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Sample records for factor iiib generates

  1. Impact of lymph node ratio as a valuable prognostic factor in gallbladder carcinoma, focusing on stage IIIB gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung-Gwan; Kim, Choong-Young; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joon; Koh, Yang-Seok; Kim, Jung-Chul; Cho, Chol-Kyoon; Kim, Hyun-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose It is increasingly being recognized that the lymph node ratio (LNR) is an important prognostic factor for gallbladder carcinoma patients. The present study evaluated predictors of tumor recurrence and survival in a large, mono-institutional cohort of patients who underwent surgical resection for gallbladder carcinoma, focusing specifically on the prognostic value of lymph node (LN) status and of LNR in stage IIIB patients. Methods Between 2004 and 2011, 123 patients who underwent R0 radical resection for gallbladder carcinoma at the Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were staged according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 7th edition, and prognostic factors affecting disease free survival, such as age, sex, comorbidity, body mass index, presence of preoperative symptoms, perioperative blood transfusion, postoperative complications, LN dissection, tumor size, differentiation, lymph-vascular invasion, perineural invasion, T stage, presence of LN involvement, N stage, numbers of positive LNs, LNR and implementation of adjuvant chemotherapy, were statistically analyzed. Results LN status was an important prognostic factor in patients undergoing curative resection for gallbladder carcinoma. The total number of LNs examined was implicated with prognosis, especially in N0 patients. LNR was a powerful predictor of disease free survival even after controlling for competing risk factors, in curative resected gallbladder cancer patients, and especially in stage IIIB patients. Conclusion LNR is confirmed as an independent prognostic factor in curative resected gallbladder cancer patients, especially in stage IIIB gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:23487246

  2. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; ...

  3. Type III-B rotaxane dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Watson K-W; Lee, Siu-Fung; Wong, Chi-Hin; Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Kwan, Chak-Shing; Chak, Chun-Pong; Mendes, Paula M; Cheng, Christopher H K; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai

    2013-11-28

    Type III-B first generation [3]rotaxane and second generation [4]rotaxane dendrimers have been synthesized via (1) a modified copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC), (2) Glaser-Hay's acetylenic oxidative homo-coupling, and (3) amide formation. The dendron does not reveal obvious cytotoxicities in L929 fibroblast cells. The rotaxane dendrimers can capture ammonia and are switchable both in solution and on surfaces.

  4. TATA-box DNA binding activity and subunit composition for RNA polymerase III transcription factor IIIB from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    McBryant, S J; Meier, E; Leresche, A; Sharp, S J; Wolf, V J; Gottesfeld, J M

    1996-01-01

    The RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor TFIIIB contains the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP) and polymerase III-specific TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Previous studies have shown that DNA oligonucleotides containing the consensus TATA-box sequence inhibit polymerase III transcription, implying that the DNA binding domain of TBP is exposed in TFIIIB. We have investigated the TATA-box DNA binding activity of Xenopus TFIIIB, using transcription inhibition assays and a gel mobility shift assay. Gel shift competition assays with mutant and nonspecific DNAs demonstrate the specificity of the TFIIIB-TATA box DNA complex. The apparent dissociation constant for this protein-DNA interaction is approximately 0.4 nM, similar to the affinity of yeast TBP for the same sequence. TFIIIB transcriptional activity and TATA-box binding activity cofractionate during a series of four ion-exchange chromatographic steps, and reconstituted transcription reactions demonstrate that the TATA-box DNA-protein complex contains TFIIIB TAF activity. Polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 75 and 92 kDa are associated with TBP in this complex. These polypeptides were renatured after elution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-gels and tested individually and in combination for TFIIIB TAF activity. Recombinant TBP along with protein fractions containing the 75- and 92-kDa polypeptides were sufficient to reconstitute TFIIIB transcriptional activity and DNA binding activity, suggesting that Xenopus TFIIIB is composed of TBP along with these polypeptides. PMID:8756620

  5. IIIB or not IIIB: a previously unanswered question.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Jennifer T; Mishkin, Joseph D; Patel, Parag C; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Markham, David W; Drazner, Mark H

    2012-05-01

    The term New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IIIB has been used increasingly in clinical medicine, including as an inclusion criteria for many clinical trials assessing left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Indeed, NYHA class IIIB is incorporated in the Food and Drug Administration's approved indication for the Heartmate II. However, on review of the medical literature, we found that there is no consensus definition of NYHA class IIIB. Until the ambiguity is resolved, we suggest that this designation not be used in clinical practice or by investigators leading clinical trials assessing therapies which convey substantial risk to patients and therefore require clarity in describing the enrolled patient population. With ongoing improvements in LVADs, this therapy will increasingly be considered in patients less sick than those who require inotropic support, providing urgency to establish a consensus system of classifying such patients who nevertheless fall within the spectrum of advanced heart failure. Herein we propose a modification of the standard NYHA classification system which can be used to fill this void.

  6. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB) masquerading as a behavioural disorder.

    PubMed

    Brady, Jacqueline; Trehan, Aditi; Landis, Dennis; Toro, Camilo

    2013-05-08

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) that manifest primarily as psychiatric and behavioural symptoms in childhood are often mistaken for idiopathic primary psychiatric disorders. The pathophysiological basis of these symptoms may be overlooked until later in the disease course when neurological deficits become dominant; this results in a significant delay in establishing a proper diagnosis. To illustrate this, we describe two siblings who presented with behavioural issues and mild learning disabilities in childhood, and were consequently given multiple psychiatric diagnoses. In early adulthood, however, they manifested a rapid cognitive decline. Subsequent cranial MRI imaging revealed progressive brain iron accumulation in deep brain nuclei. Whole exome sequencing and biochemical investigation confirmed the diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB. Their long diagnostic odyssey illustrates the importance of considering IEMs when assessing individuals with behavioural abnormalities and cognitive impairment.

  7. Cutaneous head and neck melanoma in OPTiM, a randomized phase 3 trial of talimogene laherparepvec versus granulocyte‐macrophage colony‐stimulating factor for the treatment of unresected stage IIIB/IIIC/IV melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sanjiv S.; Ollila, David W.; Hallmeyer, Sigrun; Milhem, Mohammed; Amatruda, Thomas; Nemunaitis, John J.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Chen, Lisa; Shilkrut, Mark; Ross, Merrick; Kaufman, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Cutaneous head and neck melanoma has poor outcomes and limited treatment options. In OPTiM, a phase 3 study in patients with unresectable stage IIIB/IIIC/IV melanoma, intralesional administration of the oncolytic virus talimogene laherparepvec improved durable response rate (DRR; continuous response ≥6 months) compared with subcutaneous granulocyte‐macrophage colony‐stimulating factor (GM‐CSF). Methods Retrospective review of OPTiM identified patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma given talimogene laherparepvec (n = 61) or GM‐CSF (n = 26). Outcomes were compared between talimogene laherparepvec and GM‐CSF treated patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma. Results DRR was higher for talimogene laherparepvec–treated patients than for GM‐CSF treated patients (36.1% vs 3.8%; p = .001). A total of 29.5% of patients had a complete response with talimogene laherparepvec versus 0% with GM‐CSF. Among talimogene laherparepvec–treated patients with a response, the probability of still being in response after 12 months was 73%. Median overall survival (OS) was 25.2 months for GM‐CSF and had not been reached with talimogene laherparepvec. Conclusion Treatment with talimogene laherparepvec was associated with improved response and survival compared with GM‐CSF in patients with cutaneous head and neck melanoma. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 1752–1758, 2016 PMID:27407058

  8. Efficacy and safety of talimogene laherparepvec versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with stage IIIB/C and IVM1a melanoma: subanalysis of the Phase III OPTiM trial

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Kevin J; Andtbacka, Robert HI; Collichio, Frances; Downey, Gerald; Chen, Lisa; Szabo, Zsolt; Kaufman, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Talimogene laherparepvec is the first oncolytic immunotherapy to receive approval in Europe, the USA and Australia. In the randomized, open-label Phase III OPTiM trial (NCT00769704), talimogene laherparepvec significantly improved durable response rate (DRR) versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in 436 patients with unresectable stage IIIB–IVM1c melanoma. The median overall survival (OS) was longer versus GM-CSF in patients with earlier-stage melanoma (IIIB–IVM1a). Here, we report a detailed subgroup analysis of the OPTiM study in patients with IIIB–IVM1a disease. Patients and methods The patients were randomized (2:1 ratio) to intralesional talimogene laherparepvec or subcutaneous GM-CSF and were evaluated for DRR, overall response rate (ORR), OS, safety, benefit–risk and numbers needed to treat. Descriptive statistics were used for subgroup comparisons. Results Among 249 evaluated patients with stage IIIB–IVM1a melanoma, DRR was higher with talimogene laherparepvec compared with GM-CSF (25.2% versus 1.2%; P<0.0001). ORR was also higher in the talimogene laherparepvec arm (40.5% versus 2.3%; P<0.0001), and 27 patients in the talimogene laherparepvec arm had a complete response, compared with none in GM-CSF-treated patients. The incidence rates of exposure-adjusted adverse events (AE) and serious AEs were similar with both treatments. Conclusion The subgroup of patients with stage IIIB, IIIC and IVM1a melanoma (57.1% of the OPTiM intent-to-treat population) derived greater benefit in DRR and ORR from talimogene laherparepvec compared with GM-CSF. Talimogene laherparepvec was well tolerated. PMID:27895500

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  11. Intracranial gene delivery of LV-NAGLU vector corrects neuropathology in murine MPS IIIB.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Carmela; Villani, Guglielmo R D; Di Napoli, Daniele; Nusco, Edoardo; Calì, Gaetano; Nitsch, Lucio; Di Natale, Paola

    2009-06-01

    Mucopolysacccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). The disease is characterized by mild somatic features and severe neurological involvement with high mortality. Although several therapeutic approaches have been applied to the murine model of the disease, no effective therapy is available for patients. In this study, we used the lentiviral-NAGLU vector to deliver the functional human NAGLU gene into the brain of young adult MPS IIIB mice. We report the restoration of active enzyme with a sustained expression throughout a large portion of the brain, and a significantly improved behavioral performance of treated animals. Moreover, we analyzed the effect of therapy on the expression profile of some genes related to neurotrophic signaling molecules and inflammatory cytokines previously found altered in MPS IIIB mice. At 1 month from treatment, the level of cerebellin 1 (Cbln1) was decreased while the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) expression was increased, both reaching normal values. At 6 months from treatment a significant reduction in the expression of all the inflammation- and oxidative stress-related genes was observed, as well as the maintenance of the correction of the Bdnf gene expression. These results indicate that NAGLU delivery from intracerebral sources has the capacity to alleviate most disease manifestations in MPS IIIB mice; furthermore, Bdnf might be a response-to-therapy biomarker for MPS IIIB.

  12. CIMAvax EGF vaccine for stage IIIb/IV non-small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jian Y.; Kananathan, Ratnavelu

    2012-01-01

    This case report documents the use of the CIMAvax Epidermal Growth Factor vaccine regimen in a 54 y old female with stage IIIb non-small cell lung carcinoma. Even after 48 mo since diagnosis her ECOG performance remains at zero. Further, this report documents a reaction to the vaccine of grade 3 severity not previously documented. PMID:22906936

  13. Theory of type IIIb solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.; De La Noe, J.

    1976-01-01

    During the initial space-time evolution of an electron beam injected into the corona, the strong beam-plasma interaction occurs at the head of the beam, leading to the amplification of a quasi-monochromatic large-amplitude plasma wave that stabilizes by trapping the beam particles. Oscillation of the trapped particles in the wave troughs amplifies sideband electrostatic waves. The sidebands and the main wave subsequently decay to observable transverse electromagnetic waves through the parametric decay instability. This process gives rise to the elementary striation bursts. Owing to velocity dispersion in the beam and the density gradient of the corona, the entire process may repeat at a finite number of discrete plasma levels, producing chains of elementary bursts. All the properties of the type IIIb bursts are accounted for in the context of the theory.

  14. 5'- and 3'-terminal nucleotides in the FGFR2 ISAR splicing element core have overlapping roles in exon IIIb activation and exon IIIc repression.

    PubMed

    Jones, R B; Carstens, R P; Luo, Y; McKeehan, W L

    2001-09-01

    The cell type-specific, mutually-exclusive alternative splicing of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) pre-mRNA is tightly regulated. A sequence termed ISAR (intronic splicing activator and repressor) has been implicated as an important cis regulatory element in both activation of exon IIIb and repression of exon IIIc splicing in epithelial cells. In order to better understand how this single sequence could have dual roles, we transfected minigenes containing a series of 2-bp mutations in the 18 3'-most nucleotides of ISAR that we refer to as the ISAR core. Transfection of cells with dual-exon (IIIb and IIIc) minigenes revealed that mutation of terminal sequences of the core led to decreased exon IIIb inclusion and increased exon IIIc inclusion. Transfection of cells with single-exon IIIb minigenes and single-exon IIIc minigenes revealed that mutation of terminal sequences of the ISAR core led to decreased exon IIIb inclusion and increased exon IIIc inclusion, respectively. Nucleotides of the ISAR core responsible for exon IIIb activation appear to overlap very closely with those required for exon IIIc repression. We describe a model in which ISAR and a 5' intronic sequence known as IAS2 form a stem structure required for simultaneous exon IIIb activation and exon IIIc repression.

  15. The neurobehavioral phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, E.; King, K.; Ahmed, A.; Rudser, K.; Rumsey, R.; Yund, B.; Delaney, K.; Nestrasil, I.; Whitley, C.; Potegal, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our goal was to describe the neurobehavioral phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB (MPS IIIB). Parents report that behavioral abnormalities are a major problem in MPS III posing serious challenges to parenting and quality-of-life for both patient and parent. Our previous research on MPS IIIA identified autistic symptoms, and a Klüver-Bucy-type syndrome as indicated by reduced startle and loss of fear associated with amygdala atrophy. We hypothesized that MPS IIIB would manifest similar attributes when assessed with the same neurobehavioral protocol. Methods Ten patients with MPS IIIB were compared with 9 MPS IIIA patients, all older than 6. 8 younger children with Hurler syndrome (1H) were chosen as a comparison group for the Risk Room procedure; MPS IH does not directly affect social/emotional function and these younger children were closer to the developmental level of the MPS IIIB group. To examine disease severity, cognitive ability was assessed. Four evaluations were used: the Risk Room procedure (to measure social-emotional characteristics, especially fear and startle responses), the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), the Sanfilippo Behavior Rating Scale (SBRS), and amygdala brain volumes calculated from manually-traced MRI images. Results The two groups are equivalent in severity and show severe cognitive impairment. On the ADOS, the MPS IIIB patients exhibited the same autistic features as IIIA. The IIIB means differed from MPS IH means on most measures. However, the IIIB group did not approach the Risk Room stranger, like the MPS IH group who kept their distance, but unlike the IIIA group who showed no fear of the stranger. On the SBRS, the MPS IIIB patients were described as more inattentive and more fearful, especially of new people than the MPS IIIA. Onsets of some disease characteristics appeared more closely spaced and slightly earlier in MPS IIIB than IIIA. Conclusions On most behavioral measures, MPS IIIB patients did

  16. Long-term Outcome after Radiotherapy for FIGO Stage IIIB and IVA Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Anamaria R.; Amdur, Robert J. . E-mail: amdurrj@shands.ufl.edu; Morris, Christopher G.; Morgan, Linda S.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcome after radiotherapy with curative intent for Stage IIIB and IVA carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 patients treated with radiotherapy with curative intent at University of Florida between January 1980 and December 2003 for Stage IIIB (84 patients) or IVA (7 patients) carcinoma of the cervix. Results: The median follow-up of the surviving patients was 8.8 years. The 5- and 10-year estimates of local control, regional control, locoregional control, relapse-free survival, and overall survival were 53% and 53%, 55% and 47%, 34% and 29%, 30% and 26%, and 29% and 21%, respectively. Ninety percent of the recurrences occurred within 2 years of treatment. Of these, 60% of all failures were local, 29% were regional, and 11% were distant failures alone. Also, 17% of the failures were in the paraaortic nodes with no evidence of failure in the pelvis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted with the endpoint of relapse-free or overall survival. No factor was statistically significant. Complications from therapy were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading system; the overall severe late complication rate was 13% (Grade 3-5). Conclusion: This series is one of the most mature of published reports. With long-term follow-up, approximately one-third of patients with Stage IIIB or IVA carcinoma of the cervix were cured, with a 13% complication rate.

  17. Endodontic management of dens invaginatus Type IIIb: Case series

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Jorge N. R.; da Costa, Rui Pereira; Anderson, Craig; Quaresma, Sérgio André; Corte-Real, Luís S. M.; Monroe, Adam D.

    2016-01-01

    Dens invaginatus may be seen as a developmental malformation. It is characterized by an invagination of the enamel and dentin, creating a lumen inside the affected tooth, which may extend as deep as the apical foramen. Oehlers Type IIIb is considered the most challenging clinical conditions. The purpose of this study is to discuss the nonsurgical endodontic management of vital and necrotic dens invaginatus Type IIIb cases. Due to the complex anatomical consideration of dens invaginatus Type IIIb, endodontic treatment is extremely technique sensitive. A conservative approach was used in a vital case to treat the invaginated lumen only, to preserve the vitality of the pulp, and a more invasive approach was used in a necrotic case to debride the lumen and necrotic pulp for proper disinfection of the root canal system. Although different, all the approaches were successful. The clinical signs and symptoms were resolved. The vital case remains vital after 19 months, and the recall radiographs were able to show satisfactory periapical healing both in vital and necrotic cases. Due to the highly complex anatomy of dens invaginatus Type IIIb, the decision of preserving the pulp vitality may not be related only to pulpal diagnosis but also to the technical requirements of the treatment. Although very technically sensitive, it may be possible to treat the invaginated lumen exclusively, while preserving the vitality of the pulp. Necrotic cases may require a more aggressive approach to achieve a favorable prognosis. PMID:28042276

  18. Persistence Factors of First-Generation Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Tawanda M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation utilized a qualitative narrative case study method to explore the unknown factors and elements of perseverance in spite of adversity and crisis. The study documented the lives of five African American women in order to describe, understand, and explain the central research question of how and why some first-generation learners…

  19. Novel mutation detection of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, FGFR2IIIa, FGFR2IIIb, FGFR2IIIc, FGFR3, FGFR4 gene for craniosynostosis: A prospective study in Asian Indian patient

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Mayadhar; Bajpai, Minu; Malhotra, Arun; Samantaray, Jyotish Chandra; Dwivedi, Sadananda; Das, Sambhunath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniosynostosis (CS) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition classically combining craniosynostosis and non-syndromic craniosynostosis with digital anomalies of the hands and feet. The majority of cases are caused by heterozygous mutations in the third immunoglobulin-like domain (IgIII) of FGFR2, whilst a larger number of cases can be attributed to mutations outside this region of the protein. Aims: To find out the FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4 gene in craniosynostosis syndrome. Settings and Design: A hospital based prospective study. Materials and Methods: Prospective analysis of clinical records of patients registered in CS clinic from December 2007 to January 2015 was done in patients between 4 months to 13 years of age. We have performed genetic findings in a three generation Indian family with Craniosynostosis syndrome. Results: We report for the first time the clinical and genetic findings in a three generation Indian family with Craniosynostosis syndrome caused by a heterozygous missense mutation, Thr 392 Thr and ser 311 try, located in the IgII domain of FGFR2. FGFR 3 and 4 gene basis syndrome was eponymously named. Genetic analysis demonstrated that 51/56 families to be unrelated. In FGFR3 gene 10/TM location of 1172 the nucleotide changes C>A, Ala 391 Glu 19/56 and Exon-19, 5q35.2 at conserved linker region the changes occurred pro 246 Arg in 25/56 families. Conclusions: Independent genetic origins, but phenotypic similarities in the 51 families add to the evidence supporting the theory of selfish spermatogonial selective advantage for this rare gain-of-function FGFR2 mutation. PMID:26557159

  20. Genetic relationships among Italian and Mexican maize-rhizosphere Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) populations belonging to Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 group

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A close association between maize roots and Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) bacteria has been observed in different locations globally. In this study we investigated by MultiLocus Restriction Typing (MLRT) the genetic diversity and relationships among Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 populations associated with roots of maize plants cultivated in geographically distant countries (Italy and Mexico), in order to provide new insights into their population structure, evolution and ecology. Results The 31 B. cenocepacia IIIB and 65 BCC6 isolates gave rise to 29 and 39 different restriction types (RTs), respectively. Two pairs of isolates of B. cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6, recovered from both Italian and Mexican maize rhizospheres, were found to share the same RT. The eBURST (Based Upon Related Sequence Types) analysis of MLRT data grouped all the B. cenocepacia IIIB isolates into four clonal complexes, with the RT-4-complex including the 42% of them, while the majority of the BCC6 isolates (94%) were grouped into the RT-104-complex. These two main clonal complexes included RTs shared by both Italian and Mexican maize rhizospheres and a clear relationship between grouping and maize variety was also found. Grouping established by eBURST correlated well with the assessment using unweighted-pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA). The standardized index of association values obtained in both B. cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 suggests an epidemic population structure in which occasional clones emerge and spread. Conclusions Taken together our data demonstrate a wide dispersal of certain B. cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 isolates in Mexican and Italian maize rhizospheres. Despite the clear relationship found between the geographic origin of isolates and grouping, identical RTs and closely related isolates were observed in geographically distant regions. Ecological factors and selective pressure may preferably promote some genotypes within each local microbial

  1. 77 FR 9163 - Removal of Category IIIa, IIIb, and IIIc Definitions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 1 RIN 2120-AK03 Removal of Category IIIa, IIIb, and IIIc Definitions AGENCY: Federal... removing the definitions of Category IIIa, IIIb, and IIIc operations. The definitions are outdated because... definitions will aid in international harmonization efforts, future landing minima reductions, and...

  2. Sequence similarities among kappa IIIb chains of monoclonal human IgM kappa autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Light chains of the serologically and chemically defined V region sub- subgroup kappa IIIb are preferentially associated with several types of human IgM kappa (monoclonal) autoantibodies and are remarkably homologous in primary structure, as evidenced by partial amino acid sequence data. To establish the extent of homology among such proteins, we have determined the complete variable region (V) sequence of the light chains of four monoclonal IgM kappa autoantibodies, of which two (GAR and GOT) are rheumatoid factors (RFs), the third (SON) has anti- apo beta lipoprotein specificity, and the fourth (PIE) binds specifically to intermediate filaments. The region encoded by the V kappa segment gene (positions 1-95) in all four light (L) chains is virtually identical in sequence, differing by only one residue in the FR3 of protein SON and in the first CDR of protein GOT. Further, the CDR3 of kappa chain SON contains an additional residue (prolyl) located at the carboxyl-terminus of the V segment. The region encoded by the J gene (positions 96-108) is identical after position 96 for the two RFs GAR and GOT (J kappa 2), but different in proteins SON (J kappa 4) and PIE (J kappa 1). The amino acid residue at position 96, located in CDR3 at the site of combinatoriaL joining of the V kappa and J kappa gene segments and involved as a contacting residue in the hapten binding site, is different in all four light chains. These results demonstrate the extensive homology in sequence among light chains of IgM kappa autoantibodies and indicate that a particular V kappa germ line gene, kappa IIIb, is expressed as a phylogenetic response to certain self antigens or as part of a selection process by which these autoimmune responses are regulated. PMID:6432934

  3. Factors for Generating Initial Construction Schedules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Switches 128/1600 Accessories 128/1700 Power Distribution 128/2000 Uninterruptible Power Systems 128/2100 Static Charger - Battery 128/2200 Motor-Generator...are not to be construed as an official Depart- ment of the Army position, unless so designated by other authorized documents. DESTROY THIS REPORT WHEN...0704-0188), Washington, DC 205M0. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED I September 1991 Final 4. TITLE AND

  4. A Scenario for the Fine Structures of Solar Type IIIb Radio Bursts Based on Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb-III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  5. Molecular defects in Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB).

    PubMed

    Beesley, C E; Jackson, M; Young, E P; Vellodi, A; Winchester, B G

    2005-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB) is an autosomal recessive disease that is caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). NAGLU is involved in the degradation of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) heparan sulphate, and a deficiency results in the accumulation of partially degraded GAGs inside lysosomes. Early clinical symptoms include hyperactivity, aggressiveness and delayed development, followed by progressive mental deterioration, although there are a small number of late-onset attenuated cases. The gene for NAGLU has been fully characterized and we report the molecular analysis of 18 Sanfilippo B families. In total, 34 of the 36 mutant alleles were characterized in this study and 20 different mutations were identified including 8 novel changes (R38W, V77G, 407-410del4, 703delT, A246P, Y335C, 1487delT, E639X). The four novel missense mutations were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and all were shown to decrease the NAGLU activity markedly, although A246P did produce 12.7% residual enzyme activity.

  6. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. Cytokines, neurotrophins, and oxidative stress in brain disease from mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB.

    PubMed

    Villani, Guglielmo R D; Gargiulo, Nadia; Faraonio, Raffaella; Castaldo, Sigismondo; Gonzalez Y Reyero, Enrico; Di Natale, Paola

    2007-02-15

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPS IIIB; Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is characterized by profound neurological deterioration. Because a murine model of MPS IIIB disease is available, we focused on analysis of gene expression in the brain and cerebellum of 7-month-old MPS IIIB mice by pathway-specific filter microarrays designed to probe apoptotic-related, neurotrophic signalling molecules and inflammatory cytokines and receptors. Moreover, we extended the analysis with real-time PCR performed at 1, 3, 7 months after birth. Bdnf was down-regulated in the brain but up-regulated in the cerebellum at 7 months of age, both at RNA and at protein levels. Cbln1 presented a threefold increase in the oldest brains while remaining unaltered in the cerebellum. Ccl3, Casp11, gp91(phox), p67(phox), and p47(phox) showed an increased expression in both brain and cerebellum at each examined time point. Ccl3, in particular, exhibited in both organs and at all times tested approximately a tenfold increase in its expression. Insofar as p47(phox), p67(phox), and gp91(phox) are all components of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase, our results suggest the possible involvement of the reactive oxygen species in the genesis of neurodegeneration in MPS IIIB disease.

  8. A SCENARIO FOR THE FINE STRUCTURES OF SOLAR TYPE IIIb RADIO BURSTS BASED ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-10

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb–III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb–IIIb or III–IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  9. RADGEN: A radiation exchange factor generator for rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D.R.

    1987-10-01

    The RADGEN computer program has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to generate input required for the thermal radiation models used in the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer program. The COBRA-SFS program uses radiation exchange factors to describe the net amount of energy transferred from each surface to every other surface in an enclosure. The RADGEN program generates radiation exchange factors for arrays of rods on a square or triangular pitch as well as open channel geometries. This report describes the input requirements for the RADGEN code, which may be executed in a batch or interactive mode, and outlines the solution procedure used to obtain the exchange factors. 4 refs., 25 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Long-term clinical course of a patient with mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ja Hye; Chi, Yang Hyun; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is a rare genetic disorder caused by lysosomal storage of heparan sulfate. MPS IIIB results from a deficiency in the enzyme alpha-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase (NAGLU). Affected patients begin showing behavioral changes, progressive profound mental retardation, and severe disability from the age of 2 to 6 years. We report a patient with MPS IIIB with a long-term follow-up duration. He showed normal development until 3 years. Subsequently, he presented behavioral changes, sleep disturbance, and progressive motor dysfunction. He had been hospitalized owing to recurrent pneumonia and epilepsy with severe cognitive dysfunction. The patient had compound heterozygous c.1444C>T (p.R482W) and c.1675G>T (p.D559Y) variants of NAGLU. Considering that individuals with MPS IIIB have less prominent facial features and skeletal changes, evaluation of long-term clinical course is important for diagnosis. Although no effective therapies for MPS IIIB have been developed yet, early and accurate diagnosis can provide important information for family planning in families at risk of the disorder. PMID:28018442

  11. Isolated Limb Perfusion With Melphalan in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB-IV Melanoma or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-22

    Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Eccrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Skin Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Melanoma

  12. Negative pressure wound therapy for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul Hyun; Shon, Oog Jin; Kim, Gi Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures have been treated by initial wide wound debridement, stabilization of fracture with external fixation, and delayed wound closure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of staged treatment using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Materials and Methods: 15 patients with Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures, treated using staged protocol by a single surgeon between January 2007 and December 2011 were reviewed in this retrospective study. The clinical results were assessed using a Puno scoring system for severe open fractures of the tibia at the last followup. The range of motion (ROM) of the knee and ankle joints and postoperative complication were evaluated at the last followup. The radiographic results were assessed using time to bone union, coronal and sagittal angulations and a shortening at the last followup. Results: The mean score of Puno scoring system was 87.4 (range 67–94). The mean ROM of the knee and ankle joints was 121.3° (range 90°–130°) and 37.7° (range 15°–50°), respectively. Bone union developed in all patients and the mean time to union was 25.3 weeks (range 16–42 weeks). The mean coronal angulation was 2.1° (range 0–4°) and sagittal was 2.7° (range 1–4°). The mean shortening was 4.1 mm (range 0–8 mm). Three patients had partial flap necrosis and 1 patient had total flap necrosis. There was no superficial and deep wound infection. Conclusion: Staged treatment using NPWT decreased the risks of infection and requirement of flap surgeries in Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Therefore, staged treatment using NPWT could be a useful treatment option for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. PMID:27746498

  13. The Comparative Characteristic of Components in the Iiib-Iii Pairs According to the Observation Data Obtained by Radio Telescope URAN-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Dorovskiy, V. V.; Vashchishin, R. V.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Rucker, G.

    In this paper we analyze the properties of type IIIb and type III bursts in IIIb-III pairs observed by radio telescope URAN-2 at frequencies 16-32 MHz. We discuss pro and contra of harmonic phenomenon of decameter IIIb-III pairs.

  14. Tissue factor-driven thrombin generation and inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Hugo

    2012-05-01

    The transmembrane receptor tissue factor is a prominent protein expressed at macrophages and smooth muscle cells within human atherosclerotic lesions. While many coagulation proteins are detectable in atherosclerosis, a locally active thrombin and fibrin generating molecular machinery may be instrumental in manipulating cellular functions involved in atherogenesis. These include inflammation, angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Indeed, many experimental studies in mice show a correlation between hypercoagulability and increased atherosclerosis. In mice, the amount of atherosclerosis and/or the plaque phenotype, appear to be modifiable by specific anticoagulant interventions. While attempts to vary tissue factor level in the vasculature does not directly reduce plaque burden, the overexpression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor attenuates thrombogenicity and neo intima formation in mice. Moreover, inhibition of factor Xa or thrombin with novel selective agents, including rivaroxaban and dabigatran, inhibits inflammation associated with atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice. The potential to modify a complex chronic disease like atherosclerosis with novel selective anticoagulants merits further clinical study.

  15. Results of a conservative treatment combining induction (neoadjuvant) and consolidation chemotherapy, hormonotherapy, and external and interstitial irradiation in 98 patients with locally advanced breast cancer (IIIA-IIIB)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquillat, C.; Baillet, F.; Weil, M.; Auclerc, G.; Housset, M.; Auclerc, M.; Sellami, M.; Jindani, A.; Thill, L.; Soubrane, C.

    1988-05-15

    Ninety-eight patients with locally advanced breast cancer (Stage IIIA-IIIB) were entered into a pilot study combining intensive induction (neoadjuvant) chemotherapy (VTMFAP) with or without hormonochemotherapy, external and interstitial radiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy with or without hormonochemotherapy. Tumor regression over 50% was observed in 91% patients after chemotherapy, and complete clinical remission occurred in 100% patients after irradiation. The rate of local relapse is 13%. The 3-year disease-free survival is 62% and 3-year global survival is 77%. Initial chemotherapeutic tumor regression greater than 75% is the main predictive factor for disease-free survival.

  16. Developing the Next Generation Shell Buckling Design Factors and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor (SBKF) Project was established in the spring of 2007 by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) in collaboration with the Constellation Program and Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. The SBKF project has the current goal of developing less-conservative, robust shell buckling design factors (a.k.a. knockdown factors) and design and analysis technologies for light-weight stiffened metallic launch vehicle (LV) structures. Preliminary design studies indicate that implementation of these new knockdown factors can enable significant reductions in mass and mass-growth in these vehicles and can help mitigate some of NASA s LV development and performance risks. In particular, it is expected that the results from this project will help reduce the reliance on testing, provide high-fidelity estimates of structural performance, reliability, robustness, and enable increased payload capability. The SBKF project objectives and approach used to develop and validate new design technologies are presented, and provide a glimpse into the future of design of the next generation of buckling-critical launch vehicle structures.

  17. Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB confers enhanced neonatal intracranial transduction by AAV8 but not by 5, 9 or rh10

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, J A; Bloom, M D; Heldermon, C D

    2016-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB, MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. To determine the possible therapeutic utility of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in early gene therapy-based interventions, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four central nervous system (CNS) administered rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10. To simulate optimal earliest treatment of the disease, each rAAV serotype was injected into the CNS of neonatal MPS IIIB and control animals. We observed marked differences in biodistribution and transduction profiles between the serotypes and this differed in MPS IIIB compared with healthy control mice. Overall, in control mice, all serotypes performed comparably, although some differences were observed in certain focal areas. In MPS IIIB mice, AAV8 was more efficient than AAV5, -9 and -rh10 for gene delivery to most structures analyzed, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. Noteworthy, the pattern of biodistribution within the CNS varied by serotype and genotype. Interestingly, AAV8 also produced the highest green fluorescent protein intensity levels compared with any other serotype and demonstrated improved transduction in NAGLU compared with control brains. Importantly, we also show leakage of AAV8, -9 and -rh10, but not AAV5, from CNS parenchyma to systemic organs. Overall, our data suggest that AAV8 represents the best therapeutic gene transfer vector for early intervention in MPS IIIB. PMID:26674264

  18. Implant Materials Generate Different Peri-implant Inflammatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Slosar, Paul J.; Schneider, Jennifer M.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. An in vitro study examining factors produced by human mesenchymal stem cells on spine implant materials. Objective. The aim of this study was to examine whether the inflammatory microenvironment generated by cells on titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-alloy, TiAlV) surfaces is affected by surface microtexture and whether it differs from that generated on poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK). Summary of Background Data. Histologically, implants fabricated from PEEK have a fibrous connective tissue surface interface whereas Ti-alloy implants demonstrate close approximation with surrounding bone. Ti-alloy surfaces with complex micron/submicron scale roughness promote osteoblastic differentiation and foster a specific cellular environment that favors bone formation whereas PEEK favors fibrous tissue formation. Methods. Human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on tissue culture polystyrene, PEEK, smooth TiAlV, or macro-/micro-/nano-textured rough TiAlV (mmnTiAlV) disks. Osteoblastic differentiation and secreted inflammatory interleukins were assessed after 7 days. Fold changes in mRNAs for inflammation, necrosis, DNA damage, or apoptosis with respect to tissue culture polystyrene were measured by low-density polymerase chain reaction array. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance, followed by Bonferroni's correction of Student's t-test. Results. Cells on PEEK upregulated mRNAs for chemokine ligand-2, interleukin (IL) 1β, IL6, IL8, and tumor necrosis factor. Cells grown on the mmnTiAlV had an 8-fold reduction in mRNAs for toll-like receptor-4. Cells grown on mmnTiAlV had reduced levels of proinflammatory interleukins. Cells on PEEK had higher mRNAs for factors strongly associated with cell death/apoptosis, whereas cells on mmnTiAlV exhibited reduced cytokine factor levels. All results were significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion. These results suggest that fibrous tissue around PEEK implants may be due to several factors: reduced osteoblastic differentiation of

  19. Generation of monoclonal antibody targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Olena; Ovcharenko, Galyna; Klymenko, Tetyana; Zhyvoloup, Olexandr; Gaman, Nadia; Volkova, Darija; Gout, Ivan; Filonenko, Valeriy

    2009-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a member of the FGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, whose function has been implicated in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and tumorigenesis. Deregulation of FGFR3 signaling has been implicated with human pathologies, including cancer. Activating mutations in FGFR3 gene are frequently detected in bladder cancer, multiple myeloma, and noninvasive papillary urothelial cell carcinomas, while the overexpression of the receptor is observed in thyroid lymphoma and bladder cancer. The main aim of this study was to generate hybridoma clones producing antibody that could specifically recognize FGFR3/S249C mutant, but not the wild-type FGFR. To achieve this, we used for immunization bacterially expressed fragment of FGFR3 corresponding to loops II-III of the extracellular domain (GST-His/FGFR3/S249C-LII-III), which possesses oncogenic mutation at Ser249 detected in at least 50% of bladder cancers. Primary ELISA screening allowed us to isolate several hybridoma clones that showed specificity towards FGFR3/S249C, but not FGFR3wt protein. Unfortunately, these clones were not stable during single-cell cloning and expansion and lost the ability to recognize specifically FGFR3/S249C. However, this study allowed us to generate several monoclonal antibodies specific towards both FGFR3wt and FGFR3/S249C recombinant proteins. Produced hybridomas secreted MAbs that were specific in Western blotting towards bacterially expressed FGFR3wt and FGFR3/S249C, as well as the full-length receptors ectopically expressed in Sf21 and HEK293 cells. Moreover, transiently expressed wild-type and oncogenic forms of FGFR were efficiently immunoprecipitated with selected antibodies from the lysates of infected Sf21 and transiently transfected HEK293. In summary, generated antibodies should be useful as tools for examining the expression pattern and biological functions of FGFR3 in normal and

  20. Novel pathologic findings associated with urinary retention in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB.

    PubMed

    Gografe, Sylvia I; Sanberg, Paul R; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Monforte, Hector; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2009-04-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB; Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is a metabolic disorder with devastating clinical characteristics starting in early childhood and leading to premature death. A knockout mouse strain was developed that models this disease. Mice of the strain B6.129S6- Naglu(tm1Efn)/J are invaluable for investigating pathogenesis and possible treatment modalities. However, the mouse strain also exhibits some objectionable phenotypic features. One such feature, urinary retention, not only is atypical of human MPS IIIB but often leads to early termination of experiments due to animal welfare concerns. The aim of this study was to investigate abnormalities associated with the urinary retention. Necropsies were performed on 9-mo-old mice; urinalysis, hematology and blood chemistry parameters were evaluated, and urogenital specimens were microscopically examined. Histopathologic examinations of urinary tract specimens proved illuminating regarding pathology in the urinary tract. A large mononuclear cell infiltrate was discovered in mutant mice of both sexes, more pronounced in females compared with male mice. The infiltrate comprises of large rounded or polygonal cells with generous variably vacuolated, granular eosinophilic cytoplasm and small round vesicular nuclei. These cells were present throughout and expand the interstitium of the lower urinary tract. Either this results in extrinsic compression of the lumen of the urethra, eventually leading to obstructive uropathy, bladder hyperdistension, and urinary retention or possibly interferes with the neurogenic component of micturition needs to be further investigated. The novel finding of an unexpected mononuclear cell infiltrate in the urinary tract in the knockout mice B6.129S6- Naglu(tm1Efn)/J is reported.

  1. Novel Pathologic Findings Associated with Urinary Retention in a Mouse Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Gografe, Sylvia I; Sanberg, Paul R; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Monforte, Hector; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2009-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB; Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is a metabolic disorder with devastating clinical characteristics starting in early childhood and leading to premature death. A knockout mouse strain was developed that models this disease. Mice of the strain B6.129S6- Naglutm1Efn/J are invaluable for investigating pathogenesis and possible treatment modalities. However, the mouse strain also exhibits some objectionable phenotypic features. One such feature, urinary retention, not only is atypical of human MPS IIIB but often leads to early termination of experiments due to animal welfare concerns. The aim of this study was to investigate abnormalities associated with the urinary retention. Necropsies were performed on 9-mo-old mice; urinalysis, hematology and blood chemistry parameters were evaluated, and urogenital specimens were microscopically examined. Histopathologic examinations of urinary tract specimens proved illuminating regarding pathology in the urinary tract. A large mononuclear cell infiltrate was discovered in mutant mice of both sexes, more pronounced in females compared with male mice. The infiltrate comprises of large rounded or polygonal cells with generous variably vacuolated, granular eosinophilic cytoplasm and small round vesicular nuclei. These cells were present throughout and expand the interstitium of the lower urinary tract. Either this results in extrinsic compression of the lumen of the urethra, eventually leading to obstructive uropathy, bladder hyperdistension, and urinary retention or possibly interferes with the neurogenic component of micturition needs to be further investigated. The novel finding of an unexpected mononuclear cell infiltrate in the urinary tract in the knockout mice B6.129S6- Naglutm1Efn/J is reported. PMID:19389305

  2. The Murine Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB Develops Cardiopathies over Time Leading to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Valeria; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Paciello, Orlando; Avallone, Luigi; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Iacobellis, Francesca; Di Napoli, Daniele; Magliulo, Fabio; Perrino, Cinzia; Trimarco, Bruno; Esposito, Giovanni; Di Natale, Paola; Pavone, Luigi Michele

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is a lysosomal disease due to the deficiency of the enzyme α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) required for heparan sulfate (HS) degradation. The disease is characterized by mild somatic features and severe neurological disorders. Very little is known on the cardiac dysfunctions in MPS IIIB. In this study, we used the murine model of MPS IIIB (NAGLU knockout mice, NAGLU-/-) in order to investigate the cardiac involvement in the disease. Echocardiographic analysis showed a marked increase in left ventricular (LV) mass, reduced cardiac function and valvular defects in NAGLU-/- mice as compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. The NAGLU-/- mice exhibited a significant increase in aortic and mitral annulus dimension with a progressive elongation and thickening of anterior mitral valve leaflet. A severe mitral regurgitation with reduction in mitral inflow E-wave-to-A-wave ratio was observed in 32-week-old NAGLU-/- mice. Compared to WT mice, NAGLU-/- mice exhibited a significantly lower survival with increased mortality observed in particular after 25 weeks of age. Histopathological analysis revealed a significant increase of myocardial fiber vacuolization, accumulation of HS in the myocardial vacuoles, recruitment of inflammatory cells and collagen deposition within the myocardium, and an increase of LV fibrosis in NAGLU-/- mice compared to WT mice. Biochemical analysis of heart samples from affected mice showed increased expression levels of cardiac failure hallmarks such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, connexin43, α-smooth muscle actin, α-actinin, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides, and myosin heavy polypeptide 7. Furthermore, heart samples from NAGLU-/- mice showed enhanced expression of the lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP2), and the autophagic markers Beclin1 and LC3 isoform II (LC3-II). Overall, our findings demonstrate that NAGLU-/- mice develop heart disease, valvular abnormalities and cardiac

  3. High duty factor plasma generator for CERN's Superconducting Proton Linac.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Kronberger, M; Scrivens, R; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Favre, G; Geisser, J-M; Küchler, D; Mathot, S; Midttun, O; Paoluzzi, M; Schmitzer, C; Steyaert, D

    2010-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 is a 160 MeV linear accelerator currently under construction. It will inject negatively charged hydrogen ions into CERN's PS-Booster. Its ion source is a noncesiated rf driven H(-) volume source directly inspired from the one of DESY and is aimed to deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 0.4 ms at a 2 Hz repetition rate. The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project is part of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. It consists of an extension of Linac4 up to 5 GeV and is foreseen to deliver protons to a future 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2). For the SPL high power option (HP-SPL), the ion source would deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 1.2 ms and operate at a 50 Hz repetition rate. This significant upgrade motivates the design of the new water cooled plasma generator presented in this paper. Its engineering is based on the results of a finite element thermal study of the Linac4 H(-) plasma generator that identified critical components and thermal barriers. A cooling system is proposed which achieves the required heat dissipation and maintains the original functionality. Materials with higher thermal conductivity are selected and, wherever possible, thermal barriers resulting from low pressure contacts are removed by brazing metals on insulators. The AlN plasma chamber cooling circuit is inspired from the approach chosen for the cesiated high duty factor rf H(-) source operating at SNS.

  4. Electrophysiological and Histological Characterization of Rod-Cone Retinal Degeneration and Microglia Activation in a Mouse Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Dennis Y.; Lotfi, Parisa; Simons, David L.; Sardiello, Marco; Wu, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome Type B or Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPS IIIB) is a neurodegenerative autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder in which patients suffer severe vision loss from associated retinopathy. Here we sought to study the underlying retinal functional and morphological changes associated with MPS IIIB disease progression using the established model of MPS IIIB, the B6.129S6-Naglu(tm1Efn)/J mouse line. Electroretinogram (ERG) was recorded from MPS IIIB and wild-type (WT) mice at the age of 28 and 46 weeks, and retinal tissues were subsequently collected for immunohistochemistry analysis. At the 28th week, rod a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly diminished in MPS IIIB compared to WT mice. The cone a- and b-waves of MPS IIIB mice were not significantly different from those of the control at the 28th week but were significantly diminished at the 46th week, when MPS IIIB mice showed a major loss of rods and rod bipolar cells in both central and peripheral regions and a minor loss of cones in the periphery. Activation of microglia and neovascularization were also detected in the MPS IIIB retina. The new findings that cones and rod bipolar cells also undergo degeneration, and that retinal microglia are activated, will inform future development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:26607664

  5. Generation and characterization of transgenic mice expressing cobra venom factor.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Halter, Roman; Kock, Michael A; Niemann, Heiner; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Paul, Dieter

    2002-10-01

    Cobra venom factor (CVF), the anticomplementary protein in cobra venom, activates the alternative complement pathway, eventually leading to complement consumption. Here, we describe the development of a transgenic mouse model for CVF. We generated a DNA construct containing the full-length cDNA for single-chain pre-pro-CVF. Expression of CVF was controlled by the alpha(1)-antitrypsin promoter to achieve liver-specific expression. Linearized DNA was microinjected into murine ovary cells (strain CD(2)F(1) (BALB/cxDBA/2J)) and the newborn mice were analyzed for stable integration of CVF DNA. After establishing the transgene, mice were propagated in a BALB/c background. The CVF mRNA was detected in the liver and, in some animals, in the kidney. CVF protein was detected in small amounts in the serum. Serum complement hemolytic activity in CVF-transgenic mice was virtually absent. The concentration of plasma C3 was significantly reduced. The CVF-transgenic animals show no unusual phenotype. They provide an animal model to study the effect of long-term complement depletion by continued activation, as well as the role of complement in host immune response and pathogenesis of disease.

  6. Cue Set Stimulation as a Factor in Human Response Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petelle, John L.

    The hypotheses that there will be a significant difference (1) in the number of responses generated according to economic issues, (2) in the number of responses generated according to social issues, (3) in the number of responses generated between the category of economic issues and the category of social issues, (4) in cue ranking by response…

  7. Lymphangiogenesis in cervical cancer evaluated by expression of the VEGF-C gene in clinical stage IB-IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Franc, Magdalena; Kachel-Flis, Agata; Michalski, Bogdan; Fila-Daniłow, Anna; Mazurek, Urszula; Michalska, Anna; Kuczerawy, Ilona; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the present study was to evaluate the profile of VEGF-C gene expression in particular stages of cervical cancer (IB-IIIB) and to estimate the correlation between VEGF-C mRNA quantity profile and clinical stage. Material and methods Material for molecular analysis consisted of cervical cancer tissue specimens collected from 38 women (10, 15, 13 cases were classified as IB, IIB and IIIB, respectively). The control group was composed of normal cervical tissues collected from 10 women who underwent hysterectomy for non-oncological reasons. The number of VEGF-C mRNA copies in particular groups was estimated by the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) method. Results In the control group the average number of mRNA copies was 134 ± 36 (median: 106), in a group with stage IB it was 16 077 ± 7090 (median: 580), for stage IIB – 35 019 ± 8945 (median: 40 870). The highest number of mRNA VEGF-C copies was derived in a group of patients with cervical cancer of stage IIIB. The average quantity was 56 155 ± 12 470, whereas median 55 981. A statistically significantly higher level of VEGF-C gene expression was disclosed in cervical cancer specimens with stage IIB and IIIB than in the control group. In stage IIIB, the VEGF-C gene expression was significantly higher than in specimens derived from individuals in stage IB. Conclusions In squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix of stage IB-IIIB genes involved in lymphangiogenesis, especially VEGF-C, are expressed, which expression increases as the clinical stage of cervical cancer is higher. PMID:26327898

  8. Factors determining waste generation in Spanish towns and cities.

    PubMed

    Prades, Miriam; Gallardo, Antonio; Ibàñez, Maria Victoria

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the generation and composition of municipal solid waste in Spanish towns and cities with more than 5000 inhabitants, which altogether account for 87% of the Spanish population. To do so, the total composition and generation of municipal solid waste fractions were obtained from 135 towns and cities. Homogeneity tests revealed heterogeneity in the proportions of municipal solid waste fractions from one city to another. Statistical analyses identified significant differences in the generation of glass in cities of different sizes and in the generation of all fractions depending on the hydrographic area. Finally, linear regression models and residuals analysis were applied to analyze the effect of different demographic, geographic, and socioeconomic variables on the generation of waste fractions. The conclusions show that more densely populated towns, a hydrographic area, and cities with over 50,000 inhabitants have higher waste generation rates, while certain socioeconomic variables (people/car) decrease that generation. Other socioeconomic variables (foreigners and unemployment) show a positive and null influence on that waste generation, respectively.

  9. Coenzyme A Binding to the Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb Increases Conformational Sampling of Antibiotic Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohu; Norris, Adrianne; Baudry, Jerome Y; Serpersu, Engin H

    2011-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to describe the dynamic properties of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (3)-IIIb (AAC) in its apo and coenzyme A (CoASH) bound forms. The {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H HSQC spectra indicate a partial structural change and coupling of the CoASH binding site with another region in the protein upon the CoASH titration into the apo enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate a significant structural and dynamic variation of the long loop in the antibiotic binding domain in the form of a relatively slow (250 ns), concerted opening motion in the CoASH enzyme complex and that binding of the CoASH increases the structural flexibility of the loop, leading to an interchange between several similar equally populated conformations.

  10. A Qualitative Study of Recovery from Type III-B and III-C Tibial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Shauver, Melissa S.; Aravind, Maya S.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    The literature has shown that long-term outcomes for both below-knee amputation and reconstruction following type III-B and III-C tibial fracture are poor. Yet, patients often report satisfaction with their treatment and/or outcomes. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between patient outcomes and satisfaction after open tibial fractures via qualitative methodology. Twenty patients who were treated for open tibial fractures at one institution were selected using purposeful sampling and interviewed in-person in a semi-structured manner. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Despite reporting marked physical and psychosocial deficits, participants relayed high satisfaction. We hypothesize that the use adaptive coping techniques successfully reduces stress, which leads to an increase in coping self-efficacy that results in the further use of adaptive coping strategies, culminating in personal growth. This stress reduction and personal growth leads to satisfaction despite poor functional and emotional outcomes. PMID:20948418

  11. Metabolome profiling to understand the defense response to sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) to Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 IIIB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot, caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn AG 2-2 IIIB, is an important disease of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). The molecular processes that mediate sugar beet resistance to R. solani are largely unknown and identifying the metabolites associated with R. solani infection ma...

  12. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  13. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Neutrophil biology and the next generation of myeloid growth factors.

    PubMed

    Dale, David C

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the body's critical phagocytic cells for defense against bacterial and fungal infections; bone marrow must produce approximately 10 x 10(9) neutrophils/kg/d to maintain normal blood neutrophil counts. Production of neutrophils depends on myeloid growth factors, particularly granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). After the original phase of development, researchers modified these growth factors to increase their size and delay renal clearance, increase their biologic potency, and create unique molecules for business purposes. Pegylated G-CSF is a successful product of these efforts. Researchers have also tried to identify small molecules to serve as oral agents that mimic the parent molecules, but these programs have been less successful. In 2006, the European Medicines Agency established guidelines for the introduction of new biologic medicinal products claimed to be similar to reference products that had previously been granted marketing authorization in the European community, called bio-similars. Globally, new and copied versions of G-CSF and other myeloid growth factors are now appearing. Some properties of the myeloid growth factors are similar to other agents, offering opportunities for the development of alternative drugs and treatments. For example, recent research shows that hematopoietic progenitor cells can be mobilized with a chemokine receptor antagonist, chemotherapy, G-CSF, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Advances in neutrophil biology coupled with better understanding and development of myeloid growth factors offer great promise for improving the care of patients with cancer and many other disorders.

  15. Literature Review: Factors Affecting the Development of Generation X and Millennials. Societal Factors Affecting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Thomas J.; adbow, Nancy

    Generation X, or "Xers," refers to those born in the United States between 1960 and 1980 and Generation Y, also known as "Millennials," refers to those born between 1980 and 2000. An examination of these two generations is important to educators as the new generation of Millennials begins to access higher education. A large and…

  16. Exploring First Generation African American Graduate Students: Motivating Factors for Pursuing a Doctoral Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Stephanie G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose for conducting the study was to examine the factors that motivate African-American first-generation students to pursue doctoral education at a four-year public university. There has been little research on the influence academic or nonacademic factors have on first-generation graduate student motivation. Similarly, little research…

  17. Factors associated with the satisfaction of millennial generation dental residents.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hwai-Tai C; O'Toole, Terry G; Arola, Patricia E; Kashner, T Michael; Chang, Barbara K

    2012-11-01

    Data from the 2010 Learners' Perceptions Survey (LPS) administered through the Office of Academic Affiliations, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) were analyzed to identify factors associated with dental residents' satisfaction with the VA as a clinical training environment. Satisfaction scores were linked to clinic workloads, dental procedure complexity levels, staffing patterns, and facility infrastructure data to explore conditions that may improve residents' satisfaction. Findings supported the construct validity of the LPS survey data and underscored the importance of maintaining optimal ratios of attending dentists, dental assistants, and administrative staff to residents so that each trainee will have opportunities to perform an adequate level of dental workload. As programs strive to improve the quality of graduate dental education, findings from this study are vital for setting curriculum design guidelines and for providing infrastructure support for dental resident education.

  18. A Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, Jordan; Newmark, Robin; Heath, Garvin; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The presented water factors may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

  19. Factors that influence the generation of autobiographical memory conjunction errors.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Aleea L; Monk-Fromont, Edwin; Schacter, Daniel L; Addis, Donna Rose

    2016-01-01

    The constructive nature of memory is generally adaptive, allowing us to efficiently store, process and learn from life events, and simulate future scenarios to prepare ourselves for what may come. However, the cost of a flexibly constructive memory system is the occasional conjunction error, whereby the components of an event are authentic, but the combination of those components is false. Using a novel recombination paradigm, it was demonstrated that details from one autobiographical memory (AM) may be incorrectly incorporated into another, forming AM conjunction errors that elude typical reality monitoring checks. The factors that contribute to the creation of these conjunction errors were examined across two experiments. Conjunction errors were more likely to occur when the corresponding details were partially rather than fully recombined, likely due to increased plausibility and ease of simulation of partially recombined scenarios. Brief periods of imagination increased conjunction error rates, in line with the imagination inflation effect. Subjective ratings suggest that this inflation is due to similarity of phenomenological experience between conjunction and authentic memories, consistent with a source monitoring perspective. Moreover, objective scoring of memory content indicates that increased perceptual detail may be particularly important for the formation of AM conjunction errors.

  20. Historical and contemporary factors generate unique butterfly communities on islands

    PubMed Central

    Vodă, Raluca; Dapporto, Leonardo; Dincă, Vlad; Shreeve, Tim G.; Khaldi, Mourad; Barech, Ghania; Rebbas, Khellaf; Sammut, Paul; Scalercio, Stefano; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Vila, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms shaping island biotas are not yet well understood mostly because of a lack of studies comparing eco-evolutionary fingerprints over entire taxonomic groups. Here, we linked community structure (richness, frequency and nestedness) and genetic differentiation (based on mitochondrial DNA) in order to compare insular butterfly communities occurring over a key intercontinental area in the Mediterranean (Italy-Sicily-Maghreb). We found that community characteristics and genetic structure were influenced by a combination of contemporary and historical factors, and among the latter, connection during the Pleistocene had an important impact. We showed that species can be divided into two groups with radically different properties: widespread taxa had high dispersal capacity, a nested pattern of occurrence, and displayed little genetic structure, while rare species were mainly characterized by low dispersal, high turnover and genetically differentiated populations. These results offer an unprecedented view of the distinctive butterfly communities and of the main processes determining them on each studied island and highlight the importance of assessing the phylogeographic value of populations for conservation. PMID:27353723

  1. Historical and contemporary factors generate unique butterfly communities on islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodă, Raluca; Dapporto, Leonardo; Dincă, Vlad; Shreeve, Tim G.; Khaldi, Mourad; Barech, Ghania; Rebbas, Khellaf; Sammut, Paul; Scalercio, Stefano; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Vila, Roger

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms shaping island biotas are not yet well understood mostly because of a lack of studies comparing eco-evolutionary fingerprints over entire taxonomic groups. Here, we linked community structure (richness, frequency and nestedness) and genetic differentiation (based on mitochondrial DNA) in order to compare insular butterfly communities occurring over a key intercontinental area in the Mediterranean (Italy-Sicily-Maghreb). We found that community characteristics and genetic structure were influenced by a combination of contemporary and historical factors, and among the latter, connection during the Pleistocene had an important impact. We showed that species can be divided into two groups with radically different properties: widespread taxa had high dispersal capacity, a nested pattern of occurrence, and displayed little genetic structure, while rare species were mainly characterized by low dispersal, high turnover and genetically differentiated populations. These results offer an unprecedented view of the distinctive butterfly communities and of the main processes determining them on each studied island and highlight the importance of assessing the phylogeographic value of populations for conservation.

