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Sample records for factor ix-binding protein

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of coagulation factor IX-binding protein from habu snake venom at pH 6.5 and 4.6

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Shikamoto, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Crystals of habu coagulation factor IX-binding protein have been obtained at pH 6.5 and 4.6 and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Coagulation factor IX-binding protein isolated from Trimeresurus flavoviridis (IX-bp) is a C-type lectin-like protein. It is an anticoagulant protein consisting of homologous subunits A and B. The subunits both contain a Ca{sup 2+}-binding site with differing affinity (K{sub d} values of 14 and 130 µM at pH 7.5). These binding characteristics are pH-dependent; under acidic conditions, the affinity of the low-affinity site was reduced considerably. In order to identify which site has high affinity and also to investigate the Ca{sup 2+}-releasing mechanism, IX-bp was crystallized at pH 6.5 and 4.6. The crystals at pH 6.5 and 4.6 diffracted to 1.72 and 2.29 Å resolution, respectively; the former crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.7, b = 63.5, c = 66.9 Å, β = 117.0°, while the latter belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with a = 134.1, b = 37.8, c = 55.8 Å, β = 110.4°.

  2. Elongation factors in protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kraal, B; Bosch, L; Mesters, J R; de Graaf, J M; Woudt, L P; Vijgenboom, E; Heinstra, P W; Zeef, L A; Boon, C

    1993-01-01

    Recent discoveries of elongation factor-related proteins have considerably complicated the simple textbook scheme of the peptide chain elongation cycle. During growth and differentiation the cycle may be regulated not only by factor modification but also factor replacement. In addition, rare tRNAs may have their own rare factor proteins. A special case is the acquisition of resistance by bacteria to elongation factor-directed antibiotics. Pertinent data from the literature and our own work with Escherichia coli and Streptomyces are discussed. The GTP-binding domain of EF-Tu has been studied extensively, but little molecular detail is available on the interactions with its other ligands or effectors, or on the way they are affected by the GTPase switch signal. A growing number of EF-Tu mutants obtained by ourselves and others are helping us in testing current ideas. We have found a synergistic effect between EF-Tu and EF-G in their uncoupled GTPase reactions on empty ribosomes. Only the EF-G reaction is perturbed by fluoroaluminates.

  3. Peak compression factor of proteins.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-08-14

    An experimental protocol is proposed in order to measure with accuracy and precision the band compression factor G(12)(2) of a protein in gradient RPLC. Extra-column contributions to bandwidth and the dependency of both the retention factor and the reduced height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) on the mobile phase composition were taken into account. The band compression factor of a small protein (insulin, MW kDa) was measured on a 2.1mm x 50mm column packed with 1.7 microm C(4)-bonded bridged ethylsiloxane BEH-silica particles, for 1 microL samples of dilute insulin solution (<0.05g/L). A linear gradient profile of acetonitrile (25-28% acetonitrile in water containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid) was applied during three different gradient times (5, 12.5, and 20 min). The mobile phase flow rate was set at 0.20 mL/min in order to avoid heat friction effects (maximum column inlet pressure 180 bar). The band compression factor of insulin is defined as the ratio of the experimental space band variance measured under gradient conditions to the reference space band variance, which would be observed if no thermodynamic compression would take place during gradient elution. It was 0.56, 0.71, and 0.76 with gradient times of 5, 12.5, and 20 min, respectively. These factors are 20-30% smaller than the theoretical band compression factors (0.79, 0.89, and 0.93) calculated from an equation derived from the well-known Poppe equation, later extended to any retention models and columns whose HETP depends on the mobile phase composition. This difference is explained in part by the omission in the model of the effect of the pressure gradient on the local retention factor of insulin during gradient elution. A much better agreement is obtained for insulin when this effect is taken into account. For lower molecular weight compounds, the pressure gradient has little effect but the finite retention of acetonitrile causes a distortion of the gradient shape during the migration of

  4. Affinity labeling of protein synthesis factors

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, D.D.; Dever, T.E.; Abramson, R.D.; Lobur, M.; Merrick, W.C.

    1986-05-01

    The authors laboratory is interested in determining those eukaryotic protein synthesis factors which interact with nucleotides and mRNA. To study the binding the authors have used the nucleotides, their analogs, and mRNA analogs as listed below: (1) UV cross-linking with normal (/sup 32/P)XTP; (2) Oxidized GTP; (3) 3'p-azido benzoyl GDP (GTP); (4) 5'p-fluoro sulfonyl benzoyl guanosine; (5) 5'p-fluoro sulfonyl benzoyl adenosine; (6) oxidized mRNA. Currently, they are continuing their efforts to specifically label the proteins, and they are also trying to isolate a single labeled tryptic peptide from the proteins.

  5. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  6. Dairy proteins and soy proteins in infant foods nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors.

    PubMed

    Maubois, J-L; Lorient, D

    Protein content of any source is classically determined through the analysis of its nitrogen content done for more 100 years by the Kjeldahl method, and the obtained result is multiplied by a number named nitrogen conversion factor (NCF). The value of NCF is related to the amino acid composition of the protein source and to the eventual presence of side groups covalently bound to some amino acids of the protein chain. Consequently, the value of NCF cannot be identical for all sources of food proteins. The aim of this paper is to review the available knowledge on the two allowed protein sources for infant food formulas, milk and soybean, in order to bring the right scientific basis which should be used for the revision of both European legislation and Codex Standard for Infant Formulas.

  7. A method for systematic purification from bovine plasma of six vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors: prothrombin, factor X, factor IX, protein S, protein C, and protein Z.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, N; Morita, T; Iwanaga, S

    1985-05-01

    A systematic purification scheme is presented for the isolation of six vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors from bovine plasma in a functionally and biochemically pure state. The vitamin K-dependent proteins concentrated by the ordinary barium citrate adsorption were first separated into four fractions, fractions A, B, C, and D, by DEAE-Sephadex A-50 chromatography. From the pooled fraction A, protein S, factor IX, and prothrombin were purified by column chromatography on Blue-Sepharose CL-6B. Heparin-Sepharose chromatography of the pooled fraction B provided mainly pure factor IX, in addition to homogeneous prothrombin. A high degree of resolution of protein C and prothrombin from the pooled fraction C was obtained with a Blue-Sepharose column. This dye-ligand chromatographic procedure was also very effective for the separation of protein Z and factor X contained in the pooled fraction D. Thus, these preparative procedures allowed high recovery of milligram and gram quantities of six vitamin K-dependent proteins from 15 liters of plasma in only two chromatographic steps, except for protein S, which required three (the third step was rechromatography on Blue-Sepharose CL-6B).

  8. Inhibitory action of amyloid precursor protein against human Hageman factor (factor XII).

    PubMed

    Niwano, H; Embury, P B; Greenberg, B D; Ratnoff, O D

    1995-02-01

    Amyloid precursor protein forms that contain Kunitz protease inhibitor domains are released from activated platelets, T-lymphocytes, and leukocytes and inhibit trypsin, plasmin, and activated factor XI. We investigated the effects of amyloid precursor protein isoforms on activated Hageman factor (factor XII), activated factor X (Stuart factor), and thrombin. Recombinant amyloid precursor proteins with or without the Kunitz domain, 770 and 695 amino acids, respectively, were produced in insect cells by Baculovirus expression (BAC770 and BAC695). Neither BAC695 nor BAC770 inhibited human alpha-thrombin or activated factor X. The partial thromboplastin time was prolonged by both amyloid precursor proteins, only one of which, BAC770, contains the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain. Both forms of amyloid precursor proteins inhibited ellagic acid-induced activation of Hageman factor but did not inhibit activated Hageman factor. Bismuth subgallate, which is an insoluble analog of ellagic acid, lost its ability to activate Hageman factor on being exposed to BAC770. Inhibition of ellagic acid-induced activation of Hageman factor by both forms of amyloid precursor protein was enhanced by heparin. These findings suggested that the heparin-binding domain of amyloid precursor proteins is not in the Kunitz domain. This heparin-binding domain may block the activation of Hageman factor by negatively charged agents. Thus, amyloid precursor proteins may be involved in the control of hemostasis, properties not all dependent on the Kunitz domain.

  9. Protein-Remodeling Factors As Potential Therapeutics for Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackrel, Meredith E.; Shorter, James

    2017-01-01

    Protein misfolding is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. A unifying feature of patients with these disorders is the accumulation of deposits comprised of misfolded protein. Aberrant protein folding can cause toxicity through a loss or gain of protein function, or both. An intriguing therapeutic approach to counter these disorders is the application of protein-remodeling factors to resolve these misfolded conformers and return the proteins to their native fold and function. Here, we describe the application of protein-remodeling factors to alleviate protein misfolding in neurodegenerative disease. We focus on Hsp104, Hsp110/Hsp70/Hsp40, NMNAT, and HtrA1, which can prevent and reverse protein aggregation. While many of these protein-remodeling systems are highly promising, their activity can be limited. Thus, engineering protein-remodeling factors to enhance their activity could be therapeutically valuable. Indeed, engineered Hsp104 variants suppress neurodegeneration in animal models, which opens the way to novel therapeutics and mechanistic probes to help understand neurodegenerative disease. PMID:28293166

  10. A Recommendation for Naming Transcription Factor Proteins in the Grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription factors are central for the exquisite temporal and spatial expression patterns of many genes. These proteins are characterized by their ability to be tethered to particular regulatory sequences in the genes that they control. While many other proteins participate in the regulation of g...

  11. How the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Robert L; Rose, George D

    2016-11-01

    How hydrophobicity (HY) drives protein folding is studied. The 1971 Nozaki-Tanford method of measuring HY is modified to use gases as solutes, not crystals, and this makes the method easy to use. Alkanes are found to be much more hydrophobic than rare gases, and the two different kinds of HY are termed intrinsic (rare gases) and extrinsic (alkanes). The HY values of rare gases are proportional to solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), whereas the HY values of alkanes depend on special hydration shells. Earlier work showed that hydration shells produce the hydration energetics of alkanes. Evidence is given here that the transfer energetics of alkanes to cyclohexane [Wolfenden R, Lewis CA, Jr, Yuan Y, Carter CW, Jr (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(24):7484-7488] measure the release of these shells. Alkane shells are stabilized importantly by van der Waals interactions between alkane carbon and water oxygen atoms. Thus, rare gases cannot form this type of shell. The very short (approximately picoseconds) lifetime of the van der Waals interaction probably explains why NMR efforts to detect alkane hydration shells have failed. The close similarity between the sizes of the opposing energetics for forming or releasing alkane shells confirms the presence of these shells on alkanes and supports Kauzmann's 1959 mechanism of protein folding. A space-filling model is given for the hydration shells on linear alkanes. The model reproduces the n values of Jorgensen et al. [Jorgensen WL, Gao J, Ravimohan C (1985) J Phys Chem 89:3470-3473] for the number of waters in alkane hydration shells.

  12. How the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Robert L.; Rose, George D.

    2016-01-01

    How hydrophobicity (HY) drives protein folding is studied. The 1971 Nozaki–Tanford method of measuring HY is modified to use gases as solutes, not crystals, and this makes the method easy to use. Alkanes are found to be much more hydrophobic than rare gases, and the two different kinds of HY are termed intrinsic (rare gases) and extrinsic (alkanes). The HY values of rare gases are proportional to solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), whereas the HY values of alkanes depend on special hydration shells. Earlier work showed that hydration shells produce the hydration energetics of alkanes. Evidence is given here that the transfer energetics of alkanes to cyclohexane [Wolfenden R, Lewis CA, Jr, Yuan Y, Carter CW, Jr (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112(24):7484–7488] measure the release of these shells. Alkane shells are stabilized importantly by van der Waals interactions between alkane carbon and water oxygen atoms. Thus, rare gases cannot form this type of shell. The very short (approximately picoseconds) lifetime of the van der Waals interaction probably explains why NMR efforts to detect alkane hydration shells have failed. The close similarity between the sizes of the opposing energetics for forming or releasing alkane shells confirms the presence of these shells on alkanes and supports Kauzmann's 1959 mechanism of protein folding. A space-filling model is given for the hydration shells on linear alkanes. The model reproduces the n values of Jorgensen et al. [Jorgensen WL, Gao J, Ravimohan C (1985) J Phys Chem 89:3470–3473] for the number of waters in alkane hydration shells. PMID:27791131

  13. Factors governing the foldability of proteins.

    PubMed

    Klimov, D K; Thirumalai, D

    1996-12-01

    We use a three-dimensional lattice model of proteins to investigate systematically the global properties of the polypeptide chains that determine the folding to the native conformation starting from an ensemble of denatured conformations. In the coarse-grained description, the polypeptide chain is modeled as a heteropolymer consisting of N beads confined to the vertices of a simple cubic lattice. The interactions between the beads are taken from a random gaussian distribution of energies, with a mean value B0 < 0 that corresponds to the overall average hydrophobic interaction energy. We studied 56 sequences all with a unique ground state (native conformation) covering two values of N (15 and 27) and two values of B0. The smaller value of magnitude of B0 was chosen so that the average fraction of hydrophobic residues corresponds to that found in natural proteins. The higher value of magnitude of B0 was selected with the expectation that only the fully compact conformations would contribute to the thermodynamic behavior. For N = 15 the entire conformation space (compact as well as noncompact structures) can be exhaustively enumerated so that the thermodynamic properties can be exactly computed at all temperatures. The thermodynamic properties for the 27-mer chain were calculated using the slow cooling technique together with standard Monte Carlo simulations. The kinetics of approach to the native state for all the sequences was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. For all sequences we find that there are two intrinsic characteristic temperatures, namely, T theta and Tf. At the temperature T theta the polypeptide chain makes a transition to a collapsed structure, while at Tf the chain undergoes a transition to the native conformation. We show that foldability of sequences can be characterized entirely in terms of these two temperatures. It is shown that fast folding sequences have small values of sigma = (T theta - Tf)/T theta whereas slow folders have larger

  14. Transcription Factor Functional Protein-Protein Interactions in Plant Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Murilo S.; Dadalto, Silvana P.; Gonçalves, Amanda B.; de Souza, Gilza B.; Barros, Vanessa A.; Fietto, Luciano G.

    2014-01-01

    Responses to biotic stress in plants lead to dramatic reprogramming of gene expression, favoring stress responses at the expense of normal cellular functions. Transcription factors are master regulators of gene expression at the transcriptional level, and controlling the activity of these factors alters the transcriptome of the plant, leading to metabolic and phenotypic changes in response to stress. The functional analysis of interactions between transcription factors and other proteins is very important for elucidating the role of these transcriptional regulators in different signaling cascades. In this review, we present an overview of protein-protein interactions for the six major families of transcription factors involved in plant defense: basic leucine zipper containing domain proteins (bZIP), amino-acid sequence WRKYGQK (WRKY), myelocytomatosis related proteins (MYC), myeloblastosis related proteins (MYB), APETALA2/ ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING FACTORS (AP2/EREBP) and no apical meristem (NAM), Arabidopsis transcription activation factor (ATAF), and cup-shaped cotyledon (CUC) (NAC). We describe the interaction partners of these transcription factors as molecular responses during pathogen attack and the key components of signal transduction pathways that take place during plant defense responses. These interactions determine the activation or repression of response pathways and are crucial to understanding the regulatory networks that modulate plant defense responses. PMID:28250372

  15. A Dominant Factor for Structural Classification of Protein Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fei; Fudo, Satoshi; Neya, Saburo; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2015-08-24

    With the increasing number of solved protein crystal structures, much information on protein shape and atom geometry has become available. It is of great interest to know the structural diversity for a single kind of protein. Our preliminary study suggested that multiple crystal structures of a single kind of protein can be classified into several groups from the viewpoint of structural similarity. In order to broadly examine this finding, cluster analysis was applied to the crystal structures of hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (Mb), human serum albumin (HSA), hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR), downloaded from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). As a result of classification by cluster analysis, 146 crystal structures of Hb were separated into five groups. The crystal structures of Mb (n = 284), HEWL (n = 336), HSA (n = 63), and HIV-1 PR (n = 488) were separated into six, five, three, and six groups, respectively. It was found that a major factor causing these structural separations is the space group of crystals and that crystallizing agents have an influence on the crystal structures. Amino acid mutation is a minor factor for the separation because no obvious point mutation making a specific cluster group was observed for the five kinds of proteins. In the classification of Hb and Mb, the species of protein source such as humans, rabbits, and mice is another significant factor. When the difference in amino sequence is large among species, the species of protein source is the primary factor causing cluster separation in the classification of crystal structures.

  16. Polydom: a secreted protein with pentraxin, complement control protein, epidermal growth factor and von Willebrand factor A domains.

    PubMed Central

    Gilgès, D; Vinit, M A; Callebaut, I; Coulombel, L; Cacheux, V; Romeo, P H; Vigon, I

    2000-01-01

    To identify extracellular proteins with epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains that are potentially involved in the control of haemopoiesis, we performed degenerate reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR on the murine bone-marrow stromal cell line MS-5 and isolated a new partial cDNA encoding EGF-like domains related to those in the Notch proteins. Cloning and sequencing of the full-length cDNA showed that it encoded a new extracellular multi-domain protein that we named polydom. This 387 kDa mosaic protein contained a signal peptide followed by a new association of eight different protein domains, including a pentraxin domain and a von Willebrand factor type A domain, ten EGF domains, and 34 complement control protein modules. The human polydom mRNA is strongly expressed in placenta, its expression in the other tissues being weak or undetectable. The particular multidomain structure of the encoded protein suggests an important biological role in cellular adhesion and/or in the immune system. PMID:11062057

  17. Clumping factor A, von Willebrand factor-binding protein and von Willebrand factor anchor Staphylococcus aureus to the vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Claes, J; Liesenborghs, L; Peetermans, M; Veloso, T R; Missiakas, D; Schneewind, O; Mancini, S; Entenza, J M; Hoylaerts, M F; Heying, R; Verhamme, P; Vanassche, T

    2017-02-09

    Essentials Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) binds to endothelium via von Willebrand factor (VWF). Secreted VWF-binding protein (vWbp) mediates S. aureus adhesion to VWF under shear stress. vWbp interacts with VWF and the Sortase A-dependent surface protein Clumping factor A (ClfA). VWF-vWbp-ClfA anchor S. aureus to vascular endothelium under shear stress.

  18. Regulation of myocardin factor protein stability by the LIM-only protein FHL2

    PubMed Central

    Hinson, Jeremiah S.; Medlin, Matt D.; Taylor, Joan M.; Mack, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that serum response factor (SRF) regulates muscle-specific gene expression and that myocardin family SRF cofactors are critical for smooth muscle cell differentiation. In a yeast two hybrid screen for novel SRF binding partners expressed in aortic SMC, we identified four and a half LIM domain protein 2 (FHL2) and confirmed this interaction by GST pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation assays. FHL2 also interacted with all three myocardin factors and enhanced myocardin and myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-A-dependent transactivation of smooth muscle α-actin, SM22, and cardiac atrial natriuretic factor promoters in 10T1/2 cells. The expression of FHL2 increased myocardin and MRTF-A protein levels, and, importantly, this effect was due to an increase in protein stability not due to an increase in myocardin factor mRNA expression. Treatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors MG-132 and lactacystin strongly upregulated endogenous MRTF-A protein levels and resulted in a substantial increase in ubiquitin immunoreactivity in MRTF-A immunoprecipitants. Interestingly, the expression of FHL2 attenuated the effects of RhoA and MRTF-B on promoter activity, perhaps through decreased MRTF-B nuclear localization or decreased SRF-CArG binding. Taken together, these data indicate that myocardin factors are regulated by proteasome-mediated degradation and that FHL2 regulates SRF-dependent transcription by multiple mechanisms, including stabilization of myocardin and MRTF-A. PMID:18586895

  19. Epidermal growth factor-stimulated protein phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, P.A.; Sisk, R.B.; Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a 6-fold increase in the phosphorylation state of a cytosolic protein (pp36, M/sub r/ = 36,000, pI = 5.5) in hepatocytes isolated from fasted, male, Wistar rats. Stimulation of /sup 32/P incorporation is observed as early as 1 min following treatment of hepatocytes with EGF and is still present at 30 min after exposure to the growth factor. The phosphate incorporated into pp36 in response to EGF is located predominantly in serine but not tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of pp36 does not occur in response to insulin or to agents which specifically activate the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (S/sub p/ -cAMPS), protein kinase C (PMA) or Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (A23187) in these cells. Prior treatment of hepatocytes with the cAMP analog, S/sub p/-cAMPS, or ADP-ribosylation of N/sub i/, the inhibitory GTP-binding protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, does not prevent EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of pp36. However, as seen in other cell types, pretreatment of hepatocytes with PMA abolishes all EGF-mediated responses including phosphorylation of pp36. These results suggest that EGP specifically activates an uncharacterized, serine protein kinase in hepatocytes that is distal to the intrinsic EGF receptor tyrosine protein kinase. The rapid activation of this kinase suggests that it may play an important role in the early response of the cell to EGF.

  20. Interactions of signaling proteins, growth factors and other proteins with heparan sulfate: mechanisms and mysteries.

    PubMed

    Billings, Paul C; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a component of cell surface and matrix-associated proteoglycans (HSPGs) that, collectively, play crucial roles in many physiologic processes including cell differentiation, organ morphogenesis and cancer. A key function of HS is to bind and interact with signaling proteins, growth factors, plasma proteins, immune-modulators and other factors. In doing so, the HS chains and HSPGs are able to regulate protein distribution, bio-availability and action on target cells and can also serve as cell surface co-receptors, facilitating ligand-receptor interactions. These proteins contain an HS/heparin-binding domain (HBD) that mediates their association and contacts with HS. HBDs are highly diverse in sequence and predicted structure, contain clusters of basic amino acids (Lys and Arg) and possess an overall net positive charge, most often within a consensus Cardin-Weintraub (CW) motif. Interestingly, other domains and residues are now known to influence protein-HS interactions, as well as interactions with other glycosaminoglycans, such as chondroitin sulfate. In this review, we provide a description and analysis of HBDs in proteins including amphiregulin, fibroblast growth factor family members, heparanase, sclerostin and hedgehog protein family members. We discuss HBD structural and functional features and important roles carried out by other protein domains, and also provide novel conformational insights into the diversity of CW motifs present in Sonic, Indian and Desert hedgehogs. Finally, we review progress in understanding the pathogenesis of a rare pediatric skeletal disorder, Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME), characterized by HS deficiency and cartilage tumor formation. Advances in understanding protein-HS interactions will have broad implications for basic biology and translational medicine as well as for the development of HS-based therapeutics.

  1. Interplay between trigger factor and other protein biogenesis factors on the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Thomas; Holtkamp, Wolf; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Nascent proteins emerging from translating ribosomes in bacteria are screened by a number of ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors, among them the chaperone trigger factor (TF), the signal recognition particle (SRP) that targets ribosomes synthesizing membrane proteins to the membrane and the modifying enzymes, peptide deformylase (PDF) and methionine aminopeptidase (MAP). Here, we examine the interplay between these factors both kinetically and at equilibrium. TF rapidly scans the ribosomes until it is stabilized on ribosomes presenting TF-specific nascent chains. SRP binding to those complexes is strongly impaired. Thus, TF in effect prevents SRP binding to the majority of ribosomes, except those presenting SRP-specific signal sequences, explaining how the small amount of SRP in the cell can be effective in membrane targeting. PDF and MAP do not interfere with TF or SRP binding to translating ribosomes, indicating that nascent-chain processing can take place before or in parallel with TF or SRP binding.

  2. Regulation of growth factor receptor degradation by ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein (ARD) 1.

    PubMed

    Meza-Carmen, Victor; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Kang, Gi Soo; Kato, Jiro; Donati, Chiara; Zhang, Chun-Yi; Vichi, Alessandro; Payne, D Michael; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Stylianou, Mario; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2011-06-28

    ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein 1 (ARD1) is a 64-kDa protein containing a functional ADP-ribosylation factor (GTP hydrolase, GTPase), GTPase-activating protein, and E3 ubiquitin ligase domains. ARD1 activation by the guanine nucleotide-exchange factor cytohesin-1 was known. GTPase and E3 ligase activities of ARD1 suggest roles in protein transport and turnover. To explore this hypothesis, we used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from ARD1-/- mice stably transfected with plasmids for inducible expression of wild-type ARD1 protein (KO-WT), or ARD1 protein with inactivating mutations in E3 ligase domain (KO-E3), or containing persistently active GTP-bound (KO-GTP), or inactive GDP-bound (KO-GDP) GTPase domains. Inhibition of proteasomal proteases in mifepristone-induced KO-WT, KO-GDP, or KO-GTP MEFs resulted in accumulation of these ARD1 proteins, whereas KO-E3 accumulated without inhibitors. All data were consistent with the conclusion that ARD1 regulates its own steady-state levels in cells by autoubiquitination. Based on reported growth factor receptor-cytohesin interactions, EGF receptor (EGFR) was investigated in induced MEFs. Amounts of cell-surface and total EGFR were higher in KO-GDP and lower in KO-GTP than in KO-WT MEFs, with levels in both mutants greater (p = 0.001) after proteasomal inhibition. Significant differences among MEF lines in content of TGF-β receptor III were similar to those in EGFR, albeit not as large. Differences in amounts of insulin receptor mirrored those in EGFR, but did not reach statistical significance. Overall, the capacity of ARD1 GTPase to cycle between active and inactive forms and its autoubiquitination both appear to be necessary for the appropriate turnover of EGFR and perhaps additional growth factor receptors.

  3. Predicting protein-protein interactions from multimodal biological data sources via nonnegative matrix tri-factorization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Huang, Heng; Ding, Chris; Nie, Feiping

    2013-04-01

    Protein interactions are central to all the biological processes and structural scaffolds in living organisms, because they orchestrate a number of cellular processes such as metabolic pathways and immunological recognition. Several high-throughput methods, for example, yeast two-hybrid system and mass spectrometry method, can help determine protein interactions, which, however, suffer from high false-positive rates. Moreover, many protein interactions predicted by one method are not supported by another. Therefore, computational methods are necessary and crucial to complete the interactome expeditiously. In this work, we formulate the problem of predicting protein interactions from a new mathematical perspective--sparse matrix completion, and propose a novel nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF)-based matrix completion approach to predict new protein interactions from existing protein interaction networks. Through using manifold regularization, we further develop our method to integrate different biological data sources, such as protein sequences, gene expressions, protein structure information, etc. Extensive experimental results on four species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, and Caenorhabditis elegans, have shown that our new methods outperform related state-of-the-art protein interaction prediction methods.

  4. Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.

    1994-12-31

    Recognition and removal of structural defects in the genome, caused by diverse physical and chemical agents, are among the most important cell functions. Proteins that recognize and bind to modified DNA, and thereby initiate damage-induced recovery processes, have been identified in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Damaged DNA-binding (DDB) proteins from prokaryotes are either DNA repair enzymes or noncatalytic subunits of larger DNA repair complexes that participate in excision repair, or in recombinational repair and SOS-mutagenesis. Although the methods employed may not have allowed detection of all eukaryotic DDB proteins and identification of their functions, it appears that during evolution cells have developed a wide array of DDB proteins that can discriminate among the diversity of DNA conformations found in the eukaryotic nucleus, as well as a gene-sharing feature found in DDB proteins that also act as transcription factors.

  5. Targeted genes and interacting proteins of hypoxia inducible factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shen, Shao-Ming; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimeric transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) functions as a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis in almost all nucleated mammalian cells. The fundamental process adapted to cellular oxygen alteration largely depends on the refined regulation on its alpha subunit, HIF-1α. Recent studies have unraveled expanding and critical roles of HIF-1α, involving in a multitude of developmental, physiological, and pathophysiological processes. This review will focus on the current knowledge of HIF-1α-targeting genes and its interacting proteins, as well as the concomitant functional relationships between them. PMID:22773957

  6. Autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: rheumatoid factors and anticitrullinated protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Song, Y W; Kang, E H

    2010-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease, characterized by chronic, erosive polyarthritis and by the presence of various autoantibodies in serum and synovial fluid. Since rheumatoid factor (RF) was first described, a number of other autoantibodies have been discovered in RA patients. The autoantigens recognized by these autoantibodies include cartilage components, chaperones, enzymes, nuclear proteins and citrullinated proteins. However, the clinical significances and pathogenic roles of these antibodies are largely unknown except for RF and anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), whose clinical usefulness has been acknowledged due to their acceptable sensitivities and specificities, and prognostic values. This review presents and discusses the current state of the art regarding RF and ACPA in RA.

  7. Fission Yeast CSL Proteins Function as Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Oravcová, Martina; Teska, Mikoláš; Půta, František; Folk, Petr; Převorovský, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcription factors of the CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jk/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) family are key regulators of metazoan development and function as the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway implicated in various cell fate decisions. CSL proteins recognize specifically the GTG[G/A]AA sequence motif and several mutants compromised in their ability to bind DNA have been reported. In our previous studies we have identified a number of novel putative CSL family members in fungi, organisms lacking the Notch pathway. It is not clear whether these represent genuine CSL family members. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches we characterized the DNA binding properties of Cbf11 and Cbf12, the antagonistic CSL paralogs from the fission yeast, important for the proper coordination of cell cycle events and the regulation of cell adhesion. We have shown that a mutation of a conserved arginine residue abolishes DNA binding in both CSL paralogs, similar to the situation in mouse. We have also demonstrated the ability of Cbf11 and Cbf12 to activate gene expression in an autologous fission yeast reporter system. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the fission yeast CSL proteins are indeed genuine family members capable of functioning as transcription factors, and provide support for the ancient evolutionary origin of this important protein family. PMID:23555033

  8. Germ cell mitogenic activity is associated with nerve growth factor-like protein(s).

    PubMed

    Onoda, M; Pflug, B; Djakiew, D

    1991-12-01

    The mitogenicity of germ cell proteins released from round spermatids (RS) and pachytene spermatocytes (PS) was investigated. Germ cells were isolated by centrifugal elutriation from 90-day-old rat testes and incubated in a supplement enriched culture media that lacked exogenous proteins. The conditioned culture media of RS and PS were dialysed/concentrated and lyophilized to prepare RS protein (RSP) and PS protein (PSP). Mitogenic activity of RSP and PSP was determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation into Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. RSP and PSP stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation by fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. At a higher concentration of RSP (300 micrograms/ml), fibroblast proliferation was stimulated from 6- to 20-fold of control cultures, whereas PSP (300 micrograms/ml) stimulated fibroblast proliferation 2.5-fold of control cultures. Since RSP exhibited substantially greater mitogenic activity than PSP we further investigated the RSP mitogenic substance(s) by immunoneutralization with antibodies against several growth factors. The mitogenic activity of RSP was significantly reduced by treatment with nerve growth factor (NGF) antibody, while neither the treatment of RSP with acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) antibody, nor basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) antibody significantly modified the mitogenic activity of RSP. Interestingly, murine NGF-beta, recombinant human NGF-beta, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not exhibit mitogenic activity on 3T3 fibroblasts. Nevertheless, the presence of a NGF-like protein in RS and PS was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence staining with a murine NGF antibody. Subsequently, a Western blot analysis with the NGF antibody identified two immunoreactive bands of 41 +/- 2 kDa and 51 +/- 1 kDa in both RSP and PSP under reduced conditions. These germ cell NGF-like proteins were apparently different from similarly prepared murine and human NGFs (13 kDa) in their molecular weight. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth

  9. How protein chemists learned about the hydrophobic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanford, C.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted today that the hydrophobic force is the dominant energetic factor that leads to the folding of polypeptide chains into compact globular entities. This principle was first explicitly introduced to protein chemists in 1938 by Irving Langmuir, past master in the application of hydrophobicity to other problems, and was enthusiastically endorsed by J.D. Bernal. But both proposal and endorsement came in the course of a debate about a quite different structural principle, the so-called "cyclol hypothesis" proposed by D. Wrinch, which soon proved to be theoretically and experimentally unsupportable. Being a more tangible idea, directly expressed in structural terms, the cyclol hypothesis received more attention than the hydrophobic principle and the latter never actually entered the mainstream of protein science until 1959, when it was thrust into the limelight in a lucid review by W. Kauzmann. A theoretical paper by H.S. Frank and M. Evans, not itself related to protein folding, probably played a major role in the acceptance of the hydrophobicity concept by protein chemists because it provided a crude but tangible picture of the origin of hydrophobicity per se in terms of water structure. PMID:9194199

  10. Effective protein-protein interaction from structure factor data of a lysozyme solution

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, M. C.; Caccamo, C.; Costa, D.; Ruberto, R.; Wanderlingh, U.; Cavero, M.; Pellicane, G.

    2013-08-07

    We report the determination of an effective protein-protein central potential for a lysozyme solution, obtained from the direct inversion of the total structure factor of the system, as extracted from small angle neutron scattering. The inversion scheme rests on a hypernetted-chain relationship between the effective potential and the structural functions, and is preliminarily tested for the case of a Lennard-Jones interaction. The characteristics of our potential are discussed in comparison with current models of effective interactions in complex fluids. The phase behavior predictions are also investigated.

  11. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Sarah N.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R.; Darling, April

    2015-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  12. Secretion of soluble complement inhibitors factor H and factor H-like protein (FHL-1) by ovarian tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Junnikkala, S; Hakulinen, J; Jarva, H; Manuelian, T; Bjørge, L; Bützow, R; Zipfel, P F; Meri, S

    2002-11-04

    We observed that the soluble complement regulators factor H and factor H-like protein were abundantly present in ascites samples as well as in primary tumours of patients with ovarian cancer. RT-PCR and immunoblotting analyses showed that the two complement inhibitors were constitutively produced by the ovarian tumour cell lines SK-OV-3 and Caov-3, but not PA-1 or SW626 cells. The amounts of factor H-like protein secreted were equal to those of factor H. This is exceptional, because e.g. in normal human serum the concentration of factor H-like protein is below 1/10th of that of factor H. In ascites samples the mean level of factor H-like protein (130+/-55 microg ml(-1)) was 5.5-fold higher than in normal human serum (24+/-3 microg ml(-1)). Ovarian tumour cells thus preferentially synthesise factor H-like protein, the alternatively spliced short variant of factor H. The tumour cells were found to bind both (125)I-labelled factor H and recombinant factor H-like protein to their surfaces. Surprisingly, the culture supernatants of all of the ovarian tumour cell lines studied, including those of PA-1 and SW626 that did not produce factor H/factor H-like protein, promoted factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b to inactive iC3b. Subsequently, the PA-1 and SW626 cell lines were found to secrete a soluble form of the membrane cofactor protein (CD46). Thus, our studies reveal two novel complement resistance mechanisms of ovarian tumour cells: (i) production of factor H-like protein and factor H and (ii) secretion of soluble membrane cofactor protein. Secretion of soluble complement inhibitors could protect ovarian tumour cells against humoral immune attack and pose an obstacle for therapy with monoclonal antibodies.

  13. Lengths of Orthologous Prokaryotic Proteins Are Affected by Evolutionary Factors

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Dien Bard, Jennifer; Cohen, Irit

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the same functional family (for example, kinases) may have significantly different lengths. It is an open question whether such variation in length is random or it appears as a response to some unknown evolutionary driving factors. The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate existence of factors affecting prokaryotic gene lengths. We believe that the ranking of genomes according to lengths of their genes, followed by the calculation of coefficients of association between genome rank and genome property, is a reasonable approach in revealing such evolutionary driving factors. As we demonstrated earlier, our chosen approach, Bubble-sort, combines stability, accuracy, and computational efficiency as compared to other ranking methods. Application of Bubble Sort to the set of 1390 prokaryotic genomes confirmed that genes of Archaeal species are generally shorter than Bacterial ones. We observed that gene lengths are affected by various factors: within each domain, different phyla have preferences for short or long genes; thermophiles tend to have shorter genes than the soil-dwellers; halophiles tend to have longer genes. We also found that species with overrepresentation of cytosines and guanines in the third position of the codon (GC3 content) tend to have longer genes than species with low GC3 content. PMID:26114113

  14. Lengths of Orthologous Prokaryotic Proteins Are Affected by Evolutionary Factors.

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Salih, Bilal; Dien Bard, Jennifer; Cohen, Irit; Bolshoy, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the same functional family (for example, kinases) may have significantly different lengths. It is an open question whether such variation in length is random or it appears as a response to some unknown evolutionary driving factors. The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate existence of factors affecting prokaryotic gene lengths. We believe that the ranking of genomes according to lengths of their genes, followed by the calculation of coefficients of association between genome rank and genome property, is a reasonable approach in revealing such evolutionary driving factors. As we demonstrated earlier, our chosen approach, Bubble-sort, combines stability, accuracy, and computational efficiency as compared to other ranking methods. Application of Bubble Sort to the set of 1390 prokaryotic genomes confirmed that genes of Archaeal species are generally shorter than Bacterial ones. We observed that gene lengths are affected by various factors: within each domain, different phyla have preferences for short or long genes; thermophiles tend to have shorter genes than the soil-dwellers; halophiles tend to have longer genes. We also found that species with overrepresentation of cytosines and guanines in the third position of the codon (GC3 content) tend to have longer genes than species with low GC3 content.

  15. Factors influencing post-exercise plasma protein carbonyl concentration.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Alex J; Turner, James E; Aldred, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Exercise of sufficient intensity and duration can cause acute oxidative stress. Plasma protein carbonyl (PC) moieties are abundant, chemically stable, and easily detectable markers of oxidative stress that are widely used for the interpretation of exercise-induced changes in redox balance. Despite many studies reporting acute increases in plasma PC concentration in response to exercise, some studies, including those from our own laboratory have shown decreases. This review will discuss the differences between studies reporting increases, decreases, and no change in plasma PC concentration following exercise in humans; highlighting participant physiology (i.e. training status) and study design (i.e. intensity, duration, and novelty of the exercise bout) as the main factors driving the direction of the PC response to exercise. The role of the 20S proteasome system is proposed as a possible mechanism mediating the clearance of plasma PC following exercise. Resting and exercise-induced differences in plasma protein composition and balance between tissues are also discussed. We suggest that exercise may stimulate the clearance of plasma PC present at baseline, whereas simultaneously increasing reactive oxygen species production that facilitates the formation of new PC groups. The balance between these two processes likely explains why some studies have reported no change or even decreases in plasma PC level post-exercise when other biomarkers of oxidative stress (e.g. markers of lipid peroxidation) were elevated. Future studies should determine factors that influence the balance between PC clearance and formation following acute exercise.

  16. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Briony E.; McCarthy, Peter; Norton, Raymond S.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6) bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that regulate processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by modulating gene transcription. IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, linker, and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarizes structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. We also highlight future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease. PMID:22654863

  17. Coagulation factor V mediates inhibition of tissue factor signaling by activated protein C in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hai Po H.; Kerschen, Edward J.; Basu, Sreemanti; Hernandez, Irene; Zogg, Mark; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J.; Toso, Raffaella; Rezaie, Alireza R.; Fernández, José A.; Camire, Rodney M.; Ruf, Wolfram; Griffin, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The key effector molecule of the natural protein C pathway, activated protein C (aPC), exerts pleiotropic effects on coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. Coagulation-independent cell signaling by aPC appears to be the predominant mechanism underlying its highly reproducible therapeutic efficacy in most animal models of injury and infection. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, we demonstrate marked disease stage–specific effects of the anticoagulant and cell signaling functions of aPC. aPC resistance of factor (f)V due to the R506Q Leiden mutation protected against detrimental anticoagulant effects of aPC therapy but also abrogated the anti-inflammatory and mortality-reducing effects of the signaling-selective 5A-aPC variant that has minimal anticoagulant function. We found that procofactor V (cleaved by aPC at R506) and protein S were necessary cofactors for the aPC-mediated inhibition of inflammatory tissue-factor signaling. The anti-inflammatory cofactor function of fV involved the same structural features that govern its cofactor function for the anticoagulant effects of aPC, yet its anti-inflammatory activities did not involve proteolysis of activated coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. These findings reveal a novel biological function and mechanism of the protein C pathway in which protein S and the aPC-cleaved form of fV are cofactors for anti-inflammatory cell signaling by aPC in the context of endotoxemia and infection. PMID:26341257

  18. RNA-Binding Proteins: Splicing Factors and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Alger M.; Cygan, Kamil J.; Brown, Brian A.; Fairbrother, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is mediated by interactions of the Core Spliceosome and an array of accessory RNA binding proteins with cis-sequence elements. Splicing is a major regulatory component in higher eukaryotes. Disruptions in splicing are a major contributor to human disease. One in three hereditary disease alleles are believed to cause aberrant splicing. Hereditary disease alleles can alter splicing by disrupting a splicing element, creating a toxic RNA, or affecting splicing factors. One of the challenges of medical genetics is identifying causal variants from the thousands of possibilities discovered in a clinical sequencing experiment. Here we review the basic biochemistry of splicing, the mechanisms of splicing mutations, the methods for identifying splicing mutants, and the potential of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25985083

  19. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins--an Update.

    PubMed

    Bach, Leon A

    2015-12-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is essential for normal growth and development, and its perturbation is implicated in a number of diseases. IGF activity is finely regulated by a family of six high-affinity IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). 1GFBPs usually inhibit IGF actions but may enhance them under certain conditions. Additionally, IGFBPs bind non-IGF ligands in the extracellular space, cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, thereby modulating cell proliferation, survival and migration in an IGF-independent manner. IGFBP activity is regulated by transcriptional mechanisms as well as by post-translational modifications and proteolysis. Understanding the balance between the various actions of IGFBPs in vivo may lead to novel insights into disease processes and possible IGFBP-based therapeutics.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 4-6.

    PubMed

    Bach, Leon A

    2015-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 4-6 have important roles as modulators of IGF actions. IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-6 predominantly inhibit IGF actions, whereas IGFBP-5 may enhance these actions under some circumstances. IGFBP-6 is unique among the IGFBPs for its marked IGF-II binding preference. IGFBPs 4-6 are found in the circulation as binary complexes with IGFs that can enter tissues. Additionally, about half of the circulating IGFBP-5 is found in ternary complexes with IGFs and an acid labile subunit; this high molecular complex cannot leave the circulation and acts as an IGF reservoir. IGFBPs 4-6 also have IGF-independent actions. These IGFBPs are regulated in a cell-specific manner and their dysregulation may play a role in a range of diseases including cancer. However, there is no clear clinical indication for measuring serum levels of these IGFBPs at present.

  1. Protein-Protein Interactions of the Baculovirus Per Os Infectivity Factors in the PIF Complex.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qin; Shen, Yunwang; Kon, Xiangshuo; Zhang, Jianjia; Feng, Min; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-28

    After ingestion of occlusion bodies, the occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) of baculoviruses establish the first round of infection within the larval host midgut cells. Several ODV envelope proteins, called per os infectivity factors (PIFs), have been shown to be essential for oral infection. Eight PIFs have been identified to date, including P74, PIFs1-6, and Ac110. At least six PIFs: P74, PIFs1-4, PIF6, together with three other ODV-specific proteins: Ac5, P95 (Ac83), and Ac108, have been reported to form a complex on the ODV surface. In this study, in order to understand the interactions of these PIFs, the direct protein-protein interactions of the nine components of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) PIF complex were investigated using yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) combined with bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. Six direct interactions comprising PIF1-PIF2, PIF1-PIF3, PIF1-PIF4, PIF1-P95, PIF2-PIF3, and PIF3-PIF4, were identified in Y2H analysis, and these results were further verified by BiFC. For P74, PIF6, Ac5 and Ac108, no direct interaction was identified. P95 (Ac83) was identified to interact with PIF1 and further Y2H analysis of the truncations and deletion mutants showed that the predicted P95 chitin-binding domain and PIF1 100-200aa were responsible for P95 interaction with PIF1. Furthermore, a summary of the protein-protein interactions of PIFs reported so far, comprising 10 reciprocal interactions and 2 self-interactions, is presented, which will facilitate our understanding of the characteristic of PIF complex.

  2. Effects of tumour necrosis factor on protein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Evans, D A; Jacobs, D O; Wilmore, D W

    1993-08-01

    Increased skeletal muscle breakdown and negative nitrogen balance are features of sepsis that may be mediated by cytokines. The effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) on protein metabolism were studied. When administered to anaesthetized dogs (0.57 x 10(5) units per kg body-weight over 6h), TNF caused urinary nitrogen excretion to increase (mean(s.e.m.) 165(15) mg kg-1 for dogs that received TNF versus 113(8) mg kg-1 for control animals, P < 0.01). Amino acid nitrogen release from the hindlimbs showed no change over the study period, indicating that the additional urinary nitrogen was not derived from peripheral protein stores. In a second study the same dose of TNF or saline was infused after the intestine had been removed. The mean(s.e.m.) urinary nitrogen excretion in control dogs that had undergone enterectomy (101(7) mg kg-1) was similar to that of intact animals, and addition of TNF did not significantly increase nitrogen excretion (86(18) mg kg-1). The results suggest that nitrogen excreted in the urine during administration of TNF is derived, at least initially, from the intestinal tract.

  3. The latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein (LTBP) family.

    PubMed Central

    Oklü, R; Hesketh, R

    2000-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) cytokines are a multi-functional family that exert a wide variety of effects on both normal and transformed mammalian cells. The secretion and activation of TGFbetas is regulated by their association with latency-associated proteins and latent TGFbeta binding proteins (LTBPs). Over the past few years, three members of the LTBP family have been identified, in addition to the protoype LTBP1 first sequenced in 1990. Three of the LTBP family are expressed in a variety of isoforms as a consequence of alternative splicing. This review summarizes the differences between the isoforms in terms of the effects on domain structure and hence possible function. The close identity between LTBPs and members of the fibrillin family, mutations in which have been linked directly to Marfan's syndrome, suggests that anomalous expression of LTBPs may be associated with disease. Recent data indicating that differential expression of LTBP1 isoforms occurs during the development of coronary heart disease is considered, together with evidence that modulation of LTBP function, and hence of TGFbeta activity, is associated with a variety of cancers. PMID:11104663

  4. Associations between individual cow factors and milk-protein production.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, J M; Martin, S W; Lissemore, K D; Leslie, K E; Gibson, J P; Scott, H M; Kelton, D F

    1998-02-06

    Associations between stage of lactation, cow characteristics, and protein production were evaluated using data from a 2-year period on 75 Ontario, 5 Alberta, and 3 Nova Scotia dairy farms. Individual-cow protein production was defined by 305-day protein yield and by the estimated breeding value for protein yield. Lactation curves for average daily protein yield were computed by parity, breed, and season of calving. Mean protein yield was highest in early lactation. However, there was no pronounced peak in daily protein yield. Parity was positively associated with 305-day protein yield and negatively associated with the estimated breeding values for protein yield. First-calf heifers had lower protein yields in early lactation and a slower rate of decline in protein yield in late lactation, as compared to later parity cows. Holstein cows had higher unadjusted protein yields and lower protein yields after adjusting for milk yield than other breeds. Holstein cows had significantly higher protein yields early in lactation compared to other breeds, but the rate of decline in protein production in late lactation was also greater. Season was associated with 305-day protein yield; the highest protein yields occurred in cows calving in the fall and winter months, but these cows had the greatest rate of decline in protein production in late lactation.

  5. Modeling of human factor Va inactivation by activated protein C

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because understanding of the inventory, connectivity and dynamics of the components characterizing the process of coagulation is relatively mature, it has become an attractive target for physiochemical modeling. Such models can potentially improve the design of therapeutics. The prothrombinase complex (composed of the protease factor (F)Xa and its cofactor FVa) plays a central role in this network as the main producer of thrombin, which catalyses both the activation of platelets and the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, the main substances of a clot. A key negative feedback loop that prevents clot propagation beyond the site of injury is the thrombin-dependent generation of activated protein C (APC), an enzyme that inactivates FVa, thus neutralizing the prothrombinase complex. APC inactivation of FVa is complex, involving the production of partially active intermediates and “protection” of FVa from APC by both FXa and prothrombin. An empirically validated mathematical model of this process would be useful in advancing the predictive capacity of comprehensive models of coagulation. Results A model of human APC inactivation of prothrombinase was constructed in a stepwise fashion by analyzing time courses of FVa inactivation in empirical reaction systems with increasing number of interacting components and generating corresponding model constructs of each reaction system. Reaction mechanisms, rate constants and equilibrium constants informing these model constructs were initially derived from various research groups reporting on APC inactivation of FVa in isolation, or in the presence of FXa or prothrombin. Model predictions were assessed against empirical data measuring the appearance and disappearance of multiple FVa degradation intermediates as well as prothrombinase activity changes, with plasma proteins derived from multiple preparations. Our work integrates previously published findings and through the cooperative analysis of in vitro

  6. Implementing a Rational and Consistent Nomenclature for Serine/Arginine-Rich Protein Splicing Factors (SR Proteins) in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Reddy, Anireddy S.N.

    2010-01-01

    Growing interest in alternative splicing in plants and the extensive sequencing of new plant genomes necessitate more precise definition and classification of genes coding for splicing factors. SR proteins are a family of RNA binding proteins, which function as essential factors for constitutive and alternative splicing. We propose a unified nomenclature for plant SR proteins, taking into account the newly revised nomenclature of the mammalian SR proteins and a number of plant-specific properties of the plant proteins. We identify six subfamilies of SR proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa), three of which are plant specific. The proposed subdivision of plant SR proteins into different subfamilies will allow grouping of paralogous proteins and simple assignment of newly discovered SR orthologs from other plant species and will promote functional comparisons in diverse plant species. PMID:20884799

  7. Implementing a rational and consistent nomenclature for serine/arginine-rich protein splicing factors (SR proteins) in plants.

    PubMed

    Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2010-09-01

    Growing interest in alternative splicing in plants and the extensive sequencing of new plant genomes necessitate more precise definition and classification of genes coding for splicing factors. SR proteins are a family of RNA binding proteins, which function as essential factors for constitutive and alternative splicing. We propose a unified nomenclature for plant SR proteins, taking into account the newly revised nomenclature of the mammalian SR proteins and a number of plant-specific properties of the plant proteins. We identify six subfamilies of SR proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa), three of which are plant specific. The proposed subdivision of plant SR proteins into different subfamilies will allow grouping of paralogous proteins and simple assignment of newly discovered SR orthologs from other plant species and will promote functional comparisons in diverse plant species.

  8. The GAGA factor regulatory network: Identification of GAGA factor associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Blokhina, Tatiana; Wolle, Daniel; Aoki, Tsutomu; Ryabykh, Vladimir; Yates, John R.; Shidlovskii, Yulii V.; Georgiev, Pavel; Schedl, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The Drosophila GAGA factor (GAF) has an extraordinarily diverse set of functions that include the activation and silencing of gene expression, nucleosome organization and remodeling, higher order chromosome architecture and mitosis. One hypothesis that could account for these diverse activities is that GAF is able to interact with partners that have specific and dedicated functions. To test this possibility we used affinity purification coupled with high throughput mass spectrometry to identify GAF associated partners. Consistent with this hypothesis the GAF interacting network includes a large collection of factors and complexes that have been implicated in many different aspects of gene activity, chromosome structure and function. Moreover, we show that GAF interactions with a small subset of partners is direct; however for many others the interactions could be indirect, and depend upon intermediates that serve to diversify the functional capabilities of the GAF protein. PMID:28296955

  9. Protein modification during anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocessing of factor VIII concentrates, factor IX concentrates, and model proteins in the presence of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Smales, C Mark; Pepper, Duncan S; James, David C

    2002-01-05

    To ensure the optimal safety of plasma derived and new generation recombinant proteins, heat treatment is customarily applied in the manufacturing of such biopharmaceuticals as a means of viral inactivation. In subjecting proteins to anti-viral heat-treatment it is necessary to use high concentrations of thermostabilizing excipients to prevent protein damage, and it is therefore imperative that the correct balance between bioprocessing conditions, maintenance of protein integrity and virus kill is found. In this study we have utilized model proteins (lysozyme, fetuin, and human serum albumin) and plasma-derived therapeutic proteins (factor VIII and factor IX) to investigate the protein modifications that occur during anti-viral heat treatment. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between bioprocessing conditions and the type and extent of protein modification under a variety of industrially relevant wet and lyophilized heat treatments using sucrose as a thermostabilizing agent. Heat treatment led to the formation of disulfide crosslinks and aggregates in proteins containing free cysteine residues. Terminal oligosaccharide sialic acid residues were hydrolyzed from the glycan moieties of glycoproteins during anti-viral heat treatment. Heat treatment promoted sucrose hydrolysis to yield glucose and fructose, leading, in turn, to the glycation of lysine amino groups in those proteins containing di-lysine motifs. During extended hear treatments, 1,2-dicarbonyl type advanced glycation end-products were also formed. Glycation-type modifications were more prevalent in wet heat-treated protein formulations.

  10. Impact of antinutritional factors in food proteins on the digestibility of protein and the bioavailability of amino acids and on protein quality.

    PubMed

    Sarwar Gilani, G; Wu Xiao, Chao; Cockell, Kevin A

    2012-08-01

    Dietary antinutritional factors have been reported to adversely affect the digestibility of protein, bioavailability of amino acids and protein quality of foods. Published data on these negative effects of major dietary antinutritional factors are summarized in this manuscript. Digestibility and the quality of mixed diets in developing countries are considerably lower than of those in developed regions. For example, the digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94 %). Poor digestibility of protein in the diets of developing countries, which are based on less refined cereals and grain legumes as major sources of protein, is due to the presence of less digestible protein fractions, high levels of insoluble fibre, and/or high concentrations of antinutritional factors present endogenously or formed during processing. Examples of naturally occurring antinutritional factors include glucosinolates in mustard and canola protein products, trypsin inhibitors and haemagglutinins in legumes, tannins in legumes and cereals, gossypol in cottonseed protein products, and uricogenic nucleobases in yeast protein products. Heat/alkaline treatments of protein products may yield Maillard reaction compounds, oxidized forms of sulphur amino acids, D-amino acids and lysinoalanine (LAL, an unnatural nephrotoxic amino acid derivative). Among common food and feed protein products, soyabeans are the most concentrated source of trypsin inhibitors. The presence of high levels of dietary trypsin inhibitors from soyabeans, kidney beans or other grain legumes have been reported to cause substantial reductions in protein and amino acid digestibility (up to 50 %) and protein quality (up to 100 %) in rats and/or pigs. Similarly, the presence of high levels of tannins in sorghum and other cereals, fababean and other grain legumes can cause

  11. Protein Destabilization as a Common Factor in Diverse Inherited Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Rachel L.; Das, Jhuma; Diaz, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    Protein destabilization by amino acid substitutions is proposed to play a prominent role in widespread inherited human disorders, not just those known to involve protein misfolding and aggregation. To test this hypothesis, we computationally evaluate the effects on protein stability of all possible amino acid substitutions in 20 disease-associated proteins with multiple identified pathogenic missense mutations. For 18 of the 20 proteins studied, substitutions at known positions of pathogenic mutations are significantly more likely to destabilize the native protein fold (as indicated by more positive values of ΔΔG). Thus, positions identified as sites of disease-associated mutations, as opposed to non-disease-associated sites, are predicted to be more vulnerable to protein destabilization upon amino acid substitution. This finding supports the notion that destabilization of native protein structure underlies the pathogenicity of broad set of missense mutations, even in cases where reduced protein stability and/or aggregation are not characteristic of the disease state. PMID:26584803

  12. Cellulose synthase interacting protein: a new factor in cellulose synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Somerville, Chris

    2010-12-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the recent identification of a novel component. CSI1, which encodes CESA interacting protein 1 (CSI1) in Arabidopsis. CSI1, as the first non-CESA proteins associated with cellulose synthase complexes, opens up many opportunities.

  13. The activating transcription factor 3 protein suppresses the oncogenic function of mutant p53 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-03-28

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer.

  14. Screening for Host Factors Directly Interacting with RSV Protein: Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Sarit; Avrahami, Dorit; Bajorek, Monika; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-throughput microfluidics platform to identify novel host cell binding partners of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) matrix (M) protein. The device consists of thousands of reaction chambers controlled by micro-mechanical valves. The microfluidic device is mated to a microarray-printed custom-made gene library. These genes are then transcribed and translated on-chip, resulting in a protein array ready for binding to RSV M protein.Even small viral proteome, such as that of RSV, presents a challenge due to the fact that viral proteins are usually multifunctional and thus their interaction with the host is complex. Protein microarrays technology allows the interrogation of protein-protein interactions, which could possibly overcome obstacles by using conventional high throughput methods. Using microfluidics platform we have identified new host interactors of M involved in various cellular pathways. A number of microfluidics based assays have already provided novel insights into the virus-host interactome, and the results have important implications for future antiviral strategies aimed at targets of viral protein interactions with the host.

  15. Screening bicyclic peptide libraries for protein-protein interaction inhibitors: discovery of a tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lian, Wenlong; Upadhyaya, Punit; Rhodes, Curran A; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2013-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions represent a new class of exciting but challenging drug targets, because their large, flat binding sites lack well-defined pockets for small molecules to bind. We report here a methodology for chemical synthesis and screening of large combinatorial libraries of bicyclic peptides displayed on rigid small-molecule scaffolds. With planar trimesic acid as the scaffold, the resulting bicyclic peptides are effective for binding to protein surfaces such as the interfaces of protein-protein interactions. Screening of a bicyclic peptide library against tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) identified a potent antagonist that inhibits the TNFα-TNFα receptor interaction and protects cells from TNFα-induced cell death. Bicyclic peptides of this type may provide a general solution for inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  16. Patagonfibrase modifies protein expression of tissue factor and protein disulfide isomerase in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María Elisa; Santoro, Marcelo Larami

    2016-09-01

    Patagonfibrase is a hemorrhagic metalloproteinase isolated from the venom of the South American rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and is an important contributor to local lesions inflicted by this species. The tissue factor (TF)-factor VIIa complex, besides triggering the coagulation cascade, has been demonstrated to be involved in inflammatory events. Our aim was to determine whether patagonfibrase affects the expression of TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme that controls TF biological activity, at the site of patagonfibrase injection, and thus if they may play a role in hemostatic and inflammatory events induced by snake venoms. Patagonfibrase (60 μg/kg) was administered s.c. to rats, and after 3 h blood was collected to evaluate hemostasis parameters, and skin fragments close to the site of injection were taken to assess TF and PDI expression. Patagonfibrase did not alter blood cell counts, plasma fibrinogen levels, or levels of TF activity in plasma. However, by semiquantitative Western blotting, patagonfibrase increased TF expression by 2-fold, and decreased PDI expression by 3-fold in skin samples. In agreement, by immunohistochemical analyses, prominent TF expression was observed in the subcutaneous tissue. Thus, patagonfibrase affects the local expression of TF and PDI without inducing any systemic hemostatic disturbance, although that they may be involved in the local inflammatory events induced by hemorrhagic metalloproteinases. Once antivenom therapy is not totally effective to treat the local injury induced by snake venoms, modulation of the activity and expression of TF and/or PDI might become a strategy for treating snake envenomation.

  17. Human chorionic gonadotropin promotes expression of protein absorption factors in the intestine of goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Hao, G; Zhong, H; Wu, Q; Lu, S Q; Zhao, Q; Liu, Z

    2015-07-27

    Protein use is crucial for the ovulation and spawning of fish. Currently, limited information is available regarding the expression of protein absorption factors during the breeding seasons of teleosts and thus how various proteins involved in this process is not well-understood. The expression of CDX2, CREB, gluatamate dehydrogenase, LAT2, aminopeptidase N, PepT1, and SP1 were significantly elevated from the non-breeding season to the breeding season in female goldfish, and all proteins except PepT1 and SP1 were elevated in male goldfish. Injection of human chorionic gonadotropin upregulated the expression of all proteins except for aminopeptidase N in female goldfish and SP1 in male goldfish, suggesting a luteinizing hormone-inductive effect on protein absorption factors. Protein use in the intestine is increased during the breeding seasons as a result of increased luteinizing hormone.

  18. Protein kinase A activation of the surfactant protein B gene is mediated by phosphorylation of thyroid transcription factor 1.

    PubMed

    Yan, C; Whitsett, J A

    1997-07-11

    Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) is a homeodomain-containing nuclear transcription factor expressed in epithelial cells of the lung and thyroid. TTF-1 binds to and activates the transcription of genes expressed selectively in the respiratory epithelium including pulmonary surfactant A, B, C and Clara cell secretory protein. Transfection with a plasmid encoding the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A; PKA) catalytic subunit, Cat-beta, stimulated the phosphorylation of a TTF-1-flag fusion protein 6-7-fold in H441 pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells. Recombinant TTF-1 was phosphorylated by purified PKA catalytic subunit in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP. PKA catalytic subunit family members, Cat-alpha and Cat-beta, markedly enhanced the transcriptional activation of surfactant B gene promoters by TTF-1 in vitro. Peptide mapping was used to identify a PKA phosphorylation site at the NH2 terminus of TTF-1. A 17-amino acid synthetic peptide comprising this site completely inhibited the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of TTF-1 in vitro. A substitution mutation of TTF-1 (Thr9 two head right arrow Ala) abolished phosphorylation by PKA and reduced transactivation of the surfactant B gene promoter. Transfection with a plasmid encoding the cAMP regulatory element binding factor inhibited transcriptional activity of the surfactant protein B gene promoter. Phosphorylation of TTF-1 mediates PKA-dependent activation of surfactant protein B gene transcription.

  19. The La protein counteracts cisplatin-induced cell death by stimulating protein synthesis of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Tilman; Kota, Venkatesh; Brock, Alexander; Morris, Amanda B.; Rodriguez, Reycel M.; Zierk, Avery W.; Howe, Philip H.; Sommer, Gunhild

    2016-01-01

    Up-regulation of anti-apoptotic factors is a critical mechanism of cancer cell resistance and often counteracts the success of chemotherapeutic treatment. Herein, we identified the cancer-associated RNA-binding protein La as novel factor contributing to cisplatin resistance. Our data demonstrate that depletion of the RNA-binding protein La in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells (HNSCC) increases the sensitivity toward cisplatin-induced cell death paralleled by reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2. Furthermore, it is shown that transient expression of Bcl2 in La-depleted cells protects against cisplatin-induced cell death. By dissecting the underlying mechanism we report herein, that the La protein is required for Bcl2 protein synthesis in cisplatin-treated cells. The RNA chaperone La binds in close proximity to the authentic translation start site and unwinds a secondary structure embedding the authentic AUG. Altogether, our data support a novel model, whereby cancer-associated La protein contributes to cisplatin resistance by stimulating the translation of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2 in HNSCC cells. PMID:27105491

  20. The La protein counteracts cisplatin-induced cell death by stimulating protein synthesis of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2.

    PubMed

    Heise, Tilman; Kota, Venkatesh; Brock, Alexander; Morris, Amanda B; Rodriguez, Reycel M; Zierk, Avery W; Howe, Philip H; Sommer, Gunhild

    2016-05-17

    Up-regulation of anti-apoptotic factors is a critical mechanism of cancer cell resistance and often counteracts the success of chemotherapeutic treatment. Herein, we identified the cancer-associated RNA-binding protein La as novel factor contributing to cisplatin resistance. Our data demonstrate that depletion of the RNA-binding protein La in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells (HNSCC) increases the sensitivity toward cisplatin-induced cell death paralleled by reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2. Furthermore, it is shown that transient expression of Bcl2 in La-depleted cells protects against cisplatin-induced cell death. By dissecting the underlying mechanism we report herein, that the La protein is required for Bcl2 protein synthesis in cisplatin-treated cells. The RNA chaperone La binds in close proximity to the authentic translation start site and unwinds a secondary structure embedding the authentic AUG. Altogether, our data support a novel model, whereby cancer-associated La protein contributes to cisplatin resistance by stimulating the translation of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl2 in HNSCC cells.

  1. Interaction of grape ASR proteins with a DREB transcription factor in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Saumonneau, Amélie; Agasse, Alice; Bidoyen, Marie-Thérèse; Lallemand, Magali; Cantereau, Anne; Medici, Anna; Laloi, Maryse; Atanassova, Rossitza

    2008-10-15

    ASR proteins (abscissic acid, stress, ripening induced) are involved in plant responses to developmental and environmental signals but their biological functions remain to be elucidated. Grape ASR gene (VvMSA) encodes a new transcription factor regulating the expression of a glucose transporter. Here, we provide evidence for some polymorphism of grape ASRs and their identification as chromosomal non-histone proteins. By the yeast two-hybrid approach, a protein partner of VvMSA is isolated and characterized as an APETALA2 domain transcription factor. Interaction of the two proteins is further demonstrated by the BiFC approach and the exclusive nuclear localization of the heterodimer is visualized.

