thus, evoke a serious scientific interest.

  13. Deletion of the UT receptor gene results in the selective loss of urotensin-II contractile activity in aortae isolated from UT receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Behm, David J; Harrison, Stephen M; Ao, Zhaohui; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Pickering, Susan J; Grau, Evelyn V; Woods, Tina N; Coatney, Robert W; Doe, Christopher P A; Willette, Robert N; Johns, Douglas G; Douglas, Stephen A

    2003-01-01

    Urotensin-II (U-II) is among the most potent mammalian vasoconstrictors identified and may play a role in the aetiology of essential hypertension. Currently, only one mouse U-II receptor (UT) gene has been cloned. It is postulated that this protein is solely responsible for mediating U-II-induced vasoconstriction. This hypothesis has been investigated in the present study, which assessed basal haemodynamics and vascular reactivity to hU-II in wild-type (UT(+/+)) and UT receptor knockout (UT(−/−)) mice. Basal left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes/pressures, stroke volumes, mean arterial blood pressures, heart rates, cardiac outputs and ejection fractions in UT(+/+) mice and in UT(−/−) mice were similar. Relative to UT(+/+) mouse isolated thoracic aorta, where hU-II was a potent spasmogen (pEC50=8.26±0.08) that evoked relatively little vasoconstriction (17±2% 60 mM KCl), vessels isolated from UT(−/−) mice did not respond to hU-II. However, in contrast, the superior mesenteric artery isolated from both the genotypes did not contract in the presence of hU-II. Reactivity to unrelated vasoconstrictors (phenylephrine, endothelin-1, KCl) and endothelium-dependent/independent vasodilator agents (carbachol, sodium nitroprusside) was similar in the aorta and superior mesenteric arteries isolated from both the genotypes. The present study is the first to directly link hU-II-induced vasoconstriction with the UT receptor. Deletion of the UT receptor gene results in loss of hU-II contractile action with no ‘nonspecific' alterations in vascular reactivity. However, as might be predicted based on the limited contractile efficacy recorded in vitro, the contribution that hU-II and its receptor make to basal systemic haemodynamics appears to be negligible in this species. PMID:12770952

  14. Phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor I receptor by insulin receptor tyrosine kinase in intact cultured skeletal muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beguinot, F.; Smith, R.J.; Kahn, C.R.; Maron, R.; Moses, A.C.; White, M.F.

    1988-05-03

    The interaction between insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF I) receptors was examined by determining the ability of each receptor type to phosphorylate tyrosine residues on the other receptor in intact L6 skeletal muscle cells. This was made possible through a sequential immunoprecipitation method with two different antibodies that effectively separated the phosphorylated insulin and IGF I receptors. After incubation of intact L6 cells with various concentrations of insulin or IGF I in the presence of (/sup 32/P)-orthophosphate, insulin receptors were precipitated with one of two human polyclonal anti-insulin receptor antibodies (B2 or B9). Phosphorylated IGF I receptors remained in solution and were subsequently precipitated by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. The identifies of the insulin and IGF I receptor ..beta..-subunits in the two immunoprecipitates were confirmed by binding affinity, by phosphopeptide mapping after trypsin digestion, and by the distinct patterns of expression of the two receptors during differentiation. Stimulated phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the insulin receptor correlated with the occupancy of the ..beta..-subunit of the insulin receptor by either insulin or IGF I as determined by affinity cross-linking. Similarly, stimulation of phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the IGF I receptor by IGF I correlated with IGF I receptor occupancy. In contrast, insulin stimulated phosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit of the IGF I receptor at hormone concentrations that were associated with significant occupancy of the insulin receptor but negligible IGF I receptor occupancy. These findings indicate that the IGF I receptor can be a substrate for the hormone-activated insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity in intact L6 skeletal muscle cells.

  15. [Azilsartan--new representative of the class of angiotensin receptor blockers II].

    PubMed

    Ostroumova, O D

    2014-01-01

    The article is a review of published data on the efficacy and tolerability of a new representative of the class of angiotensin receptor blockers II (BRA) azilsartana registered for use in the Russian Federation in 2014. It is found that this drug has the advantage in comparison with several other members of the class BRA (valsartan, olmesartan, candesartan) and an ACE inhibitor ramipril in the form of more powerful antihypertensive effect.