  2. One-stage emergency treatment of open grade IIIB tibial shaft fractures with bone loss.

    PubMed

    Tropet, Y; Garbuio, P; Obert, L; Jeunet, L; Elias, B

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the authors' experience with emergency reconstruction of severe tibial shaft fractures. Five male patients were admitted to the emergency room with a grade IIIB open tibial shaft fracture with bone loss (average age, 33 years; age range, 18-65 years). Injuries were the result of motorcycle accidents (N = 2), pedestrian accidents (N = 1), gunshot wound (N = 1), and paragliding fall (N = 1). Primary emergent one-stage management for all patients consisted of administration of antibiotics, debridement, stabilization by locked intramedullary nailing, bone grafting from the iliac crest, and coverage using free muscle flaps (four latissimus dorsi and one gracilis). The average follow-up was 21 months (range, 8 months-3.5 years). Partial weight bearing with no immobilization was started at 3 months, and full weight bearing began 5 months after trauma. No angular complications and no nonunions were observed. There was one case of superficial infection without osteitis. All fractures healed within 6 months in 4 patients and within 10 months in 1 patient. At the last follow-up examination, ankle and knee motion was normal and no pain was noted, except for 1 patient who had associated lesions (ankle motion reduced by 50%). Aggressive emergency management of severe open tibial fractures provides good results. It improves end results markedly, not only by reducing tissue loss from infection, but also reducing healing and rehabilitation times.

  3. RIP Input Tables From Wapdeg For La Design Selection: Enhanced Design Alternative Iiib

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon; K.G. Mast; J.H. Lee

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to document the Waste Package Degradation (WAPDEG) version 3.09 (CRWMS M&O 1998b. 'Software Routine Report for WAPDEG' (Version 3.09)) simulations used to analyze degradation and failure of 2-cm thick titanium grade 7 corrosion resistant material (CRM) drip shields as well as degradation and failure of the waste packages over which they are placed. The waste packages are composed of two corrosion resistant materials (CRM) barriers. The outer barrier is composed of 2 cm of Alloy 22 and the inner barrier is composed of 1.5 cm of titanium grade 7. The WAPDEG simulation results are post-processed into tables of drip shield/waste package degradation time histories suitable for use as input into the Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems (RIP) version 5.19.01 (Golder Associates 1998) computer code. This calculation supports Performance Assessment analysis of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) Enhanced Design Alternative IIIb.

  4. PET/CT surveillance detects asymptomatic recurrences in stage IIIB and IIIC melanoma patients: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Madu, Max F; Timmerman, Pieter; Wouters, Michel W J M; van der Hiel, Bernies; van der Hage, Jos A; van Akkooi, Alexander C J

    2017-02-20

    AJCC stage IIIB and IIIC melanoma patients are at risk for disease relapse or progression. The advent of effective systemic therapies has made curative treatment of progressive disease a possibility. As resection of oligometastatic disease can confer a survival benefit and as immunotherapy is possibly most effective in a low tumor load setting, there is a likely benefit to early detection of progression. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate a PET/computed tomography (CT) surveillance schedule for resected stage IIIB and IIIC melanoma. From 1-2015, stage IIIB and IIIC melanoma patients at our institution underwent 6-monthly surveillance with PET/CT, together with 3-monthly S100B assessment. When symptoms or elevated S100B were detected, an additional PET/CT was performed. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate outcomes for this surveillance schedule. Fifty-one patients were followed up, 27 patients developed a recurrence before surveillance imaging, five were detected by an elevated S100B, and one patient was not scanned according to protocol. Eighteen patients were included. Thirty-two scans were acquired. Eleven relapses were suspected on PET/CT. Ten scans were true positive, one case was false positive, and one case was false negative. All recurrences detected by PET/CT were asymptomatic at that time, with a normal range of S100B. The number of scans needed to find one asymptomatic relapse was 3.6. PET/CT surveillance imaging seems to be an effective strategy for detecting asymptomatic recurrence in stage IIIB and IIIC melanoma patients in the first year after complete surgical resection.

  5. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  6. Factors Influencing the First-Year Persistence of First Generation College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Michael

    The factors that influence the first-year persistence of first generation college students at four-year institutions were studied using data from the Beginning Postsecondary Students (BPS) database. The BPS is a longitudinal study of first-time students in the 1995 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study. First generation students are those whose…

  7. Biochemical, histological and functional correction of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB by intra-cerebrospinal fluid gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Albert; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Motas, Sandra; Villacampa, Pilar; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Molas, Maria; Sánchez, Víctor; Muñoz, Sergio; Leborgne, Christian; Moll, Xavier; Pumarola, Martí; Mingozzi, Federico; Ruberte, Jesús; Añor, Sònia; Bosch, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive tool for the treatment of monogenic disorders, in particular for lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by deficiencies in secretable lysosomal enzymes in which neither full restoration of normal enzymatic activity nor transduction of all affected cells are necessary. However, some LSD such as Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB (MPSIIIB) are challenging because the disease's main target organ is the brain and enzymes do not efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier even if present at very high concentration in circulation. To overcome these limitations, we delivered AAV9 vectors encoding for α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) to the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) of MPSIIIB mice with the disease already detectable at biochemical, histological and functional level. Restoration of enzymatic activity in Central Nervous System (CNS) resulted in normalization of glycosaminoglycan content and lysosomal physiology, resolved neuroinflammation and restored the pattern of gene expression in brain similar to that of healthy animals. Additionally, transduction of the liver due to passage of vectors to the circulation led to whole-body disease correction. Treated animals also showed reversal of behavioural deficits and extended lifespan. Importantly, when the levels of enzymatic activity were monitored in the CSF of dogs following administration of canine NAGLU-coding vectors to animals that were either naïve or had pre-existing immunity against AAV9, similar levels of activity were achieved, suggesting that CNS efficacy would not be compromised in patients seropositive for AAV9. Our studies provide a strong rationale for the clinical development of this novel therapeutic approach as the treatment for MPSIIIB.

  8. Phospholipid-esterified eicosanoids are generated in agonist-activated human platelets and enhance tissue factor-dependent thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christopher P; Morgan, Lloyd T; Maskrey, Benjamin H; Murphy, Robert C; Kühn, Hartmut; Hazen, Stanley L; Goodall, Alison H; Hamali, Hassan A; Collins, Peter W; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2010-03-05

    Here, a group of specific lipids, comprising phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)- or phosphatidylcholine (PC)-esterified 12S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12S-HETE), generated by 12-lipoxygenase was identified and characterized. 12S-HETE-PE/PCs were formed within 5 min of activation by thrombin, ionophore, or collagen. Esterified HETE levels generated in response to thrombin were 5.85 +/- 1.42 (PE) or 18.35 +/- 4.61 (PC), whereas free was 65.5 +/- 17.6 ng/4 x 10(7) cells (n = 5 separate donors, mean +/- S.E.). Their generation was stimulated by triggering protease-activated receptors-1 and -4 and signaling via Ca(2+) mobilization secretory phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase, src tyrosine kinases, and protein kinase C. Stable isotope labeling showed that they form predominantly by esterification that occurs on the same time scale as free acid generation. Unlike free 12S-HETE that is secreted, esterified HETEs remain cell-associated, with HETE-PEs migrating to the outside of the plasma membrane. 12-Lipoxygenase inhibition attenuated externalization of native PE and phosphatidylserine and HETE-PEs. Platelets from a patient with the bleeding disorder, Scott syndrome, did not externalize HETE-PEs, and liposomes supplemented with HETE-PC dose-dependently enhanced tissue factor-dependent thrombin generation in vitro. This suggests a role for these novel lipids in promoting coagulation. Thus, oxidized phospholipids form by receptor/agonist mechanisms, not merely as an undesirable consequence of vascular and inflammatory disease.

  9. Relationship between short activated partial thromboplastin times, thrombin generation, procoagulant factors and procoagulant phospholipid activity.

    PubMed

    Mina, Ashraf; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Koutts, Jerry

    2012-04-01

    Short activated partial thromboplastin times (APTTs) are associated with thrombosis. However, what short APTTs actually represent in terms of possible mechanistic pathways is not well characterized. We have assessed thrombin generation as compared with levels of procoagulant factor (fibrinogen, V, VIII, IX, XI and XII) activities, von Willebrand factor level and activity using collagen binding, as well as procoagulant phospholipid activity, in 113 consecutive samples exhibiting a short APTT compared with an equal number of age-matched and sex-matched samples yielding a normal APTT. We found a significant difference in peak thrombin generation, velocity index and area under the curve between the two groups, and that thrombin generation markers correlated with the APTT, procoagulant phospholipid activity and several procoagulant clotting factors. We conclude that short APTTs represent a procoagulant milieu, as represented by heightened thrombin generation and several other heightened procoagulant activities, which may help explain the association with thrombosis.

  10. Kinetic Modeling Sheds Light on the Mode of Action of Recombinant Factor VIIa on Thrombin Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    numerical model to generate activated factor VII (FVIIa) titration curves in the cases of normal blood composition, hemophilia A and B blood, blood...as a hemostatic agent for patients with hemophilia , congenital FVII deficiency, and Glanzmann’s thrombocytopenia [3]. Following its initial approval...normal blood composition, hemophilia A and B blood, blood lacking factor VII, blood lacking tissue factor pathway inhibitor, and diluted blood. We

  11. Robot-assisted laparoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for stage IIIb mixed germ cell testicular cancer after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyub; Kim, Dong Soo; Chang, Sung-Goo; Jeon, Seung Hyun

    2015-07-01

    Laparoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, especially when performed with the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical), has shown excellent cosmetic results with similar oncologic outcomes to those of open surgery. In this study, we present a case of robot-assisted retroperitoneal lymph node dissection performed in an 18-year-old man who was diagnosed with a stage IIIb mixed germ cell tumor and who was initially treated with radical orchiectomy, followed by chemotherapy. This case shows that robot-assisted retroperitoneal lymph node dissection is technically feasible, safe, and cosmetically favorable, even when performed on patients with high-stage disease or after chemotherapy.

  12. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibition blocks thrombin generation in humans by interfering with platelet factor V activation

    PubMed Central

    Stopa, Jack D.; Neuberg, Donna; Puligandla, Maneka; Furie, Bruce; Zwicker, Jeffrey I.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation. We previously demonstrated that glycosylated quercetin flavonoids such as isoquercetin inhibit PDI activity and thrombus formation in animal models, but whether extracellular PDI represents a viable anticoagulant target in humans and how its inhibition affects blood coagulation remain unknown. METHODS: We evaluated effects of oral administration of isoquercetin on platelet-dependent thrombin generation in healthy subjects and patients with persistently elevated anti-phospholipid antibodies. RESULTS: Following oral administration of 1,000 mg isoquercetin to healthy adults, the measured peak plasma quercetin concentration (9.2 μM) exceeded its IC50 for inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin in vitro (2.5 ± 0.4 μM). Platelet-dependent thrombin generation decreased by 51% in the healthy volunteers compared with baseline (P = 0.0004) and by 64% in the anti-phospholipid antibody cohort (P = 0.015) following isoquercetin ingestion. To understand how PDI affects thrombin generation, we evaluated substrates of PDI identified using an unbiased mechanistic-based substrate trapping approach. These studies identified platelet factor V as a PDI substrate. Isoquercetin blocked both platelet factor Va and thrombin generation with an IC50 of ~5 μM. Inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin ingestion resulted in a 53% decrease in the generation of platelet factor Va (P = 0.001). Isoquercetin-mediated inhibition was reversed with addition of exogenous factor Va. CONCLUSION: These studies show that oral administration of isoquercetin inhibits PDI activity in plasma and diminishes platelet-dependent thrombin generation predominantly by blocking the generation of platelet factor Va. These pharmacodynamic and mechanistic observations represent an important step in the development of a novel class of antithrombotic agents targeting PDI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01722669) FUNDING: National Heart

  13. Diffusion of Innovation: Factors Promoting Interest in Solar Photovoltaic Generation Systems Within Air Force Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Q42c. How likely is it that your base will request funding in these systems in the next 10 years? (large scale) Q43a.How beneficial do you think it...DIFFUSION OF INNOVATION: FACTORS PROMOTING INTEREST IN SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATION SYSTEMS WITHIN AIR...SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATION SYSTEMS WITHIN AIR FORCE INSTALLATIONS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Systems and Engineering

  14. One-Time Password Generation and Two-Factor Authentication Using Molecules and Light.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Li, Shiming; Andréasson, Joakim

    2017-03-02

    Herein, we report the first example of one-time password (OTP) generation and two-factor authentication (2FA) using a molecular approach. OTPs are passwords that are valid for one entry only. For the next login session, a new, different password is generated. This brings the advantage that any undesired recording of a password will not risk the security of the authentication process. Our molecular realization of the OTP generator is based on a photochromic molecular triad where the optical input required to set the triad to the fluorescent form differs depending on the initial isomeric state.

  15. Comparison of Retention Factors between First-Generation and Second- and Third-Generation College Students and Development of the Likelihood of Success Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gerri Brown

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the retention factors between first-generation college students and second- and third-generation college students in the postsecondary educational setting. This study examined the differences in the preselected retention factors: faculty-student interaction, college mentor, academic support, residential…

  16. [Amputation or reconstruction of IIIB and IIIC open tibial fracture. Decision criteria in the acute phase and late functional outcome].

    PubMed

    Seekamp, A; Regel, G; Ruffert, S; Ziegler, M; Tscherne, H

    1998-05-01

    In IIIB and IIIC type open tibial fractures (according to Gustilo) the primary decision that has to be made regarding therapy is wether or not the limb can be salvaged. To standardize the criteria for amputation different salvage scores have been established in recent years. In this study the Hannover Fracture Scale (HFS), the Predictive Salvage Index (PSI), the Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) and the NISSSA score were evaluated regarding their clinical relevance. When ROC Analysis was performed for all these scores in our patients the HFS revealed the highest sensitivity (0.91), but low specificity (0.71). The highest specificity was noted for the MESS (0.97), which in parallel showed the lowest sensitivity (0.59). In general it seems to be essential to make the right decision initially in order to avoid secondary amputation. All the scores mentioned here appear to be helpful in decision making. Salvaged limbs in IIIB and IIIC fractures presented a comparable good outcome, whereas salvaged IIIC injuries with a high score presented an outcome which was as bad as in secondary amputations. Secondary amputated patients required not only significant longer hospitalization but also resulted in poor outcome compared with the patients having received reconstruction or primary amputation.

  17. Treatment of stage IIIB cervical cancer with Californium-252 fast-neutron brachytherapy and external photon therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gallion, H.H.; Maruyama, Y.; van Nagell, J.R. Jr.; Donaldson, E.S.; Rowley, K.C.; Yoneda, J.; Beach, J.L.; Powell, D.E.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1987-05-15

    From January 1977 to July 1984, 32 patients with Stage IIIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy and external pelvic radiation. These patients received 4500 to 5000 rad external photon therapy and two or three outpatient Californium-252 (252Cf) implants, plus sidewall boost irradiation. Treatment results were compared retrospectively to those obtained in a historical control group of patients with Stage IIIB cervical cancer treated with external radiation and conventional photon brachytherapy from 1972 to 1976. Local or regional tumor recurrence developed in 53% of patients treated with neutron therapy and an additional 9% experienced distant metastases. Thirty-eight percent of patients remain free of disease 12 to 96 months (mean, 51 months) after therapy. The 2-year and 5-year survival rates of patients treated with neutron therapy were 53% and 36%, which were not significantly different than those obtained with photon brachytherapy (2-year survival, 61%; 5-year survival, 34%). Complications of neutron therapy were minimal and included proctitis (19%) and vaginal stenosis (9%). There were no cases of enteric fistulae. Outpatient neutron brachytherapy was cost effective and was well tolerated by patients.

  18. Treatment of stage IIIB cervical cancer with Californium-252 fast-neutron brachytherapy and external photon therapy.

    PubMed

    Gallion, H H; Maruyama, Y; van Nagell, J R; Donaldson, E S; Rowley, K C; Yoneda, J; Beach, J L; Powell, D E; Kryscio, R J

    1987-05-15

    From January 1977 to July 1984, 32 patients with Stage IIIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy and external pelvic radiation. These patients received 4500 to 5000 rad external photon therapy and two or three outpatient Californium-252 (252Cf) implants, plus sidewall boost irradiation. Treatment results were compared retrospectively to those obtained in a historical control group of patients with Stage IIIB cervical cancer treated with external radiation and conventional photon brachytherapy from 1972 to 1976. Local or regional tumor recurrence developed in 53% of patients treated with neutron therapy and an additional 9% experienced distant metastases. Thirty-eight percent of patients remain free of disease 12 to 96 months (mean, 51 months) after therapy. The 2-year and 5-year survival rates of patients treated with neutron therapy were 53% and 36%, which were not significantly different than those obtained with photon brachytherapy (2-year survival, 61%; 5-year survival, 34%). Complications of neutron therapy were minimal and included proctitis (19%) and vaginal stenosis (9%). There were no cases of enteric fistulae. Outpatient neutron brachytherapy was cost effective and was well tolerated by patients.

  19. A novel mutation (c.200T>C) in the NAGLU gene of a Korean patient with mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Eun; Park, Hyung-Doo; Jang, Mi-Ae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Cho, Sung Yoon; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2013-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB is a lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) caused by abnormalities of the enzyme α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) that is required for degradation of heparan sulfate. The patient in this study was a 4-yr-old boy. He presented with normal height and weight, pectus carinatum, and multiple persistent Mongolian spots on his back. He had mild dysmorphic features with prominent speech developmental delays and, to a lesser extent, motor developmental delays. The cetylpyridinium chloride precipitation test revealed excessive mucopolysacchariduria (657.2 mg glycosaminoglycan/g creatinine; reference range, <175 mg glycosaminoglycan/g creatinine). Thin layer chromatography showed urinary heparan sulfate excretion. NAGLU enzyme activity was significantly decreased in leukocytes (not detected; reference range, 0.9-1.51 nmol/hr/mg protein) as well as in plasma (0.14 nmol/hr/mg protein; reference range, 22.3-60.9 nmol/hr/mg protein). PCR and direct sequencing analysis of the NAGLU gene showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote for 2 mutations: c.200T>C (p.L67P) and c.1444C>T (p.R482W). The c.200T>C mutation was a novel finding. This is the first report of a Korean patient with MPS IIIB who was confirmed by molecular genetic analyses and biochemical investigation.

  20. Factors That Relate to the Persistence of First-Generation Undergraduate Students in a Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thachil, Shoba Anne

    2013-01-01

    This study examined factors that relate to the persistence of first-generation undergraduate students in a 4-year public university in the Southeastern United States. Results were analyzed from a 2011 two-part survey: CARES-I (College Assessment of Readiness for Entering Students-Intent) and CARES-A (College Assessment of Readiness for Entering…

  1. Generation Y Student-Teachers' Motivational Factors: Retention Implications for K-12 Educational Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontempo, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Generation Y represents a growing number of student-teachers who will impact the future of educational practice, yet little research has been conducted for this demographic group. The purpose of this mixed-method study was to identify motivational factors of neophyte teachers and the retention implications these findings had on Kindergarten…

  2. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2006-04-04

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  3. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2004-07-13

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  4. SEATIDE Analysis Process. Volume IIIB. Cruise Missile - Concept Generation and Screening Model (CM-CGSM). Appendices A - B.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-01-01

    s t ics of Var ious Wal leye Components and Confi gurations in the Subson ic , T ranson ic , and Supersonic Flight Reg ions ” , U. S. Naval...f t ) 100 , 000 . 0 5 R range (f t ) 1 , 000 , 000 . 0 6 W mass ( Ibm) 1,000 . 0 7 “tB ideal veloci ty ( f t / s e c ) 1, 000. 0 V 3 . 2 NEWTON ...RAPHSON PROCEDURE ~ Newton -Raphson procedure is used in several instances to solve a non- l inear equation fo r the independent variable

  5. Factors influencing municipal solid waste generation in China: a multiple statistical analysis study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Wu, Xin-wu

    2011-04-01

    A relationship between the waste production and socio-economic factors is essential in waste management. In the present study, the factors influencing municipal solid waste generation in China were investigated by multiple statistical analysis. Twelve items were chosen for investigation: GDP, per capita GDP, urban population, the proportion of urban population, the area of urban construction, the area of paved roads, the area of urban gardens and green areas, the number of the large cities, annual per capita disposable income of urban households, annual per capita consumption expenditure of urban households, total energy consumption and annual per capital consumption for households. Two methodologies from multiple statistical analysis were selected; specifically principal components analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA). Three new dimensions were identified by PCA: component 1: economy and urban development; component 2: energy consumption; and component 3: urban scale. The three components together accounted for 99.1% of the initial variance. The results show that economy and urban development are important items influencing MSW generation. The proportion of urban population and urban population had the highest loadings in all factors. The relationship between growth of gross domestic product (GDP) and production of MSW was not as clear-cut as often assumed in China, a situation that is more likely to apply to developed countries. Energy consumption was another factor considered in our study of MSW generation. In addition, the annual MSW quantity variation was investigated by cluster analysis.

  6. Factors associated with involvement in nonmetropolitan LGBTQ organizations: Proximity? Generativity? Minority stress? Social location?

    PubMed

    Paceley, Megan S; Oswald, Ramona Faith; Hardesty, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about involvement in LGBTQ organizations. Factors associated with involvement in nonmetropolitan LGBTQ organizations were examined using logistic regression and survey data from 426 LGBTQ individuals residing in a nonmetropolitan region. Involvement was examined in five types of organizations (professional, social/recreational, religious, political, and community center/charity). The same model testing proximity, generativity, minority stress, and social location hypotheses was repeated for each organization type. Results demonstrate that the generativity hypothesis is most strongly supported. Indeed, emotional attachment to the LGBTQ community significantly increased the odds of involvement in every type of organization. However, the factors associated with involvement otherwise differed by organization type. Implications for organizational leaders are discussed.

  7. Factors involved in the generation and replication of rhabdovirus defective T particles.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J J; Villarreal, L P; Breindl, M

    1976-01-01

    Previous indications that cloned B virions might be genetically predisposed to generate a particular defective T particle are shown to be inaccurate. T particle generation was found to be a much more random process than was previously believed. We show that the previously observed generation of particular sizes of T particles by B virion pools is due to the random generation of T particles during preparation of first-passage pools of cloned B virions, and these breed true during the additional passages needed to produce visible quantities of T particles. It is also shown that different host cell lines selectively amplify different T particles, suggesting a strong role of host cell factors in T particle replication. Surprisingly, our line of HeLa cells did not generate or replicate detectable T particles of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) Indiana after either serial undiluted passage or direct addition of T particles, even though the added T particles strongly interfered with B virion replication. In contrast to VSV, rabies virus generates large amounts of T particles during the first passage of cloned B virions, and every rabies-infected baby hamster kidney-21 cell culture evolves into a persistent carrier state. We find that T particle RNA is biologically inactive although T particle nucleocapsid ribonucleoprotein replicates and interferes in cells coinfected with B virions. Efforts to study the mechanism of T particle generation by in vitro attempts to generate T particles or modify their size (using sheared ribonucleoprotein or chemical or UV mutagenesis) were unsuccessful. The kinetics of UV and nitrous acid inactivation of T particles indicate a smaller target size relative to B virions, even after correcting for lengths of RNA molecules. The intercalating dye proflavine does not photosensitize VSV B virions or T particles when present during replication, indicating that there is little or no RNA base pairing in the helical nucleocapsids of either. PMID

  8. Learning a generative model of images by factoring appearance and shape.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Nicolas; Heess, Nicolas; Shotton, Jamie; Winn, John

    2011-03-01

    Computer vision has grown tremendously in the past two decades. Despite all efforts, existing attempts at matching parts of the human visual system's extraordinary ability to understand visual scenes lack either scope or power. By combining the advantages of general low-level generative models and powerful layer-based and hierarchical models, this work aims at being a first step toward richer, more flexible models of images. After comparing various types of restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) able to model continuous-valued data, we introduce our basic model, the masked RBM, which explicitly models occlusion boundaries in image patches by factoring the appearance of any patch region from its shape. We then propose a generative model of larger images using a field of such RBMs. Finally, we discuss how masked RBMs could be stacked to form a deep model able to generate more complicated structures and suitable for various tasks such as segmentation or object recognition.

  9. Generation of flat viewing zone in DFVZ autostereoscopic multiview 3D display by weighting factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Yoon, Seon-Kyu; Yoon, Ky-Hyuk

    2013-05-01

    A new method is introduced to reduce three crosstalk problems and the brightness variation in 3D image by means of the dynamic fusion of viewing zones (DFVZ) using weighting factor. The new method effectively generates the flat viewing zone at the center of viewing zone. The new type autostereoscopic 3D display can give less brightness variation of 3D image when observer moves.

  10. Different Recovery Profiles of Coagulation Factors, Thrombin Generation, and Coagulation Function After Hemorrhagic Shock in Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-06

    Different recovery profiles of coagulation factors, thrombin generation, and coagulation function after hemorrhagic shock in pigs Wenjun Z. Martini ...Defense. Address for reprints: Wenjun Z. Martini , PhD, The US Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3698 Chambers Pass, Ft. Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX...ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Martini W. Z., Cortez D. S., Dubick M. A., Blackbourne L. H., 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7

  11. Conversion of open tibial IIIb to IIIa fractures using intentional temporary deformation and the Taylor Spatial Frame.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Nunn, T

    2013-08-01

    The closure of small-to-moderate-sized soft tissue defects in open tibial fractures can be successfully achieved with acute bony shortening. In some instances, it may be possible to close soft tissue envelope defects by preserving length and intentionally creating a deformity of the limb. As the soft tissue is now able to close, this manoeuvre converts an open IIIb to IIIa fracture. This obviates the need for soft tissue reconstructive procedures such as flaps and grafts, which have the potential to cause donor-site morbidity and may fail. In this article, the authors demonstrate the technique for treating anterior medial soft tissue defects by deforming the bone at the fracture site, permitting temporary malalignment and closure of the wound. After healing of the envelope, the malalignment is gradually corrected with the use of the Taylor Spatial Frame. We present two such cases and discuss the technical indications and challenges of managing such cases.

  12. Draft genome sequence of the sugar beet pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2IIIB strain BBA69670.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Andersson, Louise; Rupp, Oliver; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred; Varrelmann, Mark; Dixelius, Christina; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-03-20

    Rhizoctonia solani is a widespread plant pathogenic fungus featuring a broad host range including several economically important crops. Accordingly, genome analyses of R. solani isolates are important to uncover their pathogenic potential. Draft genome sequences for four R. solani isolates representing three of the 14 R. solani anastomosis groups (AGs) are available. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence for an R. solani AG2-2IIIB isolate that is pathogenic on sugar beet. The fungal genome was assembled in 2065 scaffolds consisting of 5826 contigs amounting to a size of about 52 Mb which is larger than any other R. solani isolate known today. Genes potentially encoding cellulolytic, lignolytic and pectinolytic enzymes were identified.

  13. Chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy involving paclitaxel and carboplatin and in FIGO stage IIIB/IVA cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of paclitaxel plus carboplatin (TC)-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by consolidation chemotherapy in the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIIB/IVA cervical cancer patients. Methods We reviewed the medical records of FIGO stage IIIB/IVA cervical cancer patients (n=30) who had been intended to be treated with TC-based CCRT followed by consolidation chemotherapy (TC-CCRT-group) from April 2012–May 2016. Patients who had been treated with CCRT involving a single platinum agent (CCRT-group; n=52) or definitive radiotherapy alone (RT-group; n=74) from January 1997–September 2012 were also identified and used as historical controls. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results Of the 30 patients included in the TC-CCRT-group, 22 patients (73.3%) completed the planned TC-based CCRT. The most frequently observed acute grade 3/4 hematological toxicities were leukopenia and neutropenia, and diarrhea was the most common acute grade 3/4 non-hematological toxicity. After a median follow-up of 35 months, 9 patients (30.0%) had developed recurrent disease. The patients’ estimated 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 67.9% and 90.8%, respectively. In comparisons with historical control groups, the survival outcomes of TC-CCRT-group was significantly superior to CCRT-group in terms of OS (p=0.011) and significantly superior to RT-group in terms of both PFS (p=0.009) and OS (p<0.001). Conclusion TC-based CCRT followed by consolidation chemotherapy is safe and effective. A randomized controlled study needs to be conducted to further evaluate the efficacy of this multimodal approach in this patient population. PMID:27958682

  14. Pathological and biochemical studies of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (Sanfilippo syndrome type B) in juvenile emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae).

    PubMed

    Palmieri, C; Giger, U; Wang, P; Pizarro, M; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IIIB was diagnosed in 14 juvenile emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae), ages 3 weeks to 6 months, based on pathological and biochemical analyses. The animals had a history of neurological signs or sudden death; one of the birds with neurological signs and 3 others experienced acute hemoabdomen. Histopathologically, neuronal swelling and vacuolation in the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord (80%-92%); retina (100%); autonomic ganglia of the intestine (71%); gizzard (50%); adrenal gland (27%); and ear (50%) were noted in affected but not healthy emus. Cytoplasmic vacuoles were also observed in the pancreas, liver, intestine, adrenal glands, and kidneys. The intracytoplasmic inclusions were periodic acid-Schiff and Luxol Fast Blue positive, consistent with a storage disease. Foamy macrophages infiltrated the liver, intestine, tunica media of the aorta, and spleen. By transmission electron microscopy, typical lamellated cytoplasmic bodies were detected in neurons of the brain and retina, while electron-dense bodies consistent with glycosaminoglycan inclusions were observed in hepatocytes and/or hepatic macrophages. The livers of the 2 affected emus studied contained large amounts of heparan sulfate, which is suggestive of MPS type III. Compared with normal controls, hepatic and serum α-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity was very low (<8% of control), while other enzyme activities were normal to increased in the 2 affected emus studied. Moreover, affected emus were homozygous for a 2-bp deletion in the NAGLU gene. This study characterizes the pathology of MPS type IIIB in emus, which is one of the rare inborn errors in birds, showing the homology of this condition to Sanfilippo syndrome in humans.

  15. Docetaxel, Cisplatin, Pegfilgrastim, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-01

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  17. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Shota Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi

    2015-05-07

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  18. X4-tropic human immunodeficiency virus IIIB utilizes CXCR4 as coreceptor, as distinct from R5X4-tropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Islam, Salequl; Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Adnan, Nihad; Tanaka, Atsushi; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2013-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses initiate infections via CCR5 coreceptors and then change their tropism to C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), this change being associated with rapid disease progression. HIV-1IIIB, a widely described pure X4-tropic strain, is distinct from R5X4-tropic viruses. In this study, the requirement for amino terminal regions (NTRs) of CXCR4 for entry of HIV-1IIIB virus into host cells was examined and compared to that of R5X4-tropic viruses. CXCR4 and its deletion mutant (CXCR4ΔNTR23; first 23 amino acids removed from NTR) were amplified to examine their coreceptor activities. NP-2/CD4/CXCR4 and NP-2/CD4/CXCR4ΔNTR23 cell lines were prepared accordingly. Indirect immune fluorescence assay (IFA), PCR, and reverse transcriptase (RT) activity were used to compare the process of infection of host cells by HIV-1IIIB virus, one R5-tropic and five other R5X4-tropic viruses. All the R5X4-tropic HIVs were found to utilize both CCR5 and CXCR4 but unable to use CXCR4ΔNTR23 as coreceptors. In contrast, X4-tropic HIV-1IIIB was found to preferentially infect through CXCR4ΔNTR23. Viral antigens in infected NP-2/CD4/CXCR4ΔNTR23 cells were detected by IFA and confirmed by detection of proviral DNA and by performing RT assays on the spent cell-supernatants. In dual tropic viruses, deletion of 23 amino acids from NTR abrogates the coreceptor activity of CXCR4. This observation demonstrates that NTR of CXCR4 have an obligatory coreceptor role for dual tropic viruses. However, HIV-1IIIB may have different requirements for NTR than R5X4 viruses or may infect host cells independent of NTR of CXCR4.

  19. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  20. The Impact of Local and Regional Disease Extent on Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, Daniel S.; Chen, Ronald C.; Tracton, Gregg; Morris, David E.; Halle, Jan; Rosenman, Julian G.; Stefanescu, Mihaela; Pham, Erica; Socinski, Mark A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma are typically treated with initial platinum-based chemotherapy. A variety of factors (eg, performance status, gender, age, histology, weight loss, and smoking history) are generally accepted as predictors of overall survival. Because uncontrolled pulmonary disease constitutes a major cause of death in these patients, we hypothesized that clinical and radiographic factors related to intrathoracic disease at diagnosis may be prognostically significant in addition to conventional factors. The results have implications regarding the selection of patients for whom palliative thoracic radiation therapy may be of most benefit. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pooled analysis of 189 patients enrolled at a single institution into 9 prospective phase II and III clinical trials involving first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. Baseline clinical and radiographic characteristics before trial enrollment were analyzed as possible predictors for subsequent overall survival. To assess the relationship between anatomic location and volume of disease within the thorax and its effect on survival, the pre-enrollment computed tomography images were also analyzed by contouring central and peripheral intrapulmonary disease. Results: On univariate survival analysis, multiple pulmonary-related factors were significantly associated with worse overall survival, including pulmonary symptoms at presentation (P=.0046), total volume of intrathoracic disease (P=.0006), and evidence of obstruction of major bronchi or vessels on prechemotherapy computed tomography (P<.0001). When partitioned into central and peripheral volumes, central (P<.0001) but not peripheral (P=.74) disease was associated with worse survival. On multivariate analysis with known factors, pulmonary symptoms (hazard ratio, 1.46; P=.042), central disease volume (hazard ratio, 1.47; P=.042), and bronchial/vascular compression (hazard ratio, 1

  1. Generating a robust statistical causal structure over 13 cardiovascular disease risk factors using genomics data.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Azam; Yazdani, Akram; Samiei, Ahmad; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Understanding causal relationships among large numbers of variables is a fundamental goal of biomedical sciences and can be facilitated by Directed Acyclic Graphs (DAGs) where directed edges between nodes represent the influence of components of the system on each other. In an observational setting, some of the directions are often unidentifiable because of Markov equivalency. Additional exogenous information, such as expert knowledge or genotype data can help establish directionality among the endogenous variables. In this study, we use the method of principle component analysis to extract information across the genome in order to generate a robust statistical causal network among phenotypes, the variables of primary interest. The method is applied to 590,020 SNP genotypes measured on 1596 individuals to generate the statistical causal network of 13 cardiovascular disease risk factor phenotypes. First, principal component analysis was used to capture information across the genome. The principal components were then used to identify a robust causal network structure, GDAG, among the phenotypes. Analyzing a robust causal network over risk factors reveals the flow of information in direct and alternative paths, as well as determining predictors and good targets for intervention. For example, the analysis identified BMI as influencing multiple other risk factor phenotypes and a good target for intervention to lower disease risk.

  2. Clotting factor VIII (FVIII) and thrombin generation in camel plasma: A comparative study with humans

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Gader, Abdel Galil M.; Al Momen, Abdul Karim M.; Alhaider, Abdulqader; Brooks, Marjory B.; Catalfamo, James L.; Al Haidary, Ahmed A.; Hussain, Mansour F.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the highly elevated levels of clotting factor VIII (FVIII) in camel plasma. Whole blood was collected from healthy camels and factor VIII clotting activity (FVIII:C) assays were conducted using both the clotting and the chromogenic techniques. The anticoagulant citrate phosphate dextrose adenine (CPDA) produced the highest harvest of FVIII:C, the level of plasma factor VIII, compared to heparin:saline and heparin:CPDA anticoagulants. Camel FVIII can be concentrated 2 to 3 times in cryoprecipitate. There was a significant loss of camel FVIII when comparing levels of FVIII in camel plasma after 1 h of incubation at 37°C (533%), 40°C (364%), and 50°C (223%). Thrombin generation of camel plasma is comparable to that of human plasma. It was concluded that camel plasma contains very elevated levels of FVIII:C, approaching 8 times the levels in human plasma, and that these elevated levels could not be attributed to excessive thrombin generation. Unlike human FVIII:C, camel FVIII:C is remarkably heat stable. Taken together, these unique features of camel FVIII could be part of the physiological adaptation of hemostasis of the Arabian camel in order to survive in the hot desert environment. PMID:24082408

  3. Factors affecting the appreciation generated through applying human factors/ergonomics (HFE) principles to systems of work.

    PubMed

    So, R H Y; Lam, S T

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study examined the levels of appreciation (applause) given by clients to Human Factors/Ergonomic (HFE) specialists after they have modified the systems of work. Thirteen non-academic projects were chosen because the HFE interventions involved changed the way workers work at their workplaces. Companies involved range from multi-national corporations and military organizations with thousands of employees to small trading companies with less than 10 employees. In 5 cases the HFE recommendations were fully adopted and well appreciated. In 4 they were largely ignored and not appreciated, with partial adoption and some appreciation in the other 4 cases. Three factors that predict appreciation were identified: (i) alignment between the benefits HFE can provide and the project's key performance indices; (ii) awareness of HFE among the client's senior management; and (iii) a team organization appropriate for applying HFE recommendations. Having an HFE specialist on the client's side can greatly increase levels of appreciation, but lack of such a specialist will not affect levels of appreciation. A clear contractual requirement for HFE intervention does not promote appreciation significantly, but its absence can greatly reduce levels of appreciation. These relationships are discussed using the Kano's model of quality. Means to generate greater appreciation of the benefits of HFE are discussed.

  4. Generating Pedestrian Trajectories Consistent with the Fundamental Diagram Based on Physiological and Psychological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Sahil; Best, Andrew; Curtis, Sean; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Pedestrian crowds often have been modeled as many-particle system including microscopic multi-agent simulators. One of the key challenges is to unearth governing principles that can model pedestrian movement, and use them to reproduce paths and behaviors that are frequently observed in human crowds. To that effect, we present a novel crowd simulation algorithm that generates pedestrian trajectories that exhibit the speed-density relationships expressed by the Fundamental Diagram. Our approach is based on biomechanical principles and psychological factors. The overall formulation results in better utilization of free space by the pedestrians and can be easily combined with well-known multi-agent simulation techniques with little computational overhead. We are able to generate human-like dense crowd behaviors in large indoor and outdoor environments and validate the results with captured real-world crowd trajectories. PMID:25875932

  5. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development.

  6. Examining Involvement as a Critical Factor: Perceptions from First Generation and Non-First Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Mona Yvette

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the perceptions of involvement components (Non-Academic Facility Usage, Intra-Racial Relations, Campus and Charleston Involvement, Faculty Interaction, Academic Facility Usage, Inter-Racial Relations, Cultural Center Usage, and Athletic Facilities Usage) for first generation and non-first generation African American and Hispanic…

  7. Generation of mouse ES cell lines engineered for the forced induction of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Cerro, Lina S.; Piao, Yulan; Sharov, Alexei A.; Nishiyama, Akira; Cadet, Jean S.; Yu, Hong; Sharova, Lioudmila V.; Xin, Li; Hoang, Hien G.; Thomas, Marshall; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Meyers, Emily; Binder, Bernard Y.; Mowrer, Gregory; Bassey, Uwem; Longo, Dan L.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the generation and characterization of 84 mouse ES cell lines with doxycycline-controllable transcription factors (TFs) which, together with the previous 53 lines, cover 7–10% of all TFs encoded in the mouse genome. Global gene expression profiles of all 137 lines after the induction of TFs for 48 hrs can associate each TF with the direction of ES cell differentiation, regulatory pathways, and mouse phenotypes. These cell lines and microarray data provide building blocks for a variety of future biomedical research applications as a community resource. PMID:22355682

  8. Isolated and Passive Power Factor Correction AC/DC Converter for Radioisotope Stirling Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrigos, A.; Blanes, J. M.; Gutierrez, R.; Lizan, J. L.; Carrasco, J. A.; Maset, E.; Montalban, G.; Sanchis-Kilders, E.; Ejea, J. B.; Ferreres, A.

    2014-08-01

    A power processing system is described for low voltage, large inductance, single-phase alternator. This kind of electrical machine appears in Radioisotope Stirling Generators (RSG) as the electrical part attached to the thermodynamic system. The proposed power conditioning system splits into two independent stages; the front-end rectifier performs power factor control by adding a series capacitor in the AC side that forms a resonant filter with the alternator parasitic inductance. Further, the rectifier, thanks to the alternator inductance, behaves as a constant current source that supplies a current-fed, zero-voltage, zero-current push-pull stage. This approach takes advantage of all parasitic elements. Finally, some discussion about linear shunt and reconfigurable power factor filter is provided.

  9. Platelet factor 4 enhances generation of activated protein C in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, Arne; Fernandez, Jose A; Griffin, John H; Key, Nigel S; Long, Janel R; Piegors, Donald J; Lentz, Steven R

    2003-07-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4), an abundant platelet alpha-granule protein, accelerates in vitro generation of activated protein C (APC) by soluble thrombin/thrombomodulin (TM) complexes up to 25-fold. To test the hypothesis that PF4 similarly stimulates endothelium-associated TM, we assessed the influence of human PF4 on thrombin-dependent APC generation by cultured endothelial monolayers. APC generated in the presence of 1 to 100 microg PF4 was up to 5-fold higher than baseline for human umbilical vein endothelial cells, 10-fold higher for microvascular endothelial cells, and unaltered for blood outgrowth endothelial cells. In an in vivo model, cynomolgus monkeys (n = 6, each serving as its own control) were infused with either PF4 (7.5 mg/kg) or vehicle buffer, then with human thrombin (1.0 microg/kg/min) for 10 minutes. Circulating APC levels (baseline 3 ng/mL) peaked at 10 minutes, when PF4-treated and vehicle-treated animals had APC levels of 67 +/- 5 ng/mL and 39 +/- 2 ng/mL, respectively (P <.001). The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT; baseline, 28 seconds) increased maximally by 27 +/- 6 seconds in PF4-treated animals and by 9 +/- 1 seconds in control animals at 30 minutes (P <.001). PF4-dependent increases in circulating APC and APTT persisted more than 2-fold greater than that of controls from 10 through 120 minutes (P < or =.04). All APTT prolongations were essentially reversed by monoclonal antibody C3, which blocks APC activity. Thus, physiologically relevant concentrations of PF4 stimulate thrombin-dependent APC generation both in vitro by cultured endothelial cells and in vivo in a primate thrombin infusion model. These findings suggest that PF4 may play a previously unsuspected physiologic role in enhancing APC generation.

  10. Immunogenicity of HIV-1 IIIB and SHIV 89.6P Tat and Tat toxoids in rhesus macaques: induction of humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Max W; Mirchandani, Jyotika; Silvera, Peter; Régulier, Emmanuel G; Capini, Christelle; Bojczuk, Paul M; Hu, Jason; Gracely, Edward J; Boyer, Jean D; Khalili, Kamel; Zagury, Jean-François; Lewis, Mark G; Rappaport, Jay

    2002-09-01

    This study compared immune responses in rhesus macaques immunized with unmodified HIV-1 IIIB Tat, SHIV89.6P Tat, and carboxymethylated IIIB and 89.6P Tat toxoids. Immunization with either IIIB or 89.6P preparation induced high titer and broadly crossreactive serum anti-Tat IgG that recognized HIV-1 subtype-E and SIVmac251 Tat. However, the response was delayed, and titers were lower in 89.6P vaccination groups. Serum anti-Tat IgG recognized peptides corresponding to the amino-terminus, basic domain, and carboxy-terminal region. Cellular proliferative responses to Tat toxoids corresponding to the immunogen were evident in vitro in both IIIB and 89.6P groups. Crossreactive proliferative responses were observed in IIIB groups in response to stimulation with 89.6P or SIVmac251 Tat toxoids, but were much less prevalent in 89.6P groups. The truncated 86 amino acid IIIB Tat appears to be more immunogenic than the 102 amino acid 89.6P Tat with respect to both humoral and cellular immune responses, and may be a better vaccine component. Despite induction of robust humoral and cellular immune responses (including both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses) to Tat, all animals were infected upon intravenous challenge with 30 MID(50) of SHIV89.6P and outcome of vaccine groups was not different from controls. Sequencing both Tat exons from serum viral RNA revealed no evidence of escape mutants. These results suggest that with intravenous SHIV89.6P challenge in rhesus macaques, precipitous CD4+ T-cell decline overwhelms potentially protective immune responses. Alternatively, Tat specific CD8+ T-cell responses may not appropriately recognize infected cells in vivo in this model. In view of evidence demonstrating Tat specific CTLs in the SIV model and in humans infected with HIV-1, results in this pathogenic SHIV model may not apparently predict the efficacy of this approach in human studies. The potency and cross-reactivity of these immune responses confirm Tat toxoid as an excellent

  11. Asymmetry Factors Shaping Regular and Irregular Bursting Rhythms in Central Pattern Generators

    PubMed Central

    Elices, Irene; Varona, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Central Pattern Generator (CPG) circuits are neural networks that generate rhythmic motor patterns. These circuits are typically built of half-center oscillator subcircuits with reciprocally inhibitory connections. Another common property in many CPGs is the remarkable rich spiking-bursting dynamics of their constituent cells, which balance robustness and flexibility to generate their joint coordinated rhythms. In this paper, we use conductance-based models and realistic connection topologies inspired by the crustacean pyloric CPG to address the study of asymmetry factors shaping CPG bursting rhythms. In particular, we assess the role of asymmetric maximal synaptic conductances, time constants and gap-junction connectivity to establish the regularity of half-center oscillator based CPGs. We map and characterize the synaptic parameter space that lead to regular and irregular bursting activity in these networks. The analysis indicates that asymmetric configurations display robust regular rhythms and that large regions of both regular and irregular but coordinated rhythms exist as a function of the asymmetry in the circuit. Our results show that asymmetry both in the maximal conductances and in the temporal dynamics of mutually inhibitory neurons can synergistically contribute to shape wide regimes of regular spiking-bursting activity in CPGs. Finally, we discuss how a closed-loop protocol driven by a regularity goal can be used to find and characterize regular regimes when there is not time to perform an exhaustive search, as in most experimental studies. PMID:28261081

  12. Enhancing factors of electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell using Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Cha, Jaehwan; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we investigated various cultural and operational factors to enhance electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) using Geobacter sulfurreducens. The pure culture of G. sulfurreducens was cultivated using various substrates including acetate, malate, succinate, and butyrate, with fumarate as an electron acceptor. Cell growth was observed only in acetate-fed medium, when the cell concentrations increased 4-fold for 3 days. A high acetate concentration suppressed electricity generation. As the acetate concentration was increased from 5 to 20 mM, the power density dropped from 16 to 13 mW/m2, whereas the coulombic efficiency (CE) declined by about half. The immobilization of G. sulfurreducens on the anode considerably reduced the enrichment period from 15 to 7 days. Using argon gas to create an anaerobic condition in the anode chamber led to increased pH, and electricity generation subsequently dropped. When the plain carbon paper cathode was replaced by Pt-coated carbon paper (0.5 mg Pt/cm2), the CE increased greatly from 39% to 83%.

  13. Asymmetry Factors Shaping Regular and Irregular Bursting Rhythms in Central Pattern Generators.

    PubMed

    Elices, Irene; Varona, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Central Pattern Generator (CPG) circuits are neural networks that generate rhythmic motor patterns. These circuits are typically built of half-center oscillator subcircuits with reciprocally inhibitory connections. Another common property in many CPGs is the remarkable rich spiking-bursting dynamics of their constituent cells, which balance robustness and flexibility to generate their joint coordinated rhythms. In this paper, we use conductance-based models and realistic connection topologies inspired by the crustacean pyloric CPG to address the study of asymmetry factors shaping CPG bursting rhythms. In particular, we assess the role of asymmetric maximal synaptic conductances, time constants and gap-junction connectivity to establish the regularity of half-center oscillator based CPGs. We map and characterize the synaptic parameter space that lead to regular and irregular bursting activity in these networks. The analysis indicates that asymmetric configurations display robust regular rhythms and that large regions of both regular and irregular but coordinated rhythms exist as a function of the asymmetry in the circuit. Our results show that asymmetry both in the maximal conductances and in the temporal dynamics of mutually inhibitory neurons can synergistically contribute to shape wide regimes of regular spiking-bursting activity in CPGs. Finally, we discuss how a closed-loop protocol driven by a regularity goal can be used to find and characterize regular regimes when there is not time to perform an exhaustive search, as in most experimental studies.

  14. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) fetal fibroblasts with buffalo defined factors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanfei; Liu, Qingyou; Luo, Chan; Chen, Shibei; Li, Xiangping; Wang, Caizhu; Liu, Zhenzhen; Lei, Xiaocan; Zhang, Huina; Sun, Hongliang; Lu, Fenghua; Jiang, Jianrong; Shi, Deshun

    2012-09-01

    Ectopically, expression of defined factors could reprogram mammalian somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which initiates a new strategy to obtain pluripotent stem cell lines. Attempts have been made to generate buffalo pluripotent stem cells by culturing primary germ cells or inner cell mass, but the efficiency is extremely low. Here, we report a successful method to reprogram buffalo fetal fibroblasts (BFFs) into pluripotent stem cells [buffalo induced pluripotent stem cell (biPSCs)] by transduction of buffalo defined factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc) using retroviral vectors. The established biPSCs displayed typical morphological characteristics of pluripotent stem cells, normal karyotype, positive staining of alkaline phosphatase, and expressed pluripotent markers including Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, Lin28, E-Cadherin, SSEA-1, SSEA-4, TRA-1-81, STAT3, and FOXD3. They could form embryoid bodies (EBs) in vitro and teratomas after injecting into the nude BALB/C mice, and 3 germ layers were identified in the EBs and teratomas. Methylation assay revealed that the promoters of Oct4 and Nanog were hypomethylated in biPSCs compared with BFFs and pre-biPSCs, while the promoters of Sox2 and E-Cadherin were hypomethylated in both BFFs and biPSCs. Further, inhibiting p53 expression by coexpression of SV40 large T antigen and buffalo defined factors in BFFs or treating BFFs with p53 inhibitor pifithrin-a (PFT) could increase the efficiency of biPSCs generation up to 3-fold, and nuclear transfer embryos reconstructed with biPSCs could develop to blastocysts. These results indicate that BFFs can be reprogrammed into biPSCs by buffalo defined factors, and the generation efficiency of biPSCs can be increased by inhibition of p53 expression. These efforts will provide a feasible approach for investigating buffalo stem cell signal pathways, establishing buffalo stem cell lines, and producing genetic modification buffaloes in the future.

  15. Transition of historial tube flaps to free flap for 2-stage total knee arthroplasty in a patient with a history of Gustilo grade IIIB tibia fracture.

    PubMed

    Spence, Sean A; Doren, Erin L; Dayicioglu, Deniz; Bernasek, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old patient who had posttraumatic bilateral knee arthritis and underwent sequential bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The left knee joint required 2-stage reconstruction: a free flap for enhanced soft-tissue coverage and then left knee TKA. Uniquely, at age 16 years this patient sustained a left tibia grade IIIB high-energy crush injury in a car crash and underwent reconstruction with multiple pedicle tube flaps and transfer of soft tissues. Most of that reconstruction was done between the ages of 16 and 19. At age 56 years, staged TKA was performed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a knee reconstructed with pedicle tube flaps for a grade IIIB tibial fracture, followed years later by free-flap coverage before TKA. This report offers insights and treatment recommendations through long-term follow-up of a unique case and a historical perspective on how reconstructive options have evolved.

  16. Socioeconomic and Sociodemographic Factors Associated with Asthma Related Outcomes in Early Childhood: The Generation R Study

    PubMed Central

    Hafkamp-de Groen, Esther; Sonnenschein-van der Voort, Agnes M. M.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Duijts, Liesbeth; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Moll, Henriëtte A.; Hofman, Albert; de Jongste, Johan C.; Raat, Hein

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Few studies have analyzed the association of socioeconomic and sociodemographic factors with asthma related outcomes in early childhood, including Fraction of exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO) and airway resistance (Rint). We examined the association of socioeconomic and sociodemographic factors with wheezing, asthma, FeNO and Rint at age 6 years. Additionally, the role of potential mediating factors was studied. Methods The study included 6717 children participating in The Generation R Study, a prospective population-based cohort study. Data on socioeconomic and sociodemographic factors, wheezing and asthma were obtained by questionnaires. FeNO and Rint were measured at the research center. Statistical analyses were performed using logistic and linear regression models. Results At age 6 years, 9% (456/5084) of the children had wheezing symptoms and 7% (328/4953) had asthma. Children from parents with financial difficulties had an increased risk of wheezing (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) = 1.63, 95% Confidence Interval (CI):1.18–2.24). Parental low education, paternal unemployment and child's male sex were associated with asthma, independent of other socioeconomic or sociodemographic factors (aOR = 1.63, 95% CI:1.24–2.15, aOR = 1.85, 95% CI:1.11–3.09, aOR = 1.58, 95% CI:1.24–2.01, respectively). No socioeconomic or gender differences in FeNO were found. The risks of wheezing, asthma, FeNO and Rint measurements differed between ethnic groups (p<0.05). Associations between paternal unemployment, child's sex, ethnicity and asthma related outcomes remained largely unexplained. Conclusions This study showed differences between the socioeconomic and sociodemographic correlates of wheezing and asthma compared to the correlates of FeNO and Rint at age 6 years. Several socioeconomic and sociodemographic factors were independently associated with wheezing and asthma. Child's ethnicity was the only factor independently associated with FeNO. We

  17. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y.; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F.; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M. Ángeles; Santiago, César; Frade, José Miguel Rodríguez; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4+ T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention. PMID:24778234

  18. Coal-fired MHD combustor development project: Phase IIIB. First quarterly technical progress report, 13 January-30 April 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1982-05-20

    The first quarterly technical progress report of the Coal-Fired MHD Combustor Development Project (Phase IIIB) presents the accomplishments during the period 13 January to 30 April, 1982. The scope of work covered by this quarterly report relates to those tasks associated with preparing the TRW 20 MW/sub t/ MHD coal combustor for delivery to AERL for integrated power tests and the work associated with the preliminary design of a 50 MW/sub t/ coal-fired combustor. Progress during this reporting period is described. All new 20 MW/sub t/ hardware was designed and fabricated. Interface coordination meetings were conducted with AERL and DOE. Interface control drawings were completed and a 20 MW/sub t/ coal combustion User's manual was delivered to AERL. The User's manual contained a shipping plan, a crew training plan, an assembly manual, interface documentation and recommended operating procedures. Facility/combustor set-up was completed and the pre-delivery 20 MW/sub t/ coal combustor qualification test series was completed. The 50 MW/sub t/ coal-fired MHD combustor preliminary designs were finalized and the DOE preliminary design review (PDR) was successfully completed.

  19. Definitive radiotherapy with concurrent oncothermia for stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YEO, SEUNG-GU

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia enhances the susceptibility of tumors to radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy. Oncothermia, also known as electro-hyperthermia, is a new treatment modality developed to overcome the problems of traditional hyperthermia by selectively delivering energy to the malignant tissues. The present study reports the outcome of combined oncothermia and RT in a 75-year-old patient with stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Due to the advanced age and the performance status of the patient, the combination of systemic chemotherapy and RT was deemed infeasible; therefore, the patient instead decided to undergo oncothermia concurrently with definitive RT. The RT was administered at a dose of 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions using a three-dimensional conformal plan technique. Oncothermia was started concomitantly with RT and was performed for 60 min per session, two sessions per week, for a total of 12 sessions. No severe toxicities developed, with the exception of mild odynophagia, which resolved soon after the treatments. Follow-up computed tomography showed complete tumor response, and the patient was alive with no evidence of the disease 18 months after the completion of the treatment. In conclusion, the present case report suggests that oncothermia combined with RT, with the former possessing radiosensitizing potential and no additional toxicities, may be a promising alternative for advanced-age and/or frail patients with locally advanced NSCLC. PMID:26622391

  20. Myosin IIIB uses an actin-binding motif in its espin-1 cargo to reach the tips of actin protrusions.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Raymond C; Manor, Uri; Salles, Felipe T; Grati, M'hamed; Dose, Andrea C; Unrath, William C; Quintero, Omar A; Yengo, Christopher M; Kachar, Bechara

    2012-02-21

    Myosin IIIA (MYO3A) targets actin protrusion tips using a motility mechanism dependent on both motor and tail actin-binding activity [1]. We show that myosin IIIB (MYO3B) lacks tail actin-binding activity and is unable to target COS7 cell filopodia tips, yet is somehow able to target stereocilia tips. Strikingly, when MYO3B is coexpressed with espin-1 (ESPN1), a MYO3A cargo protein endogenously expressed in stereocilia [2], MYO3B targets and carries ESPN1 to COS7 filopodia tips. We show that this tip localization is lost when we remove the ESPN1 C terminus actin-binding site. We also demonstrate that, like MYO3A [2], MYO3B can elongate filopodia by transporting ESPN1 to the polymerizing end of actin filaments. The mutual dependence of MYO3B and ESPN1 for tip localization reveals a novel mechanism for the cell to regulate myosin tip localization via a reciprocal relationship with cargo that directly participates in actin binding for motility. Our results are consistent with a novel form of motility for class III myosins that requires both motor and tail domain actin-binding activity and show that the actin-binding tail can be replaced by actin-binding cargo. This study also provides a framework to better understand the late-onset hearing loss phenotype in patients with MYO3A mutations.