  2. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in a Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin Protein Solution: Effect of Formulation Factors and Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Raut, Ashlesha S; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2015-09-08

    Dual variable domain immunoglobulin proteins (DVD-Ig proteins) are large molecules (MW ∼ 200 kDa) with increased asymmetry because of their extended Y-like shape, which results in increased formulation challenges. Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) of protein solutions into protein-rich and protein-poor phases reduces solution stability at intermediate concentrations and lower temperatures, and is a serious concern in formulation development as therapeutic proteins are generally stored at refrigerated conditions. In the current work, LLPS was studied for a DVD-Ig protein molecule as a function of solution conditions by measuring solution opalescence. LLPS of the protein was confirmed by equilibrium studies and by visually observing under microscope. The protein does not undergo any structural change after phase separation. Protein-protein interactions were measured by light scattering (kD) and Tcloud (temperature that marks the onset of phase separation). There is a good agreement between kD measured in dilute solution with Tcloud measured in the critical concentration range. Results indicate that the increased complexity of the molecule (with respect to size, shape, and charge distribution on the molecule) increases contribution of specific and nonspecific interactions in solution, which are affected by formulation factors, resulting in LLPS for DVD-Ig protein.

  3. Microparticulation of whey protein: related factors affecting the solubility.

    PubMed

    Lieske, B; Konrad, G

    1994-10-01

    Solubility of Simplesse 100, the only whey-based fat substitute, was found to be good, considering the fact that technology for preparation of Simplesse 100 is a sequence of thermal steps. To characterize this phenomen, gel chromatography on Sephadex G-100, Sephacryl S-1000 and SDS-PAGE were used, supported by high-speed separation, UV studies and analytical procedures. Results show that the unusual solubility characteristic of microparticulated whey protein is related to two molecular effects: (1) optimal defolding of protein molecules and (2) stabilization of the defolded status by carbohydrate. Both effects were considered to favour non-covalent bonds, which contribute to the outstanding physico-functional and nutritive properties of microparticles.

  4. Dietary protein intake and skeletal-muscle protein metabolism in rats. Studies with salt-washed ribosomes and transfer factors

    PubMed Central

    Alexis, S. D.; Basta, S.; Young, Vernon R.

    1972-01-01

    1. Aspects of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in vitro were studied in young rats given a low-protein diet for up to 10 days and during re-feeding with an adequate diet. 2. Partially purified muscle transfer factors (transferases I and II), crude and purified (NH4Cl-washed) ribosomes and a pH5 enzyme fraction were prepared for this purpose. 3. A marked decrease in the capacity of crude ribosomes to carry out cell-free polypeptide synthesis occurred within 4 days of feeding the low-protein diet. 4. The capacity of salt-washed ribosomes to promote amino acid polymerization, in the presence of added transfer factors and aminoacyl-tRNA, was only slightly decreased by the dietary treatment. 5. However, the capacity of salt-washed ribosomes to bind 14C-labelled aminoacyl-tRNA was decreased by feeding the low-protein diet. 6. The capacity of the pH5 enzyme fraction to promote amino acid incorporation in a complete cell-free system was decreased within 2 days of feeding the low-protein diet. There is no evidence that the change is associated with aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase or binding enzyme activities of the pH5 fractions. 7. These changes are discussed in relation to the diminished rate of protein synthesis in the intact muscle cell when rats are given a low-protein diet. PMID:4634827

  5. Binding Mode Analysis of Zerumbone to Key Signal Proteins in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Ayesha; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam Hj.; Abdullah, Rasedee; Karjiban, Roghayeh Abedi; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Several signaling pathways have been implicated as causative and progression agents. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α protein plays a dual role in promoting and inhibiting cancer depending largely on the pathway initiated by the binding of the protein to its receptor. Zerumbone, an active constituent of Zingiber zerumbet, Smith, is known to act on the tumor necrosis factor pathway upregulating tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene that is able to penetrate into the hydrophobic pockets of proteins to exert its inhibiting activity with several proteins. We found a good binding with the tumor necrosis factor, kinase κB (IKKβ) and the Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) component proteins along the TNF pathway. Our results suggest that zerumbone can exert its apoptotic activities by inhibiting the cytoplasmic proteins. It inhibits the IKKβ kinase that activates the NF-κB and also binds to the NF-κB complex in the TNF pathway. Blocking both proteins can lead to inhibition of cell proliferating proteins to be downregulated and possibly ultimate induction of apoptosis. PMID:25629232

  6. Why protein R-factors are so large: a self-consistent analysis.

    PubMed

    Vitkup, Dennis; Ringe, Dagmar; Karplus, Martin; Petsko, Gregory A

    2002-03-01

    The R-factor and R-free are commonly used to measure the quality of protein models obtained in X-ray crystallography. Well-refined protein structures usually have R-factors in the range of 20-25%, whereas intrinsic errors in the experimental data are usually around 5%. We use molecular dynamics simulations to perform a self-consistent analysis by which we determine the major factors contributing to large values of protein R-factors. The analysis shows that significant R-factor values can arise from the use of isotropic B-factors to model anisotropic protein motions and from coordinate errors. Even in the absence of coordinate errors, the use of isotropic B-factors can cause the R-factors to be around 10%; for coordinate errors smaller than 0.2 A, the two errors types make similar contributions. The inaccuracy of the energy function used and multistate protein dynamics are unlikely to make significant contributions to the large R-factors.

  7. Yin Yang 1: a multifaceted protein beyond a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiyong; Cao, Paul; Wan, Mei Mei; Sui, Guangchao

    2010-01-01

    As a transcription factor, Yin Yang 1 (YY1) regulates the transcription of a dazzling list of genes and the number of its targets still mounts. Recent studies revealed that YY1 possesses functions independent of its DNA binding activity and its regulatory role in tumorigenesis has started to emerge.

  8. Bacterial chitinases and chitin-binding proteins as virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikki F; Paspaliari, Dafni K; Larsen, Tanja; Storgaard, Birgit G; Larsen, Marianne H; Ingmer, Hanne; Palcic, Monica M; Leisner, Jørgen J

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) and chitin-binding proteins (CBPs) play a fundamental role in the degradation of the ubiquitous biopolymer chitin, and the degradation products serve as an important nutrient source for marine- and soil-dwelling bacteria. However, it has recently become clear that representatives of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens encode chitinases and CBPs that support infection of non-chitinous mammalian hosts. This review addresses this biological role of bacterial chitinases and CBPs in terms of substrate specificities, regulation, secretion and involvement in cellular and animal infection.

  9. Hydrophobic environment is a key factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Pathak, Manish C; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ortlund, Eric A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2013-04-01

    The stability of thermophilic proteins has been viewed from different perspectives and there is yet no unified principle to understand this stability. It would be valuable to reveal the most important interactions for designing thermostable proteins for such applications as industrial protein engineering. In this work, we have systematically analyzed the importance of various interactions by computing different parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, inter-residue interactions, ion-pairs and hydrogen bonds. The importance of each interaction has been determined by its predicted relative contribution in thermophiles versus the same contribution in mesophilic homologues based on a dataset of 373 protein families. We predict that hydrophobic environment is the major factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins and found that 80% of thermophilic proteins analyzed showed higher hydrophobicity than their mesophilic counterparts. Ion pairs, hydrogen bonds, and interaction energy are also important and favored in 68%, 50%, and 62% of thermophilic proteins, respectively. Interestingly, thermophilic proteins with decreased hydrophobic environments display a greater number of hydrogen bonds and/or ion pairs. The systematic elimination of mesophilic proteins based on surrounding hydrophobicity, interaction energy, and ion pairs/hydrogen bonds, led to correctly identifying 95% of the thermophilic proteins in our analyses. Our analysis was also applied to another, more refined set of 102 thermophilic-mesophilic pairs, which again identified hydrophobicity as a dominant property in 71% of the thermophilic proteins. Further, the notion of surrounding hydrophobicity, which characterizes the hydrophobic behavior of residues in a protein environment, has been applied to the three-dimensional structures of elongation factor-Tu proteins and we found that the thermophilic proteins are enriched with a hydrophobic environment. The results obtained in this work highlight the

  10. New functional assays to selectively quantify the activated protein C- and tissue factor pathway inhibitor-cofactor activities of protein S in plasma.

    PubMed

    Alshaikh, N A; Rosing, J; Thomassen, M C L G D; Castoldi, E; Simioni, P; Hackeng, T M

    2017-02-17

    Essentials Protein S is a cofactor of activated protein C (APC) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). There are no assays to quantify separate APC and TFPI cofactor activities of protein S in plasma. We developed assays to measure the APC- and TFPI-cofactor activities of protein S in plasma. The assays were sensitive to protein S deficiency, and not affected by the Factor V Leiden mutation.

  11. Chloroplast protein import inhibition by a soluble factor from wheat germ lysate.

    PubMed

    Schleiff, Enrico; Motzkus, Michael; Soll, Jürgen

    2002-09-01

    Protein import into chloroplasts occurs post-translationally in vitro. The precursor proteins are generally synthesised in a reticulocyte lysate- or wheat germ lysate-derived system and imported out of this system into chloroplast. These complex soluble protein mixtures are likely to contain factors, which influence somehow the import competence and import efficiency. Here we describe a heat-stable soluble proteinaceaous factor, which inhibits protein import into chloroplasts in vitro. The inhibitor interacts directly with the precursor protein and renders it import incompetent. This mode of action is supported by two observations: firstly, binding of the precursor to the chloroplast surface is diminished in the presence of the inhibitor. Secondly, when chloroplasts were loaded with precursor proteins under conditions, which allow only binding but not import the inhibitor was unable to abolish the subsequent translocation step.

  12. BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION ANALYSIS OF INDUCIBLE PROTEIN INTERACTIONS: EFFECTS OF FACTORS AFFECTING PROTEIN FOLDING ON FLUORESCENT PROTEIN FRAGMENT ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Robida, Aaron M; Kerppola, Tom K

    2009-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis enables visualization of the subcellular locations of protein interactions in living cells. We investigated the temporal resolution and the quantitative accuracy of BiFC analysis using fragments of different fluorescent proteins. We determined the kinetics of BiFC complex formation in response to the rapamycin-inducible interaction between the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB). Fragments of YFP fused to FKBP and FRB produced detectable BiFC complex fluorescence 10 minutes after rapamycin addition and a ten-fold increase in the mean fluorescence intensity in 8 hours. The N-terminal fragment of the Venus fluorescent protein fused to FKBP produced constitutive BiFC complexes with several C-terminal fragments fused to FRB. A chimeric N-terminal fragment containing residues from Venus and YFP produced either constitutive or inducible BiFC complexes depending on the temperature at which the cells were cultured. The concentrations of inducers required for half-maximal induction of BiFC complex formation by all fluorescent protein fragments tested were consistent with the affinities of the inducers for unmodified FKBP and FRB. Treatment of the FK506 inhibitor of FKBP-FRB interaction prevented the formation of BiFC complexes by FKBP and FRB fusions, but did not disrupt existing BiFC complexes. Proteins synthesized prior to rapamycin addition formed BiFC complexes with the same efficiency as newly synthesized proteins. Inhibitors of protein synthesis attenuated BiFC complex formation independent of their effects on fusion protein synthesis. The kinetics at which they inhibited BiFC complex formation suggest that they prevented association of the fluorescent protein fragments, but not the slow maturation of BiFC complex fluorescence. Agents that induce the unfolded protein response also reduced formation of BiFC complexes. The effects of these agents were suppressed by cellular

  13. Functional and Structural Properties of a Novel Protein and Virulence Factor (Protein sHIP) in Streptococcus pyogenes *

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewska, Magdalena; Happonen, Lotta; Kahn, Fredrik; Varjosalo, Markku; Malmström, Lars; Rosenberger, George; Karlsson, Christofer; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Streicher, Werner; Malmström, Johan; Wikström, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant bacterial pathogen in the human population. The importance of virulence factors for the survival and colonization of S. pyogenes is well established, and many of these factors are exposed to the extracellular environment, enabling bacterial interactions with the host. In the present study, we quantitatively analyzed and compared S. pyogenes proteins in the growth medium of a strain that is virulent to mice with a non-virulent strain. Particularly, one of these proteins was present at significantly higher levels in stationary growth medium from the virulent strain. We determined the three-dimensional structure of the protein that showed a unique tetrameric organization composed of four helix-loop-helix motifs. Affinity pull-down mass spectrometry analysis in human plasma demonstrated that the protein interacts with histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG), and the name sHIP (streptococcal histidine-rich glycoprotein-interacting protein) is therefore proposed. HRG has antibacterial activity, and when challenged by HRG, sHIP was found to rescue S. pyogenes bacteria. This and the finding that patients with invasive S. pyogenes infection respond with antibody production against sHIP suggest a role for the protein in S. pyogenes pathogenesis. PMID:24825900

  14. HSF transcription factor family, heat shock response, and protein intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Westerheide, Sandy D; Raynes, Rachel; Powell, Chase; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2012-02-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are highly abundant in all kingdoms of life, and several protein functional classes, such as transcription factors, transcriptional regulators, hub and scaffold proteins, signaling proteins, and chaperones are especially enriched in intrinsic disorder. One of the unique cellular reactions to protein damaging stress is the so-called heat shock response that results in the upregulation of heat shock proteins including molecular chaperones. This molecular protective mechanism is conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes and allows an organism to respond to various proteotoxic stressors, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, exposure to heavy metals, and drugs. The heat shock response- related proteins can be expressed during normal conditions (e.g., during the cell growth and development) or can be induced by various pathological conditions, such as infection, inflammation, and protein conformation diseases. The initiation of the heat shock response is manifested by the activation of the heat shock transcription factors HSF 1, part of a family of related HSF transcription factors. This review analyzes the abundance and functional roles of intrinsic disorder in various heat shock transcription factors and clearly shows that the heat shock response requires HSF flexibility to be more efficient.

  15. Interaction of Leptospira elongation factor Tu with plasminogen and complement factor H: a metabolic leptospiral protein with moonlighting activities.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Danielly G; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica M; Abe, Cecília M; Monaris, Denize; Morais, Zenaide M; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Sílvio A; Isaac, Lourdes; Abreu, Patrícia A E; Barbosa, Angela S

    2013-01-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), an abundant bacterial protein involved in protein synthesis, has been shown to display moonlighting activities. Known to perform more than one function at different times or in different places, it is found in several subcellular locations in a single organism, and may serve as a virulence factor in a range of important human pathogens. Here we demonstrate that Leptospira EF-Tu is surface-exposed and performs additional roles as a cell-surface receptor for host plasma proteins. It binds plasminogen in a dose-dependent manner, and lysine residues are critical for this interaction. Bound plasminogen is converted to active plasmin, which, in turn, is able to cleave the natural substrates C3b and fibrinogen. Leptospira EF-Tu also acquires the complement regulator Factor H (FH). FH bound to immobilized EF-Tu displays cofactor activity, mediating C3b degradation by Factor I (FI). In this manner, EF-Tu may contribute to leptospiral tissue invasion and complement inactivation. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a leptospiral protein exhibiting moonlighting activities.

  16. [Determination and analysis of protein profile of different transfer factors].

    PubMed

    Guidos-Fogelbach, Guillermo Arturo; Paredes-Aguilar, Jorge Antonio; Colín-Martínez, Nayeli Montserrat; Rojo-Gutiérrez, María Isabel; López-Hidalgo, Marisol; Reyes-López, César Augusto Sandino

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: El factor de transferencia (FT) es el extracto dializable de leucocitos con propiedades de transferencia de inmunidad celular. Su uso se ha extendido en el tratamiento de una amplia gama de padecimientos inmunológicos, infecciosos y como coadyuvante de padecimientos oncológicos. A pesar de ello, no se conocen completamente aspectos importantes de su perfil proteico, concentraciones de componentes y mecanismos de acción. Objetivos: Analizar los perfiles proteicos de diferentes factores de transferencia comercializados en México. Métodos: Se obtuvieron y analizaron 6 FT comercializados en México. Se realizó la cuantificación de proteínas por el método de Bradford, cromatografía líquida de alta resolución (HPLC) y electroforesis en geles de poliacrilamida (SDS-PAGE). Todas las muestras fueron analizadas por duplicado. Resultados: Las concentraciones de proteínas totales de todos los FT analizados fueron menores de 0.2 mg/mL. Los perfiles cromatográficos mostraron diferencias en algunos FT. La concentración de proteínas resultó de 6 hasta casi mil veces más baja en comparación con lo informado por algunos fabricantes. Conclusión: Casi la totalidad de los factores de transferencia comercializados en México carecen de un etiquetado y registro sanitario que cumpla con las normas oficiales vigentes.

  17. Misfolded proteins activate Factor XII in humans, leading to kallikrein formation without initiating coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Coen; Govers-Riemslag, José W.P.; Bouma, Barend; Schiks, Bettina; Hazenberg, Bouke P.C.; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Hammarström, Per; ten Cate, Hugo; de Groot, Philip G.; Bouma, Bonno N.; Gebbink, Martijn F.B.G.

    2008-01-01

    When blood is exposed to negatively charged surface materials such as glass, an enzymatic cascade known as the contact system becomes activated. This cascade is initiated by autoactivation of Factor XII and leads to both coagulation (via Factor XI) and an inflammatory response (via the kallikrein-kinin system). However, while Factor XII is important for coagulation in vitro, it is not important for physiological hemostasis, so the physiological role of the contact system remains elusive. Using patient blood samples and isolated proteins, we identified a novel class of Factor XII activators. Factor XII was activated by misfolded protein aggregates that formed by denaturation or by surface adsorption, which specifically led to the activation of the kallikrein-kinin system without inducing coagulation. Consistent with this, we found that Factor XII, but not Factor XI, was activated and kallikrein was formed in blood from patients with systemic amyloidosis, a disease marked by the accumulation and deposition of misfolded plasma proteins. These results show that the kallikrein-kinin system can be activated by Factor XII, in a process separate from the coagulation cascade, and point to a protective role for Factor XII following activation by misfolded protein aggregates. PMID:18725990

  18. Identification of two substrates of FTS_1067 protein - An essential virulence factor of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Spidlova, Petra; Senitkova, Iva; Link, Marek; Stulik, Jiri

    2016-11-15

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular pathogen with the capacity to infect a variety of hosts including humans. One of the most important proteins involved in F. tularensis virulence and pathogenesis is the protein DsbA. This protein is annotated as a lipoprotein with disulfide oxidoreductase/isomerase activity. Therefore, its interactions with different substrates, including probable virulence factors, to assist in their proper folding are anticipated. We aimed to use the immunopurification approach to find DsbA (gene locus FTS_1067) interacting partners in F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strain FSC200 and compare the identified substrates with proteins which were found in our previous comparative proteome analysis. As a result of our work two FTS_1067 substrates, D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase family protein and HlyD family secretion protein, were identified. Bacterial two-hybrid systems were further used to test their relevance in confirming FTS_1067 protein interactions.

  19. Deep proteomics of mouse skeletal muscle enables quantitation of protein isoforms, metabolic pathways, and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms.

  20. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  1. Amblyomma americanum tick saliva insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 binds insulin but not insulin-like growth factors.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Ž M; Porter, L M; Kim, T K; Bakshi, M; Mulenga, A

    2015-10-01

    Silencing Amblyomma americanum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 (AamIGFBP-rP1) mRNA prevented ticks from feeding to repletion. In this study, we used recombinant (r)AamIGFBP-rP1 in a series of assays to obtain further insight into the role(s) of this protein in tick feeding regulation. Our results suggest that AamIGFBP-1 is an antigenic protein that is apparently exclusively expressed in salivary glands. We found that both males and females secrete AamIGFBP-rP1 into the host during feeding and confirmed that female ticks secrete this protein from within 24-48 h after attachment. Our data suggest that native AamIGFBP-rP1 is a functional insulin binding protein in that both yeast- and insect cell-expressed rAamIGFBP-rP1 bound insulin, but not insulin-like growth factors. When subjected to anti-blood clotting and platelet aggregation assays, rAamIGFBP-rP1 did not have any effect. Unlike human IGFBP-rP1, which is controlled by trypsinization, rAamIGFBP-rP1 is resistant to digestion, suggesting that the tick protein may not be under mammalian host control at the tick feeding site. The majority of tick-borne pathogens are transmitted 48 h after the tick has attached. Thus, the demonstrated antigenicity and secretion into the host within 24-48 h of the tick starting to feed makes AamIGFBP-rP1 an attractive target for antitick vaccine development.

  2. Detection of Intracellular Factor VIII Protein in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Gouri Shankar; Tseng, Sandra C.; Howard, Tom E.; Sauna, Zuben E.

    2013-01-01

    Flow cytometry is widely used in cancer research for diagnosis, detection of minimal residual disease, as well as immune monitoring and profiling following immunotherapy. Detection of specific host proteins for diagnosis predominantly uses quantitative PCR and western blotting assays. In this study, we optimized a flow cytometry-based detection assay for Factor VIII protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). An indirect intracellular staining (ICS) method was standardized using monoclonal antibodies to different domains of human Factor VIII protein. The FVIII protein expression level was estimated by calculating the mean and median fluorescence intensities (MFI) values for each monoclonal antibody. ICS staining of transiently transfected cell lines supported the method's specificity. Intracellular FVIII protein expression was also detected by the monoclonal antibodies used in the study in PBMCs of five blood donors. In summary, our data suggest that intracellular FVIII detection in PBMCs of hemophilia A patients can be a rapid and reliable method to detect intracellular FVIII levels. PMID:23555096

  3. Purification of eukaryotic translation factors from wheat germ for reconstitution of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Hikaru; Sugihara, Shouhei; Takagi, Hisanori; Ogasawara, Tomio; Endo, Yaeta; Takai, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    The wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis is a powerful and versatile method for preparation of proteins based on the accumulated DNA sequence information. As the cell extract used for it contains many factors that are unknown or do not directly involve in protein synthesis, details of the translation reaction is yet to be understood. Therefore, we have decided to try reconstitution of protein synthesis, which would be useful for better understanding of the mechanisms supporting eukaryotic protein synthesis and translational regulation and probably applicable to synthetic biology. In the present study, we fractionated an extract from crude wheat germ according to published protocols to obtain the fractions containing the eukaryotic elongation factors (eEFs) 1A, 1B, and 2. The eEF1A and eEF2 fractions supported polyphenylalanine synthesis.

  4. Sperm and spermatids contain different proteins and bind distinct egg factors.

    PubMed

    Teperek, Marta; Miyamoto, Kei; Simeone, Angela; Feret, Renata; Deery, Michael J; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2014-09-19

    Spermatozoa are more efficient at supporting normal embryonic development than spermatids, their immature, immediate precursors. This suggests that the sperm acquires the ability to support embryonic development during spermiogenesis (spermatid to sperm maturation). Here, using Xenopus laevis as a model organism, we performed 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially expressed proteins between sperm and spermatids in order to identify factors that could be responsible for the efficiency of the sperm to support embryonic development. Furthermore, benefiting from the availability of egg extracts in Xenopus, we also tested whether the chromatin of sperm could attract different egg factors compared to the chromatin of spermatids. Our analysis identified: (1) several proteins which were present exclusively in sperm; but not in spermatid nuclei and (2) numerous egg proteins binding to the sperm (but not to the spermatid chromatin) after incubation in egg extracts. Amongst these factors we identified many chromatin-associated proteins and transcriptional repressors. Presence of transcriptional repressors binding specifically to sperm chromatin could suggest its preparation for the early embryonic cell cycles, during which no transcription is observed and suggests that sperm chromatin has a unique protein composition, which facilitates the recruitment of egg chromatin remodelling factors. It is therefore likely that the acquisition of these sperm-specific factors during spermiogenesis makes the sperm chromatin suitable to interact with the maternal factors and, as a consequence, to support efficient embryonic development.

  5. Hybrid proteins of Cobra Venom Factor and cobra C3: tools to identify functionally important regions in Cobra Venom Factor.

    PubMed

    Hew, Brian E; Wehrhahn, Daniel; Fritzinger, David C; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm

    2012-09-15

    Cobra Venom Factor (CVF) is the complement-activating protein in cobra venom. CVF is structurally and functionally highly homologous to complement component C3. CVF, like C3b, the activated form of C3, forms a bimolecular complex with Factor B in serum, called C3/C5 convertase, an enzyme which activates complement components C3 and C5. Despite the high degree of homology, the two C3/C5 convertases exhibit significant functional differences. The most important difference is that the convertase formed with CVF (CVF,Bb) is physico-chemically far more stable than the convertase formed with C3b (C3b,Bb). In addition, the CVF,Bb convertase and CVF are completely resistant to inactivation by the complement regulatory proteins Factor H and Factor I. Furthermore, the CVF,Bb enzyme shows efficient C5-cleaving activity in fluid phase. In contrast, the C3b,Bb enzyme is essentially devoid of fluid-phase C5-cleaving activity. By taking advantage of the high degree of sequence identity at both the amino acid (85%) and DNA levels (93%) between CVF and cobra C3, we created hybrid proteins of CVF and cobra C3 where sections, or only a few amino acids, of the CVF sequence were replaced with the homologous amino acid sequence of cobra C3. In a first set of experiments, we created five hybrid proteins, termed H1 through H5, where the cobra C3 substitutions collectively spanned the entire length of the CVF protein. We also created three additional hybrid proteins where only four or five amino acid residues in CVF were exchanged with the corresponding amino acid residues from cobra C3. Collectively, these hybrid proteins, representing loss-of-function mutants of CVF, allowed the identification of regions and individual amino acid residues important for the CVF-specific functions. The results include the observation that the CVF β-chain is crucially important for forming a stable convertase, whereas the CVF α-chain appears to harbor no CVF-specific functions. Furthermore, the CVF

  6. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs.

  7. The promotion of angiogenesis by growth factors integrated with ECM proteins through coiled-coil structures.

    PubMed

    Assal, Yasmine; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2013-04-01

    An appropriate method to bind extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and growth factors using advanced protein engineering techniques has the potential to enhance cell proliferation and differentiation for tissue regeneration and repair. In this study we developed a method to co-immobilize non-covalently an ECM protein to three different types of growth factors: basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and single-chain vascular endothelial growth factor (scVEGF121) through a coiled-coil structure formed by helixA/helixB in order to promote angiogenesis. The designed ECM was established by fusing two repeats of elastin-derived unit (APGVGV)(12), cell-adhesive sequence (RGD), laminin-derived IKVAV sequence and collagen-binding domain (CBD) to obtain CBDEREI2. HelixA was fused to each growth factor and helixB to the engineered ECM. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured on engineered ECM and growth factors connected through the coiled-coil formation between helixA and helixB. Cell proliferation and capillary tube-like formation were monitored. Moreover, the differentiated cells with high expression of Ang-2 suggested the ECM remodeling. Our approach of non-covalent coupling method should provide a protein-release control system as a new contribution in biomaterial for tissue engineering field.

  8. Mapping transcription factor interactome networks using HaloTag protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Junshi; Galli, Mary; Kim, Alice Y; Nito, Kazumasa; Aleman, Fernando; Chang, Katherine N; Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra; Quan, Rosa; Nguyen, Hien; Song, Liang; Alvarez, José M; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Chen, Huaming; Ramachandran, Niroshan; Altmann, Stefan; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Hill, David E; Schroeder, Julian I; Chory, Joanne; LaBaer, Joshua; Vidal, Marc; Braun, Pascal; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-07-19

    Protein microarrays enable investigation of diverse biochemical properties for thousands of proteins in a single experiment, an unparalleled capacity. Using a high-density system called HaloTag nucleic acid programmable protein array (HaloTag-NAPPA), we created high-density protein arrays comprising 12,000 Arabidopsis ORFs. We used these arrays to query protein-protein interactions for a set of 38 transcription factors and transcriptional regulators (TFs) that function in diverse plant hormone regulatory pathways. The resulting transcription factor interactome network, TF-NAPPA, contains thousands of novel interactions. Validation in a benchmarked in vitro pull-down assay revealed that a random subset of TF-NAPPA validated at the same rate of 64% as a positive reference set of literature-curated interactions. Moreover, using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay, we confirmed in planta several interactions of biological interest and determined the interaction localizations for seven pairs. The application of HaloTag-NAPPA technology to plant hormone signaling pathways allowed the identification of many novel transcription factor-protein interactions and led to the development of a proteome-wide plant hormone TF interactome network.

  9. Two RNA recognition motif-containing proteins are plant mitochondrial editing factors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaowen; Hanson, Maureen R.; Bentolila, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional C-to-U RNA editing occurs in plant plastid and mitochondrial transcripts. Members of the Arabidopsis RNA-editing factor interacting protein (RIP) family and ORRM1 (Organelle RNA Recognition Motif-containing protein 1) have been recently characterized as essential components of the chloroplast RNA editing apparatus. ORRM1 belongs to a distinct clade of RNA Recognition Motif (RRM)-containing proteins, most of which are predicted to be organelle-targeted. Here we report the identification of two proteins, ORRM2 (organelle RRM protein 2) and ORRM3 (organelle RRM protein 3), as the first members of the ORRM clade to be identified as mitochondrial editing factors. Transient silencing of ORRM2 and ORRM3 resulted in reduced editing efficiency at ∼6% of the mitochondrial C targets. In addition to an RRM domain at the N terminus, ORRM3 carries a glycine-rich domain at the C terminus. The N-terminal RRM domain by itself provides the editing activity of ORRM3. In yeast-two hybrid assays, ORRM3 interacts with RIP1, ORRM2 and with itself. Transient silencing of ORRM2 in the orrm3 mutant further impairs the editing activity at sites controlled by both ORRM2 and ORRM3. Identification of the effect of ORRM2 and ORRM3 on RNA editing reveals a previously undescribed role of RRM-containing proteins as mitochondrial RNA editing factors. PMID:25800738

  10. [Mechanisms underlying physiological functions of food factors via non-specific interactions with biological proteins].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira

    2015-01-01

      We previously reported that zerumbone, a sesquiterpene found in Zingiber zerumbet SMITH, showed notable cancer preventive effects in various organs of experimental rodents. This agent up-regulated nuclear factor-E2-related factor (Nrf2)-dependent expressions of anti-oxidative and xenobiotics-metabolizing enzymes, leading to an increased self-defense capacity. On the other hand, zerumbone markedly suppressed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, an inducible pro-inflammatory enzyme, by disrupting mRNA stabilizing processes. Binding experiments using a biotin derivative of zerumbone demonstrated that Keap1, an Nrf2 repressive protein, is one of its major binding proteins that promotes their dissociation for inducing Nrf2 transactivation. We then generated a specific antibody against zerumbone-modified proteins and found that zerumbone modified numerous cellular proteins in a non-specific manner, with global distribution of the modified proteins seen not only in cytoplasm but also the nucleus. Based on those observations, zerumbone was speculated to cause proteo-stress, a notion supported by previous findings that it increased the C-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein-dependent protein ubiquitination and also promoted aggresome formation. Interestingly, zerumbone counteracted proteo-stress and heat stress via up-regulation of the protein quality control systems (PQCs), e.g., heat shock proteins (HSPs), ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagy. Meanwhile, several phytochemicals, including ursolic acid and curcumin, were identified as marked HSP70 inducers, whereas most nutrients tested were scarcely active. Recent studies have revealed that PQCs play important roles in the prevention of many lifestyle related diseases, such as cancer, thus non-specific binding of phytochemicals to cellular proteins may be a novel and unique mechanism underlying their physiological activities.

  11. "Parallel factor analysis of multi-excitation ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra for protein secondary structure determination".

    PubMed

    Oshokoya, Olayinka O; JiJi, Renee D

    2015-09-10

    Protein secondary structural analysis is important for understanding the relationship between protein structure and function, or more importantly how changes in structure relate to loss of function. The structurally sensitive protein vibrational modes (amide I, II, III and S) in deep-ultraviolet resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectra resulting from the backbone C-O and N-H vibrations make DUVRR a potentially powerful tool for studying secondary structure changes. Experimental studies reveal that the position and intensity of the four amide modes in DUVRR spectra of proteins are largely correlated with the varying fractions of α-helix, β-sheet and disordered structural content of proteins. Employing multivariate calibration methods and DUVRR spectra of globular proteins with varying structural compositions, the secondary structure of a protein with unknown structure can be predicted. A disadvantage of multivariate calibration methods is the requirement of known concentration or spectral profiles. Second-order curve resolution methods, such as parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), do not have such a requirement due to the "second-order advantage." An exceptional feature of DUVRR spectroscopy is that DUVRR spectra are linearly dependent on both excitation wavelength and secondary structure composition. Thus, higher order data can be created by combining protein DUVRR spectra of several proteins collected at multiple excitation wavelengths to give multi-excitation ultraviolet resonance Raman data (ME-UVRR). PARAFAC has been used to analyze ME-UVRR data of nine proteins to resolve the pure spectral, excitation and compositional profiles. A three factor model with non-negativity constraints produced three unique factors that were correlated with the relative abundance of helical, β-sheet and poly-proline II dihedral angles. This is the first empirical evidence that the typically resolved "disordered" spectrum represents the better defined poly-proline II type structure.

  12. The Potyviral P3 Protein Targets Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1A to Promote the Unfolded Protein Response and Viral Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luan, Hexiang; Shine, M B; Cui, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Na; Kachroo, Pradeep; Zhi, Haijan; Kachroo, Aardra

    2016-09-01

    The biochemical function of the potyviral P3 protein is not known, although it is known to regulate virus replication, movement, and pathogenesis. We show that P3, the putative virulence determinant of soybean mosaic virus (SMV), targets a component of the translation elongation complex in soybean. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), a well-known host factor in viral pathogenesis, is essential for SMV virulence and the associated unfolded protein response (UPR). Silencing GmEF1A inhibits accumulation of SMV and another ER-associated virus in soybean. Conversely, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing chemicals promote SMV accumulation in wild-type, but not GmEF1A-knockdown, plants. Knockdown of genes encoding the eEF1B isoform, which is important for eEF1A function in translation elongation, has similar effects on UPR and SMV resistance, suggesting a link to translation elongation. P3 and GmEF1A promote each other's nuclear localization, similar to the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of eEF1A by the Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Nef protein. Our results suggest that P3 targets host elongation factors resulting in UPR, which in turn facilitates SMV replication and place eEF1A upstream of BiP in the ER stress response during pathogen infection.

  13. Arabidopsis Sigma Factor Binding Proteins Are Activators of the WRKY33 Transcription Factor in Plant Defense[W

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-01-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif–containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:21990940

  14. A common site within factor H SCR 7 responsible for binding heparin, C-reactive protein and streptococcal M protein.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Eleni; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Male, Dean A; Ranganathan, Shoba; Ormsby, Rebecca J; Fischetti, Vince A; Mold, Carolyn; Gordon, David L

    2003-04-01

    The complement inhibitor factor H (fH) interacts via its seventh short consensus repeat (SCR) domain with multiple ligands including heparin, streptococcal M protein and C-reactive protein (CRP). The aim of this study was to localize the residues in SCR 7 required for these interactions. We initially built a homology model of fH SCR 6-7 using the averaged NMR structures of fH SCR 15-16 and vaccinia control protein SCR 3-4 as templates. Electrostatic potentials of the model's surface demonstrated a co-localization of three clusters of positively charged residues on SCR 7, labeled site A (R369 and K370), site B (R386 and K387) and site C (K392). These residues, localized to the linker region preceding SCR 7 and to the end of a "hypervariable loop" in SCR 7, were systematically replaced with uncharged alanine residues in an fH construct containing SCR 1-7. The resulting proteins were expressed in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. By ELISA analysis we demonstrated: first, that substituting site A inhibited heparin and CRP binding; secondly, that substituting site B inhibited binding to heparin, CRP and M protein; and thirdly, that substituting site C clearly inhibited only heparin binding.

  15. In Silico Analysis of Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Induced Protein 8-Like-1 (TIPE1) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhaoliang; Wang, Shengjun; Xu, Huaxi

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8)-like protein 1 (TIPE1) was a member of TNFAIP8 family. Previous studies have shown that TIPE1 could induce apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we attempted to predict its potential structure. Bioinformatic analysis of TIPE1 was performed to predict its potential structure using the bioinfomatic web services or softwares. The results showed that the amino acid sequences of TIPE1 were well conserved in mammals. No signal peptide and no transmembrane domain existed in human TIPE1. The aliphatic index of TIPE1 was 100.75 and the theoretical pI was 9.57. TIPE1 was a kind of stable protein and its grand average of hydropathicity was -0.108. Various post-translational modifications were also speculated to exist in TIPE1. In addition, the results of Swiss-Model Server and Swiss-Pdb Viewer program revealed that the predicted three-dimensional structure of TIPE1 protein was stable and it may accord with the rule of stereochemistry. TIPE1 was predicted to interact with FBXW5, caspase8 and so on. In conclusion, TIPE1 may be a stable protein with no signal peptide and no transmembrane domain. The bioinformatic analysis of TIPE1 will provide the basis for the further study on the function of TIPE1. PMID:26207809

  16. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  17. [Chlamydia trachomatis proteasome protein as one of the significant pathogenicity factors of exciter].

    PubMed

    Davydov, D Iu; Zigangirova, N A

    2014-01-01

    Sex-related infections are a global problem. Such infections may lead to acute or chronic diseases. Chlamydia trachomatis is a dangerous and widespread pathogenicity factor that is not sensitive to conventional drugs and has no obvious symptoms. Protein CPAF is leading factor of pathogenesis. This protein inhibits the signaling pathways of host cell and supports long survival of the pathogen in the host cell. The goal of this work was to review general properties of the proteasome Chlamydia protein CPAF, its functions, and role in pathology. The role of protein CPAF in the anti-chlamydia immune reaction is discussed. The prospects of the development of promising anti-chlamydia vaccine, as well as new effective anti-chlamydia drugs are also discussed.

  18. Some Effects of Calcium on the Activation of Human Factor VIII/Von Willebrand Factor Protein by Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, Mary Ellen; McKee, Patrick A.

    1977-01-01

    When Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (FVIII/vWF) protein is rechromatographed on 4% agarose in 0.25 M CaCl2, the protein and vWF activity appear in the void volume, but most of the FVIII procoagulant activity elutes later. Recent evidence suggests that the delayed FVIII procoagulant activity is a proteolytically modified form of FVIII/vWF protein that filters anomalously from agarose in 0.25 M CaCl2. To test whether or not thrombin is the protease involved, the effect of 0.25 M CaCl2 on FVIII/vWF and its reaction with thrombin was examined. About 30% of the FVIII procoagulant activity was lost immediately when solutions of FVIII/vWF protein were made 0.25 M in CaCl2. When FVIII in 0.15 M NaCl was activated with 0.04 U thrombin/ml and then made 0.25 M in CaCl2, the procoagulant activity of a broad range of FVIII/vWF protein concentrations remained activated for at least 6 h. But, in 0.25 M CaCl2, the increase in FVIII procoagulant activity in response to thrombin was much more gradual and once activated, the procoagulant activity was stabilized by 0.25 M CaCl2. When thrombin-activated FVIII/vWF protein was filtered on 4% agarose in 0.15 M NaCl, there was considerable inactivation of FVIII procoagulant activity; however, the procoagulant activity that did remain eluted in the void volume. In contrast, when thrombin-activated FVIII/vWF protein was filtered in 0.25 M CaCl2, the FVIII procoagulant activity eluted well after the void volume and remained activated for 6 h. The procoagulant peak isolated by filtering nonthrombin-activated FVIII/vWF protein on agarose in 0.25 M CaCl2 was compared to that isolated from thrombin-activated FVIII/vWF protein. Both procoagulant activity peak proteins had about the same specific vWF activity as the corresponding void volume protein. Before reduction, the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel patterns for the two procoagulant activity peak proteins were the same. After reduction, the gel pattern for the nonthrombin-activated procoagulant

  19. Local dynamics of proteins and DNA evaluated from crystallographic B factors

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bohdan; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Černý, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of protein and nucleic acid structures is as important as their average static picture. The local molecular dynamics concealed in diffraction images is expressed as so-called B factors. To find out how the crystal-derived B factors represent the dynamic behaviour of atoms and residues of proteins and DNA in their complexes, the distributions of scaled B factors from a carefully curated data set of over 700 protein–DNA crystal structures were analyzed [Schneider et al. (2014 ▶), Nucleic Acids Res. 42, 3381–3394]. Amino acids and nucleotides were categorized based on their molecular neighbourhood as solvent-accessible, solvent-inaccessible (i.e. forming the protein core) or lying at protein–protein or protein–DNA interfaces; the backbone and side-chain atoms were analyzed separately. The B factors of two types of crystal-ordered water molecules were also analyzed. The analysis confirmed several expected features of protein and DNA dynamics, but also revealed surprising facts. Solvent-accessible amino acids have B factors that are larger than those of residues at the biomolecular interfaces, and core-forming amino acids are the most restricted in their movement. A unique feature of the latter group is that their side-chain and backbone atoms are restricted in their movement to the same extent; in all other amino-acid groups the side chains are more floppy than the backbone. The low values of the B factors of water molecules bridging proteins with DNA and the very large fluctuations of DNA phosphates are surprising. The features discriminating different types of residues are less pronounced in structures with lower crystallographic resolution. Some of the observed trends are likely to be the consequence of improper refinement protocols that may need to be rectified. PMID:25195754

  20. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhaohua; Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse; Lin, Ren-Jang; Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  1. Functional Analysis of LIM Domain Proteins and Co-Factors in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    by tetracyclin . The LMO-4 protein is tagged with Myc and the Clim-2 protein is tagged with HA, thus allowing specific immunoprecipitation of these...western blot detecting expression of DN-Climn and LM0-4 in pools of MCF-7 cells in response to tetracyclin . The middle panel shows tet-inducible...binding proteins and transcriptional co-regulators. To search for such factors, we have screened a human breast cDNA library with LMO-4 as bait in the yeast

  2. Design of Recombinant Stem Cell Factor macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Fusion Proteins and their Biological Activity In Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Yang, Jie; Wang, Yuelang; Zhan, Chenyang; Zang, Yuhui; Qin, Junchuan

    2005-05-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) can act in synergistic way to promote the growth of mononuclear phagocytes. SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were designed on the computer using the Homology and Biopolymer modules of the software packages InsightII. Several existing crystal structures were used as templates to generate models of the complexes of receptor with fusion protein. The structure rationality of the fusion protein incorporated a series of flexible linker peptide was analyzed on InsightII system. Then, a suitable peptide GGGGSGGGGSGG was chosen for the fusion protein. Two recombinant SCF-M-CSF fusion proteins were generated by construction of a plasmid in which the coding regions of human SCF (1-165aa) and M-CSF (1-149aa) cDNA were connected by this linker peptide coding sequence followed by subsequent expression in insect cell. The results of Western blot and activity analysis showed that these two recombinant fusion proteins existed as a dimer with a molecular weight of 84 KD under non-reducing conditions and a monomer of 42 KD at reducing condition. The results of cell proliferation assays showed that each fusion protein induced a dose-dependent proliferative response. At equimolar concentration, SCF/M-CSF was about 20 times more potent than the standard monomeric SCF in stimulating TF-1 cell line growth, while M-CSF/SCF was 10 times of monomeric SCF. No activity difference of M-CSF/SCF or SCF/M-CSF to M-CSF (at same molar) was found in stimulating the HL-60 cell linear growth. The synergistic effect of SCF and M-CSF moieties in the fusion proteins was demonstrated by the result of clonogenic assay performed with human bone mononuclear, in which both SCF/M-CSF and M-CSF/SCF induced much higher number of CFU-M than equimolar amount of SCF or M-CSF or that of two cytokines mixture.

  3. The F-BAR Protein PACSIN2 Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Anthony, Eloise C.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling via growth factor receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, is key to various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell survival, and cell migration. In a variety of human diseases such as cancer, aberrant expression and activation of growth factor receptors can lead to disturbed signaling. Intracellular trafficking is crucial for proper signaling of growth factor receptors. As a result, the level of cell surface expression of growth factor receptors is an important determinant for the outcome of downstream signaling. BAR domain-containing proteins represent an important family of proteins that regulate membrane dynamics. In this study, we identify a novel role for the F-BAR protein PACSIN2 in the regulation of EGF receptor signaling. We show that internalized EGF as well as the (activated) EGF receptor translocated to PACSIN2-positive endosomes. Furthermore, loss of PACSIN2 increased plasma membrane expression of the EGF receptor in resting cells and increased EGF-induced phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. As a consequence, EGF-induced activation of Erk and Akt as well as cell proliferation were enhanced in PACSIN2-depleted cells. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel role for the F-BAR-domain protein PACSIN2 in regulating EGF receptor surface levels and EGF-induced downstream signaling. PMID:23129763

  4. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Pieper, Rembert; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Townsend, Katherine; Yu, Chenggang; Yu, Xueping; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is an infectious intracellular pathogen whose virulence and resistance to antibiotics makes it a potential bioterrorism agent. Given its genetic origin as a commensal soil organism, it is equipped with an extensive and varied set of adapted mechanisms to cope with and modulate host-cell environments. One essential virulence mechanism constitutes the specialized secretion systems that are designed to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert pathogen proteins directly into the host cell's cytosol. However, the secretion systems' proteins and, in particular, their host targets are largely uncharacterized. Here, we used a combined in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach to identify B. mallei proteins required for pathogenicity. We used bioinformatics tools, including orthology detection and ab initio predictions of secretion system proteins, as well as published experimental Burkholderia data to initially select a small number of proteins as putative virulence factors. We then used yeast two-hybrid assays against normalized whole human and whole murine proteome libraries to detect and identify interactions among each of these bacterial proteins and host proteins. Analysis of such interactions provided both verification of known virulence factors and identification of three new putative virulence proteins. We successfully created insertion mutants for each of these three proteins using the virulent B. mallei ATCC 23344 strain. We exposed BALB/c mice to mutant strains and the wild-type strain in an aerosol challenge model using lethal B. mallei doses. In each set of experiments, mice exposed to mutant strains survived for the 21-day duration of the experiment, whereas mice exposed to the wild-type strain rapidly died. Given their in vivo role in pathogenicity, and based on the yeast two-hybrid interaction data, these results point to the importance of these pathogen proteins in modulating host ubiquitination pathways, phagosomal escape, and actin

  5. Association of atypical protein kinase C isotypes with the docker protein FRS2 in fibroblast growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y P; Low, B C; Lim, J; Wong, E S; Guy, G R

    1999-07-02

    FRS2 is a docker protein that recruits signaling proteins to the plasma membrane in fibroblast growth factor signal transduction. We report here that FRS2 was associated with PKC lambda when Swiss 3T3 cells were stimulated with basic fibroblast growth factor. PKC zeta, the other member of the atypical PKC subfamily, could also bind FRS2. The association between FRS2 and PKC lambda is likely to be direct as shown by yeast two-hybrid analysis. The C-terminal fragments of FRS2 (amino acid residues 300-508) and SNT2 (amino acids 281-492), an isoform bearing 50% identity to FRS2, interacted with PKC lambda at a region (amino acids 240-562) that encompasses the catalytic domain. In vitro kinase assays revealed neither FRS2 nor SNT2 was a substrate of PKC lambda or zeta. Mutation of the alanine residue (Ala-120) to glutamate in the pseudo-substrate region of PKC lambda results in a constitutively active kinase that exhibited more than 2-fold greater binding to FRS2 in vitro than its "closed" wild-type counterpart. Tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2 did not affect its binding to the constitutively active PKC lambda mutant, suggesting that the activation of PKC lambda is necessary and sufficient for its association with FRS2. It is likely that FRS2 serves as an anchoring protein for targeting activated atypical PKCs to the cell plasma membrane in signaling pathways.

  6. Spiroplasma eriocheiris Adhesin-Like Protein (ALP) Interacts with Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Domain Proteins to Facilitate Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Libo; Liu, Yuhan; Gao, Qi; Xu, Xuechuan; Ning, Mingxiao; Bi, Jingxiu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Min; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Meng, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is a novel pathogen found in recent years, causing the tremor disease (TD) of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis. Like Spiroplasma mirum, S. eriocheiris infects the newborn mouse (adult mice are not infected) and can cause cataract. Adhesion-related protein is an important protein involved in the interaction between pathogen and host. In this study, the Adhesin-like Protein (ALP) of S. eriocheiris was detected on its outer membrane by using immune electron microscopy, and was found to be involved in the bacterium's infection of mouse embryo fibroblasts (3T6-Swiss albino). Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that ALP interacts with a diverse group of mouse proteins. The interactions between recombinant partial fibulin7 (FBLN7; including two epidermal growth factor [EGF] domains) and ALP were confirmed by Far-western blotting and colocalization. We synthetized the domains of FBLN7 [EGF domain: amino acids 136–172 and complement control protein (CCP) domain: 81–134 amino acids], and demonstrated that only EGF domain of FBLN7 can interact with ALP. Because the EGF domain has high degree of similarity to EGF, it can activate the downstream EGFR signaling pathway, in key site amino acids. The EGFR pathway in 3T6 cells was restrained after rALP stimulation resulting from competitive binding of ALP to EGF. The unborn mouse, newborn mouse, and the adult mouse with cataract have a small amount of expressed FBLN7; however, none was detected in the brain and very little expression was seen in the eye of normal adult mice. In short, ALP as a S. eriocheiris surface protein, is critical for infection and further supports the role of ALP in S. eriocheiris infection by competitive effection of the EGF/EGFR axis of the target cells. PMID:28184355

  7. Local dynamics of proteins and DNA evaluated from crystallographic B factors

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Bohdan; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Brevern, Alexandre G. de; Černý, Jiří

    2014-09-01

    Distributions of scaled B factors from 704 protein–DNA complexes reflect primarily the neighbourhood of amino-acid and nucleotide residues: their flexibility grows from the protein core to protein–protein and protein–DNA interfaces, to solvent-exposed residues. Some of the findings clearly observed at higher resolution structures can no longer be observed for structures at low resolution indicating problems in refinement protocols. The dynamics of protein and nucleic acid structures is as important as their average static picture. The local molecular dynamics concealed in diffraction images is expressed as so-called B factors. To find out how the crystal-derived B factors represent the dynamic behaviour of atoms and residues of proteins and DNA in their complexes, the distributions of scaled B factors from a carefully curated data set of over 700 protein–DNA crystal structures were analyzed [Schneider et al. (2014 ▶), Nucleic Acids Res.42, 3381–3394]. Amino acids and nucleotides were categorized based on their molecular neighbourhood as solvent-accessible, solvent-inaccessible (i.e. forming the protein core) or lying at protein–protein or protein–DNA interfaces; the backbone and side-chain atoms were analyzed separately. The B factors of two types of crystal-ordered water molecules were also analyzed. The analysis confirmed several expected features of protein and DNA dynamics, but also revealed surprising facts. Solvent-accessible amino acids have B factors that are larger than those of residues at the biomolecular interfaces, and core-forming amino acids are the most restricted in their movement. A unique feature of the latter group is that their side-chain and backbone atoms are restricted in their movement to the same extent; in all other amino-acid groups the side chains are more floppy than the backbone. The low values of the B factors of water molecules bridging proteins with DNA and the very large fluctuations of DNA phosphates are

  8. Dauricine inhibits insulin-like growth factor-I-induced hypoxia inducible factorprotein accumulation and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xu-dong; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Ke-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of dauricine (Dau) on insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-induced hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). Methods: Serum-starved MCF-7 cells were pretreated for 1 h with different concentrations of Dau, followed by incubation with IGF-I for 6 h. HIF-1α and VEGF protein expression levels were analyzed by Western blotting and ELISA, respectively. HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. In vitro angiogenesis was observed via the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) tube formation assay. An in vitro invasion assay on HUVECs was performed. Results: Dau significantly inhibited IGF-I-induced HIF-1α protein expression but had no effect on HIF-1α mRNA expression. However, Dau remarkably suppressed VEGF expression at both protein and mRNA levels in response to IGF-I. Mechanistically, Dau suppressed IGF-I-induced HIF-1α and VEGF protein expression mainly by blocking the activation of PI-3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. In addition, Dau reduced IGF-I-induced HIF-1α protein accumulation by inhibiting its synthesis as well as by promoting its degradation. Functionally, Dau inhibited angiogenesis in vitro. Moreover, Dau had a direct effect on IGF-I-induced invasion of HUVECs. Conclusion: Dau inhibits human breast cancer angiogenesis by suppressing HIF-1α protein accumulation and VEGF expression, which may provide a novel potential mechanism for the anticancer activities of Dau in human breast cancer. PMID:19349962

  9. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  10. SIPP1, a novel pre-mRNA splicing factor and interactor of protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Llorian, Miriam; Beullens, Monique; Andrés, Isabel; Ortiz, Jose-Miguel; Bollen, Mathieu

    2004-02-15

    We have identified a polypeptide that was already known to interact with polyglutamine-tract-binding protein (PQBP)-1/Npw38 as a novel splicing factor and interactor of protein phosphatase-1, hence the name SIPP1 for splicing factor that interacts with PQBP-1 and PP1 (protein phosphotase 1). SIPP1 was inhibitory to PP1, and its inhibitory potency was increased by phosphorylation with protein kinase CK1. Two-hybrid and co-sedimentation analysis revealed that SIPP1 has two distinct PP1-binding domains and that the binding of SIPP1 with PP1 involves a RVXF (Arg-Val-Xaa-Phe) motif, which functions as a PP1-binding sequence in most interactors of PP1. Enhanced-green-fluorescent-protein-tagged SIPP1 was targeted exclusively to the nucleus and was enriched in the nuclear speckles, which represent storage/assembly sites of splicing factors. We have mapped a nuclear localization signal in the N-terminus of SIPP1, while the proline-rich C-terminal domain appeared to be required for its subnuclear targeting to the speckles. Finally, we found that SIPP1 is also a component of the spliceosomes and that a SIPP1-fragment inhibits splicing catalysis by nuclear extracts independent of its ability to interact with PP1.

  11. Rpf Proteins Are the Factors of Reactivation of the Dormant Forms of Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Nikitushkin, V D; Demina, G R; Kaprelyants, A S

    2016-12-01

    As the response to unfavorable growth conditions, nonsporulating mycobacteria transform into the dormant state with the concomitant formation of the specialized dormant forms characterized by low metabolic activity and resistance to antibiotics. Such dormant cells can be reactivated under the influence of several factors including proteins of Rpf (Resuscitation promoting factor) family, which possess peptidoglycan hydrolase activity and were considered to belong to the group of the autocrine growth factors of the bacteria. Remarkable interest toward Rpf family is determined by its participation in resuscitation of the dormant forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, what in turn is the key element in resuscitation of the latent tuberculosis - an infectious disease that affects one third of the World's population. Experiments with Rpf mutant forms and with strains deleted in these proteins revealed a relationship between the enzymatic activity of this protein and its ability to resuscitate mycobacteria both in vitro and in vivo. This review discusses possible mechanisms of Rpf action including those related to possible participation of the products of mycobacterial Rpf-mediated cell wall hydrolysis (muropeptides) as signaling molecules. The unique ability of Rpf proteins to resuscitate the dormant forms of mycobacteria and to stimulate their proliferation would allow these proteins to occupy their niche in medicine - in diagnostics and in creation of antituberculosis subunit vaccines.

  12. Extracellular Stiffness Modulates the Expression of Functional Proteins and Growth Factors in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Santos, Lívia; Fuhrmann, Gregor; Juenet, Maya; Amdursky, Nadav; Horejs, Christine-Maria; Campagnolo, Paola; Stevens, Molly M

    2015-08-13

    Angiogenesis, the formation of blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is of vital importance during the early stages of bone healing. Extracellular stiffness plays an important role in regulating endothelial cell behavior and angiogenesis, but how this mechanical cue affects proliferation kinetics, gene regulation, and the expression of proteins implicated in angiogenesis and bone regeneration remains unclear. Using collagen-coated polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are exposed to an environment that mimics the elastic properties of collagenous bone, and cellular proliferation and gene and protein expressions are assessed. The proliferation and gene expression of HUVECs are not differentially affected by culture on 3 or 30 kPa PAAm hydrogels, henceforth referred to as low and high stiffness gels, respectively. Although the proliferation and gene transcript levels remain unchanged, significant differences are found in the expressions of functional proteins and growth factors implicated both in the angiogenic and osteogenic processes. The down-regulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 protein with concomitant over-expression of caveolin-1, wingless-type 2, bone morphogenic protein 2, and basic fibroblast growth factor on the high stiffness PAAm hydrogel suggests that rigidity has a pro-angiogenic effect with inherent benefits for bone regeneration.

  13. SIPP1, a novel pre-mRNA splicing factor and interactor of protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed Central

    Llorian, Miriam; Beullens, Monique; Andrés, Isabel; Ortiz, Jose-Miguel; Bollen, Mathieu

    2004-01-01

    We have identified a polypeptide that was already known to interact with polyglutamine-tract-binding protein (PQBP)-1/Npw38 as a novel splicing factor and interactor of protein phosphatase-1, hence the name SIPP1 for splicing factor that interacts with PQBP-1 and PP1 (protein phosphotase 1). SIPP1 was inhibitory to PP1, and its inhibitory potency was increased by phosphorylation with protein kinase CK1. Two-hybrid and co-sedimentation analysis revealed that SIPP1 has two distinct PP1-binding domains and that the binding of SIPP1 with PP1 involves a RVXF (Arg-Val-Xaa-Phe) motif, which functions as a PP1-binding sequence in most interactors of PP1. Enhanced-green-fluorescent-protein-tagged SIPP1 was targeted exclusively to the nucleus and was enriched in the nuclear speckles, which represent storage/assembly sites of splicing factors. We have mapped a nuclear localization signal in the N-terminus of SIPP1, while the proline-rich C-terminal domain appeared to be required for its subnuclear targeting to the speckles. Finally, we found that SIPP1 is also a component of the spliceosomes and that a SIPP1-fragment inhibits splicing catalysis by nuclear extracts independent of its ability to interact with PP1. PMID:14640981

  14. Promoter Recognition by Extracytoplasmic Function σ Factors: Analyzing DNA and Protein Interaction Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Guzina, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors are the largest and the most diverse group of alternative σ factors, but their mechanisms of transcription are poorly studied. This subfamily is considered to exhibit a rigid promoter structure and an absence of mixing and matching; both −35 and −10 elements are considered necessary for initiating transcription. This paradigm, however, is based on very limited data, which bias the analysis of diverse ECF σ subgroups. Here we investigate DNA and protein recognition motifs involved in ECF σ factor transcription by a computational analysis of canonical ECF subfamily members, much less studied ECF σ subgroups, and the group outliers, obtained from recently sequenced bacteriophages. The analysis identifies an extended −10 element in promoters for phage ECF σ factors; a comparison with bacterial σ factors points to a putative 6-amino-acid motif just C-terminal of domain σ2, which is responsible for the interaction with the identified extension of the −10 element. Interestingly, a similar protein motif is found C-terminal of domain σ2 in canonical ECF σ factors, at a position where it is expected to interact with a conserved motif further upstream of the −10 element. Moreover, the phiEco32 ECF σ factor lacks a recognizable −35 element and σ4 domain, which we identify in a homologous phage, 7-11, indicating that the extended −10 element can compensate for the lack of −35 element interactions. Overall, the results reveal greater flexibility in promoter recognition by ECF σ factors than previously recognized and raise the possibility that mixing and matching also apply to this group, a notion that remains to be biochemically tested. IMPORTANCE ECF σ factors are the most numerous group of alternative σ factors but have been little studied. Their promoter recognition mechanisms are obscured by the large diversity within the ECF σ factor group and the limited similarity with the well

  15. Protein-DNA array-based identification of transcription factor activities differentially regulated in obliterative bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ming; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Hong-Lin; Zhao, Yu-Xia; Jing, Ya-Qing; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Guo, Yi-Jiu; Chen, Xing-Long; Li, Ke-Qiu; Li, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation has already become the preferred treatment option for a variety of end-stage pulmonary failure. However the long-term results of lung transplantation are still not compelling and the major death reason is commonly due to obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) which is considered as chronic rejection presenting manifests physiologically as a progressive decline in FEV1. Transcription factors (TFs) play a key role in regulating gene expression and in providing an interconnecting regulatory between related pathway elements. Although the transcription factors are required for expression of the proinflammatory cytokines and immune proteins which are involved in obliterative bronchiolitis following lung transplantation, the alterations of the transcription factors in OB have not yet been revealed. Therefore, to investigate the alteration pattern of the transcription factors in OB, we used protein/DNA arrays. Mice orthotopic tracheal transplantation model was used in this studying. In this study, we explored the activity profiles of TFs in Protein/DNA array data of tracheal tissue in 14 and 28 day after transplanted. From a total of 345 screened TFs, we identified 42 TFs that showed associated with OB progression. Our data indicate that TFs may be potentially involved in the pathogenesis of OB, and can prevent, diagnose and treat OB after lung transplantation. In development of OB, some of the TFs may have ability to modulate the transcription of inflammatory proteins such cytokines, inflammatory enzymes and so on. PMID:26261607

  16. Mapping transcription factor interactome networks using HaloTag protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yazaki, Junshi; Galli, Mary; Kim, Alice Y.; Nito, Kazumasa; Aleman, Fernando; Chang, Katherine N.; Quan, Rosa; Nguyen, Hien; Song, Liang; Alvarez, José M.; Huang, Shao-shan Carol; Chen, Huaming; Ramachandran, Niroshan; Altmann, Stefan; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Schroeder, Julian I.; Chory, Joanne; LaBaer, Joshua; Vidal, Marc; Braun, Pascal; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarrays enable investigation of diverse biochemical properties for thousands of proteins in a single experiment, an unparalleled capacity. Using a high-density system called HaloTag nucleic acid programmable protein array (HaloTag-NAPPA), we created high-density protein arrays comprising 12,000 Arabidopsis ORFs. We used these arrays to query protein–protein interactions for a set of 38 transcription factors and transcriptional regulators (TFs) that function in diverse plant hormone regulatory pathways. The resulting transcription factor interactome network, TF-NAPPA, contains thousands of novel interactions. Validation in a benchmarked in vitro pull-down assay revealed that a random subset of TF-NAPPA validated at the same rate of 64% as a positive reference set of literature-curated interactions. Moreover, using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay, we confirmed in planta several interactions of biological interest and determined the interaction localizations for seven pairs. The application of HaloTag-NAPPA technology to plant hormone signaling pathways allowed the identification of many novel transcription factor–protein interactions and led to the development of a proteome-wide plant hormone TF interactome network. PMID:27357687

  17. Interactions between tobamovirus replication proteins and cellular factors: their impacts on virus multiplication.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Nishikiori, Masaki; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2010-11-01

    Most viral gene products function inside cells in the presence of various host proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. Thus, viral gene products come into direct contact with these molecules. The replication proteins of tobamovirus participate not only in viral genome replication but also in counterdefense mechanisms against RNA silencing and other plant defense systems. Accumulating evidence indicates that these functions are carried out through interactions with specific host components. Interactions with some cellular factors, however, are inhibitory to virus multiplication and contribute to host range restriction of tobamovirus. The interactions that have positive and negative impacts on virus multiplication should have been maintained and lost, respectively, during adaptation of the viruses to their respective natural hosts. This review lists the host factors that interact with the replication proteins of tobamovirus and discusses how they influence multiplication of the virus.

  18. Recent Insights into Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are major regulators of insulin-like growth factor bioavailability and activity in metabolic signaling. Seven IGFBP family isoforms have been identified. Recent studies have shown that IGFBPs play a pivotal role in metabolic signaling and disease, including the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Although many studies have documented the various roles played by IGFBPs, transcriptional regulation of IGFBPs is not well understood. In this review, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms of IGFBP gene expression, and we summarize the findings of transcription factor activity in the IGFBP promoter region. PMID:28116872

  19. Core Binding Factor β Protects HIV, Type 1 Accessory Protein Viral Infectivity Factor from MDM2-mediated Degradation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yusuke; Shindo, Keisuke; Nagata, Kayoko; Yoshinaga, Noriyoshi; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-11-25

    HIV, type 1 overcomes host restriction factor apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) proteins by organizing an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex together with viral infectivity factor (Vif) and a host transcription cofactor core binding factor β (CBFβ). CBFβ is essential for Vif to counteract APOBEC3 by enabling the recruitment of cullin 5 to the complex and increasing the steady-state level of Vif protein; however, the mechanisms by which CBFβ up-regulates Vif protein remains unclear. Because we have reported previously that mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) is an E3 ligase for Vif, we hypothesized that CBFβ might protect Vif from MDM2-mediated degradation. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed that Vif mutants that do not bind to CBFβ preferentially interact with MDM2 and that overexpression of CBFβ disrupts the interaction between MDM2 and Vif. Knockdown of CBFβ reduced the steady-state level of Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells. Cycloheximide chase analyses revealed that Vif E88A/W89A, which does not interact with CBFβ, degraded faster than wild-type Vif in MDM2-proficient cells but not in MDM2-null cells, suggesting that Vif stabilization by CBFβ is mainly caused by impairing MDM2-mediated degradation. We identified Vif R93E as a Vif variant that does not bind to MDM2, and the virus with this substitution mutation was more resistant to APOBEC3G than the parental virus. Combinatory substitution of Vif residues required for CBFβ binding and MDM2 binding showed full recovery of Vif steady-state levels, supporting our hypothesis. Our data provide new insights into the mechanism of Vif augmentation by CBFβ.