  16. Insulin-Insulin-like Growth Factors Hybrids as Molecular Probes of Hormone:Receptor Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Křížková, Květoslava; Chrudinová, Martina; Povalová, Anna; Selicharová, Irena; Collinsová, Michaela; Vaněk, Václav; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-05-31

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF-1 and -2, respectively), and their receptors (IR and IGF-1R) are the key elements of a complex hormonal system that is essential for the development and functioning of humans. The C and D domains of IGFs (absent in insulin) likely play important roles in the differential binding of IGF-1 and -2 to IGF-1R and to the isoforms of IR (IR-A and IR-B) and specific activation of these receptors. Here, we attempted to probe the impact of IGF-1 and IGF-2 D domains (DI and DII, respectively) and the IGF-2 C domain (CII) on the receptor specificity of these hormones. For this, we made two types of insulin hybrid analogues: (i) with the C-terminus of the insulin A chain extended by the amino acids from the DI and DII domains and (ii) with the C-terminus of the insulin B chain extended by some amino acids derived from the CII domain. The receptor binding affinities of these analogues and their receptor autophosphorylation potentials were characterized. Our results indicate that the DI domain has a more negative impact than the DII domain does on binding to IR, and that the DI domain Pro-Leu-Lys residues are important factors for a different IR-A versus IR-B binding affinity of IGF-1. We also showed that the additions of amino acids that partially "mimic" the CII domain, to the C-terminus of the insulin B chain, change the binding and autophosphorylation specificity of insulin in favor of the "metabolic" IR-B isoform. This opens new venues for rational enhancement of insulin IR-B specificity by modifications beyond the C-terminus of its B chain.

  17. Molecular and cellular effects of azilsartan: a new generation angiotensin II receptor blocker.

    PubMed

    Kajiya, Takashi; Ho, Christopher; Wang, Jiaming; Vilardi, Ryan; Kurtz, Theodore W

    2011-12-01

    Azilsartan medoxomil is a newly approved angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) reported to lower 24-h blood pressure more effectively than maximally recommended doses of older ARBs. Although azilsartan is considered to be an unusually potent angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, little is known about the potential pleiotropic effects of this molecule. We investigated pleiotropic features of azilsartan in cell-based assay systems independent of its effects on blood pressure. In cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, azilsartan enhanced adipogenesis and exerted greater effects than valsartan on expression of genes encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), PPARδ, leptin, adipsin, and adiponectin. The effects of azilsartan on adipocyte differentiation and gene expression were observed at concentrations of azilsartan that did not classically stimulate PPAR activity in cell-based transactivation assays. Azilsartan also potently inhibited vascular cell proliferation in the absence of exogenously supplemented angiotensin II. In aortic endothelial cells, azilsartan inhibited cell proliferation at concentrations as low as 1 μmol/l, whereas valsartan showed little or no antiproliferative effects at concentrations below 10 μmol/l. Antiproliferative effects of azilsartan were also observed in cells lacking AT1 receptors. In addition, azilsartan, but not valsartan, blocked angiotensin II-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells 4-8 h after washout of drug from the incubation media. These findings suggest that azilsartan can function as a pleiotropic ARB with potentially beneficial effects on cellular mechanisms of cardiometabolic disease through actions that could involve more than just blockade of AT1 receptors and/or reduction in blood pressure.

  18. Development of filtration-based time-resolved fluorescence assay for the high-throughput screening of urotensin II receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Lee, Sunghou; Lee, Byung Ho

    2011-10-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) receptor binding assay has many advantages over the traditional radioligand binding assay in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility for the screening of receptor ligands. The TRF-based urotensin receptor (UT) binding assay with an automatic vacuum filtration system was developed and evaluated for the high-throughput screening of UT receptor antagonists. For this assay development, the human recombinant urotensin II (UII) was modified by labeling europium at its N-terminal position (Eu-UII) and used as a fluorescent tracer. The microsomal membrane fraction of UT receptor was prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human UT receptor. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of UII from competition binding assays with Eu-UII were 2.76 nM, which is very similar to that of fluorescence polarization (FP)-based UT receptor binding experiment (2.18 nM). Comparing with the FP-based receptor binding assay for UII (Z' factor, 0.36), the current TRF assay presented improved Z' factor (0.76) with a relatively higher signal-to-background ratio (1.5 and 2.1, respectively). The known high-affinity UT receptor antagonists, palosuran and SB657510, exhibited IC(50) values of 23.6 and 73.4 nM, respectively, which were consistent with the IC(50) values from FP-based receptor binding assay (30.6 and 78.7 nM, respectively). These results suggest that our filtration-based TRF UT receptor binding assay can achieve the desired sensitivity with higher reproducibility to adapt for the high-throughput screening of compound libraries.