  1. Bipartite recognition of target RNAs activates DNA cleavage by the Type III-B CRISPR–Cas system

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joshua R.; Sheppard, Nolan F.; Ramia, Nancy; Deighan, Trace; Li, Hong; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems eliminate nucleic acid invaders in bacteria and archaea. The effector complex of the Type III-B Cmr system cleaves invader RNAs recognized by the CRISPR RNA (crRNA ) of the complex. Here we show that invader RNAs also activate the Cmr complex to cleave DNA. As has been observed for other Type III systems, Cmr eliminates plasmid invaders in Pyrococcus furiosus by a mechanism that depends on transcription of the crRNA target sequence within the plasmid. Notably, we found that the target RNA per se induces DNA cleavage by the Cmr complex in vitro. DNA cleavage activity does not depend on cleavage of the target RNA but notably does require the presence of a short sequence adjacent to the target sequence within the activating target RNA (rPAM [RNA protospacer-adjacent motif]). The activated complex does not require a target sequence (or a PAM) in the DNA substrate. Plasmid elimination by the P. furiosus Cmr system also does not require the Csx1 (CRISPR-associated Rossman fold [CARF] superfamily) protein. Plasmid silencing depends on the HD nuclease and Palm domains of the Cmr2 (Cas10 superfamily) protein. The results establish the Cmr complex as a novel DNA nuclease activated by invader RNAs containing a crRNA target sequence and a rPAM. PMID:26848045

  2. The Mammalian Neuronal Sodium Channel Blocker μ-Conotoxin BuIIIB has a Structured N-terminus that Influences Potency

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Zhihe; Zhang, Min-Min; Gupta, Kallol; Gajewiak, Joanna; Gulyas, Jozsef; Balaram, Padmanabhan; Rivier, Jean E.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Yoshikami, Doju; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S.

    2014-01-01

    Among the μ-conotoxins that block vertebrate voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), some have been shown to be potent analgesics following systemic administration in mice. We have determined the solution structure of a new representative of this family, μ-BuIIIB, and established its disulfide connectivities by direct mass spectrometric collision induced dissociation fragmentation of the peptide with disulfides intact. The major oxidative folding product adopts a 1-4/2-5/3-6 pattern with the following disulfide bridges: Cys5-Cys17, Cys6-Cys23 and Cys13-Cys24. The solution structure reveals that the unique N-terminal extension in μ-BuIIIB, which is also present in μ-BuIIIA and μ-BuIIIC but absent in other μ-conotoxins, forms part of a short α-helix encompassing Glu3 to Asn8. This helix is packed against the rest of the toxin and stabilized by the Cys5-Cys17 and Cys6-Cys23 disulfide bonds. As such, the side chain of Val1 is located close to the aromatic rings of Trp16 and His20, which are located on the canonical helix that displays several residues found to be essential for VGSC blockade in related μ-conotoxins. Mutations of residues 2 and 3 in the N-terminal extension enhanced the potency of μ-BuIIIB for NaV1.3. One analog, [d-Ala2]BuIIIB, showed a 40-fold increase, making it the most potent peptide blocker of this channel characterized to date and thus a useful new tool with which to characterize this channel. Based on previous results for related μ-conotoxins, the dramatic effects of mutations at the N-terminus were unanticipated, and suggest that further gains in potency might be achieved by additional modifications of this region. PMID:23557677

  3. Effective factors on twisted terahertz radiation generation in a rippled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Hassan; Dadar, Elham; Feili, Sahar

    2017-02-01

    Based on the beating of two Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams in a rippled plasma medium, the effective factors such as plasma density, Gouy phase and orbital angular momentums of input lasers on the output twisted terahertz radiation are investigated. As a result, the amplitude of the generated vortex terahertz radiation is an increasing function of plasma density. The vortex terahertz intensity is strongly dependent on the orbital angular momentum of the input lasers. The terahertz output amplitude increases by decreasing the orbital angular momentum of the Laguerre-Gaussian input lasers. Here, by employing a suitably ripple wavenumber, the destroyer effect of the relative Gouy phase of the input lasers is removed, and perfect phase matching is satisfied.

  4. Mutation Scanning of D1705 and D1709 in the RNAse IIIb Domain of MicroRNA Processing Enzyme Dicer in Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Sand, Michael; Bechara, Falk G; Skrygan, Marina; Sand, Daniel; Gambichler, Thilo; Bromba, Michael; Stockfleth, Eggert; Hessam, Schapoor

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) there have been performed several studies showing perturbations in the expression of miRNAs and the miRNA expression machinery in cutaneous melanoma. Dicer, a pivotal cytosolic enzyme of miRNA maturation has shown to be affected by both somatic and germline mutations in a variety of cancers. Recent studies have shown that recurrent somatic mutations of Dicer frequently affect the metal-ion-binding sites D1709 and D1705 of its RNase IIIb domain, therefore called hot spot mutations. The present study investigates metal-ion-binding sites D1709 and D1705 of the Dicer RNase IIIb domain in cutaneous melanomas and melanoma metastasis by Sanger sequencing. All investigated samples showed wildtype sequence and no single mutation was detected. The miRNA processing enzyme Dicer of melanoma and melanoma metastasis does not appear to be affected by mutation in the metal-ion-binding sites D1709 and D1705 of its RNase IIIb domain.

  5. Kinetic Model Facilitates Analysis of Fibrin Generation and Its Modulation by Clotting Factors: Implications for Hemostasis-Enhancing Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    investigating its potential as a hemostatic agent in trauma and surgery.6,7 These applications necessitate a detailed understanding of fibrin ...facilitates analysis of fibrin generation and its modulation by clotting factors: implications for hemostasis-enhancing therapies† Alexander Y...ability of the suggested molecular mechanisms to account for fibrin generation and degradation kinetics in diverse, physiologically relevant in vitro

  6. Modeling and analysis of PM2.5 generation for key factors identification in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dehong; Jiang, Binfan; Xie, Yulei

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the PM2.5 pollution in China has occurred frequently and caused widely concern. In order to identify the key factors for PM2.5 generation, the formation characteristics of PM2.5 would be revealed. A property of electric neutrality of PM2.5 was proposed under the least-energy principle and verified through electricity-charge calculation in this paper. It indicated that PM2.5 is formed by the effect of electromagnetic force, including the effect of ionic bond, hydrogen bond and polarization. According to the analysis of interactive forces among different chemical components, a simulation model is developed for describing the random process of PM2.5 generation. In addition, an orthogonal test with two levels and four factors has been designed and carried out through the proposed model. From the text analysis, PM2.5 would be looser and suspend longer in atmosphere due to Organic Compound (OC) existing (OC can reduce about 67% of PM2.5 density). Considering that NH4+ is the only cation in the main chemical components of PM2.5, it would be vital for anions (such as SO42- and NO3-) to aggregate together for facilitating PM2.5 growing. Therefore, in order to relieve PM2.5 pollution, control strategies for OC and NH4+ would be enhanced by government through improving the quality of oils and solvent products, decreasing the amount of nitrogenous fertilizer utilization, or changing the fertilizing environment from dry condition to wet condition.

  7. Methods and analysis of factors impact on the efficiency of the photovoltaic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianze, Li; Xia, Zhang; Chuan, Jiang; Luan, Hou

    2011-02-01

    First of all, the thesis elaborates two important breakthroughs which happened In the field of the application of solar energy in the 1950s.The 21st century the development of solar photovoltaic power generation will have the following characteristics: the continued high growth of industrial development, the significantly reducing cost of the solar cell, the large-scale high-tech development of photovoltaic industries, the breakthroughs of the film battery technology, the rapid development of solar PV buildings integration and combined to the grids. The paper makes principles of solar cells the theoretical analysis. On the basis, we study the conversion efficiency of solar cells, find the factors impact on the efficiency of the photovoltaic generation, solve solar cell conversion efficiency of technical problems through the development of new technology, and open up new ways to improve the solar cell conversion efficiency. Finally, the paper connecting with the practice establishes policies and legislation to the use of encourage renewable energy, development strategy, basic applied research etc.

  8. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  9. Phase II Study of a HER-2/neu (HER2) Intracellular Domain (ICD) Peptide-Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IIIB and IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab Monotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Intracellular Domain (ICD) Peptide - Based Vaccine Administered to Stage IIIB and IV HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Trastuzumab...To) 27 APR 2007 - 26 APR 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Phase II Study of a HER-2/neu (HER2) Intracellular Domain (ICD) Peptide ...intracellular domain (ICD) peptide -based vaccine while receiving maintenance trastuzumab. Patients enrolled will be HER2 overexpressing stage IIIB and IV

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis Uses Specific Domain Rearrangements and Allelic Exchange to Generate Diversity in Surface Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dashper, Stuart G.; Mitchell, Helen L.; Seers, Christine A.; Gladman, Simon L.; Seemann, Torsten; Bulach, Dieter M.; Chandry, P. Scott; Cross, Keith J.; Cleal, Steven M.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen of chronic periodontitis. The virulence of P. gingivalis is reported to be strain related and there are currently a number of strain typing schemes based on variation in capsular polysaccharide, the major and minor fimbriae and adhesin domains of Lys-gingipain (Kgp), amongst other surface proteins. P. gingivalis can exchange chromosomal DNA between strains by natural competence and conjugation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic variability of P. gingivalis strains sourced from international locations over a 25-year period and to determine if variability in surface virulence factors has a phylogenetic basis. Whole genome sequencing was performed on 13 strains and comparison made to 10 previously sequenced strains. A single nucleotide polymorphism-based phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a shallow tri-lobed phylogeny. There was a high level of reticulation in the phylogenetic network, demonstrating extensive horizontal gene transfer between the strains. Two highly conserved variants of the catalytic domain of the major virulence factor the Kgp proteinase (KgpcatI and KgpcatII) were found. There were three variants of the fourth Kgp C-terminal cleaved adhesin domain. Specific variants of the cell surface proteins FimA, FimCDE, MfaI, RagAB, Tpr, and PrtT were also identified. The occurrence of all these variants in the P. gingivalis strains formed a mosaic that was not related to the SNP-based phylogeny. In conclusion P. gingivalis uses domain rearrangements and genetic exchange to generate diversity in specific surface virulence factors. PMID:28184216

  11. Plasma factor and inhibitor composition contributes to thrombin generation dynamics in patients with acute or previous cerebrovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Gissel, Matthew; Undas, Anetta; Slowik, Agnieszka; Mann, Kenneth G.; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction More than 80% of cerebrovascular events are ischemic and largely thromboembolic by nature. We evaluated whether plasma factor composition and thrombin generation dynamics might be a contributor to the thrombotic phenotype of ischemic cerebrovascular events. Materials and Methods We studied (1) 100 patients with acute ischemic stroke (n=50) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) (n=50) within the first 24 hours from symptom onset, and (2) 100 individuals 1 to 4 years following ischemic stroke (n=50) or TIA (n=50). The tissue factor pathway to thrombin generation was simulated with a mathematical model using plasma levels of clotting factors (F)II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, antithrombin and free tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). Results The plasma levels of free TFPI, FII, FVIII, and FX were higher, while antithrombin was lower, in the acute patients compared to the previous event group (all p≤0.02). Thrombin generation during acute events was enhanced, with an 11% faster maximum rate, a 15% higher maximum level and a 26% larger total production (all p<0.01). The increased thrombin generation in acute patients was determined by higher FII and lower antithrombin, while increased free TFPI mediated this effect. When the groups are classified by etiology, all stroke sub-types except cardioembolic have increased TFPI and decreased AT and total thrombin produced. Conclusion Augmented thrombin generation in acute stroke/TIA is to some extent determined by altered plasma levels of coagulation factors. PMID:20709367

  12. Cave spiders choose optimal environmental factors with respect to the generated entropy when laying their cocoon

    PubMed Central

    Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Isaia, Marco; Mammola, Stefano; Lepore, Emiliano; Ventola, Luigi; Asinari, Pietro; Pugno, Nicola Maria

    2015-01-01

    The choice of a suitable area to spiders where to lay eggs is promoted in terms of Darwinian fitness. Despite its importance, the underlying factors behind this key decision are generally poorly understood. Here, we designed a multidisciplinary study based both on in-field data and laboratory experiments focusing on the European cave spider Meta menardi (Araneae, Tetragnathidae) and aiming at understanding the selective forces driving the female in the choice of the depositional area. Our in-field data analysis demonstrated a major role of air velocity and distance from the cave entrance within a particular cave in driving the female choice. This has been interpreted using a model based on the Entropy Generation Minimization - EGM - method, without invoking best fit parameters and thanks to independent lab experiments, thus demonstrating that the female chooses the depositional area according to minimal level of thermo-fluid-dynamic irreversibility. This methodology may pave the way to a novel approach in understanding evolutionary strategies for other living organisms. PMID:25556697

  13. Cave spiders choose optimal environmental factors with respect to the generated entropy when laying their cocoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Isaia, Marco; Mammola, Stefano; Lepore, Emiliano; Ventola, Luigi; Asinari, Pietro; Pugno, Nicola Maria

    2015-01-01

    The choice of a suitable area to spiders where to lay eggs is promoted in terms of Darwinian fitness. Despite its importance, the underlying factors behind this key decision are generally poorly understood. Here, we designed a multidisciplinary study based both on in-field data and laboratory experiments focusing on the European cave spider Meta menardi (Araneae, Tetragnathidae) and aiming at understanding the selective forces driving the female in the choice of the depositional area. Our in-field data analysis demonstrated a major role of air velocity and distance from the cave entrance within a particular cave in driving the female choice. This has been interpreted using a model based on the Entropy Generation Minimization - EGM - method, without invoking best fit parameters and thanks to independent lab experiments, thus demonstrating that the female chooses the depositional area according to minimal level of thermo-fluid-dynamic irreversibility. This methodology may pave the way to a novel approach in understanding evolutionary strategies for other living organisms.

  14. The impact of thrombin generation and rotation thromboelastometry on assessment of severity of factor XI deficiency.

    PubMed

    Livnat, Tami; Shenkman, Boris; Martinowitz, Uri; Zivelin, Ariella; Dardik, Rima; Tamarin, Ilia; Mansharov, Rachel; Budnik, Ivan; Salomon, Ophira

    2015-08-01

    The phenotype of bleeding in patients with severe FXI deficiency is unpredictable and unlike other bleeding disorders, it is not directly correlated with levels of FXI. In this study we analyzed whether the global coagulation assays can serve as a clinical tool in predicting bleeding tendency in patients with severe FXI deficiency undergoing surgery, taking into account the large inter-individual variability of FXI levels and genotypes. Thrombin generation (TG) was measured in 39 platelet-poor plasma with or without tissue factor (TF) and in the presence or absence of corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI). Rotation thromboelastometry (ROTEM) was performed with fresh whole blood of 26 patients applying NATEM and INTEM tests. TG induced by recalcification can distinguish between bleeding and non-bleeding patients with severe FXI deficiency particularly among those with FXI activity of 2-20IU/dl. The addition of TF or TF and CTI to the TG assay masked the ability to differentiate between XI activity, genotype as well as bleeding and non-bleeding patients. ROTEM assays failed to distinguish bleeding from non-bleeding patients but could do so between different FXI activity levels and genotypes. In conclusion, in the current study we found a sensitive tool to distinguish between bleeding and non-bleeding patients. In order to recommend TG as a predictive tool for treatment tailoring, a larger patient group is required.

  15. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  16. A GLP-Compliant Toxicology and Biodistribution Study: Systemic Delivery of an rAAV9 Vector for the Treatment of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Aaron S.; Duncan, F. Jason; Camboni, Marybeth; Waligura, Kathryn; Montgomery, Chrystal; Zaraspe, Kimberly; Naughton, Bartholomew J.; Bremer, William G.; Shilling, Christopher; Walker, Christopher M.; Bolon, Brad; Flanigan, Kevin M.; McBride, Kim L.; McCarty, Douglas M.; Fu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    No treatment is currently available for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IIIB, a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease due to defect in α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). In preparation for a clinical trial, we performed an IND-enabling GLP-toxicology study to assess systemic rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU gene delivery in WT C57BL/6 mice at 1 × 1014 vg/kg and 2 × 1014 vg/kg (n = 30/group, M:F = 1:1), and non-GLP testing in MPS IIIB mice at 2 × 1014 vg/kg. Importantly, no adverse clinical signs or chronic toxicity were observed through the 6 month study duration. The rAAV9-mediated rNAGLU expression was rapid and persistent in virtually all tested CNS and somatic tissues. However, acute liver toxicity occurred in 33% (5/15) WT males in the 2 × 1014 vg/kg cohort, which was dose-dependent, sex-associated, and genotype-specific, likely due to hepatic rNAGLU overexpression. Interestingly, a significant dose response was observed only in the brain and spinal cord, whereas in the liver at 24 weeks postinfection (pi), NAGLU activity was reduced to endogenous levels in the high dose cohort but remained at supranormal levels in the low dose group. The possibility of rAAV9 germline transmission appears to be minimal. The vector delivery resulted in transient T-cell responses and characteristic acute antibody responses to both AAV9 and rNAGLU in all rAAV9-treated animals, with no detectable impacts on tissue transgene expression. This study demonstrates a generally safe and effective profile, and may have identified the upper dosing limit of rAAV9-CMV-hNAGLU via systemic delivery for the treatment of MPS IIIB. PMID:26684447

  17. Preferred transduction with AAV8 and AAV9 via thalamic administration in the MPS IIIB model: A comparison of four rAAV serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, J.A.; Bloom, M.D.; Heldermon, C.D.

    2015-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. Since early therapeutic intervention is likely to yield the most efficacious results, we sought to determine the possible therapeutic utility of rAAV in early gene therapy based interventions. Currently, the application of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is one of the most widely used gene transfer systems, and represents a promising approach in the treatment of MPS IIIB. From a translational standpoint, a minimally invasive, yet highly efficient method of vector administration is ideal. The thalamus is thought to be the switchboard for signal relay in the central nervous system (CNS) and therefore represents an attractive target. To identify an optimal AAV vector for early therapeutic intervention, and establish whether thalamic administration represents a feasible therapeutic approach, we performed a comprehensive assessment of transduction and biodistribution profiles of four green fluorescent protein (GFP) bearing rAAV serotypes, -5, -8, -9 and -rh10, administered bilaterally into the thalamus. Of the four serotypes compared, AAV8 and -9 proved superior to AAV5 and -rh10 both in biodistribution and transduction efficiency profiles. Genotype differences in transduction efficiency and biodistribution patterns were also observed. Importantly, we conclude that AAV8 and to a lesser extent, AAV9 represent preferable candidates for early gene therapy based intervention in the treatment of MPS IIIB. We also highlight the feasibility of thalamic rAAV administration, and conclude that this method results in moderate rAAV biodistribution with limited treatment capacity, thus suggesting a need for alternate methods of vector delivery. PMID:27014573

  18. Dependent Personality Disorder: Comparing an Expert Generated and Empirically Derived Five-Factor Model Personality Disorder Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joshua D.; Lynam, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th Ed.; "DSM-IV") personality disorders (PDs) using five-factor model (FFM) prototypes and counts has shown substantial promise, with a few exceptions. Miller, Reynolds, and Pilkonis suggested that the expert-generated FFM dependent prototype might be misspecified in…

  19. The Multigenerational Workforce within Two-Year Public Community Colleges: A Study of Generational Factors Affecting Employee Learning and Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starks, Florida Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study is to broaden multigenerational workforce research involving factors affecting employee learning and interaction by using a population of Baby Boomer, Generation X, and Millennial faculty and staff age cohorts employed at two-year public community college organizations. Researchers have studied…

  20. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.

    2012-07-06

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life

  1. Factor XIa and Thrombin Generation Are Elevated in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Predict Recurrent Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Loeffen, Rinske; van Oerle, René; Leers, Mathie P. G.; Kragten, Johannes A.; Crijns, Harry; Spronk, Henri M. H.; ten Cate, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Objective In acute coronary syndrome (ACS) cardiac cell damage is preceded by thrombosis. Therefore, plasma coagulation markers may have additional diagnostic relevance in ACS. By using novel coagulation assays this study aims to gain more insight into the relationship between the coagulation system and ACS. Methods We measured plasma thrombin generation, factor XIa and D-dimer levels in plasma from ACS (n = 104) and non-ACS patients (n = 42). Follow-up measurements (n = 73) were performed at 1 and 6 months. Associations between coagulation markers and recurrent cardiovascular events were calculated by logistic regression analysis. Results Thrombin generation was significantly enhanced in ACS compared to non-ACS patients: peak height 148±53 vs. 122±42 nM. There was a significantly diminished ETP reduction (32 vs. 41%) and increased intrinsic coagulation activation (25 vs. 7%) in ACS compared to non-ACS patients. Furthermore, compared to non-ACS patients factor XIa and D-dimer levels were significantly elevated in ACS patients: 1.9±1.1 vs. 1.4±0.7 pM and 495(310–885) vs. 380(235–540) μg/L. Within the ACS spectrum, ST-elevated myocardial infarction patients had the highest prothrombotic profile. During the acute event, thrombin generation was significantly increased compared to 1 and 6 months afterwards: peak height 145±52 vs. 100±44 vs. 98±33 nM. Both peak height and factor XIa levels on admission predicted recurrent cardiovascular events (OR: 4.9 [95%CI 1.2–20.9] and 4.5 [1.1–18.9]). Conclusion ACS patients had an enhanced prothrombotic profile, demonstrated by an increased thrombin generation potential, factor XIa and D-dimer levels. This study is the first to demonstrate the positive association between factor XIa, thrombin generation and recurrent cardiovascular events. PMID:27419389

  2. Wind Power predictability a risk factor in the design, construction and operation of Wind Generation Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiesen, J.; Gulstad, L.; Ristic, I.; Maric, T.

    2010-09-01

    Summit: The wind power predictability is often a forgotten decision and planning factor for most major wind parks, both onshore and offshore. The results of the predictability are presented after having examined a number of European offshore and offshore parks power predictability by using three(3) mesoscale model IRIE_GFS and IRIE_EC and WRF. Full description: It is well known that the potential wind production is changing with latitude and complexity in terrain, but how big are the changes in the predictability and the economic impacts on a project? The concept of meteorological predictability has hitherto to some degree been neglected as a risk factor in the design, construction and operation of wind power plants. Wind power plants are generally built in places where the wind resources are high, but these are often also sites where the predictability of the wind and other weather parameters is comparatively low. This presentation addresses the question of whether higher predictability can outweigh lower average wind speeds with regard to the overall economy of a wind power project. Low predictability also tends to reduce the value of the energy produced. If it is difficult to forecast the wind on a site, it will also be difficult to predict the power production. This, in turn, leads to increased balance costs and a less reduced carbon emission from the renewable source. By investigating the output from three(3) mesoscale models IRIE and WRF, using ECMWF and GFS as boundary data over a forecasting period of 3 months for 25 offshore and onshore wind parks in Europe, the predictability are mapped. Three operational mesoscale models with two different boundary data have been chosen in order to eliminate the uncertainty with one mesoscale model. All mesoscale models are running in a 10 km horizontal resolution. The model output are converted into "day a head" wind turbine generation forecasts by using a well proven advanced physical wind power model. The power models

  3. Therapeutic Efficacy of Bone Marrow Transplant, Intracranial AAV-mediated Gene Therapy, or Both in the Mouse Model of MPS IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Heldermon, Coy D; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Herzog, Erik D; Vogler, Carole; Qin, Elizabeth; Wozniak, David F; Tan, Yun; Orrock, John L; Sands, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from a deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. In an attempt to correct the disease in the murine model of MPS IIIB, neonatal mice were treated with intracranial AAV2/5-NAGLU (AAV), syngeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT), or both (AAV/BMT). All treatments resulted in some improvement in clinical phenotype. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) treatment resulted in improvements in lifespan, motor function, hearing, time to activity onset, and daytime activity level, but no reduction of lysosomal storage. BMT resulted in improved hearing by 9 months, and improved circadian measures, but had no effect on lifespan, motor function, or central nervous system (CNS) lysosomal storage. AAV/BMT treatment resulted in improvements in hearing, time to activity onset, motor function, and reduced CNS lysosomal storage, but had no effect on lifespan. Combination therapy compared to either therapy alone resulted in synergistic effects on hearing and CNS lysosomal inclusions but antagonistic effects on motor function and lifespan. AAV alone is more efficacious than BMT or AAV/BMT treatment for lifespan. BMT was the least efficacious treatment by all measures. CNS-directed AAV treatment alone appears to be the preferred treatment, combining the most efficacy with the least toxicity of the approaches assessed. PMID:20179679

  4. Identification of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) residues essential for leukemia inhibitory factor receptor binding and generation of CNTF receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, A; Gloaguen, I; Graziani, R; Paonessa, G; Saggio, I; Hudson, K R; Laufer, R

    1996-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) drives the sequential assembly of a receptor complex containing the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and the signal transducers gp130 and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-beta (LIFR). The D1 structural motif, located at the beginning of the D-helix of human CNTF, contains two amino acid residues, F152 and K155, which are conserved among all cytokines that signal through LIFR. The functional importance of these residues was assessed by alanine mutagenesis. Substitution of either F152 or K155 with alanine was found to specifically inhibit cytokine interaction with LIFR without affecting binding to CNTFR alpha or gp130. The resulting variants behaved as partial agonists with varying degrees of residual bioactivity in different cell-based assays. Simultaneous alanine substitution of both F152 and K155 totally abolished biological activity. Combining these mutations with amino acid substitutions in the D-helix, which enhance binding affinity for the CNTFR alpha, gave rise to a potent competitive CNTF receptor antagonist. This protein constitutes a new tool for studies of CNTF function in normal physiology and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 PMID:8799186

  5. Behavioural risk factors in two generations of non-Western migrants: do trends converge towards the host population?

    PubMed

    Hosper, Karen; Nierkens, Vera; Nicolaou, Mary; Stronks, Karien

    2007-01-01

    Migrant mortality does not conform to a single pattern of convergence towards prevalence rates in the host population. To understand better how migrant mortality develops, it is necessary to further investigate how the underlying behavioural determinants change following migration. We studied whether the prevalence of behavioural risk factors over two generations of Turkish and Moroccan migrants converge towards the prevalence rates in the Dutch population. From a random sample from the population register of Amsterdam, 291 Moroccan and 505 Turkish migrants, aged 15-30, participated in a structured interview that included questions on smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and weight/height. Data from the Dutch population were available from Statistics Netherlands. By calculating age-adjusted Odds Ratio's, prevalence rates among both generations were compared with prevalence rates in the host population for men and women separately. We found indications of convergence across generations towards the prevalence rates in the host population for smoking in Turkish men, for overweight in Turkish and Moroccan women and for physical inactivity in Turkish women. Alcohol consumption, however, remained low in all subgroups and did not converge towards the higher rates in the host population. In addition, we found a reversed trend among Turkish women regarding smoking: the second generation smoked significantly more, while the first generation did not differ from ethnic Dutch. In general, behavioural risk factors in two generations of non-Western migrants in the Netherlands seem to converge towards the prevalence rates in the Dutch population. However, some subgroups and risk factors showed a different pattern.

  6. Contextual Factors Contributing to Ethnic Identity Development of Second-Generation Iranian American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daha, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    The data drawn from interviews with 55 second-generation Iranian American adolescents revealed that pride in ancient Persian culture, the adolescents' physical characteristics, perceived stereotypes, and community point of reference all combined to affect ethnic identity as well as to reinforce a sense of ethnic loyalty. The contextual factors…

  7. Viewing Generativity and Social Capital as Underlying Factors of Parent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Sharon; Patel, Nimisha

    2015-01-01

    Parent involvement in education is a multifaceted support that has many well-documented benefits for students of all ages. Parent involvement is also a common expression of generativity as defined in Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development. The activities parents engage in during their children's educational pursuits, as well as their…

  8. First-Generation Freshman College Students: Factors Impacting Retention for the Subsequent Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Laura Colson

    2013-01-01

    Against all odds, first-generation college students continue to enroll in postsecondary schools with aspirations of obtaining a bachelor's degree. Unfortunately, many have not successfully reached their goal, which in turn has affected retention rates of colleges and universities. There are programs that provide academic support and advising to…

  9. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R reduces thrombin generation when displayed on the surface of cells expressing tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Richard F; Pepler, Laura; Bhagirath, Vinai; Liaw, Patricia C; Sheffield, William P

    2014-11-01

    The M358R variant of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is a potent soluble inhibitor of thrombin. Previously we engineered AR-API M358R, a membrane-bound form of this protein and showed that it inhibited exogenous thrombin when expressed on transfected cells lacking tissue factor (TF). To determine the suitability of AR-API M358R for gene transfer to vascular cells to limit thrombogenicity, we tested the ability of AR-API M358R to inhibit endogenous thrombin generated in plasma via co-expression co-expressing it on the surface of cells expressing TF. Transfected AR-API M358R formed inhibitory complexes with thrombin following exposure of recalcified, defibrinated plasma to TF on T24/83 cells, but discontinuously monitored thrombin generation was unaffected. Similarly, AR-API M358R expression did not reduce continuously monitored thrombin generation by T24/83 cell suspensions exposed to recalcified normal plasma in a Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope-type thrombin generation assay (TGA); in contrast, 1 μM hirudin variant 3 or soluble API M358R abolished thrombin generation. Gene transfer of TF to HEK 293 conferred the ability to support TF-dependent thrombin generation on HEK 293 cells. Co-transfection of HEK 293 cells with a 9:1 excess of DNA encoding AR-API M358R to that encoding TF reduced peak thrombin generation approximately 3-fold compared to controls. These in vitro results suggest that surface display of API M358R inhibits thrombin generation when the tethered serpin is expressed in excess of TF, and suggest its potential to limit thrombosis in appropriate vascular beds in animal models.

  10. Concurrent Phosphorus Recovery and Energy Generation in Mediator-Less Dual Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells: Mechanisms and Influencing Factors.

    PubMed

    Almatouq, Abdullah; Babatunde, Akintunde O

    2016-03-29

    This study investigated the mechanism and key factors influencing concurrent phosphorus (P) recovery and energy generation in microbial fuel cells (MFC) during wastewater treatment. Using a mediator-less dual chamber microbial fuel cell operated for 120 days; P was shown to precipitate as struvite when ammonium and magnesium chloride solutions were added to the cathode chamber. Monitoring data for chemical oxygen demand (COD), pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and aeration flow rate showed that a maximum 38% P recovery was achieved; and this corresponds to 1.5 g/L, pH > 8, -550 ± 10 mV and 50 mL/min respectively, for COD, pH(cathode), ORP and cathode aeration flow rate. More importantly, COD and aeration flow rate were shown to be the key influencing factors for the P recovery and energy generation. Results further show that the maximum P recovery corresponds to 72 mW/m² power density. However, the energy generated at maximum P recovery was not the optimum; this shows that whilst P recovery and energy generation can be concurrently achieved in a microbial fuel cell, neither can be at the optimal value.

  11. Enhanced hemangioblast generation and improved vascular repair and regeneration from embryonic stem cells by defined transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Bhang, Suk Ho; Arentson, Elizabeth; Sawada, Atsushi; Kim, Chan Kyu; Kang, Inyoung; Yu, Jinsheng; Sakurai, Nagisa; Kim, Suk Hyung; Yoo, Judy Ji Woon; Kim, Paul; Pahng, Seong Ho; Xia, Younan; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Choi, Kyunghee

    2013-01-01

    The fetal liver kinase 1 (FLK-1)(+) hemangioblast can generate hematopoietic, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). ER71/ETV2, GATA2, and SCL form a core transcriptional network in hemangioblast development. Transient coexpression of these three factors during mesoderm formation stage in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) robustly enhanced hemangioblast generation by activating bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and FLK-1 signaling while inhibiting phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, WNT signaling, and cardiac output. Moreover, etsrp, gata2, and scl inhibition converted hematopoietic field of the zebrafish anterior lateral plate mesoderm to cardiac. FLK-1(+) hemangioblasts generated by transient coexpression of the three factors (ER71-GATA2-SCL [EGS]-induced FLK-1(+)) effectively produced hematopoietic, endothelial, and SMCs in culture and in vivo. Importantly, EGS-induced FLK-1(+) hemangioblasts, when codelivered with mesenchymal stem cells as spheroids, were protected from apoptosis and generated functional endothelial cells and SMCs in ischemic mouse hindlimbs, resulting in improved blood perfusion and limb salvage. ESC-derived, EGS-induced FLK-1(+) hemangioblasts could provide an attractive cell source for future hematopoietic and vascular repair and regeneration.

  12. Concurrent Phosphorus Recovery and Energy Generation in Mediator-Less Dual Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells: Mechanisms and Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Almatouq, Abdullah; Babatunde, Akintunde O.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism and key factors influencing concurrent phosphorus (P) recovery and energy generation in microbial fuel cells (MFC) during wastewater treatment. Using a mediator-less dual chamber microbial fuel cell operated for 120 days; P was shown to precipitate as struvite when ammonium and magnesium chloride solutions were added to the cathode chamber. Monitoring data for chemical oxygen demand (COD), pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and aeration flow rate showed that a maximum 38% P recovery was achieved; and this corresponds to 1.5 g/L, pH > 8, −550 ± 10 mV and 50 mL/min respectively, for COD, pHcathode, ORP and cathode aeration flow rate. More importantly, COD and aeration flow rate were shown to be the key influencing factors for the P recovery and energy generation. Results further show that the maximum P recovery corresponds to 72 mW/m2 power density. However, the energy generated at maximum P recovery was not the optimum; this shows that whilst P recovery and energy generation can be concurrently achieved in a microbial fuel cell, neither can be at the optimal value. PMID:27043584

  13. Signaling and Transcription Factors during Inner Ear Development: The Generation of Hair Cells and Otic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, Héctor; Abelló, Gina; Giraldez, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Integration between cell signals and bHLH transcription factors plays a prominent role during the development of hair cells of the inner ear. Hair cells are the sensory receptors of the inner ear, responsible for the mechano-transduction of sound waves into electrical signals. They derive from multipotent progenitors that reside in the otic placode. Progenitor commitment is the result of cell signaling from the surrounding tissues that result in the restricted expression of SoxB1 transcription factors, Sox2 and Sox3. In turn, they induce the expression of Neurog1 and Atoh1, two bHLH factors that specify neuronal and hair cell fates, respectively. Neuronal and hair cell development, however, do not occur simultaneously. Hair cell development is prevented during neurogenesis and prosensory stages, resulting in the delay of hair cell development with respect to neuron production. Negative interactions between Neurog1 and Atoh1, and of Atoh1 with other bHLH factors driven by Notch signaling, like Hey1 and Hes5, account for this delay. In summary, the regulation of Atoh1 and hair cell development relies on interactions between cell signaling and bHLH transcription factors that dictate cell fate and timing decisions during development. Interestingly, these mechanisms operate as well during hair cell regeneration after damage and during stem cell directed differentiation, making developmental studies instrumental for improving therapies for hearing impairment. PMID:28393066

  14. Impact of Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Timing on Brain Relapse Rates in Patients With Stage IIIB Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Two Different Chemoradiotherapy Regimens

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Parlak, Cem; Kotek, Ayse; Yuksel, Oznur; Cengiz, Mustafa; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Pehlivan, Berrin

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the influence of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) timing on brain relapse rates in patients treated with two different chemoradiotherapy (CRT) regimens for Stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A cohort of 134 patients, with Stage IIIB NSCLC in recursive partitioning analysis Group 1, was treated with PCI (30 Gy at 2 Gy/fr) following one of two CRT regimens. Regimen 1 (n = 58) consisted of three cycles of induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concurrent CRT (C-CRT). Regimen 2 (n = 76) consisted of immediate C-CRT during thoracic radiotherapy. Results: At a median follow-up of 27.6 months (range, 7.2-40.4), 65 patients were alive. Median, progression-free, and brain metastasis-free survival (BMFS) times for the whole study cohort were 23.4, 15.4, and 23.0 months, respectively. Median survival time and the 3-year survival rate for regimens 1 and 2 were 19.3 vs. 26.1 months (p = 0.001) and 14.4% vs. 34.4% (p < .001), respectively. Median time from the initiation of primary treatment to PCI was 123.2 (range, 97-161) and 63.4 (range, 55-74) days for regimens 1 and 2, respectively (p < 0.001). Overall, 11 (8.2%) patients developed brain metastasis (BM) during the follow-up period: 8 (13.8%) in regimen 1 and 3 (3.9%) in regimen 2 (p = 0.03). Only 3 (2.2%) patients developed BM at the site of first failure, and for 2 of them, it was also the sole site of recurrence. Median BMFS for regimens 1 and 2 were 17.4 (13.5-21.3) vs. 26.0 (22.9-29.1 months), respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion: These results suggest that in Stage IIIB NSCLC patients treated with PCI, lower BM incidence and longer survival rates result from immediate C-CRT rather than ITC-first regimens. This indicates the benefit of earlier PCI use without delay because of induction protocols.

  15. Factors affecting eluation characteristics of sorption generators of technetium-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuridin, V. S.; Chernov, V. I.; Sadkin, V. L.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Varlamova, N. V.; Rogov, A. S.; Nesterov, E. A.; Ilina, E. A.; Larionova, L. A.; Medvedeva, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the adsorbed mass of molybdenum on the width of eluation profiles of generators and the patterns of molybdenum distribution in the amount of chromatographic columns by scanning them on the germanium-gallium detector using collimating device are studied. The boundary conditions under which the maximum value of 99mTc yield from generators Ye = 1 are defined. After scanning the columns, it was found out that the degree of filling the columns with molybdenum Q and the value of its maximum adsorption depend naturally on the total weight of the adsorbed mass. In order to achieve the condition Ye = 1 the value of Q should be at least 85%.

  16. Battling the "Hydra": Changing Operational Factors in 4th Generation War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    challenging us to change current doctrine and attempts to reduce war to algebraic formulae. Current Operational Doctrine Operational art, as advanced...over terrain -- the image and concept of ’classic’ war. A- 2 Armies turned to ’science," relying upon mathematical probabilities and algebraic formulae...Jominian war of algebraic formula and mathematical probabilities, vice accepting the 3d generation premise to cause and thrive within chaos. Lacking

  17. Complicating factors in safety testing of drug metabolites: Kinetic differences between generated and preformed metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Prueksaritanont, Thomayant . E-mail: thomayant_prueksaritanont@merck.com; Lin, Jiunn H.; Baillie, Thomas A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper aims to provide a scientifically based perspective on issues surrounding the proposed toxicology testing of synthetic drug metabolites as a means of ensuring adequate nonclinical safety evaluation of drug candidates that generate metabolites considered either to be unique to humans or are present at much higher levels in humans than in preclinical species. We put forward a number of theoretical considerations and present several specific examples where the kinetic behavior of a preformed metabolite given to animals or humans differs from that of the corresponding metabolite generated endogenously from its parent. The potential ramifications of this phenomenon are that the results of toxicity testing of the preformed metabolite may be misleading and fail to characterize the true toxicological contribution of the metabolite when formed from the parent. It is anticipated that such complications would be evident in situations where (a) differences exist in the accumulation of the preformed versus generated metabolites in specific tissues, and (b) the metabolite undergoes sequential metabolism to a downstream product that is toxic, leading to differences in tissue-specific toxicity. Owing to the complex nature of this subject, there is a need to treat drug metabolite issues in safety assessment on a case-by-case basis, in which a knowledge of metabolite kinetics is employed to validate experimental paradigms that entail administration of preformed metabolites to animal models.

  18. Generation of embryos directly from embryonic stem cells by tetraploid embryo complementation reveals a role for GATA factors in organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duncan, S A

    2005-12-01

    Gene targeting in ES (embryonic stem) cells has been used extensively to study the role of proteins during embryonic development. In the traditional procedure, this requires the generation of chimaeric mice by introducing ES cells into blastocysts and allowing them to develop to term. Once chimaeric mice are produced, they are bred into a recipient mouse strain to establish germline transmission of the allele of interest. Although this approach has been used very successfully, the breeding cycles involved are time consuming. In addition, genes that are essential for organogenesis often have roles in the formation of extra-embryonic tissues that are essential for early stages of post-implantation development. For example, mice lacking the GATA transcription factors, GATA4 or GATA6, arrest during gastrulation due to an essential role for these factors in differentiation of extra-embryonic endoderm. This lethality has frustrated the study of these factors during the development of organs such as the liver and heart. Extraembryonic defects can, however, be circumvented by generating clonal mouse embryos directly from ES cells by tetraploid complementation. Here, we describe the usefulness and efficacy of this approach using GATA factors as an example.

  19. Endogenous platelet factor 4 stimulates activated protein C generation in vivo and improves survival after thrombin or lipopolysaccharide challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Lambert, Michele P.; Poncz, Mortimer; Slungaard, Arne

    2007-01-01

    Pharmacologic infusion of activated protein C (APC) improves survival in severe sepsis, and platelet factor 4 (PF4) accelerates APC generation in a primate thrombin-infusion model. We now tested whether endogenous platelet PF4 content affects APC generation. Mice completely deficient in PF4 (mPF4−/−) had impaired APC generation and survival after thrombin infusion, similar to the impairment seen in heterozygote protein C–deficient (PC+/−) mice. Transgenic mice overexpressing human PF4 (hPF4+) had increased plasma APC generation. Overexpression of platelet PF4 compensated for the defect seen in PC+/− mice. In both a thrombin and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) survival model, hPF4+ and PC+/−/hPF4+ mice had improved survival. Further, infusion of hPF4+ platelets improved survival of wild-type mice after an LPS challenge. These studies suggest that endogenous PF4 release may have biologic consequences for APC generation and survival in clinical sepsis. Infusions of PF4-rich platelets may be an effective strategy to improve outcome in this setting. PMID:17540840

  20. Endogenous platelet factor 4 stimulates activated protein C generation in vivo and improves survival after thrombin or lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M Anna; Mahmud, Shawn A; Lambert, Michele P; Poncz, Mortimer; Slungaard, Arne

    2007-09-15

    Pharmacologic infusion of activated protein C (APC) improves survival in severe sepsis, and platelet factor 4 (PF4) accelerates APC generation in a primate thrombin-infusion model. We now tested whether endogenous platelet PF4 content affects APC generation. Mice completely deficient in PF4 (mPF4(-/-)) had impaired APC generation and survival after thrombin infusion, similar to the impairment seen in heterozygote protein C-deficient (PC(+/-)) mice. Transgenic mice overexpressing human PF4 (hPF4(+)) had increased plasma APC generation. Overexpression of platelet PF4 compensated for the defect seen in PC(+/-) mice. In both a thrombin and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) survival model, hPF4(+) and PC(+/-)/hPF4(+) mice had improved survival. Further, infusion of hPF4(+) platelets improved survival of wild-type mice after an LPS challenge. These studies suggest that endogenous PF4 release may have biologic consequences for APC generation and survival in clinical sepsis. Infusions of PF4-rich platelets may be an effective strategy to improve outcome in this setting.

  1. Perceived Factors Influencing the Pursuit of Higher Education among First-Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy-Ogan, Lynne

    2009-01-01

    Students who are first in their families to pursue higher education are often less likely to receive the academic, social, and financial support needed to experience success when compared to students from college-educated families. This study examined the perceived differences among salient factors influencing the pursuit of higher education…

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel homozygous deletion in the alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase gene in a patient with Sanfilippo type B syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB).

    PubMed

    Champion, Kristen J; Basehore, Monica J; Wood, Tim; Destrée, Anne; Vannuffel, Pascal; Maystadt, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB) is an autosomal recessive disease that is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU). Over 100 different mutations in the NAGLU gene have been identified in Sanfilippo syndrome type B patients; however, no large deletions have been reported. Here we present the first case of a large homozygous intragenic NAGLU gene deletion identified in an affected child of consanguineous parents. Long range and multiplex PCR methods were used to characterize this deletion which encompasses exons 3 and 4 and is 1146 base pairs long. We propose that Alu element-mediated unequal homologous recombination between an Alu-Y in intron 2 and an Alu-Sx in intron 4 is the likely mechanism for this deletion, thereby contributing further insight into the molecular etiology of this disorder and providing additional evidence of its allelic heterogeneity.

  3. State-level Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors for Electricity Generation, Updated

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    To assist reporters in estimating emissions and emission reductions, The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has made available in the instructions to Forms EIA-1605 and EIA-1605EZ emission coefficients for most commonly used fossil fuels and electricity. These coefficients were based on 1992 emissions and generation data. In 1999, updated coefficients were prepared based on the most recent data (1998) then available; however, the updated coefficients were not included in the instructions for the 1999 data year. This year, they have been updated again, but based on three years worth of data (1997, 1998, and 1999) rather than a single year.

  4. Environmental and sustainability factors associated with next-generation biofuels in the U.S.: what do we really know?

    PubMed

    Williams, Pamela R D; Inman, Daniel; Aden, Andy; Heath, Garvin A

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we assess what is known or anticipated about environmental and sustainability factors associated with next-generation biofuels relative to the primary conventional biofuels (i.e., corn grain-based ethanol and soybean-based diesel) in the United States during feedstock production and conversion processes. Factors considered include greenhouse (GHG) emissions, air pollutant emissions, soil health and quality, water use and water quality, wastewater and solid waste streams, and biodiversity and land-use changes. Based on our review of the available literature, we find that the production of next-generation feedstocks in the U.S. (e.g., municipal solid waste, forest residues, dedicated energy crops, microalgae) are expected to fare better than corn-grain or soybean production on most of these factors, although the magnitude of these differences may vary significantly among feedstocks. Ethanol produced using a biochemical or thermochemical conversion platform is expected to result in fewer GHG and air pollutant emissions, but to have similar or potentially greater water demands and solid waste streams than conventional ethanol biorefineries in the U.S. However, these conversion-related differences are likely to be small, particularly relative to those associated with feedstock production. Modeling performed for illustrative purposes and to allow for standardized quantitative comparisons across feedstocks and conversion technologies generally confirms the findings from the literature. Despite current expectations, significant uncertainty remains regarding how well next-generation biofuels will fare on different environmental and sustainability factors when produced on a commercial scale in the U.S. Additional research is needed in several broad areas including quantifying impacts, designing standardized metrics and approaches, and developing decision-support tools to identify and quantify environmental trade-offs and ensure sustainable biofuels production.

  5. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR Bmsage PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN SILK GLAND GENERATION IN SILKWORM, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hu-hu; Zhang, Deng-pan; Chen, Rui-ting; Cai, Zi-zheng; Lu, Yan; Liang, Shuang; Miao, Yun-gen

    2015-10-01

    Salivary gland secretion is altered in Drosophila embryos with loss of function of the sage gene. Saliva has a reduced volume and an increased electron density according to transmission electron microscopy, resulting in regions of tube dilation and constriction with intermittent tube closure. However, the precise functions of Bmsage in silkworm (Bombyx mori) are unknown, although its sequence had been deposited in SilkDB. From this, Bmsage is inferred to be a transcription factor that regulates the synthesis of silk fibroin and interacts with another silk gland-specific transcription factor, namely, silk gland factor-1. In this study, we introduced a germline mutation of Bmsage using the Cas9/sgRNA system, a genome-editing technology, resulting in deletion of Bmsage from the genome of B. mori. Of the 15 tested samples, seven displayed alterations at the target site. The mutagenesis efficiency was about 46.7% and there were no obvious off-target effects. In the screened homozygous mutants, silk glands developed poorly and the middle and posterior silk glands (MSG and PSG) were absent, which was significantly different from the wild type. The offspring of G0 mosaic silkworms had indel mutations causing 2- or 9-bp deletions at the target site, but exhibited the same abnormal silk gland structure. Mutant larvae containing different open-reading frames of Bmsage had the same silk gland phenotype. This illustrated that the mutant phenotype was due to Bmsage knockout. We conclude that Bmsage participates in embryonic development of the silk gland.

  6. Outcomes of anterolateral thigh-free flaps and conversion from external to internal fixation with bone grafting in gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Chung, Duke Whan; Han, Chung Soo

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the utility and the clinical outcomes of anterolateral thigh (ALT)-free flaps and conversion from external to internal fixation with plating and bone grafting in Gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures. A total of 21 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean follow-up period was 18 months and the mean age was 46.7 years. There were 18 men and three women. The mean time from injury to flap coverage was 11.6 days. The mean size of flaps used was 15.3 × 8.2 cm. The mean size of bone defects was 2.26 cm. Segmental bone defects were observed in 5 five cases, for which bone transport or vascularized fibular graft were performed. When flaps were successful and the fracture sites did not have any evidence of infection, internal fixation with plates and bone grafting were performed. Flaps survived in 20 cases. In the 20 cases with successful flaps, two cases developed osteomyelitis, but the 20 cases achieved solid bone union at a mean of 8.6 months after the injury, salvaging the lower extremity in 100% of the cases. At the last follow-up, 9 nine cases were measured excellent or good; 6, fair; and 6, poor in the functional assessment based on the method developed by Puno et al. ALT- free flaps to cover soft tissue defects in Gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures are considered as useful option for the treatment of composite defects. In addition, conversion to internal fixation and bone grafting can be an alternative method in order to reduce the risk of complications and inconvenience of external fixators.

  7. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  8. Generation and characterization of small single domain antibodies inhibiting human tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Steeland, Sophie; Puimège, Leen; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Haustraete, Jurgen; Devoogdt, Nick; Hulpiau, Paco; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Laukens, Debby; Meuleman, Philip; De Vos, Martine; Libert, Claude

    2015-02-13

    The cytokine TNF is a well known drug target for several inflammatory diseases such as Crohn disease. Despite the great success of TNF blockers, therapy could be improved because of high costs and side effects. Selective inhibition of TNF receptor (TNFR) 1 signaling holds the potential to greatly reduce the pro-inflammatory activity of TNF, thereby preserving the advantageous immunomodulatory signals mediated by TNFR2. We generated a selective human TNFR1 inhibitor based on Nanobody (Nb) technology. Two anti-human TNFR1 Nbs were linked with an anti-albumin Nb to generate Nb Alb-70-96 named "TNF Receptor-One Silencer" (TROS). TROS selectively binds and inhibits TNF/TNFR1 and lymphotoxin-α/TNFR1 signaling with good affinity and IC50 values, both of which are in the nanomolar range. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals that TROS competes with TNF for binding to human TNFR1. In HEK293T cells, TROS strongly reduces TNF-induced gene expression, like IL8 and TNF, in a dose-dependent manner; and in ex vivo cultured colon biopsies of CD patients, TROS inhibits inflammation. Finally, in liver chimeric humanized mice, TROS antagonizes inflammation in a model of acute TNF-induced liver inflammation, reflected in reduced human IL8 expression in liver and reduced IL6 levels in serum. These results demonstrate the considerable potential of TROS and justify the evaluation of TROS in relevant disease animal models of both acute and chronic inflammation and eventually in patients.

  9. Source segregation of food waste in office areas: Factors affecting waste generation rates and quality.

    PubMed

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Boldrin, Alessio; Scheutz, Charlotte; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-12-01

    Existing legislation mandates that the amount of waste being recycled should be increased. Among others, in its Resource Strategy Plan, the Danish Government decided that at least 60% of food waste generated by the service sector, including in office areas, should be source-sorted and collected separately by 2018. To assess the achievability of these targets, source-sorted food waste and residual waste from office areas was collected and weighed on a daily basis during 133 working days. Waste composition analyses were conducted every week to investigate the efficiency of the source-sorting campaign and the purity of the source-sorted food waste. The moisture content of source-sorted food waste and residual waste fractions, and potential methane production from source-sorted food waste, was also investigated. Food waste generation equated to 23 ± 5 kg/employee/year, of which 20 ± 5 kg/employee/year was source-sorted, with a considerably high purity of 99%. Residual waste amounted to 10 ± 5 kg/employee/year and consisted mainly of paper (29 ± 13%), plastic (23 ± 9%) and missorted food waste (24 ± 16%). The moisture content of source-sorted food waste was significantly higher (8%) than missorted food waste, and the methane potential of source-sorted food waste was 463 ± 42 mL CH4/g VS. These results show that food waste in office areas offers promising potential for relatively easily collectable and pure source-sorted food waste, suggesting that recycling targets for food waste could be achieved with reasonable logistical ease in office areas.

  10. Three generations of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors developed to revolutionize the therapy of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, ~80%–85% of which is non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Sensitizing mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene (EGFRm+), such as exon 19 deletions and exon 21 L858R point mutations, are the most important drivers in NSCLC patients. In this respect, small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been designed and developed, which launched the era of targeted, personalized and precise medicine for lung cancer. Patients with EGFRm+ could achieve good responses to the treatment with the first-generation EGFR TKIs, such as erlotinib and gefitinib. However, most patients develop acquired drug resistance mostly driven by the T790M mutation occurring within exon 20. Although the second-generation EGFR TKIs, such as afatinib, dacomitinib and neratinib, demonstrated promising activity against T790M in preclinical models, they have failed to overcome resistance in patients due to dose-limiting toxicity. Recently, the third-generation EGFR TKIs have shown to be effective against cell lines and murine models harboring T790M mutations while sparing wild-type EGFR, which represents a promising breakthrough approach in overcoming T790M-mediated resistance in NSCLC patients. This article provides a comprehensive review of the therapy revolution for NSCLC with three generations of EGFR TKIs. PMID:27920501

  11. Temporal order of RNase IIIb and loss-of-function mutations during development determines phenotype in DICER1 syndrome: a unique variant of the two-hit tumor suppression model

    PubMed Central

    Brenneman, Mark; Field, Amanda; Yang, Jiandong; Williams, Gretchen; Doros, Leslie; Rossi, Christopher; Schultz, Kris Ann; Rosenberg, Avi; Ivanovich, Jennifer; Turner, Joyce; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Stewart, Douglas; Yu, Weiying; Harris, Anne; Schoettler, Peter; Goodfellow, Paul; Dehner, Louis; Messinger, Yoav; Hill, D. Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is the most frequent pediatric lung tumor and often the first indication of a pleiotropic cancer predisposition,  DICER1 syndrome, comprising a range of other individually rare, benign and malignant tumors of childhood and early adulthood. The genetics of  DICER1-associated tumorigenesis are unusual in that tumors typically bear neomorphic missense mutations at one of five specific “hotspot” codons within the RNase IIIb domain of  DICER 1, combined with complete loss of function (LOF) in the other allele. We analyzed a cohort of 124 PPB children for predisposing  DICER1 mutations and sought correlations with clinical phenotypes. Over 70% have inherited or  de novo germline LOF mutations, most of which truncate the  DICER1 open reading frame. We identified a minority of patients who have no germline mutation, but are instead mosaic for predisposing  DICER1 mutations. Mosaicism for RNase IIIb domain hotspot mutations defines a special category of  DICER1 syndrome patients, clinically distinguished from those with germline or mosaic LOF mutations by earlier onsets and numerous discrete foci of neoplastic disease involving multiple syndromic organ sites. A final category of patients lack predisposing germline or mosaic mutations and have disease limited to a single PPB tumor bearing tumor-specific RNase IIIb and LOF mutations. We propose that acquisition of a neomorphic RNase IIIb domain mutation is the rate limiting event in  DICER1-associated  tumorigenesis, and that distinct clinical phenotypes associated with mutational categories reflect the temporal order in which LOF and RNase IIIb domain mutations are acquired during development. PMID:26925222

  12. Factors affecting the pore space transformation during hydrocarbon generation in source rock (shales): laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Korost, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Oil and gas generation is a set of processes which taking place in the interior, the processes can't be observable in nature. In the process of dumping the source rock, organic matter is transformed into a complex of high-molecular compounds - precursors of oil and gas (kerogen). Entering of a source column for specific thermobaric conditions, triggers the formation of low molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds. Generation of sufficient quantities of hydrocarbons leads to the primary fluid migration within the source rock. For the experiment were selected mainly siliceous-carbonate composition rocks from Domanic horizon South-Tatar arch. The main aim of experiment was heating the rocks in the pyrolyzer to temperatures which correspond katagenes stages. For monitoring changes in the morphology of the pore space X-ray microtomography method was used. As a result, when was made a study of the composition of mineral and organic content of the rocks, as well as textural and structural features, have been identified that the majority of the rock samples within the selected collection are identical. However, characteristics such as organic content and texture of rocks are different. Thus, the experiment was divided into two parts: 1) the study of the influence of organic matter content on the morphology of the rock in the process of thermal effects; 2) study the effect of texture on the primary migration processes for the same values of organic matter. Also, an additional experiment was conducted to study the dynamics of changes in the structure of the pore space. At each stage of the experiment morphology of altered rocks characterized by the formation of new pores and channels connecting the primary voids. However, it was noted that the samples with a relatively low content of the organic matter had less changes in pore space morphology, in contrast to rocks with a high organic content. At the second stage of the research also revealed that the conversion of the pore

  13. Geologic factors contributing to landslide generation in a pyroclastic area: August 1998 Nishigo Village, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigira, Masahiro

    2002-07-01

    Vertical contrasts in permeability, particularly where permeable surface materials overlie impermeable materials that prohibit the downward infiltration of groundwater, concentrate the groundwater and become an important focus of landslides that are triggered by intense rainfall. Just such a hydrogeological structure is present within the pyroclastics in Nishigo Village in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, where intense rainfall of 1200 mm in 6 days generated more than 1000 landslides in August 1998. Three types of landslides occurred. The first type occurred along the edges of small plateaus, where horizontal beds of permeable ash, scoria, and pumice overlie impermeable mudflow deposits consisting of tuffaceous fines and andesite blocks, and massive, weakly consolidated ignimbrites. The rainfall on the plateaus infiltrated downward first, then laterally within the permeable beds, finally gushing out at the plateau edges and triggering landslides. The second type of landslide occurred where weathered tuff of the same ignimbrite was present with a slip surface at the base of the heavily weathered zone. Within this heavily weathered zone, the tuff exfoliated into thin weak plates running parallel to the slope surface. The third type of landslide involved failure of colluvium or ash that filled hollows. This type occurred as a result of subsurface erosion caused by the groundwater infiltrating the superficial beds above the impermeable tuff.