  20. Promiscuous stimulation of ParF protein polymerization by heterogeneous centromere binding factors.

    PubMed

    Machón, Cristina; Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2007-11-16

    The segrosome is the nucleoprotein complex that mediates accurate segregation of bacterial plasmids. The segrosome of plasmid TP228 comprises ParF and ParG proteins that assemble on the parH centromere. ParF, which exemplifies one clade of the ubiquitous ParA superfamily of segregation proteins, polymerizes extensively in response to ATP binding. Polymerization is modulated by the ParG centromere binding factor (CBF). The segrosomes of plasmids pTAR, pVT745 and pB171 include ParA homologues of the ParF subgroup, as well as diverse homodimeric CBFs with no primary sequence similarity to ParG, or each other. Centromere binding by these analogues is largely specific. Here, we establish that the ParF homologues of pTAR and pB171 filament modestly with ATP, and that nucleotide hydrolysis is not required for this polymerization, which is more prodigious when the cognate CBF is also present. By contrast, the ParF homologue of plasmid pVT745 did not respond appreciably to ATP alone, but polymerized extensively in the presence of both its cognate CBF and ATP. The co-factors also stimulated nucleotide-independent polymerization of cognate ParF proteins. Moreover, apart from the CBF of pTAR, the disparate ParG analogues promoted polymerization of non-cognate ParF proteins suggesting that filamentation of the ParF proteins is enhanced by a common mechanism. Like ParG, the co-factors may be modular, possessing a centromere-specific interaction domain linked to a flexible region containing determinants that promiscuously stimulate ParF polymerization. The CBFs appear to function as bacterial analogues of formins, microtubule-associated proteins or related ancillary factors that regulate eucaryotic cytoskeletal dynamics.

  1. Hierarchical functional specificity of cytosolic heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) nucleotide exchange factors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jennifer L; Verghese, Jacob; Gibney, Patrick A; Morano, Kevin A

    2014-05-09

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) molecular chaperones play critical roles in protein homeostasis. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cytosolic Hsp70 interacts with up to three types of nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) homologous to human counterparts: Sse1/Sse2 (Heat shock protein 110 (Hsp110)), Fes1 (HspBP1), and Snl1 (Bag-1). All three NEFs stimulate ADP release; however, it is unclear why multiple distinct families have been maintained throughout eukaryotic evolution. In this study we investigate NEF roles in Hsp70 cell biology using an isogenic combinatorial collection of NEF deletion mutants. Utilizing well characterized model substrates, we find that Sse1 participates in most Hsp70-mediated processes and is of particular importance in protein biogenesis and degradation, whereas Fes1 contributes to a minimal extent. Surprisingly, disaggregation and resolubilization of thermally denatured firefly luciferase occurred independently of NEF activity. Simultaneous deletion of SSE1 and FES1 resulted in constitutive activation of heat shock protein expression mediated by the transcription factor Hsf1, suggesting that these two factors are important for modulating stress response. Fes1 was found to interact in vivo preferentially with the Ssa family of cytosolic Hsp70 and not the co-translational Ssb homolog, consistent with the lack of cold sensitivity and protein biogenesis phenotypes for fes1Δ cells. No significant consequence could be attributed to deletion of the minor Hsp110 SSE2 or the Bag homolog SNL1. Together, these lines of investigation provide a comparative analysis of NEF function in yeast that implies Hsp110 is the principal NEF for cytosolic Hsp70, making it an ideal candidate for therapeutic intervention in human protein folding disorders.

  2. Reduction of Factor VIII Inhibitor Titers During Immune Tolerance Induction With Recombinant Factor VIII-Fc Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Groomes, Charles L; Gianferante, David M; Crouch, Gary D; Parekh, Dina S; Scott, David W; Lieuw, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The development of inhibitors toward factor VIII (FVIII) is a common and serious complication of hemophilia A (HA) therapy. Patients with hemophilia who develop inhibitors often undergo time- and resource-intensive immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. We report a 15-month-old male with severe HA and a high-titer inhibitor that occurred while receiving prophylactic treatment with recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), in whom significant inhibitor titer reduction was achieved with thrice weekly infusions of a new, prolonged half-life rFVIII-Fc fusion protein product (trade name Eloctate). Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of Eloctate in ITI protocols.

  3. Structural Basis for Protein anti-Aggregation Activity of the Trigger Factor Chaperone*

    PubMed Central

    Saio, Tomohide; Guan, Xiao; Rossi, Paolo; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular chaperones prevent aggregation and misfolding of proteins but scarcity of structural data has impeded an understanding of the recognition and anti-aggregation mechanisms. Here we report the solution structure, dynamics and energetics of three Trigger Factor (TF) chaperone molecules in complex with alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) captured in the unfolded state. Our data show that TF uses multiple sites to bind to several regions of the PhoA substrate protein primarily through hydrophobic contacts. NMR relaxation experiments show that TF interacts with PhoA in a highly dynamic fashion but as the number and length of the PhoA regions engaged by TF increases, a more stable complex gradually emerges. Multivalent binding keeps the substrate protein in an extended, unfolded conformation. The results show how molecular chaperones recognize unfolded polypeptides and how by acting as unfoldases and holdases prevent the aggregation and premature (mis)folding of unfolded proteins. PMID:24812405

  4. Analysis of Protein Thermostability Enhancing Factors in Industrially Important Thermus Bacteria Species

    PubMed Central

    Kumwenda, Benjamin; Litthauer, Derek; Bishop, Özlem Tastan; Reva, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    Elucidation of evolutionary factors that enhance protein thermostability is a critical problem and was the focus of this work on Thermus species. Pairs of orthologous sequences of T. scotoductus SA-01 and T. thermophilus HB27, with the largest negative minimum folding energy (MFE) as predicted by the UNAFold algorithm, were statistically analyzed. Favored substitutions of amino acids residues and their properties were determined. Substitutions were analyzed in modeled protein structures to determine their locations and contribution to energy differences using PyMOL and FoldX programs respectively. Dominant trends in amino acid substitutions consistent with differences in thermostability between orthologous sequences were observed. T. thermophilus thermophilic proteins showed an increase in non-polar, tiny, and charged amino acids. An abundance of alanine substituted by serine and threonine, as well as arginine substituted by glutamine and lysine was observed in T. thermophilus HB27. Structural comparison showed that stabilizing mutations occurred on surfaces and loops in protein structures. PMID:24023508

  5. Protein Expression Signatures for Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-mediated Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Matthew V.; Manning, H. Charles; Coffey, Robert J.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of cellular signaling networks typically involves targeted measurements of phosphorylated protein intermediates. However, phosphoproteomic analyses usually require affinity enrichment of phosphopeptides and can be complicated by artifactual changes in phosphorylation caused by uncontrolled preanalytical variables, particularly in the analysis of tissue specimens. We asked whether changes in protein expression, which are more stable and easily analyzed, could reflect network stimulation and inhibition. We employed this approach to analyze stimulation and inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by EGF and selective EGFR inhibitors. Shotgun analysis of proteomes from proliferating A431 cells, EGF-stimulated cells, and cells co-treated with the EGFR inhibitors cetuximab or gefitinib identified groups of differentially expressed proteins. Comparisons of these protein groups identified 13 proteins whose EGF-induced expression changes were reversed by both EGFR inhibitors. Targeted multiple reaction monitoring analysis verified differential expression of 12 of these proteins, which comprise a candidate EGFR inhibition signature. We then tested these 12 proteins by multiple reaction monitoring analysis in three other models: 1) a comparison of DiFi (EGFR inhibitor-sensitive) and HCT116 (EGFR-insensitive) cell lines, 2) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded mouse xenograft DiFi and HCT116 tumors, and 3) in tissue biopsies from a patient with the gastric hyperproliferative disorder Ménétrier's disease who was treated with cetuximab. Of the proteins in the candidate signature, a core group, including c-Jun, Jagged-1, and Claudin 4, were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in all three models. Although the goal of these studies was not to validate a clinically useful EGFR inhibition signature, the results confirm the hypothesis that clinically used EGFR inhibitors generate characteristic protein expression changes. This work further outlines a prototypical

  6. Recombinant Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterisation of Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Nephroblastoma-Overexpressed Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Wilhelm; Kupper, Michael; Hoffmann, Kurt; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins, especially its prominent member, the Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) has been identified as a possible biomarker for the diagnosis of fibrotic diseases. As a downstream mediator of TGF-β1 signalling, it is involved in tissue scarring, stimulates interstitial deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, and promotes proliferation of several cell types. Another member of this family, the Nephroblastoma-Overexpressed protein (NOV/CCN3), has growth-inhibiting properties. First reports further suggest that these two CCN family members act opposite to each other in regulating extracellular matrix protein expression and reciprocally influence their own expression when over-expressed. We have established stable HEK and Flp-In-293 clones as productive sources for recombinant human CCN2/CTGF. In addition, we generated an adenoviral vector for recombinant expression of rat NOV and established protocols to purify large quantities of these CCN proteins. The identity of purified human CCN2/CTGF and rat CCN3/NOV was proven by In-gel digest followed by ESI-TOF/MS mass spectrometry. The biological activity of purified proteins was demonstrated using a Smad3-sensitive reporter gene and BrdU proliferation assay in permanent cell line EA•hy 926 cells. We further demonstrate for the first time that both recombinant CCN proteins are N-glycosylated. PMID:21209863

  7. Analysis of temperature factor distribution in high-resolution protein structures.

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, S.; Murthy, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    The temperature factors obtained from X-ray refinement of proteins at high resolution show large variations from one structure to another. However, the B-values expressed in units of standard deviation about their mean value (B'-factor) at the C alpha atoms show remarkably characteristic frequency distribution. In all of the 110 proteins examined in this study, the frequency distribution exhibited a bimodal distribution. The peaks in the B'-factor frequency distribution occur at -1.1 and 0.4 for a bin size of 0.5. The peak at lower temperature factor corresponds largely to buried residues, whereas the peak at larger value corresponds to exposed residues. The distribution could be accurately described as a superposition of two Gaussian functions. The parameters describing the distribution are therefore characteristic of protein structures. The frequency distribution for a given amino acid over all the proteins also shows a similar bimodal distribution, although the areas under the two Gaussians differ from one amino acid to another. The area under the frequency distribution curve for any interval in B'-factor represents the propensity of the amino acid to occur in that interval. This propensity is related both to the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the residue and the tendency of the residue to impose a different degree of rigidity on the polypeptide chain. The frequency distribution of stretches of high B'-factors departs appreciably from that expected for a random distribution. The correlation in the B-values of sequentially proximal residues is probably responsible for the bimodal distribution. PMID:9416605

  8. Role of diacylglycerol-regulated protein kinase C isotypes in growth factor activation of the Raf-1 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, H; Smola, U; Wixler, V; Eisenmann-Tappe, I; Diaz-Meco, M T; Moscat, J; Rapp, U; Cooper, G M

    1997-01-01

    The Raf protein kinases function downstream of Ras guanine nucleotide-binding proteins to transduce intracellular signals from growth factor receptors. Interaction with Ras recruits Raf to the plasma membrane, but the subsequent mechanism of Raf activation has not been established. Previous studies implicated hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in Raf activation; therefore, we investigated the role of the epsilon isotype of protein kinase C (PKC), which is stimulated by PC-derived diacylglycerol, as a Raf activator. A dominant negative mutant of PKC epsilon inhibited both proliferation of NIH 3T3 cells and activation of Raf in COS cells. Conversely, overexpression of active PKC epsilon stimulated Raf kinase activity in COS cells and overcame the inhibitory effects of dominant negative Ras in NIH 3T3 cells. PKC epsilon also stimulated Raf kinase in baculovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells and was able to directly activate Raf in vitro. Consistent with its previously reported activity as a Raf activator in vitro, PKC alpha functioned similarly to PKC epsilon in both NIH 3T3 and COS cell assays. In addition, constitutively active mutants of both PKC alpha and PKC epsilon overcame the inhibitory effects of dominant negative mutants of the other PKC isotype, indicating that these diacylglycerol-regulated PKCs function as redundant activators of Raf-1 in vivo. PMID:9001227

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 3, a protein with a dual subcellular fate, is interacting with human ribosomal protein S2

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, Marianne; Reimers, Kerstin; Wirz, Werner; Gressner, Axel M.; Mueller, Robert; Kiefer, Paul . E-mail: pkiefer@ukaachen.de

    2005-12-16

    The secreted isoform of fibroblast growth factor 3 (FGF3) induces a mitogenic cell response, while the nuclear form inhibits cell proliferation. Recently, we identified a nucleolar FGF3-binding protein which is implicated in processing of pre-rRNA as a possible target of nuclear FGF3 signalling. Here, we report a second candidate protein identified by a yeast two-hybrid screen for nuclear FGF3 action, ribosomal protein S2, rpS2. Recombinant rpS2 binds to in vitro translated FGF3 and to nuclear FGF3 extracted from transfected COS-1 cells. Characterization of the FGF3 binding domain of rpS2 showed that both the Arg-Gly-rich N-terminal region and a short carboxyl-terminal sequence of rpS2 are necessary for FGF3 binding. Mapping the S2 binding domains of FGF3 revealed that these domains are important for both NoBP and rpS2 interaction. Transient co-expression of rpS2 and nuclear FGF3 resulted in a reduced nucleolar localization of the FGF. These findings suggest that the nuclear form of FGF3 inhibits cell proliferation by interfering with ribosomal biogenesis.

  10. Enhanced Production of Insulin-like Growth Factor I Protein in Escherichia coli by Optimization of Five Key Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbari, Javad; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Vahidi, Hossein; Moghimi, Hamidreza; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Namvaran, Mohammad Mehdi; Jafari, Sevda

    2015-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) is a kind of growth factor with clinical significance in medicine. Up to now, E. coli expression system has been widely used as a host to produce rhIGF-1 with high yields. Batch cultures as non-continuous fermentations were carried out to overproduce rhIGF-I in E. coli. The major objective of this study is over- production of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I) through a developed process by recruiting effective factors in order to achieve the most recombinant protein. In this study we investigated the effect of culture medium, induction temperature and amount of inducer on cell growth and IGF-1 production. Taguchi design of experiments (DOE) method was used as the statistical method. Analysis of experimental data showed that maximum production of rhIGF-I was occurred in 32y culture medium at 32 °C and 0.05 Mm IPTG. Under this condition, 0.694 g/L of rhIGF-I was produced as the inclusion bodies. Following optimization of these three factors, we have also optimized the amount of glucose and induction time in 5 liter top bench bioreactor. Full factorial design of experiment method was used for these two factors as the statistical method. 10 g/L and OD600=5 were selected as the optimum point of Glucose amount and induction time, respectively. Finally, we reached to a concentration of 1.26 g/L rhIGF-1 at optimum condition. PMID:26330880

  11. Nitrogen-to-Protein Conversion Factors for Three Edible Insects: Tenebrio molitor, Alphitobius diaperinus, and Hermetia illucens

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Insects are considered a nutritionally valuable source of alternative proteins, and their efficient protein extraction is a prerequisite for large-scale use. The protein content is usually calculated from total nitrogen using the nitrogen-to-protein conversion factor (Kp) of 6.25. This factor overestimates the protein content, due to the presence of nonprotein nitrogen in insects. In this paper, a specific Kp of 4.76 ± 0.09 was calculated for larvae from Tenebrio molitor, Alphitobius diaperinus, and Hermetia illucens, using amino acid analysis. After protein extraction and purification, a Kp factor of 5.60 ± 0.39 was found for the larvae of three insect species studied. We propose to adopt these Kp values for determining protein content of insects to avoid overestimation of the protein content. PMID:28252948

  12. Nitrogen-to-Protein Conversion Factors for Three Edible Insects: Tenebrio molitor, Alphitobius diaperinus, and Hermetia illucens.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Renske H; Vincken, Jean-Paul; van den Broek, Lambertus A M; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Lakemond, Catriona M M

    2017-03-22

    Insects are considered a nutritionally valuable source of alternative proteins, and their efficient protein extraction is a prerequisite for large-scale use. The protein content is usually calculated from total nitrogen using the nitrogen-to-protein conversion factor (Kp) of 6.25. This factor overestimates the protein content, due to the presence of nonprotein nitrogen in insects. In this paper, a specific Kp of 4.76 ± 0.09 was calculated for larvae from Tenebrio molitor, Alphitobius diaperinus, and Hermetia illucens, using amino acid analysis. After protein extraction and purification, a Kp factor of 5.60 ± 0.39 was found for the larvae of three insect species studied. We propose to adopt these Kp values for determining protein content of insects to avoid overestimation of the protein content.

  13. Factorization of the association rate coefficient in ligand rebinding to heme proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    A stochastic theory of ligand migration in biomolecules is used to analyze the recombination of small ligands to heme proteins after flash photolysis. The stochastic theory is based on a generalized sequential barrier model in which a ligand binds by overcoming a series of barriers formed by the solvent protein interface, the protein matrix, and the heme distal histidine system. The stochastic theory shows that the association rate coefficient λon factorizes into three terms λon =γ12Nout, where γ12 is the rate coefficient from the heme pocket to the heme binding site, is the equilibrium pocket occupation factor, and Nout is the fraction of heme proteins which do not undergo geminate recombination of a flashed-off ligand. The factorization of λon holds for any number of barriers and with no assumptions regarding the various rate coefficients so long as the exponential solvent process occurs. Transitions of a single ligand are allowed between any two sites with two crucial exceptions: (i) the heme binding site acts as a trap so that thermal dissociation of a bound ligand does not occur within the time of the measurement; (ii) the final step in the rebinding process always has a ligand in the heme pocket from where the ligand binds to the heme iron.

  14. Structural basis for conserved complement factor-like function in the antimalarial protein TEP1

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Richard H. G.; Chang, Chung-I; Chelliah, Yogarany; Blandin, Stéphanie; Levashina, Elena A.; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2007-01-01

    Thioester-containing proteins (TEPs) are a major component of the innate immune response of insects to invasion by bacteria and protozoa. TEPs form a distinct clade of a superfamily that includes the pan-protease inhibitors α2-macroglobulins and vertebrate complement factors. The essential feature of these proteins is a sequestered thioester bond that, after cleavage in a protease-sensitive region of the protein, is activated and covalently binds to its target. Recently, TEP1 from the malarial vector Anopheles gambiae was shown to mediate recognition and killing of ookinetes from the malarial parasite Plasmodium berghei, a model for the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TEP1 isoform TEP1r. Although the overall protein fold of TEP1r resembles that of complement factor C3, the TEP1r domains are repositioned to stabilize the inactive conformation of the molecule (containing an intact thioester) in the absence of the anaphylotoxin domain, a central component of complement factors. The structure of TEP1r provides a molecular basis for the differences between TEP1 alleles TEP1r and TEP1s, which correlate with resistance of A. gambiae to infection by P. berghei. PMID:17606907

  15. All-atom contact model for understanding protein dynamics from crystallographic B-factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Wei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2009-04-22

    An all-atom local contact model is described that can be used to predict protein motions underlying isotropic crystallographic B-factors. It uses a mean-field approximation to represent the motion of an atom in a harmonic potential generated by the surrounding atoms resting at their equilibrium positions. Based on a 400-ns molecular dynamics simulation of ubiquitin in explicit water, it is found that each surrounding atom stiffens the spring constant by a term that on average scales exponentially with the interatomic distance. This model combines features of the local density model by Halle and the local contact model by Zhang and Brüschweiler. When applied to a nonredundant set of 98 ultra-high resolution protein structures, an average correlation coefficient of 0.75 is obtained for all atoms. The systematic inclusion of crystal contact contributions and fraying effects is found to enhance the performance substantially. Because the computational cost of the local contact model scales linearly with the number of protein atoms, it is applicable to proteins of any size for the prediction of B-factors of both backbone and side-chain atoms. The model performs as well as or better than several other models tested, such as rigid-body motional models, the local density model, and various forms of the elastic network model. It is concluded that at the currently achievable level of accuracy, collective intramolecular motions are not essential for the interpretation of B-factors.

  16. Chemical Chaperones Improve Protein Secretion and Rescue Mutant Factor VIII in Mice with Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Milanov, Peter; Abriss, Daniela; Ungerer, Christopher; Quade-Lyssy, Patricia; Simpson, Jeremy C.; Pepperkok, Rainer; Seifried, Erhard; Tonn, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Inefficient intracellular protein trafficking is a critical issue in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases and in recombinant protein production. Here we investigated the trafficking of factor VIII (FVIII), which is affected in the coagulation disorder hemophilia A. We hypothesized that chemical chaperones may be useful to enhance folding and processing of FVIII in recombinant protein production, and as a therapeutic approach in patients with impaired FVIII secretion. A tagged B-domain-deleted version of human FVIII was expressed in cultured Chinese Hamster Ovary cells to mimic the industrial production of this important protein. Of several chemical chaperones tested, the addition of betaine resulted in increased secretion of FVIII, by increasing solubility of intracellular FVIII aggregates and improving transport from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Similar results were obtained in experiments monitoring recombinant full-length FVIII. Oral betaine administration also increased FVIII and factor IX (FIX) plasma levels in FVIII or FIX knockout mice following gene transfer. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo applications of betaine were also able to rescue a trafficking-defective FVIII mutant (FVIIIQ305P). We conclude that chemical chaperones such as betaine might represent a useful treatment concept for hemophilia and other diseases caused by deficient intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:22973456

  17. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein Loads as a Separate Factor onto DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Suzanne; Volker, Marcel; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Nigg, Alex L.; Moné, Martijn J.; van Zeeland, Albert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main DNA repair pathway in mammals for removal of UV-induced lesions. NER involves the concerted action of more than 25 polypeptides in a coordinated fashion. The xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) has been suggested to function as a central organizer and damage verifier in NER. How XPA reaches DNA lesions and how the protein is distributed in time and space in living cells are unknown. Here we studied XPA in vivo by using a cell line stably expressing physiological levels of functional XPA fused to green fluorescent protein and by applying quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The majority of XPA moves rapidly through the nucleoplasm with a diffusion rate different from those of other NER factors tested, arguing against a preassembled XPA-containing NER complex. DNA damage induced a transient (∼5-min) immobilization of maximally 30% of XPA. Immobilization depends on XPC, indicating that XPA is not the initial lesion recognition protein in vivo. Moreover, loading of replication protein A on NER lesions was not dependent on XPA. Thus, XPA participates in NER by incorporation of free diffusing molecules in XPC-dependent NER-DNA complexes. This study supports a model for a rapid consecutive assembly of free NER factors, and a relatively slow simultaneous disassembly, after repair. PMID:12897146

  18. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B; Karmali, Priya P; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M

    2017-03-07

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4-6 h) that remains stable for up to 4-6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA-LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable.

  19. Factors influencing subcellular localization of the human papillomavirus L2 minor structural protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kieback, Elisa; Mueller, Martin . E-mail: Martin.Mueller@dkfz.de

    2006-02-05

    Two structural proteins form the capsids of papillomaviruses. The major structural protein L1 is the structural determinant of the capsids and is present in 360 copies arranged in 72 pentamers. The minor structural protein L2 is estimated to be present in twelve copies per capsid. Possible roles for L2 in interaction with cell surface receptors and in virion uptake have been suggested. As previously reported, L2 localizes in subnuclear domains identified as nuclear domain 10 (ND10). As it was demonstrated that L2 is able to recruit viral and cellular proteins to ND10, a possible role for L2 as a mediator in viral assembly has been proposed. In this study, we determined factors influencing the localization of L2 at ND10. Under conditions of moderate L2 expression level and in the absence of heterologous viral components, we observed that, in contrast to previous reports, L2 is mainly distributed homogeneously throughout the nucleus. L2, however, is recruited to ND10 at a higher expression level or in the presence of viral components derived from vaccinia virus or from Semliki Forest virus. We observed that translocation of L2 to ND10 is not a concentration-dependent accumulation but rather seems to be triggered by yet unidentified cellular factors. In contrast to HPV 11 and 16 L2, the HPV 18 L2 protein seems to require L1 for efficient nuclear accumulation.

  20. Systemic delivery of factor IX messenger RNA for protein replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Suvasini; Tonnu, Nina; Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Limphong, Pattraranee; Vega, Jerel B.; Karmali, Priya P.; Chivukula, Pad; Verma, Inder M.

    2017-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of messenger RNAs for protein replacement therapies offers great promise but remains challenging. In this report, we demonstrate systemic, in vivo, nonviral mRNA delivery through lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to treat a Factor IX (FIX)-deficient mouse model of hemophilia B. Delivery of human FIX (hFIX) mRNA encapsulated in our LUNAR LNPs results in a rapid pulse of FIX protein (within 4–6 h) that remains stable for up to 4–6 d and is therapeutically effective, like the recombinant human factor IX protein (rhFIX) that is the current standard of care. Extensive cytokine and liver enzyme profiling showed that repeated administration of the mRNA–LUNAR complex does not cause any adverse innate or adaptive immune responses in immune-competent, hemophilic mice. The levels of hFIX protein that were produced also remained consistent during repeated administrations. These results suggest that delivery of long mRNAs is a viable therapeutic alternative for many clotting disorders and for other hepatic diseases where recombinant proteins may be unaffordable or unsuitable. PMID:28202722

  1. Neural regeneration protein is a novel chemoattractive and neuronal survival-promoting factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gorba, Thorsten; Bradoo, Privahini; Antonic, Ana; Marvin, Keith; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E.; Reymann, Klaus G.; Gluckman, Peter D.; Sieg, Frank . E-mail: fsieg@neurenpharma.com

    2006-10-01

    Neurogenesis and neuronal migration are the prerequisites for the development of the central nervous system. We have identified a novel rodent gene encoding for a neural regeneration protein (NRP) with an activity spectrum similar to the chemokine stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1, but with much greater potency. The Nrp gene is encoded as a forward frameshift to the hypothetical alkylated DNA repair protein AlkB. The predicted protein sequence of NRP contains domains with homology to survival-promoting peptide (SPP) and the trefoil protein TFF-1. The Nrp gene is first expressed in neural stem cells and expression continues in glial lineages. Recombinant NRP and NRP-derived peptides possess biological activities including induction of neural migration and proliferation, promotion of neuronal survival, enhancement of neurite outgrowth and promotion of neuronal differentiation from neural stem cells. NRP exerts its effect on neuronal survival by phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 and Akt kinases, whereas NRP stimulation of neural migration depends solely on p44/42 MAP kinase activity. Taken together, the expression profile of Nrp, the existence in its predicted protein structure of domains with similarities to known neuroprotective and migration-inducing factors and the high potency of NRP-derived synthetic peptides acting in femtomolar concentrations suggest it to be a novel gene of relevance in cellular and developmental neurobiology.

  2. Kinetic characterization of the protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor reaction with blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Swanson, Richard; Broze, George J; Olson, Steven T

    2008-10-31

    Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) is a recently identified member of the serpin superfamily that functions as a cofactor-dependent regulator of blood coagulation factors Xa (FXa) and XIa. Here we show that ZPI and its cofactor, protein Z (PZ), inhibit procoagulant membrane-bound factor Xa by the branched pathway acyl-intermediate trapping mechanism used by other serpins, but with significant variations of this mechanism that are unique to ZPI. Rapid kinetic analyses showed that the reaction proceeded by the initial assembly of a membrane-associated PZ-ZPI-FXa Michaelis complex (K(M) 53+/-5 nM) followed by conversion to a stable ZPI-FXa complex (k(lim) 1.2+/-0.1 s(-1)). Cofactor premixing experiments together with independent kinetic analyses of ZPI-PZ and factor Xa-PZ-membrane complex formation suggested that assembly of the Michaelis complex through either ZPI-PZ-lipid or factor Xa-PZ-lipid intermediates was rate-limiting. Reaction stoichiometry analyses and native PAGE showed that for every factor Xa molecule inhibited by ZPI, two serpin molecules were cleaved. Native PAGE and immunoblotting showed that PZ dissociated from ZPI once ZPI forms a stable complex with FXa, and kinetic analyses confirmed that PZ acted catalytically to accelerate the membrane-dependent ZPI-factor Xa reaction. The ZPI-FXa complex was only transiently stable and dissociated with a rate constant that showed a bell-shaped pH dependence indicative of participation of factor Xa active-site residues. The complex was detectable by SDS-PAGE when denatured at low pH, consistent with it being a kinetically trapped covalent acyl-intermediate. Together our findings show that ZPI functions like other serpins to regulate the activity of FXa but in a manner uniquely dependent on protein Z, procoagulant membranes, and pH.

  3. Overexpression of the transcription factor Yap1 modifies intracellular redox conditions and enhances recombinant protein secretion

    PubMed Central

    Delic, Marizela; Graf, Alexandra B.; Koellensperger, Gunda; Haberhauer-Troyer, Christina; Hann, Stephan; Mattanovich, Diethard; Gasser, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative folding of secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a redox active process, which also impacts the redox conditions in the cytosol. As the transcription factor Yap1 is involved in the transcriptional response to oxidative stress, we investigate its role upon the production of secretory proteins, using the yeast Pichia pastoris as model, and report a novel important role of Yap1 during oxidative protein folding. Yap1 is needed for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by increased oxidative protein folding. Constitutive co-overexpression of PpYAP1 leads to increased levels of secreted recombinant protein, while a lowered Yap1 function leads to accumulation of ROS and strong flocculation. Transcriptional analysis revealed that more than 150 genes were affected by overexpression of YAP1, in particular genes coding for antioxidant enzymes or involved in oxidation-reduction processes. By monitoring intracellular redox conditions within the cytosol and the ER using redox-sensitive roGFP1 variants, we could show that overexpression of YAP1 restores cellular redox conditions of protein-secreting P. pastoris by reoxidizing the cytosolic redox state to the levels of the wild type. These alterations are also reflected by increased levels of oxidized intracellular glutathione (GSSG) in the YAP1 co-overexpressing strain. Taken together, these data indicate a strong impact of intracellular redox balance on the secretion of (recombinant) proteins without affecting protein folding per se. Re-establishing suitable redox conditions by tuning the antioxidant capacity of the cell reduces metabolic load and cell stress caused by high oxidative protein folding load, thereby increasing the secretion capacity. PMID:28357216

  4. Platelet factor 4 stimulates thrombomodulin protein C-activating cofactor activity. A structure-function analysis.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Key, N S

    1994-10-14

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anionic (pI approximately 4) protein cofactor that promotes thrombin (THR) cleavage of protein C to generate activated protein C (APC), a potent anticoagulant. We find that the cationic platelet alpha-granule protein platelet factor 4 (PF4) stimulates 4-25-fold the cofactor activity of rabbit TM and two differentially glycanated versions of an extracellular domain human TM polypeptide in which the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) is either present (GAG+ TM) or absent (GAG- TM) with an ED50 of 3.3-10 micrograms/ml. No such stimulation occurs in response to beta-thromboglobulin or thrombospondin, or when protein C lacking its gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain is the substrate. Heparin and chondroitin sulfates A and E reverse PF4 stimulation. PF4 minimally affects the Kd for THR but decreases 30-fold (from 8.3 to 0.3 microM) the Km for protein C of APC generation by GAG+ TM. PF4 also strikingly transforms the [Ca2+] dependence profile of rabbit and GAG+ TM to resemble that of GAG- TM. A potential explanation for this is that PF4, like Ca2+, induces heparin-reversible alterations in native (but not Gla-domainless) protein C conformation as assessed by autofluorescence emission analysis. We conclude that PF4 stimulates TM APC generation by interacting electrostatically with both the TM GAG and the protein C Gla domain to enhance markedly the affinity of the THR.TM complex for protein C. By this mechanism, PF4 may play a previously unsuspected role in the physiologic regulation of clotting.

  5. Nuclear translocation of doublecortin-like protein kinase and phosphorylation of a transcription factor JDP2

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Tadashi; Nomada, Shohgo; Onouchi, Takashi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase. • In living cells, DCLK was cleaved into two functional fragments. • zDCLK(kinase) was translocated into the nucleus by osmotic stresses. • Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. • JDP2 was efficiently phosphorylated by zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. - Abstract: Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase predominantly expressed in brain. In a previous paper, we reported that zebrafish DCLK2 (zDCLK) was cleaved into two functional fragments; the N-terminal zDCLK(DC + SP) with microtubule-binding activity and the C-terminal zDCLK(kinase) with a Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that zDCLK(kinase) was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus when the cells were treated under hyperosmotic conditions with NaCl or mannitol. By two-hybrid screening using the C-terminal domain of DCLK, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a nuclear transcription factor, was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. Furthermore, JDP2 served as an efficient substrate for zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. These results suggest that the kinase fragment of DCLK is translocated into the nucleus upon hyperosmotic stresses and that the kinase efficiently phosphorylates JDP2, a possible target in the nucleus, with the aid of histones.

  6. Adiponectin stimulates Wnt inhibitory factor-1 expression through epigenetic regulations involving the transcription factor specificity protein 1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Lam, Janice B B; Chow, Kim H M; Xu, Aimin; Lam, Karen S L; Moon, Randall T; Wang, Yu

    2008-11-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipokine possessing growth inhibitory activities against various types of cancer cells. Our previous results demonstrated that ADN could impede Wnt/beta-catenin-signaling pathways in MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells [Wang,Y. et al. (2006) Adiponectin modulates the glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta/beta-catenin signaling pathway and attenuates mammary tumorigenesis of MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Cancer Res., 66, 11462-11470]. Here, we extended our studies to elucidate the effects of ADN on regulating the expressions of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF1), a Wnt antagonist frequently silenced in human breast tumors. Our results showed that ADN time dependently stimulated WIF1 gene and protein expressions in MDA-MB-231 cells. Overexpression of WIF1 exerted similar inhibitory effects to those of ADN on cell proliferations, nuclear beta-catenin activities, cyclin D1 expressions and serum-induced phosphorylations of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta. Blockage of WIF1 activities significantly attenuated the suppressive effects of ADN on MDA-MB-231 cell growth. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that both supplementation of recombinant ADN and adenovirus-mediated overexpression of this adipokine substantially enhanced WIF1 expressions in MDA-MB-231 tumors implanted in nude mice. More interestingly, we found that ADN could alleviate methylation of CpG islands located within the proximal promoter region of WIF1, possibly involving the specificity protein 1 (Sp1) transcription factor and its downstream target DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). Upon ADN treatment, the protein levels of both Sp1 and DNMT1 were significantly decreased. Using silencing RNA approaches, we confirmed that downregulation of Sp1 resulted in an increased expression of WIF1 and decreased methylation of WIF1 promoter. Taken together, these data suggest that ADN might elicit its antitumor activities at least partially through promoting WIF1 expressions.

  7. Conformational characterization of human eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha: a single tryptophan protein.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, R K; Yadav, Viveka Nand; Varshney, Nishant K; Berwal, Sunil K; Suresh, C G; Gaikwad, Sushama M; Pal, Jayanta K

    2009-12-11

    The alpha-subunit of the human eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (heIF2alpha), a GTP binding protein, plays a major role in the initiation of protein synthesis. During various cytoplasmic stresses, eIF2alpha gets phosphorylated by eIF2alpha-specific kinases resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis. The cloned and over expressed heIF2alpha, a protein with a single tryptophan (trp) residue was examined for its conformational characteristics using steady-state and time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and hydrophobic dye binding. The steady-state fluorescence spectrum, fluorescence lifetimes (tau(1)=1.13ns and tau(2)=4.74ns) and solute quenching studies revealed the presence of trp conformers in hydrophobic and differential polar environment at any given time. Estimation of the alpha-helix and beta-sheet content showed: (i) more compact structure at pH 2.0, (ii) distorted alpha-helix and rearranged beta-sheet in presence of 4M guanidine hydrochloride and (iii) retention of more than 50% ordered structure at 95 degrees C. Hydrophobic dye binding to the protein with loosened tertiary structure was observed at pH 2.0 indicating the existence of a molten globule-like structure. These observations indicate the inherent structural stability of the protein under various denaturing conditions.

  8. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years.

  9. Expression and Protein Interaction Analyses Reveal Combinatorial Interactions of LBD Transcription Factors During Arabidopsis Pollen Development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mirim; Kim, Min-Jung; Pandey, Shashank; Kim, Jungmook

    2016-11-01

    LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) transcription factor gene family members play key roles in diverse aspects of plant development. LBD10 and LBD27 have been shown to be essential for pollen development in Arabidopsis thaliana. From the previous RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data set of Arabidopsis pollen, we identified the mRNAs of LBD22, LBD25 and LBD36 in addition to LBD10 and LBD27 in Arabidopsis pollen. Here we conducted expression and cellular analysis using GFP:GUS (green fluorescent protein:β-glucuronidase) reporter gene and subcellular localization assays using LBD:GFP fusion proteins expressed under the control of their own promoters in Arabidopsis. We found that these LBD proteins display spatially and temporally distinct and overlapping expression patterns during pollen development. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down assays demonstrated that protein-protein interactions occur among the LBDs exhibiting overlapping expression during pollen development. We further showed that LBD10, LBD22, LBD25, LBD27 and LBD36 interact with each other to form heterodimers, which are localized to the nucleus in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Taken together, these results suggest that combinatorial interactions among LBD proteins may be important for their function in pollen development in Arabidopsis.

  10. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein acts as a processivity factor.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M W; Yang, L

    2000-05-19

    We have previously shown that endonucleases present in a protein complex, which has specificity for cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, locate sites of damage in DNA by a processive mechanism of action in normal human lymphoblastoid cells. In contrast, the endonucleases present in this complex from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) cells locate damage sites by a distributive or significantly less processive mechanism. Since the XPA protein has been shown to be responsible for the DNA repair defect in XPA cells, this protein was examined for involvement in the mechanism of target site location of these endonucleases. A recombinant XPA protein, produced by expression of the normal XPA cDNA in E. coli, was isolated and purified. The results show that the recombinant XPA protein was able to correct the defect in ability of the XPA endonucleases to act by a processive mechanism of action on UVC irradiated DNA. These studies indicate that the XPA protein, in addition to a role in damage recognition or damage verification, may function as a processivity factor.

  11. Mitochondrial Bol1 and Bol3 function as assembly factors for specific iron-sulfur proteins

    PubMed Central

    Uzarska, Marta A; Nasta, Veronica; Weiler, Benjamin D; Spantgar, Farah; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Saviello, Maria Rosaria; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Banci, Lucia; Lill, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins is a key process of cells, and defects cause many rare diseases. In the first phase of this pathway, ten Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly components synthesize and insert [2Fe-2S] clusters. The second phase is dedicated to the assembly of [4Fe-4S] proteins, yet this part is poorly understood. Here, we characterize the BOLA family proteins Bol1 and Bol3 as specific mitochondrial ISC assembly factors that facilitate [4Fe-4S] cluster insertion into a subset of mitochondrial proteins such as lipoate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase. Bol1-Bol3 perform largely overlapping functions, yet cannot replace the ISC protein Nfu1 that also participates in this phase of Fe/S protein biogenesis. Bol1 and Bol3 form dimeric complexes with both monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 and Nfu1. Complex formation differentially influences the stability of the Grx5-Bol-shared Fe/S clusters. Our findings provide the biochemical basis for explaining the pathological phenotypes of patients with mutations in BOLA3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16673.001 PMID:27532772

  12. Activation of G Proteins by Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Relies on GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rob J.; Thomas, Geraint M. H.

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are an important family of signalling molecules controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity in what is commonly called an ‘activation/inactivation cycle’. The molecular mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse the activation of monomeric G proteins is well-established, however the complete reversibility of this mechanism is often overlooked. Here, we use a theoretical approach to prove that GEFs are unable to positively control G protein systems at steady-state in the absence of GTPase activity. Instead, positive regulation of G proteins must be seen as a product of the competition between guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity—emphasising a central role for GTPase activity beyond merely signal termination. We conclude that a more accurate description of the regulation of G proteins via these processes is as a ‘balance/imbalance’ mechanism. This result has implications for the understanding of intracellular signalling processes, and for experimental strategies that rely on modulating G protein systems. PMID:26986850

  13. Modification of the protein corona-nanoparticle complex by physiological factors.

    PubMed

    Braun, Nicholas J; DeBrosse, Madeleine C; Hussain, Saber M; Comfort, Kristen K

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) effects in a biological system are driven through the formation and structure of the protein corona-NP complex, which is dynamic by nature and dependent upon factors from both the local environment and NP physicochemical parameters. To date, considerable data has been gathered regarding the structure and behavior of the protein corona in blood, plasma, and traditional cell culture medium. However, there exists a knowledge gap pertaining to the protein corona in additional biological fluids and following incubation in a dynamic environment. Using 13nm gold NPs (AuNPs), functionalized with either polyethylene glycol or tannic acid, we demonstrated that both particle characteristics and the associated protein corona were altered when exposed to artificial physiological fluids and under dynamic flow. Furthermore, the magnitude of observed behavioral shifts were dependent upon AuNP surface chemistry. Lastly, we revealed that exposure to interstitial fluid produced protein corona modifications, reshaping of the nano-cellular interface, modified AuNP dosimetry, and induction of previously unseen cytotoxicity. This study highlights the need to elucidate both NP and protein corona behavior in biologically representative environments in an effort to increase accurate interpretation of data and transfer of this knowledge to efficacy, behavior, and safety of nano-based applications.

  14. Variation of the factor H-binding protein of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Brehony, Carina; Wilson, Daniel J.; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2009-01-01

    There is currently no comprehensive meningococcal vaccine, due to difficulties in immunizing against organisms expressing serogroup B capsules. To address this problem, subcapsular antigens, particularly the outer-membrane proteins (OMPs), are being investigated as candidate vaccine components. If immunogenic, however, such antigens are often antigenically variable, and knowledge of the extent and structuring of this diversity is an essential part of vaccine formulation. Factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is one such protein and is included in two vaccines under development. A survey of the diversity of the fHbp gene and the encoded protein in a representative sample of meningococcal isolates confirmed that variability in this protein is structured into two or three major groups, each with a substantial number of alleles that have some association with meningococcal clonal complexes and serogroups. A unified nomenclature scheme was devised to catalogue this diversity. Analysis of recombination and selection on the allele sequences demonstrated that parts of the gene are subject to positive selection, consistent with immune selection on the protein generating antigenic variation, particularly in the C-terminal region of the peptide sequence. The highest levels of selection were observed in regions corresponding to epitopes recognized by previously described bactericidal monoclonal antibodies. PMID:19729409

  15. Peptide Chain Termination: Effect of Protein S on Ribosomal Binding of Release Factors

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J. L.; Caskey, C. T.

    1970-01-01

    The protein factor S, previously shown to stimulate polypeptide chain termination in bacterial extracts, has two effects upon the complex formed between ribosomes, release factor, and terminator (trinucleotide) codon: (1) in the absence of GTP or GDP, S stimulates formation of an [R·UAA·ribosome] intermediate, and (2) in the presence of GTP or GDP, S participates in dissociation of this intermediate. Factor S can stimulate fMet release from [fMet-tRNAf·AUG·ribosome] intermediates in either the presence or absence of GTP or GDP. A model is proposed which relates the in vitro effects of S ± GTP (or GDP) on fMet release to the effects of S ± GTP (or GDP) on the binding and dissociation of R factor from ribosomes. PMID:5289007

  16. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Is an Inductor of Transcription Factor Activating Protein 2 Epsilon Expression during Chondrogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Niebler, Stephan; Angele, Peter; Kujat, Richard; Bosserhoff, Anja K

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor AP-2ε (activating enhancer-binding protein epsilon) is expressed in cartilage of humans and mice. However, knowledge about regulatory mechanisms influencing AP-2ε expression is limited. Using quantitative real time PCR, we detected a significant increase in AP-2ε mRNA expression comparing initial and late stages of chondrogenic differentiation processes in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, in these samples the expression pattern of the prominent hypoxia marker gene angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4) strongly correlated with that of AP-2ε suggesting that hypoxia might represent an external regulator of AP-2ε expression in mammals. In order to show this, experiments directly targeting the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1), the complex mediating responses to oxygen deprivation, were performed. While the HIF1-activating compounds 2,2'-dipyridyl and desferrioxamine resulted in significantly enhanced mRNA concentration of AP-2ε, siRNA against HIF1α led to a significantly reduced expression rate of AP-2ε. Additionally, we detected a significant upregulation of the AP-2ε mRNA level after oxygen deprivation. In sum, these different experimental approaches revealed a novel role for the HIF1 complex in the regulation of the AP-2ε gene in cartilaginous cells and underlined the important role of hypoxia as an important external regulatory stimulus during chondrogenic differentiation modulating the expression of downstream transcription factors.

  17. The Nuclear Factor-kB Pathway Regulates Cytochrome P450 3A4 Protein Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Bollinger, Nikki; Verma, Seema; Karin, Norm J.; Lu, Yi

    2008-06-01

    We have previously observed that CYP3A4 protein levels are suppressed by inhibition of the proteasome in primary cultured hepatocytes. Because this result is opposite of what would be expected if CYP3A4 is degraded by the proteasome, it seems likely that there is another protein that is susceptible to proteasomal degradation that regulates CYP3A4 expression. In this study, we evaluate whether the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway is involved in that process. Our model system uses an adenovirus system to express CYP3A4 protein in HepG2 cells, which are derived from human cancer cells. Similar to results in primary hepatocytes, we found that inhibition of the proteasome with MG132 suppresses CYP3A4. Consistent with reports that proteasome inhibition suppresses the NF-kB pathway, we also observe a suppression of inhibitory kB kinase protein levels after treatment with MG132. Treatment of the HepG2 cells with NK-kB Activation Inhibitor also suppresses CYP3A4 proteins levels. In contrast, inhibition of either the proteasome or NF-kB pathways increases CYP3A4 mRNA levels. When the HepG2 cells are treated with cycloheximide, a general inhibitor of translation, the loss of CYP3A4 protein is accelerated by co-treatment with an NF-kB Activation Inhibitor. These results indicate that NF-kB activity regulates CYP3A4 protein stability and suggest that the NF-kB pathway is responsible for the decrease in CYP3A4 protein levels that results from the inhibition of proteasomal activity.

  18. Competition between antagonistic complement factors for a single protein on N. meningitidis rules disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Caesar, Joseph JE; Lavender, Hayley; Ward, Philip N; Exley, Rachel M; Eaton, Jack; Chittock, Emily; Malik, Talat H; Goiecoechea De Jorge, Elena; Pickering, Matthew C; Tang, Christoph M; Lea, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have found variation within the complement factor H gene family links to host susceptibility to meningococcal disease caused by infection with Neisseria meningitidis (Davila et al., 2010). Mechanistic insights have been challenging since variation within this locus is complex and biological roles of the factor H-related proteins, unlike factor H, are incompletely understood. N. meningitidis subverts immune responses by hijacking a host-immune regulator, complement factor H (CFH), to the bacterial surface (Schneider et al., 2006; Madico et al., 2007; Schneider et al., 2009). We demonstrate that complement factor-H related 3 (CFHR3) promotes immune activation by acting as an antagonist of CFH. Conserved sequences between CFH and CFHR3 mean that the bacterium cannot sufficiently distinguish between these two serum proteins to allow it to hijack the regulator alone. The level of protection from complement attack achieved by circulating N. meningitidis therefore depends on the relative levels of CFH and CFHR3 in serum. These data may explain the association between genetic variation in both CFH and CFHR3 and susceptibility to meningococcal disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04008.001 PMID:25534642

  19. A highly versatile adaptor protein for the tethering of growth factors to gelatin-based biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Addi, Cyril; Murschel, Frédéric; Liberelle, Benoît; Riahi, Nesrine; De Crescenzo, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, the tethering of growth factors to tissue scaffolds in an oriented manner can enhance their activity and increase their half-life. We chose to investigate the capture of the basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) and the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) on a gelatin layer, as a model for the functionalization of collagen-based biomaterials. Our strategy relies on the use of two high affinity interactions, that is, the one between two distinct coil peptides as well as the one occurring between a collagen-binding domain (CBD) and gelatin. We expressed a chimeric protein to be used as an adaptor that comprises one of the coil peptides and a CBD derived from the human fibronectin. We proved that it has the ability to bind simultaneously to a gelatin substrate and to form a heterodimeric coiled-coil domain with recombinant growth factors being tagged with the complementary coil peptide. The tethering of the growth factors was characterized by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance-based biosensing. The bioactivity of the immobilized bFGF and EGF was evaluated by a human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation assay and a vascular smooth muscle cell survival assay. We found that the tethering of EGF preserved its mitogenic and anti-apoptotic activity. In the case of bFGF, when captured via our adaptor protein, changes in its natural mode of interaction with gelatin were observed.

  20. Protein synthesis during cellular quiescence is inhibited by phosphorylation of a translational elongation factor.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandro F F; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Dworkin, Jonathan

    2015-06-23

    In nature, most organisms experience conditions that are suboptimal for growth. To survive, cells must fine-tune energy-demanding metabolic processes in response to nutrient availability. Here, we describe a novel mechanism by which protein synthesis in starved cells is down-regulated by phosphorylation of the universally conserved elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). Phosphorylation impairs the essential GTPase activity of EF-Tu, thereby preventing its release from the ribosome. As a consequence, phosphorylated EF-Tu has a dominant-negative effect in elongation, resulting in the overall inhibition of protein synthesis. Importantly, this mechanism allows a quick and robust regulation of one of the most abundant cellular proteins. Given that the threonine that serves as the primary site of phosphorylation is conserved in all translational GTPases from bacteria to humans, this mechanism may have important implications for growth-rate control in phylogenetically diverse organisms.

  1. Interaction between complement regulators and Streptococcus pyogenes: binding of C4b-binding protein and factor H/factor H-like protein 1 to M18 strains involves two different cell surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Caballero, David; García-Laorden, Isabel; Cortés, Guadalupe; Wessels, Michael R; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez; Albertí, Sebastián

    2004-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or group A Streptococcus, is one of the most frequent causes of pharyngitis and skin infections in humans. Many virulence mechanisms have been suggested to be involved in the infectious process. Among them is the binding to the bacterial cell surface of the complement regulatory proteins factor H, factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1), and C4b-binding protein. Previous studies indicate that binding of these three regulators to the streptococcal cell involves the M protein encoded by the emm gene. M-type 18 strains are prevalent among clinical isolates and have been shown to interact with all three complement regulators simultaneously. Using isogenic strains lacking expression of the Emm18 or the Enn18 proteins, we demonstrate in this study that, in contradistinction to previously described S. pyogenes strains, M18 strains bind the complement regulators factor H, FHL-1, and C4b-binding protein through two distinct cell surface proteins. Factor H and FHL-1 bind to the Emm18 protein, while C4BP binds to the Enn18 protein. We propose that expression of two distinct surface structures that bind complement regulatory proteins represents a unique adaptation of M18 strains that enhances their resistance to opsonization by human plasma and increases survival of this particular S. pyogenes strain in the human host. These new findings illustrate that S. pyogenes has evolved diverse mechanisms for recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface to evade immune clearance in the human host.

  2. Evolutionarily Conserved Binding of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein to Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1B*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huiwen; Gong, Weibin; Yao, Xingzhe; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is an abundant protein that is highly conserved in eukaryotes. However, its primary function is still not clear. Human TCTP interacts with the metazoan-specific eukaryotic elongation factor 1Bδ (eEF1Bδ) and inhibits its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, but the structural mechanism remains unknown. The interaction between TCTP and eEF1Bδ was investigated by NMR titration, structure determination, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, site-directed mutagenesis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and HADDOCK docking. We first demonstrated that the catalytic GEF domain of eEF1Bδ is not responsible for binding to TCTP but rather a previously unnoticed central acidic region (CAR) domain in eEF1Bδ. The mutagenesis data and the structural model of the TCTP-eEF1Bδ CAR domain complex revealed the key binding residues. These residues are highly conserved in eukaryotic TCTPs and in eEF1B GEFs, including the eukaryotically conserved eEF1Bα, implying the interaction may be conserved in all eukaryotes. Interactions were confirmed between TCTP and the eEF1Bα CAR domain for human, fission yeast, and unicellular photosynthetic microalgal proteins, suggesting that involvement in protein translation through the conserved interaction with eEF1B represents a primary function of TCTP. PMID:25635048

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus M2-1 protein induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, Kerstin . E-mail: reimers.kerstin@mh-hannover.de; Buchholz, Katja; Werchau, Hermann

    2005-01-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces the production of a number of cytokines and chemokines by activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). The activation of NF-{kappa}B has been shown to depend on viral replication in the infected cells. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of RSV M2-1 protein, a transcriptional processivity and anti-termination factor, is sufficient to activate NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells. Electromobility shift assays show increased NF-{kappa}B complexes in the nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells. M2-1 protein is found in nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells and in RSV-infected cells. Co-immunoprecipitations of nuclear extracts of M2-1-expressing cells and of RSV-infected cells revealed an association of M2-1 with Rel A protein. Furthermore, the activation of NF-{kappa}B depends on the C-terminus of the RSV M2-1 protein, as shown by NF-{kappa}B-induced gene expression of a reporter gene construct.

  4. INHIBITION OF RHABDOMYOSARCOMA CELL AND TUMOR GROWTH BY TARGETING SPECIFICITY PROTEIN (Sp) TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Pathi, Satya; Kim, Kyounghyun; Chen, Candy; Crose, Lisa; Linardic, Corinne; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 are highly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells. In tissue arrays of RMS tumor cores from 71 patients, 80% of RMS patients expressed high levels of Sp1 protein, whereas low expression of Sp1 was detected in normal muscle tissue. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) tolfenamic acid (TA) inhibited growth and migration of RD and RH30 RMS cell lines and also inhibited tumor growth in vivo using a mouse xenograft (RH30 cells) model. The effects of TA were accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes in RMS cells and tumors, and the role of Sp protein downregulation in mediating inhibition of RD and RH30 cell growth and migration was confirmed by individual and combined knockdown of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins by RNA interference. TA treatment and Sp knockdown in RD and RH30 cells also showed that four genes that are emerging as individual drug targets for treating RMS, namely c-MET, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), PDGFRα and CXCR4, are also Sp-regulated genes. These results suggest that NSAIDs such as TA may have potential clinical efficacy in drug combinations for treating RMS patients. PMID:22815231

  5. The Sbi protein is a multifunctional immune evasion factor of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emma Jane; Visai, Livia; Kerrigan, Steven W; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    The second immunoglobulin-binding protein (Sbi) of Staphylococcus aureus has two N-terminal domains that bind the Fc region of IgG in a fashion similar to that of protein A and two domains that can bind to the complement protein C3 and promote its futile consumption in the fluid phase. It has been proposed that Sbi helps bacteria to avoid innate immune defenses. By comparing a mutant defective in Sbi with mutants defective in protein A, clumping factor A, iron-regulated surface determinant H, and capsular polysaccharide, it was shown that Sbi is indeed an immune evasion factor that promotes bacterial survival in whole human blood and the avoidance of neutrophil-mediated opsonophagocytosis. Sbi is present in the culture supernatant and is also associated with the cell envelope. S. aureus strains that expressed truncates of Sbi lacking N-terminal domains D1 and D2 (D1D2) or D3 and D4 (D3D4) or a C-terminal truncate that was no longer retained in the cell envelope were analyzed. Both the secreted and envelope-associated forms of Sbi contributed to immune evasion. The IgG-binding domains contributed only when Sbi was attached to the cell, while only the secreted C3-binding domains were biologically active.

  6. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  7. Protein kinase A modulates transforming growth factor-β signaling through a direct interaction with Smad4 protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huibin; Li, Gangyong; Wu, Jing-Jiang; Wang, Lidong; Uhler, Michael; Simeone, Diane M

    2013-03-22

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling normally functions to regulate embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. It is increasingly recognized that TGFβ signaling is regulated by cross-talk with other signaling pathways. We previously reported that TGFβ activates protein kinase A (PKA) independent of cAMP through an interaction of an activated Smad3-Smad4 complex and the regulatory subunit of the PKA holoenzyme (PKA-R). Here we define the interaction domains of Smad4 and PKA-R and the functional consequences of this interaction. Using a series of Smad4 and PKA-R truncation mutants, we identified amino acids 290-300 of the Smad4 linker region as critical for the specific interaction of Smad4 and PKA-R. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the B cAMP binding domain of PKA-R was sufficient for interaction with Smad4. Targeting of B domain regions conserved among all PKA-R isoforms and exposed on the molecular surface demonstrated that amino acids 281-285 and 320-329 were required for complex formation with Smad4. Interactions of these specific regions of Smad4 and PKA-R were necessary for TGFβ-mediated increases in PKA activity, CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) phosphorylation, induction of p21, and growth inhibition. Moreover, this Smad4-PKA interaction was required for TGFβ-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition, invasion of pancreatic tumor cells, and regulation of tumor growth in vivo.

  8. Functional homology between the sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins nuclear factor I from HeLa cells and the TGGCA protein from chicken liver.

    PubMed Central

    Leegwater, P A; van der Vliet, P C; Rupp, R A; Nowock, J; Sippel, A E

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear factor I from HeLa cells, a protein with enhancing function in adenovirus DNA replication, and the chicken TGGCA protein are specific DNA-binding proteins that were first detected by independent methods and that appeared to have similar DNA sequence specificity. To test whether they are homologous proteins from different species we have compared (i) their DNA binding properties and (ii) their function in reconstituted adenovirus DNA replication systems. Using deletion and substitution mutants derived from the DNA binding site on the adenovirus 2 inverted terminal repeat, it was found that the two proteins protect the same 24-nucleotide region of both strands against DNase I digestion and that they have identical minimal recognition sequences of 15 bp containing dyad symmetry. Like nuclear factor I, the TGGCA protein enhances the initiation reaction of adenovirus 2 DNA replication in vitro in a DNA recognition site-dependent manner. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3709517

  9. FoxO proteins mediate hypoxic induction of connective tissue growth factor in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Samarin, Jana; Wessel, Julia; Cicha, Iwona; Kroening, Sven; Warnecke, Christina; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete

    2010-02-12

    Hypoxia, a driving force in neovascularization, promotes alterations in gene expression mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, CCN2) is a modulator of endothelial cell growth and migration, but its regulation by hypoxia is poorly understood. Therefore, we analyzed signaling pathways involved in the regulation of CTGF by hypoxia in endothelial cells. Exposure to low oxygen tension or treatment with the hypoxia-mimetic dimethyloxalyl glycine (DMOG) stabilized HIF-1alpha and up-regulated CTGF in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and in a murine microvascular endothelial cell line. Induction of CTGF correlated with a HIF-dependent increase in protein and mRNA levels, and nuclear accumulation of the transcription factor FoxO3a. By contrast, gene expression and cellular localization of FoxO1 were not significantly altered by hypoxia. Expression of CTGF was strongly reduced by siRNA silencing of FoxO1 or FoxO3a. Furthermore, nuclear exclusion of FoxO1/3a transcription factors by inhibition of serine/threonine protein phosphatases by okadaic acid inhibited CTGF expression, providing evidence for both FoxO proteins as regulators of CTGF expression. The DMOG-stimulated induction of CTGF was further increased when endothelial cells were co-incubated with transforming growth factor-beta, an activator of Smad signaling. Activation of RhoA-Rho kinase signaling by the microtubule-disrupting drug combretastatin A4 also enhanced the DMOG-induced CTGF expression, thus placing CTGF induction by hypoxia in a network of interacting signaling pathways. Our findings provide evidence that FoxO1, hypoxia-stimulated expression of FoxO3a and its nuclear accumulation are required for the induction of CTGF by hypoxia in endothelial cells.

  10. Cleavage of spike protein of SARS coronavirus by protease factor Xa is associated with viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Lanying; Kao, Richard Y.; Zhou, Yusen; He, Yuxian; Zhao, Guangyu; Wong, Charlotte; Jiang, Shibo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Zheng, Bo-Jian . E-mail: bzheng@hkucc.hku.hk

    2007-07-20

    The spike (S) protein of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been known to recognize and bind to host receptors, whose conformational changes then facilitate fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membrane, leading to viral entry into target cells. However, other functions of SARS-CoV S protein such as proteolytic cleavage and its implications to viral infection are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the infection of SARS-CoV and a pseudovirus bearing the S protein of SARS-CoV was inhibited by a protease inhibitor Ben-HCl. Also, the protease Factor Xa, a target of Ben-HCl abundantly expressed in infected cells, was able to cleave the recombinant and pseudoviral S protein into S1 and S2 subunits, and the cleavage was inhibited by Ben-HCl. Furthermore, this cleavage correlated with the infectivity of the pseudovirus. Taken together, our study suggests a plausible mechanism by which SARS-CoV cleaves its S protein to facilitate viral infection.

  11. Endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor isoforms involved in different intracellular protein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Patry, V; Bugler, B; Maret, A; Potier, M; Prats, H

    1997-01-01

    Four forms of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2) result from an alternative initiation of translation involving one AUG (155-amino acid form) and three CUGs (210-, 201- and 196-amino acid forms). These different forms of bFGF show different intracellular biological activities. To identify their intracellular targets, the 210- and 155-amino acid forms of bFGF were independently transfected into CHO cells and their correct subcellular localizations were verified, the 155-amino acid bFGF form being essentially cytoplasmic whereas the 210-amino acid protein was nuclear. The radiation fragmentation method was used to determine the target size of the different bFGF isoforms in the transfected CHO cells and to show that the 210- and 155-amino acids bFGF isoforms were included in protein complexes of 320 and 130 kDa respectively. Similar results were obtained using the SK-Hep1 cell line, which naturally expressed all forms of bFGF. Co-immunoprecipitation assays using different chimaeric bFGF-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase proteins showed that different cellular proteins are associated with different parts of the bFGF molecule. We conclude that bFGF isoforms are involved in different molecular complexes in the cytosol and nucleus, which would reflect different functions for these proteins. PMID:9337877

  12. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ribosome biogenesis and protein translation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Jin, Zhaoqing; Yang, Xiaohan; Li, Jian-Feng; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) as one of the molecular links between abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and its regulation on protein translation. Moreover, we identified Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6) as an interacting partner of RACK1. Because the interaction between RACK1 and eIF6 in mammalian cells is known to regulate the ribosome assembly step of protein translation initiation, it was hypothesized that the same process of protein translation in Arabidopsis is also regulated by RACK1 and eIF6. In this article, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of eIF6 in different species from different lineages and discovered some intriguing differences in protein phosphorylation sites that may contribute to its action in ribosome assembly and biogenesis. In addition, we discovered that, distinct from non-plant organisms in which eIF6 is encoded by a single gene, all sequenced plant genomes contain two or more copies of eIF6 genes. While one copy of plant eIF6 is expressed ubiquitously and might possess the conserved function in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation, the other copy seems to be only expressed in specific organs and therefore may have gained some new functions. We proposed some important studies that may help us better understand the function of eIF6 in plants.