  19. Angiotensin II acts through the angiotensin 1a receptor to upregulate pendrin

    PubMed Central

    Verlander, Jill W.; Hong, Seongun; Pech, Vladimir; Bailey, James L.; Agazatian, Diana; Matthews, Sharon W.; Coffman, Thomas M.; Le, Thu; Inagami, Tadashi; Whitehill, Florence M.; Weiner, I. David; Farley, Donna B.; Kim, Young Hee

    2011-01-01

    Pendrin is an anion exchanger expressed in the apical regions of B and non-A, non-B intercalated cells. Since angiotensin II increases pendrin-mediated Cl− absorption in vitro, we asked whether angiotensin II increases pendrin expression in vivo and whether angiotensin-induced hypertension is pendrin dependent. While blood pressure was similar in pendrin null and wild-type mice under basal conditions, following 2 wk of angiotensin II administration blood pressure was 31 mmHg lower in pendrin null than in wild-type mice. Thus pendrin null mice have a blunted pressor response to angiotensin II. Further experiments explored the effect of angiotensin on pendrin expression. Angiotensin II administration shifted pendrin label from the subapical space to the apical plasma membrane, independent of aldosterone. To explore the role of the angiotensin receptors in this response, pendrin abundance and subcellular distribution were examined in wild-type, angiotensin type 1a (Agtr1a) and type 2 receptor (Agtr2) null mice given 7 days of a NaCl-restricted diet (< 0.02% NaCl). Some mice received an Agtr1 inhibitor (candesartan) or vehicle. Both Agtr1a gene ablation and Agtr1 inhibitors shifted pendrin label from the apical plasma membrane to the subapical space, independent of the Agtr2 or nitric oxide (NO). However, Agtr1 ablation reduced pendrin protein abundance through the Agtr2 and NO. Thus angiotensin II-induced hypertension is pendrin dependent. Angiotensin II acts through the Agtr1a to shift pendrin from the subapical space to the apical plasma membrane. This Agtr1 action may be blunted by the Agtr2, which acts through NO to reduce pendrin protein abundance. PMID:21921024

  20. Insulin-like growth factor-II is produced by, signals to and is an important survival factor for the mature podocyte in man and mouse.

    PubMed

    Hale, L J; Welsh, G I; Perks, C M; Hurcombe, J A; Moore, S; Hers, I; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P W; Murphy, A J; Jeansson, M; Holly, J M; Hardouin, S N; Coward, R J

    2013-05-01

    Podocytes are crucial for preventing the passage of albumin into the urine and, when lost, are associated with the development of albuminuria, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Podocytes have limited capacity to regenerate, therefore pro-survival mechanisms are critically important. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a potent survival and growth factor; however, its major function is thought to be in prenatal development, when circulating levels are high. IGF-II has only previously been reported to continue to be expressed in discrete regions of the brain into adulthood in rodents, with systemic levels being undetectable. Using conditionally immortalized human and ex vivo adult mouse cells of the glomerulus, we demonstrated the podocyte to be the major glomerular source and target of IGF-II; it signals to this cell via the IGF-I receptor via the PI3 kinase and MAPK pathways. Functionally, a reduction in IGF signalling causes podocyte cell death in vitro and glomerular disease in vivo in an aged IGF-II transgenic mouse that produces approximately 60% of IGF-II due to a lack of the P2 promoter of this gene. Collectively, this work reveals the fundamental importance of IGF-II in the mature podocyte for glomerular health across mammalian species.

  1. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Node, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109TM3, Phe182ECL2, Gln257TM6, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108TM3, Ser109TM3, Ala163TM4, Phe182ECL2, Lys199TM5, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R. PMID:26121982

  2. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Takezako, Takanobu; Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Node, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109(TM3), Phe182(ECL2), Gln257(TM6), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108(TM3), Ser109(TM3), Ala163(TM4), Phe182(ECL2), Lys199(TM5), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R.

  3. High-density lipoprotein inhibits mechanical stress-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy through angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Liu, Xuebo; Xu, Jianfeng; Weng, Liqing; Ren, Jun; Ge, Junbo; Zou, Yunzeng

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical stress triggers cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy through an angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor-dependent mechanism. Low level of high density lipoprotein (HDL) is an independent risk factor for cardiac hypertrophy. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of HDL on mechanical stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy. A 48-hr mechanical stretch and a 4-week transverse aortic constriction were employed to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo, respectively, prior to the assessment of myocardial autophagy using LC3b-II and beclin-1. Our results indicated that HDL significantly reduced mechanical stretch-induced rise in autophagy as demonstrated by LC3b-II and beclin-1. In addition, mechanical stress up-regulated AT1 receptor expression in both cultured cardiomyocytes and in mouse hearts, whereas HDL significantly suppressed the AT1 receptor. Furthermore, the role of Akt phosphorylation in HDL-mediated action was assessed using MK-2206, a selective inhibitor for Akt phosphorylation. Our data further revealed that MK-2206 mitigated HDL-induced beneficial responses on cardiac remodelling and autophagy. Taken together, our data revealed that HDL inhibited mechanical stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy through downregulation of AT1 receptor, and HDL ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy via Akt-dependent mechanism. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.