  14. Massively parallel hypercube FFTs: CM-2 implementation and error analysis of a parallel trigonometric factor generation method

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, C.H. ); Swarztrauber, P.N. )

    1991-08-01

    On parallel computers, the way the data elements are mapped to the processors may have a large effect on the timing performance of a given algorithm. In our previous paper, we have examined a few mapping strategies for the ordered radix-2 DIF (decimation-in-frequency) Fast Fourier Transform. In particular, we have shown how reduction of communication can be achieved by combining the order and computational phases through the use of i-cycles. A parallel methods was also presented for computing the trigonometric factors which requires neither trigonometric function evaluation nor interprocessor communication. This paper first reviews some of the experimental results on the Connection Machine to demonstrate the importance of reducing communication in a parallel algorithm. The emphasis of this paper, however, is on analyzing the numerical stability of the proposed method for generating the trigonometric factors and showing how the error can be improved. 16 refs., 12 tabs.

  15. Dynamics of Thrombin Generation and Flux from Clots during Whole Human Blood Flow over Collagen/Tissue Factor Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Lu, Yichen; Sinno, Talid; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-10-28

    Coagulation kinetics are well established for purified blood proteases or human plasma clotting isotropically. However, less is known about thrombin generation kinetics and transport within blood clots formed under hemodynamic flow. Using microfluidic perfusion (wall shear rate, 200 s(-1)) of corn trypsin inhibitor-treated whole blood over a 250-μm long patch of type I fibrillar collagen/lipidated tissue factor (TF; ∼1 TF molecule/μm(2)), we measured thrombin released from clots using thrombin-antithrombin immunoassay. The majority (>85%) of generated thrombin was captured by intrathrombus fibrin as thrombin-antithrombin was largely undetectable in the effluent unless Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (GPRP) was added to block fibrin polymerization. With GPRP present, the flux of thrombin increased to ∼0.5 × 10(-12) nmol/μm(2)-s over the first 500 s of perfusion and then further increased by ∼2-3-fold over the next 300 s. The increased thrombin flux after 500 s was blocked by anti-FXIa antibody (O1A6), consistent with thrombin-feedback activation of FXI. Over the first 500 s, ∼92,000 molecules of thrombin were generated per surface TF molecule for the 250-μm-long coating. A single layer of platelets (obtained with αIIbβ3 antagonism preventing continued platelet deposition) was largely sufficient for thrombin production. Also, the overall thrombin-generating potential of a 1000-μm-long coating became less efficient on a per μm(2) basis, likely due to distal boundary layer depletion of platelets. Overall, thrombin is robustly generated within clots by the extrinsic pathway followed by late-stage FXIa contributions, with fibrin localizing thrombin via its antithrombin-I activity as a potentially self-limiting hemostatic mechanism.

  16. Analysis of Pre-Analytic Factors Affecting the Success of Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing of Solid Organ Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Goswami, Rashmi S; Singh, Rajesh R; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita

    2015-08-28

    Application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to routine clinical practice has enabled characterization of personalized cancer genomes to identify patients likely to have a response to targeted therapy. The proper selection of tumor sample for downstream NGS based mutational analysis is critical to generate accurate results and to guide therapeutic intervention. However, multiple pre-analytic factors come into play in determining the success of NGS testing. In this review, we discuss pre-analytic requirements for AmpliSeq PCR-based sequencing using Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) (Life Technologies), a NGS sequencing platform that is often used by clinical laboratories for sequencing solid tumors because of its low input DNA requirement from formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue. The success of NGS mutational analysis is affected not only by the input DNA quantity but also by several other factors, including the specimen type, the DNA quality, and the tumor cellularity. Here, we review tissue requirements for solid tumor NGS based mutational analysis, including procedure types, tissue types, tumor volume and fraction, decalcification, and treatment effects.

  17. Generating induced pluripotent stem cells from common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) fetal liver cells using defined factors, including Lin28.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Ikuo; Maeda, Takuji; Shimada, Hiroko; Kawai, Kenji; Okada, Yohei; Igarashi, Hiroshi; Oiwa, Ryo; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Aoki, Mikio; Kimura, Toru; Shiozawa, Seiji; Shinohara, Haruka; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    Although embryonic stem (ES) cell-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have potential therapeutic applications in humans, they are also useful for creating genetically modified human disease models in nonhuman primates. In this study, we generated common marmoset iPS cells from fetal liver cells via the retrovirus-mediated introduction of six human transcription factors: Oct-3/4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc, Nanog, and Lin28. Four to five weeks after introduction, several colonies resembling marmoset ES cells were observed and picked for further expansion in ES cell medium. Eight cell lines were established, and validation analyses of the marmoset iPS cells followed. We detected the expression of ES cell-specific surface markers. Reverse transcription-PCR showed that these iPS cells expressed endogenous Oct-3/4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc, Nanog and Lin28 genes, whereas all of the transgenes were silenced. Karyotype analysis showed that two of three iPS cell lines retained a normal karyotype after a 2-month culture. Both embryoid body and teratoma formation showed that marmoset iPS cells had the developmental potential to give rise to differentiated derivatives of all three primary germ layers. In summary, we generated marmoset iPS cells via the transduction of six transcription factors; this provides a powerful preclinical model for studies in regenerative medicine.

  18. Factors influencing the study of peroxidase-generated iodine species and implications for thyroglobulin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jack; Obinger, Christian; Eales, Geoff

    2008-07-01

    A key issue in the mechanism of thyroglobulin (Tg) iodination by thyroperoxidase (TPO) is whether a TPO-bound iodine intermediate directly iodinates Tg-incorporated tyrosines (specific iodination) or whether reactive iodine species released from TPO effectuate Tg iodination (nonspecific iodination). We addressed these alternatives by (a) determining the aqueous equilibria of the iodine species potentially involved in the kinetic studies of TPO-mediated iodination, and (b) reviewing the structure of the substrate channel in mammalian peroxidases. Redox-potentiometric analysis of aqueous iodine combined with integrated mathematical modelling demonstrates that I2 reacts with water to form several iodine species including hypoiodious acid (HOI). The HOI/I2 ratio depends on time, iodide concentration, buffering agents, and pH varying dramatically from pH 4 to 7.4. These factors may confound the use of Michaelis-Menten kinetics to determine the mechanism of TPO-catalyzed iodination since both I2 and HOI iodinate tyrosine but with different specificities and reaction rates. Consequently there is as yet no conclusive kinetic evidence that iodination occurs via formation of a TPO-bound iodinated intermediate. Furthermore, knowledge of TPO structure, gained from X-ray crystallographic studies indicates that access of Tg-bound tyrosyl groups to the active site of TPO is not possible. Thus the emerging conclusion is that the mechanism of Tg iodination is nonspecific. This is consistent with the occurrence of thyroid hormone formation in prevertebrate ascidians which exhibit TPO-like activity but lack the Tg gene.

  19. Generation of Potent Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Neutralizing Antibodies from Mouse Phage Display Library for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yan-Da; Wu, Yen-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Jiue; Tsai, Yi-San; Lin, Yu-Ying; Lai, Szu-Liang; Huang, Chao-Yang; Lok, Ying-Yung; Hu, Chih-Yung; Lai, Jiann-Shiun

    2016-02-05

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important stimulator for angiogenesis in solid tumors. Blocking VEGF activity is an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. Avastin, a humanized monoclonal antibody recognizes VEGF, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. To generate potential VEGF-recognizing antibodies with better tumor regression ability than that of Avastin, we have designed a systematic antibody selection plan. From mice immunized with recombinant human VEGF, we generated three phage display libraries, scFv-M13KO7, Fab-M13KO7, and scFv-Hyperphage, in single-chain Fv (scFv) or Fab format, displayed using either M13KO7 helper phage or Hyperphage. Solid-phase and solution-phase selection strategies were then applied to each library, generating six panning combinations. A total of sixty-four antibodies recognizing VEGF were obtained. Based on the results of epitope mapping, binding affinity, and biological functions in tumor inhibition, eight antibodies were chosen to examine their abilities in tumor regression in a mouse xenograft model using human COLO 205 cancer cells. Three of them showed improvement in the inhibition of tumor growth (328%-347% tumor growth ratio (% of Day 0 tumor volume) on Day 21 vs. 435% with Avastin). This finding suggests a potential use of these three antibodies for VEGF-targeted therapy.

  20. Generation and characterization of novel tetracycline-inducible pancreatic transcription factor-expressing murine embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Robert; Treff, Nathan; Budde, Melisa; Kastenberg, Zachary; Odorico, Jon

    2006-12-01

    Pancreatic development in mammals is controlled in part by the expression and function of numerous genes encoding transcription factors. Yet, how these regulate each other and their target genes is incompletely understood. Embryonic stem (ES) cells have recently been shown to be capable of differentiating into pancreatic progenitor cells and insulin-producing cells, representing a useful in vitro model system for studying pancreatic and islet development. To generate tools to study the relationships of transcription factors in pancreatic development we have established seven unique mouse ES cell lines with tetracycline-inducible expression of either Hnf4alpha, Hnf6, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Pax4, Pdx1, and Ptf1a cDNAs. Each of the cell lines was characterized for induction of transgene expression after exposure to doxycycline (DOX) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence microscopy. Transgene expression in the presence of DOX was at least 97-fold that seen in untreated cells. Immunofluorescent staining of DOX-treated cultures showed efficient (>95% of cells) transgene protein expression while showing <5% positive staining in uninduced cells. Each of the ES cell lines maintained their pluripotency as measured by teratoma formation. Furthermore, transgene expression can be efficiently achieved in vivo through DOX administration to mice. The establishment of ES cell lines with temporally controllable induction of critical pancreatic transcription factor genes provides a new set of tools that could be used to interrogate gene regulatory networks in pancreatic development and potentially generate greater numbers of beta cells from ES cells.

  1. Hot ortho-biologic topics at AAOS 2011†: platelet-rich plasma and related growth factors generate excitement.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, Julie

    2011-06-01

    Several hot topics relating to ortho-biologics were discussed at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgery (AAOS) in San Diego this February. Injecting a patient's own platelet-rich plasma (PRP) prior to orthopedic surgery was an important topic, and had its own forum devoted to debating its uses and merit. PRP use has been promoted by equipment companies such as MTF Sports Medicine, Biomet, and Arteriocyte, but others are likely to take advantage of the trend of increasing PRP use by developing a proprietary injectable that mixes PRP with certain growth factors. One possible addition would be a recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB, becaplermin) being developed by BioMimetic Therapeutics for its bone graft product. On the topic of viscosupplementation, the US's only single-injection product, Genzyme's SynviscOne®, was noticeably missing from the exhibit hall at AAOS, but an abstract comparing the single- and multiple-injection viscosupplementation techniques demonstrated that single-injection acts faster and is longer lasting. New bone morphogenetic protein formulations may improve healing of bone fractures. Molecular diagnostics may be used to predict periprosthetic joint infection, allowing orthopedic medicine to be more personalized. A diagnostic that can be used on a large scale has not yet been identified. † Adapted and reproduced from Hoggatt J. Hot Ortho-Biologic Topics at AAOS 2011: Platelet-Rich Plasma and Related Growth Factors Generate Excitement. inThought Research, 2011 Feb 28.

  2. Generational diversity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions.

  3. The African Experience. Volume I: Syllabus Lectures; Volume II: Bibliographic References; Volume IIIA: Introductory Essays; Volume IIIB: Introductory Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paden, John N.; Soja, Edward W.

    In response to demands for more and better teaching about Africa in American higher education, the US Office of Education requested that the Program of African Studies at Northwestern University generate a set of teaching materials which could be used in introductory undergraduate courses. Included in these volumes, these materials provide…

  4. Targeted expression of RALT in mouse skin inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and generates a Waved-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ballarò, Costanza; Ceccarelli, Sara; Tiveron, Cecilia; Tatangelo, Laura; Salvatore, Anna Maria; Segatto, Oreste; Alemà, Stefano

    2005-08-01

    Although it has been clearly established that negative feedback loops have a fundamental role in the regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in flies, their role in the regulation of mammalian EGFR has been inferred only recently from in vitro studies. Here, we report on the forced expression of RALT/MIG-6, a negative feedback regulator of ErbB receptors, in mouse skin. A RALT transgene driven by the K14 promoter generated a dose-dependent phenotype resembling that caused by hypomorphic and antimorphic Egfr alleles-that is, wavy coat, curly whiskers and open eyes at birth. Ex vivo keratinocytes from K14-RALT mice showed reduced biochemical and biological responses when stimulated by ErbB ligands. Conversely, knockdown of RALT by RNA interference enhanced ErbB mitogenic signalling. Thus, RALT behaves as a suppressor of EGFR signalling in mouse skin.

  5. Targeted expression of RALT in mouse skin inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and generates a Waved-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ballarò, Costanza; Ceccarelli, Sara; Tiveron, Cecilia; Tatangelo, Laura; Salvatore, Anna Maria; Segatto, Oreste; Alemà, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    Although it has been clearly established that negative feedback loops have a fundamental role in the regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in flies, their role in the regulation of mammalian EGFR has been inferred only recently from in vitro studies. Here, we report on the forced expression of RALT/MIG-6, a negative feedback regulator of ErbB receptors, in mouse skin. A RALT transgene driven by the K14 promoter generated a dose-dependent phenotype resembling that caused by hypomorphic and antimorphic Egfr alleles—that is, wavy coat, curly whiskers and open eyes at birth. Ex vivo keratinocytes from K14-RALT mice showed reduced biochemical and biological responses when stimulated by ErbB ligands. Conversely, knockdown of RALT by RNA interference enhanced ErbB mitogenic signalling. Thus, RALT behaves as a suppressor of EGFR signalling in mouse skin. PMID:16007071

  6. Decreased atrial natriuretic factor receptors and impaired cGMP generation in glomeruli from the cardiomyopathic hamster.

    PubMed

    Levin, E R; Frank, H J; Chaudhari, A; Kirschenbaum, M A; Bandt, A; Mills, S

    1989-03-15

    To determine a possible basis for the decreased action of atrial natriuretic factors (ANF) in congestive heart failure, we compared the cardiomyopathic hamster (CMH) in frank congestive failure, and the age-matched, normal, F1B strain of Golden Syrian Hamsters. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies revealed two classes of glomerular receptors. The CMH exhibited decreased binding overall and a markedly decreased number of high affinity receptors but comparable receptor affinity compared to the F1B. In contrast, the low affinity receptor population in the CMH had a much greater affinity compared to the F1B while receptor number was similar. Plasma ANF levels were substantially elevated in the CMH compared to the F1B and in-vitro generation of cGMP was significantly lower in the CMH. Such abnormalities could contribute to the resistance to ANF in this disease.

  7. Enrollment Factors that Predict Persistence of At-Risk (Low Income and First Generation) Students' Journey towards Completion of a Baccalaureate Degree at Idaho State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yizar, James H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore, track, and predict longitudinal differences (over the course of six years beginning fall semester 2001) between and among ISU low income, first generation, or the combination of low income and first generation freshman students; regarding persistence rate, and associated persistence factors, such as ACT…

  8. Is it possible to predict limb viability in complex Gustilo IIIB and IIIC tibial fractures? A comparison of two predictive indices.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, S T; O'Sullivan, M; Pasha, N; O'Shaughnessy, M; O'Connor, T P

    1997-01-01

    The patient with severe lower limb trauma presents a management dilemma; whether to amputate primarily or to attempt limb salvage. In recent years, many predictive indices have been published which purport to identify limbs which are non-viable. We retrospectively applied two recently described indices, the Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) and the Limb Salvage Index (LSI), to 54 limbs in 50 patients with either Gustilo IIIB or IIIC complex tibial fractures. There were 22 amputations (40.7 per cent) in the series. The mean MESS score in the limb salvage group was 3.8 (range 2-10), and the mean MESS score in the amputation group was 7.7 (range 4-13) (P < 0.0001). The mean LSI score in the limb salvage group was 3.6 (range 3-8), and the mean LSI score in the amputation group was 6.9 (P < 0.01). However, in the group with MESS scores > 7 (which recommends amputation), there were three limbs which were salvaged with acceptable functional outcome. Similarly, in those with LSI scores > 6 (which recommends amputation), there were seven limbs successfully salvaged. A MESS > 7 offered a greater relative risk of amputation (9.2) than a LSI score > 6 (5.3). We found both indices of use in predicting limb salvage and functional outcome. However, neither is sufficiently accurate to be considered absolutely reliable in clinical practice.

  9. Control of Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis with Efalizumab: 24-Week, Open-Label, Phase IIIb/IV Latin American Study Results

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Fernando M; Petri, Valeria; Campbell, Gladys AM; Dorantes, Gladys Leon; López, Magdalina; Galimberti, Ricardo L; Valdez, Raúl P; de Arruda, Lucia F; Guerra, Mario Amaya; Chouela, Edgardo N; Licu, Daiana

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Psoriasis is a debilitating, chronic inflammatory systemic disease affecting around 2% of the South American population. Biological therapies offer the possibility of long-term therapy with improved safety and efficacy. Methods We conducted a multicentre, open-label, single-arm, Phase IIIb/IV study of adult patients (18–75 years) with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis who were candidates for systemic therapy or phototherapy. Patients received efalizumab subcutaneously (1.0 mg/kg/wk). The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving a Physician Global Assessment (PGA) rating of “excellent” or “cleared” at Week 24. Safety outcomes were adverse events (AEs), serious AEs (SAEs) and abnormalities on laboratory tests. Results Of 189 patients included in the intent-to-treat and safety populations, 104 (55.0%) were of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity. At Week 24, 92/189 (48.7%) patients achieved or maintained a PGA rating of “excellent” or “cleared”. AEs were reported by 161/189 (85.2%) patients, SAEs by 21/189 (11.1%). One patient died during the study (meningoencephalitis). Laboratory findings were consistent with previous experience. Conclusions Efalizumab demonstrated sustained control of psoriasis up to 24 weeks in patients from Latin America, confirming results seen in Phase III studies conducted in North America and Europe. PMID:20098510

  10. 1E10 anti-idiotype vaccine in non-small cell lung cancer: experience in stage IIIb/IV patients.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Saily; Diaz, Rosa M; de la Torre, Ana; Santiesteban, Eduardo; Aguirre, Frank; Pérez, Kirenia; Rodríguez, José L; Barroso, María del Carmen; Hernández, Ana M; Toledo, Darien; Gabri, Mariano R; Alonso, Daniel F; Viada, Carmen; Gómez, Roberto E; Suárez, Eduardo; Vazquez, Ana M; Perez, Rolando; Macias, Amparo E

    2007-12-01

    Conventional treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has apparently reached a plateau of effectiveness in improving the survival of the patients. For that reason the search for new therapeutic strategies in this type of tumor is justified. 1E10 is an anti-idiotype murine monoclonal antibody (Ab2 MAb) specific to P3 Ab1 MAb, which reacts with NeuGc-containing gangliosides, sulfatides and with antigens expressed in some tumors, including those from the lung. We report the treatment with aluminum hydroxide-precipitated 1E10 MAb of 34 stage IIIb and 37 stage IV NSCLC patients. These patients were treated with the anti-idiotype vaccine, after received standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy, in a compassionate-use basis study. Patients received five bi-weekly injections of 1 mg of 1E10/Alum, other 10 doses at 28-day intervals and later the patients who maintained a good performance status continued to be immunized at this same time interval. No evidence of unexpected or serious adverse effects was reported. The median survival time of the 56 patients who entered the study with partial response or disease stabilization and with a PS 1 after the first line of chemo/radiotherapy, was 11.50 months from starting vaccination. In contrast, the median survival time calculated for patients who started vaccination with progressive disease and/or a PS2 was 6.50 months.

  11. Changes in the Factors Influencing Public Acceptance of Nuclear Power Generation in Japan Since the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Norifumi; Tsuchida, Shoji; Shiotani, Takamasa

    2016-01-01

    Public support for nuclear power generation has decreased in Japan since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in March 2011. This study examines how the factors influencing public acceptance of nuclear power changed after this event. The influence factors examined are perceived benefit, perceived risk, trust in the managing bodies, and pro-environmental orientation (i.e., new ecological paradigm). This study is based on cross-sectional data collected from two online nationwide surveys: one conducted in November 2009, before the nuclear accident, and the other in October 2011, after the accident. This study's target respondents were residents of Aomori, Miyagi, and Fukushima prefectures in the Tohoku region of Japan, as these areas were the epicenters of the Great East Japan Earthquake and the locations of nuclear power stations. After the accident, trust in the managing bodies was found to have a stronger influence on perceived risk, and pro-environmental orientation was found to have a stronger influence on trust in the managing bodies; however, perceived benefit had a weaker positive influence on public acceptance. We also discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  12. Generating favorable growth factor and protease release profiles to enable extracellular matrix accumulation within an in vitro tissue engineering environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Battiston, Kyle G; Labow, Rosalind S; Simmons, Craig A; Santerre, J Paul

    2017-02-24

    Tissue engineering (particularly for the case of load-bearing cardiovascular and connective tissues) requires the ability to promote the production and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components (e.g., collagen, glycosaminoglycan and elastin). Although different approaches have been attempted in order to enhance ECM accumulation in tissue engineered constructs, studies of underlying signalling mechanisms that influence ECM deposition and degradation during tissue remodelling and regeneration in multi-cellular culture systems have been limited. The current study investigated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-monocyte co-culture systems using different VSMC:monocyte ratios, within a degradable polyurethane scaffold, to assess their influence on ECM generation and degradation processes, and to elucidate relevant signalling molecules involved in this in vitro vascular tissue engineering system. It was found that a desired release profile of growth factors (e.g. insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1)) and hydrolytic proteases (e.g. matrix-metalloproteinases 2, 9, 13 and 14 (MMP2, MMP9, MMP13 and MMP14)), could be achieved in co-culture systems, yielding an accumulation of ECM (specifically for 2:1 and 4:1 VSMC:monocyte culture systems). This study has significant implications for the tissue engineering field (including vascular tissue engineering), not only because it identified important cytokines and proteases that control ECM accumulation/degradation within synthetic tissue engineering scaffolds, but also because the established culture systems could be applied to improve the development of different types of tissue constructs.

  13. Generation and Characterization of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor-Dependent Equine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Sun, Jane; Fortuna, Patrick R.J.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have reprogrammed dermal fibroblasts from an adult female horse into equine induced pluripotent stem cells (equiPSCs). These equiPSCs are dependent only on leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), placing them in striking contrast to previously derived equiPSCs that have been shown to be co-dependent on both LIF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These equiPSCs have a normal karyotype and have been maintained beyond 60 passages. They possess alkaline phosphatase activity and express eqNANOG, eqOCT4, and eqTERT mRNA. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that they produce NANOG, REX1, SSEA4, TRA1-60, and TRA1-81. While our equiPSCs are LIF dependent, bFGF co-stimulates their proliferation via the PI3K/AKT pathway. EquiPSCs lack expression of eqXIST and immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that during reprogramming the inactive X chromosome has likely been reactivated to generate cells that have two active X chromosomes. EquiPSCs form embryoid bodies and in vitro teratomas that contain derivatives of all three germ layers. These LIF-dependent equiPSCs likely reflect a more naive state of pluripotency than equiPSCs that are co-dependent on both LIF and bFGF and so provide a novel resource for understanding pluripotency in the horse. PMID:24555755

  14. Pathways by which the interplay of organismic and environmental factors lead to phenotypic variation within and across generations.

    PubMed

    Harper, Lawrence V

    2013-01-01

    The range of responses made to environmental exigencies by animals, including humans, may be impacted by the experiences of their progenitors. In mammals, pathways have been documented ranging from transactions between a mother and her developing fetus in the womb through continuity of parenting practices and cultural inheritance. In addition, phenotypic plasticity may be constrained by factors transmitted by the gametes that are involved in the regulation of gene expression rather than modifications to the genome itself. Possible mediators for this kind of inheritance are examined, and the conditions that might have led to the evolution of such transmission are considered. Anticipatory adjustments to possible environmental exigencies are likely to occur when such conditions recur regularly, but intermittently across generations and endure for substantial periods of time, and when adjusting to them after the fact is likely to be biologically costly, even life-threatening. It appears that physical growth and responses to nutrient availability are domains in which anticipatory, epigenetically inherited adjustments occur. In addition, given the fact that humans have oppressed one another repeatedly and for relatively long periods of time, such behavioral tendencies as boldness or innovativeness may be behavioral traits subject to such effects. The implications of these factors for research and policy are discussed.

  15. Thrombin generation by activated factor VII on platelet activated by different agonists. Extending the cell-based model of hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Raul; Scazziota, Alejandra Silvia; Herrera, Maria de Lourdes; Gonzalez, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Background Platelet activation is crucial in normal hemostasis. Using a clotting system free of external tissue factor, we investigated whether activated Factor VII in combination with platelet agonists increased thrombin generation (TG) in vitro. Methods and results TG was quantified by time parameters: lag time (LT) and time to peak (TTP), and by amount of TG: peak of TG (PTG) and area under thrombin formation curve after 35 minutes (AUC→35min) in plasma from 29 healthy volunteers using the calibrated automated thrombography (CAT) technique. TG parameters were measured at basal conditions and after platelet stimulation by sodium arachidonate (AA), ADP, and collagen (Col). In addition, the effects of recombinant activated FVII (rFVIIa) alone or combined with the other platelet agonists on TG parameters were investigated. We found that LT and TTP were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) and PTG and AUC→35min were significantly increased (p < 0.05) in platelet rich plasma activated with AA, ADP, Col, and rFVIIa compared to non-activated platelet rich plasma from normal subjects (p = 0.01). Furthermore platelet rich plasma activated by the combined effects of rFVIIa plus AA, ADP or Col had significantly reduced LT and TTP and increased AUC→35min (but not PTG) when compared to platelet rich plasma activated with agonists in the absence of rFVIIa. Conclusion Platelets activated by AA, ADP, Col or rFVIIa triggered TG. This effect was increased by combining rFVIIa with other agonists. Our intrinsic coagulation system produced a burst in TG independent of external tissue factor activity an apparent hemostatic effect with little thrombotic capacity. Thus we suggest a modification in the cell-based model of hemostasis. PMID:16630353

  16. A novel intronic cis element, ISE/ISS-3, regulates rat fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 splicing through activation of an upstream exon and repression of a downstream exon containing a noncanonical branch point sequence.

    PubMed

    Hovhannisyan, Ruben H; Carstens, Russ P

    2005-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) exons IIIb and IIIc yields two receptor isoforms, FGFR2-IIIb and -IIIc, with distinctly different ligand binding properties. Several RNA cis elements in the intron (intron 8) separating these exons have been described that are required for splicing regulation. Using a heterologous splicing reporter, we have identified a new regulatory element in this intron that confers cell-type-specific inclusion of an unrelated exon that mirrors its ability to promote cell-type-specific inclusion of exon IIIb. This element promoted inclusion of exon IIIb while at the same time silencing exon IIIc inclusion in cells expressing FGFR2-IIIb; hence, we have termed this element ISE/ISS-3 (for "intronic splicing enhancer-intronic splicing silencer 3"). Silencing of exon IIIc splicing by ISE/ISS-3 was shown to require a branch point sequence (BPS) using G as the primary branch nucleotide. Replacing a consensus BPS with A as the primary branch nucleotide resulted in constitutive splicing of exon IIIc. Our results suggest that the branch point sequence constitutes an important component that can contribute to the efficiency of exon definition of alternatively spliced cassette exons. Noncanonical branch points may thus facilitate cell-type-specific silencing of regulated exons by flanking cis elements.

  17. A Neuron-Benign Microfluidic Gradient Generator for Studying the Response of Mammalian Neurons towards Axon Guidance Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Li, Nianzhen; Keenan, Thomas M.; Folch, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of biochemical cues in isolation or in combinations in cell culture systems is crucial for unraveling the mechanisms that govern neural development and repair. The most widely used experimental paradigms that elicit axon guidance in vitro utilize as the source of the gradient a pulsatile pipette, transfected cells, or a loaded gel, producing time-varying gradients of poor reproducibility which are not well suited for studying slow-growing mammalian cells. Although microfluidic device design have allowed for generating stable, complex gradients of diffusible molecules, the flow-induced shear forces in a microchannel has made it impossible to maintain viable mammalian neuronal cultures for sufficiently long times. In this paper, we describe axonal responses of mouse cortical neurons in a “neuron-benign” gradient-generator device based on an open chamber that can establish highly stable gradients of diffusible molecules for at least 6 hours with negligible shear stress, and also allows the neurons to thrive for at least 2 weeks. Except for the period when the gradient is on, the cells in the gradient are under the same conditions as the cells on the control surfaces, which ensure a consistent set of micro-environmental variables. The gradient stability and uniformity over the cell culture surface achieved by the device, together with our software platform for acquiring, post-processing and quantitatively analyzing the large number of images allowed us to extract valuable information even from small datasets. We report a directed response of primary mammalian neurons (from E14 embryonic mice cortex) to a diffusible gradient of netrin in vitro. We infer from our studies that a large majority (~73%) of the neurons that extend axons during the gradient application grow towards the netrin source, and our data analysis also indicates that netrin acts as a growth factor for this same population of neurons. PMID:20957287

  18. Generation and characterization of a panel of monoclonal antibodies specific for human fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoyuan; Patel, Sima; Corisdeo, Susanne; Liu, Xiangdong; Micolochick, Holly; Xue, Jiyang; Yang, Qifeng; Lei, Ying; Wang, Baiyang; Soltis, Daniel

    2005-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is a member of the FGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and plays important roles in a variety of biological functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tumorigenesis. The human FGFRs share a high degree of sequence homology between themselves, as well as with their murine homologs. Consequently, it has been suggested that it may be difficult to prepare monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that are specific for the individual receptor types. In this communication, we report on the development and characterization of a panel of anti-human FGFR4 MAbs that were generated in mice using a rapid immunization protocol. Using a modified rapid immunization at multiple sites (RIMMS) protocol with the soluble extracellular domain of human FGFR4 (FGFR4-ECD), the immunized mice developed high levels of polyclonal IgG to the immunogen within 13 days of the first immunization. The lymph node cells isolated from the immunized animals were then fused with mouse myeloma cells for hybridoma generation. Use of an efficient hybridoma cloning protocol in combination with an ELISA screening procedure allowed for early identification of stable hybridomas secreting antihuman FGFR4 IgG. Several identified MAbs specifically reacted with the FGFR4 protein without binding to the other human isoforms (FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGFR3). As evaluated by BIAcore analysis, most anti-FGFR4 MAbs displayed high affinities (8.6 x 10(8) approximately 3.9 x 10(10) M) to FGFR4. Furthermore, these MAbs were able to bind to FGFR4 expressed on human breast tumor cell lines MDA-MB-361 and MDA-MB-453. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the RIMMS strategy is an effective approach for generating class-switched, high-affinity MAbs in mice to evolutionarily conserved proteins such as human FGFR4. These MAbs may be useful tools for further investigation of the biological functions and pathological roles of human FGFR4.

  19. Intellectual function evaluation of first generation immigrant children with sickle cell disease: the role of language and sociodemographic factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disease worldwide. Neurological events are among the most worrisome clinical complications of SCD and are frequently accompanied by cognitive impairment. Intellectual function in SCD may vary according to genetic and environmental factors. Immigrant children with SCD are increasing at a global level and display specific health care needs. The aim of our multicenter study was to describe the intellectual function of first generation African immigrants with SCD and the influence of sociodemographic factors on its characteristics. Methods The Wechsler Intelligence Scales were administered to evaluate broad intellectual functions in children with SCD and in age-matched healthy siblings. Patients’ clinical, socio-demographic, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Angiography (MRA) data were correlated to intellectual function scores. Results 68 children, mean age 8.95 years were evaluated. 72% spoke three languages, 21% two. FSIQ was <75 in 25% of the children. Mean VIQ was lower than PIQ in 75%. Mean verbal subtest scores were lower than performance scores. Female gender, number of languages spoken at home and mother’s employment were associated with single subtest performances (p < 0.05). MRA was abnormal in 73.4% and MRI in 35.9%. No significant correlation was established between silent lesions and intellectual function, even if patients with lesions performed worse. Fifteen siblings performed better than patients on cognitive domains, including language (p < 0.05). Conclusions Immigrant bilingual children with SCD seem to display a rate of cognitive impairment similar to their monolingual counterparts but a more pronounced and precocious onset of language difficulties. Adjunctive tests need to be considered in this group of patients to better define their specific deficits. PMID:23735165

  20. Protein disulfide isomerase acts as an injury response signal that enhances fibrin generation via tissue factor activation

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Christoph; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Manukyan, Davit; Grahl, Lenka; Lorenz, Michael; Altmann, Berid; Dlugai, Silke; Hess, Sonja; Konrad, Ildiko; Orschiedt, Lena; Mackman, Nigel; Ruddock, Lloyd; Massberg, Steffen; Engelmann, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    The activation of initiator protein tissue factor (TF) is likely to be a crucial step in the blood coagulation process, which leads to fibrin formation. The stimuli responsible for inducing TF activation are largely undefined. Here we show that the oxidoreductase protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) directly promotes TF-dependent fibrin production during thrombus formation in vivo. After endothelial denudation of mouse carotid arteries, PDI was released at the injury site from adherent platelets and disrupted vessel wall cells. Inhibition of PDI decreased TF-triggered fibrin formation in different in vivo murine models of thrombus formation, as determined by intravital fluorescence microscopy. PDI infusion increased — and, under conditions of decreased platelet adhesion, PDI inhibition reduced — fibrin generation at the injury site, indicating that PDI can directly initiate blood coagulation. In vitro, human platelet–secreted PDI contributed to the activation of cryptic TF on microvesicles (microparticles). Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that part of the extracellular cysteine 209 of TF was constitutively glutathionylated. Mixed disulfide formation contributed to maintaining TF in a state of low functionality. We propose that reduced PDI activates TF by isomerization of a mixed disulfide and a free thiol to an intramolecular disulfide. Our findings suggest that disulfide isomerases can act as injury response signals that trigger the activation of fibrin formation following vessel injury. PMID:18274674

  1. Family Aggregation and Risk Factors in Phobic Disorders over Three-Generations in a Nation-Wide Study

    PubMed Central

    Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Jakobsen, Helle; Meyer, Andrea; Jørgensen, Povl Munk; Lieb, Roselind

    2016-01-01

    Objective This nation-wide register-based study investigated how often phobic disorders (PHO) and co-morbid disorders occur in affected families compared to control families. Furthermore, the study addressed the impact of sex, year of birth, and degree of urbanization in terms of risk factors. Method A total of N = 746 child and adolescent psychiatric participants born between 1969 and 1986 and registered in the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register (DPCRR) with a diagnosis of a mental disorder before the age of 18, and developed PHO at some point during their life-time until a maximum age of 40 years were included. In addition, N = 2229 controls without any diagnosis of mental disorders before age 18 and that were matched for age, sex, and residential region were included. Diagnoses of mental disorders were also obtained from the first- degree relatives as a part of the Danish Three Generation Study (3GS). A family load component was obtained by using various mixed regression models. Results PHO occurred significantly more often in case than in control families, in particular, in mothers and siblings. Substance use disorders (SUD), Depressive disorders (DEP), anxiety disorders (ANX) and personality disorders (PERS) in the family were significantly associated with specific phobia in the case-probands. After controlling for various mental disorders comorbid to PHO it was found that some of the family transmission could be caused by various other mental disorders in family members rather than the PHO itself. Female sex and more recent year of birth were further risk factors while region of residence was not related to the manifestation of PHO. Case-relatives did not develop PHO earlier than control relatives. After adjusting for various additional explanatory variables, the family load explained only 0.0013% of the variance in the manifestation of PHO in the case-probands Discussion These findings, based on a very large and representative dataset, provide

  2. Our experiences with erlotinib in second and third line treatment patients with advanced stage IIIB/ IV non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehić, Bakir; Stanetić, Mirko; Tinjić, Ljuljeta; Smoljanović, Vlatka

    2008-11-01

    HeadHER1/EGFR is known to play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and is overexpressed in up to 80% of NSCLCs. The study of an Expanded Access Clinical Program of Erlotinib in NSCLC is a phase IV open-label, non-randomized, multicenter trial in patients with advanced (inoperable stage IIIb/IV) NSCLC who were eligible for treatment with erlotinib but had no access to trial participation. Patients for the study from Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) were selected from two Clinical centres (Sarajevo and Banja Luka). The aim of study was to evaluated efficacy and tolerability of erlotinib monotherapy in this setting. All patients who received at least one dose of erlotinib and data were entered in the database as of the CRF cut-off date of 14th May 2008 were included in analysis of data (n = 19). This population is defined as the Intent to Treat (ITT) population and includes all patients who had at least one dose of erlotinib regardless of whether major protocol violations were incurred. The findings are consistent with the results of the randomized, placebo-controlled BR.21 study. Indicating that erlotinib is an effective option for patients with advanced NSCLC who are unsuitable for, or who have previously failed standard chemotherapy. In B&H group of patients DCR was almost 84%, and PFS was approximately 24,7 weeks (compared with 44% and 9,7 weeks for erlotinib reported in phase III). Almost three quarter of the patients received erlotinib as their second line of therapy. Overall, erlotinib was well tolerated; there were no patients who withdrew due to a treatment-related AE (mainly rash) and there were few dose reductions. 24% of patients experienced an SAE (most commonly gastrointestinal (GI) disorders).

  3. Mid-Infrared (MIR) and Near-Infrared (NIR) Detection of Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 IIIB on Barley-Based Artificial Inoculum.

    PubMed

    Webb, Kimberly M; Calderón, Francisco J

    2015-10-01

    The amount of Rhizoctonia solani in the soil and how much must be present to cause disease in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is relatively unknown. This is mostly because of the usually low inoculum densities found naturally in soil and the low sensitivity of traditional serial dilution assays. We investigated the usefulness of Fourier transform mid-infrared (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic properties in identifying the artificial colonization of barley grains with R. solani AG 2-2 IIIB and in detecting R. solani populations in plant tissues and inoculants. The objectives of this study were to compare the ability of traditional plating assays to NIR and MIR spectroscopies to identify R. solani in different-size fractions of colonized ground barley (used as an artificial inoculum) and to differentiate colonized from non-inoculated barley. We found that NIR and MIR spectroscopies were sensitive in resolving different barley particle sizes, with particles that were <0.25 and 0.25-0.5 mm having different spectral properties than coarser particles. Moreover, we found that barley colonized with R. solani had different MIR spectral properties than the non-inoculated samples for the larger fractions (0.5-1.0, 1.0-2.0, and >2.0 mm) of the ground barley. This colonization was confirmed using traditional plating assays. Comparisons with the spectra from pure fungal cultures and non-inoculated barley suggest that the MIR spectrum of colonized barley is different because of the consumption of C substrates by the fungus rather than because of the presence of fungal bands in the spectra of the colonized samples. We found that MIR was better than NIR spectroscopy in differentiating the colonized from the control samples.

  4. Comparison of PG-SGA, SGA and body-composition measurement in detecting malnutrition among newly diagnosed lung cancer patients in stage IIIB/IV and benign conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Wu, Jing; Ma, Meili; Pei, Jun; Song, Yiyi; Zhang, Xueyan; Han, Baohui

    2011-09-01

    Assessment tools and body-composition measurements are useful in diagnosing malnutrition. Which one is better for lung disease patients is unclear. The objectives of the present study are: to assess relationships between different methods of nutritional measurements in lung diseases patients; to determine which one is better in diagnosing malnutrition for lung disease patients; and to determine whether lung cancer patients can be differentiated from benign lung disease patients using different measurements. A total of 96 newly diagnosed primary lung cancer patients in stage IIIB/IV and 52 benign lung disease patients nutritional status were assessed according to the SGA, the scored PG-SGA, and serum albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, hemoglobin, total lymphocyte count, body mass index (BMI), and weight. A total of 40% of lung cancer patients were severely malnourished, with men or elder having a higher rate of malnutrition. Significantly lower values of weight, BMI, total lymphocyte count, transferrin, prealbumin and serum albumin were found for them. Age, sex, weight, weight half year ago and prealbumin are in the regression equation to predict them. For benign lung disease patients, 21.2% were severely malnourished with significantly lower values of weight and transferrin. Age and prealbumin are in the equation to predict severely malnourished benign lung disease patients. The highest receiver operation characteristic area under the curve was found for the PG-SGA score, BMI and weight. PG-SGA global rating, age and iron-transferring protein are in the equation for predicting disease status. The SGA and PG-SGA are appropriate for identifying malnutrition in lung disease patients. Lung cancer patients can be differentiated from benign conditions by PG-SGA.

  5. Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Development and Global Competitiveness of US Space Transportation Industry: Critical Success Factors Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enyinda, Chris I.

    2002-01-01

    In response to the unrelenting call in both public and private sectors fora to reduce the high cost associated with space transportation, many innovative partially or fully RLV (Reusable Launch Vehicles) designs (X-34-37) were initiated. This call is directed at all levels of space missions including scientific, military, and commercial and all aspects of the missions such as nonrecurring development, manufacture, launch, and operations. According to Wertz, tbr over thirty years, the cost of space access has remained exceedingly high. The consensus in the popular press is that to decrease the current astronomical cost of access to space, more safer, reliable, and economically viable second generation RLVs (SGRLV) must be developed. Countries such as Brazil, India, Japan, and Israel are now gearing up to enter the global launch market with their own commercial space launch vehicles. NASA and the US space launch industry cannot afford to lag behind. Developing SGRLVs will immeasurably improve the US's space transportation capabilities by helping the US to regain the global commercial space markets while supporting the transportation capabilities of NASA's space missions, Developing the SGRLVs will provide affordable commercial space transportation that will assure the competitiveness of the US commercial space transportation industry in the 21st century. Commercial space launch systems are having difficulty obtaining financing because of the high cost and risk involved. Access to key financial markets is necessary for commercial space ventures. However, public sector programs in the form of tax incentives and credits, as well as loan guarantees are not yet available. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate discussion and assess the critical success factors germane for RLVs development and US global competitiveness.

  6. New Role for Kruppel-like Factor 14 as a Transcriptional Activator Involved in the Generation of Signaling Lipids*

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Thiago M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A.; Huebert, Robert C.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  7. Generation of Wheat Transcription Factor FOX Rice Lines and Systematic Screening for Salt and Osmotic Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinxia; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Yayun; Zhu, Butuo; Cao, Jian; Li, Zhanpeng; Han, Longzhi; Jia, Jizeng; Zhao, Guangyao; Sun, Xuehui

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in plant growth, development, and responses to environmental stress. In this study, we collected 1,455 full-length (FL) cDNAs of TFs, representing 45 families, from wheat and its relatives Triticum urartu, Aegilops speltoides, Aegilops tauschii, Triticum carthlicum, and Triticum aestivum. More than 15,000 T0 TF FOX (Full-length cDNA Over-eXpressing) rice lines were generated; of these, 10,496 lines set seeds. About 14.88% of the T0 plants showed obvious phenotypic changes. T1 lines (5,232 lines) were screened for salt and osmotic stress tolerance using 150 mM NaCl and 20% (v/v) PEG-4000, respectively. Among them, five lines (591, 746, 1647, 1812, and J4065) showed enhanced salt stress tolerance, five lines (591, 746, 898, 1078, and 1647) showed enhanced osmotic stress tolerance, and three lines (591, 746, and 1647) showed both salt and osmotic stress tolerance. Further analysis of the T-DNA flanking sequences showed that line 746 over-expressed TaEREB1, line 898 over-expressed TabZIPD, and lines 1812 and J4065 over-expressed TaOBF1a and TaOBF1b, respectively. The enhanced salt and osmotic stress tolerance of lines 898 and 1812 was confirmed by retransformation of the respective genes. Our results demonstrate that a heterologous FOX system may be used as an alternative genetic resource for the systematic functional analysis of the wheat genome.

  8. Application of spatial and non-spatial data analysis in determination of the factors that impact municipal solid waste generation rates in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Keser, Saniye; Duzgun, Sebnem; Aksoy, Aysegul

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatial autocorrelation exists in municipal solid waste generation rates for different provinces in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Traditional non-spatial regression models may not provide sufficient information for better solid waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unemployment rate is a global variable that significantly impacts the waste generation rates in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significances of global parameters may diminish at local scale for some provinces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GWR model can be used to create clusters of cities for solid waste management. - Abstract: In studies focusing on the factors that impact solid waste generation habits and rates, the potential spatial dependency in solid waste generation data is not considered in relating the waste generation rates to its determinants. In this study, spatial dependency is taken into account in determination of the significant socio-economic and climatic factors that may be of importance for the municipal solid waste (MSW) generation rates in different provinces of Turkey. Simultaneous spatial autoregression (SAR) and geographically weighted regression (GWR) models are used for the spatial data analyses. Similar to ordinary least squares regression (OLSR), regression coefficients are global in SAR model. In other words, the effect of a given independent variable on a dependent variable is valid for the whole country. Unlike OLSR or SAR, GWR reveals the local impact of a given factor (or independent variable) on the waste generation rates of different provinces. Results show that provinces within closer neighborhoods have similar MSW generation rates. On the other hand, this spatial autocorrelation is not very high for the exploratory variables considered in the study. OLSR and SAR models have similar regression coefficients. GWR is useful to indicate the local determinants of MSW generation rates. GWR model can be utilized to

  9. Factor Analysis of the ESL/EFL Strategy Inventory for Language Learning: Generation 1.5 Korean Immigrant College Students' Language Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Misook; Stoffa, Rosa; Kush, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores factors related to the language learning strategies of second language learners, specifically Generation 1.5 Korean immigrant students--the seventh-largest and one of the fastest growing foreign-born groups in the USA. Participants in this study were members of the Korean communities located in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia who…

  10. Consolidative Involved-Node Proton Therapy for Stage IA-IIIB Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Preliminary Dosimetric Outcomes From a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong; Morris, Christopher G.; Latif, Naeem

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose reduction to organs at risk (OARs) with proton therapy (PT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) enrolled on a Phase II study of involved-node radiotherapy (INRT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2009 and October 2010, 10 patients were enrolled on a University of Florida institutional review board-approved protocol for de novo 'classical' Stage IA-IIIB HL with mediastinal (bulky or nonbulky) involvement after chemotherapy. INRT was planned per European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. Three separate optimized plans were developed for each patient: 3D-CRT, IMRT, and PT. The primary end point was a 50% reduction in the body V4 with PT compared with 3D-CRT or IMRT. Results: The median relative reduction with PT in the primary end point, body V4, was 51% compared with 3D-CRT (p = 0.0098) and 59% compared with IMRT (p = 0.0020), thus all patients were offered treatment with PT. PT provided the lowest mean dose to the heart, lungs, and breasts for all 10 patients compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. The median difference in the OAR mean dose reduction with PT compared with 3D-CRT were 10.4 Gy/CGE for heart; 5.5 Gy/CGE for lung; 0.9 Gy/CGE for breast; 8.3 Gy/CGE for esophagus; and 4.1 Gy/CGE for thyroid. The median differences for mean OAR dose reduction for PT compared with IMRT were 4.3 Gy/CGE for heart, 3.1 Gy/CGE for lung, 1.4 Gy/CGE for breast, 2.8 Gy/CGE for esophagus, and 2.7 Gy/CGE for thyroid. Conclusions: All 10 patients benefitted from dose reductions to OARs with PT compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. It is anticipated that these reductions in dose to OAR will translate into lower rates of late complications, but long-term follow-up on this Phase II INRT study is needed.

  11. Benefits of switching from latanoprost to preservative-free tafluprost eye drops: a meta-analysis of two Phase IIIb clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Uusitalo, Hannu; Egorov, Evgeniy; Kaarniranta, Kai; Astakhov, Yuri; Ropo, Auli

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glaucoma patients frequently exhibit ocular surface side effects during treatment with prostaglandin eye drops. The present work investigated whether glaucoma patients suffering from signs and symptoms of ocular surface disease while using preserved latanoprost eye drops benefited from switching to preservative-free tafluprost eye drops. Patients and methods The analysis was based on 339 glaucoma patients enrolled in two Phase IIIb trials. The patients were required to have two symptoms, or one sign and one symptom of ocular surface disease at baseline, and at least 6 months preceding treatment with latanoprost eye drops preserved with benzalkonium chloride. All eligible patients were switched from latanoprost to preservative-free tafluprost for a total of 12 weeks. Ocular symptoms and ocular signs were evaluated at baseline and at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks after commencing treatment with tafluprost. Intraocular pressure (IOP), drop discomfort, and treatment preference were evaluated to investigate the clinical efficacy and patient-related outcomes. Results After 12 weeks of treatment with preservative-free tafluprost, the incidences of irritation/burning/stinging, foreign body sensation, tearing, itching, and dry eye sensation had diminished to one-third of those reported for preserved latanoprost at baseline. The incidences of blepharitis and corneal/conjunctival fluorescein staining had in turn decreased to one-half of those reported for preserved latanoprost. Severity of conjunctival hyperemia was halved during treatment with preservative-free tafluprost, and there was significant improvement in tear break-up time and tear production. A further reduction in IOP (~1 mmHg) was seen with preservative-free tafluprost compared with preserved latanoprost. Drop discomfort was alleviated during preservative-free tafluprost treatment, and an outstanding majority of patients (72%) preferred preservative-free tafluprost over preserved latanoprost

  12. Next-generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in epidermal growth factor receptor -mutant non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee-Seng; Cho, Byoung-Chul; Soo, Ross A

    2016-03-01

    Since the discovery of sensitizing EGFR mutations as a predictive marker of sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), the field of targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been revolutionized. Patients harbouring these sensitizing mutations treated with EGFR TKI have derived significant clinical outcome when compared with standard platinum based chemotherapy doublets. However disease progression invariably occurs at a median of about 9-13 months from initiation treatment, if acquired resistance commonly due to the development of EGFR T790M mutation. A novel class of "third generation" EGFR TKIs have been developed that is sensitising and T790M mutant-specific whilst sparing WT EGFR, representing a significant breakthrough in the treatment in NSCLC patients with acquired resistance harboring these genotypes. Early phase clinical data suggest the third generation EGFR TKIs such as osimertinib, rociletinib, and HM61713 are highly efficacious and well tolerated. Another promising class of EGFR TKI such as AZD3759 has been designed to penetrate blood brain barrier to treat brain metastases and leptomeningeal disease and has showed promising responses in patients with brain metastases. Acquired resistance to third generation EGFR TKIs has been reported including EGFR C797S. Given its non-invasive nature, plasma ctDNA is being explored as a possible approach to detect T790M mutation and to also inform on novel molecular mechansims of tertiary resistance to third generation EGFR TKIs. An understanding of the mechanisms of acquired resistance to the third-generation EGFR TKIs will greatly aid in the development of the next generation of EGFR TKIs.

  13. Human factors engineering control-room-design review/audit report: Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Arizona Public Service Company

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, J.W.; Lappa, D.A.

    1981-10-09

    A human factors engineering design review of the Palo Verde control room simulator was performed at the site on September 15 through September 17, 1981. Observed human factors design discrepancies were given priority ratings. This report summarizes the team's observations of the control room design and layout and of the control room operators' interface with the control room environment. A list of the human factors strengths observed in the Palo Verde control room simulator is given.

  14. Prediction of household and commercial BMW generation according to socio-economic and other factors for the Dublin region.

    PubMed

    Purcell, M; Magette, W L

    2009-04-01

    Both planning and design of integrated municipal solid waste management systems require accurate prediction of waste generation. This research predicted the quantity and distribution of biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) generation within a diverse 'landscape' of residential areas, as well as from a variety of commercial establishments (restaurants, hotels, hospitals, etc.) in the Dublin (Ireland) region. Socio-economic variables, housing types, and the sizes and main activities of commercial establishments were hypothesized as the key determinants contributing to the spatial variability of BMW generation. A geographical information system (GIS) 'model' of BMW generation was created using ArcMap, a component of ArcGIS 9. Statistical data including socio-economic status and household size were mapped on an electoral district basis. Historical research and data from scientific literature were used to assign BMW generation rates to residential and commercial establishments. These predictions were combined to give overall BMW estimates for the region, which can aid waste planning and policy decisions. This technique will also aid the design of future waste management strategies, leading to policy and practice alterations as a function of demographic changes and development. The household prediction technique gave a more accurate overall estimate of household waste generation than did the social class technique. Both techniques produced estimates that differed from the reported local authority data; however, given that local authority reported figures for the region are below the national average, with some of the waste generated from apartment complexes being reported as commercial waste, predictions arising from this research are believed to be closer to actual waste generation than a comparison to reported data would suggest. By changing the input data, this estimation tool can be adapted for use in other locations. Although focusing on waste in the Dublin region

  15. Shared Genetic Aetiology between Cognitive Ability and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: Generation Scotland's Scottish Family Health Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luciano, Michelle; Batty, G. David; McGilchrist, Mark; Linksted, Pamela; Fitzpatrick, Bridie; Jackson, Cathy; Pattie, Alison; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Andrew D.; Smith, Blair H.; Porteous, David; Deary, Ian J.

    2010-01-01

    People with higher general cognitive ability in early life have more favourable levels of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in adulthood and CVD itself. The mechanism of these associations is not known. Here we examine whether general cognitive ability and CVD risk factors share genetic and/or environmental aetiology. In this large,…

  16. Municipal solid waste generation in growing urban areas in Africa: current practices and relation to socioeconomic factors in Jimma, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Getahun, T; Mengistie, E; Haddis, A; Wasie, F; Alemayehu, E; Dadi, D; Van Gerven, T; Van der Bruggen, B

    2012-10-01

    As one of cities in the developing countries, a rapid population growth and industrial activities pose many environmental challenges for Jimma city, Ethiopia. One aspect of urban growth posing a threat on sustainable development is poor solid waste management, which results in environmental pollution. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the quantity, composition, sources of waste generated, their current disposal practices, and to recommend appropriate management technologies. The total waste generated daily in Jimma city was ca. 88,000 kg, and the average per capita generation rate was 0.55 ± 0.17 kg/capita/day. Eighty-seven percent of the waste was produced by households and 13% by institutions, and a negligible fraction (0.1%) was generated by street sweepings. During the rainy season, 40% more waste was generated than in the dry season because of the increased availability of agricultural food product. Further analysis showed that biodegradable organic waste constitutes 54% by weight with an average moisture content of 60% that falls within the required limits for composting. The nonbiodegradable components constitute 46% of which 30% of it was nonrecyclable material. Only 25% of the community uses municipal containers for disposal at the selected landfill site. Fifty-one percent of the households disposed their waste in individually chosen spots, whereas 22% burned their waste. Finally 2% of households use private waste collectors. The socioeconomic analysis showed that higher family income and educational status is associated more with private or municipal waste collection and less with the application of backyard or open dumping. These insights into generated waste and management practice in Jimma city allow making suggestions for improved collection, treatment, and disposal methods. A primary conclusion is that the biodegradable waste is a major fraction having suitable properties for recycling. As such an economic benefit can be obtained from

  17. Contributing Factors to Generation 1.5 Students' Successes on the Exit State Assessment for High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderhoef, Deborah E.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological narrative study investigated the successes of eight Generation 1.5 high school seniors on the Exit state assessment in English language arts in Texas. These eight participants represented three difficult ethnic cultures, Hispanic, Pakistani and Turkish; within the Hispanic cultures the countries of Mexico and El Salvador were…

  18. In Arabidopsis thaliana distinct alleles encoding mitochondrial RNA PROCESSING FACTOR 4 support the generation of additional 5' termini of ccmB transcripts.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Katrin; Jonietz, Christian; Schleicher, Sarah; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Small, Ian; Binder, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    In plant mitochondria, the 5' ends of many transcripts are generated post-transcriptionally. We show that the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein RNA PROCESSING FACTOR 4 (RPF4) supports the generation of extra 5' ends of ccmB transcripts in Landsberg erecta (Ler) and a number of other Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes. RPF4 was identified in Ler applying a forward genetic approach supported by complementation studies of ecotype Columbia (Col), which generates the Ler-type extra ccmB 5' termini only after the introduction of the RPF4 allele from Ler. Studies with chimeric RPF4 proteins composed of various parts of the RPF4 proteins from Ler and Col identified differences in the N-terminal and central PPR motifs that explain ecotype-specific variations in ccmB processing. These results fit well with binding site predictions in ccmB transcripts based on the known determinants of nucleotide base recognition by PPR motifs.