  13. Enhanced protective antibody to a mutant meningococcal factor H-binding protein with low-factor H binding

    PubMed Central

    Granoff, Dan M.; Giuntini, Serena; Gowans, Flor A.; Lujan, Eduardo; Sharkey, Kelsey; Beernink, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (FHbp) is an antigen in 2 serogroup B meningococcal vaccines. FHbp specifically binds human and some nonhuman primate complement FH. To investigate the effect of binding of FH to FHbp on protective antibody responses, we immunized infant rhesus macaques with either a control recombinant FHbp antigen that bound macaque FH or a mutant antigen with 2 amino acid substitutions and >250-fold lower affinity for FH. The mutant antigen elicited 3-fold higher serum IgG anti-FHbp titers and up to 15-fold higher serum bactericidal titers than the control FHbp vaccine. When comparing sera with similar IgG anti-FHbp titers, the antibodies elicited by the mutant antigen gave greater deposition of complement component C4b on live meningococci (classical complement pathway) and inhibited binding of FH, while the anti-FHbp antibodies elicited by the control vaccine enhanced FH binding. Thus, the mutant FHbp vaccine elicited an anti-FHbp antibody repertoire directed at FHbp epitopes within the FH binding site, which resulted in greater protective activity than the antibodies elicited by the control vaccine, which targeted FHbp epitopes outside of the FH combining site. Binding of a host protein to a vaccine antigen impairs protective antibody responses, which can be overcome with low-binding mutant antigens. PMID:27668287

  14. Transcriptional repression of Kruppel like factor-2 by the adaptor protein p66shc

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Hoffman, Timothy A.; DeRicco, Jeremy; Naqvi, Asma; Jain, Mukesh K.; Irani, Kaikobad

    2009-01-01

    The adaptor protein p66shc promotes cellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanistic relationship between p66shc and the kruppel like factor-2 (KLF2) transcription factor and show that this relationship has biological relevance to p66shc-regulated cellular oxidant level, as well as KLF2-induced target gene expression. Genetic knockout of p66shc in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) stimulates activity of the core KLF2 promoter and increases KLF2 mRNA and protein expression. Similarly, shRNA-induced knockdown of p66shc increases KLF2-promoter activity in HeLa cells. The increase in KLF2-promoter activity in p66shc-knockout MEFs is dependent on a myocyte enhancing factor-2A (MEF2A)-binding sequence in the core KLF2 promoter. Short-hairpin RNA-induced knockdown of p66shc in endothelial cells also stimulates KLF2 mRNA and protein expression, as well as expression of the endothelial KLF2 target gene thrombomodulin. MEF2A protein and mRNA are more abundant in p66shc-knockout MEFs, resulting in greater occupancy of the KLF2 promoter by MEF2A. In endothelial cells, the increase in KLF2 and thrombomodulin protein by shRNA-induced decrease in p66shc expression is partly abrogated by knockdown of MEF2A. Finally, knockdown of KLF2 abolishes the decrease in the cellular reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide observed with knockdown of p66shc, and KLF2 overexpression suppresses cellular hydrogen peroxide levels, independent of p66shc expression. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism by which p66shc promotes cellular oxidative stress, through suppression of MEF2A expression and consequent repression of KLF2 transcription.—Kumar, A., Hoffman, T. A., DeRicco, J., Naqvi, A., Jain, M. K., Irani, K. Transcriptional repression of Kruppel like factor-2 by the adaptor protein p66shc. PMID:19696221

  15. Protein Composition of Infectious Spores Reveals Novel Sexual Development and Germination Factors in Cryptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingwei; Hebert, Alexander S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Hull, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Spores are an essential cell type required for long-term survival across diverse organisms in the tree of life and are a hallmark of fungal reproduction, persistence, and dispersal. Among human fungal pathogens, spores are presumed infectious particles, but relatively little is known about this robust cell type. Here we used the meningitis-causing fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to determine the roles of spore-resident proteins in spore biology. Using highly sensitive nanoscale liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, we compared the proteomes of spores and vegetative cells (yeast) and identified eighteen proteins specifically enriched in spores. The genes encoding these proteins were deleted, and the resulting strains were evaluated for discernable phenotypes. We hypothesized that spore-enriched proteins would be preferentially involved in spore-specific processes such as dormancy, stress resistance, and germination. Surprisingly, however, the majority of the mutants harbored defects in sexual development, the process by which spores are formed. One mutant in the cohort was defective in the spore-specific process of germination, showing a delay specifically in the initiation of vegetative growth. Thus, by using this in-depth proteomics approach as a screening tool for cell type-specific proteins and combining it with molecular genetics, we successfully identified the first germination factor in C. neoformans. We also identified numerous proteins with previously unknown functions in both sexual development and spore composition. Our findings provide the first insights into the basic protein components of infectious spores and reveal unexpected molecular connections between infectious particle production and spore composition in a pathogenic eukaryote. PMID:26313153

  16. Insulin-like growth factors and their binding proteins in human colonocytes: preferential degradation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 in colonic cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Michell, N. P.; Langman, M. J.; Eggo, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the expression of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in ten paired samples of normal and tumour colonic tissue with regard to both mRNA and protein. We have compared sensitivity of these tissues to IGF-I using primary cultures of epithelial cells of colonic mucosa, and we have examined the production of IGFs and IGFBPs by these cells. In the tissues, IGFBP-2 mRNA was expressed in all normal and cancer samples but other IGFBPs showed variable expression. mRNAs for IGF-I were expressed in all normal and cancer tissues but IGF-II mRNA was only detected in cancer tissue (3 out of 10). Immunostaining of sections of normal and cancer tissue was negative for IGF-I and IGF-II; IGFBP-2 was positive in 2 out of 10 cancer tissues and 7 out of 10 normal tissues; IGFBP-3 was positive in 7 out of 10 cancer tissues and 7 out of 10 normal tissues; and IGFBP-4 was positive in 5 out of 10 cancer tissues and 6 out of 10 normal tissues. In the cells in culture, cancer cells showed increased incorporation of [35S]methionine into protein and [3H]thymidine into DNA (P < 0.02) when treated with IGF-I. Western blotting of serum-free conditioned media from cells in culture showed that 8 out of 10 normal and 3 out of 10 cancer cultures produced a 32-kDa immunoreactive IGFBP-2. No IGFBP-3 was secreted by any culture but 24-kDa IGFBP-4 was found in 3 out of 10 normal and 5 out of 10 cancer tissues. Because of the discrepancy between mRNA and protein expression for IGFBP-2, degradation of native IGFBPs was assessed using tissue extracts. Colon cancer extracts were able to degrade exogenous IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4, whereas normal tissue extracts were without effect on IGFBP-2. We conclude that IGFBPs are synthesized and secreted by cells of the colonic mucosa but that proteolysis of secreted IGFBP-2 occurs in colon cancer tissue. This selective degradation may confer a growth advantage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5

  17. Pluripotency Factors and Polycomb Group Proteins Repress Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Expression in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Chia-I; Wang, Qin; Fan, Yunxia; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor and environmental sensor that regulates expression of genes involved in drug-metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, Ahr ablation in mice and studies with orthologous genes in invertebrates suggest that AHR may also play a significant role in embryonic development. To address this hypothesis, we studied the regulation of Ahr expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny. In ES cells, interactions between OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and Polycomb Group proteins at the Ahr promoter repress AHR expression, which can also be repressed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors in hepatoma cells. In ES cells, unproductive RNA polymerase II binds at the Ahr transcription start site and drives the synthesis of short abortive transcripts. Activation of Ahr expression during differentiation follows from reversal of repressive marks in Ahr promoter chromatin, release of pluripotency factors and PcG proteins, binding of Sp factors, establishment of histone marks of open chromatin, and engagement of active RNAPII to drive full-length RNA transcript elongation. Our results suggest that reversible Ahr repression in ES cells holds the gene poised for expression and allows for a quick switch to activation during embryonic development. PMID:24316986

  18. Two additional human serum proteins structurally related to complement factor H: Evidence for a family of factor H-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Skerka, C.; Timmann, C.; Horstmann, R.D. ); Zipfel, P.F.

    1992-05-15

    The authors identify and characterize two human serum proteins with an apparent molecular mass of 24 and 29 kDa, which are antigenically related to complement factor H. These proteins represent differently glycosylated forms and are encoded by the same mRNA. The corresponding cDNA clone is 1051 bp in size and hybridized to a 1.4-kb mRNA derived from human liver. The predicted translation product represents a protein of 270 amino acids, which displays a hydrophobic leader sequence, indicative of a secreted protein. The secreted part is organized in four short consensus repeats (SCR) and has a single putative N-linked glycosylation site. The predicted sequence is closely related to that of the previously described factor H-related proteins h37 and h42, which are also derived from a 1.4-kb mRNA. Amino acid comparison of these factor H-related proteins showed identical leader sequences, an exchange of three amino acids in SCR1, identical sequences of SCR2, and a lower degree of homology between SCR3-4 (h24 and h29) and SCR4-5 (h37 and h42). In addition, SCR3-4 of h24 and h29 display homology to SCR19-20 of human complement factor H. The relatedness of structural elements of the factor H-related proteins h24, h29, h37, and h42 and of factor H, suggests a function common to these proteins and indicates the existence of a gene family consisting of factor H and at least two factor H-related genes. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIT to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates by Margaret M. Hurley and...Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates Margaret M. Hurley and Michael S. Sellers Weapons and...Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions: Application of the XPairIt API to Anthrax Lethal Factor and Substrates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ORAUW911QX-04-C

  20. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Matteotti, Christel; Yip, Cassandre; Liu, Jian; Leroy, Baptiste; Hubeau, Céline; Gerbaux, Cécile; Cloet, Samuel; Wauters, Armelle; Zorbo, Sabrina; Meyer, Pierre; Pirson, Isabelle; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wattiez, Ruddy; Harper, Scott Q.; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppée, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor induces phosphorylation of a 64-kDa nuclear protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shawver, L.K.; Pierce, G.F.; Kawahara, R.S.; Deuel, T.F.

    1989-01-15

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulated the phosphorylation of a nuclear protein of 64 kDa (pp64) in nuclei of nontransformed normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. Low levels of phosphorylation of pp64 were observed in nuclei of serum-starved NRK cells. Fetal calf serum (FCS), PDGF, and homodimeric v-sis and PDGF A-chain protein enhanced the incorporation of 32P into pp64 over 4-fold within 30 min and over 8-fold within 2 h of exposure of NRK cells to the growth factors. In contrast, constitutive phosphorylation of 32P-labeled pp64 in nuclei of NRK cells transformed by the simian sarcoma virus (SSV) was high and only minimally stimulated by PDGF and FCS. 32P-Labeled pp64 was isolated from nuclei of PDGF-stimulated nontransformed NRK cells; the 32P of pp64 was labile in 1 M KOH, and pp64 was not significantly recognized by anti-phosphotyrosine antisera, suggesting that the PDGF-induced phosphorylation of pp64 occurred on serine or on threonine residues. However, pp64 from SSV-transformed NRK cell nuclei was significantly stable to base hydrolysis and was immunoprecipitated with anti-phosphotyrosine antisera, suggesting that pp64 from SSV-transformed cell nuclei is phosphorylated also on tyrosine. FCS, PDGF, and PDGF A- and B-chain homodimers thus stimulate the rapid time-dependent phosphorylation of a 64-kDa nuclear protein shortly after stimulation of responsive cells. The growth factor-stimulated phosphorylation of pp64 and the constitutive high levels of pp64 phosphorylation in cells transformed by SSV suggest important roles for pp64 and perhaps regulated nuclear protein kinases and phosphatases in cell division and proliferation.

  2. Frameshift Mutation Confers Function as Virulence Factor to Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein from Acidovorax avenae

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Machiko; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Takehito; Yoshida, Yuki; Suzuki, Aika; Kawaguchi, Takemasa; Che, Fang-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Many plant pathogens inject type III (T3SS) effectors into host cells to suppress host immunity and promote successful infection. The bacterial pathogen Acidovorax avenae causes brown stripe symptom in many species of monocotyledonous plants; however, individual strains of each pathogen infect only one host species. T3SS-deleted mutants of A. avenae K1 (virulent to rice) or N1141 (virulent to finger millet) caused no symptom in each host plant, suggesting that T3SS effectors are involved in the symptom formation. To identify T3SS effectors as virulence factors, we performed whole-genome and predictive analyses. Although the nucleotide sequence of the novel leucine-rich repeat protein (Lrp) gene of N1141 had high sequence identity with K1 Lrp, the amino acid sequences of the encoded proteins were quite different due to a 1-bp insertion within the K1 Lrp gene. An Lrp-deleted K1 strain (KΔLrp) did not cause brown stripe symptom in rice (host plant for K1); by contrast, the analogous mutation in N1141 (NΔLrp) did not interfere with infection of finger millet. In addition, NΔLrp retained the ability to induce effector-triggered immunity (ETI), including hypersensitive response cell death and expression of ETI-related genes. These data indicated that K1 Lrp functions as a virulence factor in rice, whereas N1141 Lrp does not play a similar role in finger millet. Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that K1 Lrp interacts with oryzain α, a pathogenesis-related protein of the cysteine protease family, whereas N1141 Lrp, which contains LRR domains, does not. This specific interaction between K1 Lrp and oryzain α was confirmed by Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in rice cells. Thus, K1 Lrp protein may have acquired its function as virulence factor in rice due to a frameshift mutation. PMID:28101092

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-I, soy protein intake, and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Maureen; Shu, Xiao Ou; Yu, Herbert; Dai, Qi; Malin, Alecia S; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have found that estrogen enhances the effect of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels on breast cancer cell growth. Participants in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS) consumed large amounts of soy that was high in isoflavones, which act as weak estrogens and as anti-estrogens. We assessed whether soy protein intake modified the effect of IGF-I levels on breast cancer risk. The SBCS is a population-based case-control study of breast cancer among women aged 25-64 conducted between 1996 and 1998 in urban Shanghai. In-person interviews were completed with 1,459 incident breast cancer cases ascertained through a population-based cancer registry and 1,556 controls randomly selected from the general population (with respective response rates of 91% and 90%). This analysis is restricted to the 397 cases and 397 matched controls for whom information on IGF-I levels was available. For premenopausal breast cancer, we found nearly significant interactions between soy protein intake and IGF-I levels (P = 0.080) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) levels (P = 0.057). The direction of the interaction appeared to be negative for IGF-I levels but was positive for IGFBP-3 levels. No interaction was evident between soy protein intake and IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels among postmenopausal women. Our results suggest that soy protein intake may negatively modulate the effect of IGF-I and may positively modulate the effect of IGFBP-3 levels on premenopausal breast cancer risk. Further studies are needed to confirm our finding and to understand the biological mechanisms of these potential interactions.

  4. Dual-stage growth factor release within 3D protein-engineered hydrogel niches promotes adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Goodwin, Midori; Teasley, Eric S.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered biomimetic microenvironments from hydrogels are an emerging strategy to achieve lineage-specific differentiation in vitro. In addition to recapitulating critical matrix cues found in the native three-dimensional (3D) niche, the hydrogel can also be designed to deliver soluble factors that are present within the native inductive microenvironment. We demonstrate a versatile materials approach for the dual-stage delivery of multiple soluble factors within a 3D hydrogel to induce adipogenesis. We use a Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH) embedded with alginate microgels to deliver two pro-adipogenic soluble factors, fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) with two distinct delivery profiles. We show that dual-stage delivery of FGF-1 and BMP-4 to human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSCs) significantly increases lipid accumulation compared with the simultaneous delivery of both growth factors together. Furthermore, dual-stage growth factor delivery within a 3D hydrogel resulted in substantially more lipid accumulation compared to identical delivery profiles in 2D cultures. Gene expression analysis shows upregulation of key adipogenic markers indicative of brown-like adipocytes. These data suggest that dual-stage release of FGF-1 and BMP-4 within 3D microenvironments can promote the in vitro development of mature adipocytes. PMID:25309741

  5. Purification of scatter factor, a fibroblast-derived basic protein that modulates epithelial interactions and movement.

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, E; Gray, J; Stoker, M; Perryman, M; Furlong, R

    1989-01-01

    Scatter factor is a fibroblast-derived protein that causes separation of contiguous epithelial cells and increased local mobility of unanchored cells. Highly purified scatter factor has been obtained by a combination of ion-exchange and reverse-phase chromatography from serum-free medium conditioned by a ras-transformed clone (D4) of mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Under nonreducing conditions scatter factor has a pI of approximately 9.5 and migrates in SDS/polyacrylamide gels as a single band at approximately 62 kDa from which epithelial scatter activity can be recovered. Treatment with reducing agents destroys biological activity and is associated with the appearance of two major bands at approximately 57 and approximately 30 kDa. Whether both the 57-kDa and 30-kDa polypeptides are required for biological activity remains to be established. All the activities observed in crude medium conditioned by cells producing scatter factor are retained by highly purified preparations of scatter factor. These include (i) increased local movement, modulation of morphology, and inhibition of junction formation by single epithelial cells and (ii) disruption of epithelial interactions and cell scattering from preformed epithelial sheets. These changes occur with picomolar concentrations of purified scatter factor and without an effect on cell growth. Images PMID:2527367

  6. Chemical synthesis and X-ray structure of a heterochiral {D-protein antagonist plus vascular endothelial growth factor} protein complex by racemic crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Uppalapati, Maruti; Ault-Riché, Dana; Kenney, John; Lowitz, Joshua; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2012-10-23

    Total chemical synthesis was used to prepare the mirror image (D-protein) form of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A). Phage display against D-VEGF-A was used to screen designed libraries based on a unique small protein scaffold in order to identify a high affinity ligand. Chemically synthesized D- and L- forms of the protein ligand showed reciprocal chiral specificity in surface plasmon resonance binding experiments: The L-protein ligand bound only to D-VEGF-A, whereas the D-protein ligand bound only to L-VEGF-A. The D-protein ligand, but not the L-protein ligand, inhibited the binding of natural VEGF{sub 165} to the VEGFR1 receptor. Racemic protein crystallography was used to determine the high resolution X-ray structure of the heterochiral complex consisting of {l_brace}D-protein antagonist + L-protein form of VEGF-A{r_brace}. Crystallization of a racemic mixture of these synthetic proteins in appropriate stoichiometry gave a racemic protein complex of more than 73 kDa containing six synthetic protein molecules. The structure of the complex was determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. Detailed analysis of the interaction between the D-protein antagonist and the VEGF-A protein molecule showed that the binding interface comprised a contact surface area of approximately 800 {angstrom}{sup 2} in accord with our design objectives, and that the D-protein antagonist binds to the same region of VEGF-A that interacts with VEGFR1-domain 2.

  7. Two distinct forms of Factor VIII coagulant protein in human plasma. Cleavage by thrombin, and differences in coagulant activity and association with von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M J; Chute, L E

    1984-01-01

    We have characterized Factor VIII coagulant protein, present in normal human plasma, that reacts with a specific human 125I-labeled anti-human VIII:C antigen Fab antibody fragment. Two major Factor VIII coagulant antigen populations were present. The first, approximately 85% of the total antigen, was bound to von Willebrand factor and when tested in a standard one-stage assay had Factor VIII coagulant activity. The second antigenic population, eluting near fibrinogen when plasma was gel filtered, was not bound to von Willebrand protein, did not have Factor VIII coagulant activity unless activated, but did block anti-VIII:C Fab neutralization of clotting activity. The two antigenic populations were separable by cryoprecipitation and agarose gel electrophoresis. Although the two antigenic populations differed in their Factor VIII coagulant activity and in their binding to von Willebrand factor, the principal member of both populations is of mol wt 2.4 X 10(5). Both antigens, when proteolyzed by thrombin, were quickly converted to a 1 X 10(5)-mol wt form in association with the appearance of VIII:C activity. The 1 X 10(5)-mol wt antigen was further slowly degraded to an 8 X 10(4)-mol wt form while Factor VIII coagulant activity declined. These results demonstrate the presence of an inactive Factor VIII coagulant protein in plasma, not associated with von Willebrand factor, that can react with thrombin to yield Factor VIII coagulant activity. Images PMID:6421875

  8. Yeast nucleotide excision repair proteins Rad2 and Rad4 interact with RNA polymerase II basal transcription factor b (TFIIH).

    PubMed Central

    Bardwell, A J; Bardwell, L; Iyer, N; Svejstrup, J Q; Feaver, W J; Kornberg, R D; Friedberg, E C

    1994-01-01

    The Rad2, Rad3, Rad4, and Ss12 proteins are required for nucleotide excision repair in yeast cells and are homologs of four human proteins which are involved in a group of hereditary repair-defective diseases. We have previously shown that Rad3 protein is one of the five subunits of purified RNA polymerase II basal transcription initiation factor b (TFIIH) and that Ss12 protein physically associates with factor b (W.J. Feaver, J.Q. Svejstrup, L. Bardwell, A.J. Bardwell, S. Buratowski, K.D. Gulyas, T.F. Donahue, E.C. Friedberg, and R.D. Kornberg, Cell 75:1379-1387, 1993). Here we show that the Rad2 and Rad4 proteins interact with purified factor b in vitro. Rad2 (a single-stranded DNA endonuclease) specifically interacts with the Tfb1 subunit of factor b, and we have mapped a limited region of the Rad2 polypeptide which is sufficient for this interaction. Rad2 also interacts directly with Ss12 protein (a putative DNA helicase). The binding of Rad2 and Rad4 proteins to factor b may define intermediates in the assembly of the nucleotide excision repair repairosome. Furthermore, the loading of factor b (or such intermediates) onto promoters during transcription initiation provides a mechanism for the preferential targeting of repair proteins to actively transcribing genes. Images PMID:8196602

  9. Voluntary exercise protects against stress-induced decreases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein expression.

    PubMed

    Adlard, P A; Cotman, C W

    2004-01-01

    Exercise is increasingly recognized as an intervention that can reduce CNS dysfunctions such as cognitive decline, depression and stress. Previously we have demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is increased in the hippocampus following exercise. In this study we tested the hypothesis that exercise can counteract a reduction in hippocampal BDNF protein caused by acute immobilization stress. Since BDNF expression is suppressed by corticosterone (CORT), circulating CORT levels were also monitored. In animals subjected to 2 h immobilization stress, CORT was elevated immediately following, and at 1 h after the cessation of stress, but remained unchanged from baseline up to 24 h post-stress. The stress protocol resulted in a reduction in BDNF protein at 5 and 10 h post-stress that returned to baseline at 24 h. To determine if exercise could prevent this stress-induced reduction in BDNF protein, animals were given voluntary access to running wheels for 3 weeks prior to the stress. Stressed animals, in the absence of exercise, again demonstrated an initial elevation in CORT (at 0 h) and a subsequent decrease in hippocampal BDNF at the 10 h time point. Exercising animals, both non-stressed and stressed, demonstrated circulating CORT and hippocampal BDNF protein levels that were significantly elevated above control values at both time points examined (0 and 10 h post-stress). Thus, the persistently high CORT levels in exercised animals did not affect the induction of BDNF with exercise, and the effect of immobilization stress on BDNF protein was overcome. To examine the role of CORT in the stress-related regulation of BDNF protein, experiments were carried out in adrenalectomized (ADX) animals. BDNF protein was not downregulated as a result of immobilization stress in ADX animals, while there continued to be an exercise-induced upregulation of BDNF. This study demonstrates that CORT modulates stress-related alterations in BDNF protein. Further, exercise

  10. A comparison of blood factor XII autoactivation in buffer, protein cocktail, serum, and plasma solutions.

    PubMed

    Golas, Avantika; Yeh, Chyi-Huey Josh; Pitakjakpipop, Harit; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Vogler, Erwin A

    2013-01-01

    Activation of blood plasma coagulation in vitro by contact with material surfaces is demonstrably dependent on plasma-volume-to-activator-surface-area ratio. The only plausible explanation consistent with current understanding of coagulation-cascade biochemistry is that procoagulant stimulus arising from the activation complex of the intrinsic pathway is dependent on activator surface area. And yet, it is herein shown that activation of the blood zymogen factor XII (Hageman factor, FXII) dissolved in buffer, protein cocktail, heat-denatured serum, and FXI deficient plasma does not exhibit activator surface-area dependence. Instead, a highly-variable burst of procoagulant-enzyme yield is measured that exhibits no measurable kinetics, sensitivity to mixing, or solution-temperature dependence. Thus, FXII activation in both buffer and protein-containing solutions does not exhibit characteristics of a biochemical reaction but rather appears to be a "mechanochemical" reaction induced by FXII molecule interactions with hydrophilic activator particles that do not formally adsorb blood proteins from solution. Results of this study strongly suggest that activator surface-area dependence observed in contact activation of plasma coagulation does not solely arise at the FXII activation step of the intrinsic pathway.

  11. Roles for Transforming Growth Factor Beta Superfamily Proteins in Early Folliculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Trombly, Daniel J.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Mayo, Kelly E.

    2010-01-01

    Primordial follicle formation and the subsequent transition of follicles to the primary and secondary stages encompass the early events during folliculogenesis in mammals. These processes establish the ovarian follicle pool and prime follicles for entry into subsequent growth phases during the reproductive cycle. Perturbations during follicle formation can affect the size of the primordial follicle pool significantly, and alterations in follicle transition can cause follicles to arrest at immature stages or result in premature depletion of the follicle reserve. Determining the molecular events that regulate primordial follicle formation and early follicle growth may lead to the development of new fertility treatments. Over the last decade, many of the growth factors and signaling proteins that mediate the early stages of folliculogenesis have been identified using mouse genetic models, in vivo injection studies, and ex vivo organ culture approaches. These studies reveal important roles for the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily of proteins in the ovary. This article reviews these roles for TGF-β family proteins and focuses in particular on work from our laboratories on the functions of activin in early folliculogenesis. PMID:19197801

  12. The human mitochondrial transcription factor A is a versatile G-quadruplex binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Tarrés-Soler, Aleix; Rubio-Cosials, Anna; Cuppari, Anna; Brito, Reicy; Jaumot, Joaquim; Gargallo, Raimundo; Vilaseca, Marta; Silva, Cristina; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Eritja, Ramon; Solà, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the guanine-rich strand of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to form G-quadruplex structures (G4s) has been recently highlighted, suggesting potential functions in mtDNA replication initiation and mtDNA stability. G4 structures in mtDNA raise the question of their recognition by factors associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid. The mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a high-mobility group (HMG)-box protein, is the major binding protein of human mtDNA and plays a critical role in its expression and maintenance. HMG-box proteins are pleiotropic sensors of DNA structural alterations. Thus, we investigated and uncovered a surprising ability of TFAM to bind to DNA or RNA G4 with great versatility, showing an affinity similar than to double-stranded DNA. The recognition of G4s by endogenous TFAM was detected in mitochondrial extracts by pull-down experiments using a G4-DNA from the mtDNA conserved sequence block II (CSBII). Biochemical characterization shows that TFAM binding to G4 depends on both the G-quartets core and flanking single-stranded overhangs. Additionally, it shows a structure-specific binding mode that differs from B-DNA, including G4-dependent TFAM multimerization. These TFAM-G4 interactions suggest functional recognition of G4s in the mitochondria. PMID:28276514

  13. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins: a novel tool for testing epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Dreier, Birgit; Nagy-Davidescu, Gabriela; Seifert, Burkhardt; Behnke, Silvia; Zürrer-Härdi, Ursina; Ingold, Fabienne; Plückthun, Andreas; Moch, Holger

    2010-09-01

    Designed ankyrin repeat proteins are a novel class of specific binding molecules, which display increased thermodynamic stability, smaller size and at least equal target affinity compared to immunoglobulins, making them potentially powerful tools in diagnostic pathology and therapeutic oncology. Here, we investigated whether designed ankyrin repeat proteins can reliably identify the amplification status of the epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in breast cancer. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins specific for epidermal growth factor receptor 2 were tested in paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Detection using enzymatic biotinylation proved to be most specific and sensitive. The affinity of the designed ankyrin repeat proteins was found crucial, but for a picomolar binder no further gain was found by making it multivalent. The best designed ankyrin repeat protein, G3 (K(D) 90 pM) was compared on breast cancer tissue microarrays (n=792) to an FDA-approved rabbit monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (clone 4B5; Ventana Medical Systems) and correlated with corresponding epidermal growth factor receptor 2 amplification status measured by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Amplification status and epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression measured by designed ankyrin repeat protein and antibody correlated strongly with each other (P<0.0001 each), the correlation between designed ankyrin repeat protein and amplification status being the strongest (0.87 compared to 0.77 for the antibody, Kendall's tau-beta). Using a modified scoring system for the designed ankyrin repeat protein, we show that the designed ankyrin repeat protein detects a positive epidermal growth factor receptor 2 amplification status with similar sensitivity and significantly higher specificity than the antibody (P=0.0005). This study suggests that designed ankyrin repeat proteins provide a valuable alternative to antibodies for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor

  14. Rhoptry protein 5 (ROP5) Is a Key Virulence Factor in Neospora caninum

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Liu, Jing; Li, Muzi; Fu, Yong; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Qun

    2017-01-01

    Neospora caninum, of the Apicomplexa phylum, is a common cause of abortions in cattle and nervous system dysfunction in dogs. Rhoptry proteins of Apicomplexa play an important role in virulence. The objectives of this study were to study functions of NcROP5 in N. caninum by deleting the NcROP5 gene from the wild Nc-1 strain. We selected NcROP5 in ToxoDB and successfully constructed an NcROP5 gene-deleted vector, pTCR-NcROP5-CD KO. Then we screened the NcROP5 knockout strains (ΔNcROP5) at the gene, protein and transcription levels. Plaque assay, host cell invasion assay and intracellular proliferation test showed that the ΔNcROP5 strain had less plaque space, weakened invasion capacity and slower intracellular growth. Animal testing showed significantly lower cerebral load of ΔNcROP5 than the load of the Nc-1 strain, as well as a loss of virulence for the ΔNcROP5 strains. Phenotypic analyses using the label-free LC-MS/MS assay-based proteomic method and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis showed a reduction of NcGRA7 transcription and altered expression of multiple proteins including the apicomplexan family of binding proteins. The present study indicated that ROP5 is a key virulence factor in N. caninum in mice. The proteomic profiling of Nc-1 and ΔNcROP5 provided some data on differential proteins. These data provide a foundation for future research of protein functions in N. caninum. PMID:28326073

  15. Transfection of influenza A virus nuclear export protein induces the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Lara-Sampablo, Alejandra; Flores-Alonso, Juan Carlos; De Jesús-Ortega, Nereyda; Santos-López, Gerardo; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2014-06-24

    Influenza A virus genomic segments eight codes for non-structural 1 (NS1) protein that is involved in evasion of innate antiviral response, and nuclear export protein (NEP) that participates in the export of viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, transcription and replication. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is highly expressed during influenza virus infections and is considered an anti-infective cytokine. NS1 and NEP proteins were overexpressed and their role on TNF-α expression was evaluated. Both TNF-α mRNA and protein increased in cells transfected with NEP but not with NS1. We further investigate if NS1 or NEP regulates the activity of TNF-α promoter. In the presence of NEP the activity of TNF-α promoter increased significantly compared with the control (83.5±2.9 vs. 30.9±2.8, respectively; p=0.001). This effect decreased 15-fold when the TNF-α promoter distal region was deleted, suggesting the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and NF-kB response elements. This was corroborated by testing the effect produced on TNF-α promoter by the treatment with Raf/MEK/ERK (U0126), NF-kB (Bay-11-7082) and PI3K (Ly294-002) cell signaling inhibitors. Treatment with U0126 and Bay-117082 reduced the activity of TNF-α promoter mediated by NEP (41.5±3.2, 70% inhibition; and 80.6±7.4, 35% inhibition, respectively) compared to mock-treated control. The results suggest a new role for NEP protein that participates in the transcriptional regulation of human TNF-α expression.

  16. Protein acetylation mechanisms in the regulation of insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 signalling.

    PubMed

    Pirola, Luciano; Zerzaihi, Ouafa; Vidal, Hubert; Solari, Florence

    2012-10-15

    Lysine acetylation is a protein post-translational modification (PTM) initially discovered in abundant proteins such as tubulin, whose acetylated form confers microtubule stability, and histones, where it promotes the transcriptionally active chromatin state. Other individual reports identified lysine acetylation as a PTM regulating transcription factors and co-activators including p53, c-Myc, PGC1α and Ku70. The subsequent employment of proteomics-based approaches revealed that lysine acetylation is a widespread PTM, contributing to cellular regulation as much as protein-phosphorylation based mechanisms. In particular, most of the enzymes of central metabolic processes - glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid and urea cycles, fatty acid and glycogen metabolism - have been shown to be regulated by lysine acetylation, through the opposite actions of protein acetyltransferases and deacetylases, making protein acetylation a PTM that connects the cell's energetic state and its consequent metabolic response. In multicellular organisms, insulin/insulin-like signalling (IIS) is a major hormonal regulator of metabolism and cell growth, and very recent research indicates that most of the enzymes participating in IIS are likewise subjected to acetylation-based regulatory mechanisms, that integrate the classical phosphorylation mechanisms. Here, we review the current knowledge on acetylation/deacetylation regulatory phenomena within the IIS cascade, with emphasis on the enzymatic machinery linking the acetylation/deacetylation switch to the metabolic state. We cover this recent area of investigation because pharmacological modulation of protein acetylation/deacetylation has been shown to be a promising target for the amelioration of the metabolic abnormalities occurring in the metabolic syndrome.

  17. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo.

  18. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V.; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses) replication. Methodology/Principal Findings Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV) were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated. Conclusions/Significance The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Induced Protein 3 Interacting Protein 1 Gene Polymorphisms and Pustular Psoriasis in Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jian-Wen; Wang, Yong; Alateng, Chulu; Li, Hong-Bin; Bai, Yun-Hua; Lyu, Xin-Xiang; Wu, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated inflammatory dermatosis. Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is the severe and rare type of psoriasis. The association between tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced protein 3 interacting protein 1 (TNIP1) gene and psoriasis was confirmed in people with multiple ethnicities. This study was to investigate the association between TNIP1 gene polymorphisms and pustular psoriasis in Chinese Han population. Methods: Seventy-three patients with GPP, 67 patients with palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP), and 476 healthy controls were collected from Chinese Han population. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TNIP1 gene, namely rs3805435, rs3792798, rs3792797, rs869976, rs17728338, and rs999011 were genotyped by using polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction. Statistical analyses were performed using the PLINK 1.07 package. Allele frequencies and genotyping frequencies for six SNPs were compared by using Chi-square test, odd ratio (OR) (including 95% confidence interval) were calculated. The haplotype analysis was conducted by Haploview software. Results: The frequencies of alleles of five SNPs were significantly different between the GPP group and the control group (P ≤ 7.22 × 10−3), especially in the GPP patients without psoriasis vulgaris (PsV). In the haplotype analysis, the most significantly different haplotype was H4: ACGAAC, with 13.1% frequency in the GPP group but only 3.4% in the control group (OR = 4.16, P = 4.459 × 10−7). However, no significant difference in the allele frequencies was found between the PPP group and control group for each of the six SNPs (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Polymorphisms in TNIP1 are associated with GPP in Chinese Han population. However, no association with PPP was found. These findings suggest that TNIP1 might be a susceptibility gene for GPP. PMID:27364786

  20. Characterization of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein family in Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Tomomi; Takahashi, Shuji; Ito, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor binding protein (Igfbp) family consists of six members designated Igfbp1-6. Igfbps are involved in many vital biological functions. They physically interact with IGFs (IGF1 and IGF2) and act as carriers, thereby protecting IGFs from proteolytic degradation. Thus, they function as modulators of IGF activity. Furthermore, Igfbps have been reported to have IGF-independent activities. They interact with other proteins, including cell surface proteins, extra-cellular matrix proteins, and potentially intracellular molecules. In Xenopus tropicalis (X. tropicalis), only four igfbp genes (igfbp1, igfbp2, igfbp4, and igfbp5) have been identified, and their expression is not well characterized. We report that X. tropicalis genome lacks the igfbp3 and igfbp6 genes based on synteny analyses. We also examined the spatio-temporal expression patterns of igfbp genes in early X. tropicalis development. Expression analyses indicated that they are differentially expressed during early development. Each igfbp gene showed a characteristic spatial expression pattern. Except for igfbp5, they demonstrated overlapping expression in the pronephros. The Xenopus pronephros is composed of four domains (i.e., the proximal tubule, intermediate tubule, distal tubule, and connecting tubule). Our results showed that at least two igfbp genes are co-expressed in all pronephric domains, suggesting that redundant functions of igfbp genes are required in early pronephric kidney development.

  1. Role of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Flint, D J; Tonner, E; Beattie, J; Allan, G J

    2008-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play an important role in mammary gland development and their effects are, in turn, influenced by a family of 6 IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). The IGFBPs are expressed in time- and tissue-specific fashion during the periods of rapid growth and involution of the mammary gland. The precise roles of these proteins in vivo have, however, been difficult to determine. This review examines the indirect evidence (evolution, chromosomal location and roles in lower life-forms) the evidence from in vitro studies and the attempts to examine their roles in vivo, using IGFBP-deficient and over-expression models. Evidence exists for a role of the IGFBPs in inhibition of the survival effects of IGFs as well as in IGF-enhancing effects from in vitro studies. The location of the IGFBPs, often associated with the extracellular matrix, suggests roles as a reservoir of IGFs or as a potential barrier, restricting access of IGFs to distinct cellular compartments. We also discuss the relative importance of IGF-dependent versus IGF-independent effects. IGF-independent effects include nuclear localization, activation of proteases and interaction with a variety of extracellular matrix and cell surface proteins. Finally, we examine the increasing evidence for the IGFBPs to be considered as part of a larger family of extracellular matrix proteins involved in morphogenesis and tissue re-modeling.

  2. Pentapeptide-repeat proteins that act as topoisomerase poison resistance factors have a common dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Zhang, Yong; Blanchard, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The protein AlbG is a self-resistance factor against albicidin, a nonribosomally encoded hybrid polyketide-peptide with antibiotic and phytotoxic properties produced by Xanthomonas albilineans. Primary-sequence analysis indicates that AlbG is a member of the pentapeptide-repeat family of proteins (PRP). The structure of AlbG from X. albilineans was determined at 2.0 Å resolution by SAD phasing using data collected from a single trimethyllead acetate derivative on a home source. AlbG folds into a right-handed quadrilateral β-helix composed of approximately eight semi-regular coils. The regularity of the β-­helix is blemished by a large loop/deviation in the β-helix between coils 4 and 5. The C-terminus of the β-helix is capped by a dimerization module, yielding a dimer with a 110 Å semi-collinear β-helical axis. This method of dimer formation appears to be common to all PRP proteins that confer resistance to topoisomerase poisons and contrasts with most PRP proteins, which are typically monomeric. PMID:21393830

  3. Regulation of WRKY46 Transcription Factor Function by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Arsheed H.; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Pecher, Pascal; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Sinha, Alok K.; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are central signaling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defense as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defense. PMID:26870073

  4. Transactivation of the parathyroid hormone promoter by specificity proteins and the nuclear factor Y complex.

    PubMed

    Alimov, Alexander P; Park-Sarge, Ok-Kyong; Sarge, Kevin D; Malluche, Hartmut H; Koszewski, Nicholas J

    2005-08-01

    We previously identified a highly conserved specificity protein 1 (Sp1) DNA element in mammalian PTH promoters that acted as an enhancer of gene transcription and bound Sp1 and Sp3 proteins present in parathyroid gland nuclear extracts. More recently, a nuclear factor (NF)-Y element (NF-Y(prox)) was also described by our group, which was located approximately 30 bp downstream from the Sp1 site in the human PTH (hPTH) promoter and by itself acted as a weak enhancer of gene transcription. We now report that Sp proteins and NF-Y can synergistically enhance transcription of a minimal hPTH promoter construct. Positioning of the Sp1 DNA element appears to be critical for this synergism because deviations of one half of a helical turn caused an approximate 60% decrease in transactivation. Finally, examination of the bovine PTH (bPTH) promoter also revealed Sp1/NF-Y synergism, in conjunction with the identification of an analogous NF-Y binding site similarly positioned downstream from the bPTH Sp1 element. In summary, synergistic transactivation of the hPTH and bPTH promoters is observed by Sp proteins and the NF-Y complex. The conservation of this transactivation in the human and bovine promoters suggests that this may be a principle means of enhancing PTH gene transcription.

  5. Uniqueness of the mechanism of protein import into the peroxisome matrix: transport of folded, co-factor-bound and oligomeric proteins by shuttling receptors.

    PubMed

    Léon, Sébastien; Goodman, Joel M; Subramani, Suresh

    2006-12-01

    Based on earlier suggestions that peroxisomes may have arisen from endosymbionts that later lost their DNA, it was expected that protein transport into this organelle would have parallels to systems found in other organelles of endosymbiont origin, such as mitochondria and chloroplasts. This review highlights three features of peroxisomal matrix protein import that make it unique in comparison with these other subcellular compartments - the ability of this organelle to transport folded, co-factor-bound and oligomeric proteins, the dynamics of the import receptors during the matrix protein import cycle and the existence of a peroxisomal quality-control pathway, which insures that the peroxisome membrane is cleared of cargo-free receptors.

  6. Glucocorticoids and protein kinase A coordinately modulate transcription factor recruitment at a glucocorticoid-responsive unit.

    PubMed Central

    Espinás, M L; Roux, J; Pictet, R; Grange, T

    1995-01-01

    The rat tyrosine aminotransferase gene is a model system to study transcriptional regulation by glucocorticoid hormones. We analyzed transcription factor binding to the tyrosine aminotransferase gene glucocorticoid-responsive unit (GRU) at kb -2.5, using in vivo footprinting studies with both dimethyl sulfate and DNase I. At this GRU, glucocorticoid activation triggers a disruption of the nucleosomal structure. We show here that various regulatory pathways affect transcription factor binding to this GRU. The binding differs in two closely related glucocorticoid-responsive hepatoma cell lines. In line H4II, glucocorticoid induction promotes the recruitment of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 (HNF3), presumably through the nucleosomal disruption. However, the footprint of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is not visible, even though a regular but transient interaction of the GR is necessary to maintain HNF3 binding. In contrast, in line FTO2B, HNF3 binds to the GRU in the absence of glucocorticoids and nucleosomal disruption, showing that a "closed" chromatin conformation does not repress the binding of certain transcription factors in a uniform manner. In FTO2B cells, the footprint of the GR is detectable, but this requires the activation of protein kinase A. In addition, protein kinase A stimulation also improves the recruitment of HNF3 independently of glucocorticoids and enhances the glucocorticoid response mediated by this GRU in an HNF3-dependent manner. In conclusion, the differences in the behavior of this regulatory sequence in the two cell lines show that various regulatory pathways are integrated at this GRU through modulation of interrelated events: transcription factor binding to DNA and nucleosomal disruption. PMID:7565684

  7. Human rheumatoid factors bear the internal image of the Fc binding region of staphylococcal protein A.

    PubMed

    Oppliger, I R; Nardella, F A; Stone, G C; Mannik, M

    1987-09-01

    The binding specificity of rheumatoid factors (RFs) to human Fc resembles that of some microbial Fc-binding proteins, suggesting conformational similarities in their Fc-binding regions. Using polyclonal chicken antibodies against SPA, we have detected a crossreactive determinant shared by human RFs from different individuals, but not by non-RF IgM and IgG. Chicken anti-SPA was shown to bind to 18 of 19 IgM RFs and 2 of 2 IgG RFs isolated from different individuals. This binding was inhibitable with SPA, fragment D of SPA, human IgG, and Fc fragment of IgG. The binding site for RF was located on the Fab' fragment of chicken anti-SPA. The antigenic mimicry of RFs by a protein of microbial origin suggests that the immune response to infectious agents could induce or modulate RF production through an internal image autoantiidiotype mechanism.

  8. Isolation and characterization of lipid-protein particles containing platelet factor 3 released from human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, H; Andersson, L O; Höglund, S

    1982-01-01

    Lipid-protein particles with platelet factor 3 measured by the Stypven clotting-time test [Hardisty & Hutton (1966) Br. J. Haematol. 12, 764-776] have been isolated from platelet-release supernatant. Starting material was washed platelets, which were released by treatment with collagen. Purification of the particles from other components in the release material was accomplished by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-4B followed by affinity chromatography on poly-L-lysine-Sepharose CL-4B gel. Chemical characterization showed that the particles were composed of 40% protein, 42% phospholipids, 13% cholesterol and 5% triacylglycerols. The phospholipid composition was 38% phosphatidylcholine, 25% phosphatidylethanolamine, 9% phosphatidylserine, 2% phosphatidic acid and 26% sphingomyelin. No carbohydrate was detected. Electron-microscopic studies revealed the presence of membranous particles with diameters between 70 and 170 nm. Images PLATE 1 Fig. 3. PMID:7103943

  9. Using protein-binding microarrays to study transcription factor specificity: homologs, isoforms and complexes

    PubMed Central

    Andrilenas, Kellen K.; Penvose, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Protein–DNA binding is central to specificity in gene regulation, and methods for characterizing transcription factor (TF)–DNA binding remain crucial to studies of regulatory specificity. High-throughput (HT) technologies have revolutionized our ability to characterize protein–DNA binding by significantly increasing the number of binding measurements that can be performed. Protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) are a robust and powerful HT platform for studying DNA-binding specificity of TFs. Analysis of PBM-determined DNA-binding profiles has provided new insight into the scope and mechanisms of TF binding diversity. In this review, we focus specifically on the PBM technique and discuss its application to the study of TF specificity, in particular, the binding diversity of TF homologs and multi-protein complexes. PMID:25431149

  10. Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor: Multiple Anticoagulant Activities for a Single Protein.

    PubMed

    Mast, Alan E

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is an anticoagulant protein that inhibits early phases of the procoagulant response. Alternatively spliced isoforms of TFPI are differentially expressed by endothelial cells and human platelets and plasma. The TFPIβ isoform localizes to the endothelium surface where it is a potent inhibitor of TF-factor VIIa complexes that initiate blood coagulation. The TFPIα isoform is present in platelets. TFPIα contains a stretch of 9 amino acids nearly identical to those found in the B-domain of factor V that are well conserved in mammals. These amino acids provide exosite binding to activated factor V, which allows for TFPIα to inhibit prothrombinase during the initiation phase of blood coagulation. Endogenous inhibition at this point in the coagulation cascade was only recently recognized and has provided a biochemical rationale to explain the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying several clinical disorders. These include the east Texas bleeding disorder that is caused by production of an altered form of factor V with high affinity for TFPI and a paradoxical procoagulant effect of heparins. In addition, these findings have led to ideas for pharmacological targeting of TFPI that may reduce bleeding in hemophilia patients.

  11. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required during Trypanosoma cruzi parasitophorous vacuole development.

    PubMed

    Cueto, Juan Agustín; Vanrell, María Cristina; Salassa, Betiana Nebaí; Nola, Sébastien; Galli, Thierry; Colombo, María Isabel; Romano, Patricia Silvia

    2016-12-19

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is an obligate intracellular parasite that exploits different host vesicular pathways to invade the target cells. Vesicular and target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are key proteins of the intracellular membrane fusion machinery. During the early times of T. cruzi infection, several vesicles are attracted to the parasite contact sites in the plasma membrane. Fusion of these vesicles promotes the formation of the parasitic vacuole and parasite entry. In this work, we study the requirement and the nature of SNAREs involved in the fusion events that take place during T. cruzi infection. Our results show that inhibition of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor protein, a protein required for SNARE complex disassembly, impairs T. cruzi infection. Both TI-VAMP/VAMP7 and cellubrevin/VAMP3, two v-SNAREs of the endocytic and exocytic pathways, are specifically recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane in a synchronized manner but, although VAMP3 is acquired earlier than VAMP7, impairment of VAMP3 by tetanus neurotoxin fails to reduce T. cruzi infection. In contrast, reduction of VAMP7 activity by expression of VAMP7's longin domain, depletion by small interfering RNA or knockout, significantly decreases T. cruzi infection susceptibility as a result of a minor acquisition of lysosomal components to the parasitic vacuole. In addition, overexpression of the VAMP7 partner Vti1b increases the infection, whereas expression of a KIF5 kinesin mutant reduces VAMP7 recruitment to vacuole and, concomitantly, T. cruzi infection. Altogether, these data support a key role of TI-VAMP/VAMP7 in the fusion events that culminate in the T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole development.

  12. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins and mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Angara; Tonner, Elizabeth; Flint, David J

    2011-01-01

    Mammary gland development is dependent upon insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) as survival factors. The actions of the IGFs are modulated by a family of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6). Expression of the IGFBPs is both time-dependent and cell-specific during both the developmental phases and the involution of the mammary gland. Although studied extensively in vitro, understanding the roles of IGFBPs in vivo has been difficult, largely due to the fact that IGFBP knock-out mice have no dramatic phenotypes. This review examines the evidence from in vitro studies and the attempts to examine in vivo actions utilising models with IGFBP deficiency or over-expression. In vitro studies demonstrate that IGFBPs can act by inhibition of the survival effects of IGFs, as well as by enhancing the effects of IGFs. Because the IGFBPs are found associated with the extracellular matrix, a role for IGFBPs as a reservoir of IGFs or, alternatively as a potential barrier to IGFs, thereby restricting their entry into particular tissues or cellular compartments was postulated. We also provide evidence with respect to the IGF-independent actions of the IGFBPs which include receptors, nuclear localization, and interaction with the extracellular matrix and cell surface proteins including integrins. We believe that recent findings place some of the IGFBPs in a larger family of extracellular proteins, the secreted cysteine-rich protein (CCN) family, which have similar structural domains (involved in binding to IGFs, extracellular matrix and integrins) and are heavily implicated in tissue re-modeling and morphogenesis.

  13. Prospective evaluation of Protein C and Factor VIII in prediction of cancer-associated thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tafur, AJ; Dale, G; Cherry, M; Wren, JD; Mansfield, AS; Comp, P; Rathbun, S; Stoner, JA

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a preventable disease, yet it is one of the leading causes of death among patients with cancer. Improving risk stratification mechanisms will allow us to personalize thromboprophylaxis strategies. We sought to evaluate Collagen and Thrombin Activated Platelets (COAT-platelets) as well as protein C and factor VIII as biomarkers predictive of cancer-associated thrombosis in a prospective cohort of patients with cancer. Protein C was selected as a candidate based on bioinformatics prediction. Blood samples were collected before chemotherapy. All specimen processing was blinded to clinical data. Surveillance and adjudication of the main outcome of VTE was performed for up to 1 year. We used Cox proportional hazard regression to measure the association of biomarkers and incident events using SAS 9.2 for all statistical analysis. Death was modeled as a competing event. Among 241 patients followed for an average of 10.4 months, 15% died and 13% developed a VTE. COAT-platelets were not predictive of VTE. Low levels of pre-chemotherapy protein C (< 118 %) (HR 2.5; 95%CI 1.1–5.5) and high baseline factor VIII (> 261 % I) (HR 3.0; 95%CI 1.1–8.0) were predictive of VTE after adjusting for age, Khorana prediction risk, metastatic disease and D dimer. In addition, low protein C was predictive of overall mortality independent of age, metastatic disease and functional status (HR 2.8; 95%CI 1.3–6.0). Addition of these biomarkers to Cancer-VTE risk prediction models may add to risk stratification and patient selection to optimize thrombo-prophylaxis. PMID:26475410

  14. Factors contributing to decreased protein stability when aspartic acid residues are in {beta}-sheet regions.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Cai, X.; Raffen, R.; Gu, M.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.

    2002-07-01

    Asp residues are significantly under represented in {beta}-sheet regions of proteins, especially in the middle of {beta}-strands, as found by a number of studies using statistical, modeling, or experimental methods. To further understand the reasons for this under representation of Asp, we prepared and analyzed mutants of a {beta}-domain. Two Gln residues of the immunoglobulin light-chain variable domain (V{sub L}) of protein Len were replaced with Asp, and then the effects of these changes on protein stability and protein structure were studied. The replacement of Q38D, located at the end of a {beta}-strand, and that of Q89D, located in the middle of a {beta}-strand, reduced the stability of the parent immunoglobulin VL domain by 2.0 kcal/mol and 5.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Because the Q89D mutant of the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain was too unstable to be expressed as a soluble protein, we prepared the Q89D mutant in a triple mutant background, V{sub L}-Len M4L/Y27dD/T94H, which was 4.2 kcal/mol more stable than the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain. The structures of mutants V{sub L}-Len Q38D and V{sub L}-Len Q89D/M4L/Y27dD/T94H were determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.6 A resolution. We found no major perturbances in the structures of these QD mutant proteins relative to structures of the parent proteins. The observed stability changes have to be accounted for by cumulative effects of the following several factors: (1) by changes in main-chain dihedral angles and in side-chain rotomers, (2) by close contacts between some atoms, and, most significantly, (3) by the unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the Asp side chain and the carbonyls of the main chain. We show that the Asn side chain, which is of similar size but neutral, is less destabilizing. The detrimental effect of Asp within a {beta}-sheet of an immunoglobulin-type domain can have very serious consequences. A somatic mutation of a {beta}-strand residue to Asp could prevent the expression of the

  15. Factors contributing to decreased protein stability when aspartic acid residues are in β-sheet regions

    PubMed Central

    Pokkuluri, P.R.; Gu, M.; Cai, X.; Raffen, R.; Stevens, F.J.; Schiffer, M.

    2002-01-01

    Asp residues are significantly under represented in β-sheet regions of proteins, especially in the middle of β-strands, as found by a number of studies using statistical, modeling, or experimental methods. To further understand the reasons for this under representation of Asp, we prepared and analyzed mutants of a β-domain. Two Gln residues of the immunoglobulin light-chain variable domain (VL) of protein Len were replaced with Asp, and then the effects of these changes on protein stability and protein structure were studied. The replacement of Q38D, located at the end of a β-strand, and that of Q89D, located in the middle of a β-strand, reduced the stability of the parent immunoglobulin VL domain by 2.0 kcal/mol and 5.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Because the Q89D mutant of the wild-type VL-Len domain was too unstable to be expressed as a soluble protein, we prepared the Q89D mutant in a triple mutant background, VL-Len M4L/Y27dD/T94H, which was 4.2 kcal/mol more stable than the wild-type VL-Len domain. The structures of mutants VL-Len Q38D and VL-Len Q89D/M4L/Y27dD/T94H were determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.6 Å resolution. We found no major perturbances in the structures of these Q→D mutant proteins relative to structures of the parent proteins. The observed stability changes have to be accounted for by cumulative effects of the following several factors: (1) by changes in main-chain dihedral angles and in side-chain rotomers, (2) by close contacts between some atoms, and, most significantly, (3) by the unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the Asp side chain and the carbonyls of the main chain. We show that the Asn side chain, which is of similar size but neutral, is less destabilizing. The detrimental effect of Asp within a β-sheet of an immunoglobulin-type domain can have very serious consequences. A somatic mutation of a β-strand residue to Asp could prevent the expression of the domain both in vitro and in vivo, or it could contribute to

  16. Cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor interaction with nuclear factor-kappa B proteins in rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Widén, Christina; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Wikström, Ann-Charlotte

    2003-07-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) acts as an anti-inflammatory factor. To a large extent, this activity is exerted by the interference of pro-inflammatory nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) activity. In their respective inactive forms, both GR and NF-kappa B reside in the cytoplasm and translocate to the nucleus on relevant stimulation. Previously, p65, a component of the NF-kappa B complex, and GR have been shown to interact physically in vitro, and the interaction is assumed to take place in the nucleus of cells [McKay and Cidlowski (1999) Endocrine Rev. 20, 435-459]. We have studied the interaction between GR and NF-kappa B using in vivo -like conditions. Using immunoaffinity chromatography or immunoprecipitation, combined with Western blotting, we observed that, with endogenous protein levels in cytosolic extracts of rat liver and of H4-II-E-C3 hepatoma cells and in contrast with the current belief, p65, p50 and inhibitory kappa B alpha complex interact with GR, even in the absence of glucocorticoid or an inflammatory signal. The interaction between non-liganded/non-activated GR and p65/p50 has also been verified by both p65 and p50 co-immunoprecipitations. Intracellular localization studies, using Western blotting, revealed that glucocorticoids can decrease tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-induced nuclear entry of p65, whereas glucocorticoid-induced GR translocation was much less affected by TNFalpha. We were also able to demonstrate a nuclear interaction of GR and p65 and p50 using in vivo -like protein concentrations. Furthermore, nuclear GR interaction with heat-shock protein 90 was enhanced distinctly by TNFalpha treatment. In conclusion, our studies suggest a strong interconnectivity between the NF-kappa B and GR-signalling pathways where also, somewhat unexpectedly, a physical interaction in the cytosol constitutes an integral part of GR-NF-kappa B cross-talk.

  17. Differential expression of epidermal growth factor-related proteins in human colorectal tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Ciardiello, F; Kim, N; Saeki, T; Dono, R; Persico, M G; Plowman, G D; Garrigues, J; Radke, S; Todaro, G J; Salomon, D S

    1991-01-01

    Amphiregulin (AR) and cripto are proteins that are structurally related to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha). AR is also functionally related to this family of growth regulatory molecules and is able to bind and activate the 170-kDa EGF receptor (EGFR). Human EGFR-3 (HER3)/ERBB3 is a recently identified protein related to the EGFR that is widely expressed in breast carcinomas and is a candidate receptor for EGF-like growth factors. Differential expression of these putative ligands and receptors in transformed cells suggests that they may function in an autocrine manner to regulate tumor cell growth. Specific mRNA transcripts for TGF-alpha [4.8 kilobases (kb)], AR (1.4 kb), cripto (2.2 kb), and HER3 (6.2 kb) were expressed in a majority of human colon cancer cell lines. HER3 mRNA was detected in 55% of primary or metastatic human colorectal carcinomas but in only 22% of normal colon mucosa and 32% of normal liver samples. In contrast, cripto and AR mRNA were expressed in 60-70% of primary or metastatic human colorectal cancers but in only 2-7% of normal human colonic mucosa. Immunostaining also detected AR protein in primary and metastatic colorectal tumors but not in normal colon or uninvolved liver. These findings suggest that cripto and AR may be useful markers to discriminate between normal and malignant colonic epithelium and may provide a selective growth advantage for colorectal carcinomas. Images PMID:1715580

  18. Lipid, Lipoproteins, C-Reactive Protein, and Hemostatic Factors at Baseline in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE — Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) appear to be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) due at least in part to an increased prevalence of risk factors. We evaluated lipid, lipoprotein, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) levels at study entry in the largest multiethnic cohort of participants with IGT described, namely in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS — Measurements were performed at the baseline visit of 3,819 randomized participants of the DPP. Among 3,622 participants who were not taking lipid-lowering medicines, cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in relation to demographic, anthropometric, and metabolic measures. Major determinants of risk factors were assessed in multivariate analysis. RESULTS — Over 40% of participants had elevated triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and CRP levels and reduced HDL cholesterol levels. Men had higher triglyceride and tPA and lower HDL cholesterol concentrations and smaller LDL particle size than women, whereas women had higher CRP and fibrinogen levels. African Americans had less dyslipidemia but higher fibrinogen levels, and Asian Americans had lower CRP and fibrinogen levels than Caucasians and Hispanics. The surrogate measure of insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) had the strongest association with HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and tPA levels and LDL particle size. BMI had the greatest influence on CRP and fibrinogen levels. Using median splits of indexes of insulin resistance and insulin secretion (insulin-to-glucose ratio), participants with greater insulin resistance had a more adverse CVD risk-factor profile, whereas insulin secretion had little influence on risk factors. CONCLUSIONS — The pattern of CVD risk factors in participants with IGT in the DPP exhibits substantial heterogeneity and is significantly influenced by race, sex, and age, as well as

  19. Thermal compaction of the intrinsically disordered protein tau: entropic, structural, and hydrophobic factors.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Anna; Ciasca, Gabriele; Grottesi, Alessandro; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2017-03-28

    Globular denatured proteins have structural properties similar to those of random coils. Experiments on denatured proteins have shown that when the temperature is increased thermal compaction may take place, resulting in a reduction of their radius of gyration Rg to range between 5% and 35% of its initial value. This phenomenon has been attributed to various causes, namely entropic, hydrophobic, and structural factors. The intrinsically disordered protein tau, which helps in nucleating and stabilizing microtubules in the axons of the neurons, also undergoes a relevant compaction process: when its temperature is increased from 293 K to 333 K its gyration radius decreases by 18%. We have performed an atomistic simulation of this molecule, at the lowest and highest temperatures of the mentioned interval, using both standard molecular dynamics and metadynamics, in parallel with small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. Using the fit of the experimental data and a genetic algorithm to select the most probable configurations among those produced in both atomistic simulations (standard MD and metadynamics), we were able to compute relevant changes, related to the temperature increase, in the average angles between residues, in the transient secondary structures, in the solvent accessible surface area, and in the number of intramolecular H-bonds. The analysis of the data showed how to decompose the compaction phenomenon into three contributions. An estimate of the entropic contribution to the compaction was obtained using the changes in the mean values of the angles between contiguous residues. The computation of the solvent accessible surface at the two temperatures allowed an estimation of the second factor contributing to the compaction, namely the increase in the hydrophobic interaction. We also measured the change in the average number of residues temporarily being in α-helices, 3-helices, PP II helices, β-sheets and β-turns. Those changes in the secondary

  20. Isolation of SIP, a protein that interacts with SPB, a possible transcriptional regulatory factor in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Ishida, Kazuhiro; Machiya, Yasuhiro; Takamiya, Ken-Ichiro

    2007-10-01

    SPB is a transcriptional factor in Rhodobacter sphaeroides that represses expression of the puf operon under aerobic or semi-aerobic light conditions. Here, we identified a 17,500 Da protein designated SIP (SPB interaction protein) that interacts with SPB, as determined by binding to an SPB-His(x6) fusion protein-Ni column. The SPB-SIP interaction in vivo was confirmed by an immunoprecipitation assay. The level of transcripts and protein of SIP did not differ for all growth conditions tested, indicating that regulation of the SIP-SPB interaction, if any, is not through modulation of sip or spb expression but rather by modification of the proteins.

  1. Therapeutic effects of cell-permeant peptides that activate G proteins downstream of growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Gary S.; Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Midde, Krishna K.; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Sato, Emi; Dunkel, Ying; Gallo, Richard L.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two major signaling hubs. Signal transduction via trimeric G proteins has long been believed to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This paradigm has recently been challenged by several studies on a multimodular signal transducer, Gα-Interacting Vesicle associated protein (GIV/Girdin). We recently demonstrated that GIV’s C terminus (CT) serves as a platform for dynamic association of ligand-activated RTKs with Gαi, and for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins. However, exogenous manipulation of this platform has remained beyond reach. Here we developed cell-permeable GIV-CT peptides by fusing a TAT-peptide transduction domain (TAT-PTD) to the minimal modular elements of GIV that are necessary and sufficient for activation of Gi downstream of RTKs, and used them to engineer signaling networks and alter cell behavior. In the presence of an intact GEF motif, TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced diverse processes in which GIV’s GEF function has previously been implicated, e.g., 2D cell migration after scratch-wounding, invasion of cancer cells, and finally, myofibroblast activation and collagen production. Furthermore, topical application of TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced the complex, multireceptor-driven process of wound repair in mice in a GEF-dependent manner. Thus, TAT-GIV peptides provide a novel and versatile tool to manipulate Gαi activation downstream of growth factors in a diverse array of pathophysiologic conditions. PMID:25926659

  2. Portal vein thrombosis associated with protein C deficiency and elevated Factor VIII in hepatosplenic schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Leite, Luiz Arthur Calheiros; Ferreira, Rita de Cássia dos Santos; Hatzlhofer, Betânia Lucena Domingues; Correia, Maria Conceição Barros; Bandeira, Ângela Pontes; Owen, James Stuart; Lima, Vera Lúcia de Menezes; Domingues, Ana Lúcia Coutinho; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa

    2016-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is considered a vaso-occlusive process that can appear during the course of hepatosplenic Schistosoma mansoni, but may result from impaired portal blood flow or be associated with acquired or inherited thrombophilic factors. Here, we report the case of a 67-year-old woman who developed thrombocytopenia as a result of hypersplenism. Following the diagnosis of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis, portal vein thrombosis was detected by ultrasound examination, while haematological tests revealed low levels of protein C (43.3%) and high levels of factor VIII (183.1%). The pathogenesis of portal vein thrombosis remains unclear in some patients with S. mansoni. We recommend, therefore, that early clinical and haemostatic investigations are done to evaluate risk of portal vein thrombosis and hence avoid further complications.

  3. Multifunctional roles of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akkiprik, Mustafa; Feng, Yumei; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Kexin; Hu, Limei; Sahin, Aysegul; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Ozer, Ayse; Hao, Xishan; Zhang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor axis, which has been shown to protect cells from apoptosis, plays an essential role in normal cell physiology and in cancer development. The family of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) has been shown to have a diverse spectrum of functions in cell growth, death, motility, and tissue remodeling. Among the six IGFBP family members, IGFBP-5 has recently been shown to play an important role in the biology of breast cancer, especially in breast cancer metastasis; however, the exact mechanisms of action remain obscure and sometimes paradoxical. An in-depth understanding of IGFBP-5 would shed light on its potential role as a target for breast cancer therapeutics. PMID:18710598

  4. The PB1 Domain in Auxin Response Factor and Aux/IAA Proteins: A Versatile Protein Interaction Module in the Auxin Response[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An integral part of auxin-regulated gene expression involves the interplay of two types of transcription factors, the DNA binding auxin response factor (ARF) activators and the interacting auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) repressors. Insight into the mechanism of how these transcription factors interact with one another has recently been revealed from crystallographic information on ARF5 and ARF7 C-terminal domains (i.e., a protein-protein interaction domain referred to as domain III/IV that is related to domain III/IV in Aux/IAA proteins). Three-dimensional structures showed that this domain in ARF5 and ARF7 conforms to a well-known PB1 (Phox and Bem1) domain that confers protein-protein interactions with other PB1 domain proteins through electrostatic contacts. Experiments verifying the importance of charged amino acids in conferring ARF and Aux/IAA interactions have confirmed the PB1 domain structure. Some in planta experiments designed to test the validity of PB1 interactions in the auxin response have led to updated models for auxin-regulated gene expression and raised many questions that will require further investigation. In addition to the PB1 domain, a second protein interaction module that functions in ARF-ARF dimerization and facilitates DNA binding has recently been revealed from crystallography studies on the ARF1 and ARF5 DNA binding domains. PMID:25604444

  5. Dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor is regulated by an RNA-protein scaffold complex.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonia; Findlay, Gregory M; Bandukwala, Hozefa S; Oberdoerffer, Shalini; Baust, Beate; Li, Zhigang; Schmidt, Valentina; Hogan, Patrick G; Sacks, David B; Rao, Anjana

    2011-07-12

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) proteins are Ca(2+)-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression in many cell types. NFAT proteins are heavily phosphorylated and reside in the cytoplasm of resting cells; when cells are stimulated by a rise in intracellular Ca(2+), NFAT proteins are dephosphorylated by the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and translocate to the nucleus to activate target gene expression. Here we show that phosphorylated NFAT1 is present in a large cytoplasmic RNA-protein scaffold complex that contains a long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA), NRON [noncoding (RNA) repressor of NFAT]; a scaffold protein, IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAP); and three NFAT kinases, casein kinase 1, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase. Combined knockdown of NRON and IQGAP1 increased NFAT dephosphorylation and nuclear import exclusively after stimulation, without affecting the rate of NFAT rephosphorylation and nuclear export; and both NRON-depleted T cells and T cells from IQGAP1-deficient mice showed increased production of NFAT-dependent cytokines. Our results provide evidence that a complex of lincRNA and protein forms a scaffold for a latent transcription factor and its regulatory kinases, and support an emerging consensus that lincRNAs that bind transcriptional regulators have a similar scaffold function.

  6. Dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor is regulated by an RNA-protein scaffold complex

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sonia; Findlay, Gregory M.; Bandukwala, Hozefa S.; Oberdoerffer, Shalini; Baust, Beate; Li, Zhigang; Schmidt, Valentina; Hogan, Patrick G.; Sacks, David B.; Rao, Anjana

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) proteins are Ca2+-regulated transcription factors that control gene expression in many cell types. NFAT proteins are heavily phosphorylated and reside in the cytoplasm of resting cells; when cells are stimulated by a rise in intracellular Ca2+, NFAT proteins are dephosphorylated by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and translocate to the nucleus to activate target gene expression. Here we show that phosphorylated NFAT1 is present in a large cytoplasmic RNA-protein scaffold complex that contains a long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA), NRON [noncoding (RNA) repressor of NFAT]; a scaffold protein, IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAP); and three NFAT kinases, casein kinase 1, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase. Combined knockdown of NRON and IQGAP1 increased NFAT dephosphorylation and nuclear import exclusively after stimulation, without affecting the rate of NFAT rephosphorylation and nuclear export; and both NRON-depleted T cells and T cells from IQGAP1-deficient mice showed increased production of NFAT-dependent cytokines. Our results provide evidence that a complex of lincRNA and protein forms a scaffold for a latent transcription factor and its regulatory kinases, and support an emerging consensus that lincRNAs that bind transcriptional regulators have a similar scaffold function. PMID:21709260

  7. How Hibernation Factors RMF, HPF, and YfiA Turn Off Protein Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Polikanov, Yury S.; Blaha, Gregor M.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2013-04-08

    Eubacteria inactivate their ribosomes as 100S dimers or 70S monomers upon entry into stationary phase. In Escherichia coli, 100S dimer formation is mediated by ribosome modulation factor (RMF) and hibernation promoting factor (HPF), or alternatively, the YfiA protein inactivates ribosomes as 70S monomers. Here, we present high-resolution crystal structures of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with each of these stationary-phase factors. The binding site of RMF overlaps with that of the messenger RNA (mRNA) Shine-Dalgarno sequence, which prevents the interaction between the mRNA and the 16S ribosomal RNA. The nearly identical binding sites of HPF and YfiA overlap with those of the mRNA, transfer RNA, and initiation factors, which prevents translation initiation. The binding of RMF and HPF, but not YfiA, to the ribosome induces a conformational change of the 30S head domain that promotes 100S dimer formation.

  8. Initiation of zebrafish hematopoiesis by the TATA-box-binding protein-related factor, Trf3

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Daniel O.; Raha, Tamal; Lawson, Nathan D.; Green, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    TATA-box-binding protein (TBP)-related factor 3, TRF3 (also called TBP2), is a vertebrate-specific member of the TBP family that has a conserved C-terminal region and DNA binding domain virtually identical to that of TBP1. TRF3 is highly expressed during embryonic development, and studies in zebrafish and Xenopus have shown that TRF3 is required for normal embryogenesis2,3. Here we show that Trf3-depleted zebrafish embryos exhibit multiple developmental defects and, in particular, fail to undergo hematopoiesis. Expression profiling for Trf3-dependent genes identified mespa, which encodes a transcription factor whose murine orthologue is required for mesoderm specification4, and chromatin immunoprecipitation verified that Trf3 binds to the mespa promoter. Depletion of Mespa resulted in developmental and hematopoietic defects strikingly similar to those induced by Trf3 depletion. Injection of mespa mRNA restored normal development to a Trf3-depleted embryo, indicating mespa is the single Trf3 target gene required for zebrafish embryogenesis. Zebrafish embryos depleted of Trf3 or Mespa also failed to express cdx4, a caudal-related gene required for hematopoiesis. Mespa binds to the cdx4 promoter, and epistasis analysis revealed an ordered trf3-mespa-cdx4 pathway. Thus, in zebrafish commitment of mesoderm to the hematopoietic lineage occurs through a transcription factor pathway initiated by a TBP-related factor. PMID:18046332

  9. Identification of the blood coagulation factor interacting sequences in staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 10.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Saotomo; Takii, Takemasa; Onozaki, Kikuo; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Hida, Shigeaki

    2017-03-25

    Staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs) are a family of exoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus. We have shown that SSL10 binds to vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors and inhibits blood coagulation induced by recalcification of citrated plasma. SSL10 was revealed to bind to coagulation factors via their γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. In this study we attempted to identify the responsible sequence of SSL10 for the interaction with coagulation factors. We prepared a series of domain swap mutants between SSL10 and its paralog SSL7 that does not interact with coagulation factors, and examined their binding activity to immobilized prothrombin using ELISA-like binding assay. The domain swap mutants that contained SSL10β1-β3 ((23)MEMKN ISALK HGKNN LRFKF RGIKI QVL(60)) bound to immobilized prothrombin, and mutants that contained SSL10β10-β12 ((174)SFYNL DLRSK LKFKY MGEVI ESKQI KDIEV NLK(207)) also retained the binding activity. On the other hand, mutants that lacked these two regions did not bind to prothrombin. These sequences, each alone, bound to prothrombin as 33 amino acid length polypeptides. These results suggest that SSL10 has two responsible sequences for the binding to prothrombin. These prothrombin-binding peptides would contribute to the development of new anticoagulants.

  10. Sequence and expression analysis of putative Arachis hypogaea (peanut) Nod factor perception proteins.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Fernando; Angelini, Jorge; Figueredo, María Soledad; Muñoz, Vanina; Tonelli, María Laura; Fabra, Adriana

    2015-07-01

    Peanut, like most legumes, develops a symbiotic relationship with rhizobia to overcome nitrogen limitation. Rhizobial infection of peanut roots occurs through a primitive and poorly characterized intercellular mechanism. Knowledge of the molecular determinants of this symbiotic interaction is scarce, and little is known about the molecules implicated in the recognition of the symbionts. Here, we identify the LysM extracellular domain sequences of two putative peanut Nod factor receptors, named AhNFR1 and AhNFP. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that they correspond to LjNFR1 and LjNFR5 homologs, respectively. Transcriptional analysis revealed that, unlike LjNFR5, AhNFP expression was not induced at 8 h post bradyrhizobial inoculation. Further examination of AhNFP showed that the predicted protein sequence is identical to GmNFR5 in two positions that are crucial for Nod factor perception in other legumes. Analysis of the AhNFP LysM2 tridimensional model revealed that these two amino acids are very close, delimiting a zone of the molecule essential for Nod factor recognition. These data, together with the analysis of the molecular structure of Nod factors of native peanut symbionts previously reported, suggest that peanut and soybean could share some of the determinants involved in the signalling cascade that allows symbiosis establishment.

  11. Novel polymeric scaffolds using protein microbubbles as porogen and growth factor carriers.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ashwin; Thevenot, Paul; Dey, Jagannath; Shen, Jinhui; Sun, Man-Wu; Yang, Jian; Tang, Liping

    2010-02-01

    Polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds prepared by conventional techniques like salt leaching and phase separation are greatly limited by their poor biomolecule-delivery abilities. Conventional methods of incorporation of various growth factors, proteins, and/or peptides on or in scaffold materials via different crosslinking and conjugation techniques are often tedious and may affect scaffold's physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. To overcome such deficiencies, a novel two-step porous scaffold fabrication procedure has been created in which bovine serum albumin microbubbles (henceforth MB) were used as porogen and growth factor carriers. Polymer solution mixed with MB was phase separated and then lyophilized to create porous scaffold. MB scaffold triggered substantially lesser inflammatory responses than salt-leached and conventional phase-separated scaffolds in vivo. Most importantly, the same technique was used to produce insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-eluting porous scaffolds, simply by incorporating IGF-1-loaded MB (MB-IGF-1) with polymer solution before phase separation. In vitro such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds were able to promote cell growth to a much greater extent than scaffold soaked in IGF-1, confirming the bioactivity of the released IGF-1. Further, such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds elicited IGF-1-specific collagen production in the surrounding tissue in vivo. This novel growth factor-eluting scaffold fabrication procedure can be used to deliver a range of single or combination of bioactive biomolecules to substantially promote cell growth and function in degradable scaffold.

  12. Prospects of Neurotrophic Factors for Parkinson's Disease: Comparison of Protein and Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Domanskyi, Andrii; Saarma, Mart; Airavaara, Mikko

    2015-08-01

    Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) hold great potential as therapeutic agents in the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions, including Parkinson's disease (PD), in which the progressive loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta causes severe motor symptoms. There is extensive evidence that in preclinical animal models of PD NTFs are both neuroprotective and neurorestorative. In particular, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin (NRTN), cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor, and mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor have shown great potential to restore dopamine neurocircuitry. Although some previous clinical trials have demonstrated limited efficacy of GDNF and NRTN, there are several concerns raised with these studies. Moreover, open-label studies with GDNF as well as a study with NRTN showed clinical improvement, particularly in patients with early-stage PD. Indeed, as previous clinical trials with NTFs were associated with several technical problems, there is a great need for further investigations. In this review we discuss the emerging and existing possibilities to use NTFs as neurorestorative agents and the ways to improve their efficacy, and compare gene therapy and recombinant protein therapy approaches for restoring the dopamine circuitry in PD.

  13. Engineered proteins with Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor scaffold to manipulate RNA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Zefeng; Tanaka Hall, Traci M

    2013-08-01

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor proteins are characterized by a sequence-specific RNA-binding domain. This unique single-stranded RNA recognition module, whose sequence specificity can be reprogrammed, has been fused with functional modules to engineer protein factors with various functions. We summarize the advances made with respect to developing RNA regulatory tools, as well as opportunities for the future.

  14. Hepatitis B virus X protein impedes the DNA repair via its association with transcription factor, TFIIH

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections play an important role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV X protein (HBx) is a multifunctional protein that can modulate various cellular processes and plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HCC. HBx is known to interact with DNA helicase components of TFIIH, a basal transcriptional factor and an integral component of DNA excision repair. Results In this study, the functional relevance of this association was further investigated in the context to DNA repair. By site-directed mutagenesis HBx's critical residues for interaction with TFIIH were identified. Similarly, TFIIH mutants lacking ATPase domain and the conserved carboxyl-terminal domain failed to interact with HBx. Yeast and mammalian cells expressing HBxwt conferred hypersensitivity to UV irradiation, which is interpreted as a basic deficiency in nucleotide excision repair. HBxmut120 (Glu to Val) was defective in binding to TFIIH and failed to respond to UV. Conclusions We conclude that HBx may act as the promoting factor by inhibiting DNA repair causing DNA damage and accumulation of errors, thereby contributing to HCC development. PMID:21375739

  15. Malaria parasites possess a telomere repeat-binding protein that shares ancestry with transcription factor IIIA.

    PubMed

    Bertschi, Nicole L; Toenhake, Christa G; Zou, Angela; Niederwieser, Igor; Henderson, Rob; Moes, Suzette; Jenoe, Paul; Parkinson, John; Bartfai, Richard; Voss, Till S

    2017-03-13

    Telomere repeat-binding factors (TRFs) are essential components of the molecular machinery that regulates telomere function. TRFs are widely conserved across eukaryotes and bind duplex telomere repeats via a characteristic MYB-type domain. Here, we identified the telomere repeat-binding protein PfTRZ in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, a member of the Alveolate phylum for which TRFs have not been described so far. PfTRZ lacks an MYB domain and binds telomere repeats via a C2H2-type zinc finger domain instead. In vivo, PfTRZ binds with high specificity to the telomeric tract and to interstitial telomere repeats upstream of subtelomeric virulence genes. Conditional depletion experiments revealed that PfTRZ regulates telomere length homeostasis and is required for efficient cell cycle progression. Intriguingly, we found that PfTRZ also binds to and regulates the expression of 5S rDNA genes. Combined with detailed phylogenetic analyses, our findings identified PfTRZ as a remote functional homologue of the basic transcription factor TFIIIA, which acquired a new function in telomere maintenance early in the apicomplexan lineage. Our work sheds unexpected new light on the evolution of telomere repeat-binding proteins and paves the way for dissecting the presumably divergent mechanisms regulating telomere functionality in one of the most deadly human pathogens.

  16. Evaluation of extracellular matrix protein CCN1 as a prognostic factor for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Joji; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Otani, Yoshihiro; Onishi, Manabu; Fujii, Kentaro; Shimazu, Yosuke; Oka, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Date, Isao

    2015-10-01

    Recently, research efforts in identifying prognostic molecular biomarkers for malignant glioma have intensified. Cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1) is one of the CCN family of matricellular proteins that promotes cell growth and angiogenesis in cancers through its interaction with several integrins. In this study, we investigated the relationships among CCN1, O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase expression, the tumor removal rate, and prognosis in 46 glioblastoma patients treated at the Okayama University Hospital. CCN1 expression was high in 31 (67 %) of these patients. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) times of patients with high CCN1 expression was significantly shorter than those of patients with low CCN1 expression (p < 0.005). In a multivariate Cox analysis, CCN1 proved to be an independent prognostic factor for patient survival [PFS, hazard ratio (HR) = 3.53 (1.55-8.01), p = 0.003 and OS, HR = 3.05 (1.35-6.87), p = 0.007]. Moreover, in the 31 patients who underwent gross total resection, the PFS and OS times of those with high CCN1 expression were significantly shorter than those with low CCN1 expression. It was concluded that CCN1 might emerge as a significant prognostic factor regarding the prognosis of glioblastoma patients.

  17. HIV-1 Vpu Accessory Protein Induces Caspase-mediated Cleavage of IRF3 Transcription Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Yoon; Waheed, Abdul A.; Zhang, Zai-Rong; Freed, Eric O.; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    Vpu is an accessory protein encoded by HIV-1 that interferes with multiple host-cell functions. Herein we report that expression of Vpu by transfection into 293T cells causes partial proteolytic cleavage of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor in the innate anti-viral response. Vpu-induced IRF3 cleavage is mediated by caspases and occurs mainly at Asp-121. Cleavage produces a C-terminal fragment of ∼37 kDa that comprises the IRF dimerization and transactivation domains but lacks the DNA-binding domain. A similar cleavage is observed upon infection of the Jurkat T-cell line with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped HIV-1. Two other HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vif and Vpr, also contribute to the induction of IRF3 cleavage in both the transfection and the infection systems. The C-terminal IRF3 fragment interferes with the transcriptional activity of full-length IRF3. Cleavage of IRF3 under all of these conditions correlates with cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an indicator of apoptosis. We conclude that Vpu contributes to the attenuation of the anti-viral response by partial inactivation of IRF3 while host cells undergo apoptosis. PMID:25352594

  18. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha regulates the expression of nucleotide excision repair proteins in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Mahfouf, Walid; Ali, Nsrein; Chemin, Cecile; Ged, Cecile; Kim, Arianna L; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Bickers, David R; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of DNA repair enzymes is crucial for cancer prevention, initiation, and therapy. We have studied the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the expression of the two nucleotide excision repair factors (XPC and XPD) in human keratinocytes. We show that hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is involved in the regulation of XPC and XPD. Early UVB-induced downregulation of HIF-1alpha increased XPC mRNA expression due to competition between HIF-1alpha and Sp1 for their overlapping binding sites. Late UVB-induced enhanced phosphorylation of HIF-1alpha protein upregulated XPC mRNA expression by direct binding to a separate hypoxia response element (HRE) in the XPC promoter region. HIF-1alpha also regulated XPD expression by binding to a region of seven overlapping HREs in its promoter. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed putative HREs in the genes encoding other DNA repair proteins (XPB, XPG, CSA and CSB), suggesting that HIF-1alpha is a key regulator of the DNA repair machinery. Analysis of the repair kinetics of 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers also revealed that HIF-1alpha downregulation led to an increased rate of immediate removal of both photolesions but attenuated their late removal following UVB irradiation, indicating the functional effects of HIF-1alpha in the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage.

  19. The Myb-domain protein ULTRAPETALA1 INTERACTING FACTOR 1 controls floral meristem activities in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Fanny; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Blanvillain, Robert; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François; Morel, Patrice; Trehin, Christophe; Carles, Cristel C

    2016-04-01

    Higher plants continuously and iteratively produce new above-ground organs in the form of leaves, stems and flowers. These organs arise from shoot apical meristems whose homeostasis depends on coordination between self-renewal of stem cells and their differentiation into organ founder cells. This coordination is stringently controlled by the central transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS), which is both necessary and sufficient for stem cell specification in Arabidopsis thaliana ULTRAPETALA1 (ULT1) was previously identified as a plant-specific, negative regulator of WUS expression. However, molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation remain unknown. ULT1 protein contains a SAND putative DNA-binding domain and a B-box, previously proposed as a protein interaction domain in eukaryotes. Here, we characterise a novel partner of ULT1, named ULT1 INTERACTING FACTOR 1 (UIF1), which contains a Myb domain and an EAR motif. UIF1 and ULT1 function in the same pathway for regulation of organ number in the flower. Moreover, UIF1 displays DNA-binding activity and specifically binds to WUS regulatory elements. We thus provide genetic and molecular evidence that UIF1 and ULT1 work together in floral meristem homeostasis, probably by direct repression of WUS expression.

  20. Fat-specific protein 27 modulates nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 and the cellular response to stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27), a member of the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor a-like effector (Cide) family, is highly expressed in adipose tissues and is a lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein that induces the accumulation of LDs. Using a yeast two-hybrid system to examine potentia...

  1. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  2. Protein synthesis elongation factor EF-1 alpha expression and longevity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Shikama, N; Ackermann, R; Brack, C

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that the decline in protein synthesis observed in aging organisms may result from a decrease in elongation factor EF-1 alpha. Transgenic Drosophila melanogaster flies carrying an additional copy of the EF-1 alpha gene under control of a heat-inducible promoter have an extended lifespan, further indicating that the EF-1 alpha gene may play an important role in determining longevity. To test this hypothesis, we have quantitated EF-1 alpha mRNA, EF-1 alpha protein, and the EF-1 alpha complex-formation activity in these transgenic flies. Furthermore, we have tested whether the transgene construct is functional--i.e., whether transgenic mRNA is induced when flies are grown at higher temperature. The results show that although there is a clear difference in mean lifespan between the EF-1 alpha transgenic (E) flies and the control transgenic (C) flies, E flies do not express more EF-1 alpha protein or mRNA than C flies kept at the same experimental conditions. Although the transgene can be induced when E flies are heat-shocked at 37 degrees C, transgenic mRNA is not detectable in E flies aged at 29 degrees C. In both lines, the loss in catalytic activity with age is the same. We conclude that the E flies examined here do not live longer because of overexpressing the EF-1 alpha gene. Images PMID:8183891

  3. Structural basis of interactions between epidermal growth factor receptor and SH2 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Longo, G M; Koland, J G

    1993-02-26

    The structural basis of the interactions between the activated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and SH2 domain proteins was investigated. The c-src SH2 domain (second domain of src homology) was expressed as a recombinant fusion protein, and an in vitro assay was developed to monitor EGF receptor/SH2 domain interactions. EGF receptor tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) forms expressed in the baculovirus/insect cell system were shown to bind to the SH2 domain when phosphorylated. These TKD/SH2 domain interactions were characterized by dissociation constants of 60-320 nM. Deletion analysis indicated that the entire SH2 domain was required for recognition of the phosphorylated TKD. The binding of a highly truncated TKD protein to the SH2 domain suggested that the sites recognized by the SH2 domain included the EGF receptor autophosphorylation site, tyr992. A phosphorylated EGF receptor peptide containing tyr992 was also shown to interact with the SH2 domain. This residue may therefore mediate interactions between the EGF receptor and tyrosine kinases in the src family.

  4. Universal protein binding microarrays for the comprehensive characterization of the DNA binding specificities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael F.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) technology provides a rapid, high-throughput means of characterizing the in vitro DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs). Using high-density, custom-designed microarrays containing all 10-mer sequence variants, one can obtain comprehensive binding site measurements for any TF, regardless of its structural class or species of origin. Here, we present a protocol for the examination and analysis of TF binding specificities at high resolution using such ‘all 10-mer’ universal PBMs. This procedure involves double-stranding a commercially synthesized DNA oligonucleotide array, binding a TF directly to the double-stranded DNA microarray, and labeling the protein-bound microarray with a fluorophore-conjugated antibody. We describe how to computationally extract the relative binding preferences of the examined TF for all possible contiguous and gapped 8-mers over the full range of affinities, from highest affinity sites to nonspecific sites. Multiple proteins can be tested in parallel in separate chambers on a single microarray, enabling the processing of a dozen or more TFs in a single day. PMID:19265799

  5. On the origin of protein synthesis factors: a gene duplication/fusion model.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, B; Leclerc, F; Cedergren, R

    1997-12-01

    Sequence similarity has given rise to the proposal that IF-2, EF-G, and EF-Tu are related through a common ancestor. We evaluate this proposition and whether the relationship can be extended to other factors of protein synthesis. Analysis of amino acid sequence similarity gives statistical support for an evolutionary affiliation among IF-1, IF-2, IF-3, EF-Tu, EF-Ts, and EF-G and suggests further that this association is a result of gene duplication/fusion events. In support of this mechanism, the three-dimensional structures of IF-3, EF-Tu, and EF-G display a predictable domain structure and overall conformational similarity. The model that we propose consists of three consecutives duplication/fusion events which would have taken place before the divergence of the three superkingdoms: eubacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. The root of this protein superfamily tree would be an ancestor of the modern IF-1 gene sequence. The repeated fundamental motif of this protein superfamily is a small RNA binding domain composed of two alpha-helices packed along side of an antiparallel beta-sheet.

  6. Global Analysis of Salmonella Alternative Sigma Factor E on Protein Translation

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Jie; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Overall, Christopher C.; ...

    2015-02-16

    The alternative sigma factor E (σE) is critical for response to extracytoplasmic stress in Salmonella. Extensive studies have been conducted on σE-regulated gene expression, particularly at the transcriptional level. Increasing evidence suggests however that σE may indirectly participate in post-transcriptional regulation. Here in this study, we conducted sample-matched global proteomic and transcriptomic analyses to determine the level of regulation mediated by σE in Salmonella. We analysed samples from wild type and isogenic rpoE mutant Salmonella cultivated in three different conditions; nutrient-rich and conditions that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that 30% of the observed proteome was regulatedmore » by σE combining all three conditions. In different growth conditions, σE affected the expression of a broad spectrum of Salmonella proteins required for miscellaneous functions. Those involved in transport and binding, protein synthesis, and stress response were particularly highlighted. By comparing transcriptomic and proteomic data, we identified genes post-transcriptionally regulated by σE and found that post-transcriptional regulation was responsible for a majority of changes observed in the σE-regulated proteome. Further, comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data from hfq mutant of Salmonella demonstrated that σE–mediated post-transcriptional regulation was partially dependent on the RNA-binding protein Hfq.« less

  7. Global Analysis of Salmonella Alternative Sigma Factor E on Protein Translation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Overall, Christopher C.; Johnson, Rudd C.; Kidwai, Afshan S.; McDermott, Jason E.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Cambronne, Eric D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2015-02-16

    The alternative sigma factor E (σE) is critical for response to extracytoplasmic stress in Salmonella. Extensive studies have been conducted on σE-regulated gene expression, particularly at the transcriptional level. Increasing evidence suggests however that σE may indirectly participate in post-transcriptional regulation. Here in this study, we conducted sample-matched global proteomic and transcriptomic analyses to determine the level of regulation mediated by σE in Salmonella. We analysed samples from wild type and isogenic rpoE mutant Salmonella cultivated in three different conditions; nutrient-rich and conditions that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that 30% of the observed proteome was regulated by σE combining all three conditions. In different growth conditions, σE affected the expression of a broad spectrum of Salmonella proteins required for miscellaneous functions. Those involved in transport and binding, protein synthesis, and stress response were particularly highlighted. By comparing transcriptomic and proteomic data, we identified genes post-transcriptionally regulated by σE and found that post-transcriptional regulation was responsible for a majority of changes observed in the σE-regulated proteome. Further, comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data from hfq mutant of Salmonella demonstrated that σE–mediated post-transcriptional regulation was partially dependent on the RNA-binding protein Hfq.

  8. Global Analysis of Salmonella Alternative Sigma Factor E on Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Overall, Christopher C.; Johnson, Rudd C.; Kidwai, Afshan S.; McDermott, Jason E.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Cambronne, Eric D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor E (σE) is critical for response to extracytoplasmic stress in Salmonella. Extensive studies have been conducted on σE-regulated gene expression, particularly at the transcriptional level. Increasing evidence suggests however that σE may indirectly participate in post-transcriptional regulation. In this study, we conducted sample-matched global proteomic and transcriptomic analyses to determine the level of regulation mediated by σE in Salmonella. Samples were analyzed from wild-type and isogenic rpoE mutant Salmonella cultivated in three different conditions: nutrient-rich and conditions that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that 30% of the observed proteome was regulated by σE combining all three conditions. In different growth conditions, σE affected the expression of a broad spectrum of Salmonella proteins required for miscellaneous functions. Those involved in transport and binding, protein synthesis, and stress response were particularly highlighted. By comparing transcriptomic and proteomic data, we identified genes post-transcriptionally regulated by σE and found that post-transcriptional regulation was responsible for a majority of changes observed in the σE-regulated proteome. Further, comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data from hfq mutant of Salmonella demonstrated that σE-mediated post-transcriptional regulation was partially dependent on the RNA-binding protein Hfq. PMID:25686268

  9. Global analysis of Salmonella alternative sigma factor E on protein translation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Overall, Christopher C; Johnson, Rudd C; Kidwai, Afshan S; McDermott, Jason E; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Cambronne, Eric D; Adkins, Joshua N

    2015-04-03

    The alternative sigma factor E (σ(E)) is critical for response to extracytoplasmic stress in Salmonella. Extensive studies have been conducted on σ(E)-regulated gene expression, particularly at the transcriptional level. Increasing evidence suggests however that σ(E) may indirectly participate in post-transcriptional regulation. In this study, we conducted sample-matched global proteomic and transcriptomic analyses to determine the level of regulation mediated by σ(E) in Salmonella. Samples were analyzed from wild-type and isogenic rpoE mutant Salmonella cultivated in three different conditions: nutrient-rich and conditions that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that 30% of the observed proteome was regulated by σ(E) combining all three conditions. In different growth conditions, σ(E) affected the expression of a broad spectrum of Salmonella proteins required for miscellaneous functions. Those involved in transport and binding, protein synthesis, and stress response were particularly highlighted. By comparing transcriptomic and proteomic data, we identified genes post-transcriptionally regulated by σ(E) and found that post-transcriptional regulation was responsible for a majority of changes observed in the σ(E)-regulated proteome. Further, comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data from hfq mutant of Salmonella demonstrated that σ(E)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation was partially dependent on the RNA-binding protein Hfq.

  10. Small molecule modulators of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinases, the key regulators of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Manali; Kulkarni, Abhijeet; Pal, Jayanta K

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha kinases (eIF-2α kinases) are key mediators of stress response in cells. In mammalian cells, there are four eIF-2α kinases, namely HRI (Heme-Regulated Inhibitor), PKR (RNA-dependent Protein Kinase), PERK (PKR-like ER Kinase) and GCN2 (General Control Non-derepressible 2). These kinases get activated during diverse cytoplasmic stress conditions and phosphorylate the alpha-subunit of eIF2, leading to global protein synthesis inhibition. Therefore, eIF-2α kinases play a vital role in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and cell signaling. Deregulation of eIF-2α kinases and protein synthesis has been linked to numerous pathological conditions such as certain cancers, anemia and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, modulation of these kinases by small molecules holds a great therapeutic promise. In this review we have compiled the available information on inhibitors and activators of these four eIF-2α kinases. The review concludes with a note on the selectivity issue of currently available modulators and future perspectives for the design of specific small molecule probes.

  11. Apple FLOWERING LOCUS T proteins interact with transcription factors implicated in cell growth and organ development.

    PubMed

    Mimida, Naozumi; Kidou, Shin-Ichiro; Iwanami, Hiroshi; Moriya, Shigeki; Abe, Kazuyuki; Voogd, Charlotte; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika; Kotoda, Nobuhiro

    2011-05-01

    Understanding the flowering process in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) is essential for developing methods to shorten the breeding period and regulate fruit yield. It is known that FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) acts as a transmissible floral inducer in the Arabidopsis flowering network system. To clarify the molecular network of two apple FT orthologues, MdFT1 and MdFT2, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that interact with MdFT1. We identified several transcription factors, including two members of the TCP (TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA and PROLIFERATING CELL FACTORs) family, designated MdTCP2 and MdTCP4, and an Arabidopsis thaliana VOZ1 (Vascular plant One Zinc finger protein1)-like protein, designated MdVOZ1. MdTCP2 and MdVOZ1 also interacted with MdFT2 in yeast. The expression domain of MdTCP2 and MdVOZ1 partially overlapped with that of MdFT1 and MdFT2, most strikingly in apple fruit tissue, further suggesting a potential interaction in vivo. Constitutive expression of MdTCP2, MdTCP4 and MdVOZ1 in Arabidopsis affected plant size, leaf morphology and the formation of leaf primordia on the adaxial side of cotyledons. On the other hand, chimeric MdTCP2, MdTCP4 and MdVOZ1 repressors that included the ethylene-responsive transcription factors (ERF)-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) domain motif influenced reproduction and inflorescence architecture in transgenic Arabidopsis. These results suggest that MdFT1 and/or MdFT2 might be involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and the formation of new tissues and that they might affect leaf and fruit development by interacting with TCP- and VOZ-family proteins. DDBJ accession nos. AB531019 (MdTCP2a mRNA), AB531020 (MdTCP2b mRNA), AB531021 (MdTCP4a mRNA), AB531022 (MdTCP4b mRNA) and AB531023 (MdVOZ1a mRNA).

  12. Dynamic structure factor of vibrating fractals: proteins as a case study.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Klafter, Joseph; Granek, Rony

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamic structure factor S(k,t) of proteins at large wave numbers k, kR(g)≫1, where R(g) is the gyration radius. At this regime measurements are sensitive to internal dynamics, and we focus on vibrational dynamics of folded proteins. Exploiting the analogy between proteins and fractals, we perform a general analytic calculation of the displacement two-point correlation functions, <[u(−>)(i)(t)-u(−>)(j)(0)](2)>. We confront the derived expressions with numerical evaluations that are based on protein data bank (PDB) structures and the Gaussian network model (GNM) for a few proteins and for the Sierpinski gasket as a controlled check. We use these calculations to evaluate S(k,t) with arrested rotational and translational degrees of freedom, and show that the decay of S(k,t) is dominated by the spatially averaged mean-square displacement of an amino acid. The latter has been previously shown to evolve subdiffusively in time, <[u(−>)(i)(t)-u(−>)(i)(0)](2)> ~t(ν), where ν is the anomalous diffusion exponent that depends on the spectral dimension d(s) and fractal dimension d(f). As a result, for wave numbers obeying k(2))(2)>≳1, S(k,t) effectively decays as a stretched exponential S(k,t)≃S(k)e(-(Γ(k)t)(β)) with β≃ν, where the relaxation rate is Γ(k)~(k(B)T/mω(o)(2))(1/β)k(2/β), T is the temperature, and mω(o)(2) the GNM effective spring constant describing the interaction between neighboring amino acids. The static structure factor is dominated by the fractal character of the native fold, S(k)~k(-d(f)), with negligible to marginal influence of vibrations. The analytical expressions are first confronted with numerically based calculations on the Sierpinski gasket, and very good agreement is found between simulations and theory. We then perform PDB-GNM-based numerical calculations for a few proteins, and an effective stretched exponential decay of the dynamic structure factor is found, albeit their relatively small size

  13. [Identification of an auxin response factor-like protein cDNA from mango cotyledon section].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jie-Ning; Huang, Xue-Lin; Huang, Xia; Li, Xiao-Ju

    2004-01-01

    Auxin-responsive elements (AuxRE) interact with a new class of plant-specific transcription factors, auxin response factors (ARFs). Some of ARFs have been shown to repress or activate expression of genes with an AuxRE promotor element. In Arabidopsis, ARFs play important roles in early embryo development and vascular strand formation (ARF5), floral patterning (ARF3) and photo- and gravitropic responses (ARF7). Two cut surfaces (distal and proximal) of mango (Mangifera indica L. var. Zi-Hua) cotyledon showed different patterns of adventitious root formation, with only the proximal cut surface, but not the distal one, could be induced to form the roots. Thus, the mango cotyledon is a good system for studying adventitious root formation. A cDNA fragment homologous to the Arabidopsis auxin response factor-like protein and relates to adventitious root formation from the cut sections were isolated using suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH). Two cDNA clones, designated as MiARF1 (mango auxin response factor 1 gene, GenBank accession number AY255705) and MiARF2 (mango auxin response factor 2 gene, GenBank accession number is AY300808), were identified by 3'RACE. MiARF1, 3 272bp long, contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 2 523bp, 5'UTR of 285bp and 3'UTR of 464bp, MiARF2, 1 474bp long, contains an ORF of 981bp, 5' UTR of 285bp and 3'UTR of 208bp. The deduced MiARF1 and MiARF2 are homologues of auxin response factor (ARF) family of transcriptional regulators, and show high similarity to ARF of Arabidopsis in conserved domains. The motifs of MiARF1 EL-WHACAGPL in DBD (DNA binding domain) and GDDPW in IV domain are identical to that of ARF-like protein of Arabidopsis. MiARF2 is identical to MiARF1 in a large part of DBD, but lacks a carboxyl-terminal domain containing conserved motifs III and IV. Virtual Northern blot showed that the expression of MiARF2 was high in rooting tissue of cultured cotyledon sections but low in non-rooting tissue, and the MiARF1 was

  14. A Drosophila haemocyte-specific protein, hemolectin, similar to human von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Goto, A; Kumagai, T; Kumagai, C; Hirose, J; Narita, H; Mori, H; Kadowaki, T; Beck, K; Kitagawa, Y

    2001-01-01

    We identified a novel Drosophila protein of approximately 400 kDa, hemolectin (d-Hml), secreted from haemocyte-derived Kc167 cells. Its 11.7 kbp cDNA contains an open reading frame of 3843 amino acid residues, with conserved domains in von Willebrand factor (VWF), coagulation factor V/VIII and complement factors. The d-hml gene is located on the third chromosome (position 70C1-5) and consists of 26 exons. The major part of d-Hml consists of well-known motifs with the organization: CP1-EG1-CP2-EG2-CP3-VD1-VD2-VD'-VD3-VC1-VD"-VD"'-FC1-FC2-VC2-LA1-VD4-VD5-VC3-VB1-VB2-VC4-VC5-CK1 (CP, complement-control protein domain; EG, epidermal-growth-factor-like domain; VB, VC, VD, VWF type B-, C- and D-like domains; VD', VD", VD"', truncated C-terminal VDs; FC, coagulation factor V/VIII type C domain; LA, low-density-lipoprotein-receptor class A domain; CK, cysteine knot domain). The organization of VD1-VD2-VD'-VD3, essential for VWF to be processed by furin, to bind to coagulation factor VIII and to form interchain disulphide linkages, is conserved. The 400 kDa form of d-Hml was sensitive to acidic cleavage near the boundary between VD2 and VD', where the cleavage site of pro-VWF is located. Agarose-gel electrophoresis of metabolically radiolabelled d-Hml suggested that it is secreted from Kc167 cells mainly as dimers. Resembling VWF, 7.9% (305 residues) of cysteine residues on the d-Hml sequence had well-conserved positions in each motif. Coinciding with the development of phagocytic haemocytes, d-hml transcript was detected in late embryos and larvae. Its low-level expression in adult flies was induced by injury at any position on the body. PMID:11563973

  15. Impaired Immunogenicity of Meningococcal Neisserial Surface Protein A in Human Complement Factor H Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Eduardo; Pajon, Rolando; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-11-23

    Neisserial surface protein A (NspA) is a highly conserved outer membrane protein previously investigated as a meningococcal vaccine candidate. Despite eliciting serum bactericidal activity in mice, a recombinant NspA vaccine failed to elicit serum bactericidal antibodies in a phase 1 clinical trial in humans. The discordant results may be explained by the recent discovery that NspA is a human-specific ligand of the complement inhibitor factor H (FH). Therefore, in humans but not mice, NspA would be expected to form a complex with FH, which could impair human anti-NspA protective antibody responses. To investigate this question, we immunized human FH transgenic BALB/c mice with three doses of recombinant NspA expressed in Escherichia coli microvesicles, with each dose being separated by 3 weeks. Three of 12 (25%) transgenic mice and 13 of 14 wild-type mice responded with bactericidal titers of ≥1:10 in postimmunization sera (P = 0.0008, Fisher's exact test). In contrast, human FH transgenic and wild-type mice immunized with a control meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccine had similar serum bactericidal antibody responses directed at PorA, which is not known to bind human FH, and a mutant factor H binding protein (FHbp) antigen with a >50-fold lower level of FH binding than wild-type FHbp antigen binding.Thus, human FH can impair anti-NspA serum bactericidal antibody responses, which may explain the poor immunogenicity of the NspA vaccine previously tested in humans. A mutant NspA vaccine engineered to have decreased binding to human FH may increase protective antibody responses in humans.

  16. Platelet factor 4 binds to glycanated forms of thrombomodulin and to protein C. A potential mechanism for enhancing generation of activated protein C.

    PubMed

    Dudek, A Z; Pennell, C A; Decker, T D; Young, T A; Key, N S; Slungaard, A

    1997-12-12

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule heparin-binding protein. We have previously shown that PF4 accelerates up to 25-fold the proteolytic conversion of protein C to activated protein C by the thrombin.thrombomodulin complex by increasing its affinity for protein C 30-fold. This stimulatory effect requires presence of the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain in protein C and is enhanced by the presence of a chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) domain on thrombomodulin. We hypothesized that cationic PF4 binds to both protein C and thrombomodulin through these anionic domains. Qualitative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of avidin extracts of solutions containing biotinylated PF4 and candidate ligands shows that PF4 binds to GAG+ but not GAG- forms of thrombomodulin and native but not Gla-domainless protein C. Quantitative analysis using the surface plasmon resonance-based BIAcoreTM biosensor system confirms the extremely high affinity of PF4 for heparin (KD = 4 nM) and shows that PF4 binds to GAG+ thrombomodulin with a KD of 31 nM and to protein C with a KD of 0.37 microM. In contrast, PF4 had no measurable interaction with GAG- thrombomodulin or Gla-domainless protein C. Western blot analysis of normal human plasma extracted with biotinylated PF4 demonstrates PF4 binding to protein C in a physiologic context. Thus, PF4 binds with relative specificity and high affinity to the GAG- domain of thrombomodulin and the Gla domain of protein C. These interactions may enhance the affinity of the thrombin.thrombomodulin complex for protein C and thereby promote the generation of activated protein C.

  17. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 in pancreas tissues and its correlation with epithelial growth factor receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Liu, Su-Xia; Cui, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Dong-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8 or TIPE) is a recently identified protein considered to be associated with carcinogenesis. To investigate its expression pattern in pancreatic cancer patients and to analyse its correlation with clinicopathological significance and the expression levels of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the TNFAIP8 and EGFR proteins in pancreatic cancers, pancreatitis tissues, and healthy controls. The results showed stronger staining of TNFAIP8 protein in pancreatic cancer tissues compared with normal pancreas tissue. Furthermore, in 56 patients with pancreatic cancer, the expression levels of TNFAIP8 in patients with low tumor stage was higher than that with high tumor stage, and correlated with tumor staging and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Furthermore, TNFAIP8 expression positively correlated with EGFR levels (r=0.671135, P<0.05). These results indicate that TNFAIP8 may play important roles in the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu protein expression in meningiomas: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Chowhan, Amit Kumar; Rukmangadha, Nandyala; Patnayak, Rashmi; Phaneendra, Bobbidi Venkata; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mowliswara; Reddy, Mandyam Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas are common slow-growing primary central nervous system tumors that arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid and spinal cord. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) or HER2/neu (also known as c-erbB2) is a 185-kD transmembrane glycoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity expressed in meningiomas and various other tumors. It can be used in targeted therapy for HER2/neu positive meningiomas. Aim: To correlate the expression of HER2/neu protein in meningiomas with gender, location, histological subtypes, and grade. Materials and Methods: It was 3½ years prospective (March 2010–October 2011) and retrospective (May 2008–February 2010) study of histopathologically diagnosed intracranial and intraspinal meningiomas. Clinical details of all the cases were noted from the computerized hospital information system. Immunohistochemistry for HER2/neu protein was performed along with scoring. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test to look for any association of HER2/neu with gender, location, grade, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas at 5% level of significance. Results: A total of 100 cases of meningiomas were found during the study period. Of which, 80 were Grade I, 18 were Grade II, and 2 were Grade III meningiomas as per the World Health Organization 2007 criteria. The female-male ratio was 1.9:1 and the mean age was 47.8 years. HER2/neu protein was expressed in 75% of Grade I and 72.2% of Grade II and none of Grade III meningiomas. About 72.7% brain invasive meningiomas showed HER2/neu immunopositivity. Conclusion: HER2/neu protein was expressed in 73% of meningiomas. Statistically significant difference of HER2/neu expression was not seen between females and males of Grade I and Grade II/III meningiomas, intracranial and spinal tumors, Grade I and Grade II/III cases, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas. PMID:27695231

  19. Evolutionary Dynamics of Floral Homeotic Transcription Factor Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Madelaine; Thompson, Beth; Brabazon, Holly; Del Gizzi, Robert; Zhang, Thompson; Whipple, Clinton

    2016-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have widely acknowledged roles in the regulation of development, but few studies have addressed the timing and mechanism of shifting PPIs over evolutionary history. The B-class MADS-box transcription factors, PISTILLATA (PI) and APETALA3 (AP3) are key regulators of floral development. PI-like (PIL) and AP3-like (AP3L) proteins from a number of plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and the grass Zea mays (maize), bind DNA as obligate heterodimers. However, a PIL protein from the grass relative Joinvillea can bind DNA as a homodimer. To ascertain whether Joinvillea PIL homodimerization is an anomaly or indicative of broader trends, we characterized PIL dimerization across the Poales and uncovered unexpected evolutionary lability. Both obligate B-class heterodimerization and PIL homodimerization have evolved multiple times in the order, by distinct molecular mechanisms. For example, obligate B-class heterodimerization in maize evolved very recently from PIL homodimerization. A single amino acid change, fixed during domestication, is sufficient to toggle one maize PIL protein between homodimerization and obligate heterodimerization. We detected a signature of positive selection acting on residues preferentially clustered in predicted sites of contact between MADS-box monomers and dimers, and in motifs that mediate MADS PPI specificity in Arabidopsis. Changing one positively selected residue can alter PIL dimerization activity. Furthermore, ectopic expression of a Joinvillea PIL homodimer in Arabidopsis can homeotically transform sepals into petals. Our results provide a window into the evolutionary remodeling of PPIs, and show that novel interactions have the potential to alter plant form in a context-dependent manner. PMID:26908583

  20. Archaeal ribosomal stalk protein interacts with translation factors in a nucleotide-independent manner via its conserved C terminus

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Naoko; Honda, Takayoshi; Baba, Kentaro; Naganuma, Takao; Tanzawa, Takehito; Arisaka, Fumio; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Protein synthesis on the ribosome requires translational GTPase factors to bind to the ribosome in the GTP-bound form, take individual actions that are coupled with GTP hydrolysis, and dissociate, usually in the GDP-bound form. The multiple copies of the flexible ribosomal stalk protein play an important role in these processes. Using biochemical approaches and the stalk protein from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus horikoshii, we here provide evidence that the conserved C terminus of the stalk protein aP1 binds directly to domain I of the elongation factor aEF-2, irrespective of whether aEF-2 is bound to GTP or GDP. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that four hydrophobic amino acids at the C terminus of aP1, Leu-100, 103, 106, and Phe-107, are crucial for the direct binding. P1 was also found to bind to the initiation factor aIF5B, as well as aEF-1α, but not aIF2γ, via its C terminus. Moreover, analytical ultracentrifugation and gel mobility shift analyses showed that a heptameric complex of aP1 and aP0, aP0(aP1)2(aP1)2(aP1)2, can bind multiple aEF-2 molecules simultaneously, which suggests that individual copies of the stalk protein are accessible to the factor. The functional significance of the C terminus of the stalk protein was also shown using the eukaryotic proteins P1/P2 and P0. It is likely that the conserved C terminus of the stalk proteins of archaea and eukaryotes can bind to translation factors both before and after GTP hydrolysis. This consistent binding ability of the stalk protein may contribute to maintaining high concentrations of translation factors around the ribosome, thus promoting translational efficiency. PMID:22355137

  1. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibition blocks thrombin generation in humans by interfering with platelet factor V activation

    PubMed Central

    Stopa, Jack D.; Neuberg, Donna; Puligandla, Maneka; Furie, Bruce; Zwicker, Jeffrey I.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation. We previously demonstrated that glycosylated quercetin flavonoids such as isoquercetin inhibit PDI activity and thrombus formation in animal models, but whether extracellular PDI represents a viable anticoagulant target in humans and how its inhibition affects blood coagulation remain unknown. METHODS: We evaluated effects of oral administration of isoquercetin on platelet-dependent thrombin generation in healthy subjects and patients with persistently elevated anti-phospholipid antibodies. RESULTS: Following oral administration of 1,000 mg isoquercetin to healthy adults, the measured peak plasma quercetin concentration (9.2 μM) exceeded its IC50 for inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin in vitro (2.5 ± 0.4 μM). Platelet-dependent thrombin generation decreased by 51% in the healthy volunteers compared with baseline (P = 0.0004) and by 64% in the anti-phospholipid antibody cohort (P = 0.015) following isoquercetin ingestion. To understand how PDI affects thrombin generation, we evaluated substrates of PDI identified using an unbiased mechanistic-based substrate trapping approach. These studies identified platelet factor V as a PDI substrate. Isoquercetin blocked both platelet factor Va and thrombin generation with an IC50 of ~5 μM. Inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin ingestion resulted in a 53% decrease in the generation of platelet factor Va (P = 0.001). Isoquercetin-mediated inhibition was reversed with addition of exogenous factor Va. CONCLUSION: These studies show that oral administration of isoquercetin inhibits PDI activity in plasma and diminishes platelet-dependent thrombin generation predominantly by blocking the generation of platelet factor Va. These pharmacodynamic and mechanistic observations represent an important step in the development of a novel class of antithrombotic agents targeting PDI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01722669) FUNDING: National Heart

  2. Toxic Compound, Anti-Nutritional Factors and Functional Properties of Protein Isolated from Detoxified Jatropha curcas Seed Cake

    PubMed Central

    Saetae, Donlaporn; Suntornsuk, Worapot

    2011-01-01

    Jatropha curcas is a multipurpose tree, which has potential as an alternative source for biodiesel. All of its parts can also be used for human food, animal feed, fertilizer, fuel and traditional medicine. J. curcas seed cake is a low-value by-product obtained from biodiesel production. The seed cake, however, has a high amount of protein, with the presence of a main toxic compound: phorbol esters as well as anti-nutritional factors: trypsin inhibitors, phytic acid, lectin and saponin. The objective of this work was to detoxify J. curcas seed cake and study the toxin, anti-nutritional factors and also functional properties of the protein isolated from the detoxified seed cake. The yield of protein isolate was approximately 70.9%. The protein isolate was obtained without a detectable level of phorbol esters. The solubility of the protein isolate was maximal at pH 12.0 and minimal at pH 4.0. The water and oil binding capacities of the protein isolate were 1.76 g water/g protein and 1.07 mL oil/g protein, respectively. The foam capacity and stability, including emulsion activity and stability of protein isolate, had higher values in a range of basic pHs, while foam and emulsion stabilities decreased with increasing time. The results suggest that the detoxified J. curcas seed cake has potential to be exploited as a novel source of functional protein for food applications. PMID:21339978

  3. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: Demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Block, L.H.; Abraham, W.M.; Groscurth, P.; Qiao, B.Y.; Perruchoud, A.P. )

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  4. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Block, L H; Abraham, W M; Groscurth, P; Qiao, B Y; Perruchoud, A P

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  5. The Caenorhabditis elegans Protein FIC-1 Is an AMPylase That Covalently Modifies Heat-Shock 70 Family Proteins, Translation Elongation Factors and Histones

    PubMed Central

    Truttmann, Matthias C.; Guo, Xuanzong; Engert, Christoph; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein AMPylation by Fic domain-containing proteins (Fic proteins) is an ancient and conserved post-translational modification of mostly unexplored significance. Here we characterize the Caenorhabditis elegans Fic protein FIC-1 in vitro and in vivo. FIC-1 is an AMPylase that localizes to the nuclear surface and modifies core histones H2 and H3 as well as heat shock protein 70 family members and translation elongation factors. The three-dimensional structure of FIC-1 is similar to that of its human ortholog, HYPE, with 38% sequence identity. We identify a link between FIC-1-mediated AMPylation and susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, establishing a connection between AMPylation and innate immunity in C. elegans. PMID:27138431

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β positively regulates protein synthesis and cell proliferation through the regulation of translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Shin, S; Wolgamott, L; Tcherkezian, J; Vallabhapurapu, S; Yu, Y; Roux, P P; Yoon, S-O

    2014-03-27

    Protein synthesis has a key role in the control of cell proliferation, and its deregulation is associated with pathological conditions, notably cancer. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), was known to inhibit protein synthesis. However, it does not substantially inhibit protein synthesis and cell proliferation in many cancer types. We were interested in finding a novel target in rapamycin-resistant cancer. The rate-limiting factor for translation is eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), which is negatively regulated by eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). Here, we provide evidence that glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β promotes cell proliferation through positive regulation of protein synthesis. We found that GSK-3β phosphorylates and inactivates 4E-BP1, thereby increasing eIF4E-dependent protein synthesis. Considering the clinical relevance of pathways regulating protein synthesis, our study provides a promising new strategy and target for cancer therapy.

  7. Novel Polymeric Scaffolds Using Protein Microbubbles as Porogen and Growth Factor Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ashwin; Thevenot, Paul; Dey, Jagannath; Shen, Jinhui; Sun, Man-Wu; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds prepared by conventional techniques like salt leaching and phase separation are greatly limited by their poor biomolecule-delivery abilities. Conventional methods of incorporation of various growth factors, proteins, and/or peptides on or in scaffold materials via different crosslinking and conjugation techniques are often tedious and may affect scaffold's physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. To overcome such deficiencies, a novel two-step porous scaffold fabrication procedure has been created in which bovine serum albumin microbubbles (henceforth MB) were used as porogen and growth factor carriers. Polymer solution mixed with MB was phase separated and then lyophilized to create porous scaffold. MB scaffold triggered substantially lesser inflammatory responses than salt-leached and conventional phase-separated scaffolds in vivo. Most importantly, the same technique was used to produce insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)–eluting porous scaffolds, simply by incorporating IGF-1–loaded MB (MB-IGF-1) with polymer solution before phase separation. In vitro such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds were able to promote cell growth to a much greater extent than scaffold soaked in IGF-1, confirming the bioactivity of the released IGF-1. Further, such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds elicited IGF-1–specific collagen production in the surrounding tissue in vivo. This novel growth factor–eluting scaffold fabrication procedure can be used to deliver a range of single or combination of bioactive biomolecules to substantially promote cell growth and function in degradable scaffold. PMID:19327002

  8. Variations in concentrations of the major endometrial secretory proteins (placental protein 14 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1) in assisted conception regimes.

    PubMed

    Arthur, I D; Anthony, F W; Chard, T; Masson, G M; Thomas, E J

    1995-03-01

    We have previously shown that placental protein 14 (PP14) concentrations were depressed in two pregnancies that followed down-regulation of the anterior pituitary and exogenous hormone support prior to a frozen-thawed embryo transfer. We now report on a more comprehensive series of pregnancies following this form of treatment, in-vitro fertilization (IVF) and natural cycle frozen-thawed embryo transfer. Serum specimens were analysed for PP14 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 12 days after embryo transfer and at 7 weeks gestation. At 12 days after embryo transfer, the mean serum PP14 concentrations in the IVF and natural cycle were significantly higher in those who conceived than those who did not (82 versus 23 and 107 versus 39 micrograms/l respectively, P < 0.001). Although the mean PP14 concentration in the hormone-supported pregnant patients was higher than in the non-pregnant patients, this had not reached statistical significance 12 days after embryo transfer (49 versus 31 micrograms/l). By 7 weeks gestation the PP14 concentrations in the hormone-supported pregnant patients were significantly higher than in the non-pregnant patients (152 versus 31 micrograms/l, P < 0.001). However, the PP14 concentrations for hormone-supported pregnant patients were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than those for pregnant IVF or natural cycle patients at 7 weeks gestation (152, 777 and 660 micrograms/l respectively). The PP14 concentrations in the pregnant patients, although lower than those in IVF and natural cycle pregnancies, were higher than those previously reported in ovarian failure and Turner's syndrome ovum donation cycles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. WARP is a new member of the von Willebrand factor A-domain superfamily of extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Jamie; Tay Ting, Su; Bateman, John F

    2002-04-24

    We report a new member of the von Willebrand factor A-domain protein superfamily, WARP (for von Willebrand factor A-domain-related protein). The full-length mouse WARP cDNA is 2.3 kb in size and predicts a protein of 415 amino acids which contains a signal sequence, a VA-like domain, two fibronectin type III-like repeats, and a short proline- and arginine-rich segment. WARP mRNA was expressed predominantly in chondrocytes and in vitro expression experiments in transfected 293 cells indicated that WARP is a secreted glycoprotein that forms disulphide-bonded oligomers. We conclude that WARP is a new member of the von Willebrand factor A-domain (VA-domain) superfamily of extracellular matrix proteins which may play a role in cartilage structure and function.

  10. The regulation and activation of ciliary neurotrophic factor signaling proteins in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zvonic, Sanjin; Cornelius, Peter; Stewart, William C; Mynatt, Randall L; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2003-01-24

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is primarily known for its roles as a lesion factor released by the ruptured glial cells that prevent neuronal degeneration. However, CNTF has also been shown to cause weight loss in a variety of rodent models of obesity/type II diabetes, whereas a modified form also causes weight loss in humans. CNTF administration can correct or improve hyperinsulinemia, hyperphagia, and hyperlipidemia associated with these models of obesity. In order to investigate the effects of CNTF on fat cells, we examined the expression of CNTF receptor complex proteins (LIFR, gp130, and CNTFRalpha) during adipocyte differentiation and the effects of CNTF on STAT, Akt, and MAPK activation. We also examined the ability of CNTF to regulate the expression of adipocyte transcription factors and other adipogenic proteins. Our studies clearly demonstrate that the expression of two of the three CNTF receptor complex components, CNTFRalpha and LIFR, decreases during adipocyte differentiation. In contrast, gp130 expression is relatively unaffected by differentiation. In addition, preadipocytes are more sensitive to CNTF treatment than adipocytes, as judged by both STAT 3 and Akt activation. Despite decreased levels of CNTFRalpha expression in fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, CNTF treatment of these cells resulted in a time-dependent activation of STAT 3. Chronic treatment of adipocytes resulted in a substantial decrease in fatty-acid synthase and a notable decline in SREBP-1 levels but had no effect on the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, acrp30, adipocyte-expressed STAT proteins, or C/EBPalpha. However, CNTF resulted in a significant increase in IRS-1 expression. CNTFRalpha receptor expression was substantially induced in the fat pads of four rodent models of obesity/type II diabetes as compared with lean littermates. Moreover, we demonstrated that CNTF can activate STAT 3 in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in vivo. In

  11. Processing factors that influence casein and serum protein separation by microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Hurt, E; Barbano, D M

    2010-10-01

    Our objective was to demonstrate the effect of various processing factors on the performance of a microfiltration system designed to process skim milk and separate casein (CN) from serum proteins (SP). A mathematical model of a skim milk microfiltration process was developed with 3 stages plus an additional fourth finishing stage to standardize the retentate to 9% true protein (TP) and allow calculation of yield of a liquid 9% TP micellar CN concentrate (MCC) and milk SP isolate (MSPI; 90% SP on a dry basis). The model was used to predict the effect of 5 factors: 1) skim milk composition, 2) heat treatment of skim milk, 3) concentration factor (CF) and diafiltration factor (DF), 4) control of CF and DF, and 5) SP rejection by the membrane on retentate and permeate composition, SP removal, and MCC and MSPI yield. When skim milk TP concentration increased from 3.2 to 3.8%, the TP concentration in the third stage retentate increased from 7.92 to 9.40%, the yield of MCC from 1,000 kg of skim milk increased from 293 to 348 kg, and the yield of MSPI increased from 6.24 to 7.38 kg. Increased heat treatment (72.9 to 85.2°C) of skim milk caused the apparent CN as a percentage of TP content of skim milk as measured by Kjeldahl analysis to increase from 81.97 to 85.94% and the yield of MSPI decreased from 6.24 to 4.86 kg, whereas the third stage cumulative percentage SP removal decreased from 96.96 to 70.08%. A CF and DF of 2× gave a third stage retentate TP concentration of 5.38% compared with 13.13% for a CF and DF of 5×, with the third stage cumulative SP removal increasing from 88.66 to 99.47%. Variation in control of the balance between CF and DF (instead of an equal CF and DF) caused either a progressive increase or decrease in TP concentration in the retentate across stages depending on whether CF was greater than DF (increasing TP in retentate) or CF was less than DF (decreasing TP in retentate). An increased rejection of SP by the membrane from an SP removal

  12. Association and regulation of protein factors of field effect in prostate tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Kristin N.; Jones, Anna C.; Nguyen, Julie P.T.; Antillon, Kresta S.; Janos, Sara N.; Overton, Heidi N.; Jenkins, Shannon M.; Frisch, Emily H.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Field effect or field cancerization denotes the presence of molecular aberrations in structurally intact cells residing in histologically normal tissues adjacent to solid tumors. Currently, the etiology of prostate field-effect formation is unknown and there is a prominent lack of knowledge of the underlying cellular and molecular pathways. We have previously identified an upregulated expression of several protein factors representative of prostate field effect, i.e., early growth response-1 (EGR-1), platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A), macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1), and fatty acid synthase (FASN) in tissues at a distance of 1 cm from the visible margin of intracapsule prostate adenocarcinomas. We have hypothesized that the transcription factor EGR-1 could be a key regulator of prostate field-effect formation by controlling the expression of PDGF-A, MIC-1, and FASN. Taking advantage of our extensive quantitative immunofluorescence data specific for EGR-1, PDGF-A, MIC-1, and FASN generated in disease-free, tumor-adjacent, and cancerous human prostate tissues, we chose comprehensive correlation as our major approach to test this hypothesis. Despite the static nature and sample heterogeneity of association studies, we show here that sophisticated data generation, such as by spectral image acquisition, linear unmixing, and digital quantitative imaging, can provide meaningful indications of molecular regulations in a physiologically relevant in situ environment. Our data suggest that EGR-1 acts as a key regulator of prostate field effect through induction of pro-proliferative (PDGF-A and FASN), and suppression of pro-apoptotic (MIC-1) factors. These findings were corroborated by computational promoter analyses and cell transfection experiments in non-cancerous prostate epithelial cells with ectopically induced and suppressed EGR-1 expression. Among several clinical applications, a detailed knowledge of pathways of field effect may lead to the

  13. Production of functional human insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) using recombinant expression in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Wanscher, Anne Sofie Molsted; Williamson, Michael; Ebersole, Tasja Wainani; Streicher, Werner; Wikström, Mats; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) display many functions in humans including regulation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway. The various roles of human IGFBPs make them attractive protein candidates in drug discovery. Structural and functional knowledge on human proteins with therapeutic relevance is needed to design and process the next generation of protein therapeutics. In order to conduct structural and functional investigations large quantities of recombinant proteins are needed. However, finding a suitable recombinant production system for proteins such as full-length human IGFBPs, still remains a challenge. Here we present a mammalian HEK293 expression method suitable for over-expression of secretory full-length human IGFBP-1 to -7. Protein purification of full-length human IGFBP-1, -2, -3 and -5 was conducted using a two-step chromatography procedure and the final protein yields were between 1 and 12mg protein per liter culture media. The recombinant IGFBPs contained PTMs and exhibited high-affinity interactions with their natural ligands IGF-1 and IGF-2.

  14. In-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of de novo protein synthesis induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoan; Bowling, Heather; Hom, Nancy; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Klann, Eric; Chao, Moses V; Neubert, Thomas A

    2014-12-05

    Measuring the synthesis of new proteins in the context of a much greater number of pre-existing proteins can be difficult. To overcome this obstacle, bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) can be combined with stable isotope labeling by amino acid in cell culture (SILAC) for comparative proteomic analysis of de novo protein synthesis (BONLAC). In the present study, we show that alkyne resin-based isolation of l-azidohomoalanine (AHA)-labeled proteins using azide/alkyne cycloaddition minimizes contamination from pre-existing proteins. Using this approach, we isolated and identified 7414 BONCAT-labeled proteins. The nascent proteome isolated by BONCAT was very similar to the steady-state proteome, although transcription factors were highly enriched by BONCAT. About 30% of the methionine residues were replaced by AHA in our BONCAT samples, which allowed for identification of methionine-containing peptides. There was no bias against low-methionine proteins by BONCAT at the proteome level. When we applied the BONLAC approach to screen for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced protein synthesis, 53 proteins were found to be significantly changed 2 h after BDNF stimulation. Our study demonstrated that the newly synthesized proteome, even after a short period of stimulation, can be efficiently isolated by BONCAT and analyzed to a depth that is similar to that of the steady-state proteome.