  19. Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix

    DOEpatents

    Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

    2012-10-16

    A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

  20. Theoretical exploration of control factors for the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectrum in two-color field.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinting; Yang, Dapeng; Yao, Li

    2014-09-15

    In this work, the laser-parameter effects on the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectrum and attosecond trains by mixing two-color laser field, a visible light field of 800 nm and a mid-infrared (mid-IR) laser pulses of 2400 nm, are theoretically demonstrated for the first time. Different schemes are applied to discuss the function of intensity, carrier-envelope phase (CEP) and pulse duration on the generation of an isolated attosecond pulse. As a consequence, an isolated 16as pulse is obtained by Fourier transforming an ultrabroad XUV continuum of 208 eV with the fundamental field of duration of 6 fs, 9×10(14)W/cm2 of intensity, the duration of 12 fs, the CEPs of the two driving pulses of -π and the relative strength ratio √R=0.2.

  1. Three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting generated by one-loop fermion factors

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, Michael I.; Grotch, Howard; Shelyuto, Valery A.

    2004-10-01

    We consider three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium generated by diagrams with one-loop radiative photon insertions both in the electron and muon lines. An analytic result for these nonlogarithmic corrections of order {alpha}(Z{sup 2}{alpha})(Z{alpha})(m/M)E{sub F} is obtained. This result constitutes a next step in the implementation of the program of reduction of the theoretical uncertainty of hyperfine splitting below 10 Hz.

  2. Wind Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    When Enerpro, Inc. president, Frank J. Bourbeau, attempted to file a patent on a system for synchronizing a wind generator to the electric utility grid, he discovered Marshall Space Flight Center's Frank Nola's power factor controller. Bourbeau advanced the technology and received a NASA license and a patent for his Auto Synchronous Controller (ASC). The ASC reduces generator "inrush current," which occurs when large generators are abruptly brought on line. It controls voltage so the generator is smoothly connected to the utility grid when it reaches its synchronous speed, protecting the components from inrush current damage. Generator efficiency is also increased in light winds by applying lower than rated voltage. Wind energy is utilized to drive turbines to generate electricity for utility companies.

  3. Activation of the endothelium by IL-1 alpha and glucocorticoids results in major increase of complement C3 and factor B production and generation of C3a.

    PubMed Central

    Coulpier, M; Andreev, S; Lemercier, C; Dauchel, H; Lees, O; Fontaine, M; Ripoche, J

    1995-01-01

    Constitutive secretion of complement C3 and factor B by the endothelial cell (EC) is lowered by therapeutic concentrations of glucocorticoids such as hydrocortisone or dexamethasone, whereas regulatory protein factor H production is increased by these hormones. In contrast, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 alpha has a stimulatory effect on C3 and factor B secretion by the endothelium and an inhibitory effect on factor H secretion. In this study, we examined the combined effect of IL-1 alpha and glucocorticoids on C3 and factor B expression by the endothelial cell. When dexamethasone or hydrocortisone were added to IL-1 alpha, significant potentialization of IL-1 alpha-induced stimulation of C3 and factor B production was observed, occurring at various concentrations of either stimuli. Dose-response experiments indicate that, in vitro, optimal concentrations are in the range of 10(-7) to 10(-5) M for dexamethasone and 50-200 U for IL-1 alpha. In contrast, dexamethasone counteracts, in an additive way, the inhibitory effect of IL-1 alpha on regulatory complement protein factor H production by EC. Such a potentialization between glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha was not observed for another marker of endothelial activation, IL-1 alpha-induced stimulation of coagulation tissue factor expression. The association of glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha therefore appears to be a specific and major stimulus for the secretion of complement C3 and factor B, two acute-phase proteins, by the endothelium. As a result of the in vitro endothelium stimulation by glucocorticoids and IL-1 alpha, C3a is generated in the vicinity of the endothelial cell. This study further suggests that complement activation, with its deleterious consequences, may result from the stimulation of endothelium in situations where high levels of IL-1 alpha and endogenous glucocorticoids coexist, such as in septic shock. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:7621583

  4. Human factors in the presentation of computer-generated information - Aspects of design and application in automated flight traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roske-Hofstrand, Renate J.

    1990-01-01

    The man-machine interface and its influence on the characteristics of computer displays in automated air traffic is discussed. The graphical presentation of spatial relationships and the problems it poses for air traffic control, and the solution of such problems are addressed. Psychological factors involved in the man-machine interface are stressed.

  5. Immigrant Parents' Choice of a Bilingual versus Monolingual Kindergarten for Second-Generation Children: Motives, Attitudes, and Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Mila; Moin, Victor; Leikin, Mark; Breitkopf, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated how immigrant parents describe and explain their family language policy concerning their child's preschool bilingual development, and also explored the factors linked to the parents' choice of bilingual or monolingual kindergarten for their child. The study design was based on a comparison of 2 groups of parents: those who…

  6. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key factor for stimulation of macrophage proliferation by ceramide 1-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guane; Ordonez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio

    2012-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages. However, the mechanisms involved in this action were only partially described. Here, we demonstrate that C1P stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and that ROS are required for the mitogenic effect of C1P. ROS production was dependent upon prior activation of NADPH oxidase by C1P, which was determined by measuring phosphorylation of the p40phox subunit and translocation of p47phox from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In addition, C1P activated cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A{sub 2} and protein kinase C-{alpha}, and NADPH oxidase activation was blocked by selective inhibitors of these enzymes. These inhibitors, and inhibitors of ROS production, blocked the mitogenic effect of C1P. By using BHNB-C1P (a photolabile caged-C1P analog), we demonstrate that all of these C1P actions are caused by intracellular C1P. It can be concluded that the enzyme responsible for C1P-stimulated ROS generation in bone marrow-derived macrophages is NADPH oxidase, and that this enzyme is downstream of PKC-{alpha} and cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} in this pathway. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enzyme responsible for ROS generation by C1P in macrophages is NADPH oxidase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NADPH oxidase lies downstream of cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} and PKC-{alpha} in this pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROS generation is essential for the stimulation of macrophage proliferation by C1P.

  7. A Combinatorial Code for Gene Expression Generated by Transcription Factor Bach2 and MAZR (MAZ-Related Factor) through the BTB/POZ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Akira; Yamagiwa, Hironori; Hoshino, Hideto; Muto, Akihiko; Sato, Kazushige; Morita, Masanobu; Hayashi, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2000-01-01

    Bach2 is a B-cell- and neuron-specific transcription repressor that forms heterodimers with the Maf-related oncoproteins. We show here that Bach2 activates transcription by interacting with its novel partner MAZR. MAZR was isolated by the yeast two-hybrid screen using the BTB/POZ domain of Bach2 as bait. Besides the BTB/POZ domain, MAZR possesses Zn finger motifs that are closely related to those of the Myc-associated Zn finger (MAZ) protein. MAZR mRNA was coexpressed with Bach2 in B cells among hematopoietic cells and in developing mouse limb buds, suggesting a cooperative role for MAZR and Bach2 in these cells. MAZR forms homo- and hetero-oligomers with Bach2 through the BTB domain, which oligomers bind to guanine-rich sequences. Unlike MAZ, MAZR functioned as a strong activator of the c-myc promoter in transfection assays with B cells. However, it does not possess a typical activation domain, suggesting a role for it as an unusual type of transactivator. The fgf4 gene, which regulates morphogenesis of limb buds, contains both guanine-rich sequences and a Bach2 binding site in its regulatory region. In transfection assays using fibroblast cells, the fgf4 gene was upregulated in the presence of both MAZR and Bach2 in a BTB/POZ domain-dependent manner. The results provide a new perspective on the function of BTB/POZ domain factors and indicate that BTB/POZ domain-mediated oligomers of transcription factors may serve as combinatorial codes for gene expression. PMID:10669750

  8. Lavage of Leukotriene B4 Induces Lung Generation of Tumor Necrosis Factor-A and Neutrophil Diapedesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    iTlHIMTiTi METHODS Animal Preparation Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ( Charles River Lab, Wilmington, MA) (n=114) weighing approximately 500 g were...airways. Rabbit Serum: Sterile normal rabbit preimmune serum (IP:001 Genzyme) was diluted and given in the same volume as IP:400. Endotoxin content of IP...interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-a of endotoxin versus leukoctye chemoat- tractants. Am J Pathol 1989; 135:227-237. 23. Carlos TM, Harlan JM

  9. Monitoring Low Molecular Weight Heparins at Therapeutic Levels: Dose-Responses of, and Correlations and Differences between aPTT, Anti-Factor Xa and Thrombin Generation Assays

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Owain; Lybeck, Emanuel; Strandberg, Karin; Tynngård, Nahreen; Schött, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Background Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH’s) are used to prevent and treat thrombosis. Tests for monitoring LMWH’s include anti-factor Xa (anti-FXa), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and thrombin generation. Anti-FXa is the current gold standard despite LMWH’s varying affinities for FXa and thrombin. Aim To examine the effects of two different LMWH’s on the results of 4 different aPTT-tests, anti-FXa activity and thrombin generation and to assess the tests’ concordance. Method Enoxaparin and tinzaparin were added ex-vivo in concentrations of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 anti-FXa international units (IU)/mL, to blood from 10 volunteers. aPTT was measured using two whole blood methods (Free oscillation rheometry (FOR) and Hemochron Jr (HCJ)) and an optical plasma method using two different reagents (ActinFSL and PTT-Automat). Anti-FXa activity was quantified using a chromogenic assay. Thrombin generation (Endogenous Thrombin Potential, ETP) was measured on a Ceveron Alpha instrument using the TGA RB and more tissue-factor rich TGA RC reagents. Results Methods’ mean aPTT at 1.0 IU/mL LMWH varied between 54s (SD 11) and 69s (SD 14) for enoxaparin and between 101s (SD 21) and 140s (SD 28) for tinzaparin. ActinFSL gave significantly shorter aPTT results. aPTT and anti-FXa generally correlated well. ETP as measured with the TGA RC reagent but not the TGA RB reagent showed an inverse exponential relationship to the concentration of LMWH. The HCJ-aPTT results had the weakest correlation to anti-FXa and thrombin generation (Rs0.62–0.87), whereas the other aPTT methods had similar correlation coefficients (Rs0.80–0.92). Conclusions aPTT displays a linear dose-respone to LMWH. There is variation between aPTT assays. Tinzaparin increases aPTT and decreases thrombin generation more than enoxaparin at any given level of anti-FXa activity, casting doubt on anti-FXa’s present gold standard status. Thrombin generation with tissue factor-rich activator is

  10. The splicing factor PQBP1 regulates mesodermal and neural development through FGF signaling

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yasuno; Thomsen, Gerald H.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is an important means of regulating developmental processes, yet the molecular mechanisms governing alternative splicing in embryonic contexts are just beginning to emerge. Polyglutamine-binding protein 1 (PQBP1) is an RNA-splicing factor that, when mutated, in humans causes Renpenning syndrome, an X-linked intellectual disability disease characterized by severe cognitive impairment, but also by physical defects that suggest PQBP1 has broader functions in embryonic development. Here, we reveal essential roles for PQBP1 and a binding partner, WBP11, in early development of Xenopus embryos. Both genes are expressed in the nascent mesoderm and neurectoderm, and morpholino knockdown of either causes defects in differentiation and morphogenesis of the mesoderm and neural plate. At the molecular level, knockdown of PQBP1 in Xenopus animal cap explants inhibits target gene induction by FGF but not by BMP, Nodal or Wnt ligands, and knockdown of either PQBP1 or WBP11 in embryos inhibits expression of fgf4 and FGF4-responsive cdx4 genes. Furthermore, PQBP1 knockdown changes the alternative splicing of FGF receptor-2 (FGFR2) transcripts, altering the incorporation of cassette exons that generate receptor variants (FGFR2 IIIb or IIIc) with different ligand specificities. Our findings may inform studies into the mechanisms underlying Renpenning syndrome. PMID:25209246

  11. Generation of a complement-derived chemotactic factor for tumor cells in experimentally induced peritoneal exudates and its effect on the local metastasis of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, F. W.; Mokashi, S.; Delikatny, J.

    1982-01-01

    A chemotactic factor for tumor cells was found in inflammatory exudate fluids induced by giving intraperitoneal injections of glycogen to Sprague-Dawley rats. The quantity of chemotactic activity and the period of time during which it could be detected correlated with the inflammatory reaction, measured by the cellular composition of the exudates and their content of protein and lysosomal enzymes. In gel filtration the chemotactic factor behaved mainly as a molecule having a molecular weight of approximately 6000 daltons. Its biologic activity was blocked by antiserums directed against C5 but not by antiserums against C3 or C4. In these two respects, the factor generated in vivo has the same properties as a previously described chemotactic factor that can be generated in vitro by proteolysis of purified C5 or C5a. Chemotactic activity was not detected in the glycogen-induced peritoneal exudates of rats depleted of serum complement by cobra venom factor. Intravenously injected Walker tumor cells arrested and formed metastases in the mesenteries of rats with peritonitis in greater numbers than in normal controls, animals depleted of complement during the experimental period, or animals given intraperitoneal injections of the vasopermeability agent, histamine. The growth of tumor cells in vitro was not promoted by peritoneal exudate fluids, nor was the number of metastases on vivo greater than in negative controls, in animals in which peritonitis was induced 24 hours after the intravenous injection of tumor cells. It is argued that chemotactic mechanisms can contribute to the formation of metastases at sites of tissue injury. PMID:7091299

  12. Robust Replication Control Is Generated by Temporal Gaps between Licensing and Firing Phases and Depends on Degradation of Firing Factor Sld2.

    PubMed

    Reusswig, Karl-Uwe; Zimmermann, Fabian; Galanti, Lorenzo; Pfander, Boris

    2016-10-04

    Temporal separation of DNA replication initiation into licensing and firing phases ensures the precise duplication of the genome during each cell cycle. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) is known to generate this separation by activating firing factors and at the same time inhibiting licensing factors but may not be sufficient to ensure robust separation at transitions between both phases. Here, we show that a temporal gap separates the inactivation of firing factors from the re-activation of licensing factors during mitosis in budding yeast. We find that gap size critically depends on phosphorylation-dependent degradation of the firing factor Sld2 mediated by CDK, DDK, Mck1, and Cdc5 kinases and the ubiquitin-ligases Dma1/2. Stable mutants of Sld2 minimize the gap and cause increased genome instability in an origin-dependent manner when combined with deregulation of other replication regulators or checkpoint mechanisms. Robust separation of licensing and firing phases therefore appears indispensable to safeguard genome stability.

  13. Hysteresis behavior of Kerr frequency comb generation in a high-quality-factor whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takumi; Chen-Jinnai, Akitoshi; Nagano, Takuma; Kobatake, Tomoya; Suzuki, Ryo; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2016-07-01

    A numerical and experimental study of Kerr frequency comb generation in a silica toroid microcavity is presented. We use a generalized mean-field Lugiato-Lefever equation and solve it with the split-step Fourier method. We observe that a stable mode-locked regime can be accessed when we reduce the input power after strong pumping due to the bistable nature of the nonlinear cavity system used. The experimental results agree well with the results of the numerical analysis, where we obtain a low-noise Kerr comb spectrum by gradually reducing the pumping input after strong pumping. This finding complements the results obtained by a previous wavelength scanning method and clarifies the procedure for achieving mode-locked states in such high-Q microcavity systems.

  14. Use of mice tolerant to lipopolysaccharide to demonstrate requirement of cooperation between macrophages and lymphocytes to generate lipopolysaccharide-induced colony-stimulating factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Z; Hertogs, C F; Pluznik, D H

    1983-01-01

    Injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into mice was followed by a rapid elevation of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in the serum. A second, challenging injection of LPS given 3 to 4 days later failed to induce elevated levels of CSF in the serum. Such mice tolerant to LPS were used as an experimental tool to identify the CSF-producing cells which respond to LPS. We observed that generation of LPS-induced CSF in mice tolerant to LPS could be restored by an intraperitoneal injection of spleen cells 24 h before the challenging injection of LPS. Depletion of the adherent cells from the spleen cells reduced the ability of the splenic lymphocytes to restore the capacity of the mice tolerant to LPS to generate serum CSF. Reconstitution of the splenic lymphocytes with 5% thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, however, reestablished the restorative capacity of these cells, whereas almost no restoration was observed after direct injection of elicited peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that the spleen cells are active in generating CSF, provided that macrophages are present and can interact with the splenic lymphocytes to generate LPS-induced CSF in the serum. PMID:6602767

  15. Factors influencing storm-generated suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in four basins of contrasting land use, humid-tropical Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, Allen C.

    2013-01-01

    The significant characteristics controlling the variability in storm-generated suspended-sediment loads and concentrations were analyzed for four basins of differing land use (forest, pasture, cropland, and urbanizing) in humid-tropical Puerto Rico. Statistical analysis involved stepwise regression on factor scores. The explanatory variables were attributes of flow, hydrograph peaks, and rainfall, categorized into 5 flow periods: (1) the current storm hydrograph, (2) the flow and rainfall since the previous storm event, (3) the previous storm event, (4) 2nd previous storm event, and (5) the 3rd previous storm event. The response variables (storm generated sediment loads and concentrations) were analyzed for three portions of the storm hydrograph: (1) the entire storm, (2) the rising limb, and (3) the recessional limb. Hysteresis differences in sediment concentration between the rising and falling limb were also analyzed using these explanatory variables.

  16. SU-E-P-15: Technique Factor Modulation and Reference Plane Air Kerma Rates in Response to Simulated Patient Thickness Variations for a Sample of Current Generation Fluoroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderle, K; Rakowski, J; Dong, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare approaches to technique factor modulation and air kerma rates in response to simulated patient thickness variations for four state-of-the-art and one previous-generation interventional fluoroscopes. Methods: A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used as a tissue surrogate for the purposes of determining fluoroscopic reference plane air kerma rates, kVp, mA, and spectral filtration over a wide range of simulated tissue thicknesses. Data were acquired for each fluoroscopic and acquisition dose curve within a default abdomen or body imaging protocol. Results: The data obtained indicated vendor- and model-specific variations in the approach to technique factor modulation and reference plane air kerma rates across a range of tissue thicknesses. Some vendors have made hardware advances increasing the radiation output capabilities of their fluoroscopes; this was evident in the acquisition air kerma rates. However, in the imaging protocol evaluated, all of the state-of-the-art systems had relatively low air kerma rates in the fluoroscopic low-dose imaging mode as compared to the previous-generation unit. Each of the newest-generation systems also employ copper filtration in the selected protocol in the acquisition mode of imaging; this is a substantial benefit, reducing the skin entrance dose to the patient in the highest dose-rate mode of fluoroscope operation. Conclusion: Understanding how fluoroscopic technique factors are modulated provides insight into the vendor-specific image acquisition approach and provides opportunities to optimize the imaging protocols for clinical practice. The enhanced radiation output capabilities of some of the fluoroscopes may, under specific conditions, may be beneficial; however, these higher output capabilities also have the potential to lead to unnecessarily high dose rates. Therefore, all parties involved in imaging, including the clinical team, medical physicists, and imaging vendors, must work

  17. Targeted next generation sequencing and identification of risk factors in World Health Organization defined atypical chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Mrinal M; Barraco, Daniela; Lasho, Terra L; Finke, Christy M; Reichard, Kaaren; Hoversten, Katherine P; Ketterling, Rhett P; Gangat, Naseema; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2017-03-17

    Atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) is an aggressive myeloid neoplasm with overlapping features of myelodysplastic syndromes (prominent granulocytic dysplasia) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (neutrophilic leukocytosis). We studied 25 molecularly-annotated and World Health Organization defined aCML patients; median age 70 years, 84% males. Cytogenetic abnormalities were seen in 36% and gene mutations in 100%. Mutational frequencies were, ASXL1 28%, TET2 16%, NRAS 16%, SETBP1 12%, RUNX1 12%, ETNK1 8% and PTPN11 4%. Fifteen patients (60%) had >1 mutation, while 9 (36%) had ≥3. The median overall survival (OS) was 10.8 months and at last follow up (median 11 months), 17 (68%) deaths and 2 (8%) leukemic transformations were documented. On univariate analysis, survival was adversely impacted by advanced age (p=0.02), low hemoglobin (p=0.01), red blood cell transfusion dependence (p=0.03), high white blood cell count (p=0.02), TET2 (p=0.03), NRAS (p=0.04), PTPN11 (p=0.02) mutations and the presence of ≥3 gene mutations (p=0.006); ASXL1, SETBP1, and ETNK1 mutations did not impact OS. In multivariable analysis, advanced age (p=0.003) [age >67: HR 10.1, 95% CI 1.3-119], low hemoglobin (p=0.008) [HB< 10gm/dl: HR 8.2, 95% CI 1.6-23.2] and TET2 mutations (p=0.01) [HR 8.8, 95% CI 1.6-47.7] retained prognostic significance. We then used age >67 years, hemoglobin <10 gm/dl and the presence of TET2 mutations (each counted as one risk factor) to create a hazard ratio weighted prognostic model; effectively stratifying patients into two risk categories, low (0-1 risk factor) and high (≥2 risk factors), with median OS of 18 and 7 months respectively. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. [Predict factors associated with malnutrition from patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) in head and neck cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Arribas, L; Hurtós, L; Milà, R; Fort, E; Peiró, I

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: La valoración global subjetiva generada por el paciente (VGS-GP) es una herramienta validada para la valoración nutricional de los pacientes oncológicos. Objetivo: El objetivo de nuestro estudio es conocer la prevalencia de desnutrición de los pacientes con cáncer de cabeza y cuello en el momento del diagnóstico y evaluar los factores pronósticos independientes de desnutrición a partir de la VGS-GP. Material y métodos: Todos los pacientes ambulatorios que fueron evaluados por el Comité de Tumores de Cabeza y Cuello para diagnóstico primario, estadiaje y decisión terapéutica fueron evaluados a través de la VGSGP. Se excluyeron recidivas tumorales y segundas neoplasias. Resultados: Se evaluaron 64 pacientes (55 hombres y 9 mujeres) con una edad media de 63 2013s y un índice de masa corporal (IMC) de 25,3 kg/m(2). Después de realizar la VGS-GP se observó que el 43,8% presentaban desnutrición o riesgo de padecerla. Los síntomas más frecuentes en el momento del diagnóstico fueron la disfagia (48,4%) y la anorexia (26.6%). Dentro de la VGS-GP, los principales factores pronósticos (p<0,001) fueron el porcentaje de pérdida de peso, los niveles de albúmina, el valor del IMC y la presencia de disfagia y/o anorexia. Conclusiones: Parámetros como el IMC, la pérdida de peso y las cifras de albúmina en el momento del diagnóstico de cáncer de cabeza y cuello, son factores predictivos independientes para el diagnóstico de desnutrición, así como la presencia de anorexia o disfagia.

  19. Fluctuations of the transcription factor ATML1 generate the pattern of giant cells in the Arabidopsis sepal

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Heather M; Teles, José; Formosa-Jordan, Pau; Refahi, Yassin; San-Bento, Rita; Ingram, Gwyneth; Jönsson, Henrik; Locke, James C W; Roeder, Adrienne H K

    2017-01-01

    Multicellular development produces patterns of specialized cell types. Yet, it is often unclear how individual cells within a field of identical cells initiate the patterning process. Using live imaging, quantitative image analyses and modeling, we show that during Arabidopsis thaliana sepal development, fluctuations in the concentration of the transcription factor ATML1 pattern a field of identical epidermal cells to differentiate into giant cells interspersed between smaller cells. We find that ATML1 is expressed in all epidermal cells. However, its level fluctuates in each of these cells. If ATML1 levels surpass a threshold during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, the cell will likely enter a state of endoreduplication and become giant. Otherwise, the cell divides. Our results demonstrate a fluctuation-driven patterning mechanism for how cell fate decisions can be initiated through a random yet tightly regulated process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19131.001 PMID:28145865

  20. Generation of Rhesus Macaque-Tropic HIV-1 Clones That Are Resistant to Major Anti-HIV-1 Restriction Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nomaguchi, Masako; Yokoyama, Masaru; Kono, Ken; Nakayama, Emi E.; Shioda, Tatsuo; Doi, Naoya; Fujiwara, Sachi; Saito, Akatsuki; Akari, Hirofumi; Miyakawa, Kei; Ryo, Akihide; Ode, Hirotaka; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in macaque cells is restricted mainly by antiviral cellular APOBEC3, TRIM5α/TRIM5CypA, and tetherin proteins. For basic and clinical HIV-1/AIDS studies, efforts to construct macaque-tropic HIV-1 (HIV-1mt) have been made by us and others. Although rhesus macaques are commonly and successfully used as infection models, no HIV-1 derivatives suitable for in vivo rhesus research are available to date. In this study, to obtain novel HIV-1mt clones that are resistant to major restriction factors, we altered Gag and Vpu of our best HIV-1mt clone described previously. First, by sequence- and structure-guided mutagenesis, three amino acid residues in Gag-capsid (CA) (M94L/R98S/G114Q) were found to be responsible for viral growth enhancement in a macaque cell line. Results of in vitro TRIM5α susceptibility testing of HIV-1mt carrying these substitutions correlated well with the increased viral replication potential in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with different TRIM5 alleles, suggesting that the three amino acids in HIV-1mt CA are involved in the interaction with TRIM5α. Second, we replaced the transmembrane domain of Vpu of this clone with the corresponding region of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVgsn166 Vpu. The resultant clone, MN4/LSDQgtu, was able to antagonize macaque but not human tetherin, and its Vpu effectively functioned during viral replication in a macaque cell line. Notably, MN4/LSDQgtu grew comparably to SIVmac239 and much better than any of our other HIV-1mt clones in rhesus macaque PBMCs. In sum, MN4/LSDQgtu is the first HIV-1 derivative that exhibits resistance to the major restriction factors in rhesus macaque cells. PMID:23966385

  1. Transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibits tissue engineering cartilage absorption via inducing the generation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chichi; Bi, Wei; Gong, Yiming; Ding, Xiaojun; Guo, Xuehua; Sun, Jian; Cui, Lei; Yu, Youcheng

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the mechanisms of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 inhibiting the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. We transfected TGF-β1 gene into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and co-cultured with interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes. We then characterized the morphological changes, apoptosis and characterization of chondrogenic-committed cells from TGF-β1(+) BMMSCs and explored their mechanisms. Results showed that BMMSCs apoptosis and tissue engineering cartilage absorption in the group with added IFN-γ and TNF-α were greater than in the control group. In contrast, there was little BMMSC apoptosis and absorption by tissue engineering cartilage in the group with added CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes; Foxp3(+) T cells and CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells were found. In contrast, no type II collagen or Foxp3(+) T cells or CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells was found in the TGF-β1(-) BMMSC group. The data suggest that IFN-γ and TNF-α induced BMMSCs apoptosis and absorption of tissue engineering cartilage, but the newborn regulatory T (Treg) cells inhibited the function of IFN-γ and TNF-α and protected BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage. TGF-β1not only played a cartilage inductive role, but also inhibited the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. The pathway proposed in our study may simulate the actual reaction procedure after implantation of BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage in vivo.

  2. Generation of an optimized lentiviral vector encoding a high-expression factor VIII transgene for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J M; Denning, G; Doering, C B; Spencer, H T

    2013-06-01

    We previously compared the expression of several human factor VIII (fVIII) transgene variants and demonstrated the superior expression properties of B domain-deleted porcine fVIII. Subsequently, a hybrid human/porcine fVIII molecule (HP-fVIII) comprising 91% human amino-acid sequence was engineered to maintain the high-expression characteristics of porcine fVIII. The bioengineered construct then was used effectively to treat knockout mice with hemophilia A. In the current study, we focused on optimizing self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector systems by analyzing the efficacy of various lentiviral components in terms of virus production, transduction efficiency and transgene expression. Specifically, three parameters were evaluated: (1) the woodchuck hepatitis post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE), (2) HIV versus SIV viral vector systems and (3) various internal promoters. The inclusion of a WPRE sequence had negligible effects on viral production and HP-fVIII expression. HIV and SIV vectors were compared and found to be similar with respect to transduction efficiency in both K562s and HEK-293T cells. However, there was an enhanced expression of HP-fVIII by the SIV system, which was evident in both K562 and BHK-M cell lines. To further compare expression of HP-fVIII from an SIV-based lentiviral system, we constructed expression vectors containing the high expression transgene and a human elongation factor-1 alpha, cytomegalovirus (CMV) or phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. Expression was significantly greater from the CMV promoter, which also yielded therapeutic levels of HP-fVIII in hemophilia A mice. Based on these studies, an optimized vector contains the HP-fVIII transgene driven by a CMV internal promoter within a SIV-based lentiviral backbone lacking a WPRE.

  3. Next-generation SELEX identifies sequence and structural determinants of splicing factor binding in human pre-mRNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Daniel C.; Chang, Brian L.; Gunderson, Samuel I.; Alpert, Lauren; Thompson, William A.; Fairbrother, William G.

    2009-01-01

    Many splicing factors interact with both mRNA and pre-mRNA. The identification of these interactions has been greatly improved by the development of in vivo cross-linking immunoprecipitation. However, the output carries a strong sampling bias in favor of RNPs that form on more abundant RNA species like mRNA. We have developed a novel in vitro approach for surveying binding on pre-mRNA, without cross-linking or sampling bias. Briefly, this approach entails specifically designed oligonucleotide pools that tile through a pre-mRNA sequence. The pool is then partitioned into bound and unbound fractions, which are quantified by a two-color microarray. We applied this approach to locating splicing factor binding sites in and around ∼4000 exons. We also quantified the effect of secondary structure on binding. The method is validated by the finding that U1snRNP binds at the 5′ splice site (5′ss) with a specificity that is nearly identical to the splice donor motif. In agreement with prior reports, we also show that U1snRNP appears to have some affinity for intronic G triplets that are proximal to the 5′ss. Both U1snRNP and the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) avoid exonic binding, and the PTB binding map shows increased enrichment at the polypyrimidine tract. For PTB, we confirm polypyrimidine specificity and are also able to identify structural determinants of PTB binding. We detect multiple binding motifs enriched in the PTB bound fraction of oligonucleotides. These motif combinations augment binding in vitro and are also enriched in the vicinity of exons that have been determined to be in vivo targets of PTB. PMID:19861426

  4. The immunosuppressives FK 506 and cyclosporin A inhibit the generation of protein factors binding to the two purine boxes of the interleukin 2 enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brabletz, T; Pietrowski, I; Serfling, E

    1991-01-01

    Like Cyclosporin A (CsA), the macrolide FK 506 is a potent immunosuppressive that inhibits early steps of T cell activation, including the synthesis of Interleukin 2 (II-2) and numerous other lymphokines. The block of II-2 synthesis occurs at the transcriptional level. At concentrations that block T cell activation, FK 506 and CsA inhibit the proto-enhancer activity of Purine boxes of the II-2 promoter and the generation of lymphocyte-specific factors binding to the Purine boxes. Under the same conditions, the DNA binding of other II-2 enhancer factors remains unaffected by both compounds. These results support the view that FK 506 and CsA, which both inhibit the activity of peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerases, suppress T cell activation by a similar, if not identical mechanism. Images PMID:1707162

  5. The effectiveness of power-generating complexes constructed on the basis of nuclear power plants combined with additional sources of energy determined taking risk factors into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Khrustalev, V. A.; Portyankin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of combining nuclear power plants equipped with water-cooled water-moderated power-generating reactors (VVER) with other sources of energy within unified power-generating complexes is analyzed. The use of such power-generating complexes makes it possible to achieve the necessary load pickup capability and flexibility in performing the mandatory selective primary and emergency control of load, as well as participation in passing the night minimums of electric load curves while retaining high values of the capacity utilization factor of the entire power-generating complex at higher levels of the steam-turbine part efficiency. Versions involving combined use of nuclear power plants with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units for generating electricity are considered. In view of the fact that hydrogen is an unsafe energy carrier, the use of which introduces additional elements of risk, a procedure for evaluating these risks under different conditions of implementing the fuel-and-hydrogen cycle at nuclear power plants is proposed. Risk accounting technique with the use of statistical data is considered, including the characteristics of hydrogen and gas pipelines, and the process pipelines equipment tightness loss occurrence rate. The expected intensities of fires and explosions at nuclear power plants fitted with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units are calculated. In estimating the damage inflicted by events (fires and explosions) occurred in nuclear power plant turbine buildings, the US statistical data were used. Conservative scenarios of fires and explosions of hydrogen-air mixtures in nuclear power plant turbine buildings are presented. Results from calculations of the introduced annual risk to the attained net annual profit ratio in commensurable versions are given. This ratio can be used in selecting projects characterized by the most technically attainable and socially acceptable safety.

  6. Evaluation of field-generated accumulation factors for predicting the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated PAH compounds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, V.A.

    1995-07-01

    Equilibrium partitioning of neutral organic chemicals between the organic carbon fraction of bedded sediments and the lipids of resident organisms provides the theoretical basis for one of the most popular approaches to the development of sediment quality criteria (SQC) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The proposed equilibrium partitioning-based SQC seek to relate estimated doses of sediment-associated chemicals to toxicity in exposed biota. Criteria documents for several polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, endrin, and dieldrin have been released by the EPA for public review, and may soon be promulgated. A procedure recommended in the Implementation Manual (the Green Book) for public law regulating ocean disposal of dredged sediments (Section 103, Public Law 92-532, Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act, the Ocean Dumping Act) has used equilibrium partitioning-based estimations to screen sediments for bioaccumulation potential for several years. The screening test, termed theoretical bioaccumulation potential, TBP, is also included in the draft manual for inland waters to implement dredged material testing requirements of the Clean Water Act. TBP employs an accumulation factor (AF), defined as the ratio at equilibrium of the organic carbon-normalized concentration of a neutral organic chemical in a sediment and the lipid-normalized concentration of the chemical in an exposed organism. The Green Book currently recommends using a universal AF =4 for all neutral chemicals, the rationale being that this value is suitably protective of all neutral chemicals, provided certain caveats are recognized. This study compared the predictive capability of PAH AFs derived from field data with that of the universal AF=4 in making TBP estimations.

  7. Generation of a conditionally immortalized myeloid progenitor cell line requiring the presence of both interleukin-3 and stem cell factor to survive and proliferate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Candy; Evans, Caroline A; Spooncer, Elaine; Pierce, Andrew; Mottram, Rachel; Whetton, Anthony D

    2003-09-01

    The H-2Kappab temperature-sensitive (ts) A58 transgenic (Immorto) mouse has been used previously to generate conditionally immortalized cells from a number of tissues. The present study aimed to investigate characteristics of primitive myeloid precursor cells derived from H-2Kappab-tsA58 bone marrow. Cell populations were enriched for granulocyte/macrophage progenitors by centrifugal elutriation, and were cultured in the presence and absence of cytokines at the permissive and restrictive temperatures for the A58 oncogene. Cells derived from H-2Kappab-tsA58 mice required both A58 activation and the growth factors, stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin-3 (IL-3), for long-term cell survival and growth; cells were maintained for > 300 d in culture under these conditions. IL-3- and SCF-dependent clonal cell lines were derived with a phenotype (lin-, Sca-1+, CD34+, ER-MP 58+, ER-MP 12+, ER-MP 20-) characteristic of primitive myeloid progenitors. These cells differentiated on addition of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and acquired mature cell morphology with some upregulation of differentiation markers. In conclusion, the A58 oncogene can immortalize haemopoietic progenitor cells. These cells require two cytokines for growth, IL-3 and SCF; as such, they constitute a useful resource for the study of synergistic interactions between growth factors. The ability to develop monocytic cell characteristics also permits the investigation of cytokine-mediated early haemopoietic progenitor cell development.

  8. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, generates two bioactive products during the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein: use of a novel inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, C H; Moores, K E; Boyd, H F; Dhanak, D; Ife, R J; Leach, C A; Leake, D S; Milliner, K J; Patterson, R A; Suckling, K E; Tew, D G; Hickey, D M

    1999-01-01

    A novel and potent azetidinone inhibitor of the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), i.e. platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, is described for the first time. This inhibitor, SB-222657 (Ki=40+/-3 nM, kobs/[I]=6. 6x10(5) M-1.s-1), is inactive against paraoxonase, is a poor inhibitor of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and has been used to investigate the role of Lp-PLA2 in the oxidative modification of lipoproteins. Although pretreatment with SB-222657 did not affect the kinetics of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by Cu2+ or an azo free-radical generator as determined by assay of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs), conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, in both cases it inhibited the elevation in lysophosphatidylcholine content. Moreover, the significantly increased monocyte chemoattractant activity found in a non-esterified fatty acid fraction from LDL oxidized by Cu2+ was also prevented by pretreatment with SB-222657, with an IC50 value of 5.0+/-0.4 nM. The less potent diastereoisomer of SB-222657, SB-223777 (Ki=6.3+/-0.5 microM, kobs/[I]=1.6x10(4) M-1.s-1), was found to be significantly less active in both assays. Thus, in addition to generating lysophosphatidylcholine, a known biologically active lipid, these results demonstrate that Lp-PLA2 is capable of generating oxidized non-esterified fatty acid moieties that are also bioactive. These findings are consistent with our proposal that Lp-PLA2 has a predominantly pro-inflammatory role in atherogenesis. Finally, similar studies have demonstrated that a different situation exists during the oxidation of high-density lipoprotein, with enzyme(s) other than Lp-PLA2 apparently being responsible for generating lysophosphatidylcholine. PMID:10024526

  9. Major controlling factors on hydrocarbon generation and leakage in South Atlantic conjugate margins: A comparative study of Colorado, Orange, Campos and Lower Congo basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcano, Gabriela; Anka, Zahie; di Primio, Rolando

    2013-09-01

    We present a supra-regional comparative study of the major internal and external factors controlling source rock (SR) maturation and hydrocarbon (HC) generation and leakage in two pairs of conjugate margins across the South Atlantic: the Brazil (Campos Basin)-Angola (Lower Congo Basin) margins located in the "central segment", and the Argentina (Colorado Basin)-South Africa (Orange Basin) in the "southern segment". Our approach is based on the analysis and integration of borehole data, 1D numerical modeling, 2D seismic reflection data, and published reports. Coupling of modeling results, sedimentation rate calculation and seal-bypass system analysis reveal that: (1) oil window is reached by syn-rift SRs in the southern segment during the Early to Late Cretaceous when thermal subsidence is still active, while in the central segment they reach it in Late-Cretaceous-Neogene during a salt remobilization phase, and (2) early HC generation from post-rift SRs in the southern segment and from all SRs in the central segment appears to be controlled mainly by episodes of increased sedimentation rates. The latter seems to be associated with the Andes uplift history for the western South Atlantic basins (Campos and Colorado) and to a possibly climate-driven response for the eastern South Atlantic basins (Orange and Lower Congo). Additionally, we observe that the effect of volcanism on SR maturation in the southern segment is very local. The comparison of Cretaceous mass transport deposit (MTD) episodes with HC peak of generation and paleo-leakage indicators in the southern segment revealed the possible causal effect that HC generation and leakage have over MTD development. Interestingly, Paleogene leakage indicators, which were identified in the Argentina-South Africa conjugate margins, occur contemporaneously to low sedimentation rate periods. Nonetheless, present-day leakage indicators which were also identified in both pairs of conjugate margins might be related to seal

  10. Diagnostic throughput factor analysis for en-route airspace and optimal aircraft trajectory generation based on capacity prediction and controller workload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sanghyun

    Today's National Airspace System (NAS) is approaching its limit to efficiently cope with the increasing air traffic demand. Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) with its ambitious goals aims to make the air travel more predictable with fewer delays, less time sitting on the ground and holding in the air to improve the performance of the NAS. However, currently the performance of the NAS is mostly measured using delay-based metrics which do not capture a whole range of important factors that determine the quality and level of utilization of the NAS. The factors affecting the performance of the NAS are themselves not well defined to begin with. To address these issues, motivated by the use of throughput-based metrics in many areas such as ground transportation, wireless communication and manufacturing, this thesis identifies the different factors which majorly affect the performance of the NAS as demand (split into flight cancellation and flight rerouting), safe separation (split into conflict and metering) and weather (studied as convective weather) through careful comparison with other applications and performing empirical sensitivity analysis. Additionally, the effects of different factors on the NAS's performance are quantitatively studied using real traffic data with the Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool (FACET) for various sectors and centers of the NAS on different days. In this thesis we propose a diagnostic tool which can analyze the factors that have greater responsibility for regions of poor and better performances of the NAS. Based on the throughput factor analysis for en-route airspace, it was found that weather and controller workload are the major factors that decrease the efficiency of the airspace. Also, since resources such as air traffic controllers, infrastructure and airspace are limited, it is becoming increasingly important to use the available resources efficiently. To alleviate the impact of the weather and controller

  11. Mitigating environmental impacts through the energetic use of wood: Regional displacement factors generated by means of substituting non-wood heating systems.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Christian; Klein, Daniel; Richter, Klaus; Weber-Blaschke, Gabriele

    2016-11-01

    Wood biomass, especially when applied for heating, plays an important role for mitigating environmental impacts such as climate change and the transition towards higher shares of renewable energy in today's energy mix. However, the magnitude of mitigation benefits and burdens associated with wood use can vary greatly depending on regional parameters such as the displaced fossil reference or heating mix. Therefore, regionalized displacement factors, considering region-specific production conditions and substituted products are required when assessing the precise contribution of wood biomass towards the mitigation of environmental impacts. We carried out Life Cycle Assessments of wood heating systems for typical Bavarian conditions and substitute energy carriers with a focus on climate change and particulate matter emissions. In order to showcase regional effects, we created weighted displacement factors for the region of Bavaria, based on installed capacities of individual wood heating systems and the harvested tree species distribution. The study reveals that GHG displacements between -57gCO2-eq.∗MJ(-1) of useful energy through the substitution of natural gas with a 15kW spruce pellets heating system and -165gCO2-eq.∗MJ(-1) through the substitution of power utilized for heating with a modern 6kW beech split log heating system can be achieved. It was shown that the GHG mitigation potentials of wood utilization are overestimated through the common use of light fuel oil as the only reference system. We further propose a methodology for the calculation of displacement factors which is adaptable to other regions worldwide. Based on our approach it is possible to generate displacement factors for wood heating systems which enable accurate decision-making for project planning in households, heating plants, communities and also for entire regions.

  12. Science versus the stars: a double-blind test of the validity of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory and computer-generated astrological natal charts.

    PubMed

    Wyman, Alyssa Jayne; Vyse, Stuart

    2008-07-01

    The authors asked 52 college students (38 women, 14 men, M age = 19.3 years, SD = 1.3 years) to identify their personality summaries by using a computer-generated astrological natal chart when presented with 1 true summary and 1 bogus one. Similarly, the authors asked participants to identify their true personality profile from real and bogus summaries that the authors derived from the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI; P. T. Costa Jr. & R. R. McCrae, 1985). Participants identified their real NEO-FFI profiles at a greater-than-chance level but were unable to identify their real astrological summaries. The authors observed a P. T. Barnum effect in the accuracy ratings of both psychological and astrological measures but did not find differences between the odd-numbered (i.e., favorable) signs and the even-numbered (i.e., unfavorable) signs.

  13. The human fibroblast growth factor receptor genes: a common structural arrangement underlies the mechanisms for generating receptor forms that differ in their third immunoglobulin domain.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D E; Lu, J; Chen, H; Werner, S; Williams, L T

    1991-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms by which multiple forms of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors are generated, we have mapped the arrangement of exons and introns in the human FGF receptor 1 (FGFR 1) gene (flg). We found three alternative exons encoding a portion of the third immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain of the receptor. One of these alternatives encodes a sequence that is part of a secreted form of FGFR 1. The other two encode sequences that are likely part of transmembrane forms of FGFR 1. One of these forms has not been previously reported in published cDNAs. Also, we have determined the structural organization of a portion of the human FGFR 2 gene (bek) and found a similar arrangement of alternative exons for the third Ig-like domain. The arrangement of these genes suggests that there are conserved mechanisms governing the expression of secreted FGF receptors as well as the expression of at least two distinct membrane-spanning forms of the FGF receptors. The diverse forms appear to be generated by alternative splicing of mRNA and selective use of polyadenylation signals. Images PMID:1652059

  14. Generation of Naïve Bovine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using PiggyBac Transposition of Doxycycline-Inducible Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takamasa; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Kimura, Koji; Matsuyama, Shuichi; Minami, Naojiro; Yamada, Masayasu; Imai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in large domestic animals has achieved only limited success; most of the PSCs obtained to date have been classified as primed PSCs, which possess very little capacity to produce chimeric offspring. By contrast, mouse PSCs have been classified as naïve PSCs that can contribute to most of the tissues of chimeras, including germ cells. Here, we describe the generation of two different types of bovine induced pluripotent stem cells (biPSCs) from amnion cells, achieved through introduction of piggyBac vectors containing doxycycline-inducible transcription factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc). One type of biPSCs, cultured in medium supplemented with knockout serum replacement (KSR), FGF2, and bovine leukemia inhibitory factor (bLIF), had a flattened morphology like human PSCs; these were classified as primed-type. The other type biPSCs, cultured in KSR, bLIF, Mek/Erk inhibitor, GSK3 inhibitor and forskolin, had a compact morphology like mouse PSCs; these were classified as naïve-type. Cells could easily be switched between these two types of biPSCs by changing the culture conditions. Both types of biPSCs had strong alkaline phosphatase activity, expressed pluripotent markers (OCT3/4, NANOG, REX1, ESRRβ, STELLA, and SOCS3), and formed embryoid bodies that gave rise to differentiated cells from all three embryonic germ layers. However, only naïve-type biPSCs showed the hallmarks of naïve mouse PSCs, such as LIF-dependent proliferation, lack of FGF5 expression, and active XIST expression with two active X chromosomes. Furthermore, naïve-type biPSCs could contribute to the inner cell mass (ICM) of host blastocysts and most tissues within chimeric embryos. This is the first report of generation of biPSCs with several characteristics similar to those of naïve mouse PSCs and a demonstrated potential to contribute to chimeras.

  15. Generation of Naïve Bovine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using PiggyBac Transposition of Doxycycline-Inducible Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Takamasa; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Kimura, Koji; Matsuyama, Shuichi; Minami, Naojiro; Yamada, Masayasu; Imai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in large domestic animals has achieved only limited success; most of the PSCs obtained to date have been classified as primed PSCs, which possess very little capacity to produce chimeric offspring. By contrast, mouse PSCs have been classified as naïve PSCs that can contribute to most of the tissues of chimeras, including germ cells. Here, we describe the generation of two different types of bovine induced pluripotent stem cells (biPSCs) from amnion cells, achieved through introduction of piggyBac vectors containing doxycycline-inducible transcription factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc). One type of biPSCs, cultured in medium supplemented with knockout serum replacement (KSR), FGF2, and bovine leukemia inhibitory factor (bLIF), had a flattened morphology like human PSCs; these were classified as primed-type. The other type biPSCs, cultured in KSR, bLIF, Mek/Erk inhibitor, GSK3 inhibitor and forskolin, had a compact morphology like mouse PSCs; these were classified as naïve-type. Cells could easily be switched between these two types of biPSCs by changing the culture conditions. Both types of biPSCs had strong alkaline phosphatase activity, expressed pluripotent markers (OCT3/4, NANOG, REX1, ESRRβ, STELLA, and SOCS3), and formed embryoid bodies that gave rise to differentiated cells from all three embryonic germ layers. However, only naïve-type biPSCs showed the hallmarks of naïve mouse PSCs, such as LIF-dependent proliferation, lack of FGF5 expression, and active XIST expression with two active X chromosomes. Furthermore, naïve-type biPSCs could contribute to the inner cell mass (ICM) of host blastocysts and most tissues within chimeric embryos. This is the first report of generation of biPSCs with several characteristics similar to those of naïve mouse PSCs and a demonstrated potential to contribute to chimeras. PMID:26287611

  16. A Hox Transcription Factor Collective Binds a Highly Conserved Distal-less cis-Regulatory Module to Generate Robust Transcriptional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Juli D; Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-04-01

    cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) generate precise expression patterns by integrating numerous transcription factors (TFs). Surprisingly, CRMs that control essential gene patterns can differ greatly in conservation, suggesting distinct constraints on TF binding sites. Here, we show that a highly conserved Distal-less regulatory element (DCRE) that controls gene expression in leg precursor cells recruits multiple Hox, Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) complexes to mediate dual outputs: thoracic activation and abdominal repression. Using reporter assays, we found that abdominal repression is particularly robust, as neither individual binding site mutations nor a DNA binding deficient Hth protein abolished cooperative DNA binding and in vivo repression. Moreover, a re-engineered DCRE containing a distinct configuration of Hox, Exd, and Hth sites also mediated abdominal Hox repression. However, the re-engineered DCRE failed to perform additional segment-specific functions such as thoracic activation. These findings are consistent with two emerging concepts in gene regulation: First, the abdominal Hox/Exd/Hth factors utilize protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to form repression complexes on flexible combinations of sites, consistent with the TF collective model of CRM organization. Second, the conserved DCRE mediates multiple cell-type specific outputs, consistent with recent findings that pleiotropic CRMs are associated with conserved TF binding and added evolutionary constraints.

  17. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

    PubMed Central

    Manetta, Joseph; Bina, Holly; Ryan, Paul; Fox, Niles; Witcher, Derrick R; Kikly, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. PMID:25258549

  18. A Hox Transcription Factor Collective Binds a Highly Conserved Distal-less cis-Regulatory Module to Generate Robust Transcriptional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Juli D.; Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-01-01

    cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) generate precise expression patterns by integrating numerous transcription factors (TFs). Surprisingly, CRMs that control essential gene patterns can differ greatly in conservation, suggesting distinct constraints on TF binding sites. Here, we show that a highly conserved Distal-less regulatory element (DCRE) that controls gene expression in leg precursor cells recruits multiple Hox, Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) complexes to mediate dual outputs: thoracic activation and abdominal repression. Using reporter assays, we found that abdominal repression is particularly robust, as neither individual binding site mutations nor a DNA binding deficient Hth protein abolished cooperative DNA binding and in vivo repression. Moreover, a re-engineered DCRE containing a distinct configuration of Hox, Exd, and Hth sites also mediated abdominal Hox repression. However, the re-engineered DCRE failed to perform additional segment-specific functions such as thoracic activation. These findings are consistent with two emerging concepts in gene regulation: First, the abdominal Hox/Exd/Hth factors utilize protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to form repression complexes on flexible combinations of sites, consistent with the TF collective model of CRM organization. Second, the conserved DCRE mediates multiple cell-type specific outputs, consistent with recent findings that pleiotropic CRMs are associated with conserved TF binding and added evolutionary constraints. PMID:27058369

  19. Rare DNA variants in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene increase risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: a next-generation sequencing study.

    PubMed

    Hawi, Z; Cummins, T D R; Tong, J; Arcos-Burgos, M; Zhao, Q; Matthews, N; Newman, D P; Johnson, B; Vance, A; Heussler, H S; Levy, F; Easteal, S; Wray, N R; Kenny, E; Morris, D; Kent, L; Gill, M; Bellgrove, M A

    2017-04-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent and highly heritable disorder of childhood with negative lifetime outcomes. Although candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have identified promising common variant signals, these explain only a fraction of the heritability of ADHD. The observation that rare structural variants confer substantial risk to psychiatric disorders suggests that rare variants might explain a portion of the missing heritability for ADHD. Here we believe we performed the first large-scale next-generation targeted sequencing study of ADHD in 152 child and adolescent cases and 188 controls across an a priori set of 117 genes. A multi-marker gene-level analysis of rare (<1% frequency) single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) revealed that the gene encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was associated with ADHD at Bonferroni corrected levels. Sanger sequencing confirmed the existence of all novel rare BDNF variants. Our results implicate BDNF as a genetic risk factor for ADHD, potentially by virtue of its critical role in neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity.

  20. Stretching human mesenchymal stromal cells on stiffness-customized collagen type I generates a smooth muscle marker profile without growth factor addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothdiener, Miriam; Hegemann, Miriam; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Walters, Brandan; Papugy, Piruntha; Nguyen, Phong; Claus, Valentin; Seeger, Tanja; Stoeckle, Ulrich; Boehme, Karen A.; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Stegemann, Jan P.; Hart, Melanie L.; Kurz, Bodo; Klein, Gerd; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    Using matrix elasticity and cyclic stretch have been investigated for inducing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation towards the smooth muscle cell (SMC) lineage but not in combination. We hypothesized that combining lineage-specific stiffness with cyclic stretch would result in a significantly increased expression of SMC markers, compared to non-stretched controls. First, we generated dense collagen type I sheets by mechanically compressing collagen hydrogels. Atomic force microscopy revealed a nanoscale stiffness range known to support myogenic differentiation. Further characterization revealed viscoelasticity and stable biomechanical properties under cyclic stretch with >99% viable adherent human MSC. MSCs on collagen sheets demonstrated a significantly increased mRNA but not protein expression of SMC markers, compared to on culture flasks. However, cyclic stretch of MSCs on collagen sheets significantly increased both mRNA and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transgelin, and calponin versus plastic and non-stretched sheets. Thus, lineage-specific stiffness and cyclic stretch can be applied together for inducing MSC differentiation towards SMCs without the addition of recombinant growth factors or other soluble factors. This represents a novel stimulation method for modulating the phenotype of MSCs towards SMCs that could easily be incorporated into currently available methodologies to obtain a more targeted control of MSC phenotype.

  1. Transient blockade of the inducible costimulator pathway generates long-term tolerance to factor VIII after nonviral gene transfer into hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Baowei; Ye, Peiqing; Blazar, Bruce R; Freeman, Gordon J; Rawlings, David J; Ochs, Hans D; Miao, Carol H

    2008-09-01

    Formation of inhibitory antibodies is a common problem encountered in clinical treatment for hemophilia. Human factor VIII (hFVIII) plasmid gene therapy in hemophilia A mice also leads to strong humoral responses. We demonstrate that short-term therapy with an anti-ICOS monoclonal antibody to transiently block the inducible costimulator/inducible costimulator ligand (ICOS/ICOSL) signaling pathway led to sustained tolerance to hFVIII in hFVIII plasmid-treated hemophilia A mice and allowed persistent, high-level FVIII functional activity (100%-300% of normal). Anti-ICOS treatment resulted in depletion of ICOS(+)CD4(+) T cells and activation of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes. CD4(+) T cells from anti-ICOS-treated mice did not proliferate in response to hFVIII stimulation and produced high levels of regulatory cytokines, including interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta. Moreover, CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs from tolerized mice adoptively transferred dominant tolerance in syngeneic hFVIII plasmid-treated hemophilia A mice and reduced the production of antibodies against FVIII. Anti-ICOS-treated mice tolerized to hFVIII generated normal primary and secondary antibody responses after immunization with the T-dependent antigen, bacteriophage Phix 174, indicating maintenance of immune competency. Our data indicate that transient anti-ICOS monoclonal antibody treatment represents a novel single-agent immunomodulatory strategy to overcome the immune responses against transgene product after gene therapy.