  15. Cloning of human epidermal growth factor as a bacterial secretory protein, its properties and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, D.A.; Matsunami, R.K.; Campion, S.R.; Foote, R.S.; Mural, R.J.; Larimer, F.W.; Stevens, A.; Niyogi, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    A chimeric gene, containing the DNA coding for the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and that for the signal peptide of E. coli alkaline phosphatase, was constructed by the annealing and subsequent ligation of appropriate DNA oligonucleotides synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The gene was then cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the transcriptional control of the E. coli trp-lac (tac) promoter, and then transformed into E. coli. Following induction with isopropylthiogalactoside, the secretion of EGF into the E. coli periplasmic space and some into the growth medium was confirmed by its specific binding to the EGF receptor and stimulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The size and physicochemical properties of the purified protein mimicked those of authentic human EGF. Studies of structure/function relationships by specific alterations of targeted amino acid residues in the EGF molecule have been initiated by utilizing site-directed mutagenesis.

  16. Phosphorylation of the human-transforming-growth-factor-beta-binding protein endoglin.

    PubMed Central

    Lastres, P; Martín-Perez, J; Langa, C; Bernabéu, C

    1994-01-01

    Endoglin is an homodimeric membrane antigen with capacity to bind transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Phosphorylation of human endoglin was demonstrated in endothelial cells as well as in mouse fibroblast transfectants expressing two isoforms, L-endoglin or S-endoglin, with distinct cytoplasmic domains. The extent of L-endoglin phosphorylation was found to be 8-fold higher than that of S-endoglin, and phosphopeptide analyses revealed at least three different phosphorylation sites for L-endoglin, whereas S-endoglin produces only one phosphopeptide. The immunoprecipitated L-endoglin was found to be phosphorylated mainly on serine, and, to a minor extent, on threonine, residues. Treatment of the cells with TGF-beta 1 or the protein kinase C inhibitor H-7 resulted in a reduction of the levels of endoglin phosphorylation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8053900

  17. Divergent Transactivation of Maize Storage Protein Zein Genes by the Transcription Factors Opaque2 and OHPs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Ji, Chen; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-01-01

    Maize transcription factors (TFs) opaque2 (O2) and the O2 heterodimerizing proteins (OHP1 and OHP2) originated from an ancient segmental duplication. The 22-kDa (z1C) and 19-kDa (z1A, z1B, and z1D) α-zeins are the most abundant storage proteins in maize endosperm. O2 is known to regulate α-zein gene expression, but its target motifs in the 19-kDa α-zein gene promoters have not been identified. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of α-zein genes by these TFs are also not well understood. In this study, we found that the O2 binding motifs in the α-zein gene promoters are quite flexible, with ACGT being present in the z1C and z1A promoters and a variant, ACAT, being present in the z1B and z1D promoters. OHPs recognized and transactivated all of the α-zein promoters, although to much lower levels than did O2. In the presence of O2, the suppression of OHPs did not cause a significant reduction in the transcription of α-zein genes, but in the absence of O2, OHPs were critical for the expression of residual levels of α-zeins. These findings demonstrated that O2 is the primary TF and that OHPs function as minor TFs in this process. This relationship is the converse of that involved in 27-kDa γ-zein gene regulation, indicating that the specificities of O2 and the OHPs for regulating zein genes diverged after gene duplication. The prolamine-box binding factor by itself has limited transactivation activity, but it promotes the binding of O2 to O2 motifs, resulting in the synergistic transactivation of α-zein genes. PMID:27474726

  18. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  19. Whey protein and albumin effects upon urinary risk factors for stone formation.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Camila Mithie; Tiselius, Hans-Göran; Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman

    2017-03-22

    Protein supplements are consumed for an expected increase in muscle mass and improved exercise performance, but as their impact on lithogenic parameters are unknown, we aimed to evaluate the effects of Whey protein (WP) and Albumin upon the risk factors for nephrolithiasis. WP or Albumin supplements (one scoop/day) were administered for 3 days to 18 healthy volunteers, with 1-week washout period between them. Serum and 24-h urine samples were collected at baseline and after completing each intervention. All participants were asked to replicate their baseline diet during the subsequent urine collection. After WP or albumin, mean protein equivalent of nitrogen appearance (PNA) was significantly higher (p < 0.001), as the result of the consumption of each of the supplements, but mean urinary calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, uric acid, citrate, oxalate, magnesium, creatinine, pH, and urinary saturation indices did not differ from baseline. However, individual increases higher than 50% in urinary calcium were observed in 39% of the individuals and variable decreases in urinary pH in 44 and 67% of them, respectively, after WP or Albumin. Increases higher than 50% in urinary sodium occurred in one-third of them after Albumin. A short-term consumption of WP or albumin by healthy subjects, under controlled diet, did not significantly change the mean lithogenic parameters. Nevertheless, the wide individual variation and relevant increases/decreases observed for urinary calcium, sodium, and pH suggest the need of a closer surveillance of these parameters and adequacy of diet in case of supplementation by stone formers.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and tumor necrosis factor-alpha attenuate Clara cell secretory protein promoter function.

    PubMed

    Harrod, Kevin S; Jaramillo, Richard J

    2002-02-01

    The Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP, also CC-10/uterglobin) is a 16-kD homodimeric protein abundantly expressed in the airways of mammals. Although the molecular function is unknown, gene-targeting studies indicate CCSP as a regulator of lung inflammation following acute respiratory infection or injury. CCSP is decreased in the lungs of mice following acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) infection. In the present study, the role of decreased promoter function in the regulation of CCSP by P.a. was assessed using an in vitro co-culture system and in vivo studies of transgenic mice. CCSP promoter activity in lung epithelial cells was markedly decreased by P.a. or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in a dose-dependent manner. Regulation of CCSP promoter function by either P.a. or TNF-alpha was localized to the proximal 166 bp flanking region of the CCSP promoter activity. Decreased regulation of the CCSP promoter by P.a. or TNF-alpha was specific to CCSP, as human surfactant protein D (SP-D) promoter activity was unaffected or increased by P.a. or TNF-alpha, respectively. A neutralizing antibody against human TNF-alpha was able to reverse both the TNF-alpha- mediated as well as P.a.-mediated decrease in CCSP promoter function in lung epithelial cells. TNF-alpha secretion by lung epithelial cells coincided with the decrease in CCSP promoter function following P.a. administration. Using a transgenic mouse model, P.a. administration to the lung markedly attenuated CCSP promoter-conferred gene expression in vivo. The attenuation of CCSP promoter activity in lung epithelial cells by P.a. involves, in part, autocrine/paracrine secretion of TNF-alpha, which in turn regulates CCSP transcription through cis-active elements in the proximal promoter region.

  1. Identification and characterization of a mitochondrial unfolded protein response transcription factor ATFS-1 in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Gui; Yue, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Yuan, Feng-Hua; Bi, Hai-Tao; Yuan, Kai; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2016-07-01

    A mitochondrial specific stress response termed mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) is activated in responding to disturbance of protein homeostasis in mitochondria. The activating transcription factor associated with stress-1 (designated as ATFS-1) is the key regulator of UPR(mt). To investigating the roles of ATFS-1 (LvATFS-1) in Litopenaeus vannamei mitochondrial stress remission and immunity, it's full length cDNA was cloned. The open reading frame of LvATFS-1 was 1, 557 bp in length, deducing to a 268 amino acids protein. LvATFS-1 was highly expressed in muscle, hemocytes and eyestalk. Subcellular location assays showed that N-terminal of LvATFS-1 contained a mitochondrial targeting sequence, which could directed the fused EGFP located to mitochondria. And the C-terminal of LvATFS-1, which had a nuclear localization signal, expressed in nucleus. The in vitro experiments verified that LvATFS-1 could reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). And results of real-time RT-PCR indicated that LvATFS-1 might scavenge excess ROS via ROS-eliminating genes regulation. Reporter gene assays showed that LvATFS-1 could upregulated the expression of the antimicrobial peptide genes in Drosophila Schneider 2 cells. Results of real-time RT-PCR showed that Vibrio alginolyticus or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection induced the expression of LvATFS-1. And knocked-down LvATFS-1 by RNAi resulted in a higher cumulative mortality of L. vannamei upon V. alginolyticus or WSSV infection. These results suggested that LvATFS-1 not only rolled in mitochondrial specific stress responding, but also important for L. vannamei immunologic defence.

  2. Heat Shock Factor 1 Is a Substrate for p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dayalan Naidu, Sharadha; Sutherland, Calum; Zhang, Ying; Risco, Ana; de la Vega, Laureano; Caunt, Christopher J.; Hastie, C. James; Lamont, Douglas J.; Torrente, Laura; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Keyse, Stephen M.; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) monitors the structural integrity of the proteome. Phosphorylation at S326 is a hallmark for HSF1 activation, but the identity of the kinase(s) phosphorylating this site has remained elusive. We show here that the dietary agent phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) inhibits heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), the main negative regulator of HSF1; activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); and increases S326 phosphorylation, trimerization, and nuclear translocation of HSF1, and the transcription of a luciferase reporter, as well as the endogenous prototypic HSF1 target Hsp70. In vitro, all members of the p38 MAPK family rapidly and stoichiometrically catalyze the S326 phosphorylation. The use of stable knockdown cell lines and inhibitors indicated that among the p38 MAPKs, p38γ is the principal isoform responsible for the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S326 in cells. A protease-mass spectrometry approach confirmed S326 phosphorylation and unexpectedly revealed that p38 MAPK also catalyzes the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S303/307, previously known repressive posttranslational modifications. Thus, we have identified p38 MAPKs as highly efficient catalysts for the phosphorylation of HSF1. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the magnitude and persistence of activation of p38 MAPK are important determinants of the extent and duration of the heat shock response. PMID:27354066

  3. Abnormal expression of FLI1 protein is an adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yi Hua; Zhang, Nianxiang; Singh, Neera; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; York, Heather; Qutub, Amina A.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Watson, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI1), an Ets transcription factor family member, is linked to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) by chromosomal events at the FLI1 locus, but the biologic impact of FLI1 expression on AML is unknown. FLI1 protein expression was measured in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients. Expression was similar in peripheral blood (PB) and BM and higher at diagnosis than at relapse (P = .02). Compared with normal CD34+ cells, expression in AML was above or below normal in 32% and 5% of patients, respectively. Levels were negatively correlated with an antecedent hematologic disorder (P = .002) but not with age or cytogenetics. Mutated NPM1 (P = .0007) or FLT3-ITD (P < .02) had higher expression. FLI1 levels were negatively correlated with 10 of 195 proteins associated with proliferation and stromal interaction, and positively correlated (R > 0.3) with 19 others. The FLI1 level was not predictive of remission attainment, but patients with low or high FLI1 expression had shorter remission duration (22.6 and 40.3 vs 51.1 weeks, respectively; P = .01) and overall survival (45.2 and 35.4 vs 59.4 weeks, respectively; P = .03). High FLI1 levels were adverse in univariate and multivariate analysis. FLI1 expression is frequently abnormal and prognostically adverse in AML. FLI1 and/or its response genes may be therapeutically targetable to interfere with AML cell biology. PMID:21917756

  4. Biological effects of targeted inactivation of hepatocyte growth factor-like protein in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, J A; Carrick, T L; Degen, J L; Witte, D; Degen, S J

    1998-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor-like protein (HGFL) is a liver-derived serum glycoprotein involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, and is proposed to have a fundamental role in embryogenesis, fertility, hematopoiesis, macrophage activation, and tissue repair. To assess the in vivo effects of total loss of HGFL, we generated mice with targeted disruption of the gene resulting in loss of the protein. Disruption of the HGFL gene allowed for normal embryogenesis, and followed a Mendelian pattern of genetic transmission. Mice homozygous for the targeted allele (HGFL-/- mice) are fertile, and grow to adulthood without obvious phenotypic abnormalities in unchallenged animals, except for development of lipid-containing cytoplasmic vacuoles in hepatocytes throughout the liver lobules. These histologic changes are not accompanied by discernible changes in synthetic or excretory hepatic functions. Hematopoiesis appears unaltered, and although macrophage activation is delayed in the absence of HGFL, migration to the peritoneal cavity upon challenge with thioglycollate was similar in HGFL-/- and wild-type mice. Challenged with incision to skin, HGFL-/- mice display normal wound healing. These data demonstrate that HGFL is not essential for embryogenesis, fertility, or wound healing. HGFL-deficient mice will provide a valuable means to assess the role of HGFL in hepatic and systemic responses to inflammatory and infectious stimuli in vivo. PMID:9486989

  5. Evolutionary and molecular analysis of Dof transcription factors identified a conserved motif for intercellular protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Ahmad, Munawar; Rim, Yeonggil; Lucas, William J; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2013-06-01

    · Cell-to-cell trafficking of transcription factors (TFs) has been shown to play an important role in the regulation of plant developmental events, but the evolutionary relationship between cell-autonomous and noncell-autonomous (NCA) TFs remains elusive. · AtDof4.1, named INTERCELLULAR TRAFFICKING DOF 1 (ITD1), was chosen as a representative NCA member to explore this evolutionary relationship. Using domain structure-function analyses and swapping studies, we examined the cell-to-cell trafficking of plant-specific Dof TF family members across Arabidopsis and other species. · We identified a conserved intercellular trafficking motif (ITM) that is necessary and sufficient for selective cell-to-cell trafficking and can impart gain-of-function cell-to-cell movement capacity to an otherwise cell-autonomous TF. The functionality of related motifs from Dof members across the plant kingdom extended, surprisingly, to a unicellular alga that lacked plasmodesmata. By contrast, the algal homeodomain related to the NCA KNOX homeodomain was either inefficient or unable to impart such cell-to-cell movement function. · The Dof ITM appears to predate the evolution of selective plasmodesmal trafficking in the plant kingdom, which may well have acted as a molecular template for the evolution of Dof proteins as NCA TFs. However, the ability to efficiently traffic for KNOX homeodomain (HD) proteins may have been acquired during the evolution of early nonvascular plants.

  6. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology - as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development.

  7. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology – as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development. PMID:26636629

  8. Stimulation of Leishmania tropica protein kinase CK2 activities by platelet-activating factor (PAF).

    PubMed

    Dutra, Patricia M L; Vieira, Danielle P; Meyer-Fernandes, Jose R; Silva-Neto, Mario A C; Lopes, Angela H

    2009-09-01

    Leishmania tropica is one of the causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid mediator in diverse biological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that PAF promoted a three-fold increase on ecto-protein kinase and a three-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity of L. tropica live promastigotes. When casein was added to the reaction medium, along with PAF, there was a four-fold increase on the ecto-kinase activity. When live L. tropica promastigotes were pre-incubated for 30 min in the presence of PAF-plus casein, a six-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity was observed. Also, a protein released from L. tropica promastigotes reacted with polyclonal antibodies for the mammalian CK2 alpha catalytic subunit. Furthermore, in vitro mouse macrophage infection by L. tropica was doubled when promastigotes were pre-treated for 2 h with PAF. Similar results were obtained when the interaction was performed in the presence of purified CK2 or casein. TBB and DRB, CK2 inhibitors, reversed PAF enhancement of macrophage infection by L. tropica. WEB 2086, a competitive PAF antagonist, reversed all PAF effects here described. This study shows for the first time that PAF promotes the activation of two isoforms of CK2, secreted and membrane-bound, correlating these activities to infection of mouse macrophages.

  9. Yes associated protein is a poor prognostic factor in well-differentiated lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Hyun; Kim, Young Keum; Shin, Dong Hoon; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Shin, Nari; Kim, Arong; Lee, Jung Hee; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Jee Yeon; Lee, Chang Hun; Sol, Mee Young

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is a highly conserved potent regulator of cell growth and apoptosis including large tumor suppressor (LATS) and Yes-associated protein (YAP). LATS has been regarded as a tumor suppressor gene and YAP as either of a tumor suppressor gene or an oncogene. We investigated their expression in lung adenocarcinoma. YAP and LATS protein expression was assessed in 167 surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas and compared with clinicopathologic factors. Disease free survival and overall survival were also evaluated. YAP expression was noted in cytoplasm (48 cases; 28.7%), nuclear (34; 20.4%) and both locations (4; 2.4%). The nuclear expression was typically observed in well differentiated adenocarcinoma. LATS was expressed in cytoplasm when its signal is weak. Perinuclear expression of LATS was observed when it is strongly expressed. While cytoplasmic and nuclear YAP expressions were inversely related. In well differentiated adenocarcinoma patients, YAP nuclear expression was related with more frequent relapse. Both of nuclear YAP and LATS expression were more frequently observed in well differentiated adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, YAP expression exhibited more frequent relapse in well differentiated adenocarcinoma group. We suggest that YAP may act as an oncogene and predict poorer prognosis in well differentiated lung adenocarcinoma.

  10. Translation Elongation Factor Tuf of Acinetobacter baumannii Is a Plasminogen-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Koenigs, Arno; Zipfel, Peter F.; Kraiczy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen, causing a variety of opportunistic infections of the skin, soft tissues and wounds, urinary tract infections, secondary meningitis, pneumonia and bacteremia. Over 63% of A. baumannii infections occurring in the United States are caused by multidrug resistant isolates, and pan-resistant isolates have begun to emerge that are resistant to all clinically relevant antibiotics. The complement system represents the first line of defense against invading pathogens. However, many A. baumannii isolates, especially those causing severe bacteremia are resistant to complement-mediated killing, though the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show for the first time that A. baumannii binds host-derived plasminogen and we identify the translation elongation factor Tuf as a moonlighting plasminogen-binding protein that is exposed on the outer surface of A. baumannii. Binding of plasminogen to Tuf is at least partly dependent on lysine residues and ionic interactions. Plasminogen, once bound to Tuf can be converted to active plasmin and proteolytically degrade fibrinogen as well as the key complement component C3b. Thus, Tuf acts as a multifunctional protein that may contribute to virulence of A. baumannii by aiding in dissemination and evasion of the complement system. PMID:26230848

  11. Abnormal expression of FLI1 protein is an adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kornblau, Steven M; Qiu, Yi Hua; Zhang, Nianxiang; Singh, Neera; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; York, Heather; Qutub, Amina A; Coombes, Kevin R; Watson, Dennis K

    2011-11-17

    Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI1), an Ets transcription factor family member, is linked to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) by chromosomal events at the FLI1 locus, but the biologic impact of FLI1 expression on AML is unknown. FLI1 protein expression was measured in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients. Expression was similar in peripheral blood (PB) and BM and higher at diagnosis than at relapse (P = .02). Compared with normal CD34(+) cells, expression in AML was above or below normal in 32% and 5% of patients, respectively. Levels were negatively correlated with an antecedent hematologic disorder (P = .002) but not with age or cytogenetics. Mutated NPM1 (P = .0007) or FLT3-ITD (P < .02) had higher expression. FLI1 levels were negatively correlated with 10 of 195 proteins associated with proliferation and stromal interaction, and positively correlated (R > 0.3) with 19 others. The FLI1 level was not predictive of remission attainment, but patients with low or high FLI1 expression had shorter remission duration (22.6 and 40.3 vs 51.1 weeks, respectively; P = .01) and overall survival (45.2 and 35.4 vs 59.4 weeks, respectively; P = .03). High FLI1 levels were adverse in univariate and multivariate analysis. FLI1 expression is frequently abnormal and prognostically adverse in AML. FLI1 and/or its response genes may be therapeutically targetable to interfere with AML cell biology.

  12. Characterization of Factors Affecting Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis Results With Synthetic and Protein Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Aaron B; Carnell, Pauline; Carpenter, John F

    2016-04-01

    In many manufacturing and research areas, the ability to accurately monitor and characterize nanoparticles is becoming increasingly important. Nanoparticle tracking analysis is rapidly becoming a standard method for this characterization, yet several key factors in data acquisition and analysis may affect results. Nanoparticle tracking analysis is prone to user input and bias on account of a high number of parameters available, contains a limited analysis volume, and individual sample characteristics such as polydispersity or complex protein solutions may affect analysis results. This study systematically addressed these key issues. The integrated syringe pump was used to increase the sample volume analyzed. It was observed that measurements recorded under flow caused a reduction in total particle counts for both polystyrene and protein particles compared to those collected under static conditions. In addition, data for polydisperse samples tended to lose peak resolution at higher flow rates, masking distinct particle populations. Furthermore, in a bimodal particle population, a bias was seen toward the larger species within the sample. The impacts of filtration on an agitated intravenous immunoglobulin sample and operating parameters including "MINexps" and "blur" were investigated to optimize the method. Taken together, this study provides recommendations on instrument settings and sample preparations to properly characterize complex samples.

  13. KRIT1 protein depletion modifies endothelial cell behavior via increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Peter V; Kuebel, Julia M; Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2014-11-21

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1(+/-) mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1.

  14. Cauliflower mosaic virus major inclusion body protein interacts with the aphid transmission factor, the virion-associated protein, and gene VII product.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Lindy; Raikhy, Gaurav; Leisner, Scott M

    2012-12-01

    The Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) gene VI product (P6) is a multifunctional protein essential for viral infection. In order to perform its various tasks, P6 interacts with both viral and host factors, as well as forming electron-dense cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Here we investigate the interactions of P6 with three CaMV proteins: P2 (aphid transmission factor), P3 (virion-associated protein), and P7 (protein of unknown function). Based on yeast two-hybrid and maltose-binding protein pull-down experiments, P6 interacted with all three of these CaMV proteins. P2 helps to stabilize P6 inclusion bodies. Although the P2s from two CaMV isolates (W260 and CM1841) differ in the ability to stabilize inclusion bodies, both interacted similarly with P6. This suggests that inclusion body stability may not be dependent on the efficiency of P2-P6 interaction. However, neither P2 nor P3 interacted with P7 in yeast two-hybrid assays.

  15. Regulatory role of the 90-kDa-heat-shock protein (Hsp90) and associated factors on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Erlejman, Alejandra G; Lagadari, Mariana; Toneatto, Judith; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Galigniana, Mario D

    2014-02-01

    The term molecular chaperone was first used to describe the ability of nucleoplasmin to prevent the aggregation of histones with DNA during the assembly of nucleosomes. Subsequently, the name was extended to proteins that mediate the post-translational assembly of oligomeric complexes protecting them from denaturation and/or aggregation. Hsp90 is a 90-kDa molecular chaperone that represents the major soluble protein of the cell. In contrast to most conventional chaperones, Hsp90 functions as a refined sensor of protein function and its principal role in the cell is to facilitate biological activity to properly folded client proteins that already have a preserved tertiary structure. Consequently, Hsp90 is related to basic cell functions such as cytoplasmic transport of soluble proteins, translocation of client proteins to organelles, and regulation of the biological activity of key signaling factors such as protein kinases, ubiquitin ligases, steroid receptors, cell cycle regulators, and transcription factors. A growing amount of evidence links the protective action of this molecular chaperone to mechanisms related to posttranslational modifications of soluble nuclear factors as well as histones. In this article, we discuss some aspects of the regulatory action of Hsp90 on transcriptional regulation and how this effect could have impacted genetic assimilation mechanism in some organisms.

  16. Direct detection of transcription factors in cotyledons during seedling development using sensitive silicon-substrate photonic crystal protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah I; Tan, Yafang; Shamimuzzaman, Md; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T; Vodkin, Lila

    2015-03-01

    Transcription factors control important gene networks, altering the expression of a wide variety of genes, including those of agronomic importance, despite often being expressed at low levels. Detecting transcription factor proteins is difficult, because current high-throughput methods may not be sensitive enough. One-dimensional, silicon-substrate photonic crystal (PC) arrays provide an alternative substrate for printing multiplexed protein microarrays that have greater sensitivity through an increased signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescent signal compared with performing the same assay upon a traditional aminosilanized glass surface. As a model system to test proof of concept of the silicon-substrate PC arrays to directly detect rare proteins in crude plant extracts, we selected representatives of four different transcription factor families (zinc finger GATA, basic helix-loop-helix, BTF3/NAC [for basic transcription factor of the NAC family], and YABBY) that have increasing transcript levels during the stages of seedling cotyledon development. Antibodies to synthetic peptides representing the transcription factors were printed on both glass slides and silicon-substrate PC slides along with antibodies to abundant cotyledon proteins, seed lectin, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The silicon-substrate PC arrays proved more sensitive than those performed on glass slides, detecting rare proteins that were below background on the glass slides. The zinc finger transcription factor was detected on the PC arrays in crude extracts of all stages of the seedling cotyledons, whereas YABBY seemed to be at the lower limit of their sensitivity. Interestingly, the basic helix-loop-helix and NAC proteins showed developmental profiles consistent with their transcript patterns, indicating proof of concept for detecting these low-abundance proteins in crude extracts.

  17. Maternal insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, body mass index, and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, R.; Holly, J; Soothill, P.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To examine the hypothesis that the maternal insulin-like growth factor system may constrain fetal growth.
METHODS—A prospective observational study of maternal serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and fetal growth was undertaken in neonates with birthweights below the 5th centile. They had been classified either as having fetal growth restriction (FGR) due to placental dysfunction (increased umbilical artery Doppler pulsatility index (PI); n = 25) or as being small for gestational age (SGA; normal umbilical artery PI, growth velocity and amniotic fluid; n = 27). Eighty nine controls had normal birthweights (5th-95th centile), umbilical artery PI, growth velocity, and amniotic fluid. IGFBP-1 was measured by radioimmunoassay.
RESULTS—Among the controls, there was no significant correlation between IGFBP-1 and birthweight after allowing for body mass index (BMI). Maternal BMI was high in FGR and after adjusting for this, IGFBP-1 was increased (109 ng/ml) compared with SGA babies (69ng/ml) and controls (57 ng/ml) and correlated with the umbilical artery PI.
CONCLUSIONS—Maternal IGFBP-1 is probably not part of normal placental function. Its increase in FGR could be the cause or consequence of impaired placental perfusion, but high IGFBP-1 concentrations might further reduce the availability of maternal IGF-I to the placenta. This could worsen placental function and so adversely affect fetal growth.
 PMID:10685983

  18. Identification and characterization a novel transcription factor activator protein-1 in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Limeng; Li, Chenghua; Chang, Yaqing; Gao, Yinxue; Wang, Yi; Wei, Jing; Song, Jian; Sun, Ping

    2015-08-01

    The transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) is an important gene expression regulator with typical Jun and region-leucine zipper (bZIP) domains and can respond to a plethora of physiological and pathological stimulus. In this study, we identified a novel AP-1 gene in Apostichopus japonicus by transcriptome sequencing and RACE approaches (designated as AjAP-1). The full-length of AjAP-1 was of 2944 bp including a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 201 bp, a 3' UTR of 1753 bp and a putative open reading frame of 990 bp encoding a polypeptide of 329 amino acid residues. Two representative domains of Jun and bZIP as well as two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) were also detected in deduced amino acid of AjAP-1. Spatial distribution expression indicated that AjAP-1 was ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues with predominant expression in the body wall, moderate in the tube feet, respiratory tree and colemocytes and slightly weak in the intestine and longitudinal muscle. Time-course expression analysis in intestine and coelomocytes revealed that AjAP-1 both reached its peak expression at 4 h after Vibrio splendidus challenge with a 2.6 and 8.2-fold increase compared to their control groups, respectively. Taken together, all these results suggested that AjAP-1 was a novel immune factor and might be involved in the processes of anti-bacteria response in sea cucumber.

  19. A Novel Protein Domain Induces High Affinity Selenocysteine Insertion Sequence Binding and Elongation Factor Recruitment*

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Jesse; Caban, Kelvin; Ranaweera, Ruchira; Gonzalez-Flores, Jonathan N.; Copeland, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is incorporated at UGA codons in mRNAs possessing a Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) element in their 3′-untranslated region. At least three additional factors are necessary for Sec incorporation: SECIS-binding protein 2 (SBP2), Sec-tRNASec, and a Sec-specific translation elongation factor (eEFSec). The C-terminal half of SBP2 is sufficient to promote Sec incorporation in vitro, which is carried out by the concerted action of a novel Sec incorporation domain and an L7Ae RNA-binding domain. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, we show that two distinct regions of the Sec incorporation domain are required for Sec incorporation. Physical separation of the Sec incorporation and RNA-binding domains revealed that they are able to function in trans and established a novel role of the Sec incorporation domain in promoting SECIS and eEFSec binding to the SBP2 RNA-binding domain. We propose a model in which SECIS binding induces a conformational change in SBP2 that recruits eEFSec, which in concert with the Sec incorporation domain gains access to the ribosomal A site. PMID:18948268

  20. SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein-like transcription factors: star players for plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zenglin; Liu, Danmei; Zhang, Kai; Li, Aili; Mao, Long

    2010-11-01

    SQUAMOSA Promoter-Binding Protein-Like (SPL) genes encode plant-specific transcription factors that play important roles in plant phase transition, flower and fruit development, plant architecture, gibberellins signaling, sporogenesis, and response to copper and fungal toxins. In Arabidopsis, many SPL genes are post-transcriptionally regulated by the microRNA (miRNA) miR156, among which AtSPL9 in turn positively regulates the expression of the second miRNA miR172. This miR156-AtSPL9-miR172 regulatory pathway plays critical roles during juvenile to adult leaf development and the miR156-SPLs feedback interaction persists all through the plant development, which may be conserved in other plants. In the present paper, we provide a concise review on the most recent progress in the regulatory mechanisms associated with plant SPL transcription factors, especially in relation to miRNAs. The potential application of these discoveries in agriculture is briefly discussed.

  1. Nerve Growth Factor Promoter Activity Revealed in Mice Expressing Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kawaja, Michael D.; Smithson, Laura J.; Elliott, Janet; Trinh, Gina; Crotty, Anne-Marie; Michalski, Bernadeta; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its precursor proNGF are perhaps the best described growth factors of the mammalian nervous system. There remains, however, a paucity of information regarding the precise cellular sites of proNGF/NGF synthesis. Here we report the generation of transgenic mice in which the NGF promoter controls the ectopic synthesis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). These transgenic mice provide an unprecedented resolution of both neural cells (e.g., neocortical and hippocampal neurons) and non-neural cells (e.g., renal interstitial cells and thymic reticular cells) that display NGF promoter activity from postnatal development to adulthood. Moreover, the transgene is inducible by injury. At 2 days after sciatic nerve ligation, a robust population of EGFP-positive cells is seen in the proximal nerve stump. These transgenic mice offer novel insights into the cellular sites of NGF promoter activity and can be used as models for investigating the regulation of proNGF/NGF expression after injury. PMID:21456011

  2. ADAM binding protein Eve-1 is required for ectodomain shedding of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motonari; Nanba, Daisuke; Mori, Seiji; Shiba, Fumio; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Koichiro; Matsuura, Nariaki; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2004-10-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) are implicated in the ectodomain shedding of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands in EGFR transactivation. However, the activation mechanisms of ADAMs remain elusive. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms of ADAM activation, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening using the cytoplasmic domain of ADAM12 as bait, and identified a protein that we designated Eve-1. Two cDNAs were cloned and characterized. They encode alternatively spliced isoforms of Eve-1, called Eve-1a and Eve-1b, that have four and five tandem Src homology 3 (SH3) domains in the carboxyl-terminal region, respectively, and seven proline-rich SH3 domain binding motifs in the amino-terminal region. The short forms of Eve-1, Eve-1c and Eve-1d, translated at Met-371 are human counterparts of mouse Sh3d19. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that Eve-1 is abundantly expressed in skeletal muscle and heart. Western blot analysis revealed the dominant production of Eve-1c in human cancer cell lines. Knockdown of Eve-1 by small interfering RNA in HT1080 cells reduced the shedding of proHB-EGF induced by angiotensin II and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, as well as the shedding of pro-transforming growth factor-alpha, promphiregulin, and proepiregulin by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, suggesting that Eve-1 plays a role in positively regulating the activity of ADAMs in the signaling of EGFR-ligand shedding.

  3. Virulence factor rtx in Legionella pneumophila, evidence suggesting it is a modular multifunctional protein

    PubMed Central

    D'Auria, Giuseppe; Jiménez, Núria; Peris-Bondia, Francesc; Pelaz, Carmen; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés

    2008-01-01

    Background The repeats in toxin (Rtx) are an important pathogenicity factor involved in host cells invasion of Legionella pneumophila and other pathogenic bacteria. Its role in escaping the host immune system and cytotoxic activity is well known. Its repeated motives and modularity make Rtx a multifunctional factor in pathogenicity. Results The comparative analysis of rtx gene among 6 strains of L. pneumophila showed modularity in their structures. Among compared genomes, the N-terminal region of the protein presents highly dissimilar repeats with functionally similar domains. On the contrary, the C-terminal region is maintained with a fashionable modular configuration, which gives support to its proposed role in adhesion and pore formation. Despite the variability of rtx among the considered strains, the flanking genes are maintained in synteny and similarity. Conclusion In contrast to the extracellular bacteria Vibrio cholerae, in which the rtx gene is highly conserved and flanking genes have lost synteny and similarity, the gene region coding for the Rtx toxin in the intracellular pathogen L. pneumophila shows a rapid evolution. Changes in the rtx could play a role in pathogenicity. The interplay of the Rtx toxin with host membranes might lead to the evolution of new variants that are able to escape host cell defences. PMID:18194518

  4. How initiation factors tune the rate of initiation of protein synthesis in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Antoun, Ayman; Pavlov, Michael Y; Lovmar, Martin; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2006-01-01

    The kinetics of initiator transfer RNA (tRNA) interaction with the messenger RNA (mRNA)-programmed 30S subunit and the rate of 50S subunit docking to the 30S preinitiation complex were measured for different combinations of initiation factors in a cell-free Escherichia coli system for protein synthesis with components of high purity. The major results are summarized by a Michaelis–Menten scheme for initiation. All three initiation factors are required for maximal efficiency (kcat/KM) of initiation and for maximal in vivo rate of initiation at normal concentration of initiator tRNA. Spontaneous release of IF3 from the 30S preinitiation complex is required for subunit docking. The presence of initiator tRNA on the 30S subunit greatly increases the rate of 70S ribosome formation by increasing the rate of IF3 dissociation from the 30S subunit and the rate of 50S subunit docking to the IF3-free 30S preinitiation complex. The reasons why IF1 and IF3 are essential in E. coli are discussed in the light of the present observations. PMID:16724118

  5. Differential compartmentalization of Streptococcus pyogenes virulence factors and host protein binding properties as a mechanism for host adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kilsgård, Ola; Karlsson, Christofer; Malmström, Erik; Malmström, Johan

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although S. pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen with no other known animal reservoir, several murine infection models exist to explore different aspects of the bacterial pathogenesis. Inoculating mice with wild-type S. pyogenes strains can result in the generation of new bacterial phenotypes that are hypervirulent compared to the original inoculum. In this study, we used a serial mass spectrometry based proteomics strategy to investigate if these hypervirulent strains have an altered distribution of virulence proteins across the intracellular, surface associated and secreted bacterial compartments and if any change in compartmentalization can alter the protein-protein interaction network between bacteria and host proteins. Quantitative analysis of the S. pyogenes surface and secreted proteomes revealed that animal passaged strains are associated with significantly higher amount of virulence factors on the bacterial surface and in the media. This altered virulence factor compartmentalization results in increased binding of several mouse plasma proteins to the bacterial surface, a trend that was consistent for mouse plasma from several different mouse strains. In general, both the wild-type strain and animal passaged strain were capable of binding high amounts of human plasma proteins. However, compared to the non-passaged strains, the animal passaged strains displayed an increased ability to bind mouse plasma proteins, in particular for M protein binders, indicating that the increased affinity for mouse blood plasma proteins is a consequence of host adaptation of this pathogen to a new host. In conclusion, plotting the total amount of virulence factors against the total amount of plasma proteins associated to the bacterial surface could clearly separate out animal passaged strains from wild type strains indicating a virulence model that could

  6. Characterization of FNR* mutant proteins indicates two distinct mechanisms for altering oxygen regulation of the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, D M; Lazazzera, B A; Kiley, P J

    1995-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the mechanism by which the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR* is activated in response to anaerobiosis, we have analyzed FNR mutant proteins which, unlike the wild-type protein, stimulate gene expression in the presence of oxygen in vivo. Cell extracts containing seven different FNR* mutant proteins were tested in vitro for the ability to bind to the FNR consensus DNA site in a gel retardation assay under aerobic conditions. At the concentration of protein tested, only extracts which contained FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 showed significant DNA binding. The three position-154 FNR* mutant proteins could be further distinguished from the other mutant proteins by analysis of the in vivo phenotypes of FNR* proteins containing amino acid substitutions at either of two essential cysteine residues. In the presence of oxygen, FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 were the least affected when either Cys-23 or Cys-122 was substituted for Ser. On the basis of these in vivo and in vitro analyses, FNR* mutant proteins appear to segregate into at least two classes. Thus, it appears that each class of FNR* substitutions alters the normal pathway of FNR activation in response to oxygen deprivation by a different mechanism. PMID:7608069

  7. Assessment of Label-Free Quantification in Discovery Proteomics and Impact of Technological Factors and Natural Variability of Protein Abundance.

    PubMed

    Al Shweiki, Mhd Rami; Mönchgesang, Susann; Majovsky, Petra; Thieme, Domenika; Trutschel, Diana; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang

    2017-04-07

    We evaluated the state of label-free discovery proteomics focusing especially on technological contributions and contributions of naturally occurring differences in protein abundance to the intersample variability in protein abundance estimates in this highly peptide-centric technology. First, the performance of popular quantitative proteomics software, Proteome Discoverer, Scaffold, MaxQuant, and Progenesis QIP, was benchmarked using their default parameters and some modified settings. Beyond this, the intersample variability in protein abundance estimates was decomposed into variability introduced by the entire technology itself and variable protein amounts inherent to individual plants of the Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 accession. The technical component was considerably higher than the biological intersample variability, suggesting an effect on the degree and validity of reported biological changes in protein abundance. Surprisingly, the biological variability, protein abundance estimates, and protein fold changes were recorded differently by the software used to quantify the proteins, warranting caution in the comparison of discovery proteomics results. As expected, ∼99% of the proteome was invariant in the isogenic plants in the absence of environmental factors; however, few proteins showed substantial quantitative variability. This naturally occurring variation between individual organisms can have an impact on the causality of reported protein fold changes.

  8. Signal transduction by epidermal growth factor and heregulin via the kinase-deficient ErbB3 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H H; Vijapurkar, U; Hellyer, N J; Bravo, D; Koland, J G

    1998-01-01

    The role of protein tyrosine kinase activity in ErbB3-mediated signal transduction was investigated. ErbB3 was phosphorylated in vivo in response to either heregulin (HRG) in cells expressing both ErbB3 and ErbB2, or epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cells expressing both ErbB3 and EGF receptor. A recombinant receptor protein (ErbB3-K/M, in which K/M stands for Lys-->Met amino acid substitution) containing an inactivating mutation in the putative ATP-binding site was also phosphorylated in response to HRG and EGF. Both the wild-type ErbB3 and mutant ErbB3-K/M proteins transduced signals to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Shc and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Separate kinase-inactivating mutations in the EGF receptor and ErbB2 proteins abolished ErbB3 phosphorylation and signal transduction activated by EGF and HRG respectively. Hence the protein tyrosine kinase activity necessary for growth factor signalling via the ErbB3 protein seems to be provided by coexpressed EGF and ErbB2 receptor proteins. PMID:9693119

  9. Signal transduction by epidermal growth factor and heregulin via the kinase-deficient ErbB3 protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, H H; Vijapurkar, U; Hellyer, N J; Bravo, D; Koland, J G

    1998-08-15

    The role of protein tyrosine kinase activity in ErbB3-mediated signal transduction was investigated. ErbB3 was phosphorylated in vivo in response to either heregulin (HRG) in cells expressing both ErbB3 and ErbB2, or epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cells expressing both ErbB3 and EGF receptor. A recombinant receptor protein (ErbB3-K/M, in which K/M stands for Lys-->Met amino acid substitution) containing an inactivating mutation in the putative ATP-binding site was also phosphorylated in response to HRG and EGF. Both the wild-type ErbB3 and mutant ErbB3-K/M proteins transduced signals to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Shc and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Separate kinase-inactivating mutations in the EGF receptor and ErbB2 proteins abolished ErbB3 phosphorylation and signal transduction activated by EGF and HRG respectively. Hence the protein tyrosine kinase activity necessary for growth factor signalling via the ErbB3 protein seems to be provided by coexpressed EGF and ErbB2 receptor proteins.

  10. Visualization of nuclear localization of transcription factors with cyan and green fluorescent proteins in the red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Uji, Toshiki; Takahashi, Megumu; Saga, Naotsune; Mikami, Koji

    2010-04-01

    Transcription factors play a central role in expression of genomic information in all organisms. The objective of our study is to analyze the function of transcription factors in red algae. One way to analyze transcription factors in eukaryotic cells is to study their nuclear localization, as reported for land plants and green algae using fluorescent proteins. There is, however, no report documenting subcellular localization of transcription factors from red algae. In the present study, using the marine red alga Porphyra yezoensis, we confirmed for the first time successful expression of humanized fluorescent proteins (ZsGFP and ZsYFP) from a reef coral Zoanthus sp. and land plant-adapted sGFP(S65T) in gametophytic cells comparable to expression of AmCFP. Following molecular cloning and characterization of transcription factors DP-E2F-like 1 (PyDEL1), transcription elongation factor 1 (PyElf1) and multiprotein bridging factor 1 (PyMBF1), we then demonstrated that ZsGFP and AmCFP can be used to visualize nuclear localization of PyElf1 and PyMBF1. This is the first report to perform visualization of subcellular localization of transcription factors as genome-encoded proteins in red algae.

  11. Identification of a plant serine-arginine-rich protein similar to the mammalian splicing factor SF2/ASF.

    PubMed

    Lazar, G; Schaal, T; Maniatis, T; Goodman, H M

    1995-08-15

    We show that the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana has a serine-arginine-rich (SR) protein family whose members contain a phosphoepitope shared by the animal SR family of splicing factors. In addition, we report the cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding a higher-plant SR protein from Arabidopsis, SR1, which has striking sequence and structural homology to the human splicing factor SF2/ASF. Similar to SF2/ASF, the plant SR1 protein promotes splice site switching in mammalian nuclear extracts. A novel feature of the Arabidopsis SR protein is a C-terminal domain containing a high concentration of proline, serine, and lysine residues (PSK domain), a composition reminiscent of histones. This domain includes a putative phosphorylation site for the mitotic kinase cyclin/p34cdc2.

  12. The cellular transcription factor SP1 and an unknown cellular protein are required to mediate Rep protein activation of the adeno-associated virus p19 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, D J; Muzyczka, N

    1997-01-01

    Control of adeno-associated virus (AAV) transcription from the three AAV promoters (p5, p19, and p40) requires the adenovirus E1a protein and the AAV nonstructural (Rep) proteins. The Rep proteins have been shown to repress the AAV p5 promoter yet facilitate activation of the p19 and p40 promoters during a productive infection. To elucidate the mechanism of promoter regulation by the AAV Rep proteins, the cellular factors involved in mediating Rep activation of the p19 promoter were characterized. A series of protein-DNA binding experiments using extracts derived from uninfected HeLa cells was performed to identify cellular factors that bind to the p19 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, DNase I protection analyses, and UV cross-linking experiments demonstrated specific interactions with the cellular factor SP1 (or an SP1-like protein) at positions -50 and -130 relative to the start of p19 transcription. Additionally, an unknown cellular protein (cellular AAV activating protein [cAAP]) with an approximate molecular mass of 34 kDa was found to interact with a CArG-like element at position -140. Mutational analysis of the p19 promoter suggested that the SP1 site at -50 and the cAAP site at -140 were necessary to mediate Rep activation of p19. Antibody precipitation experiments demonstrated that Rep-SP1 protein complexes can exist in vivo. Although Rep was demonstrated to interact with p19 DNA directly, the affinity of Rep binding was much lower than that seen for the Rep binding elements within the terminal repeat and the p5 promoter. Furthermore, the interaction of purified Rep68 with the p19 promoter in vitro was negligible unless purified SP1 was also added to the reaction. Thus, the ability of Rep to transactivate the p19 promoter is likely to involve SP1-Rep protein contacts that facilitate Rep interaction with p19 DNA. PMID:9032303

  13. Key factors influencing ADME properties of therapeutic proteins: A need for ADME characterization in drug discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Tibbitts, Jay; Canter, David; Graff, Ryan; Smith, Alison; Khawli, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Protein therapeutics represent a diverse array of biologics including antibodies, fusion proteins, and therapeutic replacement enzymes. Since their inception, they have revolutionized the treatment of a wide range of diseases including respiratory, vascular, autoimmune, inflammatory, infectious, and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as cancer. While in vivo pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and efficacy studies are routinely carried out for protein therapeutics, studies that identify key factors governing their absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties have not been fully investigated. Thorough characterization and in-depth study of their ADME properties are critical in order to support drug discovery and development processes for the production of safer and more effective biotherapeutics. In this review, we discuss the main factors affecting the ADME characteristics of these large macromolecular therapies. We also give an overview of the current tools, technologies, and approaches available to investigate key factors that influence the ADME of recombinant biotherapeutic drugs, and demonstrate how ADME studies will facilitate their future development. PMID:26636901

  14. The transcription factor GLI1 interacts with SMAD proteins to modulate transforming growth factor β-induced gene expression in a p300/CREB-binding protein-associated factor (PCAF)-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nye, Monica D; Almada, Luciana L; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G; Marks, David L; Elsawa, Sherine F; Vrabel, Anne; Tolosa, Ezequiel J; Ellenrieder, Volker; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E

    2014-05-30

    The biological role of the transcription factor GLI1 in the regulation of tumor growth is well established; however, the molecular events modulating this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism underlying the role of GLI1 as an effector of TGFβ signaling in the regulation of gene expression in cancer cells. TGFβ stimulates GLI1 activity in cancer cells and requires its transcriptional activity to induce BCL2 expression. Analysis of the mechanism regulating this interplay identified a new transcriptional complex including GLI1 and the TGFβ-regulated transcription factor, SMAD4. We demonstrate that SMAD4 physically interacts with GLI1 for concerted regulation of gene expression and cellular survival. Activation of the TGFβ pathway induces GLI1-SMAD4 complex binding to the BCL2 promoter whereas disruption of the complex through SMAD4 RNAi depletion impairs GLI1-mediated transcription of BCL2 and cellular survival. Further characterization demonstrated that SMAD2 and the histone acetyltransferase, PCAF, participate in this regulatory mechanism. Both proteins bind to the BCL2 promoter and are required for TGFβ- and GLI1-stimulated gene expression. Moreover, SMAD2/4 RNAi experiments showed that these factors are required for the recruitment of GLI1 to the BCL2 promoter. Finally, we determined whether this novel GLI1 transcriptional pathway could regulate other TGFβ targets. We found that two additional TGFβ-stimulated genes, INTERLEUKIN-7 and CYCLIN D1, are dependent upon the intact GLI1-SMAD-PCAF complex for transcriptional activation. Collectively, these results define a novel epigenetic mechanism that uses the transcription factor GLI1 and its associated complex as a central effector to regulate gene expression in cancer cells.

  15. The Transcription Factor GLI1 Interacts with SMAD Proteins to Modulate Transforming Growth Factor β-Induced Gene Expression in a p300/CREB-binding Protein-associated Factor (PCAF)-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Monica D.; Almada, Luciana L.; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G.; Marks, David L.; Elsawa, Sherine F.; Vrabel, Anne; Tolosa, Ezequiel J.; Ellenrieder, Volker; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    The biological role of the transcription factor GLI1 in the regulation of tumor growth is well established; however, the molecular events modulating this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism underlying the role of GLI1 as an effector of TGFβ signaling in the regulation of gene expression in cancer cells. TGFβ stimulates GLI1 activity in cancer cells and requires its transcriptional activity to induce BCL2 expression. Analysis of the mechanism regulating this interplay identified a new transcriptional complex including GLI1 and the TGFβ-regulated transcription factor, SMAD4. We demonstrate that SMAD4 physically interacts with GLI1 for concerted regulation of gene expression and cellular survival. Activation of the TGFβ pathway induces GLI1-SMAD4 complex binding to the BCL2 promoter whereas disruption of the complex through SMAD4 RNAi depletion impairs GLI1-mediated transcription of BCL2 and cellular survival. Further characterization demonstrated that SMAD2 and the histone acetyltransferase, PCAF, participate in this regulatory mechanism. Both proteins bind to the BCL2 promoter and are required for TGFβ- and GLI1-stimulated gene expression. Moreover, SMAD2/4 RNAi experiments showed that these factors are required for the recruitment of GLI1 to the BCL2 promoter. Finally, we determined whether this novel GLI1 transcriptional pathway could regulate other TGFβ targets. We found that two additional TGFβ-stimulated genes, INTERLEUKIN-7 and CYCLIN D1, are dependent upon the intact GLI1-SMAD-PCAF complex for transcriptional activation. Collectively, these results define a novel epigenetic mechanism that uses the transcription factor GLI1 and its associated complex as a central effector to regulate gene expression in cancer cells. PMID:24739390

  16. The Role of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF) Binding Proteins (IGFBPs) in IGF-Mediated Tumorigenicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    residue using 4-azidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester ( HSAB ). This photoprobe, referred to as abGlyl-IGFl, has been crosslinked to IGFBP-3 as...insulin-like growth factor- binding protein; rhIGFBP, recombinant human insulin-like growth fac- tor-binding protein; HSAB , N-hydroxysuccinimidyl 4...activity (19). In good agreement Inc. (South San Francisco, CA). HSAB was synthesized from p-amino- with these findings, insulin lacks these residues

  17. Specific Protein-Protein Interaction between Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors and Homeoproteins of the Pitx Family

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Gino; Lebel, Mélanie; Chamberland, Michel; Paradis, Francois W.; Drouin, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    Homeoproteins and basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors are known for their critical role in development and cellular differentiation. The pituitary pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene is a target for factors of both families. Indeed, pituitary-specific transcription of POMC depends on the action of the homeodomain-containing transcription factor Pitx1 and of bHLH heterodimers containing NeuroD1. We now show lineage-restricted expression of NeuroD1 in pituitary corticotroph cells and a direct physical interaction between bHLH heterodimers and Pitx1 that results in transcriptional synergism. The interaction between the bHLH and homeodomains is restricted to ubiquitous (class A) bHLH and to the Pitx subfamily. Since bHLH heterodimers interact with Pitx factors through their ubiquitous moiety, this mechanism may be implicated in other developmental processes involving bHLH factors, such as neurogenesis and myogenesis. PMID:10848608

  18. Defining the role of corticotropin releasing factor binding protein in alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Haass-Koffler, C L; Henry, A T; Melkus, G; Simms, J A; Naemmuddin, M; Nielsen, C K; Lasek, A W; Magill, M; Schwandt, M L; Momenan, R; Hodgkinson, C A; Bartlett, S E; Swift, R M; Bonci, A; Leggio, L

    2016-11-15

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) exerts its effects by acting on its receptors and on the binding protein (CRFBP), and has been implicated in alcohol use disorder (AUD). Therefore, identification of the exact contribution of each protein that mediates CRF effects is necessary to design effective therapeutic strategies for AUD. A series of in vitro/in vivo experiments across different species were performed to define the biological discrete role of CRFBP in AUD. First, to establish the CRFBP role in receptor signaling, we developed a novel chimeric cell-based assay and showed that CFRBP full length can stably be expressed on the plasma membrane. We discovered that only CRFBP(10 kD) fragment is able to potentiate CRF-intracellular Ca(2+) release. We provide evidence that CRHBP gene loss increased ethanol consumption in mice. Then, we demonstrate that selective reduction of CRHBP expression in the center nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol-dependent rats. CRFBP amygdalar downregulation, however, does not attenuate yohimbine-induced ethanol self-administration. This effect was associated with decreased hemodynamic brain activity in the CRFBP-downregulated CeA and increased hemodynamic activity in the caudate putamen during yohimbine administration. Finally, in alcohol-dependent patients, genetic variants related to the CRFBP(10 kD) fragment were associated with greater risk for alcoholism and anxiety, while other genetic variants were associated with reduced risk for anxiety. Taken together, our data provide evidence that CRFBP may possess both inhibitory and excitatory roles and may represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of AUD.

  19. Platelet factor 4 enhances generation of activated protein C in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, Arne; Fernandez, Jose A; Griffin, John H; Key, Nigel S; Long, Janel R; Piegors, Donald J; Lentz, Steven R

    2003-07-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4), an abundant platelet alpha-granule protein, accelerates in vitro generation of activated protein C (APC) by soluble thrombin/thrombomodulin (TM) complexes up to 25-fold. To test the hypothesis that PF4 similarly stimulates endothelium-associated TM, we assessed the influence of human PF4 on thrombin-dependent APC generation by cultured endothelial monolayers. APC generated in the presence of 1 to 100 microg PF4 was up to 5-fold higher than baseline for human umbilical vein endothelial cells, 10-fold higher for microvascular endothelial cells, and unaltered for blood outgrowth endothelial cells. In an in vivo model, cynomolgus monkeys (n = 6, each serving as its own control) were infused with either PF4 (7.5 mg/kg) or vehicle buffer, then with human thrombin (1.0 microg/kg/min) for 10 minutes. Circulating APC levels (baseline 3 ng/mL) peaked at 10 minutes, when PF4-treated and vehicle-treated animals had APC levels of 67 +/- 5 ng/mL and 39 +/- 2 ng/mL, respectively (P <.001). The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT; baseline, 28 seconds) increased maximally by 27 +/- 6 seconds in PF4-treated animals and by 9 +/- 1 seconds in control animals at 30 minutes (P <.001). PF4-dependent increases in circulating APC and APTT persisted more than 2-fold greater than that of controls from 10 through 120 minutes (P < or =.04). All APTT prolongations were essentially reversed by monoclonal antibody C3, which blocks APC activity. Thus, physiologically relevant concentrations of PF4 stimulate thrombin-dependent APC generation both in vitro by cultured endothelial cells and in vivo in a primate thrombin infusion model. These findings suggest that PF4 may play a previously unsuspected physiologic role in enhancing APC generation.

  20. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts protein-1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lanciotti, Angela; Brignone, Maria Stefania; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Petrini, Stefania; Caramia, Martino; Veroni, Caterina; Minnone, Gaetana; Bernardo, Antonietta; Franciolini, Fabio; Pessia, Mauro; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara Corinna; Ambrosini, Elena

    2016-04-15

    Mutations in the MLC1 gene, which encodes a protein expressed in brain astrocytes, are the leading cause of MLC, a rare leukodystrophy characterized by macrocephaly, brain edema, subcortical cysts, myelin and astrocyte vacuolation. Although recent studies indicate that MLC1 protein is implicated in the regulation of cell volume changes, the exact role of MLC1 in brain physiology and in the pathogenesis of MLC disease remains to be clarified. In preliminary experiments, we observed that MLC1 was poorly expressed in highly proliferating astrocytoma cells when compared with primary astrocytes, and that modulation of MLC1 expression influenced astrocyte growth. Because volume changes are key events in cell proliferation and during brain development MLC1 expression is inversely correlated to astrocyte progenitor proliferation levels, we investigated the possible role for MLC1 in the control of astrocyte proliferation. We found that overexpression of wild type but not mutant MLC1 in human astrocytoma cells hampered cell growth by favoring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) degradation and by inhibiting EGF-induced Ca(+) entry, ERK1/2 and PLCγ1 activation, and calcium-activated KCa3.1 potassium channel function, all molecular pathways involved in astrocyte proliferation stimulation. Interestingly, MLC1 did not influence AKT, an EGFR-stimulated kinase involved in cell survival. Moreover, EGFR expression was higher in macrophages derived from MLC patients than from healthy individuals. Since reactive astrocytes proliferate and re-express EGFR in response to different pathological stimuli, the present findings provide new information on MLC pathogenesis and unravel an important role for MLC1 in other brain pathological conditions where astrocyte activation occurs.

  1. Dual roles of protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa in coordinating angiogenesis induced by pro-angiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ping-Hui; Chen, Gang; Mason, Malcolm; Jiang, Wen G.; Ye, Lin

    2017-01-01

    A potential role may be played by receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa (PTPRK) in angiogenesis due to its critical function in coordinating intracellular signal transduction from various receptors reliant on tyrosine phosphorylation. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of PTPRK in the cellular functions of vascular endothelial cells (HECV) and its role in angiogenesis using in vitro assays and a PTPRK knockdown vascular endothelial cell model. PTPRK knockdown in HECV cells (HECVPTPRKkd) resulted in a decrease of cell proliferation and cell-matrix adhesion; however, increased cell spreading and motility were seen. Reduced focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin protein levels were seen in the PTPRK knockdown cells which may contribute to the inhibitory effect on adhesion. HECVPTPRKkd cells were more responsive to the treatment of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) in their migration compared with the untreated control and cells treated with VEGF. Moreover, elevated c-Src and Akt1 were seen in the PTPRK knockdown cells. The FGF-promoted cell migration was remarkably suppressed by an addition of PLCγ inhibitor compared with other small inhibitors. Knockdown of PTPRK suppressed the ability of HECV cells to form tubules and also impaired the tubule formation that was induced by FGF and conditioned medium of cancer cells. Taken together, it suggests that PTPRK plays dual roles in coordinating angiogenesis. It plays a positive role in cell proliferation, adhesion and tubule formation, but suppresses cell migration, in particular, the FGF-promoted migration. PTPRK bears potential to be targeted for the prevention of tumour associated angiogenesis. PMID:28259897

  2. Defining the role of corticotropin releasing factor binding protein in alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Haass-Koffler, C L; Henry, A T; Melkus, G; Simms, J A; Naemmuddin, M; Nielsen, C K; Lasek, A W; Magill, M; Schwandt, M L; Momenan, R; Hodgkinson, C A; Bartlett, S E; Swift, R M; Bonci, A; Leggio, L

    2016-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) exerts its effects by acting on its receptors and on the binding protein (CRFBP), and has been implicated in alcohol use disorder (AUD). Therefore, identification of the exact contribution of each protein that mediates CRF effects is necessary to design effective therapeutic strategies for AUD. A series of in vitro/in vivo experiments across different species were performed to define the biological discrete role of CRFBP in AUD. First, to establish the CRFBP role in receptor signaling, we developed a novel chimeric cell-based assay and showed that CFRBP full length can stably be expressed on the plasma membrane. We discovered that only CRFBP(10 kD) fragment is able to potentiate CRF-intracellular Ca2+ release. We provide evidence that CRHBP gene loss increased ethanol consumption in mice. Then, we demonstrate that selective reduction of CRHBP expression in the center nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol-dependent rats. CRFBP amygdalar downregulation, however, does not attenuate yohimbine-induced ethanol self-administration. This effect was associated with decreased hemodynamic brain activity in the CRFBP-downregulated CeA and increased hemodynamic activity in the caudate putamen during yohimbine administration. Finally, in alcohol-dependent patients, genetic variants related to the CRFBP(10 kD) fragment were associated with greater risk for alcoholism and anxiety, while other genetic variants were associated with reduced risk for anxiety. Taken together, our data provide evidence that CRFBP may possess both inhibitory and excitatory roles and may represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of AUD. PMID:27845775

  3. Random mutagenesis of global transcription factor cAMP receptor protein for improved osmotolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongfang; Chong, Huiqing; Ching, Chi Bun; Jiang, Rongrong

    2012-05-01

    The naturally existing microbial hosts can rarely satisfy industrial requirements, thus there has always been an intense effort in strain engineering to meet the needs of these bioprocesses. Here, in this work, we want to prove the concept that engineering global transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli can improve cell phenotypes. CRP is one of the global regulatory proteins that can regulate the transcription of over 400 genes in E. coli. The target phenotype in this study is strain osmotolerance. Amino acid mutations were introduced to CRP by either error-prone PCR or DNA shuffling, and the random mutagenesis libraries were subjected to enrichment selection under NaCl stress. Five CRP mutants (MT1-MT5) were selected from the error-prone PCR libraries with enhanced osmotolerance. DNA shuffling technique was employed to generate mutant MT6 with MT1-MT5 as templates. All of these variants showed much better growth in the presence of NaCl compared to the wild type, and MT6 presented the best tolerance towards NaCl. In the presence of 0.9 M NaCl, the growth rate of MT6 is 0.113 h(-1), while that of WT is 0.077 h(-1). MT6 also exhibited resistance to other osmotic stressors, such as KCl, glucose, and sucrose. DNA microarray analysis showed that genes involved in colanic acid biosynthesis are up-regulated in the absence of salt stress, whereas carbohydrate metabolic genes are differentially expressed under NaCl stress when comparing MT6 to WT. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the elongation of both WT and MT6 when exposed to NaCl but the cell surface of MT6 was relatively smooth.

  4. ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 4C (ARL4C) interacts with galectin-3 during oocyte development and embryogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 4 (ARL4) is a GTP-binding protein which belongs to the ADP-ribosylation factor protein (ARF) superfamily of small GTPases. ARL4 has been shown to be mainly related to the development of male germ cells and embryogenesis in mouse. To investigate the role of ARL4 i...

  5. Unraveling transcription factor interactions with heterochromatin protein 1 using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Amanda P.; Hays, Nicole M.; Day, Richard N.

    2013-02-01

    The epigenetic control of heterochromatin deposition is achieved through a network of protein interactions mediated by the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). In earlier studies, we showed that the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), a transcription factor that controls cell differentiation, localizes to heterochromatin, and interacts with HP1α. Here, deletion and mutagenesis are combined with live-cell imaging approaches to characterize these protein interactions. The results demonstrate that the basic region and leucine zipper (BZip) domain of C/EBPα is sufficient for the interaction with HP1α in regions of heterochromatin. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and cross-correlation (FCS and FCCS) revealed very different diffusion profiles for HP1α and the BZip protein, and co-expression studies indicated that the mobile fractions of these nuclear proteins diffuse independently of one another. The steady-state interactions of these proteins in regions of heterochromatin were monitored using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). A point mutation in HP1α, W174A, which disrupts the interactions with proteins containing the common PxVxL motif did not affect the interaction with the BZip protein. In contrast, the HP1α W41A mutation, which prevents binding to methylated histones, exhibited greatly reduced FRET efficiency when compared to the wild type HP1α or HP1αW174A. The functional significance of these interactions is discussed.

  6. Development and regional expression of beta nerve growth factor messenger RNA and protein in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, S R; Ebendal, T; Lärkfors, L; Olson, L; Seiger, A; Strömberg, I; Persson, H

    1986-01-01

    The presence of nerve growth factor (NGF) mRNA and protein in the rat central nervous system is documented. Blot-hybridization analysis showed an abundance of NGF mRNA in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and olfactory bulb. Enzyme immunoassay confirmed significant levels of a NGF-like protein in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Bioassay of a NGF-like immunoaffinity-purified protein from these regions was physiologically indistinguishable from NGF. Immunohistochemistry revealed a widespread distribution of NGF-like reactivity in the adult brain, preferentially in fiber tracts. NGF mRNA accumulation began at birth, with adult levels reached 3 weeks postnatally. Enzyme immunoassay detected the presence of a NGF-like protein in the embryonic rat brain. Postnatally, the level of NGF-like protein reached a maximum at 3 weeks. Additionally, a distinct fetal form of NGF may exist. Images PMID:3456170

  7. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  8. Maize endosperm-specific transcription factors O2 and PBF network the regulation of protein and starch synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Zheng, Xixi; Yang, Jun; Messing, Joachim; Wu, Yongrui

    2016-01-01

    The maize endosperm-specific transcription factors opaque2 (O2) and prolamine-box binding factor (PBF) regulate storage protein zein genes. We show that they also control starch synthesis. The starch content in the PbfRNAi and o2 mutants was reduced by ∼5% and 11%, respectively, compared with normal genotypes. In the double-mutant PbfRNAi;o2, starch was decreased by 25%. Transcriptome analysis reveals that >1,000 genes were affected in each of the two mutants and in the double mutant; these genes were mainly enriched in sugar and protein metabolism. Pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase 1 and 2 (PPDKs) and starch synthase III (SSIII) are critical components in the starch biosynthetic enzyme complex. The expression of PPDK1, PPDK2, and SSIII and their protein levels are further reduced in the double mutants as compared with the single mutants. When the promoters of these genes were analyzed, we found a prolamine box and an O2 box that can be additively transactivated by PBF and O2. Starch synthase IIa (SSIIa, encoding another starch synthase for amylopectin) and starch branching enzyme 1 (SBEI, encoding one of the two main starch branching enzymes) are not directly regulated by PBF and O2, but their protein levels are significantly decreased in the o2 mutant and are further decreased in the double mutant, indicating that o2 and PbfRNAi may affect the levels of some other transcription factor(s) or mRNA regulatory factor(s) that in turn would affect the transcript and protein levels of SSIIa and SBEI. These findings show that three important traits—nutritional quality, calories, and yield—are linked through the same transcription factors. PMID:27621432

  9. Factors affecting interactions between sulphonate-terminated dendrimers and proteins: A three case study.

    PubMed

    González-García, Estefanía; Maly, Marek; de la Mata, Francisco Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes a deep study on the interactions between sulphonate-terminated carbosilane dendrimers and proteins. Three different proteins with different molecular weights and isoelectric points were employed and different pHs, dendrimer concentrations and generations were tested. Variations in fluorescence intensity and emission wavelength were used as protein-dendrimer interaction probes. Interaction between dendrimers and proteins greatly depended on the protein itself and pH. Other important issues were the dendrimer concentration and generation. Protein-dendrimer interactions were favored under acidic working conditions when proteins were positively charged. Moreover, in general, high dendrimer generations promoted these interactions. Modeling of protein-dendrimer interactions allowed to understand the different behaviors observed for every protein.

  10. Physical and functional interactions between the Wwox tumor suppressor protein and the AP-2gamma transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Aqeilan, Rami I; Palamarchuk, Alexey; Weigel, Ronald J; Herrero, Juan J; Pekarsky, Yuri; Croce, Carlo M

    2004-11-15

    The WWOX gene encodes a tumor suppressor WW domain-containing protein, Wwox. Alterations of WWOX have been demonstrated in multiple types of cancer, and introduction of Wwox into Wwox-negative tumor cells has resulted in tumor suppression and apoptosis. The Wwox protein contains two WW domains that typically bind proline-rich motifs and mediate protein-protein interactions. Recently, we have described functional cross-talk between the Wwox protein and the p53 homologue, p73. To further explore the biological function of Wwox, we investigated other interacting candidates. In this report, we demonstrate a physical and functional association between AP-2gamma transcription factor and the Wwox protein. AP-2gamma at 20q13.2 encodes a transcription factor and is frequently amplified in breast carcinoma. We show that Wwox binds to the PPPY motif of AP-2gamma via its first WW domain. Alterations of tyrosine 33 in the first WW domain of Wwox or the proline-rich motif in AP-2gamma dramatically reduce this interaction. In addition, our results demonstrate that Wwox expression triggers redistribution of nuclear AP-2gamma to the cytoplasm, hence suppressing its transactivating function. Our results suggest that Wwox tumor suppressor protein inhibits AP-2gamma oncogenic activity by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

  11. A Dictyostelium mutant lacking an F-actin cross-linking protein, the 120-kD gelation factor

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins are known to regulate in vitro the assembly of actin into supramolecular structures, but evidence for their activities in living nonmuscle cells is scarce. Amebae of Dictyostelium discoideum are nonmuscle cells in which mutants defective in several actin-binding proteins have been described. Here we characterize a mutant deficient in the 120-kD gelation factor, one of the most abundant F-actin cross- linking proteins of D. discoideum cells. No F-actin cross-linking activity attributable to the 120-kD protein was detected in mutant cell extracts, and antibodies recognizing different epitopes on the polypeptide showed the entire protein was lacking. Under the conditions used, elimination of the gelation factor did not substantially alter growth, shape, motility, or chemotactic orientation of the cells towards a cAMP source. Aggregates of the mutant developed into fruiting bodies consisting of normally differentiated spores and stalk cells. In cytoskeleton preparations a dense network of actin filaments as typical of the cell cortex, and bundles as they extend along the axis of filopods, were recognized. A significant alteration found was an enhanced accumulation of actin in cytoskeletons of the mutant when cells were stimulated with cyclic AMP. Our results indicate that control of cell shape and motility does not require the fine-tuned interactions of all proteins that have been identified as actin-binding proteins by in vitro assays. PMID:1698791

  12. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; McDonald, W Hayes; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Shen, Rong-Fong; Wang, Yisong; Liu, Yie

    2010-01-01

    Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping) is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS). After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  13. A novel specificity protein 1 (SP1)-like gene regulating protein kinase C-1 (Pkc1)-dependent cell wall integrity and virulence factors in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amos; Park, Yoon-Dong; Larsen, Peter; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Wollenberg, Kurt; Qiu, Jin; Myers, Timothy G; Williamson, Peter R

    2011-06-10

    Eukaryotic cells utilize complex signaling systems to detect their environments, responding and adapting as new conditions arise during evolution. The basidiomycete fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is a leading cause of AIDS-related death worldwide and utilizes the calcineurin and protein kinase C-1 (Pkc1) signaling pathways for host adaptation and expression of virulence. In the present studies, a C-terminal zinc finger transcription factor, homologous both to the calcineurin-responsive zinc fingers (Crz1) of ascomycetes and to the Pkc1-dependent specificity protein-1 (Sp1) transcription factors of metazoans, was identified and named SP1 because of its greater similarity to the metazoan factors. Structurally, the Cryptococcus neoformans Sp1 (Cn Sp1) protein was found to have acquired an additional zinc finger motif from that of Crz1 and showed Pkc1-dependent phosphorylation, nuclear localization, and whole genome epistatic associations under starvation conditions. Transcriptional targets of Cn Sp1 shared functional similarities with Crz1 factors, such as cell wall synthesis, but gained the regulation of processes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, including trehalose metabolism, and lost others, such as the induction of autophagy. In addition, overexpression of Cn Sp1 in a pkc1Δ mutant showed restoration of altered phenotypes involved in virulence, including cell wall stability, nitrosative stress, and extracellular capsule production. Cn Sp1 was also found to be important for virulence of the fungus using a mouse model. In summary, these data suggest an evolutionary shift in C-terminal zinc finger proteins during fungal evolution, transforming them from calcineurin-dependent to PKC1-dependent transcription factors, helping to shape the role of fungal pathogenesis of C. neoformans.

  14. Antigenicity of recombinant maltose binding protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins with and without factor Xa cleaving

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that MAP expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such prot...

  15. Associations of serum insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 levels with biomarker-calibrated protein, dairy product and milk intake in the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Jeannette M; Gunter, Marc J; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Prentice, Ross L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Tinker, Lesley F; Vitolins, Mara Z; Strickler, Howard D

    2014-03-14

    It is well established that protein-energy malnutrition decreases serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels, and supplementation of 30 g of whey protein daily has been shown to increase serum IGF-I levels by 8 % after 2 years in a clinical trial. Cohort studies provide the opportunity to assess associations between dietary protein intake and IGF axis protein levels under more typical eating conditions. In the present study, we assessed the associations of circulating IGF axis protein levels (ELISA, Diagnostic Systems Laboratories) with total biomarker-calibrated protein intake, as well as with dairy product and milk intake, among postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (n 747). Analyses were carried out using multivariate linear regression models that adjusted for age, BMI, race/ethnicity, education, biomarker-calibrated energy intake, alcohol intake, smoking, physical activity and hormone therapy use. There was a positive association between milk intake and free IGF-I levels. A three-serving increase in milk intake per d (approximately 30 g of protein) was associated with an estimated average 18·6 % higher increase in free IGF-I levels (95 % CI 0·9, 39·3 %). However, total IGF-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels were not associated with milk consumption and nor were there associations between biomarker-calibrated protein intake, biomarker-calibrated energy intake, and free IGF-I, total IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels. The findings of the present study carried out in postmenopausal women are consistent with clinical trial data suggesting a specific relationship between milk consumption and serum IGF-I levels, although in the present study this association was only statistically significant for free, but not total, IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels.

  16. Salting-out in the aqueous single-protein solution: the effect of shape factor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bong Ho; Bae, Young Chan

    2003-06-01

    A molecular-thermodynamic model is developed to describe salt-induced protein precipitation. The protein-protein interaction goes through the potential of mean force. An equation of state is derived based on the generalized van der Waals partition function. The attractive term including the potential of mean force is perturbed by the statistical mechanical perturbation theory. The precipitation behaviors are studied by calculating the partition coefficient with various conditions such as the ionic strength and the shape of protein. Our results show that the protein shape plays a significant role in the protein precipitation behavior.

  17. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  18. Transcription factor activating protein 2 beta (TFAP2B) mediates noradrenergic neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Fakhera; Ackermann, Sandra; Kahlert, Yvonne; Volland, Ruth; Roels, Frederik; Engesser, Anne; Hertwig, Falk; Kocak, Hayriye; Hero, Barbara; Dreidax, Daniel; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Berthold, Frank; Nürnberg, Peter; Westermann, Frank; Fischer, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal pediatric tumor that originates from the developing sympathetic nervous system and shows a broad range of clinical behavior, ranging from fatal progression to differentiation into benign ganglioneuroma. In experimental neuroblastoma systems, retinoic acid (RA) effectively induces neuronal differentiation, and RA treatment has been therefore integrated in current therapies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation are still poorly understood. We here investigated the role of transcription factor activating protein 2 beta (TFAP2B), a key factor in sympathetic nervous system development, in neuroblastoma pathogenesis and differentiation. Microarray analyses of primary neuroblastomas (n = 649) demonstrated that low TFAP2B expression was significantly associated with unfavorable prognostic markers as well as adverse patient outcome. We also found that low TFAP2B expression was strongly associated with CpG methylation of the TFAP2B locus in primary neuroblastomas (n = 105) and demethylation with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in induction of TFAP2B expression in vitro, suggesting that TFAP2B is silenced by genomic methylation. Tetracycline inducible re-expression of TFAP2B in IMR-32 and SH-EP neuroblastoma cells significantly impaired proliferation and cell cycle progression. In IMR-32 cells, TFAP2B induced neuronal differentiation, which was accompanied by up-regulation of the catecholamine biosynthesizing enzyme genes DBH and TH, and down-regulation of MYCN and REST, a master repressor of neuronal genes. By contrast, knockdown of TFAP2B by lentiviral transduction of shRNAs abrogated RA-induced neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y and SK-N-BE(2)c neuroblastoma cells almost completely. Taken together, our results suggest that TFAP2B is playing a vital role in retaining RA responsiveness and mediating noradrenergic neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma.

  19. Engineering global transcription factor cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli for improved 1-butanol tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongfang; Chong, Huiqing; Ching, Chi Bun; Song, Hao; Jiang, Rongrong

    2012-05-01

    One major challenge in biofuel production, including biobutanol production, is the low tolerance of the microbial host towards increasing biofuel concentration during fermentation. Here, we have demonstrated that Escherichia coli 1-butanol tolerance can be greatly enhanced through random mutagenesis of global transcription factor cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). Four mutants (MT1-MT4) with elevated 1-butanol tolerance were isolated from error-prone PCR libraries through an enrichment screening. A DNA shuffling library was then constructed using MT1-MT4 as templates and one mutant (MT5) that exhibited the best tolerance ability among all variants was selected. In the presence of 0.8 % (v/v, 6.5 g/l) 1-butanol, the growth rate of MT5 was found to be 0.28 h(-1) while that of wild type was 0.20 h(-1). When 1-butanol concentration increased to 1.2 % (9.7 g/l), the growth rate of MT5 (0.18 h(-1)) became twice that of the wild type (0.09 h(-1)). Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon test showed that cell surface of MT5 was less hydrophobic and its cell length became significantly longer in the presence of 1-butanol, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed that several CRP regulated, 1-butanol stress response related genes (rpoH, ompF, sodA, manX, male, and marA) demonstrated differential expression in MT5 in the presence or absence of 1-butanol. In conclusion, direct manipulation of the transcript profile through engineering global transcription factor CRP can provide a useful tool in strain engineering.

  20. Evolution of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP) family.

    PubMed

    Daza, Daniel Ocampo; Sundström, Görel; Bergqvist, Christina A; Duan, Cunming; Larhammar, Dan

    2011-06-01

    The evolution of the IGF binding protein (IGFBP) gene family has been difficult to resolve. Both chromosomal and serial duplications have been suggested as mechanisms for the expansion of this gene family. We have identified and annotated IGFBP sequences from a wide selection of vertebrate species as well as Branchiostoma floridae and Ciona intestinalis. By combining detailed sequence analysis with sequence-based phylogenies and chromosome information, we arrive at the following scenario: the ancestral chordate IGFBP gene underwent a local gene duplication, resulting in a gene pair adjacent to a HOX cluster. Subsequently, the gene family expanded in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidization (2R) resulting in the six IGFBP types that are presently found in placental mammals. The teleost fish ancestor underwent a third tetraploidization (3R) that further expanded the IGFBP repertoire. The five sequenced teleost fish genomes retain 9-11 of IGFBP genes. This scenario is supported by the phylogenies of three adjacent gene families in the HOX gene regions, namely the epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and the Ikaros and distal-less (DLX) transcription factors. Our sequence comparisons show that several important structural components in the IGFBPs are ancestral vertebrate features that have been maintained in all orthologs, for instance the integrin interaction motif Arg-Gly-Asp in IGFBP-2. In contrast, the Arg-Gly-Asp motif in IGFBP-1 has arisen independently in mammals. The large degree of retention of IGFBP genes after the ancient expansion of the gene family strongly suggests that each gene evolved distinct and important functions early in vertebrate evolution.

  1. Protein growth factors loaded highly porous chitosan scaffold: a comparison of bone healing properties.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Samit K; Kundu, Biswanath; Basu, Debabrata

    2013-04-01

    Present study aimed to investigate and compare effectiveness of porous chitosan alone and in combination with insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in bone healing. Highly porous (85±2%) with wide distribution of macroporous (70-900 μm) chitosan scaffolds were fabricated as bone substitutes by employing a simple liquid hardening method using 2% (w/v) chitosan suspension. IGF-1 and BMP-2 were infiltrated using vacuum infiltration with freeze drying method. Adsorption efficiency was found to be 87±2 and 90±2% for BMP-2 and IGF-1 respectively. After thorough material characterization (pore details, FTIR and SEM), samples were used for subsequent in vivo animal trial. Eighteen rabbit models were used to evaluate and compare control (chitosan) (group A), chitosan with IGF-1 (group B) and chitosan with BMP-2 (group C) in the repair of critical size bone defect in tibia. Radiologically, there was evidence of radiodensity in defect area from 60th day (initiated on 30th day) in groups B and C as compared to group A and attaining nearly bony density in most of the part at day 90. Histological results depicted well developed osteoblastic proliferation around haversian canal along with proliferating fibroblast, vascularization and reticular network which was more pronounced in group B followed by groups C and A. Fluorochrome labeling and SEM studies in all groups showed similar outcome. Hence, porous chitosan alone and in combination with growth factors (GFs) can be successfully used for bone defect healing with slight advantage of IGF-1 in chitosan samples.

  2. Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Mediates Platelet Adhesion and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Modjeski, Kristina L.; Ture, Sara K.; Field, David J.; Cameron, Scott J.; Morrell, Craig N.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis-associated pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Because platelets are necessary for hemostasis and thrombosis, platelet directed therapies must balance inhibiting platelet function with bleeding risk. Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) is a large scaffolding protein that localizes and organizes interacting proteins in other cells, such as neurons. We have investigated the role of GRIP1 in platelet function to determine its role as a molecular scaffold in thrombus formation. Platelet-specific GRIP1-/- mice were used to determine the role of GRIP1 in platelets. GRIP1-/- mice had normal platelet counts, but a prolonged bleeding time and delayed thrombus formation in a FeCl3-induced vessel injury model. In vitro stimulation of WT and GRIP1-/- platelets with multiple agonists showed no difference in platelet activation. However, in vivo platelet rolling velocity after endothelial stimulation was significantly greater in GRIP1-/- platelets compared to WT platelets, indicating a potential platelet adhesion defect. Mass spectrometry analysis of GRIP1 platelet immunoprecipitation revealed enrichment of GRIP1 binding to GPIb-IX complex proteins. Western blots confirmed the mass spectrometry findings that GRIP1 interacts with GPIbα, GPIbβ, and 14-3-3. Additionally, in resting GRIP1-/- platelets, GPIbα and 14-3-3 have increased interaction compared to WT platelets. GRIP1 interactions with the GPIb-IX binding complex are necessary for normal platelet adhesion to a stimulated endothelium. PMID:27631377

  3. Activity and regulation by growth factors of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (elongation factor 2-kinase) in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parmer, T G; Ward, M D; Yurkow, E J; Vyas, V H; Kearney, T J; Hait, W N

    1999-01-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (CaM kinase III, elongation factor-2 kinase) is a unique member of the Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase family. Activation of CaM kinase III leads to the selective phosphorylation of elongation factor 2 (eEF-2) and transient inhibition of protein synthesis. Recent cloning and sequencing of CaM kinase III revealed that this enzyme represents a new superfamily of protein kinases. The activity of CaM kinase III is selectively activated in proliferating cells; inhibition of the kinase blocked cells in G0/G1-S and decreased viability. To determine the significance of CaM kinase III in breast cancer, we measured the activity of the kinase in human breast cancer cell lines as well as in fresh surgical specimens. The specific activity of CaM kinase III in human breast cancer cell lines was equal to or greater than that seen in a variety of cell lines with similar rates of proliferation. The specific activity of CaM kinase III was markedly increased in human breast tumour specimens compared with that of normal adjacent breast tissue. The activity of this enzyme was regulated by breast cancer mitogens. In serum-deprived MDA-MB-231 cells, the combination of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulated cell proliferation and activated CaM kinase III to activities observed in the presence of 10% serum. Inhibition of enzyme activity blocked cell proliferation induced by growth factors. In MCF-7 cells separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, CaM kinase III was increased in S-phase over that of other phases of the cell cycle. In summary, the activity of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase III is controlled by breast cancer mitogens and appears to be constitutively activated in human breast cancer. These results suggest that CaM kinase III may contribute an important link between growth factor/receptor interactions, protein synthesis and the induction of cellular proliferation in human breast

  4. The antiviral restriction factor IFN-induced transmembrane protein 3 prevents cytokine-driven CMV pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Maria A.; Clare, Simon; Marsden, Morgan; Abdul-Karim, Juneid; Kane, Leanne; Harcourt, Katherine; Brandt, Cordelia; Fielding, Ceri A.; Smith, Sarah E.; Wash, Rachael S.; Brias, Silvia Gimeno; Stack, Gabrielle; Cambridge, Emma L.; Isherwood, Christopher; Speak, Anneliese O.; Johnson, Zoë; Ferlin, Walter; Jones, Simon A.; Humphreys, Ian R.

    2017-01-01

    The antiviral restriction factor IFN-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3) inhibits cell entry of a number of viruses, and genetic diversity within IFITM3 determines susceptibility to viral disease in humans. Here, we used the murine CMV (MCMV) model of infection to determine that IFITM3 limits herpesvirus-associated pathogenesis without directly preventing virus replication. Instead, IFITM3 promoted antiviral cellular immunity through the restriction of virus-induced lymphopenia, apoptosis-independent NK cell death, and loss of T cells. Viral disease in Ifitm3–/– mice was accompanied by elevated production of cytokines, most notably IL-6. IFITM3 inhibited IL-6 production by myeloid cells in response to replicating and nonreplicating virus as well as following stimulation with the TLR ligands Poly(I:C) and CpG. Although IL-6 promoted virus-specific T cell responses, uncontrolled IL-6 expression in Ifitm3–/– mice triggered the loss of NK cells and subsequently impaired control of MCMV replication. Thus, IFITM3 represents a checkpoint regulator of antiviral immunity that controls cytokine production to restrict viral pathogenesis. These data suggest the utility of cytokine-targeting strategies in the treatment of virus-infected individuals with impaired IFITM3 activity. PMID:28240600

  5. Identifying Druggable Targets by Protein Microenvironments Matching: Application to Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T; Altman, R B

    2014-01-01

    Druggability of a protein is its potential to be modulated by drug-like molecules. It is important in the target selection phase. We hypothesize that: (i) known drug-binding sites contain advantageous physicochemical properties for drug binding, or “druggable microenvironments” and (ii) given a target, the presence of multiple druggable microenvironments similar to those seen previously is associated with a high likelihood of druggability. We developed DrugFEATURE to quantify druggability by assessing the microenvironments in potential small-molecule binding sites. We benchmarked DrugFEATURE using two data sets. One data set measures druggability using NMR-based screening. DrugFEATURE correlates well with this metric. The second data set is based on historical drug discovery outcomes. Using the DrugFEATURE cutoffs derived from the first, we accurately discriminated druggable and difficult targets in the second. We further identified novel druggable transcription factors with implications for cancer therapy. DrugFEATURE provides useful insight for drug discovery, by evaluating druggability and suggesting specific regions for interacting with drug-like molecules. PMID:24452614

  6. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 potentiates bone morphogenetic protein-2 induced bone formation.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosaku; Viggeswarapu, Manjula; Bargouti, Maggie; Liu, Hui; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2011-02-01

    The mechanisms driving bone marrow stem cell mobilization are poorly understood. A recent murine study found that circulating bone marrow-derived osteoprogenitor cells (MOPCs) were recruited to the site of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-induced bone formation. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) and its cellular receptor CXCR4 have been shown to mediate the homing of stem cells to injured tissues. We hypothesized that chemokines, such as SDF-1, are also involved with mobilization of bone marrow cells. The CD45(-) fraction is a major source of MOPCs. In this report we determined that the addition of BMP-2 or SDF-1 to collagen implants increased the number of MOPCs in the peripheral blood. BMP-2-induced mobilization was blocked by CXCR4 antibody, confirming the role of SDF-1 in mobilization. We determined for the first time that addition of SDF-1 to implants containing BMP-2 enhances mobilization, homing of MOPCs to the implant, and ectopic bone formation induced by suboptimal BMP-2 doses. These results suggest that SDF-1 increases the number of osteoprogenitor cells that are mobilized from the bone marrow and then home to the implant. Thus, addition of SDF-1 to BMP-2 may improve the efficiency of BMPs in vivo, making their routine use for orthopaedic applications more affordable and available to more patients.

  7. Locations of human and mouse genes encoding the RFX1 and RFX2 transcription factor proteins.

    PubMed

    Doyle, J; Hoffman, S; Ucla, C; Reith, W; Mach, B; Stubbs, L

    1996-07-01

    RFX transcription factors constitute a highly conserved family of site-specific DNA binding proteins involved in the expression of a variety of cellular and viral genes, including major histocompatibility complex class II genes and genes in human hepatitis B virus. Five members of the RFX gene family have been isolated from human and mouse, and all share a highly characteristic DNA binding domain that is distinct from other known DNA binding motifs. The human RFX1 and RFX2 genes have been assigned by in situ hybridization to chromosome 19p13.1 and 19p13.3, respectively. In this paper, we present data that localize RFX1 and RFX2 precisely within the detailed physical map of human chromosome 19 and genetic data that assign Rfx1 and Rfx2 to homologous regions of mouse chromosomes 8 and 17, respectively. These data define the established relationships between these homologous mouse and human regions in further detail and provide new tools for linking cloned genes to phenotypes in both species.

  8. Vap (Vascular Associated Protein): a novel factor involved in erythropoiesis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Atsuo; Endo, Sumie; Dawid, Igor B

    2012-05-04

    Both endothelial and erythroid cells are generated in the intermediate cell mass (ICM) during zebrafish embryogenesis, but the nature of the genes that contribute to the processes of erythrocyte maturation and blood vessel network formation is not fully understood. From our in situ-based screening, we have identified a novel factor, Vap (Vascular Associated Protein) that is predominantly expressed in the ICM, and subsequently enriched in endothelial cells. Vap expression in the ICM was drastically suppressed in the cloche mutant that has defects in both vasculogenesis and hematopoiesis, whereas Vap expression was not affected in the vlad tepes/gata1 mutant. Knockdown of Vap using anti-sense morpholinos (VAP-MO) not only resulted in decreased numbers of erythrocytes but also in the strong suppression of hemoglobin production. Further, we found that Vap knockdown caused the disorganization of the intersegmental vessels (ISVs), which show irregular branching. We propose that Vap plays an important role in the maturation of endothelial and erythroid cells in zebrafish.

  9. [Surfactant protein and thyroid transcription factor 1 in pleuro-pulmonary neoplasia. Immunohistochemical study].

    PubMed

    Dessy, E; Falleni, M; Del Curto, B; Braidotti, P; Pietra, G G

    2000-12-01

    Aim of this work was to investigate the ability of the antibodies against Surfactant proteins (SP) and Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) to distinguish primary neoplasms of the lung from metastatic carcinomas to the lung and pleural mesotheliomas. We evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of the antibodies anti SP-A, SP-B, pro SP-C, SP-D, and TTF-1 in a series of 56 primary lung carcinomas, 9 metastatic carcinomas to the lung, 5 pleural mesotheliomas and 8 non-pulmonary carcinomas. Among primary lung neoplasms, only adenocarcinomas immunostained for all SP (specificity = 1; total sensitivity = 0.52). TTF-1 had an excellent specificity (= 1), but a weak sensitivity (= 0.34) in recognizing primary lung carcinomas. TTF-1 was present in lung adenocarcinomas which were negative for SPs; however it failed to distinguish the subtypes. Pleural mesotheliomas, pulmonary metastases and non-pulmonary carcinomas were not immunoreactive for SP-A, SP-B, SP-D, and TTF-1. Pro SP-C was positive also in the adenocarcinomas of the large bowel and in their pulmonary and nodal metastases. These results demonstrate that the combined use of antibodies anti SP-A, SP-B and TTF-1 is the best association in distinguishing primary lung carcinomas from metastatic carcinomas to the lung and pleural mesotheliomas.

  10. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  11. Examining Crosstalk among Transforming Growth Factor β, Bone Morphogenetic Protein, and Wnt Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Coster, Adam D.; Thorne, Curtis A.; Wu, Lani F.; Altschuler, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    The integration of morphogenic signals by cells is not well understood. A growing body of literature suggests increasingly complex coupling among classically defined pathways. Given this apparent complexity, it is difficult to predict where, when, or even whether crosstalk occurs. Here, we investigated pairs of morphogenic pathways, previously reported to have multiple points of crosstalk, which either do not share (TGFβ and Wnt/β-catenin) or share (TGFβ and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)) core signaling components. Crosstalk was measured by the ability of one morphogenic pathway to cross-activate core transcription factors and/or target genes of another morphogenic pathway. In contrast to previous studies, we found a surprising absence of crosstalk between TGFβ and Wnt/β-catenin. Further, we did not observe expected cross-pathway inhibition in between TGFβ and BMP, despite the fact that both use (or could compete) for the shared component SMAD4. Critical to our assays was a separation of timescales, which helped separate crosstalk due to initial signal transduction from subsequent post-transcriptional feedback events. Our study revealed fewer (and different) inter-morphogenic pathway crosstalk connections than expected; even pathways that share components can be insulated from one another. PMID:27895117

  12. [Lymphocyte transformation test following stimulation with a protein factor from neutrophilic granulocytes (PMNL) in psoriasis patients].

    PubMed

    Ruszczak, Z; Ciborska, L; Kaszuba, A

    1988-12-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) was given to 20 healthy subjects and 43 patients with generalized psoriasis vulgaris: it was given right after stimulation with PHA (spontaneous) and after stimulation with allogenic and autogenic protein factor (NPF). NPF was isolated from secondary lysosome granules of peripheral blood neutrophils. The results were analyzed using computer statistic tests. No distinct differences were noticed between the spontaneous transformation test in psoriatic patients compared to the controls. After stimulation with PHA, the percentage of blast cells was significantly lower in patients with psoriasis. When allogenic and autogenic NPF was used for stimulation, the LTT values were significantly higher in the psoriasis group than in the control subjects. This fact points out the increase in sensitivity of lymphocytes to NPF in active psoriasis and the possibility of abnormal neutrophil-lymphocyte interactions in vivo. This phenomenon may be intensified when under the influence of bacterial or viral agents, or medicaments; the degranulation of secondary lysosome granules of neutrophils occurs, causing the release of NPF. These investigations support our opinion that psoriasis is a systemic disease and that NPF plays a considerable role in the psoriatic reaction.

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi elongation factor EF-Tu is an immunogenic protein during Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Sebastian E; Yang, Youyun; Troxell, Bryan; Yang, Xiuli; Pal, Utpal; Yang, X Frank

    2015-09-02

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease, does not produce lipopolysaccharide but expresses a large number of lipoproteins on its cell surface. These outer membrane lipoproteins are highly immunogenic and have been used for serodiagnosis of Lyme disease. Recent studies have shown that highly conserved cytosolic proteins such as enolase and elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) unexpectedly localized on the surface of bacteria including B. burgdorferi, and surface-localized enolase has shown to contribute to the enzootic cycle of B. burgdorferi. In this study, we studied the immunogenicity, surface localization, and function of B. burgdorferi EF-Tu. We found that EF-Tu is highly immunogenic in mice, and EF-Tu antibodies were readily detected in Lyme disease patients. On the other hand, active immunization studies showed that EF-Tu antibodies did not protect mice from infection when challenged with B. burgdorferi via either needle inoculation or tick bites. Borrelial mouse-tick cycle studies showed that EF-Tu antibodies also did not block B. burgdorferi migration and survival in ticks. Consistent with these findings, we found that EF-Tu primarily localizes in the protoplasmic cylinder of spirochetes and is not on the surface of B. burgdorferi. Taken together, our studies suggest that B. burgdorferi EF-Tu is not surfaced exposed, but it is highly immunogenic and is a potential serodiagnostic marker for Lyme borreliosis.

  14. Structural basis for the regulation of insulin-like growth factors by IGF binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Siwanowicz, Igor; Popowicz, Grzegorz M; Wisniewska, Magdalena; Huber, Robert; Kuenkele, Klaus-Peter; Lang, Kurt; Engh, Richard A; Holak, Tad A

    2005-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) control the extracellular distribution, function, and activity of IGFs. Here, we report an X-ray structure of the binary complex of IGF-I and the N-terminal domain of IGFBP-4 (NBP-4, residues 3-82) and a model of the ternary complex of IGF-I, NBP-4, and the C-terminal domain (CBP-4, residues 151-232) derived from diffraction data with weak definition of the C-terminal domain. These structures show how the IGFBPs regulate IGF signaling. Key features of the structures include (1) a disulphide bond ladder that binds to IGF and partially masks the IGF residues responsible for type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-IR) binding, (2) the high-affinity IGF-I interaction site formed by residues 39-82 in a globular fold, and (3) CBP-4 interactions. Although CBP-4 does not bind individually to either IGF-I or NBP-4, in the ternary complex, CBP-4 contacts both and also blocks the IGF-IR binding region of IGF-I.

  15. Synergistic interaction between the fibroblast growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathways in lens cells.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Bruce A; Musil, Linda S

    2015-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) play a central role in two processes essential for lens transparency--fiber cell differentiation and gap junction-mediated intercellular communication (GJIC). Using serum-free primary cultures of chick lens epithelial cells (DCDMLs), we investigated how the FGF and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathways positively cooperate to regulate lens development and function. We found that culturing DCDMLs for 6 d with the BMP blocker noggin inhibits the canonical FGF-to-ERK pathway upstream of FRS2 activation and also prevents FGF from stimulating FRS2- and ERK-independent gene expression, indicating that BMP signaling is required at the level of FGF receptors. Other experiments revealed a second type of BMP/FGF interaction by which FGF promotes expression of BMP target genes as well as of BMP4. Together these studies reveal a novel mode of cooperation between the FGF and BMP pathways in which BMP keeps lens cells in an optimally FGF-responsive state and, reciprocally, FGF enhances BMP-mediated gene expression. This interaction provides a mechanistic explanation for why disruption of either FGF or BMP signaling in the lens leads to defects in lens development and function.

  16. Markers of collagen metabolism and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in term infants

    PubMed Central

    Hytinantti, T; Rutanen, E; Turpeinen, M; Sorva, R; Andersson, S

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To study the relation between fetal growth and markers of collagen metabolism and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) in term infants.
METHODS—Cord vein plasma was obtained from 67 term infants of gestational age 37.1-41.7 weeks (39 appropriate for gestational age (AGA), 11 large for gestational age (LGA; relative birth weight ⩾ 2.0 SD), and 17 small for gestational age (SGA; relative birth weight ⩽ −2.0 SD)) for analysis of markers of metabolism of collagen type I (PICP and ICTP) and III (PIIINP) and of IGFBP-1.
RESULTS—Negative correlations existed between gestational age and PICP (r = −0.294, p = 0.0158), ICTP (r = −0.338, p = 0.0052), and PIIINP (r = −0.432, p = 0.0003). These correlations were also found in SGA infants (all p < 0.05). IGFBP-1 showed negative correlations with birth weight and relative birth weight (r = −0.644, p = 0.0001, and r = −0.693, p = 0.0001 respectively) but not with gestational age (p>0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—In the term fetus, collagen metabolism is primarily dependent on maturity and not on intrauterine growth status, whereas IGFBP-1 reflects intrauterine growth independently of maturity.

 PMID:10873165

  17. Drosophila damaged DNA-binding protein 1 is an essential factor for development.

    PubMed

    Takata, Kei-ichi; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2004-10-01

    The damaged DNA-binding protein (DDB) complex, thought to recognize (6-4) photoproducts and other lesions in DNA, has been implicated to have a role in global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER) and E2F-1-mediated transcription. The complex consists of a heterodimer of p127 (DDB1) and p48 (DDB2), the latter also being known as XPE. We reported previously that in Drosophila expression of the DDB1 (D-DDB1) gene is controlled by the DRE/DREF system, and external injury to DNA is not essential for D-DDB1 function. In the present study of the function of D-DDB1 in a multicellular system, we prepared transgenic flies, which were knocked down for the D-DDB1 gene due to RNA interference (RNAi), and performed immunocytochemistry to ascertain the distribution of D-DDB1 in the eye imaginal disc. It was found to be abundant in the anterior of the morphogenetic furrow (MF). Whole-body overexpression of dsRNA of D-DDB1 in Drosophila using a GAL4-UAS targeted expression system induced melanotic tumors and caused complete lethality. When limited to the eye imaginal disc, a severe rough eye phenotype resulted. Correspondingly, all of the D-DDB1 gene knocked-out flies also died. D-DDB1 therefore appears to be an essential development-associated factor in a multicellular organism.

  18. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14, a novel insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 binding partner

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chen; Yao, Guangyin; Zou, Minji; Chen, Guangyu; Wang, Min; Liu, Jingqian; Wang, Jiaxi; Xu, Donggang . E-mail: xudg@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2007-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is known to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in IGF-dependent and IGF-independent manners, but the mechanism underlying IGF-independent effects is not yet clear. In a yeast two-hybrid assay, IGFBP-3 was used as the bait to screen a human fetal liver cDNA library for it interactors that may potentially mediate IGFBP-3-regulated functions. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GalNAc-T14), a member of the GalNAc-Tases family, was identified as a novel IGFBP-3 binding partner. This interaction involved the ricin-type beta-trefoil domain of GalNAc-T14. The interaction between IGFBP-3 and GalNAc-T14 was reconfirmed in vitro and in vivo, using GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and mammalian two-hybrid assays. Our findings may provide new clues for further study on the mechanism behind the IGF-independent effects of IGFBP-3 promoting apoptosis. The role of GalNAc-T14 as an intracellular mediator of the effects of IGFBP-3 need to be verified in future studies.

  19. Expression of protein tyrosine kinases and stem cell factor in chicken blastodermal cells.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, E; Etches, R J

    2001-02-01

    Chicken blastodermal cells (CBC) from Stage X embryos, which were isolated from newly laid, fertile, unincubated eggs, are pluripotent cells and can produce somatic and germline chimeras when injected into recipient stage X embryos. The CBC retain their pluripotential ability for up to 7 d in vitro. The molecular mechanisms that control proliferation and differentiation of CBC are largely unknown, although protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) are known to play important roles in these processes in similar cells. To understand better the molecular mechanisms of proliferation and differentiation in CBC, expression profiles of PTK and stem cell factor (SCF) were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using gene-specific and degenerate oligonucleotide primers. Seventeen distinct PTK, including 14 receptor-type and 3 nonreceptor-type PTK and SCF were identified by RT-PCR. Expression of all of the genes was confirmed by northern blot analysis. The northern blot analysis showed that all probes hybridized with one or more transcripts at various expression levels. The expression of the 17 PTK and SCF genes in CBC suggests that they might play a role in signal transduction pathways that control the proliferation or differentiation in CBC.

  20. Dynamic hydration shell restores Kauzmann's 1959 explanation of how the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Robert L

    2014-09-09

    Kauzmann's explanation of how the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding is reexamined. His explanation said that hydrocarbon hydration shells are formed, possibly of clathrate water, and they explain why hydrocarbons have uniquely low solubilities in water. His explanation was not universally accepted because of skepticism about the clathrate hydration shell. A revised version is given here in which a dynamic hydration shell is formed by van der Waals (vdw) attraction, as proposed in 1985 by Jorgensen et al. [Jorgensen WL, Gao J, Ravimohan C (1985) J Phys Chem 89:3470-3473]. The vdw hydration shell is implicit in theories of hydrophobicity that contain the vdw interaction between hydrocarbon C and water O atoms. To test the vdw shell model against the known hydration energetics of alkanes, the energetics should be based on the Ben-Naim standard state (solute transfer between fixed positions in the gas and liquid phases). Then the energetics are proportional to n, the number of water molecules correlated with an alkane by vdw attraction, given by the simulations of Jorgensen et al. The energetics show that the decrease in entropy upon hydration is the root cause of hydrophobicity; it probably results from extensive ordering of water molecules in the vdw shell. The puzzle of how hydrophobic free energy can be proportional to nonpolar surface area when the free energy is unfavorable and the only known interaction (the vdw attraction) is favorable, is resolved by finding that the unfavorable free energy is produced by the vdw shell.

  1. Protein Hit1, a novel box C/D snoRNP assembly factor, controls cellular concentration of the scaffolding protein Rsa1 by direct interaction

    PubMed Central

    Rothé, Benjamin; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Quinternet, Marc; Back, Régis; Tiotiu, Decebal; Jacquemin, Clémence; Loegler, Christine; Schlotter, Florence; Peña, Vlad; Eckert, Kelvin; Moréra, Solange; Dorsselaer, Alain Van; Branlant, Christiane; Massenet, Séverine; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah; Manival, Xavier; Charpentier, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis of eukaryotic box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles (C/D snoRNPs) involves conserved trans-acting factors, which are proposed to facilitate the assembly of the core proteins Snu13p/15.5K, Nop58p/NOP58, Nop56p/NOP56 and Nop1p/Fibrillarin on box C/D small nucleolar RNAs (C/D snoRNAs). In yeast, protein Rsa1 acts as a platform, interacting with both the RNA-binding core protein Snu13 and protein Pih1 of the Hsp82–R2TP chaperone complex. In this work, a proteomic approach coupled with functional and structural studies identifies protein Hit1 as a novel Rsa1p-interacting partner involved in C/D snoRNP assembly. Hit1p contributes to in vivo C/D snoRNA stability and pre-RNA maturation kinetics. It associates with U3 snoRNA precursors and influences its 3′-end processing. Remarkably, Hit1p is required to maintain steady-state levels of Rsa1p. This stabilizing activity is likely to be general across eukaryotic species, as the human protein ZNHIT3(TRIP3) showing sequence homology with Hit1p regulates the abundance of NUFIP1, the Rsa1p functional homolog. The nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the Rsa1p317–352–Hit1p70–164 complex reveals a novel mode of protein–protein association explaining the strong stability of the Rsa1p–Hit1p complex. Our biochemical data show that C/D snoRNAs and the core protein Nop58 can interact with the purified Snu13p–Rsa1p–Hit1p heterotrimer. PMID:25170085

  2. Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu) proteins structural stability and bioinformatics in ancestral gene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Holden, T.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    A paleo-experimental evolution report on elongation factor EF-Tu structural stability results has provided an opportunity to rewind the tape of life using the ancestral protein sequence reconstruction modeling approach; consistent with the book of life dogma in current biology and being an important component in the astrobiology community. Fractal dimension via the Higuchi fractal method and Shannon entropy of the DNA sequence classification could be used in a diagram that serves as a simple summary. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, DLG1 in cognitive skill, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology with EF Tu DNA sequences have accounted for the reported circular dichroism thermo-stability data systematically; the results also infer a relatively less volatility geologic time period from 2 to 3 Gyr from adaptation viewpoint. Comparison to Thermotoga maritima MSB8 and Psychrobacter shows that Thermus thermophilus HB8 EF-Tu calibration sequence could be an outlier, consistent with free energy calculation by NUPACK. Diagram methodology allows computer simulation studies and HAR1 shows about 0.5% probability from chimp to human in terms of diagram location, and SNP simulation results such as amoebic meningoencephalitis NAF1 suggest correlation. Extensions to the studies of the translation and transcription elongation factor sequences in Megavirus Chiliensis, Megavirus Lba and Pandoravirus show that the studied Pandoravirus sequence could be an outlier with the highest fractal dimension and lowest entropy, as compared to chicken as a deviant in the DNMT3A DNA methylation gene sequences from zebrafish to human and to the less than one percent probability in computer simulation using the HAR1 0.5% probability as reference. The diagram methodology would be useful in ancestral gene

  3. Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase regulates the synthesis of microtubule-related proteins in neurons.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Justin W; Genheden, Maja; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Wang, Xuemin; Foster, Leonard J; Proud, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of the elongation phase of protein synthesis is important for numerous physiological processes in both neurons and other cell types. Elongation is primarily regulated via eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K). However, the consequence of altering eEF2K activity on the synthesis of specific proteins is largely unknown. Using both pharmacological and genetic manipulations of eEF2K combined with two protein-labeling techniques, stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture and bio-orthogonal non-canonical amino acid tagging, we identified a subset of proteins whose synthesis is sensitive to inhibition of eEF2K in murine primary cortical neurons. Gene ontology (GO) analyses indicated that processes related to microtubules are particularly sensitive to eEF2K inhibition. Our findings suggest that eEF2K likely contributes to neuronal function by regulating the synthesis of microtubule-related proteins. Modulation of the elongation phase of protein synthesis is important for numerous physiological processes in neurons. Here, using labeling of new proteins coupled with proteomic techniques in primary cortical neurons, we find that the synthesis of microtubule-related proteins is up-regulated by inhibition of elongation. This suggests that translation elongation is a key regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics in neurons.

  4. Immunotherapy of metastatic breast cancer patients with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Ushijima, Naofumi

    2008-01-15

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of breast cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Patient serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden. The deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, resulting in no macrophage activation and immunosuppression. Stepwise incubation of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated probably the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages treated in vitro with GcMAF (100 pg/ml) are highly tumoricidal to mammary adenocarcinomas. Efficacy of GcMAF for treatment of metastatic breast cancer was investigated with 16 nonanemic patients who received weekly administration of GcMAF (100 ng). As GcMAF therapy progresses, the MAF precursor activity of patient Gc protein increased with a concomitant decrease in serum Nagalase. Because of proportionality of serum Nagalase activity to tumor burden, the time course progress of GcMAF therapy was assessed by serum Nagalase activity as a prognostic index. These patients had the initial Nagalase activities ranging from 2.32 to 6.28 nmole/min/mg protein. After about 16-22 administrations (approximately 3.5-5 months) of GcMAF, these patients had insignificantly low serum enzyme levels equivalent to healthy control enzyme levels, ranging from 0.38 to 0.63 nmole/min/mg protein, indicating eradication of the tumors. This therapeutic procedure resulted in no recurrence for more than 4 years.

  5. A novel firmicute protein family related to the actinobacterial resuscitation-promoting factors by non-orthologous domain displacement

    PubMed Central

    Ravagnani, Adriana; Finan, Christopher L; Young, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background In Micrococcus luteus growth and resuscitation from starvation-induced dormancy is controlled by the production of a secreted growth factor. This autocrine resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is the founder member of a family of proteins found throughout and confined to the actinobacteria (high G + C Gram-positive bacteria). The aim of this work was to search for and characterise a cognate gene family in the firmicutes (low G + C Gram-positive bacteria) and obtain information about how they may control bacterial growth and resuscitation. Results In silico analysis of the accessory domains of the Rpf proteins permitted their classification into several subfamilies. The RpfB subfamily is related to a group of firmicute proteins of unknown function, represented by YabE of Bacillus subtilis. The actinobacterial RpfB and firmicute YabE proteins have very similar domain structures and genomic contexts, except that in YabE, the actinobacterial Rpf domain is replaced by another domain, which we have called Sps. Although totally unrelated in both sequence and secondary structure, the Rpf and Sps domains fulfil the same function. We propose that these proteins have undergone "non-orthologous domain displacement", a phenomenon akin to "non-orthologous gene displacement" that has been described previously. Proteins containing the Sps domain are widely distributed throughout the firmicutes and they too fall into a number of distinct subfamilies. Comparative analysis of the accessory domains in the Rpf and Sps proteins, together with their weak similarity to lytic transglycosylases, provide clear evidence that they are muralytic enzymes. Conclusions The results indicate that the firmicute Sps proteins and the actinobacterial Rpf proteins are cognate and that they control bacterial culturability via enzymatic modification of the bacterial cell envelope. PMID:15774001

  6. Rapid increase in fibroblast growth factor 21 in protein malnutrition and its impact on growth and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yori; Saito, Kenji; Nakazawa, Kyoko; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kato, Hisanori; Takenaka, Asako

    2015-11-14

    Protein malnutrition promotes hepatic steatosis, decreases insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I production and retards growth. To identify new molecules involved in such changes, we conducted DNA microarray analysis on liver samples from rats fed an isoenergetic low-protein diet for 8 h. We identified the fibroblast growth factor 21 gene (Fgf21) as one of the most strongly up-regulated genes under conditions of acute protein malnutrition (P<0·05, false-discovery rate<0·001). In addition, amino acid deprivation increased Fgf21 mRNA levels in rat liver-derived RL-34 cells (P<0·01). These results suggested that amino acid limitation directly increases Fgf21 expression. FGF21 is a polypeptide hormone that regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. FGF21 also promotes a growth hormone-resistance state and suppresses IGF-I in transgenic mice. Therefore, to determine further whether Fgf21 up-regulation causes hepatic steatosis and growth retardation after IGF-I decrease in protein malnutrition, we fed an isoenergetic low-protein diet to Fgf21-knockout (KO) mice. Fgf21-KO did not rescue growth retardation and reduced plasma IGF-I concentration in these mice. Fgf21-KO mice showed greater epididymal white adipose tissue weight and increased hepatic TAG and cholesterol levels under protein malnutrition conditions (P<0·05). Overall, the results showed that protein deprivation directly increased Fgf21 expression. However, growth retardation and decreased IGF-I were not mediated by increased FGF21 expression in protein malnutrition. Furthermore, FGF21 up-regulation rather appears to have a protective effect against obesity and hepatic steatosis in protein-malnourished animals.

  7. The pathogenic mechanism of the Mycobacterium ulcerans virulence factor, mycolactone, depends on blockade of protein translocation into the ER.

    PubMed

    Hall, Belinda S; Hill, Kirsti; McKenna, Michael; Ogbechi, Joy; High, Stephen; Willis, Anne E; Simmonds, Rachel E

    2014-04-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans is characterised by tissue necrosis and immunosuppression due to mycolactone, the necessary and sufficient virulence factor for Buruli ulcer disease pathology. Many of its effects are known to involve down-regulation of specific proteins implicated in important cellular processes, such as immune responses and cell adhesion. We have previously shown mycolactone completely blocks the production of LPS-dependent proinflammatory mediators post-transcriptionally. Using polysome profiling we now demonstrate conclusively that mycolactone does not prevent translation of TNF, IL-6 and Cox-2 mRNAs in macrophages. Instead, it inhibits the production of these, along with nearly all other (induced and constitutive) proteins that transit through the ER. This is due to a blockade of protein translocation and subsequent degradation of aberrantly located protein. Several lines of evidence support this transformative explanation of mycolactone function. First, cellular TNF and Cox-2 can be once more detected if the action of the 26S proteasome is inhibited concurrently. Second, restored protein is found in the cytosol, indicating an inability to translocate. Third, in vitro translation assays show mycolactone prevents the translocation of TNF and other proteins into the ER. This is specific as the insertion of tail-anchored proteins into the ER is unaffected showing that the ER remains structurally intact. Fourth, metabolic labelling reveals a near-complete loss of glycosylated and secreted proteins from treated cells, whereas cytosolic proteins are unaffected. Notably, the profound lack of glycosylated and secreted protein production is apparent in a range of different disease-relevant cell types. These studies provide a new mechanism underlying mycolactone's observed pathological activities both in vitro and in vivo. Mycolactone-dependent inhibition of protein translocation into the ER not only explains the deficit of innate cytokines, but

  8. A growth factor-responsive gene of murine BALB/c 3T3 cells encodes a protein homologous to human tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hartzell, S.; Ryder, K.; Lanahan, A.; Nathans, D.; Lau, L.F.

    1989-06-01

    Polypeptide growth factors rapidly induce the transcription of a set of genes that appear to mediate cell growth. The authors report that one of the genes induced in BALB/c mouse 3T3 cells encodes a transmembrane protein (mTF) homologous to human tissue factor, which is involved in the proteolytic activation of blood clotting. mTF mRNA is present in many murine tissues and cell lines. The authors' results raise the possibility that mTF may also play a role in cell growth.

  9. Collagen and Stretch Modulate Autocrine Secretion of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins from Differentiated Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Fenwick-Smith, Daniela; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1995-01-01

    Stretch-induced skeletal muscle growth may involve increased autocrine secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) since IGF-1 is a potent growth factor for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and stretch elevates IGF-1 mRNA levels in vivo. In tissue cultures of differentiated avian pectoralis skeletal muscle cells, nanomolar concentrations of exogenous IGF-1 stimulated growth in mechanically stretched but not static cultures. These cultures released up to 100 pg of endogenously produced IGF-1/micro-g of protein/day, as well as three major IGF binding proteins of 31, 36, and 43 kilodaltons (kDa). IGF-1 was secreted from both myofibers and fibroblasts coexisting in the muscle cultures. Repetitive stretch/relaxation of the differentiated skeletal muscle cells stimulated the acute release of IGF-1 during the first 4 h after initiating mechanical activity, but caused no increase in the long-term secretion over 24-72 h of IGF-1, or its binding proteins. Varying the intensity and frequency of stretch had no effect on the long-term efflux of IGF-1. In contrast to stretch, embedding the differentiated muscle cells in a three-dimensional collagen (Type I) matrix resulted in a 2-5-fold increase in long-term IGF-1 efflux over 24-72 h. Collagen also caused a 2-5-fold increase in the release of the IGF binding proteins. Thus, both the extracellular matrix protein type I collagen and stretch stimulate the autocrine secretion of IGF-1, but with different time kinetics. This endogenously produced growth factor may be important for the growth response of skeletal myofibers to both types of external stimuli.

  10. Mining the Brassica oleracea genome for Q-type C2H2 zinc finger transcription factor proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Q-type zinc finger proteins have been studied in several plant species and have been associated with response to stress. A whole genome analysis of Arabidopsis identified 176 putative C2H2 transcription factors (TF). Q-type C2H2 TFs containing the QALGGH motif and are a subset of these. In Arabidops...

  11. Acute handling disturbance modulates plasma insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of acute stressor exposure on proximal (growth hormone; GH) and distal (insulin-like growth factor-I; IGF-I and IGF-binding proteins) components of the somatotropic axis are poorly understood in finfish. We exposed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to a 5-minute handling disturbance to...

  12. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by react...

  13. Heat-induced accumulation of protein synthesis elongation factor 1A indicates an important role in heat tolerance in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress substantially reduces crop productivity worldwide, and will become more severe due to global warming. Identification of proteins involved in heat stress response may help develop varieties for heat tolerance. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) is a cytosolic, multifunctional protei...

  14. The use of insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 in diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer J; Xu, Haodong

    2011-03-01

    The histologic distinction between reactive processes and malignant neoplasms and between low-grade and high-grade tumors is not always straightforward and is sometimes extremely challenging. This is especially the case when the diagnostic material is a small biopsy specimen or a cytology specimen with scant cellularity. In addition, suboptimal processing and crush artifact may limit accurate diagnosis. A reliable diagnostic biomarker that preferentially highlights malignant processes and high-grade tumors would be very valuable in segregating these entities from reactive processes and low-grade lesions. Recent extensive studies have shown that an oncoprotein, insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3, is not only a prognostic biomarker but also a diagnostic molecule. This review focuses on discussing the value of insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 in diagnostic pathology, with a focus on utilization of insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 in the discrimination of benign effusions from malignant effusions, malignant mesothelioma from mesothelial hyperplasia, carcinoids from high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas, low-grade dysplasia from high-grade dysplasia, hepatocellular carcinoma from hepatic adenoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic pancreatic ductal carcinoma from benign bile duct lesions, melanoma from nevi, and follicular thyroid carcinoma from follicular adenoma of the thyroid, as well as examining insulin like-growth factor II messenger RNA binding protein-3 expression in lymphomas of germinal center origin.

  15. Heat tolerance and expression of protein synthesis elongation factors, EF-Tu and EF-1a, in spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein elongation factors, EF-Tu and EF-1a, have been implicated in cell response to heat stress. In spring wheat, EF-Tu displays chaperone activity and reduces thermal aggregation of Rubisco activase. Similarly, in mammalian cells, EF-1a displays chaperone-like activity and regulates the expressio...

  16. The Potyviral P3 Protein Targets Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1A to Promote the Unfolded Protein Response and Viral Pathogenesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shine, M.B.; Cui, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Na; Kachroo, Pradeep; Zhi, Haijan; Kachroo, Aardra

    2016-01-01

    The biochemical function of the potyviral P3 protein is not known, although it is known to regulate virus replication, movement, and pathogenesis. We show that P3, the putative virulence determinant of soybean mosaic virus (SMV), targets a component of the translation elongation complex in soybean. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), a well-known host factor in viral pathogenesis, is essential for SMV virulence and the associated unfolded protein response (UPR). Silencing GmEF1A inhibits accumulation of SMV and another ER-associated virus in soybean. Conversely, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing chemicals promote SMV accumulation in wild-type, but not GmEF1A-knockdown, plants. Knockdown of genes encoding the eEF1B isoform, which is important for eEF1A function in translation elongation, has similar effects on UPR and SMV resistance, suggesting a link to translation elongation. P3 and GmEF1A promote each other’s nuclear localization, similar to the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of eEF1A by the Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Nef protein. Our results suggest that P3 targets host elongation factors resulting in UPR, which in turn facilitates SMV replication and place eEF1A upstream of BiP in the ER stress response during pathogen infection. PMID:27356973

  17. NSs Virulence Factor of Rift Valley Fever Virus Engages the F-Box Proteins FBXW11 and β-TRCP1 To Degrade the Antiviral Protein Kinase PKR

    PubMed Central

    Kainulainen, Markus; Lau, Simone; Samuel, Charles E.; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) is a relevant pathogen of both humans and livestock in Africa. The nonstructural protein NSs is a major virulence factor known to suppress the type I interferon (IFN) response by inhibiting host cell transcription and by proteasomal degradation of a major antiviral IFN effector, the translation-inhibiting protein kinase PKR. Here, we identified components of the modular SCF (Skp1, Cul1, F-box protein)-type E3 ubiquitin ligases as mediators of PKR destruction by NSs. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against the conserved SCF subunit Skp1 protected PKR from NSs-mediated degradation. Consequently, RVFV replication was severely reduced in Skp1-depleted cells when PKR was present. SCF complexes have a variable F-box protein subunit that determines substrate specificity for ubiquitination. We performed an siRNA screen for all (about 70) human F-box proteins and found FBXW11 to be involved in PKR degradation. The partial stabilization of PKR by FBXW11 depletion upregulated PKR autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of the PKR substrate eIF2α and caused a shutoff of host cell protein synthesis in RVFV-infected cells. To maximally protect PKR from the action of NSs, knockdown of structurally and functionally related FBXW1 (also known as β-TRCP1), in addition to FBXW11 deletion, was necessary. Consequently, NSs was found to interact with both FBXW11 and β-TRCP1. Thus, NSs eliminates the antiviral kinase PKR by recruitment of SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligases containing FBXW11 and β-TRCP1 as substrate recognition subunits. This antagonism of PKR by NSs is essential for efficient RVFV replication in mammalian cells. IMPORTANCE Rift Valley fever virus is a pathogen of humans and animals that has the potential to spread from Africa and the Arabian Peninsula to other regions. A major virulence mechanism is the proteasomal degradation of the antiviral kinase PKR by the viral protein NSs. Here, we

  18. Integrated Analysis of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Datasets Reveals Information on Protein Expressivity and Factors Affecting Translational Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangxin; Wu, Gang; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Integrated analysis of large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic data can provide important insights into the metabolic mechanisms underlying complex biological systems. In this chapter, we present methods to address two aspects of issues related to integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. First, due to the fact that proteomic datasets are often incomplete, and integrated analysis of partial proteomic data may introduce significant bias. To address these issues, we describe a zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP)-based model to uncover the complicated relationships between protein abundances and mRNA expression levels, and then apply them to predict protein abundance for the proteins not experimentally detected. The ZIP model takes into consideration the undetected proteins by assuming that there is a probability mass at zero representing expressed proteins that were undetected owing to technical limitations. The model validity is demonstrated using biological information of operons, regulons, and pathways. Second, weak correlation between transcriptomic and proteomic datasets is often due to biological factors affecting translational processes. To quantify the effects of these factors, we describe a multiple regression-based statistical framework to quantitatively examine the effects of various translational efficiency-related sequence features on mRNA-protein correlation. Using the datasets from sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris, the analysis shows that translation-related sequence features can contribute up to 15.2-26.2% of the total variation of the correlation between transcriptomic and proteomic datasets, and also reveals the relative importance of various features in translation process.

  19. Binding of the Vestigial co-factor switches the DNA-target selectivity of the Scalloped selector protein.

    PubMed

    Halder, G; Carroll, S B

    2001-09-01

    The formation and identity of organs and appendages are regulated by specific selector genes that encode transcription factors that regulate potentially large sets of target genes. The DNA-binding domains of selector proteins often exhibit relatively low DNA-binding specificity in vitro. It is not understood how the target selectivity of most selector proteins is determined in vivo. The Scalloped selector protein controls wing development in Drosophila by regulating the expression of numerous target genes and forming a complex with the Vestigial protein. We show that binding of Vestigial to Scalloped switches the DNA-binding selectivity of Scalloped. Two conserved domains of the Vestigial protein that are not required for Scalloped binding in solution are required for the formation of the heterotetrameric Vestigial-Scalloped complex on DNA. We suggest that Vestigial affects the conformation of Scalloped to create a wing cell-specific DNA-binding selectivity. The modification of selector protein DNA-binding specificity by co-factors appears to be a general mechanism for regulating their target selectivity in vivo.

  20. Pin1 down-regulates transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling by inducing degradation of Smad proteins.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ayako; Koinuma, Daizo; Miyazawa, Keiji; Uchida, Takafumi; Saitoh, Masao; Kawabata, Masahiro; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Akiyama, Hirotada; Abe, Masahiro; Miyazono, Kohei; Matsumoto, Toshio; Imamura, Takeshi

    2009-03-06

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is crucial in numerous cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. TGF-beta signaling is transduced by intracellular Smad proteins that are regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2) prevents TGF-beta and bone morphogenetic protein signaling by interacting with Smads and inducing their ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Here we identified Pin1, a peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase, as a novel protein binding Smads. Pin1 interacted with Smad2 and Smad3 but not Smad4; this interaction was enhanced by the phosphorylation of (S/T)P motifs in the Smad linker region. (S/T)P motif phosphorylation also enhanced the interaction of Smad2/3 with Smurf2. Pin1 reduced Smad2/3 protein levels in a manner dependent on its peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity. Knockdown of Pin1 increased the protein levels of endogenous Smad2/3. In addition, Pin1 both enhanced the interaction of Smurf2 with Smads and enhanced Smad ubiquitination. Pin1 inhibited TGF-beta-induced transcription and gene expression, suggesting that Pin1 negatively regulates TGF-beta signaling by down-regulating Smad2/3 protein levels via induction of Smurf2-mediated ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation.

  1. Protein sieving characteristics of sub-20-nm pore size filters at varying ionic strength during nanofiltration of Coagulation Factor IX.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Clint J; Jorba, Nuria; Shitanishi, Kenneth T; Herring, Steven W

    2013-05-01

    Nanofiltration assures that protein therapeutics are free of adventitious agents such as viruses. Nanofilter pores must allow passage of protein drugs but be small enough to retain viruses. Five nanofilters have been evaluated to identify those that can be used interchangeably to yield a high purity Coagulation Factor IX product. When product preparations prior to nanofiltration were analyzed using electrophoresis, Western blot, liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry and size exclusion HPLC, factor IX, inter - α - trypsin inhibitor and C4b binding protein (C4BP) were observed. C4BP was removed from product by all five nanofilters when nanofiltration was performed at physiological ionic strength. However, at high ionic strength, C4BP was removed by only two nanofilters. HPLC indicated that the Stokes radius of C4BP was larger at low ionic strength than at high ionic strength. The results suggest that C4BP exists in an open conformation at physiological ionic strength and is removed by nanofiltration whereas, at high ionic strength, the protein collapses to an extent that allows passage through some nanofilters. Manufacturers should be aware that protein contaminants in other nanofiltered protein drugs could behave similarly and conditions of nanofiltration must be evaluated to ensure consistent product purity.

  2. Merging Worlds of Nanomaterials and Biological Environment: Factors Governing Protein Corona Formation on Nanoparticles and Its Biological Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroozandeh, Parisa; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2015-05-01

    Protein corona has became a prevalent subject in the field of nanomedicine owing to its diverse role in determining the efficiency, efficacy, and the ultimate biological fate of the nanomaterials used as a tool to treat and diagnose various diseases. For instance, protein corona formation on the surface of nanoparticles can modify its physicochemical properties and interfere with its intended functionalities in the biological microenvironments. As such, much emphasis should be placed in understanding these complex phenomena that occur at the bio-nano interface. The main aim of this review is to present different factors that are influencing protein-nanoparticle interaction such as physicochemical properties of nanoparticle ( i.e., size and size distribution, shape, composition, surface chemistry, and coatings) and the effect of biological microenvironments. Apart from that, the effect of ignored factors at the bio-nano interface such as temperature, plasma concentration, plasma gradient effect, administration route, and cell observer were also addressed.

  3. Pineapple translation factor SUI1 and ribosomal protein L36 promoters drive constitutive transgene expression patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Koia, Jonni; Moyle, Richard; Hendry, Caroline; Lim, Lionel; Botella, José Ramón

    2013-03-01

    The availability of a variety of promoter sequences is necessary for the genetic engineering of plants, in basic research studies and for the development of transgenic crops. In this study, the promoter and 5' untranslated regions of the evolutionally conserved protein translation factor SUI1 gene and ribosomal protein L36 gene were isolated from pineapple and sequenced. Each promoter was translationally fused to the GUS reporter gene and transformed into the heterologous plant system Arabidopsis thaliana. Both the pineapple SUI1 and L36 promoters drove GUS expression in all tissues of Arabidopsis at levels comparable to the CaMV35S promoter. Transient assays determined that the pineapple SUI1 promoter also drove GUS expression in a variety of climacteric and non-climacteric fruit species. Thus the pineapple SUI1 and L36 promoters demonstrate the potential for using translation factor and ribosomal protein genes as a source of promoter sequences that can drive constitutive transgene expression patterns.

  4. Factor H specifically capture novel Factor H-binding proteins of Streptococcus suis and contribute to the virulence of the bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Ma, Caifeng; Fu, Yang; He, Yanan; Yu, Yanfei; Du, Dechao; Yao, Huochun; Lu, Chengping; Zhang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Factor H (FH), a regulatory protein of the complement system, can bind specifically to factor H-binding proteins (FHBPs) of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2), which contribute to evasion of host innate immune defenses. In the present study, we aimed to identify novel FHBPs and characterize the biological functions of FH in SS2 pathogenesis. Here, a method that combined proteomics and Far-western blotting was developed to identify the surface FHBPs of SS2. With this method, fourteen potential novel FHBPs were identified among SS2 surface proteins. We selected eight newly identified proteins and further confirmed their binding activity to FH. The binding of SS2 to immobilized FH decreased dramatically after pre-incubation with anti-FHBPs polyclonal antibodies. We showed for the first time that SS2 also interact specifically with mouse FH. Furthermore, we found that FH play an important role in adherence and invasion of SS2 to HEp-2 cells. Additionally, using a mouse model of intraperitoneal challenge, we confirmed that SS2 pre-incubated with FH enhanced bacteremia and brain invasion, compared with SS2 not pretreated with FH. Taken together, this study provides a useful method to characterize the host-bacteria interactions. These results first indicated that binding of FH to the cell surface improved the adherence and invasion of SS2 to HEp-2 cells, promoting SS2 to resist killing and leading to enhance virulence.