  2. Stretching human mesenchymal stromal cells on stiffness-customized collagen type I generates a smooth muscle marker profile without growth factor addition

    PubMed Central

    Rothdiener, Miriam; Hegemann, Miriam; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Walters, Brandan; Papugy, Piruntha; Nguyen, Phong; Claus, Valentin; Seeger, Tanja; Stoeckle, Ulrich; Boehme, Karen A.; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Stegemann, Jan P.; Hart, Melanie L.; Kurz, Bodo; Klein, Gerd; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Using matrix elasticity and cyclic stretch have been investigated for inducing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation towards the smooth muscle cell (SMC) lineage but not in combination. We hypothesized that combining lineage-specific stiffness with cyclic stretch would result in a significantly increased expression of SMC markers, compared to non-stretched controls. First, we generated dense collagen type I sheets by mechanically compressing collagen hydrogels. Atomic force microscopy revealed a nanoscale stiffness range known to support myogenic differentiation. Further characterization revealed viscoelasticity and stable biomechanical properties under cyclic stretch with >99% viable adherent human MSC. MSCs on collagen sheets demonstrated a significantly increased mRNA but not protein expression of SMC markers, compared to on culture flasks. However, cyclic stretch of MSCs on collagen sheets significantly increased both mRNA and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transgelin, and calponin versus plastic and non-stretched sheets. Thus, lineage-specific stiffness and cyclic stretch can be applied together for inducing MSC differentiation towards SMCs without the addition of recombinant growth factors or other soluble factors. This represents a novel stimulation method for modulating the phenotype of MSCs towards SMCs that could easily be incorporated into currently available methodologies to obtain a more targeted control of MSC phenotype. PMID:27775041

  3. Isolated rat stomach ECL cells generate prostaglandin E(2) in response to interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Lindström, E; Lerner, U H; Håkanson, R

    2001-03-30

    The ECL cells control parietal cells by releasing histamine in their immediate vicinity. Gastrin and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) stimulate histamine secretion from isolated ECL cells, while somatostatin and galanin inhibit stimulated secretion. Prostaglandin E2 and related prostaglandins likewise suppress ECL-cell histamine secretion. Conceivably, that is how they inhibit acid secretion. In the present study, we examined if prostaglandin E2 can be generated by isolated ECL cells. Rat stomach ECL cells were purified (>90% purity) by counterflow elutriation and gradient centrifugation and cultured for 48 h. ECL cell stimulants (gastrin and PACAP) and inflammatory agents (interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and bradykinin) were tested for their ability to induce prostaglandin E2 accumulation (24-h incubation), measured by radioimmunoassay. Gastrin and PACAP did not affect prostaglandin E2 accumulation but interleukin-1 beta (300 pg/ml), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (10 ng/ml) and bradykinin (1 microM) induced a 2- to 3-fold increase in the amount of prostaglandin E2 accumulated. While the combination of interleukin-1 beta and bradykinin induced a 9-fold increase, the combination interleukin-1 beta+tumor necrosis factor-alpha and bradykinin + tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced additive effects only. The combination of interleukin-1 beta + tumor necrosis factor-alpha + bradykinin did not induce a greater effect than interleukin-1 beta + bradykinin. The effect of interleukin-1 beta + bradykinin was abolished by adding 10 nM hydrocortisone (suppressing phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase) or 1 microM indomethacin (inhibiting cyclooxygenase). Incubating ECL cells in the presence of interleukin-1 beta+bradykinin for 24 h reduced their ability to secrete histamine in response to gastrin. The inhibitory effect was reversed by 1 microM indomethacin. Also, increasing the concentrations of hydrocortisone in the medium resulted in an

  4. Efficacy and safety of a new generation von Willebrand factor/factor VIII concentrate (Wilate®) in the management of perioperative haemostasis in von Willebrand disease patients undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Windyga, J; von Depka-Prondzinski, M

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Wilate®, a new generation, plasma-derived, high-purity, double virus-inactivated von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII (FVIII) concentrate (ratio close to physiological 1:1) in the perioperative management of haemostasis in von Willebrand disease (VWD). Data for VWD patients who received Wilate® for perioperative management were obtained from four European, prospective, open-label, non-controlled, non-randomised, multicentre phase II or III clinical trials. A total of 57 surgical procedures were performed (major: n = 27; minor n = 30) in 32 patients. The majority of patients (n = 19, 59.4%) had type 3 VWD, 9 (28.1%) had type 2 VWD and four (12.5%) had type 1 VWD. During major surgery, median daily FVIII dose and mean number of infusions were 25 IU•kg-1 FVIII (VWF:RCo ~23 IU•kg-1) and 11.0, respectively. Corresponding values for minor surgery were 35 IU•kg-1 (VWF:RCo ~32 IU•kg-1) and 1.5. The efficacy of Wilate® was rated by the investigator as excellent or good in 51 of 53 (96%) procedures. Tolerability was rated as very good or good in 100% of major surgeries (27 of 27) and minor surgeries (29 of 29). Wilate® is an effective and well-tolerated VWF/FVIII replacement therapy in the perioperative management of haemostasis in patients with VWD. It can be administered at a similar FVIII dose, but at a lower VWF dose, as compared to older generation products. Clinical benefits were shown in a population with a high proportion of type 3 VWD patients.

  5. Coagulation factor XII genetic variation, ex vivo thrombin generation, and stroke risk in the elderly: results from the Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Olson, N. C.; Butenas, S.; Lange, L. A.; Lange, E. M.; Cushman, M.; Jenny, N. S.; Walston, J.; Souto, J. C.; Soria, J. M.; Chauhan, G.; Debette, S.; Longstreth, W.T.; Seshadri, S.; Reiner, A.P.; Tracy, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Relationships of thrombin generation (TG) with cardiovascular disease risk are under-evaluated in population-based cohorts. Objectives Evaluate the relationships of TG influenced by the contact and tissue factor coagulation pathways ex vivo with common SNPs and incident cardiovascular disease and stroke. Patients/Methods We measured peak TG (pTG) in baseline plasma samples of Cardiovascular Health Study participants (n=5,411), both with and without inhibitory anti-FXIa antibody (pTG/FXIa−). We evaluated their associations with ~50K SNPs using the IBCv2 genotyping array, and with incident cardiovascular disease and stroke events over a median follow-up of 13.2-years. Results The minor allele for a SNP in the coagulation factor XII gene (F12), rs1801020, was associated with lower pTG in European-Americans (β=−34.2 nM ± 3.5 nM; p=3.3×10−22; minor allele frequency (MAF) =0.23) and African-Americans (β=−31.1 nM ± 7.9 nM; p=9.0×10−5; MAF=0.42). Lower FXIa-independent pTG (pTG/FXIa−) was associated with the F12 rs1801020 minor allele, and higher pTG/FXIa− was associated with the ABO SNP rs657152 minor allele (β=16.3 nM; p=4.3×10−9; MAF=0.37). The risk factor-adjusted ischemic stroke hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) was 1.09 (1.01, 1.17; p=0.03) for pTG, 1.06 (0.98, 1.15; p=0.17) for pTG/FXIa−, and 1.11 (1.02, 1.21; p=0.02) for FXIa-dependent pTG (pTG/FXIa+), per 1-SD increment (n=834 ischemic strokes). In a multi-cohort candidate gene analysis, rs1801020 was not associated with incident ischemic stroke (β= −0.02; (SE=0.08); p=0.81). Conclusions These results support the importance of contact activation pathway-dependent TG as a risk factor for ischemic stroke and indicate the importance of F12 SNPs on TG ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:26286125

  6. Abciximab does not inhibit the increase of thrombin generation produced in platelet-rich plasma in vitro by sodium arachidonate or tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Altman, Raul; Scazziota, Alejandra; Santoro, Silvina; Gonzalez, Claudio

    2005-07-01

    Aspirin and platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa blockers are currently used for acute coronary events, and in percutaneous coronary intervention for preventing further coronary outcomes, because they inhibit platelet function. Aspirin also inhibits thrombin generation (TG) in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) activated by sodium arachidonate (AA). The effect of the platelet membrane GP IIb-IIIa (integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3)) blocker abciximab on thrombin generation was studied in vitro using PRP. Thirty healthy volunteers taking no medication, and 28 volunteers who had taken aspirin (160 mg/day for 3-4 days), were included in the protocol. Control or in vivo aspirinated PRP, stimulated or not by AA or tissue factor (TF), was investigated for the inhibitory effect of abciximab pre-incubated for 3 minutes. AA and TF added in vitro activated non-aspirinated PRP: lag-time (LT) and time to peak (TTP) were significantly shortened. Peak TG (PTG) and endogenous thrombin potential (ETG) were increased by AA but not TF; thus, AA seems to be more efficient than TF for TG in this system. Abciximab added in vitro to non-activated, non-aspirinated PRP had no effect on LT, TTP, or ETP, but caused a decrease in PTG that was not statistically significant. Abciximab (3 or 4 microg/mL) added in vitro to AA or TF-activated, non-aspirinated PRP produced no effect on TG, although in aspirinated platelets both LT and time to peak were prolonged. AA as well as TF added in vitro to PRP or in vivo aspirinated PRP increased TG, although AA seems to be more efficient in our assay system. Abciximab, which affects non-aspirinated, nonactivated PRP weakly, has no effect on AA or TF in activated control PRP or in vivo aspirinated PRP.

  7. Activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 coordinates dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase/PPAR-γ/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathways that enhance nitric oxide generation in human glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zaiming; Aslam, Shakil; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) degrades asymmetric dimethylarginine, which inhibits nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS). Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional factor that binds to antioxidant response elements and transcribes many antioxidant genes. Because the promoters of the human DDAH-1 and DDAH-2, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and PPAR-γ genes contain 2 to 3 putative antioxidant response elements, we hypothesized that they were regulated by Nrf2/antioxidant response element. Incubation of human renal glomerular endothelial cells with the Nrf2 activator tert-butylhydroquinone (20 μmol·L(-1)) significantly (P<0.05) increased NO and activities of NOS and DDAH and decreased asymmetric dimethylarginine. It upregulated genes for hemoxygenase-1, eNOS, DDAH-1, DDAH-2, and PPAR-γ and partitioned Nrf2 into the nucleus. Knockdown of Nrf2 abolished these effects. Nrf2 bound to one antioxidant response element on DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 and PPAR-γ promoters but not to the eNOS promoter. An increased eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (P-eNOSser-1177) expression with tert-butylhydroquinone was prevented by knockdown of PPAR-γ. Expression of Nrf2 was reduced by knockdown of PPAR-γ, whereas PPAR-γ was reduced by knockdown of Nrf2, thereby demonstrating 2-way positive interactions. Thus, Nrf2 transcribes HO-1 and other genes to reduce reactive oxygen species, and DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 to reduce asymmetric dimethylarginine and PPAR-γ to increase eNOS and its phosphorylation and activity thereby coordinating 3 pathways that enhance endothelial NO generation.

  8. Heparins that block VEGF-A-mediated von Willebrand factor fiber generation are potent inhibitors of hematogenous but not lymphatic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Desch, Anna; Mayer, Frank Thomas; Koett, Julian; Nowak, Kai; Karampinis, Ioannis; Bohlmann, Michael K.; Umansky, Viktor; Bauer, Alexander Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) serves as a nidus for platelet aggregation and thrombosis. We hypothesize that VWF fibers contribute to the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and to metastasis formation. Here, we show that vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells (ECs) express VWF in vitro and release VWF fibers after activation by tumor cell supernatants. In contrast, an ex vivo analysis of primary mouse tumors revealed the presence of VWF fibers in the blood microvasculature but not in lymphatic vessels. Unlike the anticoagulant Fondaparinux, an inhibitor of thrombin generation, the low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) Tinzaparin inhibited VWF fiber formation and vessel occlusion in tumor vessels by blocking thrombin-induced EC activation and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A)-mediated VWF release. Intradermal tumor cell inoculation in VWF- and ADAMTS13-deficient mice did not alter lymph node metastases compared with wild type animals. Interestingly, multiple tumor-free distal organs exhibited hallmarks of malignancy-related VTE, including luminal VWF fibers, platelet-rich thrombi and vessel occlusions. Furthermore, ADAMTS13 deficiency, characterized by prolonged intraluminal VWF network lifetimes, resulted in a severely increased number of metastatic foci in an experimental model of hematogenous lung seeding. Treatment with Tinzaparin inhibited tumor-induced release of VWF multimers, impeded platelet aggregation and decreased lung metastasis. Thus, our data strongly suggest a critical role of luminal VWF fibers in determining the occurrence of thrombosis and cancer metastasis. Moreover, the findings highlight LMWHs as therapeutic strategy to treat thrombotic complications while executing anti-metastatic activities. PMID:27602496

  9. KONJAC1 and 2 Are Key Factors for GDP-Mannose Generation and Affect l-Ascorbic Acid and Glucomannan Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sawake, Shota; Tajima, Noriaki; Mortimer, Jenny C; Lao, Jeemeng; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Yu, Xiaolan; Yamanashi, Yukiko; Yoshimi, Yoshihisa; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Dupree, Paul; Tsumuraya, Yoichi; Kotake, Toshihisa

    2015-12-01

    Humans are unable to synthesize l-ascorbic acid (AsA), yet it is required as a cofactor in many critical biochemical reactions. The majority of human dietary AsA is obtained from plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPP), VITAMIN C DEFECTIVE1 (VTC1), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in AsA synthesis: the formation of GDP-Man. In this study, we identified two nucleotide sugar pyrophosphorylase-like proteins, KONJAC1 (KJC1) and KJC2, which stimulate the activity of VTC1. The kjc1kjc2 double mutant exhibited severe dwarfism, indicating that KJC proteins are important for growth and development. The kjc1 mutation reduced GMPP activity to 10% of wild-type levels, leading to a 60% reduction in AsA levels. On the contrary, overexpression of KJC1 significantly increased GMPP activity. The kjc1 and kjc1kjc2 mutants also exhibited significantly reduced levels of glucomannan, which is also synthesized from GDP-Man. Recombinant KJC1 and KJC2 enhanced the GMPP activity of recombinant VTC1 in vitro, while KJCs did not show GMPP activity. Yeast two-hybrid assays suggested that the stimulation of GMPP activity occurs via interaction of KJCs with VTC1. These results suggest that KJCs are key factors for the generation of GDP-Man and affect AsA level and glucomannan accumulation through the stimulation of VTC1 GMPP activity.

  10. Pharmacogenomics of insulin-like growth factor-I generation during GH treatment in children with GH deficiency or Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A; Clayton, P; Tatò, L; Yoo, H W; Rodriguez-Arnao, M D; Skorodok, J; Ambler, G R; Zignani, M; Zieschang, J; Della Corte, G; Destenaves, B; Champigneulle, A; Raelson, J; Chatelain, P

    2014-01-01

    Individual responses to growth hormone (GH) treatment are variable. Short-term generation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is recognized as a potential marker of sensitivity to GH treatment. This prospective, phase IV study used an integrated genomic analysis to identify markers associated with 1-month change in IGF-I (ΔIGF-I) following initiation of recombinant human (r-h)GH therapy in treatment-naïve children with GH deficiency (GHD) (n=166) or Turner syndrome (TS) (n=147). In both GHD and TS, polymorphisms in the cell-cycle regulator CDK4 were associated with 1-month ΔIGF-I (P<0.05). Baseline gene expression was also correlated with 1-month ΔIGF-I in both GHD and TS (r=0.3; P<0.01). In patients with low IGF-I responses, carriage of specific CDK4 alleles was associated with MAPK and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in GHD, and with p53 and Wnt signaling pathways in TS. Understanding the relationship between genomic markers and early changes in IGF-I may allow development of strategies to rapidly individualize r-hGH dose. PMID:23567489

  11. A phase III, multicenter randomized controlled trial of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy paclitaxel plus cisplatin versus surgery alone for stage IIA–IIIB esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan; Liu, Xianben; Zhang, Ruixiang; Wang, Zongfei; Sun, Haibo; Liu, Shilei

    2017-01-01

    Background The survival benefits of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for esophagus squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains controversial. The surgical procedure was not well defined in NAC strategy, in past trials. The different surgical procedure and different levels of lymphadenectomy may decrease the survival benefits from NAC. The new chemotherapy regimen with paclitaxel is promising. The purpose of this study is to confirm the superiority of paclitaxel, cisplatin and McKeown esophagectomy with total two-field lymphadenectomy compared with surgery alone for ESCC. Methods A two-arm phase III trial was launched in June 2015. A total of 528 patients will be recruited from eight Chinese institutions within 2.5 years. The overall survival (OS) is the primary endpoint, and the secondary endpoints include disease-free survival (DFS), R0 resection rate, complication rate, perioperation mortality, days of hospitalization, quality of life (QOL), NAC response rate, pathologic response rate, toxicities of NAC, prognostic factors, predictive factors, progression-free survival (PFS), and adverse events. Discussion The study will provide the final conclusion of NAC for ESCC in China. Trial registration NCT02442440 (https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/). PMID:28203424

  12. Effects of production and market factors on ethanol profitability for an integrated first and second generation ethanol plant using the whole sugarcane as feedstock

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sugarcane is an attractive feedstock for ethanol production, especially if the lignocellulosic fraction can also be treated in second generation (2G) ethanol plants. However, the profitability of 2G ethanol is affected by the processing conditions, operating costs and market prices. This study focuses on the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) and maximum profitability of ethanol production in an integrated first and second generation (1G + 2G) sugarcane-to-ethanol plant. The feedstock used was sugarcane juice, bagasse and leaves. The lignocellulosic fraction was hydrolysed with enzymes. Yields were assumed to be 95% of the theoretical for each of the critical steps in the process (steam pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis (EH), fermentation, solid/liquid separation, anaerobic digestion) in order to obtain the best conditions possible for ethanol production, to assess the lowest production costs. Techno-economic analysis was performed for various combinations of process options (for example use of pentoses, addition of leaves), EH conditions (water-insoluble solids (WIS) and residence time), operating cost (enzymes) and market factors (wholesale prices of electricity and ethanol, cost of the feedstock). Results The greatest reduction in 2G MESP was achieved when using the pentoses for the production of ethanol rather than biogas. This was followed, in decreasing order, by higher enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency (EHE), by increasing the WIS to 30% and by a short residence time (48 hours) in the EH. The addition of leaves was found to have a slightly negative impact on 1G + 2G MESP, but the effect on 2G MESP was negligible. Sugarcane price significantly affected 1G + 2G MESP, while the price of leaves had a much lower impact. Net present value (NPV) analysis of the most interesting case showed that integrated 1G + 2G ethanol production including leaves could be more profitable than 1G ethanol, despite the fact that the MESP was higher than

  13. New Generation Strategic Submarine Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    Economic Analyses ............ ................... .. 111-150 1. Cost Assumptions ........... .................. .. 111-153 2. Cost Evaluation...111-156 III-C-2 Investment Cost Elements ........ ................. ... 111-156 III-C-3 Cost of Point Design (Crew of 30) in Present...111-148 III-B-28. Crew Support of Battle Evolution Missile ... ......... ... 111-149 III-C-l Life Cycle Cost

  14. Joint health scores in a haemophilia A cohort from Pakistan with minimal or no access to factor VIII concentrate: correlation with thrombin generation and underlying mutation.

    PubMed

    Khanum, F; Bowen, D J; Kerr, B C; Collins, P W

    2014-05-01

    Haemophilia A is associated with recurrent joint bleeding which leads to synovitis and debilitating arthropathy. Coagulation factor VIII level is an important determinant of bleed number and development of arthropathy . The aim of this study was to compare the haemophilia joint health score (HJHS) and Gilbert score with severity, age, thrombin generation (TG) and underlying mutation in a haemophilia A cohort which had minimal access to haemostatic replacement therapy. Ninety-two haemophilia A individuals were recruited from Pakistan. Age, age at first bleed, target joints, haemophilic arthropathy joints, HJHS and Gilbert score were recorded. A strong correlation was found between HJHS and Gilbert score (r = 0.98), both were significantly higher in severe (n = 59) compared with non-severe (n = 29) individuals before the age of 12 years (P ≤ 0.01) but not thereafter. When individuals were divided according to developmental age (<12 years, 12-16 years and >16 years), both HJHS and Gilbert score were significantly lower in the youngest group (P ≤ 0.001), there was no difference between 12-16 years and >16 years. In severe individuals there was no correlation between in vitro TG and joint score, whereas in non-severe individuals there was a weak negative correlation. In the severe group, no significant difference was observed for either joint score according to the underlying mutation type (inversion, missense, nonsense, frameshift). In this cohort of haemophilia A individuals with minimal access to haemostatic treatment, haemophilic arthropathy correlated with severity and age; among severe individuals, joint health scores did not relate to either the underlying mutation or in vitro TG.

  15. Platelet factor 4 binds to glycanated forms of thrombomodulin and to protein C. A potential mechanism for enhancing generation of activated protein C.

    PubMed

    Dudek, A Z; Pennell, C A; Decker, T D; Young, T A; Key, N S; Slungaard, A

    1997-12-12

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule heparin-binding protein. We have previously shown that PF4 accelerates up to 25-fold the proteolytic conversion of protein C to activated protein C by the thrombin.thrombomodulin complex by increasing its affinity for protein C 30-fold. This stimulatory effect requires presence of the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain in protein C and is enhanced by the presence of a chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) domain on thrombomodulin. We hypothesized that cationic PF4 binds to both protein C and thrombomodulin through these anionic domains. Qualitative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of avidin extracts of solutions containing biotinylated PF4 and candidate ligands shows that PF4 binds to GAG+ but not GAG- forms of thrombomodulin and native but not Gla-domainless protein C. Quantitative analysis using the surface plasmon resonance-based BIAcoreTM biosensor system confirms the extremely high affinity of PF4 for heparin (KD = 4 nM) and shows that PF4 binds to GAG+ thrombomodulin with a KD of 31 nM and to protein C with a KD of 0.37 microM. In contrast, PF4 had no measurable interaction with GAG- thrombomodulin or Gla-domainless protein C. Western blot analysis of normal human plasma extracted with biotinylated PF4 demonstrates PF4 binding to protein C in a physiologic context. Thus, PF4 binds with relative specificity and high affinity to the GAG- domain of thrombomodulin and the Gla domain of protein C. These interactions may enhance the affinity of the thrombin.thrombomodulin complex for protein C and thereby promote the generation of activated protein C.

  16. Natural soluble interleukin-15Ralpha is generated by cleavage that involves the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17).

    PubMed

    Budagian, Vadim; Bulanova, Elena; Orinska, Zane; Ludwig, Andreas; Rose-John, Stefan; Saftig, Paul; Borden, Ernest C; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2004-09-24

    This study shows that the high affinity alpha-chain of the interleukin (IL)-15 receptor exists not only in membrane-anchored but also in soluble form. Soluble IL-15Ralpha (sIL-15Ralpha) can be detected in mouse sera and cell-conditioned media by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. This protein has a molecular mass of about 30 kDa because of the presence of a single N-glycosylation site, which is reduced to 26 kDa after N-glycosidase treatment. Transmembrane IL-15Ralpha is constitutively converted into its soluble form by proteolytic cleavage that involves tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE), and this process is further enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation. The hydroxamate GW280264X, which is capable of blocking TACE and the closely related disintegrin-like metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10), effectively inhibited both spontaneous and PMA-inducible cleavage of IL-15Ralpha, whereas GI254023X, which preferentially blocks ADAM10, was ineffective. Overexpression of TACE but not ADAM10 in COS-7 cells enhanced the constitutive and PMA-inducible cleavage of IL-15Ralpha. Moreover, murine fibroblasts deficient in TACE but not ADAM10 expression exhibited a significant reduction in the spontaneous and inducible IL-15Ralpha shedding, whereas a reconstitution of TACE in these cells restored the release of sIL-15Ralpha, thereby suggesting that TACE-mediated proteolysis may represent a major mechanism for sIL-15Ralpha generation in mice. The existence of natural sIL-15Ralpha offers novel insights into the complex biology of IL-15 and envisages a new level for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasma DNA from Cancer Patients: Factors Influencing Consistency with Tumour DNA and Prospective Investigation of Its Utility for Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaisaki, Pamela J.; Cutts, Anthony; Popitsch, Niko; Camps, Carme; Pentony, Melissa M.; Wilson, Gareth; Page, Suzanne; Kaur, Kulvinder; Vavoulis, Dimitris; Henderson, Shirley; Gupta, Avinash; Middleton, Mark R.; Karydis, Ioannis; Talbot, Denis C.; Schuh, Anna; Taylor, Jenny C.

    2016-01-01

    Use of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) as a liquid biopsy has been proposed for potential identification and monitoring of solid tumours. We investigate a next-generation sequencing approach for mutation detection in ctDNA in two related studies using a targeted panel. The first study was retrospective, using blood samples taken from melanoma patients at diverse timepoints before or after treatment, aiming to evaluate correlation between mutations identified in biopsy and ctDNA, and to acquire a first impression of influencing factors. We found good concordance between ctDNA and tumour mutations of melanoma patients when blood samples were collected within one year of biopsy or before treatment. In contrast, when ctDNA was sequenced after targeted treatment in melanoma, mutations were no longer found in 9 out of 10 patients, suggesting the method might be useful for detecting treatment response. Building on these findings, we focused the second study on ctDNA obtained before biopsy in lung patients, i.e. when a tentative diagnosis of lung cancer had been made, but no treatment had started. The main objective of this prospective study was to evaluate use of ctDNA in diagnosis, investigating the concordance of biopsy and ctDNA-derived mutation detection. Here we also found positive correlation between diagnostic lung biopsy results and pre-biopsy ctDNA sequencing, providing support for using ctDNA as a cost-effective, non-invasive solution when the tumour is inaccessible or when biopsy poses significant risk to the patient. PMID:27626278

  18. Weekly and every 2 weeks cetuximab maintenance therapy after platinum-based chemotherapy plus cetuximab as first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer: randomized non-comparative phase IIIb NEXT trial.

    PubMed

    Heigener, David F; Pereira, José Rodrigues; Felip, Enriqueta; Mazal, Juraj; Manzyuk, Lyudmila; Tan, Eng Huat; Merimsky, Ofer; Sarholz, Barbara; Esser, Regina; Gatzemeier, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    The First-Line Erbitux in Lung Cancer (FLEX) trial showed that the addition of cetuximab to chemotherapy followed by weekly cetuximab maintenance significantly improved survival in the first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phase IIIb NSCLC Erbitux Trial (NEXT) trial (NCT00820755) investigated the efficacy and safety of weekly and every 2 weeks cetuximab maintenance therapy in this setting. Patients were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy plus cetuximab, and those progression-free after four to six cycles were randomized to every 2 weeks (500 mg/m(2)) or weekly (250 mg/m(2)) cetuximab maintenance. Randomization was stratified for tumor histology and response status. The primary endpoint for a regimen would be reached if the lower boundary of the 95 % confidence interval (CI) for the 1-year survival rate exceeded 55 %. A planned 480 patients were to be randomized. However, enrollment was curtailed following a negative opinion from the European Medicines Agency with regard to the use of cetuximab in this setting. After combination therapy, 311/583 (53.3 %) patients without progression were randomized to maintenance therapy: 157 to every 2 weeks cetuximab and 154 to weekly cetuximab. Baseline characteristics were balanced between these groups and exposure to cetuximab was similar. The 1-year survival rate was 62.8 % (95 % CI, 54.7-70.0) for every 2 weeks cetuximab and 64.4 % (95 % CI, 56.2-71.4) for weekly cetuximab. Safety profiles were similar, manageable, and in line with expectations. Therefore, in patients with advanced NSCLC who were progression-free after four to six cycles of first-line chemotherapy plus cetuximab, weekly and every 2 weeks cetuximab maintenance therapy were associated with similar survival outcomes.

  19. Nonresected Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Stages I Through IIIB: Accelerated, Twice-Daily, High-Dose Radiotherapy-A Prospective Phase I/II Trial With Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kopp, Peter; Kranzinger, Manfred; Merz, Florian; Nairz, Olaf; Studnicka, Michael; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to investigate the tolerability of accelerated, twice-daily, high-dose radiotherapy. The secondary endpoints were survival and locoregional tumor control. Methods and Materials: Thirty consecutive patients with histologically/cytologically proven non-small-cell lung cancer were enrolled. Tumor Stage I, II, IIIA, and IIIB was found in 7, 3, 12, and 8 patients, respectively. We applied a median of 84.6 Gy (range, 75.6-90.0 Gy) to the primary tumors, 63.0 Gy (range, 59.4-72.0 Gy) to lymph nodes, and 45 Gy to nodes electively (within a region of about 6 cm cranial to macroscopically involved sites). Fractional doses of 1.8 Gy twice daily, with an interval of 11 hours, were given, resulting in a median treatment time of 35 days. In the majority of patients the conformal target-splitting technique was used. In 19 patients (63%) two cycles of induction chemotherapy were given. The median follow-up time of survivors is 72 months (range, 62-74 months). Results: We found Grade 1, 2 and 3 acute esophageal toxicity in 11 patients (37%), 2 patients (7%), and 2 patients (7%), respectively. Grade 2 acute pneumonitis was seen in 2 patients (7%). No late toxicity greater than Grade 1 was observed. The actual overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years are 63% and 23%, respectively; the median overall survival, 27.7 months. In 9 patients a local failure occurred, 7 of them presenting initially with an atelectasis without availability of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography staging at that time. In 4 patients recurrence occurred regionally. Conclusions: This Phase I/II trial with long-term follow-up shows low toxicity with promising results for survival and locoregional tumor control.

  20. An Examination of the Factors That Contribute to Undergraduate Persistence and Graduate Degree Aspirations for First-Generation College Students Attending Elite Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Grazziella Michele Pagliarulo

    2012-01-01

    First-generation college students' paths to and through higher education may be quite different from those of their non-first peers. Given some of first-generation students' background characteristics (e.g., race, income, educational aspirations, cultural capital) and the complexities of their home and college environments, the factors…

  1. Human-factors engineering control-room design review/audit: Waterford 3 SES Generating Station, Louisiana Power and Light Company

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, J.W.

    1983-03-10

    A human factors engineering design review/audit of the Waterford-3 control room was performed at the site on May 10 through May 13, 1982. The report was prepared on the basis of the HFEB's review of the applicant's Preliminary Human Engineering Discrepancy (PHED) report and the human factors engineering design review performed at the site. This design review was carried out by a team from the Human Factors Engineering Branch, Division of Human Factors Safety. The review team was assisted by consultants from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (University of California), Livermore, California.

  2. Socio-Linguistic Factors in Second Language Lexical Knowledge: The Case of Second-Generation Children of Russian-Jewish Immigrants in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Mila; Kozminsky, Ely; Leikin, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The factors affecting the mastery of the host country's language by the children of immigrants are important in the study of immigration-related issues. This exploratory study analyses the possible link between parental socio-linguistic background factors (parent-child language choice, parental proficiency in L2, educational level, socio-economic…

  3. Factors Influencing Generation Y African Americans in Their Choice for College Education: An Empirical Case Study of Fort Valley State University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyapong, Samuel K.; Smith, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to assist a newly appointed Public Relations Officer to determine the most effective way to promote the institution to college-bound Generation Y African-Americans we offered to conduct a survey research of our current students. The results were very revealing and have been used successfully to increase enrollment to historically high…

  4. The Effect of Language Specific Factors on Early Written Composition: The Role of Spelling, Oral Language and Text Generation Skills in a Shallow Orthography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arfé, Barbara; Dockrell, Julie E.; De Bernardi, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Spelling skills have been identified as one of the major barriers to written text production in young English writers. By contrast oral language skills and text generation have been found to be less influential in the texts produced by beginning writers. To date, our understanding of the role of spelling skills in transparent orthographies is…

  5. Differential requirements for the canonical NF-κB transcription factors c-REL and RELA during the generation and activation of mature B-cells

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Nilushi S.; Anderson, Michael M.; Silva, Kathryn; Carette, Amanda; Orelli, Fabiano; Bhagat, Govind; Klein, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Signaling through the canonical NF-κB pathway is critical for the generation and maintenance of mature B-cells and for antigen-dependent B-cell activation. c-REL (rel) and RELA (rela) are the downstream transcriptional activators of the canonical NF-κB pathway. Studies of B-cells derived from constitutional rel knockout mice and chimeric mice repopulated with rela−/− fetal liver cells provided evidence that the subunits can have distinct roles during B-cell development. However, the B-cell-intrinsic functions of c-REL and RELA during B-cell generation and antigen-dependent B-cell activation have not been determined in vivo. To clarify this issue, we crossed mice with conditional rel and rela alleles individually or in combination to mice that express Cre-recombinase in B-cells. We here report that, whereas single deletion of rel or rela did not impair mature B-cell generation and maintenance, their simultaneous deletion led to a dramatic reduction of follicular and marginal zone B-cells. Upon T-cell-dependent immunization, B-cell-specific deletion of the c-REL subunit alone abrogated the formation of germinal centers (GC), whereas rela deletion did not affect GC formation. T-independent responses were strongly impaired in mice with B-cell-specific deletion of rel, and only modestly in mice with RELA-deficient B-cells. Our findings identify differential requirements for the canonical NF-κB subunits c-REL and RELA at distinct stages of mature B-cell development. The subunits are jointly required for the generation of mature B-cells. During antigen-dependent B-cell activation, c-REL is the critical subunit required for the initiation of the GC-reaction and for optimal T-independent antibody responses, with RELA being largely dispensable at this stage. PMID:27649781

  6. Third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors in T790M-positive non-small cell lung cancer: review on emerged mechanisms of resistance

    PubMed Central

    Minari, Roberta; Bordi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Osimertinib, third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), has been approved in the US and EU for the treatment of EGFR mutant T790M-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients resistant to first- or second-generation EGFR-TKIs, such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. Although exciting survival data and response rates have been registered in patients treated with this and other third-generation EGFR-TKIs, unfortunately acquired resistance still occurs after approximately 10 months. Mechanisms determining progression of disease are heterogeneous and not fully understood. EGFR-dependent resistance mechanisms (such as new EGFR mutations), bypass pathway activation [as erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (HER2) or MET amplification] and histological transformation [in small cell lung cancer (SCLC)] have been reported, similarly to previous generation TKIs. Here, we review principle mechanisms of innate and acquired resistance described in literature both in clinical and preclinical settings during NSCLC treatment with third-generation EGFR-TKIs. PMID:28149764

  7. Third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors in T790M-positive non-small cell lung cancer: review on emerged mechanisms of resistance.

    PubMed

    Minari, Roberta; Bordi, Paola; Tiseo, Marcello

    2016-12-01

    Osimertinib, third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), has been approved in the US and EU for the treatment of EGFR mutant T790M-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients resistant to first- or second-generation EGFR-TKIs, such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. Although exciting survival data and response rates have been registered in patients treated with this and other third-generation EGFR-TKIs, unfortunately acquired resistance still occurs after approximately 10 months. Mechanisms determining progression of disease are heterogeneous and not fully understood. EGFR-dependent resistance mechanisms (such as new EGFR mutations), bypass pathway activation [as erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (HER2) or MET amplification] and histological transformation [in small cell lung cancer (SCLC)] have been reported, similarly to previous generation TKIs. Here, we review principle mechanisms of innate and acquired resistance described in literature both in clinical and preclinical settings during NSCLC treatment with third-generation EGFR-TKIs.

  8. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  9. Mixing zone and drinking water intake dilution factor and wastewater generation distributions to enable probabilistic assessment of down-the-drain consumer product chemicals in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Kapo, Katherine E; McDonough, Kathleen; Federle, Thomas; Dyer, Scott; Vamshi, Raghu

    2015-06-15

    Environmental exposure and associated ecological risk related to down-the-drain chemicals discharged by municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are strongly influenced by in-stream dilution of receiving waters which varies by geography, flow conditions and upstream wastewater inputs. The iSTREEM® model (American Cleaning Institute, Washington D.C.) was utilized to determine probabilistic distributions for no decay and decay-based dilution factors in mean annual and low (7Q10) flow conditions. The dilution factors derived in this study are "combined" dilution factors which account for both hydrologic dilution and cumulative upstream effluent contributions that will differ depending on the rate of in-stream decay due to biodegradation, volatilization, sorption, etc. for the chemical being evaluated. The median dilution factors estimated in this study (based on various in-stream decay rates from zero decay to a 1h half-life) for WWTP mixing zones dominated by domestic wastewater flow ranged from 132 to 609 at mean flow and 5 to 25 at low flow, while median dilution factors at drinking water intakes (mean flow) ranged from 146 to 2×10(7) depending on the in-stream decay rate. WWTPs within the iSTREEM® model were used to generate a distribution of per capita wastewater generated in the U.S. The dilution factor and per capita wastewater generation distributions developed by this work can be used to conduct probabilistic exposure assessments for down-the-drain chemicals in influent wastewater, wastewater treatment plant mixing zones and at drinking water intakes in the conterminous U.S. In addition, evaluation of types and abundance of U.S. wastewater treatment processes provided insight into treatment trends and the flow volume treated by each type of process. Moreover, removal efficiencies of chemicals can differ by treatment type. Hence, the availability of distributions for per capita wastewater production, treatment type, and dilution factors at a national

  10. Evaluating Health Advice in a Web 2.0 Environment: The Impact of Multiple User-Generated Factors on HIV Advice Perceptions.

    PubMed

    Walther, Joseph B; Jang, Jeong-Woo; Hanna Edwards, Ashley A

    2016-12-02

    Unlike traditional media, social media systems often present information of different types from different kinds of contributors within a single message pane, a juxtaposition of potential influences that challenges traditional health communication processing. One type of social media system, question-and-answer advice systems, provides peers' answers to health-related questions, which yet other peers read and rate. Responses may appear good or bad, responders may claim expertise, and others' aggregated evaluations of an answer's usefulness may affect readers' judgments. An experiment explored how answer feasibility, expertise claims, and user-generated ratings affected readers' assessments of advice about anonymous HIV testing. Results extend the heuristic-systematic model of persuasion (Chaiken, 1980) and warranting theory (Walther & Parks, 2002). Information that is generally associated with both systematic and heuristic processes influenced readers' evaluations. Moreover, content-level cues affected judgments about message sources unexpectedly. When conflicting cues were present, cues with greater warranting value (consensus user-generated ratings) had greater influence on outcomes than less warranted cues (self-promoted expertise). Findings present a challenge to health professionals' concerns about the reliability of online health information systems.

  11. Manassantin B isolated from Saururus chinensis inhibits cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin D2 generation by blocking Fyn-mediated nuclear factor-kappaB and mitogen activated protein kinase pathways in bone marrow derived-mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of manassantin B (Man B) isolated from Saururus chinensis (S. chinensis) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) generation in mouse bone marrow derived-mast cells (BMMCs). Man B inhibited the generation of PGD2 dose-dependently by inhibiting COX-2 expression in immunoglobulin E (IgE)/Ag-stimulated BMMCs. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of COX-2 expression by Man B, the effects of Man B on the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), a transcription factor essential and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) for COX-2 induction, were examined. Man B attenuated the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and its DNA-binding activity by inhibiting inhibitors of kappa Bα (IκBα) degradation and concomitantly suppressing IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation. In addition, Man B suppressed phosphorylation of MAPKs including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. It was also found that Man B suppressed Fyn kinase activation and consequent downstream signaling processes, including those involving Syk, Gab2, and Akt. Taken together, the present results suggest that Man B suppresses COX-2 dependent PGD2 generation by primarily inhibiting Fyn kinase in FcεRI-mediated mast cells.

  12. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα)-induced Ceramide Generation via Ceramide Synthases Regulates Loss of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Corbacho, María José; Canals, Daniel; Adada, Mohamad M; Liu, Mengling; Senkal, Can E; Yi, Jae Kyo; Mao, Cungui; Luberto, Chiara; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2015-10-16

    Ceramide synthases (CerS1-CerS6), which catalyze the N-acylation of the (dihydro)sphingosine backbone to produce (dihydro)ceramide in both the de novo and the salvage or recycling pathway of ceramide generation, have been implicated in the control of programmed cell death. However, the regulation of the de novo pathway compared with the salvage pathway is not fully understood. In the current study, we have found that late accumulation of multiple ceramide and dihydroceramide species in MCF-7 cells treated with TNFα occurred by up-regulation of both pathways of ceramide synthesis. Nevertheless, fumonisin B1 but not myriocin was able to protect from TNFα-induced cell death, suggesting that ceramide synthase activity is crucial for the progression of cell death and that the pool of ceramide involved derives from the salvage pathway rather than de novo biosynthesis. Furthermore, compared with control cells, TNFα-treated cells exhibited reduced focal adhesion kinase and subsequent plasma membrane permeabilization, which was blocked exclusively by fumonisin B1. In addition, exogenously added C6-ceramide mimicked the effects of TNFα that lead to cell death, which were inhibited by fumonisin B1. Knockdown of individual ceramide synthases identified CerS6 and its product C16-ceramide as the ceramide synthase isoform essential for the regulation of cell death. In summary, our data suggest a novel role for CerS6/C16-ceramide as an upstream effector of the loss of focal adhesion protein and plasma membrane permeabilization, via the activation of caspase-7, and identify the salvage pathway as the critical mechanism of ceramide generation that controls cell death.

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα)-induced Ceramide Generation via Ceramide Synthases Regulates Loss of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Programmed Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Corbacho, María José; Canals, Daniel; Adada, Mohamad M.; Liu, Mengling; Senkal, Can E.; Yi, Jae Kyo; Mao, Cungui; Luberto, Chiara; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide synthases (CerS1–CerS6), which catalyze the N-acylation of the (dihydro)sphingosine backbone to produce (dihydro)ceramide in both the de novo and the salvage or recycling pathway of ceramide generation, have been implicated in the control of programmed cell death. However, the regulation of the de novo pathway compared with the salvage pathway is not fully understood. In the current study, we have found that late accumulation of multiple ceramide and dihydroceramide species in MCF-7 cells treated with TNFα occurred by up-regulation of both pathways of ceramide synthesis. Nevertheless, fumonisin B1 but not myriocin was able to protect from TNFα-induced cell death, suggesting that ceramide synthase activity is crucial for the progression of cell death and that the pool of ceramide involved derives from the salvage pathway rather than de novo biosynthesis. Furthermore, compared with control cells, TNFα-treated cells exhibited reduced focal adhesion kinase and subsequent plasma membrane permeabilization, which was blocked exclusively by fumonisin B1. In addition, exogenously added C6-ceramide mimicked the effects of TNFα that lead to cell death, which were inhibited by fumonisin B1. Knockdown of individual ceramide synthases identified CerS6 and its product C16-ceramide as the ceramide synthase isoform essential for the regulation of cell death. In summary, our data suggest a novel role for CerS6/C16-ceramide as an upstream effector of the loss of focal adhesion protein and plasma membrane permeabilization, via the activation of caspase-7, and identify the salvage pathway as the critical mechanism of ceramide generation that controls cell death. PMID:26318452

  14. Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators

    DOEpatents

    Caplan, Malcolm; Vinogradov, Sergel Evge'evich; Ribin, Valeri Vasil'evich; Shekalov, Valentin Ivanovich; Rutberg, Philip Grigor'evich; Safronov, Alexi Anatol'evich

    2008-12-09

    Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators. The material contains a porous metal matrix impregnated with a material emitting electrons. The material uses a mixture of copper and iron powders as a porous metal matrix and a Group IIIB metal component such as Y.sub.2O.sub.3 is used as a material emitting electrons at, for example, the proportion of the components, mass %: iron: 3-30; Y.sub.2O.sub.3:0.05-1; copper: the remainder. Copper provides a high level of heat conduction and electric conductance, iron decreases intensity of copper evaporation in the process of plasma creation providing increased strength and lifetime, Y.sub.2O.sub.3 provides decreasing of electronic work function and stability of arc burning. The material can be used for producing the electrodes of low temperature AC plasma generators used for destruction of liquid organic wastes, medical wastes, and municipal wastes as well as for decontamination of low level radioactive waste, the destruction of chemical weapons, warfare toxic agents, etc.

  15. Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators

    DOEpatents

    Caplan, Malcolm; Vinogradov, Sergel Evge'evich; Ribin, Valeri Vasil'evich; Shekalov, Valentin Ivanovich; Rutberg, Philip Grigor'evich; Safronov, Alexi Anatol'evich; Shiryaev, Vasili Nikolaevich

    2010-03-02

    Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators. The material contains a porous metal matrix impregnated with a material emitting electrons. The material uses a mixture of copper and iron powders as a porous metal matrix and a Group IIIB metal component such as Y.sub.2O.sub.3 is used as a material emitting electrons at, for example, the proportion of the components, mass %: iron:3-30; Y.sub.2O.sub.3:0.05-1; copper: the remainder. Copper provides a high level of heat conduction and electric conductance, iron decreases intensity of copper evaporation in the process of plasma creation providing increased strength and lifetime, Y.sub.2O.sub.3 provides decreasing of electronic work function and stability of arc burning. The material can be used for producing the electrodes of low temperature AC plasma generators used for destruction of liquid organic wastes, medical wastes, municipal wastes as well as for decontamination of low level radioactive waste, the destruction of chemical weapons, warfare toxic agents, etc.

  16. The metabolism of L-arginine and its significance for the biosynthesis of endothelium-derived relaxing factor: L-glutamine inhibits the generation of L-arginine by cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sessa, W.C.; Hecker, M.; Mitchell, J.A. Vane, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    The mechanism by which L-glutamine (L-Gln) inhibits the release of endothelium-derived factor from bovine aortic cultured endothelial cells was investigated. The intracellular concentration of L-arginine (L-Arg) in Arg-depleted endothelial cells was inversely related to the level of L-Gln. Removal of L-Gln from the culture medium (usually containing L-Gln at 2 mM) abolished the inhibitory effect of the culture medium on L-Arg generation. L-Gln (0.2 and 2 mM) but not D-Gln inhibited the generation of L-Arg by both Arg-depleted and nondepleted endothelial cells. L-Gln did not interfere with the uptake of L-Arg or the metabolism of L-Arg-L-Phe to L-Arg but inhibited the formation of L-Arg from L-citrulline (L-Cit), L-Cit-L-Phe, and N{sup G}-monomethyl-L-arginine. L-Gln also inhibited the conversion of L-({sup 14}C)Cit to L-({sup 14}C)Arg by Arg-depleted endothelial cells. However, L-Gln did not inhibit the conversion of L-argininosuccinic acid to L-Arg by endothelial cell homogenates. Thus, L-Gln interferes with the conversion of L-Cit to L-Arg probably by acting on argininosuccinate synthetase rather than argininosuccinate lyase. L-Gln also inhibited the generation of L-Arg by the monocyte-macrophage cell line J774 but had no effect on the conversion of L-Cit to L-Arg by these cells. As the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor from cultured and non-cultured endothelial cells is limited by the availability of L-Arg, endogenous L-Gln may play a regulatory role in the biosynthesis of endothelium-derived relaxing factor.

  17. Structural factors affecting pore space transformation during hydrocarbon generation in source rock (shales): laboratory experiments and X-ray microtomography/SEM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, Dina; Korost, Dmitry; Gerke, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Oil and gas generation is a complex superposition of processes which take place in the interiors and are not readily observable in nature in human life time-frames. During burial of the source rocks organic matter is transformed into a mixture of high-molecular compounds - precursors of oil and gas (kerogen). Specific thermobaric conditions trigger formation of low molecular weight hydrocarbon compounds. Generation of sufficient quantities of hydrocarbons leads to the primary fluid migration. For series of our experiments we selected mainly siliceous-carbonate composition shale rocks from Domanic horizon of South-Tatar arch. Rock samples were heated in the pyrolyzer to temperatures closely corresponding to different catagenesis stages. X-ray microtomography method was used to monitor changes in the morphology of the pore space within studied shale rocks. By routine measurements we made sure that all samples (10 in total) had similar composition of organic and mineral phases. All samples in the collection were grouped according to initial structure and amount of organics and processed separately to: 1) study the influence of organic matter content on the changing morphology of the rock under thermal effects; 2) study the effect of initial structure on the primary migration processes for samples with similar organic matter content. An additional experiment was conducted to study the dynamics of changes in the structure of the pore space and prove the validity of our approach. At each stage of heating the morphology of altered rocks was characterized by formation of new pores and channels connecting primary voids. However, it was noted that the samples with a relatively low content of the organic matter had less changes in pore space morphology, in contrast to rocks with a high organic content. Second part of the study also revealed significant differences in resulting pore structures depending on initial structure of the unaltered rocks and connectivity of original

  18. Influence of socio-economic factors on street litter generation in the middle east: effects of education level, age, and type of residence.

    PubMed

    Arafat, Hassan A; Al-Khatib, Issam A; Daoud, Raeda; Shwahneh, Hadeel

    2007-08-01

    Street littering is considered an important environmental health issue in the Middle East. This problem is growing steadily and is attracting great concerns within the communities. The purpose of this paper, which focuses on Nablus district (Palestinian Territory), is to measure the perception and opinion of residents toward littering, in addition to studying prevailing attitudes and practices on littering. This was achieved using an interview survey approach. The influence of three socio-economic factors; level of education, age, and type of residence, on the littering behaviour of individuals was studied. As a result, possible remedial actions have been suggested. The data presented in this work can be considered as one piece of information, which can be compiled with other future data to design an effective litter control programrhe for Middle Eastern countries.

  19. Science Teacher Efficacy and Extrinsic Factors Toward Professional Development Using Video Games in a Design-Based Research Model: The Next Generation of STEM Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annetta, Leonard A.; Frazier, Wendy M.; Folta, Elizabeth; Holmes, Shawn; Lamb, Richard; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2013-02-01

    Designed-based research principles guided the study of 51 secondary-science teachers in the second year of a 3-year professional development project. The project entailed the creation of student-centered, inquiry-based, science, video games. A professional development model appropriate for infusing innovative technologies into standards-based curricula was employed to determine how science teacher's attitudes and efficacy where impacted while designing science-based video games. The study's mixed-method design ascertained teacher efficacy on five factors (General computer use, Science Learning, Inquiry Teaching and Learning, Synchronous chat/text, and Playing Video Games) related to technology and gaming using a web-based survey). Qualitative data in the form of online blog posts was gathered during the project to assist in the triangulation and assessment of teacher efficacy. Data analyses consisted of an Analysis of Variance and serial coding of teacher reflective responses. Results indicated participants who used computers daily have higher efficacy while using inquiry-based teaching methods and science teaching and learning. Additional emergent findings revealed possible motivating factors for efficacy. This professional development project was focused on inquiry as a pedagogical strategy, standard-based science learning as means to develop content knowledge, and creating video games as technological knowledge. The project was consistent with the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) framework where overlapping circles of the three components indicates development of an integrated understanding of the suggested relationships. Findings provide suggestions for development of standards-based science education software, its integration into the curriculum and, strategies for implementing technology into teaching practices.

  20. Generation X

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    service or government agency. STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT GENERATION X BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL NEIL YAMASHIRO United States Army National Guard CVI...WAR COLLEGE, CARLISLE BARRACKS, PA 17013-5050 ■"""" mimmm n USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT Generation X by LTC Neil Yamashiro COL Paul...is unlimited. 11 ABSTRACT AUTHOR: LTC Neil Yamashiro TITLE: Generation X FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 7 April 1998 PAGES: 26

  1. Efficient generation of smooth muscle cells from adipose-derived stromal cells by 3D mechanical stimulation can substitute the use of growth factors in vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Mojtaba; Bolhuis-Versteeg, Lydia A M; Poot, André A; Harmsen, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    Occluding artery disease causes a high demand for bioartificial replacement vessels. We investigated the combined use of biodegradable and creep-free poly (1,3-trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) with smooth muscle cells (SMC) derived by biochemical or mechanical stimulation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASC) to engineer bioartificial arteries. Biochemical induction of cultured ASC to SMC was done with TGF-β1 for 7d. Phenotype and function were assessed by qRT-PCR, immunodetection and collagen contraction assays. The influence of mechanical stimulation on non-differentiated and pre-differentiated ASC, loaded in porous tubular PTMC scaffolds, was assessed after culturing under pulsatile flow for 14d. Assays included qRT-PCR, production of extracellular matrix and scanning electron microscopy. ASC adhesion and TGF-β1-driven differentiation to contractile SMC on PTMC did not differ from tissue culture polystyrene controls. Mesenchymal and SMC markers were increased compared to controls. Interestingly, pre-differentiated ASC had only marginal higher contractility than controls. Moreover, in 3D PTMC scaffolds, mechanical stimulation yielded well-aligned ASC-derived SMC which deposited ECM. Under the same conditions, pre-differentiated ASC-derived SMC maintained their SMC phenotype. Our results show that mechanical stimulation can replace TGF-β1 pre-stimulation to generate SMC from ASC and that pre-differentiated ASC keep their SMC phenotype with increased expression of SMC markers.

  2. The CRG1 gene required for resistance to the singlet oxygen-generating cercosporin toxin in Cercospora nicotianae encodes a putative fungal transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuang-Ren; Daub, Margaret E; Kuchler, Karl; Schüller, Christoph

    2003-03-07

    The Cercospora nicotianae CRG1 gene is involved in cellular resistance to the perylenequinone toxin, cercosporin, that generates highly toxic singlet oxygen upon exposure to light. The entire open reading frame (ORF) of CRG1 was isolated and sequenced. The gene contains an ORF of 1950bp including a 65-bp intron. The predicted 650 amino acid CRG1 protein contains a Cys(6)Zn(2) binuclear cluster DNA-binding motif with homology to various fungal regulatory proteins, indicating that CRG1 may act functionally as a transcription activator. Targeted gene disruption of CRG1 resulted in mutants that are partially sensitive to cercosporin and reduced in cercosporin production. Genetic complementation revealed that CRG1 fully restored cercosporin resistance, but only slightly restored cercosporin production in a UV-derived mutant (CS10) containing a single nucleotide substitution in crg1. Complementation of a crg1-null mutant, however, yielded strains that are similar to the wild-type in both phenotypes. These results indicate that the transcription regulator CRG1 is involved in the activation of genes associated with cercosporin resistance and production in the fungus Cercospora nicotianae.

  3. Neurobehavioral impairments, generation of oxidative stress and release of pro-apoptotic factors after chronic exposure to sulphur mustard in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Bal, Amanjit; Bhutia, Yangchen D.; Vijayaraghavan, R.; Flora, S.J.S.; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2009-10-15

    Recent global events have focused attention on the potential threat of international and domestic chemical terrorism, as well as the possibility of chemical warfare proliferation. Sulphur mustard (SM) is one of the potent chemical warfare agents (CWA), which initiates a cascade of events that converge on the redox mechanisms common to brain injury. The present study was designed to examine the effects of chronic SM exposure on neurobehavioral impairments, mitochondrial oxidative stress in male Swiss Albino mice and its role in inducing apoptotic neuronal cell death. The animals were divided into four groups (control, low, medium and high dose) of 5 animals each. Exposure to SM was given percutaneously daily for 12 weeks. The results demonstrated impairment in neurobehavioral indices viz. rota rod, passive avoidance and water maze tests in a dose dependent manner. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content whereas, decrease in the activity of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase suggesting impaired antioxidant defense system. Immunoblotting of cytochrome c, Bcl-2, Bax and activation of caspase-3 suggest induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. Finally, increased p53 expression suggests that it may target the mitochondrial pathway for inducing apoptosis in response to DNA damage signals. In conclusion, chronic SM exposure may have the potential to generate oxidative stress which may trigger the release of cytochrome c as well as caspase-3 activation in neurons leading to cell death by apoptosis in a dose dependent manner which may in the end be responsible for the disruption of cognitive functions in mice.

  4. Effects of lipid and urea extraction on δ15N values of deep-sea sharks and hagfish: Can mathematical correction factors be generated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Diana A.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Dean Grubbs, R.

    2015-05-01

    Stable isotope analysis is broadly employed to investigate diverse ecological questions. In order to make appropriate comparisons among multiple taxa, however, it is necessary to standardize values to account for interspecific differences in factors that affect isotopic ratios. For example, varying concentrations of soluble nitrogen compounds, such as urea or trimethylamine oxide, can affect the analysis and interpretation of δ15N values of sharks or hagfish. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of a standard chloroform/methanol extraction on the stable isotope values of muscle tissue obtained from 10 species of sharks and three species of hagfish collected from poorly-known deep-water (>200 m) communities. We detected significant differences in δ15N, %N, and C:N values as a result of extractions in 8 of 10 shark and all three hagfish species. We observed increased δ15N values, but shifts in %N and C:N values were not unidirectional. Mathematical normalizations for δ15N values were successfully created for four shark and two hagfish species. However, they were not successful for two shark species. Therefore, performing extractions of all samples is recommended.