  5. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase α2 in Neutrophils Regulates Vascular Repair via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α and a Network of Proteins Affecting Metabolism and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Malik, Randa; Zippel, Nina; Frömel, Timo; Heidler, Juliana; Zukunft, Sven; Walzog, Barbara; Ansari, Nariman; Pampaloni, Francesco; Wingert, Susanne; Rieger, Michael A.; Wittig, Ilka; Fisslthaler, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is stimulated by hypoxia, and although the AMPKα1 catalytic subunit has been implicated in angiogenesis, little is known about the role played by the AMPKα2 subunit in vascular repair. Objective: To determine the role of the AMPKα2 subunit in vascular repair. Methods and Results: Recovery of blood flow after femoral artery ligation was impaired (>80%) in AMPKα2−/− versus wild-type mice, a phenotype reproduced in mice lacking AMPKα2 in myeloid cells (AMPKα2ΔMC). Three days after ligation, neutrophil infiltration into ischemic limbs of AMPKα2ΔMC mice was lower than that in wild-type mice despite being higher after 24 hours. Neutrophil survival in ischemic tissue is required to attract monocytes that contribute to the angiogenic response. Indeed, apoptosis was increased in hypoxic neutrophils from AMPKα2ΔMC mice, fewer monocytes were recruited, and gene array analysis revealed attenuated expression of proangiogenic proteins in ischemic AMPKα2ΔMC hindlimbs. Many angiogenic growth factors are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induction was attenuated in AMPKα2-deficient cells and accompanied by its enhanced hydroxylation. Also, fewer proteins were regulated by hypoxia in neutrophils from AMPKα2ΔMC mice. Mechanistically, isocitrate dehydrogenase expression and the production of α-ketoglutarate, which negatively regulate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stability, were attenuated in neutrophils from wild-type mice but remained elevated in cells from AMPKα2ΔMC mice. Conclusions: AMPKα2 regulates α-ketoglutarate generation, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stability, and neutrophil survival, which in turn determine further myeloid cell recruitment and repair potential. The activation of AMPKα2 in neutrophils is a decisive event in the initiation of vascular repair after ischemia. PMID:27777247

  6. A novel member of the SAF (scaffold attachment factor)-box protein family inhibits gene expression and induces apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ching Wan; Lee, Youn-Bok; Uney, James; Flynn, Andrea; Tobias, Jonathan H.; Norman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The SLTM [SAF (scaffold attachment factor)-like transcription modulator] protein contains a SAF-box DNA-binding motif and an RNA-binding domain, and shares an overall identity of 34% with SAFB1 {scaffold attachment factor-B1; also known as SAF-B (scaffold attachment factor B), HET [heat-shock protein 27 ERE (oestrogen response element) and TATA-box-binding protein] or HAP (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1-interacting protein)}. Here, we show that SLTM is localized to the cell nucleus, but excluded from nucleoli, and to a large extent it co-localizes with SAFB1. In the nucleus, SLTM has a punctate distribution and it does not co-localize with SR (serine/arginine) proteins. Overexpression of SAFB1 has been shown to exert a number of inhibitory effects, including suppression of oestrogen signalling. Although SLTM also suppressed the ability of oestrogen to activate a reporter gene in MCF-7 breast-cancer cells, inhibition of a constitutively active β-galactosidase gene suggested that this was primarily the consequence of a generalized inhibitory effect on transcription. Measurement of RNA synthesis, which showed a particularly marked inhibition of [3H]uridine incorporation into mRNA, supported this conclusion. In addition, analysis of cell-cycle parameters, chromatin condensation and cytochrome c release showed that SLTM induced apoptosis in a range of cultured cell lines. Thus the inhibitory effects of SLTM on gene expression appear to result from generalized down-regulation of mRNA synthesis and initiation of apoptosis consequent upon overexpressing the protein. While indicating a crucial role for SLTM in cellular function, these results also emphasize the need for caution when interpreting phenotypic changes associated with manipulation of protein expression levels. PMID:17630952

  7. Interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor stimulate two novel protein kinases that phosphorylate the heat shock protein hsp27 and beta-casein.

    PubMed

    Guesdon, F; Freshney, N; Waller, R J; Rawlinson, L; Saklatvala, J

    1993-02-25

    We have partially purified and characterized two protein kinases that were strongly activated by interleukin-1 (IL-1) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in MRC-5 fibroblasts. The kinases were separated by anion exchange chromatography of cytosolic fractions. They phosphorylated in vitro the small heat shock protein (hsp27) or beta-casein and were stimulated 3- and 4.5-fold, respectively, in cells that had been exposed to IL-1 or TNF for 10 min. They were distinct from the mitogen-activated protein kinases, whose activation by IL-1 or TNF has been reported recently. The hsp27 kinase phosphorylated its substrate on serine residues. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 45-kDa by gel filtration. It is probably involved in the increase in hsp27 phosphorylation seen in intact cells. The beta-casein kinase behaved as a 65-kDa protein. It phosphorylated its substrate on serine and threonine residues and had little activity on alpha-casein. The hsp27 and beta-casein kinases were not activated after stimulation of the cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). In contrast, the MAP kinases were activated to a similar extent (2-3-fold) by the cytokines and by PMA. The hsp27- and beta-casein kinases probably correspond to novel enzymes whose mechanisms of activation may be independent of protein kinase C or MAP kinases.

  8. Organization and nucleotide sequences of the Spiroplasma citri genes for ribosomal protein S2, elongation factor Ts, spiralin, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and an unidentified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, C; Saillard, C; Bové, J M

    1990-01-01

    The gene for spiralin, the major membrane protein of the helical mollicute Spiroplasma citri, was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 5-kilobase-pair (kbp) DNA fragment. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 5.0-kbp spiroplasmal DNA fragment was determined (GenBank accession no. M31161). The spiralin gene was identified by the size and amino acid composition of its translational product. Besides the spiralin gene, the spiroplasmal DNA fragment was found to contain five additional open reading frames (ORFs). The translational products of four of these ORFs were identified by their amino acid sequence homologies with known proteins: ribosomal protein S2, elongation factor Ts, phosphofructokinase, and pyruvate kinase, respectively encoded by the genes rpsB, tsf, pfk, and pyk. The product of the fifth ORF remains to be identified and was named protein X (X gene). The order of the above genes was tsf--X--spiralin gene--pfk--pyk. These genes were transcribed in one direction, while the gene for ribosomal protein S2 (rpsB) was transcribed in the opposite direction. Images PMID:2139649

  9. Human pathogenic Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. resists complement-mediated killing by direct binding of immune regulators factor H and factor H-like protein 1.

    PubMed

    Herzberger, Pia; Siegel, Corinna; Skerka, Christine; Fingerle, Volker; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; van Dam, Alje; Wilske, Bettina; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. has recently been shown to be a novel human pathogenic genospecies that causes Lyme disease in Europe. In order to elucidate the immune evasion mechanisms of B. spielmanii, we compared the abilities of isolates obtained from Lyme disease patients and tick isolate PC-Eq17 to escape from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Using a growth inhibition assay, we show that four B. spielmanii isolates, including PC-Eq17, are serum resistant, whereas a single isolate, PMew, was more sensitive to complement-mediated lysis. All isolates activated complement in vitro, as demonstrated by covalent attachment of C3 fragments; however, deposition of the later activation products C6 and C5b-9 was restricted to the moderately serum-resistant isolate PMew and the serum-sensitive B. garinii isolate G1. Furthermore, serum adsorption experiments revealed that all B. spielmanii isolates acquired the host alternative pathway regulators factor H and factor H-like protein (FHL-1) from human serum. Both complement regulators retained their factor I-mediated C3b inactivation activities when bound to spirochetes. In addition, two distinct factor H and FHL-1 binding proteins, BsCRASP-1 and BsCRASP-2, were identified, which we estimated to be approximately 23 to 25 kDa in mass. A further factor H binding protein, BsCRASP-3, was found exclusively in the tick isolate, PC-Eq17. This is the first report describing an immune evasion mechanism utilized by B. spielmanii sp. nov., and it demonstrates the capture of human immune regulators to resist complement-mediated killing.

  10. Analytical model for studying how environmental factors influence protein conformational stability in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Jason K.; Raverkar, Prajakta S.; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2006-12-01

    We introduce an analytical modeling strategy for probing the conformational stability of globular proteins in aqueous solution. In this approach, the intrinsic (i.e., infinite dilution) thermodynamic stability and coarse structural properties of the proteins, as well as the effective protein-protein interactions, derive from a heteropolymer collapse theory that incorporates predicted temperature- and pressure-dependent hydrophobic interactions. Protein concentration effects are estimated by integrating this information into a molecular thermodynamic model, which is an ad hoc generalization of the exact equilibrium theory of a one-dimensional binary mixture of square-well particles that interconvert through an isomerization (i.e., folding) reaction. The end result is an analytical multiscale modeling approach which, although still schematic, can predict that folded proteins exhibit a closed-loop region of stability in the pressure-temperature plane and that protein concentration has a nonmonotonic effect on protein stability, results consistent with qualitative trends observed in both experiments of protein solutions and simulations of coarse-grained protein models.

  11. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years.

  12. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Steffen; Ohmayer, Uli; Neueder, Andreas; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Hochmuth, Eduard; Deutzmann, Rainer; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA). Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes) are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU) processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  13. Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Induces Vascular Leakage through Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Ru; Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Perng, Guey-Chuen

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most common mosquito-borne flavivirus; it can either cause mild dengue fever or the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). One of the characteristic features of DHF/DSS is vascular leakage; although DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) has been proved to induce vascular leakage after binding to Toll-like receptor 4, the down-stream mechanism has not yet been fully understood. In the sera of DENV-infected patients, the concentrations of DENV NS1 and inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) are positively correlated with disease severity, but whether DENV NS1 induces vascular leakage through MIF secretion remains unknown. We demonstrated that recombinant NS1 induced vascular leakage and MIF secretion both in human endothelial cell line HMEC-1 and in mice. Furthermore, these phenomena were inhibited in the presence of anti-NS1 antibodies both in vitro and in vivo. DENV NS1 also induced LC3-I to LC3-II conversion and p62 degradation in endothelial cell line, which indicated the formation of autophagy. To clarify whether MIF or autophagy mediated DENV NS1-induced vascular leakage, various inhibitors were applied. The results showed that DENV NS1-induced vascular leakage and VE-cadherin disarray were blocked in the presence of MIF inhibitors, anti-MIF-antibodies or autophagy inhibitors. An Atg5 knockdown clone further confirmed that autophagy formation of endothelial cells was required in NS1-induced vascular leakage. Furthermore, DENV NS1-induced LC3 puncta were also decreased in the presence of MIF inhibitors, indicating that MIF mediated DENV NS1-induced autophagy. Taken together, the results suggest a potential mechanism of DENV-induced vascular leakage and provide possible therapeutic targets against DHF/DSS. PMID:27409803

  14. Cerebral klotho protein as a humoral factor for maintenance of baroreflex.

    PubMed

    Chen, L-J; Cheng, M-F; Ku, P-M; Cheng, J-T

    2015-02-01

    The klotho protein produced by the choroid plexus is known as a humoral factor in central nervous system. Many hormones affecting the baroreflex sensitivity have been introduced in the brain. However, role of klotho in the baroreflex sensitivity is still unknown. Recently, mutations in the klotho gene have been linked to cardiovascular diseases in both animals and human subjects. Also, silencing of brain klotho has been reported to enhance cold-induced elevation of blood pressure. Thus, we investigated the role of klotho in maintenance of central cardiovascular reflex sensitivity. Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were used. Either klotho shRNA or scramble shRNA was also ICV-infused into the brains of WKY rats to investigate the role of klotho in brain. Recombinant klotho or rat IgG was infused into the cerebral paraventricle (ICV) of SHRs for further understanding the role of klotho in hypertension. The baroreflex sensitivity was detected using the challenge with a depressor dose of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 50 μg/kg) or with a pressor dose of phenylephrine (PE, 8 μg/kg). We found that silencing of klotho expression in the brain decreased the baroreflex sensitivity in WKY rats. Also, modulation of the blood pressure for one week altered the cardiovascular homeostasis and resulted in an increased expression of klotho in medulla oblongata. Moreover, the baroreflex sensitivity was restored in SHRs that received recombinant klotho through ICV brain. Thus, klotho is involved in the maintenance of baroreflex sensitivity in the brain.

  15. Inactivation of fibroblast growth factor binding protein 3 causes anxiety-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yasunari; Kitano, Ayumi; Takao, Keizo; Prasansuklab, Anchalee; Mushiroda, Taisei; Yamazaki, Keiko; Kumada, Tomohiro; Shibata, Minoru; Takaoka, Yuki; Awaya, Tomonari; Kato, Takeo; Abe, Takaya; Iwata, Nakao; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Heike, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms of emotional modulation and the molecular pathophysiology of anxiety disorders are largely unknown. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family has been implicated in the regulation of many physiological and pathological processes, which include the control of emotional behaviors. The present study examined mice with a targeted deletion of the fgf-bp3 gene, which encodes a novel FGF-binding protein, in animal models relevant to anxiety. To define the behavioral consequences of FGF-BP3 deficiency, we evaluated fgf-bp3-deficient mice using anxiety-related behavioral paradigms that provide a conflict between the desire to explore an unknown area or objects and the aversion to a brightly lit open space. The fgf-bp3-deficient mice exhibited alterations in time spent in the central area of the open-field arena, were less active in the lit areas of a light/dark transition test, and had a prolonged latency to feed during a novelty-induced hypophagia test. These changes were associated with alterations in light-induced orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) activation in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that FGF-BP3 is a potent mediator of anxiety-related behaviors in mice and suggest that distinct pathways regulate emotional behaviors. Therefore, FGF-BP3 plays a critical role in the regulation of emotional states and in the development of anxiety disorders and should be investigated as a therapeutic target for anxiety disease in humans.

  16. The Transcription Factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 Controls Border-Like Cell Release1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Karve, Rucha

    2016-01-01

    The root cap covers the tip of the root and functions to protect the root from environmental stress. Cells in the last layer of the root cap are known as border cells, or border-like cells (BLCs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These cells separate from the rest of the root cap and are released from its edge as a layer of living cells. BLC release is developmentally regulated, but the mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that the transcription factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 (NLP7) is required for the proper release of BLCs in Arabidopsis. Mutations in NLP7 lead to BLCs that are released as single cells instead of an entire layer. NLP7 is highly expressed in BLCs and is activated by exposure to low pH, a condition that causes BLCs to be released as single cells. Mutations in NLP7 lead to decreased levels of cellulose and pectin. Cell wall-loosening enzymes such as CELLULASE5 (CEL5) and a pectin lyase-like gene, as well as the root cap regulators SOMBRERO and BEARSKIN1/2, are activated in nlp7-1 seedlings. Double mutant analysis revealed that the nlp7-1 phenotype depends on the expression level of CEL5. Mutations in NLP7 lead to an increase in susceptibility to a root-infecting fungal pathogen. Together, these data suggest that NLP7 controls the release of BLCs by acting through the cell wall-loosening enzyme CEL5. PMID:27221617

  17. Mxi1 regulates cell proliferation through insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Je Yeong; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Jong Hoon

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mxi1 regulates cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of IGFBP-3 is regulated by Mxi1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of Mxi1 reduces IGFBP-3 expression in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Mxi1, a member of the Myc-Max-Mad network, is an antagonist of the c-Myc oncogene and is associated with excessive cell proliferation. Abnormal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis are observed in organs of Mxi1-/- mice. However, the Mxi1-reltaed mechanism of proliferation is unclear. The present study utilized microarray analysis using Mxi1 mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to identify genes associated with cell proliferation. Among these genes, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) was selected as a candidate gene for real-time PCR to ascertain whether IGFBP-3 expression is regulated by Mxi1. Expression of IGFBP-3 was decreased in Mxi1-/- MEFs and Mxi1-/- mice, and the gene was regulated by Mxi1 in Mxi1 MEFs. Furthermore, proliferation pathways related to IGFBP-3 were regulated in Mxi1-/- mice compared to Mxi1+/+ mice. To determine the effect of Mxi1 inactivation on the induction of cell proliferation, a proliferation assay is performed in both Mxi1 MEFs and Mxi1 mice. Cell viability was regulated by Mxi1 in Mxi1 MEFs and number of PCNA-positive cells was increased in Mxi1-/- mice compared to Mxi1+/+ mice. Moreover, the IGFBP-3 level was decreased in proliferation defect regions in Mxi1-/- mice. The results support the suggestion that inactivation of Mxi1 has a positive effect on cell proliferation by down-regulating IGFBP-3.

  18. Endothelial cell protein C receptor-mediated redistribution and tissue-level accumulation of factor VIIa

    PubMed Central

    Clark, C A; Vatsyayan, R; Hedner, U; Esmon, C T; Pendurthi, U R; Rao, L V M

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies show that activated factor VII (FVIIa) binds to the endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) on the vascular endothelium; however, the importance of this interaction in hemostasis or pathophysiology is unknown. Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the FVIIa interaction with EPCR on the endothelium in mediating FVIIa transport from the circulation to extravascular tissues. Methods Wild-type, EPCR-deficient or ECPR-over-expressing mice were injected with human recombinant (r)FVIIa (120 μg kg−1 body weight) via the tail vein. At varying time intervals after rFVIIa administration, blood and various tissues were collected to measure FVIIa antigen and activity levels. Tissue sections were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for FVIIa and EPCR. Results The data reveal that, after intravenous (i.v.) injection, rFVIIa rapidly disappears from the blood and associates with the endothelium in an EPCR-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the association of FVIIa with the endothelium was maximal at 30 min and thereafter progressively declined. The FVIIa association with the endothelium was undetectable at time points exceeding 24 h post-FVIIa administration. The levels of rFVIIa accumulated in tissue correlate with expression levels of EPCR in mice and FVIIa associated with tissues remained functionally active for periods of at least 7 days. Conclusions The observation that an EPCR-dependent association of FVIIa with the endothelium is most pronounced soon after rFVIIa administration and subsequently declines temporally, combined with the retention of functionally active FVIIa in tissue homogenates for extended periods, indicates that FVIIa binding to EPCR on the endothelium facilitates the transport of FVIIa from circulation to extravascular tissues where TF resides. PMID:22950420

  19. Human Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Regulation through GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor Alpha (GABPa)

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Nowick, Katja; Piccini, Ilaria; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Querfurth, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of phenotypic differences between closely related species are likely caused by differences in gene regulation. While this has already been postulated over 30 years ago, only few examples of evolutionary changes in gene regulation have been verified. Here, we identified and investigated binding sites of the transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPa) aiming to discover cis-regulatory adaptations on the human lineage. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing experiments in a human cell line, we found 11,619 putative GABPa binding sites. Through sequence comparisons of the human GABPa binding regions with orthologous sequences from 34 mammals, we identified substitutions that have resulted in 224 putative human-specific GABPa binding sites. To experimentally assess the transcriptional impact of those substitutions, we selected four promoters for promoter-reporter gene assays using human and African green monkey cells. We compared the activities of wild-type promoters to mutated forms, where we have introduced one or more substitutions to mimic the ancestral state devoid of the GABPa consensus binding sequence. Similarly, we introduced the human-specific substitutions into chimpanzee and macaque promoter backgrounds. Our results demonstrate that the identified substitutions are functional, both in human and nonhuman promoters. In addition, we performed GABPa knock-down experiments and found 1,215 genes as strong candidates for primary targets. Further analyses of our data sets link GABPa to cognitive disorders, diabetes, KRAB zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF), and human-specific genes. Thus, we propose that differences in GABPa binding sites played important roles in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:26814189

  20. Positive anti‐cyclic citrullinated proteins and rheumatoid factor during active lung tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Elkayam, O; Segal, R; Lidgi, M; Caspi, D

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of anti‐cyclic citrullinated proteins (anti‐CCP) and IgM rheumatoid factor (RF) in sera of patients with TB compared with healthy controls. Patients and methods 47 consecutive patients with recently diagnosed active pulmonary TB and 39 healthy controls were studied. Data were collected by questionnaire on clinical features of the disease, duration of symptoms, fever, cough, arthralgia, myalgia, sicca symptoms. Serum samples were collected from patients before starting treatment for TB and frozen at −20°C. Anti‐CCP and IgM RF were evaluated by ELISA. Results The mean (SD) duration of TB related symptoms was 4.4 (1.7) months, 73% had fever, 94% a cough. Rheumatic symptoms were relatively rare: arthralgia (4%), myalgias (4%), eye and mouth dryness (2% and 9%, respectively). Mean (SD) levels of anti‐CCP were significantly increased in patients with TB compared with controls: 44.9 (51) IU v 20 (7.3) IU (p = 0.002). Serum levels >40 U were found in 15/47 (32%) patients compared with 1/39 (2.6%) controls (p = 0.002). Mean (SD) serum levels of IgM RF were significantly increased in patients with TB: 17.8 (19) v 4.3 (5) (p<0.0001). IgM RF was positive (>6 IU) in 29/47 (62%) patients v 1/39 (2.6%) controls (p<0.0001). Conclusions A significant proportion of patients with active TB have an increased titre of anti‐CCP and IgM RF. PMID:16361276

  1. Serine 249 phosphorylation by ATM protein kinase regulates hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α transactivation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Chen, Hui; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Li, Chang-Yan; Ge, Chang-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Yu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 alpha (HNF1α) exerts important effects on gene expression in multiple tissues. Several studies have directly or indirectly supported the role of phosphorylation processes in the activity of HNF1α. However, the molecular mechanism of this phosphorylation remains largely unknown. Using microcapillary liquid chromatography MS/MS and biochemical assays, we identified a novel phosphorylation site in HNF1α at Ser249. We also found that the ATM protein kinase phosphorylated HNF1α at Ser249 in vitro in an ATM-dependent manner and that ATM inhibitor KU55933 treatment inhibited phosphorylation of HNF1α at Ser249 in vivo. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association between HNF1α and ATM. Moreover, ATM enhanced HNF1α transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the ATM kinase-inactive mutant did not. The use of KU55933 confirmed our observation. Compared with wild-type HNF1α, a mutation in Ser249 resulted in a pronounced decrease in HNF1α transactivation, whereas no dominant-negative effect was observed. The HNF1αSer249 mutant also exhibited normal nuclear localization but decreased DNA-binding activity. Accordingly, the functional studies of HNF1αSer249 mutant revealed a defect in glucose metabolism. Our results suggested that ATM regulates the activity of HNF1α by phosphorylation of serine 249, particularly in glucose metabolism, which provides valuable insights into the undiscovered mechanisms of ATM in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  2. Altered regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in hippocampus following slice preparation.

    PubMed

    Danzer, S C; Pan, E; Nef, S; Parada, L F; McNamara, J O

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) play important roles in regulating survival, structure, and function of CNS neurons. One method of studying the functions of these molecules has utilized in vitro hippocampal slice preparations. An important caveat to using slices, however, is that slice preparation itself might alter the expression of BDNF, thereby confounding experimental results. To address this concern, BDNF immunoreactivity was examined in rodent slices using two different methods of slice preparation. Rapid and anatomically selective regulation of BDNF content followed slice preparation using both methodologies; however, different patterns of altered BDNF immunoreactivity were observed. First, in cultured slices, BDNF content decreased in the dentate molecular layer and increased in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer and the mossy fiber pathway of the hippocampus after 30 min. Furthermore, an initially "punctate" pattern of BDNF labeling observed in the mossy fiber pathway of control sections changed to homogenous labeling of the pathway in vitro. In contrast to these findings, slices prepared as for acute slice physiology exhibited no change in BDNF content in the molecular layer and mossy fiber pathway 30 min after slicing, but exhibited significant increases in the dentate granule and CA3 pyramidal cell layers. These findings demonstrate that BDNF protein content is altered following slice preparation, that different methods of slice preparation produce different patterns of BDNF regulation, and raise the possibility that BDNF release and TrkB activation may also be regulated. These consequences of hippocampal slice preparation may confound analyses of exogenous or endogenous BDNF on hippocampal neuronal structure or function.

  3. Serum Insulin-like Growth Factor I Quantitation by Mass Spectrometry: Insights for Protein Quantitation with this Technology.

    PubMed

    Kam, Richard Kin Ting; Ho, Chung Shun; Chan, Michael Ho Ming

    2016-12-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a widely used technique in the clinical laboratory, especially for small molecule quantitation in biological specimens, for example, steroid hormones and therapeutic drugs. Analysis of circulating macromolecules, including proteins and peptides, is largely dominated by traditional enzymatic, spectrophotometric, or immunological assays in clinical laboratories. However, these methodologies are known to be subjected to interfering substances, for example heterophilic antibodies, as well as subjected to non-specificity issues. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in using LC-MS platforms for protein analysis in the clinical setting, due to the superior specificity compared to immunoassay, and the possibility of simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteins. Different analytical approaches are possible using LC-MS-based methodology, including accurate mass measurement of intact molecules, protein digestion followed by detection of proteolytic peptides, and in combination with immunoaffinity purification. Proteins with different complexity, isoforms, variants, or chemical alteration can be simultaneously analysed by LC-MS, either by targeted or non-targeted approaches. While the LC-MS platform offers a more specific determination of proteins, there remain issues of LC-MS assay harmonization, correlation with current existing platforms, and the potential impact in making clinical decision. In this review, the clinical utility, historical aspect, and challenges in using LC-MS for protein analysis in the clinical setting will be discussed, using insulin-like growth factor (IGF) as an example.

  4. Increased intestinal protein synthesis during sepsis and following the administration of tumour necrosis factor alpha or interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    von Allmen, D; Hasselgren, P O; Higashiguchi, T; Frederick, J; Zamir, O; Fischer, J E

    1992-01-01

    The influence of sepsis on intestinal protein synthesis was studied in rats. Sepsis was induced by caecal ligation and puncture (CLP); control rats were sham-operated. Protein synthesis was measured in vivo in the jejunum and ileum following a flooding dose of [14C]leucine. At 8 h after CLP the protein synthesis rate was increased by approx. 15% in jejunal mucosa, and at 16 h after CLP, the protein synthesis rate was increased by 50-60% in the mucosa and seromuscular layer of both jejunum and ileum. In a second series of experiments, rats were treated with recombinant tumour necrosis factor alpha (rTNF alpha) or recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) administered at a total dose of 300 micrograms/kg body weight over 16 h. Control rats received corresponding volumes of solvent. Treatment with rTNF alpha resulted in an approx. 25% increase in mucosal protein synthesis in jejunum. Following treatment with rIL-1 alpha, protein synthesis increased by 25% in jejunal mucosa and almost doubled in ileal mucosa. The results suggest that sepsis stimulates intestinal protein synthesis and that this response may, at least in part, be mediated by TNF and/or IL-1. PMID:1530589

  5. Measles virus C protein suppresses gamma-activated factor formation and virus-induced cell growth arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Shin-ichi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Fujii, Nobuhiro

    2011-05-25

    Measles virus (MeV) produces two accessory proteins, V and C, from the P gene. These accessory proteins have been reported to contribute to efficient virus proliferation through the modulation of host cell events. Our previous paper described that Vero cell-adapted strains of MeV led host cells to growth arrest through the upregulation of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), and wild strains did not. In the present study, we found that C protein expression levels varied among MeV strains in infected SiHa cells. C protein levels were inversely correlated with IRF-1 expression levels and with cell growth arrest. Forced expression of C protein released cells from growth arrest. C-deficient recombinant virus efficiently upregulated IRF-1 and caused growth arrest more efficiently than the wild-type virus. C protein preferentially bound to phosphorylated STAT1 and suppressed STAT1 dimer formation. We conclude that MeV C protein suppresses IFN-{gamma} signaling pathway via inhibition of phosphorylated STAT1 dimerization.

  6. Identification of a Taraxacum brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor protein that is localized on rubber particles and promotes rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Laibach, Natalie; Hillebrand, Andrea; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Two protein families required for rubber biosynthesis in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum have recently been characterized, namely the cis-prenyltransferases (TbCPTs) and the small rubber particle proteins (TbSRPPs). The latter were shown to be the most abundant proteins on rubber particles, where rubber biosynthesis takes place. Here we identified a protein designated T. brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor (TbREF) by using mass spectrometry to analyze rubber particle proteins. TbREF is homologous to the TbSRPPs but has a molecular mass that is atypical for the family. The promoter was shown to be active in laticifers, and the protein itself was localized on the rubber particle surface. In TbREF-silenced plants generated by RNA interference, the rubber content was significantly reduced, correlating with lower TbCPT protein levels and less TbCPT activity in the latex. However, the molecular mass of the rubber was not affected by TbREF silencing. The colloidal stability of rubber particles isolated from TbREF-silenced plants was also unchanged. This was not surprising because TbREF depletion did not affect the abundance of TbSRPPs, which are required for rubber particle stability. Our findings suggest that TbREF is an important component of the rubber biosynthesis machinery in T. brevicorniculatum, and may play a role in rubber particle biogenesis and influence rubber production.

  7. Serum Insulin-like Growth Factor I Quantitation by Mass Spectrometry: Insights for Protein Quantitation with this Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung Shun; Chan, Michael Ho Ming

    2016-01-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a widely used technique in the clinical laboratory, especially for small molecule quantitation in biological specimens, for example, steroid hormones and therapeutic drugs. Analysis of circulating macromolecules, including proteins and peptides, is largely dominated by traditional enzymatic, spectrophotometric, or immunological assays in clinical laboratories. However, these methodologies are known to be subjected to interfering substances, for example heterophilic antibodies, as well as subjected to non-specificity issues. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in using LC-MS platforms for protein analysis in the clinical setting, due to the superior specificity compared to immunoassay, and the possibility of simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteins. Different analytical approaches are possible using LC-MS-based methodology, including accurate mass measurement of intact molecules, protein digestion followed by detection of proteolytic peptides, and in combination with immunoaffinity purification. Proteins with different complexity, isoforms, variants, or chemical alteration can be simultaneously analysed by LC-MS, either by targeted or non-targeted approaches. While the LC-MS platform offers a more specific determination of proteins, there remain issues of LC-MS assay harmonization, correlation with current existing platforms, and the potential impact in making clinical decision. In this review, the clinical utility, historical aspect, and challenges in using LC-MS for protein analysis in the clinical setting will be discussed, using insulin-like growth factor (IGF) as an example. PMID:28149264

  8. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  9. An Interaction with Ewing's Sarcoma Breakpoint Protein EWS Defines a Specific Oncogenic Mechanism of ETS Factors Rearranged in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kedage, Vivekananda; Selvaraj, Nagarathinam; Nicholas, Taylor R; Budka, Justin A; Plotnik, Joshua P; Jerde, Travis J; Hollenhorst, Peter C

    2016-10-25

    More than 50% of prostate tumors have a chromosomal rearrangement resulting in aberrant expression of an oncogenic ETS family transcription factor. However, mechanisms that differentiate the function of oncogenic ETS factors expressed in prostate tumors from non-oncogenic ETS factors expressed in normal prostate are unknown. Here, we find that four oncogenic ETS (ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5), and no other ETS, interact with the Ewing's sarcoma breakpoint protein, EWS. This EWS interaction was necessary and sufficient for oncogenic ETS functions including gene activation, cell migration, clonogenic survival, and transformation. Significantly, the EWS interacting region of ERG has no homology with that of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5. Therefore, this finding may explain how divergent ETS factors have a common oncogenic function. Strikingly, EWS is fused to various ETS factors by the chromosome translocations that cause Ewing's sarcoma. Therefore, these findings link oncogenic ETS function in both prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma.

  10. Secreted proteins induced by epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor beta in EL2 rat fibroblasts. Role in the mitogenic response.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, P; Favalli, C; Liboi, E

    1988-05-01

    Most growth active hormones and peptides are mitogenic only in the presence of other growth factors [e.g., Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) and Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) in "competence-progression" fibroblast model]. We have previously described that EGF alone is able to induce the signals which appear necessary for the mitogenic stimulation of EL2 rat embryo fibroblast line. Recently, we have demonstrated that Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF beta) slightly stimulates the mitogenic response in EL2 cells. Here, we show that in EGF-treated EL2 cells the induction of at least four inducible-secreted proteins (ISPs, range from 29,000 to 68,000 Mr) is accompanied by a marked increase in DNA synthesis. In contrast, TGF beta or different concentrations of EGF induce a slow increase of the ISPs proportional to slow induction in DNA synthesis. Our results suggest that the mitogenic response in EL2 cell line may be connected with the qualitative and quantitative induction of these secreted proteins.

  11. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Lowers Protein Oxidation in Patients with Thermal Injury,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    of protein breakdown. Attempts to limit catabolism by experimental treatment with growth hormone have been promising under certain conditions. 1,2 The...administration of pharmacologic doses of growth hormone to fasting adult humans resulted in a protein sparing effect, but has failed to stimulate...protein synthesis in other studies.3 Clinical trials using growth hormone in a variety of catabolic conditions demonstrated that growth hormone was

  12. Synergistic Effects of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor on Bone Morphogenetic Proteins Induced Bone Formation In Vivo: Influencing Factors and Future Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Wang, Hai; Qiu, Guixing; Su, Xinlin

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), as key mediators in angiogenesis and osteogenesis, are used in a combined delivery manner as a novel strategy in bone tissue engineering. VEGF has the potential to enhance BMPs induced bone formation. Both gene delivery and material-based delivery systems were incorporated in previous studies to investigate the synergistic effects of VEGF and BMPs. However, their results were controversial due to variation of methods incorporated in different studies. Factors influencing the synergistic effects of VEGF on BMPs induced bone formation were identified and analyzed in this review to reduce confusion on this issue. The potential mechanisms and directions of future studies were also proposed here. Further investigating mechanisms of the synergistic effects and optimizing these influencing factors will help to generate more effective bone regeneration. PMID:28070506

  13. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Liu, Qiang

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  14. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein is associated with the adapter protein Grb2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor in living cells.

    PubMed Central

    She, H Y; Rockow, S; Tang, J; Nishimura, R; Skolnik, E Y; Chen, M; Margolis, B; Li, W

    1997-01-01

    Src homology domains [i.e., Src homology domain 2 (SH2) and Src homology domain 3 (SH3)] play a critical role in linking receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signaling networks. A well-defined function of the SH3-SH2-SH3 adapter Grb2 is to link receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), to the p21ras-signaling pathway. Grb2 has also been implicated to play a role in growth factor-regulated actin assembly and receptor endocytosis, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we show that Grb2 interacts through its SH3 domains with the human Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp), which plays a role in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We find that WASp is expressed in a variety of cell types and is exclusively cytoplasmic. Although the N-terminal SH3 domain of Grb2 binds significantly stronger than the C-terminal SH3 domain to WASp, full-length Grb2 shows the strongest binding. Both phosphorylation of WASp and its interaction with Grb2, as well as with another adapter protein Nck, remain constitutive in serum-starved or epidermal growth factor-stimulated cells. WASp coimmunoprecipitates with the activated EGFR after epidermal growth factor stimulation. Purified glutathione S-transferase-full-length-Grb2 fusion protein, but not the individual domains of Grb2, enhances the association of WASp with the EGFR, suggesting that Grb2 mediates the association of WASp with EGFR. This study suggests that Grb2 translocates WASp from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane and the Grb2-WASp complex may play a role in linking receptor tyrosine kinases to the actin cytoskeleton. Images PMID:9307968

  15. Different Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Agonists Produce Unique Signatures for the Recruitment of Downstream Signaling Proteins* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Ronan, Tom; Macdonald-Obermann, Jennifer L.; Huelsmann, Lorel; Bessman, Nicholas J.; Naegle, Kristen M.; Pike, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    The EGF receptor can bind seven different agonist ligands. Although each agonist appears to stimulate the same suite of downstream signaling proteins, different agonists are capable of inducing distinct responses in the same cell. To determine the basis for these differences, we used luciferase fragment complementation imaging to monitor the recruitment of Cbl, CrkL, Gab1, Grb2, PI3K, p52 Shc, p66 Shc, and Shp2 to the EGF receptor when stimulated by the seven EGF receptor ligands. Recruitment of all eight proteins was rapid, dose-dependent, and inhibited by erlotinib and lapatinib, although to differing extents. Comparison of the time course of recruitment of the eight proteins in response to a fixed concentration of each growth factor revealed differences among the growth factors that could contribute to their differing biological effects. Principal component analysis of the resulting data set confirmed that the recruitment of these proteins differed between agonists and also between different doses of the same agonist. Ensemble clustering of the overall response to the different growth factors suggests that these EGF receptor ligands fall into two major groups as follows: (i) EGF, amphiregulin, and EPR; and (ii) betacellulin, TGFα, and epigen. Heparin-binding EGF is distantly related to both clusters. Our data identify differences in network utilization by different EGF receptor agonists and highlight the need to characterize network interactions under conditions other than high dose EGF. PMID:26786109

  16. The tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 family in immune homeostasis and inflammatory cancer diseases.

    PubMed

    Luan, Y Y; Yao, Y M; Sheng, Z Y

    2013-01-01

    Within the immune system homeostasis is maintained by a myriad of mechanisms that include the regulation of immune cell activation and programmed cell death. The breakdown of immune homeostasis may lead to fatal inflammatory diseases. We set out to identify genes of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) family that has a functional role in the process of immune homeostasis. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8), which functions as an oncogenic molecule, is also associated with enhanced cell survival and inhibition of apoptosis. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) governs immune homeostasis in both the innate and adaptive immune system and prevents hyper-responsiveness by negatively regulating signaling via T cell receptors and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). There also exist two highly homologous but uncharacterized proteins, TIPE1 and TIPE3. This review is an attempt to provide a summary of TNFAIP8 family associated with immune homeostasis and inflammatory cancer diseases.

  17. Solubilized auxin-binding protein : Subcellular localization and regulation by a soluble factor from homogenates of corn shoots.

    PubMed

    Cross, J W; Briggs, W R

    1979-01-01

    Discontinuous sucrose gradient fractionations indicate that the high-affinity auxin binding protein which can be solubilized from the microsomes of coleoptiles and primary leaves of Zea mays L. seedlings is probably located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Since aromatic hydroxylations are enzymatic activities typical of the ER of plant cells, we have examined the effects of several electron-transport inhibitors on the binding of 1-naphthylacetic acid (NAA). NaN3 strongly inhibits this binding, but KCN and CO do not. Trans-cinnamic acid and trans-p-coumaric acid, which are the substrates of ER hydroxylase activities in plants (but which are themselves not auxins), also inhibit this binding. Supernatant fractions from corn shoots contain factors inhibitory to the binding of NAA to the intact membranes and solubilized Site I auxin-binding protein. Here we show that these factors are competitive inhibitors of the binding of [(14)C]NAA but do not change the apparent affinity of the protein for indoleacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid or naphthoxyacetic acid. Several tissues were assayed for factors inhibitory to auxin binding to the solubilized protein, but only supernants from corn shoots were markedly inhibitory at low concentrations.

  18. A cytosolic protein factor from the naked mole-rat activates proteasomes of other species and protects these from inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Karl A; Osmulski, Pawel A; Pierce, Anson; Weintraub, Susan T; Gaczynska, Maria; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2014-11-01

    The naked mole-rat maintains robust proteostasis and high levels of proteasome-mediated proteolysis for most of its exceptional (~31years) life span. Here, we report that the highly active proteasome from the naked mole-rat liver resists attenuation by a diverse suite of proteasome-specific small molecule inhibitors. Moreover, mouse, human, and yeast proteasomes exposed to the proteasome-depleted, naked mole-rat cytosolic fractions, recapitulate the observed inhibition resistance, and mammalian proteasomes also show increased activity. Gel filtration coupled with mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy indicates that these traits are supported by a protein factor that resides in the cytosol. This factor interacts with the proteasome and modulates its activity. Although Heat shock protein 72 kDa (HSP72) and Heat shock protein 40 kDa (Homolog of bacterial DNAJ1) (HSP40(Hdj1)) are among the constituents of this factor, the observed phenomenon, such as increasing peptidase activity and protecting against inhibition cannot be reconciled with any known chaperone functions. This novel function may contribute to the exceptional protein homeostasis in the naked mole-rat and allow it to successfully defy aging.

  19. E3 ubiquitin ligase RFWD2 controls lung branching through protein-level regulation of ETV transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Herriges, John C.; Zhang, Zhen; Young, Randee E.; Verheyden, Jamie M.; Sun, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian lung is an elaborate branching organ, and it forms following a highly stereotypical morphogenesis program. It is well established that precise control at the transcript level is a key genetic underpinning of lung branching. In comparison, little is known about how regulation at the protein level may play a role. Ring finger and WD domain 2 (RFWD2, also termed COP1) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that modifies specific target proteins, priming their degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system. RFWD2 is known to function in the adult in pathogenic processes such as tumorigenesis. Here, we show that prenatal inactivation of Rfwd2 gene in the lung epithelium led to a striking halt in branching morphogenesis shortly after secondary branch formation. This defect is accompanied by distalization of the lung epithelium while growth and cellular differentiation still occurred. In the mutant lung, two E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors essential for normal lung branching, ETS translocation variant 4 (ETV4) and ETV5, were up-regulated at the protein level, but not at the transcript level. Introduction of Etv loss-of-function alleles into the Rfwd2 mutant background attenuated the branching phenotype, suggesting that RFWD2 functions, at least in part, through degrading ETV proteins. Because a number of E3 ligases are known to target factors important for lung development, our findings provide a preview of protein-level regulatory network essential for lung branching morphogenesis. PMID:27335464

  20. Conserved motifs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic polypeptide release factors: tRNA-protein mimicry hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Ebihara, K; Uno, M; Nakamura, Y

    1996-01-01

    Translation termination requires two codon-specific polypeptide release factors in prokaryotes and one omnipotent factor in eukaryotes. Sequences of 17 different polypeptide release factors from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were compared. The prokaryotic release factors share residues split into seven motifs. Conservation of many discrete, perhaps critical, amino acids is observed in eukaryotic release factors, as well as in the C-terminal portion of elongation factor (EF) G. Given that the C-terminal domains of EF-G interacts with ribosomes by mimicry of a tRNA structure, the pattern of conservation of residues in release factors may reflect requirements for a tRNA-mimicry for binding to the A site of the ribosome. This mimicry would explain why release factors recognize stop codons and suggests that all prokaryotic and eukaryotic release factors evolved from the progenitor of EF-G. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8643594

  1. Soluble prokaryotic overexpression and purification of bioactive human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor by maltose binding protein and protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Do, Bich Hang; Ryu, Han-Bong; Hoang, Phuong; Koo, Bon-Kyung; Choe, Han

    2014-01-01

    Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hGCSF), a neutrophil-promoting cytokine, is an effective therapeutic agent for neutropenia patients who have undergone several cancer treatments. Efficient production of hGCSF using E. coli is challenging because the hormone tends to aggregate and forms inclusion bodies. This study examined the ability of seven different N-terminal fusion tags to increase expression of soluble hGCSF in E. coli. Four tag proteins, namely maltose-binding protein (MBP), N-utilization substance protein A, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the b'a' domain of PDI (PDIb'a'), increased the solubility of hGCSF under normal conditions. Lowering the expression temperature from 30°C to 18°C also increased the solubility of thioredoxin-tagged and glutathione S-transferase-tagged hGCSF. By contrast, hexahistidine-tagged hGCSF was insoluble at both temperatures. Simple conventional chromatographic methods were used to purify hGCSF from the overexpressed PDIb'a'-hGCSF and MBP-hGCSF proteins. In total, 11.3 mg or 10.2 mg of pure hGCSF were obtained from 500 mL cultures of E. coli expressing PDIb'a'-hGCSF or MBP-hGCSF, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis and silver staining confirmed high purity of the isolated hGCSF proteins, and the endotoxin levels were less than 0.05 EU/µg of protein. Subsequently, the bioactivity of the purified hGCSF proteins similar to that of the commercially available hGCSF was confirmed using the mouse M-NFS-60 myelogenous leukemia cell line. The EC50s of the cell proliferation dose-response curves for hGCSF proteins purified from MBP-hGCSF and PDIb'a'-hGCSF were 2.83±0.31 pM, and 3.38±0.41 pM, respectively. In summary, this study describes an efficient method for the soluble overexpression and purification of bioactive hGCSF in E. coli.

  2. Structural characterization and biological activity of recombinant human epidermal growth factor proteins with different N-terminal sequences.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, M; Bauhofer, A; Schwind, P; Bade, E; Rasched, I; Przybylski, M

    1994-05-18

    The primary structures and molecular homogeneity of recombinant human epidermal growth factors from different suppliers were characterized and their biological activities evaluated by a standard DNA synthesis assay. Molecular weight determinations using 252Cf-plasma-desorption and electrospray mass spectrometry in combination with N- and C-terminal sequence analysis and determination of intramolecular disulfide bridges revealed that one recombinant protein had the correct human-identical structure (54 aa residues; 6347 Da). In contrast, a second recombinant protein (7020 Da) was found to contain a pentapeptide (KKYPR) insert following its N-terminal methionine. This structural variant showed a significant reduction in its capacity to stimulate DNA synthesis.

  3. Inactivation of Smad-Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling by Ca2+-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, Stephen J.; Lui, Stephen; Abdel-Wahab, Nadia; Mason, Roger M.; Chantry, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family transduce signals through Smad proteins. Smad signaling can be regulated by the Ras/Erk/mitogen-activated protein pathway in response to receptor tyrosine kinase activation and the gamma interferon pathway and also by the functional interaction of Smad2 with Ca2+-calmodulin. Here we report that Smad–TGF-β-dependent transcriptional responses are prevented by expression of a constitutively activated Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Cam kinase II). Smad2 is a target substrate for Cam kinase II in vitro at serine-110, -240, and -260. Cam kinase II induces in vivo phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad4 and, to a lesser extent, Smad3. A phosphopeptide antiserum raised against Smad2 phosphoserine-240 reacted with Smad2 in vivo when coexpressed with Cam kinase II and by activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor, HER2 (c-erbB2), and the TGF-β receptor. Furthermore, Cam kinase II blocked nuclear accumulation of a Smad2 and induced Smad2-Smad4 hetero-oligomerization independently of TGF-β receptor activation, while preventing TGF-β-dependent Smad2-Smad3 interactions. These findings provide a novel cross-talk mechanism by which Ca2+-dependent kinases activated downstream of multiple growth factor receptors antagonize cell responses to TGF-β. PMID:11027280

  4. Insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein during olanzapine administration: effects of the antidiabetic metformin.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; Sandia, Ignacio; Lacruz, Anny; Rangel, Nairy; de Mendoza, Soaira; Beaulieu, Serge; Contreras, Quilianio; Galeazzi, Tatiana; Vargas, Doritza

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the Authors assessed some insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein after olanzapine administration, and the effect of metformin on these variables, 37 patients with chronic schizophrenia were given olanzapine (10 mg/day for 14 weeks). Nineteen patients received metformin (850-2550 mg/day) and 18 received placebo in a randomized, double-blind protocol. The following variables were quantified before and after olanzapine: cortisol, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, glucagon, growth hormone, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein. Results were correlated with the changes in body weight and the insulin resistance index. We have reported elsewhere that metformin did not prevent olanzapine-induced weight gain, and the insulin resistance index significantly decreased after metformin and placebo; Baptista T, et al. Can J Psychiatry 2006; 51: 192-196. Cortisol, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and fibrinogen levels significantly decreased in both groups. Glucagon significantly increased after metformin (P=0.03). Leptin tended to increase after placebo (P=0.1) and displayed a small nonsignificant reduction after metformin. The C-reactive protein did not change significantly in any group. Contrarily to most published studies, olanzapine was associated with decreased insulin resistance. Decrements in cortisol, fibrinogen and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels point to an improvement in the metabolic profile. The trend for leptin to increase after placebo, but not after metformin in spite of similar weight gain suggests a beneficial effect of this antidiabetic agent.

  5. A major latex-like protein is a key factor in crop contamination by persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Inui, Hideyuki; Sawada, Mami; Goto, Junya; Yamazaki, Kiyoshi; Kodama, Noriko; Tsuruta, Hiroki; Eun, Heesoo

    2013-04-01

    This is the first report, to our knowledge, to reveal important factors by which members of the Cucurbitaceae family, such as cucumber (Cucumis sativus), watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), melon (Cucumis melo), pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo), squash (C. pepo), and zucchini (C. pepo), are selectively polluted with highly toxic hydrophobic contaminants, including organochlorine insecticides and dioxins. Xylem sap of C. pepo ssp. pepo, which is a high accumulator of hydrophobic compounds, solubilized the hydrophobic compound pyrene into the aqueous phase via some protein(s). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of xylem sap of two C. pepo subspecies revealed that the amount of 17-kD proteins in C. pepo ssp. pepo was larger than that in C. pepo ssp. ovifera, a low accumulator, suggesting that these proteins may be related to the translocation of hydrophobic compounds. The protein bands at 17 kD contained major latex-like proteins (MLPs), and the corresponding genes MLP-PG1, MLP-GR1, and MLP-GR3 were cloned from the C. pepo cultivars Patty Green and Gold Rush. Expression of the MLP-GR3 gene in C. pepo cultivars was positively correlated with the band intensity of 17-kD proteins and bioconcentration factors toward dioxins and dioxin-like compounds. Recombinant MLP-GR3 bound polychlorinated biphenyls immobilized on magnetic beads, whereas recombinant MLP-PG1 and MLP-GR1 did not. These results indicate that the high expression of MLP-GR3 in C. pepo ssp. pepo plants and the existence of MLP-GR3 in their xylem sap are related to the efficient translocation of hydrophobic contaminants. These findings should be useful for decreasing the contamination of fruit of the Cucurbitaceae family as well as the phytoremediation of hydrophobic contaminants.

  6. Characterization of Soybean Storage and Allergen Proteins Affected by Environmental and Genetic Factors.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry; Khan, Farooq; Song, Qijian; Lakshman, Sukla; Cregan, Perry; Scott, Roy; Shipe, Emerson; Garrett, Wesley

    2016-02-17

    There is limited information on the influence of genetic and environmental variability on soybean protein composition. This study aimed to determine the role of genotype (G), environments (E), and the interrelationship of genotype and environment (G×E) on soybean seed protein. Three sets of nine soybean genotypes were grown in replicated trials at Maryland, South Carolina, and South Dakota. At each location, the nine genotypes were grown with two planting/sowing dates. We applied two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to study the variability of soybean storage and allergen proteins. Statistical analysis of 47 storage and 8 allergen proteins, in terms of differentially expressed protein spots significant at the p<0.005 level, was performed. We found more spots that showed statistically significant differences in expression among E compared to G and G×E interaction.

  7. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Factor 6 (TRAF6) Associates with Huntingtin Protein and Promotes Its Atypical Ubiquitination to Enhance Aggregate Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Zucchelli, Silvia; Marcuzzi, Federica; Codrich, Marta; Agostoni, Elena; Vilotti, Sandra; Biagioli, Marta; Pinto, Milena; Carnemolla, Alisia; Santoro, Claudio; Gustincich, Stefano; Persichetti, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of polyglutamines in the first exon of huntingtin (HTT), which confers aggregation-promoting properties to amino-terminal fragments of the protein (N-HTT). Mutant N-HTT aggregates are enriched for ubiquitin and contain ubiquitin E3 ligases, thus suggesting a role for ubiquitination in aggregate formation. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) binds to WT and polyQ-expanded N-HTT in vitro as well as to endogenous full-length proteins in mouse and human brain in vivo. Endogenous TRAF6 is recruited to cellular inclusions formed by mutant N-HTT. Transient overexpression of TRAF6 promotes WT and mutant N-HTT atypical ubiquitination with Lys6, Lys27, and Lys29 linkage formation. Both interaction and ubiquitination seem to be independent from polyQ length. In cultured cells, TRAF6 enhances mutant N-HTT aggregate formation, whereas it has no effect on WT N-HTT protein localization. Mutant N-HTT inclusions are enriched for ubiquitin staining only when TRAF6 and Lys6, Lys27, and Lys29 ubiquitin mutants are expressed. Finally, we show that TRAF6 is up-regulated in post-mortem brains from HD patients where it is found in the insoluble fraction. These results suggest that TRAF6 atypical ubiquitination warrants investigation in HD pathogenesis. PMID:21454471

  9. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) associates with huntingtin protein and promotes its atypical ubiquitination to enhance aggregate formation.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Silvia; Marcuzzi, Federica; Codrich, Marta; Agostoni, Elena; Vilotti, Sandra; Biagioli, Marta; Pinto, Milena; Carnemolla, Alisia; Santoro, Claudio; Gustincich, Stefano; Persichetti, Francesca

    2011-07-15

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of polyglutamines in the first exon of huntingtin (HTT), which confers aggregation-promoting properties to amino-terminal fragments of the protein (N-HTT). Mutant N-HTT aggregates are enriched for ubiquitin and contain ubiquitin E3 ligases, thus suggesting a role for ubiquitination in aggregate formation. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) binds to WT and polyQ-expanded N-HTT in vitro as well as to endogenous full-length proteins in mouse and human brain in vivo. Endogenous TRAF6 is recruited to cellular inclusions formed by mutant N-HTT. Transient overexpression of TRAF6 promotes WT and mutant N-HTT atypical ubiquitination with Lys(6), Lys(27), and Lys(29) linkage formation. Both interaction and ubiquitination seem to be independent from polyQ length. In cultured cells, TRAF6 enhances mutant N-HTT aggregate formation, whereas it has no effect on WT N-HTT protein localization. Mutant N-HTT inclusions are enriched for ubiquitin staining only when TRAF6 and Lys(6), Lys(27), and Lys(29) ubiquitin mutants are expressed. Finally, we show that TRAF6 is up-regulated in post-mortem brains from HD patients where it is found in the insoluble fraction. These results suggest that TRAF6 atypical ubiquitination warrants investigation in HD pathogenesis.

  10. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search for: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Email People Departments Calendar Careers Give my.harvard ... Nutrition Source Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health > The Nutrition Source > What Should I Eat? > Protein ...

  11. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go lean with protein. • Choose lean meats and poultry. Lean beef cuts include round steaks (top loin, ... main dishes. • Use nuts to replace meat or poultry, not in addition to meat or poultry (i. ...

  12. Nerve Growth Factor Increases mRNA Levels for the Prion Protein and the β -amyloid Protein Precursor in Developing Hamster Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, William C.; Neve, Rachael L.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; McKinley, Michael P.

    1988-12-01

    Deposition of amyloid filaments serves as a pathologic hallmark for some neurodegenerative disorders. The prion protein (PrP) is found in amyloid of animals with scrapie and humans with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; the β protein is present in amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome patients. These two proteins are derived from precursors that in the brain are expressed primarily in neurons and are membrane bound. We found that gene expression for PrP and the β -protein precursor (β -PP) is regulated in developing hamster brain. Specific brain regions showed distinct patterns of ontogenesis for PrP and β -PP mRNAs. The increases in PrP and β -PP mRNAs in developing basal forebrain coincided with an increase in choline acetyltransferase activity, raising the possibility that these markers might be coordinately controlled in cholinergic neurons and regulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Injections of NGF into the brains of neonatal hamsters increased both PrP and β -PP mRNA levels. Increased PrP and β -PP mRNA levels induced by NGF were confined to regions that contain NGF-responsive cholinergic neurons and were accompanied by elevations in choline acetyltransferase. It remains to be established whether or not exogenous NGF acts to increase PrP and β -PP gene expression selectively in forebrain cholinergic neurons in the developing hamster and endogenous NGF regulates expression of these genes.

  13. Complement regulatory proteins in early human fetal life: CD59, membrane co-factor protein (MCP) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF) are differentially expressed in the developing liver.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, K L; Houlihan, J M; Holmes, C H

    1993-01-01

    The human fetus appears to be capable of protecting itself from maternal complement (C) from an early stage in development by expressing the C regulatory proteins decay-accelerating factor (DAF), membrane co-factor protein (MCP) and CD59 on fetally derived trophoblast at the feto-maternal interface. In this study we have examined the ontogeny of these proteins within the fetus itself and have focused on the liver which represents a major site of haemopoiesis during development. Immunostaining revealed that DAF, MCP and CD59 are all expressed from at least 6 weeks of gestation in the liver but that these proteins display distinct distribution patterns. CD59 was broadly distributed both within the epithelial and haemopoietic compartments, but expression of C3 convertase regulators was more restricted. DAF expression was limited to isolated cells within haemopoietic nests and the epithelium was DAF-negative. Although MCP expression on haemopoietic cells was also limited, by contrast with DAF the developing hepatic epithelium was strongly MCP-positive. Typical CD59 and MCP components were observed in fetal liver extracts by immunoblotting, although liver MCP components consistently migrated 4000-5000 MW ahead of those observed on placental trophoblast. Differences in the distribution of these proteins were also observed between the fetal and adult liver. In particular, by comparison with fetal hepatic epithelium, there was an apparent loss of MCP expression from adult hepatocytes. Thus, MCP appears to be developmentally regulated in the human liver and is expressed in the absence of DAF on the early hepatic epithelium. Overall, this study suggests that C regulatory proteins, and in particular CD59 and MCP, are required from the very early stages of gestation within the fetus itself. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7505254

  14. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized β-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasome Accessory Factor A (PafA) Can Transfer Prokaryotic Ubiquitin-Like Protein (Pup) between Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Susan; Burns-Huang, Kristin E.; Janssen, Guido V.; Li, Huilin; Ovaa, Huib; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The protein degradation machinery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis includes a proteasome and a ubiquitin-like protein (Pup). Proteasome accessory factor A (PafA) attaches Pup to proteins to target them for degradation by the proteasome. Free Pup is unstable and never observed in extracts of M. tuberculosis, an observation that led us to hypothesize that PafA may need alternative sources of Pup. Here, we show that PafA can move Pup from one proteasome substrate, inositol 1-phosphate synthetase (Ino1), to two different proteins, malonyl coenzyme A (CoA)-acyl carrier protein transacylase (FabD) and lonely guy (Log). This apparent “transpupylation” reaction required a previously unrecognized depupylase activity in PafA, and, surprisingly, this depupylase activity was much more efficient than the activity of the dedicated depupylase Dop (deamidase of Pup). Thus, PafA can potentially use both newly synthesized Pup and recycled Pup to doom proteins for degradation. PMID:28223451

  16. Binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) to the hepatitis delta virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Greco-Stewart, Valerie S.; Thibault, Catherine St-Laurent; Pelchat, Martin . E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca

    2006-12-20

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) has a very limited protein coding capacity and must rely on host proteins for its replication. A ribonucleoprotein complex was detected following UV cross-linking between HeLa nuclear proteins and an RNA corresponding to the right terminal stem-loop domain of HDV genomic RNA. Mass spectrometric analysis of the complex revealed the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) as a novel HDV RNA-interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated the interaction between HDV RNA and PSF both in vitro in HeLa nuclear extract and in vivo within HeLa cells containing both polarities of the HDV genome. Analysis of the binding of various HDV-derived RNAs to purified, recombinant PSF further confirmed the specificity of the interaction and revealed that PSF directly binds to the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Our findings provide evidence of the involvement of a host mRNA processing protein in the HDV life cycle.

  17. Expression of factor H binding protein in meningococcal strains can vary at least 15-fold and is genetically determined

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Spinsanti, Marco; De Angelis, Gabriella; Tomei, Sara; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Scarselli, Maria; Rigat, Fabio; Messuti, Nicola; Biolchi, Alessia; Muzzi, Alessandro; Anderloni, Giulia; Brunelli, Brunella; Cartocci, Elena; Buricchi, Francesca; Tani, Chiara; Stella, Maria; Moschioni, Monica; Del Tordello, Elena; Colaprico, Annalisa; Savino, Silvana; Giuliani, Marzia M.; Delany, Isabel; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Costantino, Paolo; Norais, Nathalie; Rappuoli, Rino; Masignani, Vega

    2016-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a lipoprotein of Neisseria meningitidis important for the survival of the bacterium in human blood and a component of two recently licensed vaccines against serogroup B meningococcus (MenB). Based on 866 different amino acid sequences this protein is divided into three variants or two families. Quantification of the protein is done by immunoassays such as ELISA or FACS that are susceptible to the sequence variation and expression level of the protein. Here, selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry was used for the absolute quantification of fHbp in a large panel of strains representative of the population diversity of MenB. The analysis revealed that the level of fHbp expression can vary at least 15-fold and that variant 1 strains express significantly more protein than variant 2 or variant 3 strains. The susceptibility to complement-mediated killing correlated with the amount of protein expressed by the different meningococcal strains and this could be predicted from the nucleotide sequence of the promoter region. Finally, the absolute quantification allowed the calculation of the number of fHbp molecules per cell and to propose a mechanistic model of the engagement of C1q, the recognition component of the complement cascade. PMID:26888286

  18. Surfactant protein A is a principal and oxidation-sensitive microbial permeabilizing factor in the alveolar lining fluid.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, Alexander I; Wu, Huixing; Wan, Sijue; McCormack, Francis X

    2005-07-08

    We have reported that surfactant protein A kills some Gram-negative organisms by increasing membrane permeability. In this study, we investigated the physiologic importance of this activity and the effect of oxidative stress on the antimicrobial functions of SP-A in vitro and in vivo. Concentrated bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from SP-A+/+ mice increased the permeability of the Escherichia coli K12 cell membrane to a greater extent than lavage from SP-A-/- animals. Similarly, calcium-dependent surfactant-binding proteins of SP-A+/+ mice increased membrane permeability more than those from SP-A-/- mice and produced greater zonal killing of agar-embedded bacteria in a radial diffusion assay. Exposure of human SP-A to copper-initiated surfactant phospholipid peroxidation or to free radicals generated by human neutrophils in vitro increased the level of SP-A-associated carbonyl moieties and blocked the permeabilizing function of the protein. We also found that exposure of mice to 90% O2 for 4 days, sufficient to lead to consumption of glutathione, oxidation of protein thiols, and accumulation of airspace protein-associated carbonyl moieties, blocked the permeabilizing activity of lavage fluid from SP-A+/+ mice. We conclude that SP-A is a major microbial permeablizing factor in lavage fluid and that oxidative stress inhibits the antibacterial activity of SP-A by a mechanism that includes oxidative modification and functional inactivation of the protein.

  19. Cellular processing of the nerve growth factor precursor by the mammalian pro-protein convertases.

    PubMed Central

    Seidah, N G; Benjannet, S; Pareek, S; Savaria, D; Hamelin, J; Goulet, B; Laliberte, J; Lazure, C; Chrétien, M; Murphy, R A

    1996-01-01

    In order to define the enzymes responsible for the maturation of the precursor of nerve growth factor (proNGF), its biosynthesis and intracellular processing by the pro-protein convertases furin, PC1, PC2, PACE4, PC5 and the PC5 isoform PC5/6-B were analysed using the vaccinia virus expression system in cells containing a regulated and/or a constitutive secretory pathway. Results demonstrate that in both cell types furin, and to a lesser extent PACE4 and PC5/6-B, are the best candidate proNGF convertases. Furthermore, two processed NGF forms of 16.5 and 13.5 kDa were evident in constitutively secreting cell lines such as LoVo and BSC40 cells, whereas only the 13.5 kDa form was observed in AtT20 cells, which contain secretory granules. Both forms display the same N-terminal sequence as mature NGF, and were also produced following site-directed mutagenesis of the C-terminal Arg-Arg sequence of NGF into Ala-Ala, suggesting that the difference between them is not at the C-terminus. Co-expression of proNGF with furin and either chromogranin B or secretogranin II (but not chromogranin A) in BSC40 cells eliminated the 16.5 kDa form. Data also show that N-glycosylation of the pro-segment of proNGF and trimming of the oligosaccharide chains are necessary for the exit of this precursor from the endoplasmic reticulum and its eventual processing and secretion. Sulphate labelling experiments demonstrated that proNGF is processed into mature NGF following the arrival of the precursor in the trans-Golgi network. This comparative study shows that the three candidate mammalian subtilisin/kexin-like convertases identified process proNGF into NGF and that the nature of the final processed products is dependent on the intracellular environment. PMID:8615794

  20. Sestrin 2 protein regulates platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (Pdgfrβ) expression by modulating proteasomal and Nrf2 transcription factor functions.