  5. Radionuclide Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, F.; Knapp, F. F. (Russ)

    Radionuclide generator systems continue to play a key role in providing both diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides for various applications in nuclear medicine, oncology, and interventional cardiology. Although many parent/daughter pairs have been evaluated as radionuclide generator systems, there are a relatively small number of generators, which are currently in routine clinical and research use. Essentially every conceivable approach has been used for parent/separation strategies, including sublimation, thermochromatographic separation, solvent extraction, and adsorptive column chromatography. The most widely used radionuclide generator for clinical applications is the 99Mo/99mTc generator system, but recent years have seen an enormous increase in the use of generators to provide therapeutic radionuclides, which has paralleled the development of complementary technologies for targeting agents for therapy and in the general increased interest in the use of unsealed therapeutic radioactive sources. More recently, use of the 68Ge/68Ga generator is showing great potential as a source of positron-emitting 68Ga for positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging. Key advantages for the use of radionuclide generators include reasonable costs, the convenience of obtaining the desired daughter radionuclide on demand, and availability of the daughter radionuclide in high specific activity, no-carrier added form.

  6. Generative Semantics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagha, Karim Nazari

    2011-01-01

    Generative semantics is (or perhaps was) a research program within linguistics, initiated by the work of George Lakoff, John R. Ross, Paul Postal and later McCawley. The approach developed out of transformational generative grammar in the mid 1960s, but stood largely in opposition to work by Noam Chomsky and his students. The nature and genesis of…

  7. Inhibitory effect of butein on tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human lung epithelial cells via inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji Hoon; Yang, Eun Sun; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2012-12-01

    Cell adhesion molecules play an important role in inflammatory response, angiogenesis and tumor progression. Butein (tetrahydroxychalcone) is a small molecule from natural sources, known to be a potential therapeutic drug with anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antioxidant activities. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of butein on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced adhesion molecule expression and its molecular mechanism of action. Butein significantly decreased TNF-α-induced monocyte (U937) cell adhesion to lung epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Butein also inhibited the protein and mRNA expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-stimulated A549 human lung epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Butein inhibited TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in A549 cells; it also inhibited the phosphorylation of MAPKs and Akt, suggesting that the MAPK/Akt signaling pathway may be involved in the butein-mediated inhibition of TNF-α-induced leukocyte adhesion to A549 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that butein affects cell adhesion through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression by inhibiting the NF-κB/MAPK/Akt signaling pathway and ROS generation, thereby, elucidating the role of butein in the anti-inflammatory response.

  8. Nrf2 Transcription Factor Can Directly Regulate mTOR: LINKING CYTOPROTECTIVE GENE EXPRESSION TO A MAJOR METABOLIC REGULATOR THAT GENERATES REDOX ACTIVITY.

    PubMed

    Bendavit, Gabriel; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Hilmi, Khalid; Shah, Sujay; Batist, Gerald

    2016-12-02

    Nrf2 is a master transcription factor that regulates a wide variety of cellular proteins by recognizing and binding to antioxidant response elements (AREs) in their gene promoter regions. In this study we show that increasing cellular Nrf2 results in transcriptional activation of the gene for mTOR, which is central to the PI3K signaling pathway. This is the case in cells with normal physiological PI3K. However, in cells with abnormally active PI3K increased cellular Nrf2 levels have no effect on mTOR. ChIP assays results show that increased Nrf2 binding is associated with decreased p65 binding and H3-K27me3 signal (marker of gene repression) as well as increased H3-K4me3 signal (marker of gene activation). However, in cells with PI3K activation, no effect of cellular Nrf2 increase on mTOR transcription was observed. In these cells, increasing Nrf2 levels increases Nrf2 promoter binding marginally, whereas p65 binding and H3-K27me3 mark were significantly increased, and H3-K4me3 signal is reduced. Together, these data show for the first time that Nrf2 directly regulates mTOR transcription when the PI3K pathway is intact, whereas this function is lost when PI3K is activated. We have identified a link between the Nrf2 system of sensing environmental stress and mTOR, which is a key cellular protein in metabolism. Studies in cells with activating mutations in the PI3K pathway suggest that Nrf2 transcriptional regulation of mTOR is related to promoter binding of p65 and of methylation of histone residues permissive of transcription.

  9. Environmental Factors Influencing the Structural Dynamics of Soil Microbial Communities During Assisted Phytostabilization of Acid-Generating Mine Tailings: a Mesocosm Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Root, Robert A.; Neilson, Julia W; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M.

    2014-01-01

    Compost-assisted phytostabilization has recently emerged as a robust alternative for reclamation of metalliferous mine tailings. Previous studies suggest that root-associated microbes may be important for facilitating plant establishment on the tailings, yet little is known about the long-term dynamics of microbial communities during reclamation. A mechanistic understanding of microbial community dynamics in tailings ecosystems undergoing remediation is critical because these dynamics profoundly influence both the biogeochemical weathering of tailings and the sustainability of a plant cover. Here we monitor the dynamics of soil microbial communities (i.e. bacteria, fungi, archaea) during a 12-month mesocosm study that included 4 treatments: 2 unplanted controls (unamended and compost-amended tailings) and 2 compost-amended seeded tailings treatments. Bacterial, fungal and archaeal communities responded distinctively to the revegetation process and concurrent changes in environmental conditions and pore water chemistry. Compost addition significantly increased microbial diversity and had an immediate and relatively long-lasting buffering-effect on pH, allowing plants to germinate and thrive during the early stages of the experiment. However, the compost buffering capacity diminished after six months and acidification took over as the major factor affecting plant survival and microbial community structure. Immediate changes in bacterial communities were observed following plant establishment, whereas fungal communities showed a delayed response that apparently correlated with the pH decline. Fluctuations in cobalt pore water concentrations, in particular, had a significant effect on the structure of all three microbial groups, which may be linked to the role of cobalt in metal detoxification pathways. The present study represents, to our knowledge, the first documentation of the dynamics of the three major microbial groups during revegetation of compost

  10. Madecassoside ameliorates bleomycin‐induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice through promoting the generation of hepatocyte growth factor via PPAR‐γ in colon

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ying; Xia, Yu‐Feng; Lv, Qi; Yue, Meng‐Fan; Qiao, Si‐Miao; Yang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Madecassoside has potent anti‐pulmonary fibrosis (PF) effects when administered p.o., despite having extremely low oral bioavailability. Herein, we explored the mechanism of this anti‐PF effect with regard to gut hormones. Experimental Approach A PF model was established in mice by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. Haematoxylin and eosin stain and Masson's trichrome stain were used to assess histological changes in the lung. Quantitative‐PCR and Western blot detected mRNA and protein levels, respectively, and cytokines were measured by ELISA. Small interfering RNA was used for gene‐silencing. EMSA was applied to detect DNA‐binding activity. Key Results Administration of madecassoside, p.o., but not its main metabolite madecassic acid, exhibited a direct anti‐PF effect in mice. However, i.p. madecassoside had no anti‐PF effect. Madecassoside increased the expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in colon tissues, and HGF receptor antagonists attenuated its anti‐PF effect. Madecassoside facilitated the secretion of HGF from colonic epithelial cells by activating the PPAR‐γ pathway, as shown by an up‐regulation of PPAR‐γ mRNA expression, nuclear translocation and DNA‐binding activity both in vitro and in vivo. Also GW9662, a selective PPAR‐γ antagonist, almost completely prevented the madecassoside‐induced increased expression of HGF and amelioration of PF. Conclusions and Implications The potent anti‐PF effects induced by p.o. madecassoside in mice are not mediated by its metabolites or itself after absorption into blood. Instead, madecassoside increases the activity of PPAR‐γ, which subsequently increases HGF expression in colonic epithelial cells. HGF then enters into the circulation and lung tissue to exert an anti‐PF effect. PMID:26750154

  11. High-Affinity DNA Aptamer Generation Targeting von Willebrand Factor A1-Domain by Genetic Alphabet Expansion for Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment Using Two Types of Libraries Composed of Five Different Bases.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Ken-Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2017-01-11

    The novel evolutionary engineering method ExSELEX (genetic alphabet expansion for systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) provides high-affinity DNA aptamers that specifically bind to target molecules, by introducing an artificial hydrophobic base analogue as a fifth component into DNA aptamers. Here, we present a newer version of ExSELEX, using a library with completely randomized sequences consisting of five components: four natural bases and one unnatural hydrophobic base, 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds). In contrast to the limited number of Ds-containing sequence combinations in our previous library, the increased complexity of the new randomized library could improve the success rates of high-affinity aptamer generation. To this end, we developed a sequencing method for each clone in the enriched library after several rounds of selection. Using the improved library, we generated a Ds-containing DNA aptamer targeting von Willebrand factor A1-domain (vWF) with significantly higher affinity (KD = 75 pM), relative to those generated by the initial version of ExSELEX, as well as that of the known DNA aptamer consisting of only the natural bases. In addition, the Ds-containing DNA aptamer was stabilized by introducing a mini-hairpin DNA resistant to nucleases, without any loss of affinity (KD = 61 pM). This new version is expected to consistently produce high-affinity DNA aptamers.

  12. Induction of the sufA operon encoding Fe-S assembly proteins by superoxide generators and hydrogen peroxide: involvement of OxyR, IHF and an unidentified oxidant-responsive factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Hee; Yeo, Won-Sik; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2004-03-01

    A promoter (sufAp), inducible by various oxidants, directs transcription of the sufABCDSE operon encoding an alternative Fe-S cluster assembly system in Escherichia coli. Superoxide generators and H2O2 induced expression of sufA-lacZ even in DeltasoxRS and DeltaoxyR mutants, suggesting participation of an additional regulator(s) in oxidant induction of the sufA operon. Through deletion and linker scanning mutagenesis, we found three cis-acting oxidant-responsive elements (OREs). ORE-I lies between -236 and -197 nucleotides from the transcription start site, overlapping extensively with the OxyR binding site reported previously. ORE-II (-156 to -127) was found to be the site of IHF action. ORE-III (-56 to -35) had no predictable binding sites for known regulators. Gel mobility shift assays with a 50 bp DNA probe containing ORE-III revealed the presence of an ORE-III-specific factor that binds only when cells are treated with oxidants. S1 mapping analysis revealed that phenazine methosulphate (PMS) and H2O2 induced sufA expression by more than 40-fold. In a DeltaoxyR mutant, sufA was still induced more than 10-fold. Fur, a ferric uptake regulator that negatively regulates this operon in response to iron availability, did not mediate the oxidant induction. Deletion of the suf operon caused cells to be more sensitive to superoxide-generating agents without affecting sensitivity to H2O2. From these results, we propose that the oxidant induction of the sufA operon is mediated through OxyR, IHF, plus an unidentified oxidant-responsive factor, and that the suf gene products are needed to defend cells against oxidative stress caused by superoxide generators.

  13. Computational Protein Design to Re-Engineer Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1α (SDF) Generates an Effective and Translatable Angiogenic Polypeptide Analog

    PubMed Central

    Hiesinger, William; Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Atluri, Pavan; Marotta, Nicole A.; Frederick, John R.; Fitzpatrick, J. Raymond; McCormick, Ryan C.; Muenzer, Jeffrey R.; Yang, Elaine C.; Levit, Rebecca D.; Yuan, Li-Jun; MacArthur, John W.; Saven, Jeffery G.; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND After ischemic injury, cardiac secretion of the potent endothelial progenitor stem cell (EPC) chemokine SDF stimulates endogenous neovascularization and myocardial repair, a process insufficiently robust to repair major infarcts. Experimentally, exogenous administration of recombinant SDF enhances neovasculogenesis and cardiac function after MI. However, SDF has a short half-life, is bulky, and very expensive. Smaller analogs of SDF may provide translational advantages including enhanced stability and function, ease of synthesis, lower cost, and potential modulated delivery via engineered biomaterials. In this study, computational protein design was used to create a more efficient evolution of the native SDF protein. METHODS and RESULTS Protein structure model was used to engineer an SDF polypeptide analog (ESA) that splices the N-terminus (activation and binding) and C-terminus (extracellular stabilization) with a diproline segment designed to limit the conformational flexibility of the peptide backbone and retain the relative orientation of these segments observed in the native structure of SDF. EPCs in ESA gradient, assayed by Boyden chamber, showed significantly increased migration compared to both SDF and control gradients (ESA 567±74 cells/HPF vs SDF 438±46 p=0.037; vs Control 156±45 p=0.001). EPC receptor activation was evaluated by quantifying phosphorylated AKT. ESA had significantly greater pAKT levels than SDF and control (1.64±0.24 vs 1.26±0.187, p=0.01; vs. 0.95±0.08, p<0.001). Angiogenic growth factor assays revealed a distinct increase in Angiopoietin-1 expression in the ESA and SDF treated hearts. Also, CD-1 mice (n=30) underwent LAD ligation and peri-infarct intramyocardial injection of ESA, SDF-1α, or saline. At 2 weeks, echocardiography demonstrated a significant gain in EF, CO, SV, and Fractional Area Change (FAC) in mice treated with ESA when compared to controls and significant improvement in FAC when compared to SDF treated

  14. Association of rat thoracic aorta dilatation by astragaloside IV with the generation of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors and nitric oxide, and the blockade of Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    HU, GUANYING; LI, XIXIONG; ZHANG, SANYIN; WANG, XIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the roles of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) and nitric oxide (NO) in mediating the vasodilatation response to astragaloside IV and the effects of astragaloside IV on voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and receptor-operated Ca2+ channels in rat thoracic aortic rings precontracted with potassium chloride (KCl; 60 mM) or phenylephrine (PHE; 1 µM). The results showed that astragaloside IV (1×10−4-3×10−1 g/l) concentration-dependently relaxed the contraction induced by KCl (10–90 mM) or PHE (1×10−9-3×10−5 µM) and inhibited concentration-contraction curves for the two vasoconstrictors in the aortic rings. Preincubation with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 µM) significantly attenuated astragaloside IV-induced relaxation in the endothelium-intact and -denuded arterial rings precontracted with PHE. Astragaloside IV, following preincubation with L-NAME (100 µM) plus indomethacin (10 µM), exerted vasodilatation, which was depressed by tetraethtylamine (1 mM) and propargylglycine (100 µM), but not by carbenoxolone (10 µM), catalase (500 U/ml) or proadifen hydrochloride (10 µM). The action mode of astragaloside IV was evident in comparison to nifedipine. Inhibition of PHE-induced contraction by astragaloside IV (100 mg/l) was more potent compared to inhibition of KCl-induced contraction, while inhibition of KCl-induced contraction by nifedipine (100 mg/l) was more potent compared to inhibition of PHE-induced contraction by nifedipine (100 mg/l). In addition, the combination of astragaloside IV and nifedipine exhibited synergistic and additive inhibitory effects on contraction evoked by KCl, which was similar to PHE. In conclusion, astragaloside IV, as a Ca2+ antagonist, relaxes the vessels through the blockade of superior receptor-operated Ca2+ and inferior voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, which modulate NO from vascular endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, and

  15. Energy generator

    SciTech Connect

    Krisko, P.

    1989-08-01

    The patent describes a power booster. It comprises: at least one pendulum means suspended at one end to oscillate about the point of suspension; power generating means; mass means connected to one end of the pendulum means; spring means disposed in operative cooperation with the mass means to impart energy into the pendulum means and assist the pendulum means in oscillating about the point of suspension; and energy transfer linkage means between the pendulum means and the power generating means for transferring energy between the pendulum means and the power generating means.

  16. Analyzing Generation Y Workforce Motivation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    happiness . The survey was designed to provide insight on the overall average job satisfaction of each respondent (how happy each respondent is with their...job compared to the average of all respondents); the overall average job satisfaction of each generation (how happy each generation is with their...factors converted to a single scale); average level of happiness for each generation (how each generation is satisfied with their current jobs

  17. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Adlhart, O. J.

    1985-04-23

    This disclosure relates to a replaceable cartridge hydrogen generator of the type which relies at least partially on the process of anodic corrosion to produce hydrogen. A drum contains a plurality of the cartridges.

  18. Generation Wrecked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Noshua

    2002-01-01

    Young adults in Generation X are facing financial problems. Because of their college and credit card debt, many in worse financial shape than anyone since the Depression and have little or no retirement savings. (JOW)

  19. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  20. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  1. Generation of fibrosarcomas in vivo by a retrovirus that expresses the normal B chain of platelet-derived growth factor and mimics the alternative splice pattern of the v-sis oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Pech, M.; Gazit, A.; Arnstein, P.; Aaronson, S.A. )

    1989-04-01

    A retrovirus containing the entire human platelet-derived growth factor B-chain (PDGF-B) gene was constructed in order to investigate the in vivo biological activity of its encoded growth factor. When this virus was introduced into newborn mice, it reproducibly generated fibrosarcomas at the site of inoculation. Proviruses in each fibrosarcoma analyzed had lost 149 nucleotides downstream of the PDGF-B coding region. This deletion originated from an alternative or aberrant splice event that occurred within exon 7 of the PDGF-B gene and mimicked the v-sis oncogene. Thus, deletion of this region may be necessary for efficient retrovirus replication or for more potent transforming function. Evidence that the normal growth factor coding sequence was unaltered derived from RNase protection studies and immunoprecipitation analysis. Tumors were generally polyclonal but demonstrated clonal subpopulations. Moreover, tumor-derived cell lines became monoclonal within a few tissue culture passages and rapidly formed tumors in vivo. These findings argue that overexpression of the normal human PDGF-B gene product under retrovirus control can induce the fully malignant phenotype.

  2. Window generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William K.; May, Roger A.

    1989-03-01

    The present invention relates generally to video target recognition systems and more specifically to a window generator which receives a field of video data and applies an identification code to rectangular subregions to identify distinct target areas within a given background area. The present invention comprises a window generator which provides a 6 bit target identification number for up to 63 target areas and one background area in a frame of serially scanned data. The window generator receives a field of video data from an image data source. This video data consists of digitized frames of serially scanned data similar to a conventional television screen image, which is divided horizontally in pixels, and vertically in lines. The window generator permits any given frame to be subdivided into specific rectangular subregions, which may be located anywhere on the video picture. By allowing statistics to be collected on the individual subregions (or target areas) the window generator permits local processing of video data within the specified target areas as opposed to processing of video data over the entire video field. One embodiment of the window generator is composed of: a microprocessor, a random access memory (RAM), a comparator, a line memory, two counters, an OR gate, a frame initialization circuit, and a buffer. These elements function as described below.

  3. Microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  4. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  5. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.R.

    1984-06-19

    A hydrogen generator decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen, and includes an induction coil which is electrically heated to a temperature sufficient to decompose water passing therethrough. A generator coil is connected in communicating relation to the induction coil, and is positioned in a fire resistant crucible containing ferrous oxide pellets. Oxygen and hydrogen produced by decomposition of water pass through the ferrous oxide pellets where the oxygen reacts with the ferrous oxide and the hydrogen is burned to produce heat for heating a building, such as a conventional home.

  6. Solar Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Vanguard I dish-Stirling module program, initiated in 1982, produced the Vanguard I module, a commercial prototype erected by the Advanco Corporation. The module, which automatically tracks the sun, combines JPL mirrored concentrator technology, an advanced Stirling Solar II engine/generator, a low cost microprocessor-controlled parabolic dish. Vanguard I has a 28% sunlight to electricity conversion efficiency. If tests continue to prove the system effective, Advanco will construct a generating plant to sell electricity to local utilities. An agreement has also been signed with McDonnell Douglas to manufacture a similar module.

  7. Generational mentoring.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Della W

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare organizations struggle with the best way to integrate new staff members, including novice and experienced nurses returning to practice, into the organization. One way of accomplishing this integration is mentoring. Mentoring is a process of guiding the development of another person. The methods used to mentor staff members can be influenced by the generation to which they belong. Each generation typically experiences different events that shape their expectations and responses. Consideration of the influence of these events can improve the effectiveness of the mentoring process.

  8. Lung injury and lung cancer caused by cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress: Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities involving the ceramide-generating machinery and epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldkorn, Tzipora; Filosto, Simone; Chung, Samuel

    2014-11-20

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are frequently caused by tobacco smoking. However, these diseases present opposite phenotypes involving redox signaling at the cellular level. While COPD is characterized by excessive airway epithelial cell death and lung injury, lung cancer is caused by uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation. Notably, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that lung cancer incidence is significantly higher in patients who have preexisting emphysema/lung injury. However, the molecular link and common cell signaling events underlying lung injury diseases and lung cancer are poorly understood. This review focuses on studies of molecular mechanism(s) underlying smoking-related lung injury (COPD) and lung cancer. Specifically, the role of the ceramide-generating machinery during cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress leading to both apoptosis and proliferation of lung epithelial cells is emphasized. Over recent years, it has been established that ceramide is a sphingolipid playing a major role in lung epithelia structure/function leading to lung injury in chronic pulmonary diseases. However, new and unexpected findings draw attention to its potential role in lung development, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. To address this dichotomy in detail, evidence is presented regarding several protein targets, including Src, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and neutral sphingomyelinase 2, the major sphingomyelinase that controls ceramide generation during oxidative stress. Furthermore, their roles are presented not only in apoptosis and lung injury but also in enhancing cell proliferation, lung cancer development, and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for treating lung cancer.

  9. Beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 supplementation on brain docosahexaenoic acid, brain derived neurotrophic factor, and cognitive performance in the second-generation Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Richa S; Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-01-01

    In vegetarian population, vitamin B12 deficiency coexists with suboptimal levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Studies indicate a need for supplementation/fortification of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids to reduce the risk of brain disorders. We have described the effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on brain development in F1 generation animals. The current study investigates the effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids supplementation on brain function and cognition. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned the following groups: control, vitamin B12 deficient (BD), vitamin B12 deficient + omega-3 fatty acid (BDO), vitamin B12 supplemented (BS), vitamin B12 supplemented + omega-3 fatty acid (BSO). The same diets were continued for two generations. BDO group showed higher (P < 0.05) levels of BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) in the cortex and hippocampus as compared with the BD group. The cognitive performance was also normalized in this group. BS showed comparable levels of DHA, BDNF (protein and mRNA), and CREB mRNA (cAMP response element-binding protein) to that of control group while Tropomyosin receptor kinase mRNA levels were higher. The combined vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation further enhanced the levels of DHA (P < 0.05) and BDNF (P < 0.05) in the hippocampus and CREB mRNA (P < 0.01) in the cortex as compared with BS group. The cognitive performance of these animals was higher (P < 0.05) as compared with BS group. Our data indicates the beneficial effects of vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation across two generations on brain development and function.

  10. Generative Contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyles, Dan Allen

    Educational research has identified how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) practice and education have underperforming metrics in racial and gender diversity, despite decades of intervention. These disparities are part of the construction of a culture of science that is alienating to these populations. Recent studies in a social science framework described as "Generative Justice" have suggested that the context of social and scientific practice might be modified to bring about more just and equitable relations among the disenfranchised by circulating the value they and their non-human allies create back to them in unalienated forms. What is not known are the underlying principles of social and material space that makes a system more or less generative. I employ an autoethnographic method at four sites: a high school science class; a farm committed to "Black and Brown liberation"; a summer program geared towards youth environmental mapping; and a summer workshop for Harlem middle school students. My findings suggest that by identifying instances where material affinity, participatory voice, and creative solidarity are mutually reinforcing, it is possible to create educational contexts that generate unalienated value, and circulate it back to the producers themselves. This cycle of generation may help explain how to create systems of justice that strengthen and grow themselves through successive iterations. The problem of lack of diversity in STEM may be addressed not merely by recruiting the best and the brightest from underrepresented populations, but by changing the context of STEM education to provide tools for its own systematic restructuring.

  11. Generation Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    2010-01-01

    There is a shortage of accounting professors with Ph.D.s who can prepare the next generation. To help reverse the faculty deficit, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) has created the new Accounting Doctoral Scholars program by pooling more than $17 million and soliciting commitments from more than 70 of the nation's…

  12. Recombinant generation of two fragments of the rat complement inhibitory factor H [FH(SCR1-7) and FH(SCR1-4)] and their structural and functional characterization in comparison to FH isolated from rat serum.

    PubMed

    Demberg, T; Heine, I; Götze, O; Altermann, W W; Seliger, B; Schlaf, G

    2006-01-01

    Factor H (FH) is the predominant soluble inhibitor of the complement system. With a concentration of 200-800 microg/ml in human and rat plasma it acts as a cofactor for the soluble factor I (FI)-mediated cleavage of the component C3b to iC3b. Furthermore it competes with factor B for binding to C3b and C3(H2O) and promotes the dissociation of the C3bBb complex. FH is a monomer of about 155 kDa which comprises 20 short consensus repeats (SCR), each of which is composed of approximately 60 amino acid (aa) residues. Two functional fragments of FH comprising the SCR1-4 or SCR1-7 were generated using either the Baculovirus system or stably transfected human embryonal kidney cells, respectively. These fragments, as well as FH purified from rat serum, were first analyzed for their relative molecular weights (Mr) using non-reducing or reducing SDS-PAGE. The Mr of the FH variants differed by about 20% depending on the experimental conditions employed. Only the Mr of proteins separated under reducing conditions were in accordance with the MW calculated from the aa sequence. Analyses of the glycosylation patterns using PAS-staining showed a lack of staining of the recombinant variants (SCR1-4 and SCR1-7) in contrast to FH(SCR1-20) from serum. Using a complement hemolysis assay (CH50-assay) all three variants exhibited a molar complement inhibitory activity of FH(1-20)/FH(1-7)/FH(1-4) of about 3/1/1. These data support the postulated model of FH bearing three binding sites for its ligand C3b, from which one is located in the SCR1-4, whereas the other two are located in the SCR8-20.

  13. Resolution with Limited Factoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    The resolution principle was originally proposed by J.A. Robinson. Resolution with factoring rule is complete for the first-order logic. However, unlimited applications of factoring rule may generate many irrelevant and redundant clauses. Noll presented resolution rule with half-factoring. In this paper, we demonstrate how to eliminate the half-factoring.

  14. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOEpatents

    Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

    1981-06-08

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  15. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  16. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  17. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  18. Thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Pryslak, N.E.

    1974-02-26

    A thermoelectric generator having a rigid coupling or stack'' between the heat source and the hot strap joining the thermoelements is described. The stack includes a member of an insulating material, such as ceramic, for electrically isolating the thermoelements from the heat source, and a pair of members of a ductile material, such as gold, one each on each side of the insulating member, to absorb thermal differential expansion stresses in the stack. (Official Gazette)

  19. Electric generator

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Jr., John S.; Wilson, James R.; McDonald, Jr., Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  20. Interaction Between the Effects of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and Prepulse Parameters on Prepulse Inhibition in Two Inbred Rat Strains and the F1 Generation of a Cross Between Them

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Lisa H.; Sutherland, Jane E.; Muhlhauser, Carey M.

    2009-01-01

    Levels of prepulse inhibition (PPI) depend on the interval between the startling and prepulse stimuli. Brown Norway rats show less PPI of the acoustic startle response than Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats when the interval between the prepulse and startling stimulus is 100 msec. Central administration of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) decreases PPI at this inter-stimulus interval. Here, the effect of CRF on PPI over a range of inter-stimulus intervals was examined in WKY and BN rats, and in the F1 generation of a cross between them. Rats received an intracerebroventricular infusion of either saline or CRF 30 min prior to testing PPI. Test trials included startle stimulus alone trials, and trials on which a prepulse stimulus of either 6, 12, or 15 dB above background preceded the startling stimulus by either 20, 75, 100, 500 or 2000 msec. CRF decreased PPI in WKY rats at all inter-stimulus intervals and all prepulse intensities, while the effect of CRF on PPI in BN rats only occurred at intermediate intervals. BN and WKY rats showed different levels of PPI only at the intermediate intervals. Baseline PPI in the F1 rats resembled the WKY phenotype. The CRF-induced change in PPI in the F1 generation has some qualities of the effects in each of the progenitor strains. These results suggest that both the effect of rats strain and of CRF on PPI depend on the inter-stimulus interval, and that there is an interaction between prepulse stimulus intensity and the inter-stimulus interval. PMID:19373982

  1. Smoke generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A smoke generator is disclosed which is particularly suitable for mounting on the wing tips of an aircraft and for conducting airflow studies. The device includes a network of thermally insulated tubes for carrying a fluid which is used to produce smoke. The fluid, which need not be combustible, is heated above its vaporization temperature by electric current which is passed through the fluid conduit tubes, so that the tubes serve both as fluid conduits and resistance heating elements. Fluid supply and monitoring systems and electrical control systems are also disclosed.

  2. Piezoelectrostatic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A piezoelectrostatic generator includes a plurality of elongated piezoelectric elements having first and second ends, with the first ends fixedly mounted in a cylindrical housing and the second extending radially inwardly toward an axis. A shaft movable along the axis is connected to the inner ends of the elements to produce bending forces in piezoelectric strips within the elements. Each element includes a pair of strips mounted in surface contact and in electrical series to produce a potential upon bending. Electrodes spaced from the strips by a solid dielectric material act as capacitor plates to collect the potential charge.

  3. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  4. Tide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Feltenberger, B.D.

    1981-06-16

    A tidewater power system consisting of a high tide reservoir and a low tide reservoir. The high tide reservoir has an inlet adapted to be supported at high tide level and an outlet with a water wheel and generator between the outlet of the high tide reservoir and the low tide reservoir. The low tide reservoir has an outlet at the low tide level. The outlet from the high tide reservoir is adjustable to control the flow rate and the high tide reservoir can be closed at high tide to retain water for use over a period of time.

  5. Generation Y Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Garret; Painting, Kristen; Barrera, Aaron; Skytland, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Are you familiar with the famed Generation Y, or "Gen Yers?" Generation Y is projected to be 47 percent of the workforce by 2014. They were born roughly between 1977 and 2000, but that is definitely not their only defining factor. But who is this group, and what do they have to do with the future of the space program and the Johnson Space Center (JSC)? During 2007, a group of Gen Yers at JSC participated on a committee to address the NASA Headquarters strategic communications plan. Fitzpatrick, along with his co-authors, created a presentation to share the Gen Yers' perspective on their generation in conjunction with the strategic communications strategy released. This knowledge capture (KC) event is that presentation.

  6. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOEpatents

    Pettibone, Joseph S.; Wheeler, Paul C.

    1983-01-01

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  7. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: a possible role in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Senthil Kumar, K J; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25-200μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE2 production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease.

  8. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, J.M.; Baker, W.R.

    1963-09-17

    This invention is a magnetohydrodynamic device for generating a highly ionized ion-electron plasma at a region remote from electrodes and structural members, thus avoiding contamination of the plasma. The apparatus utilizes a closed, gas-filled, cylindrical housing in which an axially directed magnetic field is provided. At one end of the housing, a short cylindrical electrode is disposed coaxially around a short axial inner electrode. A radial electrical discharge is caused to occur between the inner and outer electrodes, creating a rotating hydromagnetic ionization wave that propagates aiong the magnetic field lines toward the opposite end of the housing. A shorting switch connected between the electrodes prevents the wave from striking the opposite end of the housing. (AEC)

  9. Triboelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong L; Fan, Fengru; Lin, Long; Zhu, Guang; Pan, Caofeng; Zhou, Yusheng

    2015-11-03

    A generator includes a thin first contact charging layer and a thin second contact charging layer. The thin first contact charging layer includes a first material that has a first rating on a triboelectric series. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer includes a second material that has a second rating on a triboelectric series that is more negative than the first rating. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer is disposed adjacent to the first contact charging layer so that the second side of the second contact charging layer is in contact with the second side of the first contact charging layer.

  10. Next-Generation Assessment of Human Growth Factor Receptor 2 (ERBB2) Amplification Status: Clinical Validation in the Context of a Hybrid Capture-Based, Comprehensive Solid Tumor Genomic Profiling Assay.

    PubMed

    Ross, Dara S; Zehir, Ahmet; Cheng, Donavan T; Benayed, Ryma; Nafa, Khedoudja; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Weigelt, Britta; Razavi, Pedram; Hyman, David M; Baselga, José; Berger, Michael F; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria E

    2017-03-01

    Establishing ERBB2 [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] amplification status in breast and gastric carcinomas is essential to treatment selection. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) constitute the current standard for assessment. With further advancements in genomic medicine, new clinically relevant biomarkers are rapidly emerging and options for targeted therapy are increasing in patients with advanced disease, driving the need for comprehensive molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an attractive approach for up-front comprehensive assessment, including ERBB2 status, but the concordance with traditional methods of HER2 assessment is not well established. The Memorial Sloan Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets (MSK-IMPACT) assay, a hybrid capture-based NGS assay interrogating the coding regions of 410 cancer-related genes, was performed on manually macrodissected unstained sections from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast (n = 213) and gastroesophageal (n = 39) tumors submitted for clinical mutation profiling. ERBB2 status was assessed using a custom bioinformatics pipeline, and NGS results were compared to IHC and FISH. NGS ERBB2 amplification calls had an overall concordance of 98.4% (248/252) with the combined IHC/FISH results in this validation set. Discrepancies occurred in the context of low tumor content and HER2 heterogeneity. ERBB2 amplification status can be reliably determined by hybridization capture-based NGS methods, allowing efficient concurrent testing for other potentially actionable genomic alterations, particularly in limited material.

  11. Inorganic pyrophosphate generation by transforming growth factor-beta-1 is mainly dependent on ANK induction by Ras/Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cailotto, Frederic; Bianchi, Arnaud; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Moulin, David; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Netter, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    ANK is a multipass transmembrane protein transporter thought to play a role in the export of intracellular inorganic pyrophosphate and so to contribute to the pathophysiology of chondrocalcinosis. As transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-beta1) was shown to favor calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition, we investigated the contribution of ANK to the production of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (ePPi) by chondrocytes and the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of Ank expression by TGF-beta1. Chondrocytes were exposed to 10 ng/mL of TGF-beta1, and Ank expression was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. ePPi was quantified in cell supernatants. RNA silencing was used to define the respective roles of Ank and PC-1 in TGF-beta1-induced ePPi generation. Finally, selective kinase inhibitors and dominant-negative/overexpression plasmid strategies were used to explore the contribution of several signaling pathways to Ank induction by TGF-beta1. TGF-beta1 strongly increased Ank expression at the mRNA and protein levels, as well as ePPi production. Using small interfering RNA technology, we showed that Ank contributed approximately 60% and PC-1 nearly 20% to TGF-beta1-induced ePPi generation. Induction of Ank by TGF-beta1 required activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway but not of p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase or of protein kinase A. In line with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor calphostin C, Gö6976 (a Ca2+-dependent PKC inhibitor) diminished TGF-beta1-induced Ank expression by 60%, whereas a 10% inhibition was observed with rottlerin (a PKCdelta inhibitor). These data suggest a regulatory role for calcium in TGF-beta1-induced Ank expression. Finally, we demonstrated that the stimulatory effect of TGF-beta1 on Ank expression was inhibited by the suppression of the Ras/Raf-1 pathway, while being enhanced by their constitutive activation. Transient overexpression of Smad 7, an

  12. Effect of low dose beta blockers on atrial and ventricular (B type) natriuretic factor in heart failure: a double blind, randomised comparison of metoprolol and a third generation vasodilating beta blocker.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, J. E.; Chan, W. W.; Hung, Y. T.; Chan, S. K.; Shum, I. O.; Raymond, K.; Woo, K. S.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--This study examines the acute effects of two differing beta adrenergic blocking agents (metoprolol and a third generation vasodilating beta blocker) on plasma concentrations of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), brain (ventricular) natriuretic factor (BNF), and haemodynamic variables in patients with heart failure. SETTING--University teaching hospital. METHODS--20 patients with impaired left ventricular systolic function [ejection fraction 32 (SEM 2.3)%] were randomised in a double blind manner to receive either oral metoprolol 6.25 mg twice daily or celiprolol 25 mg daily. Haemodynamic variables were evaluated by Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery catheter over 24 hours. ANF and BNF concentrations were measured at baseline, 5 h, and 24 h by radioimmunoassay. RESULTS--At baseline ANF and BNF concentrations were considerably raised compared to the normal range. Treatment with metoprolol caused ANF to rise further to 147% of the basal level at 5 h (P = 0.017) and 112% at 24 h (P = 0.029). This was associated with a small but non-significant rise in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance were unchanged at 24 h. In contrast, after celiprolol ANF fell to 90% of basal levels at 5 h and to 74% of basal level at 24 h (P = 0.019), associated with a small but non-significant fall in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure [-3.3 (2.7) mm Hg] and systemic vascular resistance, and rise in cardiac output from 3.2 (0.2) to 4.0 (0.4) l/min (P = 0.04). BNF concentrations rose to 112% of baseline at 5 h (P = 0.09) after metoprolol but fell slightly, to 91% of baseline values, after celiprolol (NS). CONCLUSIONS--Metoprolol, even in very low doses (6.25 mg), produced a rise in ANF and BNF, although minimal haemodynamic changes were detected. In contrast, a vasodilating beta blocker was associated with a significant fall in ANF and BNF and a small rise in cardiac output. This study confirms both the advantages of vasodilating beta blockers

  13. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-κB/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: A possible role in atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Senthil Kumar, K.J.; Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lu, Fung-Jou; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25–200 μg/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE{sub 2} production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-κB/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-κB activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease. - Highlights: • Humic acid (HA) induce pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators in macrophages. • HA-induced inflammation is mediated by ROS and NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathways. • The inflammatory potential of HA correlated with activation of Nrf2/HO-1 genes. • HA exposure to mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokines production in vivo. • HA may be one of the main causes of early

  14. Internal and ancestral controls of cell-generation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    Lateral and longitudinal correlations between related cells reveal associations between the generation times of cells for an intermediate period /three generations in bacteral cultures/. Generation times of progeny are influenced by nongenetic factors transmitted from their ancestors.

  15. Why Do First-Generation Students Fail?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Sanjay S.; Newbold, John J.; O'Rourke, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have determined factors contributing to first-generation student success. This study finds that first-generation students are less involved, have less social and financial support, and do not show a preference for active coping strategies. First-generation students report less social and academic satisfaction as well as lower…

  16. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M

    2011-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) consist of four signaling family members and one nonsignaling "decoy" receptor, Fgfr-like 1 (Fgfrl1), all of which are expressed in the developing kidney. Several studies have shown that exogenous fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) affect growth and maturation of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) and ureteric bud (UB) in cultured tissues. Transgenic and conditional knockout approaches in whole animals have shown that Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 (predominantly the IIIc isoform) in kidney mesenchyme are critical for early MM and UB formation. Conditional deletion of the ligand, Fgf8, in nephron precursors or global deletion of Fgfrl1 interrupts nephron formation. Fgfr2 (likely the IIIb isoform signaling downstream of Fgf7 and Fgf10) is critical for ureteric morphogenesis. Moreover, Fgfr2 appears to act independently of Frs2α (the major signaling adapter for Fgfrs) in regulating UB branching. Loss of Fgfr2 in the MM leads to many kidney and urinary tract anomalies, including vesicoureteral reflux. Thus Fgfr signaling is critical for patterning of virtually all renal lineages at early and later stages of development.

  17. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M

    2011-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) are expressed throughout the developing kidney. Several early studies have shown that exogenous fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) affect growth and maturation of the metanephric mesenchyme (MM) and ureteric bud (UB). Transgenic mice that over-express a dominant negative receptor isoform develop renal aplasia/severe dysplasia, confirming the importance of Fgfrs in renal development. Furthermore, global deletion of Fgf7, Fgf10, and Fgfr2IIIb (isoform that binds Fgf7 and Fgf10) in mice leads to small kidneys with fewer collecting ducts and nephrons. Deletion of Fgfrl1, a receptor lacking intracellular signaling domains, causes severe renal dysgenesis. Conditional targeting of Fgf8 from the MM interrupts nephron formation. Deletion of Fgfr2 from the UB results in severe ureteric branching and stromal mesenchymal defects, although loss of Frs2α (major signaling adapter for Fgfrs) in the UB causes only mild renal hypoplasia. Deletion of both Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 in the MM results in renal aplasia with defects in MM formation and initial UB elongation and branching. Loss of Fgfr2 in the MM leads to many renal and urinary tract anomalies as well as vesicoureteral reflux. Thus, Fgfr signaling is critical for patterning of virtually all renal lineages at early and later stages of development.

  18. Role of fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney development.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M

    2007-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfrs) are expressed in the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme of the developing kidney. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that exogenous fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) increase growth and maturation of the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. Deletion of fgf7, fgf10, and fgfr2IIIb (the receptor isoform that binds Fgf7 and Fgf10) in mice lead to smaller kidneys with fewer collecting ducts and nephrons. Overexpression of a dominant negative receptor isoform in transgenic mice has revealed more striking defects including renal aplasia or severe dysplasia. Moreover, deletion of many fgf ligands and receptors in mice results in early embryonic lethality, making it difficult to determine their roles in kidney development. Recently, conditional targeting approaches revealed that deletion of fgf8 from the metanephric mesenchyme interrupts nephron formation. Furthermore, deletion of fgfr2 from the ureteric bud resulted in both ureteric bud branching and stromal mesenchymal patterning defects. Deletion of both fgfr1 and fgfr2 in the metanephric mesenchyme resulted in renal aplasia, characterized by defects in metanephric mesenchyme formation and initial ureteric bud elongation and branching. Thus, Fgfr signaling is critical for growth and patterning of all renal lineages at early and later stages of kidney development.

  19. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Cinq-Mars, Robert S; Burke, Timothy; Irish, James; Gustafson, Brian; Kirtley, James; Alawa, Aiman

    2011-09-01

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. Completed final reporting and deliverables

  20. Alternative inclusion of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 exon IIIc in Dunning prostate tumors reveals unexpected epithelial mesenchymal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Oltean, Sebastian; Sorg, Brian S; Albrecht, Todd; Bonano, Vivian I; Brazas, Robert M; Dewhirst, Mark W; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2006-09-19

    In epithelial cells, alternative splicing of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) transcripts leads to the expression of the FGFR2(IIIb) isoform, whereas in mesenchymal cells, the same process results in the synthesis of FGFR2(IIIc). Expression of the FGFR2(IIIc) isoform during prostate tumor progression suggests a disruption of the epithelial character of these tumors. To visualize the use of FGFR2 exon IIIc in prostate AT3 tumors in syngeneic rats, we constructed minigene constructs that report on alternative splicing. Imaging these alternative splicing decisions revealed unexpected mesenchymal-epithelial transitions in these primary tumors. These transitions were observed more frequently where tumor cells were in contact with stroma. Indeed, these transitions were frequently observed among lung micrometastases in the organ parenchyma and immediately adjacent to blood vessels. Our data suggest an unforeseen relationship between epithelial mesenchymal plasticity and malignant fitness.

  1. Advanced LMMHD space power generation concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Vincent; Wong, Albert; Kim, Kilyoo; Dhir, Vijay

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation concept has been proposed and studied worldwide as one of the future power generation sources. An advanced one fluid two phase liquid metal (LM) MHD power generation concept was developed for space nuclear power generation design. The concept employs a nozzle to accelerate the liquid metal coolant to an acceptable velocity with Mach number greater than unity. Such nozzle and the MHD power generator replace the turbogenerator of a high temperature Rankine turboelectric cycle concept. As a result, the power generation system contains no movable parts. This provides high reliability, which is a very important factor in space application.

  2. Multi-factor authentication

    DOEpatents

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  3. Bayesian Exploratory Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Gabriella; Frühwirth-Schnatter, Sylvia; Heckman, James J.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops and applies a Bayesian approach to Exploratory Factor Analysis that improves on ad hoc classical approaches. Our framework relies on dedicated factor models and simultaneously determines the number of factors, the allocation of each measurement to a unique factor, and the corresponding factor loadings. Classical identification criteria are applied and integrated into our Bayesian procedure to generate models that are stable and clearly interpretable. A Monte Carlo study confirms the validity of the approach. The method is used to produce interpretable low dimensional aggregates from a high dimensional set of psychological measurements. PMID:25431517

  4. Leading Generation Y

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    autonomy. 36 Howe and Strauss show readers that this team ethic shows up in Generation Y’s political views.37 When teens from the Millennial ...April 2008 WORD COUNT: 5,582 PAGES: 30 KEY TERMS: Leadership, Millennial Generation , Next Generation , Recruiting, and Retention CLASSIFICATION... Millennial Generation , Generation Y or the Next Generation , the Army needs to consider the gap between Boomers, Generation X and the Soldiers that

  5. VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gross, J.E.

    1959-10-31

    This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

  6. Phosphors containing boron and metals of Group IIIA and IIIB

    DOEpatents

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2006-10-31

    A phosphor comprises: (a) at least a first metal selected from the group consisting of yttrium and elements of lanthanide series other than europium; (b) at least a second metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and scandium; (c) boron; and (d) europium. The phosphor is used in light source that comprises a UV radiation source to convert UV radiation to visible light.

  7. Self-Esteem, Locus of Control, College Adjustment, and GPA among First- and Continuing-Generation Students: A Moderator Model of Generational Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspelmeier, Jeffery E.; Love, Michael M.; McGill, Lauren A.; Elliott, Ann N.; Pierce, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The role of generational status (first-generation vs. continuing-generation college students) as a moderator of the relationship between psychological factors and college outcomes was tested to determine whether generational status acts as a risk factor or as a sensitizing factor. The sample consisted of 322 undergraduate students who completed…

  8. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  9. Power Generation for River and Tidal Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, Eduard; Wright, Alan; Gevorgian, Vahan; Donegan, James; Marnagh, Cian; McEntee, Jarlath

    2016-06-01

    Renewable energy sources are the second largest contributor to global electricity production, after fossil fuels. The integration of renewable energy continued to grow in 2014 against a backdrop of increasing global energy consumption and a dramatic decline in oil prices during the second half of the year. As renewable generation has become less expensive during recent decades, and it becomes more accepted by the global population, the focus on renewable generation has expanded from primarily wind and solar to include new types with promising future applications, such as hydropower generation, including river and tidal generation. Today, hydropower is considered one of the most important renewable energy sources. In river and tidal generation, the input resource flow is slower but also steadier than it is in wind or solar generation, yet the level of water turbulent flow may vary from one place to another. This report focuses on hydrokinetic power conversion.

  10. ELECTROSTATIC POWER GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROSTATIC GENERATORS , POWER EQUIPMENT, ELECTRIC GOVERNORS, CIRCUITS, VACUUM SEALS, ELECTRICAL INSULATION, VACUUM, ELECTRODES, FINISHES, SURFACE...FINISHING, SURFACE PROPERTIES, HARDNESS, PULSE GENERATORS , TRANSFORMERS, FIELD EMISSION.

  11. ELECTROSTATIC POWER GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROSTATIC GENERATORS , POWER EQUIPMENT, ELECTRICAL INSULATION, FIELD EMISSION, ELECTRODES, VACUUM, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ANODES, CATHODES, POLISHES...DIELECTRICS, COATINGS, PRESSURE, HARDNESS, PULSE GENERATORS , TRANSFORMERS, VACUUM SEALS, EQUATIONS.

  12. Enhanced Elliptic Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    2007-01-01

    An enhanced method of elliptic grid generation has been invented. Whereas prior methods require user input of certain grid parameters, this method provides for these parameters to be determined automatically. "Elliptic grid generation" signifies generation of generalized curvilinear coordinate grids through solution of elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). Usually, such grids are fitted to bounding bodies and used in numerical solution of other PDEs like those of fluid flow, heat flow, and electromagnetics. Such a grid is smooth and has continuous first and second derivatives (and possibly also continuous higher-order derivatives), grid lines are appropriately stretched or clustered, and grid lines are orthogonal or nearly so over most of the grid domain. The source terms in the grid-generating PDEs (hereafter called "defining" PDEs) make it possible for the grid to satisfy requirements for clustering and orthogonality properties in the vicinity of specific surfaces in three dimensions or in the vicinity of specific lines in two dimensions. The grid parameters in question are decay parameters that appear in the source terms of the inhomogeneous defining PDEs. The decay parameters are characteristic lengths in exponential- decay factors that express how the influences of the boundaries decrease with distance from the boundaries. These terms govern the rates at which distance between adjacent grid lines change with distance from nearby boundaries. Heretofore, users have arbitrarily specified decay parameters. However, the characteristic lengths are coupled with the strengths of the source terms, such that arbitrary specification could lead to conflicts among parameter values. Moreover, the manual insertion of decay parameters is cumbersome for static grids and infeasible for dynamically changing grids. In the present method, manual insertion and user specification of decay parameters are neither required nor allowed. Instead, the decay parameters are

  13. Methods of Generating and Evaluating Hypertext.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blustein, James; Staveley, Mark S.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on methods of generating and evaluating hypertext. Highlights include historical landmarks; nonlinearity; literary hypertext; models of hypertext; manual, automatic, and semi-automatic generation of hypertext; mathematical models for hypertext evaluation, including computing coverage and correlation; human factors in evaluation; and…

  14. Work Values across Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.; Leuty, Melanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Mainstream publication discussions of differences in generational cohorts in the workplace suggest that individuals of more recent generations, such as Generation X and Y, have different work values than do individuals of the Silent and Baby Boom generations. Although extant research suggests that age may influence work values, few of the…

  15. Talkin' 'bout My Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickes, Persis C.

    2010-01-01

    The monikers are many: (1) "Generation Y"; (2) "Echo Boomers"; (3) "GenMe"; (4) the "Net Generation"; (5) "RenGen"; and (6) "Generation Next". One name that appears to be gaining currency is "Millennials," perhaps as a way to better differentiate the current generation from its…

  16. Minding the Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2011-01-01

    Generational conflict is back. After years of relative silence, and mutual ignorance, the young and old are once more at war. With youth unemployment high on the political agenda, the fortunes of the "jobless generation" are being contrasted with those of the "golden generation" of baby boomers, but is one generation really…

  17. Solar thermal electricity generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasemagha, Khairy Ramadan

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of modeling the thermal performance and economic feasibility of large (utility scale) and small solar thermal power plants for electricity generation. A number of solar concepts for power systems applications have been investigated. Each concept has been analyzed over a range of plant power ratings from 1 MW(sub e) to 300 MW(sub e) and over a range of capacity factors from a no-storage case (capacity factor of about 0.25 to 0.30) up to intermediate load capacity factors in the range of 0.46 to 0.60. The solar plant's economic viability is investigated by examining the effect of various parameters on the plant costs (both capital and O & M) and the levelized energy costs (LEC). The cost components are reported in six categories: collectors, energy transport, energy storage, energy conversion, balance of plant, and indirect/contingency costs. Concentrator and receiver costs are included in the collector category. Thermal and electric energy transport costs are included in the energy transport category. Costs for the thermal or electric storage are included in the energy storage category; energy conversion costs are included in the energy conversion category. The balance of plant cost category comprises the structures, land, service facilities, power conditioning, instrumentation and controls, and spare part costs. The indirect/contingency category consists of the indirect construction and the contingency costs. The concepts included in the study are (1) molten salt cavity central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-C-Salt); (2) molten salt external central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-E-Salt); (3) sodium external central receiver with sodium storage (PFCR/RE-Na); (4) sodium external central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-E-Na/Salt); (5) water/steam external central receiver with oil/rock storage (PFCR/R-E-W/S); (6) parabolic dish with stirling engine conversion and lead acid battery storage (PFDR/SLAB); (7) parabolic dish

  18. DNA Generated Electric Current Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lanshuang; Hu, Shengqiang; Guo, Linyan; Shen, Congcong; Yang, Minghui; Rasooly, Avraham

    2017-02-21

    In addition to its primary function as a genetic material, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is also a potential biologic energy source for molecular electronics. For the first time, we demonstrate that DNA can generate a redox electric current. As an example of this new functionality, DNA generated redox current was used for electrochemical detection of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a clinically important breast cancer biomarker. To induce redox current, the phosphate of the single stranded DNA aptamer backbone was reacted with molybdate to form redox molybdophosphate precipitate and generate an electrochemical current of ∼16.8 μA/μM cm(2). This detection of HER2 was performed using a sandwich detection assay. A HER2 specific peptide was immobilized onto a gold electrode surface for capturing HER2 in buffer and serum. The HER2 specific aptamer was used as both ligand to bind the captured HER2 and to generate a redox current signal. When tested for HER2 detection, the electrochemical current generated by the aptasensor was proportional to HER2 concentration in the range of 0.01 to 5 ng/mL, with a current generated in the range of ∼6.37 to 31.8 μA/cm(2) in both buffer and serum. This detection level is within the clinically relevant range of HER2 concentrations. This method of electrochemical signal amplification greatly simplifies the signal transduction of aptasensors, broadening their use for HER2 analysis. This novel approach of using the same aptamer as biosensor ligand and as transducer can be universally extended to other aptasensors for a wide array of biodetection applications. Moreover, electric currents generated by DNA or other nucleic acids can be used in molecular electronics or implanted devices for both power generation and measurement of output.

  19. Gamma ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  20. Risk factors for brain metastases after prophylactic cranial irradiation in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Haiyan; Xie, Peng; Meng, Xue; Yuan, Shuanghu; Sun, Xindong; Li, Wanlong; Fan, Bingjie; Li, Xiaolin; Yu, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Despite administration of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI), some small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients still suffer from brain metastases (BM) with unknown risk factors. We conducted this study to identify patients with higher BM risk after PCI and improve their outcome. The characteristics and survival of all the SCLC patients underwent PCI in our institute from 2003 to 2014 were analyzed. Kaplan-Meier method was applied to estimate BM free survival (BMFS) and overall survival (OS). Cox regression analyses were performed to explore risk factors for BM. A total of 175 patients with the median age of 55 years (range, 29–76) were eligible, among whom 36 (20.6%) developed BM with median follow-up of 42 months. Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed HART and TNM classification (p < 0.05) were associated with BM. Two-stage system was not related with BMFS or OS (p > 0.05). Stage IIIB-IV and HART were independent risk factors for BM after PCI in SCLC. TNM classification was more valuable on prognosis than two-stage system. Further large-scale studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:28202905

  1. Supersonic MHD generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, M.A.

    1983-11-29

    An improved MHD electrical power generating system of the type having a MHD topping cycle and a steam generating bottoming cycle is disclosed. The system typically includes a combustion system, a conventional MHD generator and a first diffuser radiant boiler. The improvement comprises a first supersonic MHD generator and ramjet engine configuration operatively connected in series with each other and with the conventional MHD generator. The first supersonic MHD generator and ramjet engine configuration increase the power output and improve the operating efficiency of the electrical generating system. A diffuser system is also disclosed which is in fluid communication with the supersonic MHD generator and the ramjet engine for collecting bypass plasma gas to be used for heating a second radiant boiler adapted for powering a steam turbine generator.

  2. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  3. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  4. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  5. An analysis of factors causing the occurrence of off-design thermally induced force effects in the zone of weld joint no. 111-1 in a PGV-1000M steam generator and recommendations on excluding them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakirov, M. B.; Levchuk, V. I.; Povarov, V. P.; Gromov, A. F.

    2014-08-01

    Inadmissible operational flaws occurring in the critical zones of heat-transfer and mechanical equipment are commonly revealed in all nuclear power plant units both in Russia and abroad. The number of such flaws will only grow in the future because the majority of nuclear power plants have been in operation for a time that is either close to or even exceeds the assigned service life. In this connection, establishing cause-and-effect relations with regard to accelerated incipience and growth of flaws, working out compensating measures aimed at reducing operational damageability, and setting up monitoring of equipment integrity degradation of during operation are becoming the matters of utmost importance. There is a need to introduce new approaches to comprehensive diagnostics of the technical state of important nuclear power plant equipment, including continuous monitoring of its operational damageability and the extent of its loading in the most critical zones. Starting from 2011, such a monitoring system has successfully been used for the Novovoronezh NPP Unit 5 in the zone of weld joint no. 111-1 of steam generator no. 4. Based on the results from operation of this system in 2011-2013, unsteady thermally induced force effects (periodic thermal shocks and temperature abnormalities) were reveled, which had not been considered in the design, and which have an essential influence on the operational loading of this part. Based on an analysis of cause-and-effect relations pertinent to temperature abnormalities connected with technological operations, a set of measures aimed at reducing the thermally induced force loads exerted on pipeline sections was developed, which includes corrections to the process regulations for safe operation and to the operating manuals (involving changes in the algorithms for manipulating with the stop and control valves in the steam generator blowdown system).

  6. Second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M.J.; Biwer, B.M.; Schauer, M.W.; Frye, J.M.; Gruen, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are increasingly being used as in situ surface probes. These techniques are coherent and inherently surface sensitive by the nature of the mediums response to intense laser light. Here we will review these two techniques using aqueous corrosion as an example problem. Aqueous corrosion of technologically important materials such as Fe, Ni and Cr proceeds from a reduced metal surface with layer by layer growth of oxide films mitigated by compositional changes in the chemical makeup of the growing film. Passivation of the metal surface is achieved after growth of only a few tens of atomic layers of metal oxide. Surface Second Harmonic Generation and a related nonlinear laser technique, Sum Frequency Generation have demonstrated an ability to probe the surface composition of growing films even in the presence of aqueous solutions. 96 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Refrigeration generation using expander-generator units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, A. V.; Agababov, V. S.; Koryagin, A. V.; Baidakova, Yu. O.

    2016-05-01

    The problems of using the expander-generator unit (EGU) to generate refrigeration, along with electricity were considered. It is shown that, on the level of the temperatures of refrigeration flows using the EGU, one can provide the refrigeration supply of the different consumers: ventilation and air conditioning plants and industrial refrigerators and freezers. The analysis of influence of process parameters on the cooling power of the EGU, which depends on the parameters of the gas expansion process in the expander and temperatures of cooled environment, was carried out. The schematic diagram of refrigeration generation plant based on EGU is presented. The features and advantages of EGU to generate refrigeration compared with thermotransformer of steam compressive and absorption types were shown, namely: there is no need to use the energy generated by burning fuel to operate the EGU; beneficial use of the heat delivered to gas from the flow being cooled in equipment operating on gas; energy production along with refrigeration generation, which makes it possible to create, using EGU, the trigeneration plants without using the energy power equipment. It is shown that the level of the temperatures of refrigeration flows, which can be obtained by using the EGU on existing technological decompression stations of the transported gas, allows providing the refrigeration supply of various consumers. The information that the refrigeration capacity of an expander-generator unit not only depends on the parameters of the process of expansion of gas flowing in the expander (flow rate, temperatures and pressures at the inlet and outlet) but it is also determined by the temperature needed for a consumer and the initial temperature of the flow of the refrigeration-carrier being cooled. The conclusion was made that the expander-generator units can be used to create trigeneration plants both at major power plants and at small energy.

  8. Quantum random number generator

    DOEpatents

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  9. Meet the Millennial Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Brian

    2000-01-01

    The "Millennial Generation" has grown up with prosperity, working parents, the Internet, divorce, and Columbine. They are fundamentally different in outlook and ambition from preceding generations and have their own ideas about how they want to live and work. (JOW)

  10. Generating Customized Verifiers for Automatically Generated Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen; Fischer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Program verification using Hoare-style techniques requires many logical annotations. We have previously developed a generic annotation inference algorithm that weaves in all annotations required to certify safety properties for automatically generated code. It uses patterns to capture generator- and property-specific code idioms and property-specific meta-program fragments to construct the annotations. The algorithm is customized by specifying the code patterns and integrating them with the meta-program fragments for annotation construction. However, this is difficult since it involves tedious and error-prone low-level term manipulations. Here, we describe an annotation schema compiler that largely automates this customization task using generative techniques. It takes a collection of high-level declarative annotation schemas tailored towards a specific code generator and safety property, and generates all customized analysis functions and glue code required for interfacing with the generic algorithm core, thus effectively creating a customized annotation inference algorithm. The compiler raises the level of abstraction and simplifies schema development and maintenance. It also takes care of some more routine aspects of formulating patterns and schemas, in particular handling of irrelevant program fragments and irrelevant variance in the program structure, which reduces the size, complexity, and number of different patterns and annotation schemas that are required. The improvements described here make it easier and faster to customize the system to a new safety property or a new generator, and we demonstrate this by customizing it to certify frame safety of space flight navigation code that was automatically generated from Simulink models by MathWorks' Real-Time Workshop.

  11. Starter/generator testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anon

    1994-10-01

    Sundstrand Aerospace and GE Aircraft Engines have studied the switched reluctance machine for use as an integral starter/generator for future aircraft engines. They have conducted an initial, low-power testing of the starter/generator, which is based on power inverters using IGBT-technology semiconductors, to verify its feasibility in the externally mounted version of the integral starter/generator. This preliminary testing of the 250-kW starter/generator reveals favorable results.

  12. Endopeptidase Cleavage Generates a Functionally Distinct Isoform of C1q/Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Protein-12 (CTRP12) with an Altered Oligomeric State and Signaling Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhikui; Lei, Xia; Seldin, Marcus M.; Wong, G. William

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived adipokines are an important class of secreted metabolic regulators that mediate tissue cross-talk to control systemic energy balance. We recently described C1q/TNF-related protein-12 (CTRP12), a novel insulin-sensitizing adipokine that regulates glucose metabolism in liver and adipose tissue. However, the biochemical properties of CTRP12 and its naturally occurring cleaved isoform have not been characterized. Here, we show that CTRP12 is a secreted hormone subjected to multiple functionally relevant posttranslational modifications at highly conserved residues. For example, Asn39 is glycosylated, whereas Cys85 mediates the assembly of higher order oligomeric structure. Endopeptidase cleavage at Lys91 generates a cleaved globular gCTRP12 isoform, the expression of which is increased by insulin. PCSK3/furin was identified as the major proprotein convertase expressed by adipocytes that mediates the endogenous cleavage of CTRP12. Cleavage at Lys91 is context-dependent: mutation of the charged Arg93 to Ala on the P2′ position enhanced cleavage, and triple mutations (K90A/K91A/R93A) abolished cleavage. Importantly, the two isoforms of CTRP12 differ in oligomeric structures and are functionally distinct. The full-length protein forms trimers and larger complexes, and the cleaved isoform consisted of predominantly dimers. Whereas full-length fCTRP12 strongly activated Akt signaling in H4IIE hepatocytes and 3T3-L1 adipocytes, gCTRP12 preferentially activated MAP kinase (ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK) signaling. Further, only fCTRP12 improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. These results reveal a novel mechanism controlling signaling specificity and function of a hormone via cleavage-dependent alteration in oligomeric state. PMID:22942287

  13. Hydrogen sulfide suppresses oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-stimulated monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 generation from macrophages via the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway.

    PubMed

    Du, Junbao; Huang, Yaqian; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Qiaoli; Zhao, Manman; Zhu, Mingzhu; Liu, Jia; Chen, Stella X; Bu, Dingfang; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-04-04

    This study was designed to examine the role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the generation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-stimulated monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) from macrophages and possible mechanisms. THP-1 cells and RAW macrophages were pretreated with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and hexyl acrylate and then treated with ox-LDL. The results showed that ox-LDL treatment down-regulated the H2S/cystathionine-β-synthase pathway, with increased MCP-1 protein and mRNA expression in both THP-1 cells and RAW macrophages. Hexyl acrylate promoted ox-LDL-induced inflammation, whereas the H2S donor NaHS inhibited it. NaHS markedly suppressed NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity, and recruitment to the MCP-1 promoter in ox-LDL-treated macrophages. Furthermore, NaHS decreased the ratio of free thiol groups in p65, whereas the thiol reductant DTT reversed the inhibiting effect of H2S on the p65 DNA binding activity. Most importantly, site-specific mutation of cysteine 38 to serine in p65 abolished the effect of H2S on the sulfhydration of NF-κB and ox-LDL-induced NF-κB activation. These results suggested that endogenous H2S inhibited ox-LDL-induced macrophage inflammation by suppressing NF-κB p65 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity, and recruitment to the MCP-1 promoter. The sulfhydration of free thiol group on cysteine 38 in p65 served as a molecular mechanism by which H2S inhibited NF-κB pathway activation in ox-LDL-induced macrophage inflammation.

  14. Motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Hickam, Christopher Dale

    2008-05-13

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  15. Solar thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Toberer, Eric S.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Warren, Emily L.

    2016-05-03

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from concentrated sunlight. A novel detailed balance model for STEGs is provided and applied to both state-of-the-art and idealized materials. STEGs can produce electricity by using sunlight to heat one side of a thermoelectric generator. While concentrated sunlight can be used to achieve extremely high temperatures (and thus improved generator efficiency), the solar absorber also emits a significant amount of black body radiation. This emitted light is the dominant loss mechanism in these generators. In this invention, we propose a solution to this problem that eliminates virtually all of the emitted black body radiation. This enables solar thermoelectric generators to operate at higher efficiency and achieve said efficient with lower levels of optical concentration. The solution is suitable for both single and dual axis solar thermoelectric generators.

  16. Mechanism of metformin action in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells involves oxidative stress generation, DNA damage, and transforming growth factor β1 induction.

    PubMed

    Marinello, Poliana Camila; da Silva, Thamara Nishida Xavier; Panis, Carolina; Neves, Amanda Fouto; Machado, Kaliana Larissa; Borges, Fernando Henrique; Guarnier, Flávia Alessandra; Bernardes, Sara Santos; de-Freitas-Junior, Júlio Cesar Madureira; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Luiz, Rodrigo Cabral; Cecchini, Rubens; Cecchini, Alessandra Lourenço

    2016-04-01

    The participation of oxidative stress in the mechanism of metformin action in breast cancer remains unclear. We investigated the effects of clinical (6 and 30 μM) and experimental concentrations of metformin (1000 and 5000 μM) in MCF-7 and in MDA-MB-231 cells, verifying cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, DNA damage, and intracellular pathways related to cell growth and survival after 24 h of drug exposure. Clinical concentrations of metformin decreased metabolic activity of MCF-7 cells in the MTT assay, which showed increased oxidative stress and DNA damage, although cell death and impairment in the proliferative capacity were observed only at higher concentrations. The reduction in metabolic activity and proliferation in MDA-MB-231 cells was present only at experimental concentrations after 24 h of drug exposition. Oxidative stress and DNA damage were induced in this cell line at experimental concentrations. The drug decreased cytoplasmic extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and AKT and increased nuclear p53 and cytoplasmic transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in both cell lines. These findings suggest that metformin reduces cell survival by increasing reactive oxygen species, which induce DNA damage and apoptosis. A relationship between the increase in TGF-β1 and p53 levels and the decrease in ERK1/2 and AKT was also observed. These findings suggest the mechanism of action of metformin in both breast cancer cell lineages, whereas cell line specific undergoes redox changes in the cells in which proliferation and survival signaling are modified. Taken together, these results highlight the potential clinical utility of metformin as an adjuvant during the treatment of luminal and triple-negative breast cancer.

  17. Generation of human innate immune responses towards membrane macrophage colony stimulating factor (mM-CSF) expressing U251 glioma cells within immunodeficient (NIH-nu/beige/xid) mice.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Christina; Hoa, Neil; Callahan, Linda L; Schiltz, Patric M; Jahroudi, Reza Alipanah; Zhang, Jian Gang; Wepsic, H Terry; Jadus, Martin R

    2007-06-01

    The response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to cloned human HLA-A2+ U251 glioma cells (U251-2F11/TK) expressing membrane macrophage colony stimulating factor (mM-CSF) was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Enriched human monocytes derived from cancer patients produced a respiratory burst following 20min of interaction with mM-CSF expressing U251 glioma cells. This respiratory burst response was not observed in the enriched human monocytes following similar exposure to the viral vector control U251 (U251-VV) cells. Reactive oxygen species such as H(2)O(2) and HOCl produced death of the U251 cells. The U251-2F11/TK cells failed to grow in severely compromised combined immunodeficient (NIH-bg-nu-xidBR) mice that were depleted of murine monocyte/macrophages then reconstituted with human HLA-A2+ PBMC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were produced by PBMC, both in vitro and in vivo in response tomM-CSF expressing U251 cells. U251-2F11/TK cells failed to form subcutaneous tumors in macrophage depleted mice reconstituted with human PBMC; whereas, progressive growth of such tumors was observed with the U251-VV cells. U251-2F11/TK tumors formed if the initial inoculums of PBMC were depleted of monocytes. From this work it can be concluded that mM-CSF transduced U251-2F11/TK glioma cells can safely stimulate human innate immune responses in vivo.

  18. RANTES, MDC and SDF-1alpha, prevent the HIVgp120-induced food and water intake decrease in rats.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Khalil; Guevara-Martínez, Marcela; Montes-Rodríguez, Corinne J; Prospéro-García, Oscar

    2006-03-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-wasting syndrome might be facilitated by the HIVgp120 affecting the immunological system. We studied the effect (subchronic administration: 5 days) of HIVgp120, and a few immune-response mediators: regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES), stromal derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), and their combination, on food and water intake in rats, motor control and pain perception. Eighty male adult Wistar rats received an intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of: vehicle 5 microl/day or 0.92 nmol daily of HIVgp120IIIB, RANTES, SDF-1alpha, or MDC, and the combination of RANTES+HIVgp120IIIB, SDF-1alpha+HIVgp120IIIB, or MDC+HIVgp120IIIB. Food and water intake was measured every day during administration, and 24 and 48 h after the last administration. Rats were also weighed the first and the last day of experiment in order to detect the impact of these treatments in the body weight. HIVgp120IIIB significantly decreased food and water intake. These rats gain less weight than the control (vehicle) and chemokines-treated subjects with exception of those treated with SDF-1alpha that also gain less weight. In addition, HIVgp120 deteriorated motor control. HIVgp120IIIB effects on food and water intake, and motor control were prevented by these chemokines. HIVgp120+RANTES, HIVgp120+SDF-1alpha, and SDF-1alpha alone induced hyperalgesia. Results suggest an interaction between HIVgp120 and the chemokine system to generate the HIV-wasting syndrome, the motor abnormalities and changes in pain perception.

  19. Activation of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed Central

    Di Scipio, R G; Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1978-01-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) is a single-chain plasma glycoprotein (mol wt 57,000) that participates in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It is present in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease, Factor IXabeta, by Factor XIa (activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent) in the presence of calcium ions. In the activation reaction, two internal peptide bonds are hydrolyzed in Factor IX. These cleavages occur at a specific arginyl-alanine peptide bond and a specific arginyl-valine peptide bond. This results in the release of an activation peptide (mol wt approximately equal to 11,000) from the internal region of the precursor molecule and the generation of Factor IXabeta (mol wt approximately equal to 46,000). Factor IXabeta is composed of a light chain (mol wt approximately equal to 18,000) and a heavy chain (mol wt approximately equal to 28,000), and these chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain originates from the amino terminal portion of the precursor molecule and has an amino terminal sequence of Tyr-Asn-Ser-Gly-Lys. The heavy chain originates from the carboxyl terminal region of the precursor molecule and contains an amino terminal sequence of Val-Val-Gly-Gly-Glu. The heavy chain of Factor IXabeta also contains the active site sequence of Phe-Cys-Ala-Gly-Phe-His-Glu-Gly-Arg-Asp-Ser-Cys-Gln-Gly-Asp-SER-Gly-Gly-Pro. The active site serine residue is shown in capital letters. Factor IX is also converted to Factor IXaalpha by a protease from Russell's viper venom. This activation reaction, however, occurs in a single step and involves only the cleavage of the internal arginyl-valine peptide bond. Human Factor IXabeta was inhibited by human antithrombin III by the formation of a one-to-one complex of enzyme and inhibitor. In this reaction, the inhibitor was tightly bound to the heavy chain of the enzyme. These data indicate that the mechanism of activation of human Factor IX and its

  20. Quantum random number generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  1. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; ...

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a highmore » speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  2. Quantum random number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which have important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness—coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. On the basis of the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modelling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, in which verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category that provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  3. Steam generator support system

    DOEpatents

    Moldenhauer, J.E.

    1987-08-25

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

  4. Steam generator support system

    DOEpatents

    Moldenhauer, James E.

    1987-01-01

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

  5. Method of grid generation

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Daniel W.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  6. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  7. Solar fuels generator

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.

    2016-10-25

    The solar fuels generator includes an ionically conductive separator between a gaseous first phase and a second phase. A photoanode uses one or more components of the first phase to generate cations during operation of the solar fuels generator. A cation conduit is positioned provides a pathway along which the cations travel from the photoanode to the separator. The separator conducts the cations. A second solid cation conduit conducts the cations from the separator to a photocathode.

  8. Parallel unstructured grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, Rainald; Camberos, Jose; Merriam, Marshal

    1991-01-01

    A parallel unstructured grid generation algorithm is presented and implemented on the Hypercube. Different processor hierarchies are discussed, and the appropraite hierarchies for mesh generation and mesh smoothing are selected. A domain-splitting algorithm for unstructured grids which tries to minimize the surface-to-volume ratio of each subdomain is described. This splitting algorithm is employed both for grid generation and grid smoothing. Results obtained on the Hypercube demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithms developed.

  9. Distributed generation systems model

    SciTech Connect

    Barklund, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    A slide presentation is given on a distributed generation systems model developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and its application to a situation within the Idaho Power Company`s service territory. The objectives of the work were to develop a screening model for distributed generation alternatives, to develop a better understanding of distributed generation as a utility resource, and to further INEL`s understanding of utility concerns in implementing technological change.

  10. Generation adequacy: Who decides?

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.

    1999-10-01

    As part of a project for the Edison Electric Institute, the authors examined the commercial and reliability aspects of investments in new generation. This article reviews historical data and projections on new generating capacity, discusses the pros and cons of alternative ways to maintain adequacy, and quantifies the effects of mandating minimum planning-reserve margins versus reliance on market prices to stimulate investments in new generation.

  11. Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Mason, Lee S.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    High-efficiency radioisotope power generators will play an important role in future NASA space exploration missions. Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs) have been identified as a candidate generator technology capable of providing mission designers with an efficient, high-specific-power electrical generator. SRGs high conversion efficiency has the potential to extend the limited Pu-238 supply when compared with current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Due to budgetary constraints, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) was canceled in the fall of 2013. Over the past year a joint study by NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE) called the Nuclear Power Assessment Study (NPAS) recommended that Stirling technologies continue to be explored. During the mission studies of the NPAS, spare SRGs were sometimes required to meet mission power system reliability requirements. This led to an additional mass penalty and increased isotope consumption levied on certain SRG-based missions. In an attempt to remove the spare power system, a new generator architecture is considered, which could increase the reliability of a Stirling generator and provide a more fault-tolerant power system. This new generator called the Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator (MSRG) employs multiple parallel Stirling convertor/controller strings, all of which share the heat from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. For this design, generators utilizing one to eight GPHS modules were analyzed, which provided about 50 to 450 W of direct current (DC) to the spacecraft, respectively. Four Stirling convertors are arranged around each GPHS module resulting in from 4 to 32 Stirling/controller strings. The convertors are balanced either individually or in pairs, and are radiatively coupled to the GPHS modules. Heat is rejected through the housing/radiator, which is similar in construction to the ASRG. Mass and power analysis for these systems indicate that specific

  12. Thermophotovoltaic energy generation

    DOEpatents

    Celanovic, Ivan; Chan, Walker; Bermel, Peter; Yeng, Adrian Y. X.; Marton, Christopher; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Araghchini, Mohammad; Jensen, Klavs F.; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert; Fisher, Peter

    2015-08-25

    Inventive systems and methods for the generation of energy using thermophotovoltaic cells are described. Also described are systems and methods for selectively emitting electromagnetic radiation from an emitter for use in thermophotovoltaic energy generation systems. In at least some of the inventive energy generation systems and methods, a voltage applied to the thermophotovoltaic cell (e.g., to enhance the power produced by the cell) can be adjusted to enhance system performance. Certain embodiments of the systems and methods described herein can be used to generate energy relatively efficiently.

  13. Explosive MHD Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, E. F.; Ostashev, V. E.; Fortov, V. E.

    2004-11-01

    Explosive driven MHD generators (EMHD) occupy an intermediate position between destroyed Explosive Flux Compression Generators and solid-propellant- pulsed MHD generators. Studies revealed the negative consequences of destroying a plasma liner through Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The real efficiency of conversion of condensed HE charge chemical energy reaches ~10% if the magnetic field in a MHD channel is approximately 8-10 T. Accommodation of 20-30 linear MHD channels into a toroidal magnet seems to be optimal for EMHD generator design. This device may operate repeatedly with a frequency of up to 6.5×103pps.

  14. STEAM GENERATOR GROUP PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. A.; Lewis, M

    1985-09-01

    This report is a summary of progress in the Surry Steam Generator Group Project for 1984. Information is presented on the analysis of two baseline eddy current inspections of the generator. Round robin series of tests using standard in-service inspection techniques are described along with some preliminary results. Observations are reported of degradation found on tubing specimens removed from the generator, and on support plates characterized in-situ. Residual stresses measured on a tubing specimen are reported. Two steam generator repair demonstrations are described; one for antivibration bar replacement, and one on tube repair methods. Chemical analyses are shown for sludge samples removed from above the tube sheet.

  15. 100 WATT THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GENERATORS , *ENERGY CONVERSION, HEAT EXCHANGERS, THERMOELECTRICITY, THERMOCOUPLES, BLOWERS, MODULES(ELECTRONICS), SILICON ALLOYS, GERMANIUM ALLOYS, COMBUSTION, GASOLINE, VAPORIZATION, FUELS, LEAD COMPOUNDS.

  16. 100 WATT THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GENERATORS , THERMOELECTRICITY, THERMOCOUPLES, HEATERS, HEAT TRANSFER, ENERGY CONVERSION, GASOLINE, VOLTAGE REGULATORS, HEAT EXCHANGERS, LIFE EXPECTANCY(SERVICE LIFE), STARTING, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING).

  17. Unstructured surface grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on unstructured surface grid generation are presented. Topics covered include: requirements for curves, surfaces, solids, and text; surface approximation; triangulation; advancing; projection; mapping; and parametric curves.

  18. NEGATIVE GATE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jones, C.S.; Eaton, T.E.

    1958-02-01

    This patent relates to pulse generating circuits and more particularly to rectangular pulse generators. The pulse generator of the present invention incorporates thyratrons as switching elements to discharge a first capacitor through a load resistor to initiate and provide the body of a Pulse, and subsequently dlscharge a second capacitor to impress the potential of its charge, with opposite potential polarity across the load resistor to terminate the pulse. Accurate rectangular pulses in the millimicrosecond range are produced across a low impedance by this generator.

  19. Second generation PFB for advanced power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Van Hook, J.

    1995-11-01

    Research is being conducted under a United States Department of Energy (USDOE) contract to develop a new type of coal-fueled plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant-called an advanced or second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (APFBC) plant-offers the promise of 45-percent efficiency (HHV), with emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized-coal-fired plants with scrubbers. This paper summarizes the pilot plant R&D work being conducted to develop this new type of plant. Although pilot plant testing is still underway, preliminary estimates indicate the commercial plant Will perform better than originally envisioned. Efficiencies greater than 46 percent are now being predicted.

  20. Pulsed Corona Discharge Generated By Marx Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sretenovic, G. B.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kovacevic, V. V.; Kuraica, M. M.; Puric J.

    2010-07-01

    The pulsed plasma has a significant role in new environmental protection technologies. As a part of a pulsed corona system for pollution control applications, Marx type repetitive pulse generator was constructed and tested in arrangement with wire-plate corona reactor. We performed electrical measurements, and obtained voltage and current signals, and also power and energy delivered per pulse. Ozone formation by streamer plasma in air was chosen to monitor chemical activity of the pulsed corona discharge.

  1. Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Mason, Lee S.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    High efficiency radioisotope power generators will play an important role in future NASA space exploration missions. Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRG) have been identified as a candidate generator technology capable of providing mission designers with an efficient, high specific power electrical generator. SRGs high conversion efficiency has the potential to extend the limited Pu-238 supply when compared with current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). Due to budgetary constraints, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) was canceled in the fall of 2013. Over the past year a joint study by NASA and DOE called the Nuclear Power Assessment Study (NPAS) recommended that Stirling technologies continue to be explored. During the mission studies of the NPAS, spare SRGs were sometimes required to meet mission power system reliability requirements. This led to an additional mass penalty and increased isotope consumption levied on certain SRG-based missions. In an attempt to remove the spare power system, a new generator architecture is considered which could increase the reliability of a Stirling generator and provide a more fault-tolerant power system. This new generator called the Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator (MSRG) employs multiple parallel Stirling convertor/controller strings, all of which share the heat from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. For this design, generators utilizing one to eight GPHS modules were analyzed, which provide about 50 to 450 watts DC to the spacecraft, respectively. Four Stirling convertors are arranged around each GPHS module resulting in from 4 to 32 Stirling/controller strings. The convertors are balanced either individually or in pairs, and are radiatively coupled to the GPHS modules. Heat is rejected through the housing/radiator which is similar in construction to the ASRG. Mass and power analysis for these systems indicate that specific power may be slightly lower than the ASRG and

  2. Compatibility of segmented thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J.; Ursell, T.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that power generation efficiency improves when materials with appropriate properties are combined either in a cascaded or segmented fashion across a temperature gradient. Past methods for determining materials used in segmentation weremainly concerned with materials that have the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. However, the example of SiGe segmented with Bi2Te3 and/or various skutterudites shows a marked decline in device efficiency even though SiGe has the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. The origin of the incompatibility of SiGe with other thermoelectric materials leads to a general definition of compatibility and intrinsic efficiency. The compatibility factor derived as = (Jl+zr - 1) a is a function of only intrinsic material properties and temperature, which is represented by a ratio of current to conduction heat. For maximum efficiency the compatibility factor should not change with temperature both within a single material, and in the segmented leg as a whole. This leads to a measure of compatibility not only between segments, but also within a segment. General temperature trends show that materials are more self compatible at higher temperatures, and segmentation is more difficult across a larger -T. The compatibility factor can be used as a quantitative guide for deciding whether a material is better suited for segmentation orcascading. Analysis of compatibility factors and intrinsic efficiency for optimal segmentation are discussed, with intent to predict optimal material properties, temperature interfaces, and/or currentheat ratios.

  3. Passive hydrogel fuel generator

    SciTech Connect

    Neefe, Ch. W.

    1985-04-16

    A passive hydrogen oxygen generator in which the long wavelength infrared portion of the sun's spectrum heats water to provide circulation of the water within the generator. The shorter wavelength portion of the spectrum to which water is transparent is used in splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen by photoelectrolysis.

  4. Next generation space robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Tsutomu; Oda, Mitsushige; Imai, Ryoichi

    1989-01-01

    The recent research effort on the next generation space robots is presented. The goals of this research are to develop the fundamental technologies and to acquire the design parameters of the next generation space robot. Visual sensing and perception, dexterous manipulation, man machine interface and artificial intelligence techniques such as task planning are identified as the key technologies.

  5. Internal split field generator

    DOEpatents

    Thundat,; George, Thomas [Knoxville, TN; Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Vass, Arpad Alexander [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  6. Solar Fuel Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The disclosure provides conductive membranes for water splitting and solar fuel generation. The membranes comprise an embedded semiconductive/photoactive material and an oxygen or hydrogen evolution catalyst. Also provided are chassis and cassettes containing the membranes for use in fuel generation.

  7. Reconfigurable Image Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archdeacon, John L. (Inventor); Iwai, Nelson H. (Inventor); Kato, Kenji H. (Inventor); Sweet, Barbara T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A RiG may simulate visual conditions of a real world environment, and generate the necessary amount of pixels in a visual simulation at rates up to 120 frames per second. RiG may also include a database generation system capable of producing visual databases suitable to drive the visual fidelity required by the RiG.

  8. Generativity and Flourishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The psychological construct of "generativity" was introduced by Erik Erikson in "Childhood and Society" in 1950. This rich and complex notion encompasses the constellation of desires, concerns and commitments that motivate individuals and societies to pass on legacies to future generations. "Flourishing," which means,…

  9. Generation Y Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skytland, Nicholas; Painting, Kristen; Barrera, Aaron; Fitzpatrick, Garret

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the perception of NASA and the importance of engaging those people born between 1977 and 2000, also known as Generation Y. It examines some of the differences in attitudes and experiences, and how it reflects on how they view NASA. It also discusses use of the internet in connecting to the people from that generation.

  10. The fifth generation computer

    SciTech Connect

    Moto-Oka, T.; Kitsuregawa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The leader of Japan's Fifth Generation computer project, known as the 'Apollo' project, and a young computer scientist elucidate in this book the process of how the idea came about, international reactions, the basic technology, prospects for realization, and the abilities of the Fifth Generation computer. Topics considered included forecasting, research programs, planning, and technology impacts.

  11. Solar fuel generator

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Nathan S.; West, William C.

    2017-01-17

    The disclosure provides conductive membranes for water splitting and solar fuel generation. The membranes comprise an embedded semiconductive/photoactive material and an oxygen or hydrogen evolution catalyst. Also provided are chassis and cassettes containing the membranes for use in fuel generation.

  12. When Generations Collide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2009-01-01

    As members of Generations X and Y face a workplace dominated by boomers, they are all starting to chafe. Some colleges are having trouble attracting, managing, and sometimes retaining people younger than 35. Members of the younger generations grew up watching their parents sacrifice for their careers, and they want something different: balance and…

  13. When Generations Collide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    When four generations converge in the academic workplace, it can create serious culture clashes. It is happening across college campuses--in offices as diverse as admissions, student affairs, legal affairs, and technology. It is especially striking in the faculty ranks, where generational challenges have extra significance amid recruiting efforts,…

  14. Generative Processes: Thick Drawing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallick, Karl

    2012-01-01

    This article presents techniques and theories of generative drawing as a means for developing complex content in architecture design studios. Appending the word "generative" to drawing adds specificity to the most common representation tool and clarifies that such drawings are not singularly about communication or documentation but are…

  15. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  16. Cross-Generational Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cindy; Thurston, Judy Kay

    2007-01-01

    What happens when you combine senior citizens, pre-service art teachers, and elementary students? Cross-generational connections based on sharing memories, ideas, skills, laughter, tears, and creativity. The authors describe the cross-generational book exchange project. This project was initiated when a group of Central Michigan University (CMU)…

  17. Geometric grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, David

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a highly automated hexahedral grid generator based on extensive geometrical and solid modeling operations developed in response to a vision of a designer-driven one day turnaround CFD process which implies a designer-driven one hour grid generation process.

  18. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  19. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  20. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  1. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  2. Use of an artificial neural network to predict risk factors of nosocomial infection in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Pan, Qin-Shi; Hong, Wan-Dong; Pan, Jingye; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Xu, Gang; Wang, Yu-Min

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods to analyze and predict the related risk factors of nosocomial infection in lung cancer patients are various, but the results are inconsistent. A total of 609 patients with lung cancer were enrolled to allow factor comparison using Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney test or the Chi-square test. Variables that were significantly related to the presence of nosocomial infection were selected as candidates for input into the final ANN model. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the performance of the artificial neural network (ANN) model and logistic regression (LR) model. The prevalence of nosocomial infection from lung cancer in this entire study population was 20.1% (165/609), nosocomial infections occurring in sputum specimens (85.5%), followed by blood (6.73%), urine (6.0%) and pleural effusions (1.82%). It was shown that long term hospitalization (≥ 22 days, P= 0.000), poor clinical stage (IIIb and IV stage, P=0.002), older age (≥ 61 year old, P=0.023), and use the hormones were linked to nosocomial infection and the ANN model consisted of these four factors .The artificial neural network model with variables consisting of age, clinical stage, time of hospitalization, and use of hormones should be useful for predicting nosocomial infection in lung cancer cases.

  3. Quantum random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  4. Fastrac Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Dennis, Jay

    2001-01-01

    A rocket engine gas generator component development test was recently conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This gas generator is intended to power a rocket engine turbopump by the combustion of Lox and RP-1. The testing demonstrated design requirements for start sequence, wall compatibility, performance, and stable combustion. During testing the gas generator injector was modified to improve distribution of outer wall coolant and the igniter boss was modified to investigate the use of a pyrotechnic igniter. Expected chamber pressure oscillations at longitudinal acoustic mode were measured for three different chamber lengths tested. High amplitude discrete oscillations resulted in the chamber-alone configurations when chamber acoustic modes coupled with feed-system acoustics modes. For the full gas generator configuration, which included a turbine inlet manifold, high amplitude oscillations occurred only at off-design very low power levels. This testing led to a successful gas generator design for the Fastrac 60,000 lb thrust engine.

  5. Improved Flow-Controlling Vortex Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.; Marner, Wilbur J.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1989-01-01

    Symmetrical tangential streams control flow of radial primary streams. Vortex generator uses small secondary stream of fluid to control normally-larger primary stream. Improved version of vortex generator described in "Variable Control Port for Fluidic Control Device," (NPO-16603). Secondary, or control, flows entering tangentially through diametrically opposite ports set up swirling motion restraining primary flow. Pressure of secondary fluid in relation to primary fluid controlling factor. Like valve, vortex generator varies rate of flow of primary fluid from maximum value down to zero. When properly designed, requires low pressure differential between primary and secondary streams and expends relatively small amount of secondary fluid.

  6. Thrombin generation in clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Hugo

    2012-03-01

    Commercial assays for determining thrombin generation in plasma are being tested in clinical conditions associated with thrombosis or bleeding. While pre-analytical conditions remain a source of inter laboratory variation, demanding for further standardization, clinical research proceeds. In patients at risk of venous thrombosis thrombin generation (TG) analysis may be utilized to detect underlying thrombophilia and this has been achieved both with addition of thrombomodulin or activated protein C, to test the contribution of the protein C system. In patients with documented venous thromboembolism, increased TG values are seen in those patients at greatest risk for recurrence, although the data are not consistent yet. In patients with arterial vascular disease, effects on TG patterns are seen that both reflect atherosclerosis (and its risk factors) and link to risk of recurrent atherothrombosis (coronary or stroke), but the data are limited. In patients with a bleeding diathesis, like hemophilia, the main importance of TG assays lies in the application for monitoring replacement therapy, either with factor concentrate or rFVIIa. An interesting application is in conjunction with thromboelastography, for monitoring peri-operative transfusion policy. Finally, TG analysis may contribute to monitoring anticoagulant drug treatment, but these and other applications would greatly benefit from whole blood, point of care applications of TG testing.

  7. Next-generation Digital Earth

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Michael F.; Guo, Huadong; Annoni, Alessandro; Bian, Ling; de Bie, Kees; Campbell, Frederick; Craglia, Max; Ehlers, Manfred; van Genderen, John; Jackson, Davina; Lewis, Anthony J.; Pesaresi, Martino; Remetey-Fülöpp, Gábor; Simpson, Richard; Skidmore, Andrew; Wang, Changlin; Woodgate, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A speech of then-Vice President Al Gore in 1998 created a vision for a Digital Earth, and played a role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth, that achieved many but not all the elements of this vision. The technical achievements of Google Earth, and the functionality of this first generation of virtual globes, are reviewed against the Gore vision. Meanwhile, developments in technology continue, the era of “big data” has arrived, the general public is more and more engaged with technology through citizen science and crowd-sourcing, and advances have been made in our scientific understanding of the Earth system. However, although Google Earth stimulated progress in communicating the results of science, there continue to be substantial barriers in the public’s access to science. All these factors prompt a reexamination of the initial vision of Digital Earth, and a discussion of the major elements that should be part of a next generation. PMID:22723346

  8. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  9. Next-generation Digital Earth.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, Michael F; Guo, Huadong; Annoni, Alessandro; Bian, Ling; de Bie, Kees; Campbell, Frederick; Craglia, Max; Ehlers, Manfred; van Genderen, John; Jackson, Davina; Lewis, Anthony J; Pesaresi, Martino; Remetey-Fülöpp, Gábor; Simpson, Richard; Skidmore, Andrew; Wang, Changlin; Woodgate, Peter

    2012-07-10

    A speech of then-Vice President Al Gore in 1998 created a vision for a Digital Earth, and played a role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth, that achieved many but not all the elements of this vision. The technical achievements of Google Earth, and the functionality of this first generation of virtual globes, are reviewed against the Gore vision. Meanwhile, developments in technology continue, the era of "big data" has arrived, the general public is more and more engaged with technology through citizen science and crowd-sourcing, and advances have been made in our scientific understanding of the Earth system. However, although Google Earth stimulated progress in communicating the results of science, there continue to be substantial barriers in the public's access to science. All these factors prompt a reexamination of the initial vision of Digital Earth, and a discussion of the major elements that should be part of a next generation.

  10. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  11. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  12. Hybrid texture generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazunori; Nakajima, Masayuki

    1995-04-01

    A method is given for synthesizing a texture by using the interface of a conventional drawing tool. The majority of conventional texture generation methods are based on the procedural approach, and can generate a variety of textures that are adequate for generating a realistic image. But it is hard for a user to imagine what kind of texture will be generated simply by looking at its parameters. Furthermore, it is difficult to design a new texture freely without a knowledge of all the procedures for texture generation. Our method offers a solution to these problems, and has the following four merits: First, a variety of textures can be obtained by combining a set of feature lines and attribute functions. Second, data definitions are flexible. Third, the user can preview a texture together with its feature lines. Fourth, people can design their own textures interactively and freely by using the interface of a conventional drawing tool. For users who want to build this texture generation method into their own programs, we also give the language specifications for generating a texture. This method can interactively provide a variety of textures, and can also be used for typographic design.

  13. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  14. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  15. Reliability model generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMann, Catherine M. (Inventor); Cohen, Gerald C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved method and system for automatically generating reliability models for use with a reliability evaluation tool is described. The reliability model generator of the present invention includes means for storing a plurality of low level reliability models which represent the reliability characteristics for low level system components. In addition, the present invention includes means for defining the interconnection of the low level reliability models via a system architecture description. In accordance with the principles of the present invention, a reliability model for the entire system is automatically generated by aggregating the low level reliability models based on the system architecture description.

  16. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  17. Graph Generator Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lothian, Josh; Powers, Sarah S; Sullivan, Blair D; Baker, Matthew B; Schrock, Jonathan; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  18. Owl: electronic datasheet generator.

    PubMed

    Appleton, Evan; Tao, Jenhan; Wheatley, F Carter; Desai, Devina H; Lozanoski, Thomas M; Shah, Pooja D; Awtry, Jake A; Jin, Shawn S; Haddock, Traci L; Densmore, Douglas M

    2014-12-19

    Owl ( www.owlcad.org ) is a biodesign automation tool that generates electronic datasheets for synthetic biological parts using common formatting. Data can be retrieved automatically from existing repositories and modified in the Owl user interface (UI). Owl uses the data to generate an HTML page with standard typesetting that can be saved as a PDF file. Here we present the Owl software tool in its alpha version, its current UI, its description of input data for generating a datasheet, its example datasheets, and the vision of the tool's role in biodesign automation.

  19. PULSE SYNTHESIZING GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1963-08-01

    >An electronlc circuit for synthesizing electrical current pulses having very fast rise times includes several sinewave generators tuned to progressively higher harmonic frequencies with signal amplitudes and phases selectable according to the Fourier series of the waveform that is to be synthesized. Phase control is provided by periodically triggering the generators at precisely controlled times. The outputs of the generators are combined in a coaxial transmission line. Any frequency-dependent delays that occur in the transmission line can be readily compensated for so that the desired signal wave shape is obtained at the output of the line. (AEC)

  20. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  1. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Ebbers, Christopher A.; Beach, Raymond J.

    2004-03-09

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  2. Cryogenic generator cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckels, P. W.; Fagan, T. J.; Parker, J. H., Jr.; Long, L. J.; Shestak, E. J.; Calfo, R. M.; Hannon, W. F.; Brown, D. B.; Barkell, J. W.; Patterson, A.

    The concept for a hydrogen cooled aluminum cryogenic generator was presented by Schlicher and Oberly in 1985. Following their lead, this paper describes the thermal design of a high voltage dc, multimegawatt generator of high power density. The rotor and stator are cooled by saturated liquid and supercritical hydrogen, respectively. The brushless exciter on the same shaft is also cooled by liquid hydrogen. Component development testing is well under way and some of the test results concerning the thermohydraulic performance of the conductors are reported. The aluminum cryogenic generator's characteristics are attractive for hydrogen economy applications.

  3. How induction generators work

    SciTech Connect

    Nailen, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    The operating principles of the induction generator, which is a standard squirrel cage motor in which the shaft is coupled to and driven by an engine or turbine at a rate above its synchronous speed and which, under these conditions, produces electrical power, are described. The advantages of induction generators, e.g., low cost, simplicity, frequency and voltage controlled by the utility system, no synchronizing controls needed, and the advantages of using small induction generators run by wind turbines, small gas turbines and in low head hydro plants are discussed. (LCL)

  4. Solid expellant plasma generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H. (Inventor); Poe, Garrett D. (Inventor); Rood, Robert (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved solid expellant plasma generator has been developed. The plasma generator includes a support housing, an electrode rod located in the central portion of the housing, and a mass of solid expellant material that surrounds the electrode rod within the support housing. The electrode rod and the solid expellant material are made of separate materials that are selected so that the electrode and the solid expellant material decompose at the same rate when the plasma generator is ignited. This maintains a point of discharge of the plasma at the interface between the electrode and the solid expellant material.

  5. Automated knowledge generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, Harley R.; Gonzalez, Avelino J.

    1988-01-01

    The general objectives of the NASA/UCF Automated Knowledge Generation Project were the development of an intelligent software system that could access CAD design data bases, interpret them, and generate a diagnostic knowledge base in the form of a system model. The initial area of concentration is in the diagnosis of the process control system using the Knowledge-based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) diagnostic system. A secondary objective was the study of general problems of automated knowledge generation. A prototype was developed, based on object-oriented language (Flavors).

  6. Article: Next Generation Compliance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The article Next Generation Compliance by Cynthia Giles, Assistant Administrator for OECA was published in The Environmental Forum, Sept-Oct 2013 explains EPA's strategy on using new technologies to improve compliance with environmental laws.

  7. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Edward W.; Simms, Richard

    1981-01-01

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  8. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, E.W.; Simms, R.

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  9. Next Generation Internet Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    desJardins, R.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with next generation Internet are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Internet architecture; 2) NASA's advanced networking; 3) Internet capability, capacity and applications; and 4) Systems engineering.

  10. Oscillating fluid power generator

    DOEpatents

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  11. Hazardous Waste Generators

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many industries generate hazardous waste. EPA regulates hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to ensure these wastes are managed in ways that are protective of human health and the environment.

  12. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Power Generation is a concise summary of MHD theory, history, and future trends. Results of the major international MHD research projects are discussed. Data from MHD research is included. Economics of initial and operating costs are considered.

  14. Aerodynamics of vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Robert E., Jr.; Russell, David A.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was undertaken of the separation delay and dramatic boundary-layer thinning that can occur in vortex-generator installations. Wind tunnel measurements of the dynamic-pressure profile downstream of a vortex generator were found to compare under certain conditions with that downstream of a suction slit, while water-tunnel visualization studies of vortex-generator height and geometry suggested optimum configurations, and only a minor effect of base porosity. A series of progressively more complex inviscid flow models was developed to be applied to a 3-D integral boundary-layer code. This code predicted layer thinning downstream of the suction site of the vortex models, and other observed features. Thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are now being used with the ultimate goal of clarifying the physical processes involved in vortex generator performance and developing calculational procedures capable of predicting it.

  15. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  16. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  17. Hydroacoustic pulsating jet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unrau, A.; Meier, G. E. A.

    1987-04-01

    A high pressure turbulent jet generator connected to a low pressure hydraulic tube is studied to investigate water hammer in tubes with fast flow variations, generating high pressure pulsating water jets. The pulsating jet generator consists of a tube, a hydraulic valve, a spring, and a water container. The jet is the effect of the combination of turbulent pipe flow with a valve for flow nozzle. The jet pressure depends on specific oscillation impedance and flow velocity variations. For inlet pressure of 0.5 to 2 bar the pressure rises to 40 bar. The described pulsating jet generator is more effective than the earlier model. A piezoelectric pressure controller is used to register pressure signals and high speed photos are made of the jet. Test results are consistent with theoretical calculation.

  18. Biomass for Electricity Generation

    EIA Publications

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

  19. Natural Language Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Proceedings of the 6th International Workshop on Language Generation, Trento, Italy, April 1992 ( to appear). " Parsimonious or Profligate: How Many and...and generate human language into and from computer-internal format in restricted domains, and since the cost of teaching people specialized computer... languages and interaction procedures is likely to remain high, it is incumbent on Artificial Intelligence researchers to develop algorithms that

  20. Using online tone generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-04-01

    Online tone generators are free, user friendly, and can make for engaging and meaningful study of many topics in the areas of interference, waves, and the physics of music. By using a website such as OnlineToneGenerator.com, and through opening multiple windows simultaneously, students can immediately perform several experiments. In this article, I highlight five lesson ideas that come naturally from these types of websites.

  1. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  2. [The central pattern generators].

    PubMed

    Balaban, P M; Vorontsov, D D; Dyakonova, V E; Dyakonova, T L; Zakharov, I S; Korshunova, T A; Orlov, O Yu; Pavlova, G A; Panchin, Yi V; Sakharov, D A; Falikman, M V

    2013-01-01

    The central pattern generator (CPG) is defined as a set of neurons involved in joint production of patterned motor output. The roundtable discussion on the CPG was a part of the 5th All-Russian Conference on Animal Behavior (Moscow, Nov. 21, 2012). The discussion centred on three core themes: 1) the mechanisms of the organization and reconfiguration of pattern generating neuronal ensembles, 2) extrapolations that extend the CPG concept beyond the motor systems, and 3) evolutionary and developmental aspects of CPG.

  3. Interactive DIF Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preheim, Larry E.; Amy, Laraine; Young, Jimmie D.

    1993-01-01

    Interactive DIF Generator (IDG) computer program serves as utility to generate and manipulate directory interchange format (DIF) files. Creates and updates DIF files, sent to NASA's Master Directory, also referred to as International Global Change Directory at Goddard Space Flight Center. Many government and university data systems use Master Directory to advertise availability of research data. IDG is interactive software tool and requires mouse or trackball to operate. Written in C language.

  4. Liquid propellant gas generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design of gas generators intended to provide hot gases for turbine drive is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the design and operation of bipropellant gas generators because of their wider use. Problems and limitations involved in turbine operation due to temperature effects are analyzed. Methods of temperature control of gas turbines and combustion products are examined. Drawings of critical sections of gas turbines to show their operation and areas of stress are included.

  5. Natural language generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maybury, Mark T.

    The goal of natural language generation is to replicate human writers or speakers: to generate fluent, grammatical, and coherent text or speech. Produced language, using both explicit and implicit means, must clearly and effectively express some intended message. This demands the use of a lexicon and a grammar together with mechanisms which exploit semantic, discourse and pragmatic knowledge to constrain production. Furthermore, special processors may be required to guide focus, extract presuppositions, and maintain coherency. As with interpretation, generation may require knowledge of the world, including information about the discourse participants as well as knowledge of the specific domain of discourse. All of these processes and knowledge sources must cooperate to produce well-written, unambiguous language. Natural language generation has received less attention than language interpretation due to the nature of language: it is important to interpret all the ways of expressing a message but we need to generate only one. Furthermore, the generative task can often be accomplished by canned text (e.g., error messages or user instructions). The advent of more sophisticated computer systems, however, has intensified the need to express multisentential English.

  6. Fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Makiel, Joseph M.

    1985-01-01

    A high temperature solid electrolyte fuel cell generator comprising a housing means defining a plurality of chambers including a generator chamber and a combustion products chamber, a porous barrier separating the generator and combustion product chambers, a plurality of elongated annular fuel cells each having a closed end and an open end with the open ends disposed within the combustion product chamber, the cells extending from the open end through the porous barrier and into the generator chamber, a conduit for each cell, each conduit extending into a portion of each cell disposed within the generator chamber, each conduit having means for discharging a first gaseous reactant within each fuel cell, exhaust means for exhausting the combustion product chamber, manifolding means for supplying the first gaseous reactant to the conduits with the manifolding means disposed within the combustion product chamber between the porous barrier and the exhaust means and the manifolding means further comprising support and bypass means for providing support of the manifolding means within the housing while allowing combustion products from the first and a second gaseous reactant to flow past the manifolding means to the exhaust means, and means for flowing the second gaseous reactant into the generator chamber.

  7. Microprocessor control of a wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnecco, A. J.; Whitehead, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A microprocessor based system was used to control the unattended operation of a wind turbine generator. The turbine and its microcomputer system are fully described with special emphasis on the wide variety of tasks performed by the microprocessor for the safe and efficient operation of the turbine. The flexibility, cost and reliability of the microprocessor were major factors in its selection.

  8. Ethnic Attachment among Second Generation Korean Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Joann; Min, Pyong Gap

    1999-01-01

    Describes the levels of second-generation Korean-American adolescents' (n=approximately 237) cultural, social, and psychological dimensions of attachment and examines the major factors highly correlated with two of the dimensions of ethnic attachment: use of the Korean language and Korean friendships. Findings support the view that high levels of…

  9. Power-Factor Controller With Regenerative Braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modified power-factor motor-control circuit operates motor as a phase-controlled generator when load attempts to turn at higher than synchronous speed. An induction motor is required to act at times as a brake. Circuit modification allows power-factor controller to save energy in motoring mode and convert automatically to an induction-generator controller in generating, or braking, mode.

  10. Simulations of vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via direct numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the stream direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators at NASA Ames and Stanford University (Saddoughi, 1994, and Jacobson and Reynolds, 1993). Jacobson and Reynolds (1993) used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and he observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. Our task is to simulate the flows generated by these devices and to conduct a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. The results of the present simulations would help us assess some of the effects of three-dimensionality in experiments and investigate the role

  11. Tumor necrosis factor alpha leads to increased cell surface expression of CXCR4 in SK-N-MC cells.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin; Gorgun, Gullue; Kleyner, Yelena; Garcia, Anthony; Kramer, Michael; Melanson, Suzanne M; Mathys, Jean Marie; Yiannoutsos, Constantin; Skolnik, Paul R; Navia, Bradford A

    2005-07-01

    Both host and viral factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated bran injury. In this study, the authors examined the interactions between tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, CXCR4, the alpha chemokine receptor, and three HIV isolates, including the T-tropic viruses, HIV-1(MN) and HIV-1(IIIB), and the dual tropic virus, HIV-1(89.6). The authors show by flow cytometry that treatment of differentiated SK-N-MC cells with TNF-alpha induces a significant increase in the cell surface expression of CXCR4 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effect is partly regulated at the level of transcription. To assess the biological significance of this finding, we show that TNF-alpha potentiates the ability of the above mentioned HIV isolates to induce neuronal apoptosis and that the effect is significantly reduced by pretreating cells with monoclonal antibodies to either CXCR4 and TNF-alpha. Together these results suggest that TNF-alpha may render neuronal cells vulnerable to the apoptotic effects of HIV by increasing the cell surface expression of CXCR4 and thus identify another mechanism by which TNF-alpha contributes to the pathogenesis of HIV-associated brain injury.

  12. New Generator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Roy S.

    2015-02-17

    New generator technology project is driven by the need to be able to remotely deploy generator technology where it is needed, when it is needed. Both the military and aid programs that provide assistance after disasters could use the ability to deploy energy generation that fits the needs of the situation. Currently, pre-specified generators are deployed, sometime more than half way around the world to provide electricity. Through our Phase-I to Phase III DARPA grant, we will provide a mechanism where a 3d print station and raw materials could be shipped to a deployment site and remotely deployed personnel. These remote personnel can collaborate with engineers at a home location where 3d print plans can be optimized for the remote purpose. The plans can then be sent electronically to the remote location for printing, much like NASA sent the plans for a socket wrench to the International Space Station for printing in . If multiple generators need to be deployed at different remote locations, within miles of each other the printer rig can be moved to print the generators where they are needed. 3d printing is growing in the field of manufacturing. 3d printing has matured to the point where many types of materials are now available for many types of manufacturing. Both magnetic and electrically conductive material materials have recently been developed which can now lead to 3d printing of engines and generators. Our project will provide a successful printer rig that can be remotely deployed, to print a generator design in the field as well as provide a process for deploying the printed generator as well. This Systems Engineering Management Plan(SEMP) will provide the planning required for a Phase I DARPA grant that may also include goals for Phase II and Phase II grants. The SEMP provides a proposed project schedule, references, system engineering processes, specialty engineering system deployment and product support sections. Each section will state how our company

  13. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  14. Epigenetics and Future Generations.

    PubMed

    Del Savio, Lorenzo; Loi, Michele; Stupka, Elia

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence of intergenerational epigenetic programming of disease risk broadens the scope of public health preventive interventions to future generations, i.e. non existing people. Due to the transmission of epigenetic predispositions, lifestyles such as smoking or unhealthy diet might affect the health of populations across several generations. While public policy for the health of future generations can be justified through impersonal considerations, such as maximizing aggregate well-being, in this article we explore whether there are rights-based obligations supervening on intergenerational epigenetic programming despite the non-identity argument, which challenges this rationale in case of policies that affect the number and identity of future people. We propose that rights based obligations grounded in the interests of non-existing people might fall upon existing people when generations overlap. In particular, if environmental exposure in F0 (i.e. existing people) will affect the health of F2 (i.e. non-existing people) through epigenetic programming, then F1 (i.e. existing and overlapping with both F0 and F2) might face increased costs to address F2's condition in the future: this might generate obligations upon F0 from various distributive principles, such as the principle of equal opportunity for well being.

  15. Fifth generation light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2016-12-01

    Coherent light sources are one of the most fundamental research tools in biology, technology and in other areas. Synchrotron light source consists of a few basic parts: energy source - which is an electron beam accelerator, energy converter between electron and photon beams - which is an undulator, and photon user experimental lines. Each of these parts is separately a complex system, which is currently a subject to fast technological development. Future light sources of the fifth generation are based on completely new solutions of these fundamental parts, in comparison with the sources of the previous generations. Energy source is a new generation laser - plasma accelerator with electrical field in the area of multiple GV/m. A miniature undulator is tested in the MEMS technology from new materials. Classical light beam lines, vacuum, and difficult for management and beam distribution, change their meaning in the case of availability of miniature undulators positioned immediately at or even inside the experimental stations. After an introduction concerning the light sources of the previous generations, the article shows current research efforts on the mentioned key components of the fifth generation light sources. In some cases this is a continuation and modernization of the previous technologies, in the majority it is a brave endeavour to apply completely new technologies, like laser - plasma acceleration.

  16. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  17. Predictive Factors of Late Radiation Fibrosis: A Prospective Study in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mazeron, Renaud; Etienne-Mastroianni, Benedicte; Perol, David; Arpin, Dominique; Vincent, Michel; Falchero, Lionel; Martel-Lafay, Isabelle; Carrie, Christian; Claude, Line

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To determine predictive factors of late radiation fibrosis (RF) after conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Ninety-six patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were included in a prospective trial. Clinical evaluation, chest X-ray, and pulmonary functional tests including diffusion parameters were performed before and 6 months after radiotherapy. An independent panel of experts prospectively analyzed RF, using Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic scales classification. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify relationships between clinical, functional, or treatment parameters and incidence of RF. Variations of circulating serum levels of pro-inflammatory (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, tumor growth factor beta1) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines during 3D-RT were examined to identify correlations with RF. Results: Of the 96 patients included, 72 were evaluable for RF at 6 months. Thirty-seven (51.4%) developed RF (Grade >=1), including six severe RF (Grades 2-3; 8.3%). In univariate analysis, only poor Karnofsky Performance Status and previous acute radiation pneumonitis were associated with RF (p < 0.05). Dosimetric factors (mean lung dose, percentage of lung volume receiving more than 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 Gy) were highly correlated with RF (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, previous acute radiation pneumonitis and dosimetric parameters were significantly correlated with RF occurrence. It was not significantly correlated either with cytokines at baseline or with their variation during 3D-RT. Conclusions: This study confirms the importance of dosimetric parameters to limit the risk of RF. Contrary to acute radiation pneumonitis, RF was not correlated to cytokine variations during 3D-RT.

  18. Next generation workforce.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    The health care industry has become a very complex business. CQsts are rising and resources such as funding and human capital are diminishing. Human capital resources are about to reach true crisis proportions. The vital workforce we have counted on is expected to begin thinning as large numbers of Boomers retire. Not only does this deplete the workforce from a pure numbers perspective, but it also affects intellectual capital and institutional memory. Generational trends and characteristics have affected the workforce environment and will continue to do so as another generation continues to enter the workforce. Generation Y, also tagged Nexter, offers core values that can bring positive changes to the health care workforce. Technology continues to change at lightning speed. Embracing new technology and using it to refine the way we do business will help deliver success. Meaningful strategic plans are needed to change the model of business delivery and employee care in our future workforce.

  19. Thermochemical solar hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Licht, Stuart

    2005-10-07

    Solar direct, indirect and hybrid thermochemical processes are presented for the generation of hydrogen and compared to alternate solar hydrogen processes. A hybrid solar thermal/electrochemical process combines efficient photovoltaics and concentrated excess sub-bandgap heat into highly efficient elevated temperature solar electrolysis of water and generation of H2 fuel utilizing the thermodynamic temperature induced decrease of E(H2O) with increasing temperature. Theory and experiment is presented for this process using semiconductor bandgap restrictions and combining photodriven charge transfer, with excess sub-bandgap insolation to lower the water potential, and their combination into highly efficient solar generation of H2 is attainable. Fundamental water thermodynamics and solar photosensitizer constraints determine solar energy to hydrogen fuel conversion efficiencies in the 50% range over a wide range of insolation, temperature, pressure and photosensitizer bandgap conditions.

  20. Spherical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-11-21

    A spherical neutron generator is formed with a small spherical target and a spherical shell RF-driven plasma ion source surrounding the target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) ion plasma is produced by RF excitation in the plasma ion source using an RF antenna. The plasma generation region is a spherical shell between an outer chamber and an inner extraction electrode. A spherical neutron generating target is at the center of the chamber and is biased negatively with respect to the extraction electrode which contains many holes. Ions passing through the holes in the extraction electrode are focused onto the target which produces neutrons by D-D or D-T reactions.